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Sample records for fiji south pacific

  1. Fiji in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Rosalind; Semaan, Leslie

    This text introduces Fiji and other island nations located in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean. Cut off from the world by vast expanses of water, these people developed a unique culture. Contents include: Teacher Overview, Geography of the South Pacific Islands, History of the South Pacific, Fiji, Traditional Village Life, Yaquna Ceremony,…

  2. Fiji.

    PubMed

    1985-11-01

    Fiji is a group of volcanic islands located in the South Pacific. Because of the rough terrain in its center, that area is sparsely populated; most of Fiji's population live on the island coasts. Almost all indigenous Fijians are Christians and English is the official language. In 1970 Fiji became a fully sovereign and independent nation within the British Commonwealth. The British monarch appoints the governor general who in turn appoints as prime minister the leader of the majority party in House of Representatives. The transition to independence for Fijians was achieved in a peaceful fashion. While there are some racial tensions between the Indo-Fijians and the indigenous Fijians, the 2 major political parties and the various leaders have succeeded in maintaining order. The government of Fiji, since attaining independence, has worked hard toward economic and social progress and there have been great strides made in education, health, agriculture, and nutrition. The thrust of Fiji's economy is sugar and the 2nd component is tourism. Fiji does import a wide variety of goods but industrial development is proceeding well. Fiji encourages local and foreign investment in the hopes of promoting development and providing industrial jobs. Regional cooperation is the main element in Fiji foreign policy they joined the UN in 1970. Full diplomatic relations exist between the US and Fiji and US and Fijian officials have exchanged visits. In 1985 the US provided $1.5 million in disaster relief funds to Fiji; there is expedcted to be a bilateral aid agreement between the 2 countries in 1986. Travel notes, government and US officials, and further information are included.

  3. Genetic analysis of Black Tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) across its natural distribution range reveals more recent colonization of Fiji and other South Pacific islands

    PubMed Central

    Waqairatu, Salote S; Dierens, Leanne; Cowley, Jeff A; Dixon, Tom J; Johnson, Karyn N; Barnes, Andrew C; Li, Yutao

    2012-01-01

    The Black Tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) has a natural distribution range from East Africa to the South Pacific Islands. Although previous studies of Indo-Pacific P. monodon have found populations from the Indian Ocean and Australasia to differ genetically, their relatedness to South Pacific shrimp remains unknown. To address this, polymorphisms at eight shared microsatellite loci and haplotypes in a 418-bp mtDNA-CR (control region) sequence were examined across 682 P. monodon from locations spread widely across its natural range, including the South Pacific islands of Fiji, Palau, and Papua New Guinea (PNG). Observed microsatellite heterozygosities of 0.82–0.91, allele richness of 6.85–9.69, and significant mtDNA-CR haplotype variation indicated high levels of genetic diversity among the South Pacific shrimp. Analysis of microsatellite genotypes using a Bayesian STRUCTURE method segregated Indo-Pacific P. monodon into eight distinct clades, with Palau and PNG shrimp clustering among others from Southeast Asia and eastern Australia, respectively, and Fiji shrimp clustering as a distinct group. Phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA-CR haplotypes delineated shrimp into three groupings, with shrimp from Fiji again being distinct by sharing no haplotypes with other populations. Depending on regional location, the genetic structures and substructures identified from the genotyping and mtDNA-CR haplotype phylogeny could be explained by Metapopulation and/or Member–Vagrant type evolutionary processes. Neutrality tests of mutation-drift equilibrium and estimation of the time since population expansion supported a hypothesis that South Pacific P. monodon were colonized from Southeast Asia and eastern Australia during the Pleistocene period over 60,000 years ago when land bridges were more expansive and linked these regions more closely. PMID:22957205

  4. A coral δ18O record of ENSO driven sea surface salinity variability in Fiji (south -western tropical Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bec, Nolwenn; Julliet-Leclerc, Anne; Corrège, Thierry; Blamart, Dominique; Delcroix, Thierry

    2000-12-01

    The role of salinity in the dynamics and thermodynamics of El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events is increasingly being investigated. However, instrumental records of salinity are scarce and short in the tropical Pacific, and there is a clear need for a reliable salinity proxy to extend our knowledge of ENSO through time. Here, we present 40 years of δ18O data from a Fiji coral (16°48‧S-177°27‧E). The coral δ18O signal integrates both sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) variations. On a seasonal timescale, δ18O is mainly driven by SST changes whereas on an interannual ENSO timescale, it is almost exclusively affected by SSS variability. Since interannual fluctuations of SSS are rather well correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index in Fiji, coral δ18O can be used to reconstruct paleo-salinity data with some level of confidence. This may help for tracking ENSO influences back in time.

  5. The Regional Hydrothermal Helium-3 Plume in the Tonga-Fiji-Samoa Region of the South Pacific: An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J. A.; Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.; Massoth, G. J.; Arculus, R. J.; Greene, R. R.; Haxel, J. H.; Buck, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    A long hydrographic transect across the Pacific in 1987 detected a curious 3He maximum in the bathymetric gap between the Samoan Islands and the Tonga-Kermadec Arc. The strongest signal reached δ3He = 43% at ~1750 m depth at station TEW-39 (15°S, 173.1°W). By examining additional profiles, Lupton et al. [2003] found that this is a regional plume which extends for over 1000 km to the northwest but is absent at 170°W only 300 km to the east. The magnitude and depth of the plume implies that it is not the distal plume from the East Pacific Rise, which is weaker (δ3He = 28%) and lies at 2500 m depth in this area of the south Pacific. During the past decade, we have used ships of opportunity to collect additional helium profiles in an attempt to define the extent of this plume and identify its source. We re-occupied the 1987 TEW-39 station location in 2004 and 2008, and found the plume to still be present with a similar δ3He signal (38% and 36% respectively) at the same 1750 m depth. Other recent profiles showed that the plume is present all along the northern margin of the Lau Basin over the Tonga Trench between 173°W and 175.5°W with little variation in signal strength. This plume has no detectable signal in temperature, suspended particles, or other hydrothermal properties other than helium. The plume overlies a location so deep (>4000 m) and so distant from active volcanoes that it must be the "far-field" plume from a strong and persistent source. Possible sources include hydrothermal activity in the northern Lau Basin, Machias Seamount, or activity on the flanks of one of the Samoan Islands. While its source remains elusive, it is clear that this helium plume is a major oceanographic feature of the south Pacific which merits further study.

  6. A Fiji multi-coral δ18O composite approach to obtaining a more accurate reconstruction of the last two-centuries of the ocean-climate variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassié, Emilie P.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Corrège, Thierry; Wu, Henry C.; Lemley, Gavin M.; Howe, Steve; Cabioch, Guy

    2014-12-01

    The limited availability of oceanographic data in the tropical Pacific Ocean prior to the satellite era makes coral-based climate reconstructions a key tool for extending the instrumental record back in time, thereby providing a much needed test for climate models and projections. We have generated a unique regional network consisting of five Porites coral δ18O time series from different locations in the Fijian archipelago. Our results indicate that using a minimum of three Porites coral δ18O records from Fiji is statistically sufficient to obtain a reliable signal for climate reconstruction, and that application of an approach used in tree ring studies is a suitable tool to determine this number. The coral δ18O composite indicates that while sea surface temperature (SST) variability is the primary driver of seasonal δ18O variability in these Fiji corals, annual average coral δ18O is more closely correlated to sea surface salinity (SSS) as previously reported. Our results highlight the importance of water mass advection in controlling Fiji coral δ18O and salinity variability at interannual and decadal time scales despite being located in the heavy rainfall region of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The Fiji δ18O composite presents a secular freshening and warming trend since the 1850s coupled with changes in both interannual (IA) and decadal/interdecadal (D/I) variance. The changes in IA and D/I variance suggest a re-organization of climatic variability in the SPCZ region beginning in the late 1800s to period of a more dominant interannual variability, which could correspond to a southeast expansion of the SPCZ.

  7. Accretion and hydrothermalism in North Fiji basin, Southwest Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Auzende, J.M.; Eissen, J.P.

    1986-07-01

    The North Fiji basin is a marginal basin surrounded by: (1) the New Hebrides island arc in the west, which ends at the Matthew-Hunter Ridge in the south; (2) the Hunter fracture zone in the southeast; (3) the Fiji Islands in the east; and (4) the complex Vitiaz Trench system in the north. The investigations in this area suggest a complex opening has been active for approximately the past 10 m.y. The detailed bathymetry and the structure of the central part of this basin are still poorly known. The major element consists of an axial ridge. The trend of this ridge is imprecise, but it is probably oriented north-south near 173.5/sup 0/E, at least between 21/sup 0/ and 15/sup 0/S. The other remarkable feature consists of a complex system of ridges and faulted blocks running along the western edge of the Fiji Archipelago. This system has been interpreted by some authors as an accretion ridge. The purposes of the third leg of SEAPSO cruise onboard the R/V Jean-Charcot (December 2-24, 1985) are as follows: (1) to explore the typical structures of the North Fiji basin between 21/sup 0/ and 17/sup 0/S (axial ridge, seamounts, fracture zones, and the complex border west of Fiji), using multibeam echo-sounder (Seabeam), seismic reflection, magnetic, and gravimetric surveys; and (2) to complete Seabeam coverage and samplings (such as dredging, coring, water sampling, and bottom photographs) of two to three small box-shaped areas on the axial ridge, in order to localize and eventually characterize hydrothermal vents. The various morphotectonic, petrologic, chemical, and geodynamic results of this survey will be discussed.

  8. The Diplommatinidae of Fiji – a hotspot of Pacific land snail biodiversity (Caenogastropoda, Cyclophoroidea)

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Eike; Bouchet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The minute (adult size 1.3–4.8 mm) land snail species of the family Diplommatinidae in the Fiji archipelago are revised based on historical material and modern (1998–99) collections targeting limestone outcrops on the largest island, Viti Levu, and several smaller islands in the Lau group. The forty-two species (including 30 new species) belong to the genera Moussonia Semper, 1865, Palaina Semper, 1865 and Diancta Martens, 1867, which are briefly characterized and keyed. The diagnostic structure of the inner lamellar system of each species is illustrated. All species except one are endemic to Fiji. In Viti Levu, the 12 localities surveyed each had 1–13 (average 5) species of Diplommatinidae; ten species were each found at a single site only. In the Lau islands, five islands were visited, with 1–4 species per island; four species are known from single islands. The number of historically known species not recollected in 1998–99 (7 species), the number of single-site occurrences (14 species), and the numerous islands — including limestone islands — that have not been surveyed at all, indicate that the 42 species of Diplommatinidae currently known from Fiji represent perhaps only half of the Fiji diplommatinid fauna. Such numbers approach the diplommatinid diversity of Palau (39 described and more than 60 undescribed species), and surpasses by far the diversity of other South Pacific archipelagos of comparable land area (New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Samoa). Nomenclatural acts: Lectotypes designated: Diplommatina fuscula, Diplommatina fuscula var. vitiana, Diplommatina godeffroyana, Diplommatina godeffroyana var. latecostata, Diplommatina tuberosa, Diplommatina martensi var. macrostoma, all Mousson, 1870. Neotypes designated: Diplommatina subregularis, Diplommatina ascendens, Diplommatina quadrata, all Mousson, 1870. New species: Diancta aurea sp. n., Diancta aurita sp. n., Diancta basiplana sp. n., Diancta controversa sp. n., Diancta densecostulata sp

  9. Home Reef, South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the South Pacific, south of Late Island along the Tofua volcanic arc in Tonga, a new volcanic island Home Reef is being re-born. The island is thought to have emerged after a volcanic eruption in mid-August that has also spewed large amounts of floating pumice into Tongan waters and sweeping across to Fiji about 350 km (220 miles) to the west of where the new island has formed. In 2004 a similar eruption created an ephemeral island about 0.5 by 1.5 km (0.3 by 0.9 miles) in size; it was no longer visible in an ASTER image acquired November 2005. This simulated natural color image shows the vegetation-covered stratovolcanic island of Late in the upper right. Home Reef is found in the lower left. The two bluish plumes are hot seawater that is laden with volcanic ash and chemicals; the larger one can be traced for more than 14 km (8.4 miles) to the east. The image was acquired October 10, 2006 and covers an area of 24.3 by 30.2 km. It is located at 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  10. Providing University Education in Physical Geography across the South Pacific Islands: Multi-Modal Course Delivery and Student Grade Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, James P.; Poole, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Enormous distances across the vast South Pacific hinder student access to the main Fiji campus of the regional tertiary education provider, the University of the South Pacific (USP). Fortunately, USP has been a pioneer in distance education (DE) and promotes multi-modal delivery of programmes. Geography has embraced DE, but doubts remain about…

  11. Environmental Education in the South Pacific: An Evaluation of Progress in Three Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Neil; Topalian, Teny

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates formal environmental education in three countries in the South Pacific Region: Fiji (Melanesia); Kiribati (Micronesia); and Niue (Polynesia). Findings reveal that environmental education is at different stages of evolution in each of these countries and only Niue appears to deliver environmental education effectively when compared with…

  12. The South Pacific superswell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Marcia K.; Fischer, Karen M.

    Seafloor depths in a broad area of French Polynesia are 250 to 750 m shallower than lithosphere of the same age in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. The area of shallow seafloor also correlates with a region of high density of volcanoes, low seismic velocity in the upper mantle, and a reduction in the thickness of the elastic plate supporting the volcanoes. The Marquesas fracture zone marks an abrupt transition between normal lithosphere to the north which follows the thermal subsidence curve for a 125-km-thick plate and shallow lithosphere to the south which behaves as though it is only 75-km thick. This age dependence in the French Polynesian depth anomalies, the low elastic plate thickness, and the change in depth at the Marquesas fracture zone, a lithospheric discontinuity, require elevated temperatures in the lithosphere. The pattern and amplitude of the depth anomaly is not consistent with the notion that it results from lithospheric thinning beneath a number of overlapping hot spot swells. Rather, we propose that hot spot traces cluster in this region because the lithosphere is already thinner and more vulnerable to magma penetration. The reduction in the thickness of the thermal plate is presumably due to enhanced small-scale convection resulting from the thermal and/or chemical effect of a broad mantle up welling beneath the South Pacific as imaged by seismic tomography. The morphologic and petrologic characteristics of this superswell resemble those that existed in the mid-Cretaceous over H. W. Menard's Darwin Rise, a region of the Pacific which includes the Mid-Pacific Mountains, the Marshall Islands, Magellan Seamounts, and Wake Guyots. We propose that the South Pacific superswell is the modern-day equivalent of the Darwin Rise, and that it may be merely an extreme example of global variability in lithospheric thermal structure as a function of temperature, chemistry, and/or state-of-stress in the upper mantle.

  13. Curriculum Plan for a Diploma Programme in Library/Information Studies To Be Offered by the University of the South Pacific Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Therese Bissen

    This curriculum plan for the Diploma Programme in Library/Information Studies at the University of the South Pacific was designed to meet the needs of undergraduate library/information education in the South Pacific region. The program is presented through distance education to students in the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Solomon…

  14. Featuring the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Brian Terrence; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This thematic section includes "Community Education in the Cook Islands" (Brian Terrence Hagan); "Developing the Grassroots: A Community Education Program in Fiji" (Joseph Veramu); "Literacy in the Community: The Papua New Guinea Experience" (Vincent Manukayasi); "Young Aborigine People Learn about Life through Comic Books"; and "A New and…

  15. 137Cs in the western South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2007-09-01

    The 137Cs activities were determined for seawater samples from the East Caroline, Coral Sea, New Hebrides, South Fiji and Tasman Sea (two stations) Basins of the western South Pacific Ocean by gamma spectrometry using a low background Ge detector. The 137Cs activities ranged from 1.4 to 2.3 Bq m(-3) over the depth interval 0-250 m and decreased exponentially from the subsurface to 1000 m depth. The distribution profiles of 137Cs activity at these six western South Pacific Ocean stations did not differ from each other significantly. There was a remarkable difference for the vertical profiles of 137Cs activity between the East Caroline Basin station in this study and the GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Study) station at the same latitude in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean; the 137Cs inventory over the depth interval 100-1000 m increased from 400+/-30 Bq m(-2) to 560+/-30 Bq m(-2) during the period from 1973 to 1992. The total 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean ranged from 850+/-70 Bq m(-2) in the Coral Sea Basin to 1270+/-90 Bq m(-2) in the South Fiji Basin. Higher 137Cs inventories were observed at middle latitude stations in the subtropical gyre than at low latitude stations. The 137Cs inventories were 1.9-4.5 times (2.9+/-0.7 on average) and 1.7-4.3 times (3.1+/-0.7 on average) higher than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout at the same latitude and that of the estimated 137Cs deposition density in 10 degrees latitude by 10 degrees longitude grid data obtained by Aoyama et al. [Aoyama M, Hirose K, Igarashi Y. Re-construction and updating our understanding on the global weapons tests 137Cs fallout. J Environ Monit 2006;8:431-438], respectively. The possible processes for higher 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout may be attributable to the inter-hemisphere dispersion of the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing 137Cs from

  16. 137Cs in the western South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2007-09-01

    The 137Cs activities were determined for seawater samples from the East Caroline, Coral Sea, New Hebrides, South Fiji and Tasman Sea (two stations) Basins of the western South Pacific Ocean by gamma spectrometry using a low background Ge detector. The 137Cs activities ranged from 1.4 to 2.3 Bq m(-3) over the depth interval 0-250 m and decreased exponentially from the subsurface to 1000 m depth. The distribution profiles of 137Cs activity at these six western South Pacific Ocean stations did not differ from each other significantly. There was a remarkable difference for the vertical profiles of 137Cs activity between the East Caroline Basin station in this study and the GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Study) station at the same latitude in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean; the 137Cs inventory over the depth interval 100-1000 m increased from 400+/-30 Bq m(-2) to 560+/-30 Bq m(-2) during the period from 1973 to 1992. The total 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean ranged from 850+/-70 Bq m(-2) in the Coral Sea Basin to 1270+/-90 Bq m(-2) in the South Fiji Basin. Higher 137Cs inventories were observed at middle latitude stations in the subtropical gyre than at low latitude stations. The 137Cs inventories were 1.9-4.5 times (2.9+/-0.7 on average) and 1.7-4.3 times (3.1+/-0.7 on average) higher than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout at the same latitude and that of the estimated 137Cs deposition density in 10 degrees latitude by 10 degrees longitude grid data obtained by Aoyama et al. [Aoyama M, Hirose K, Igarashi Y. Re-construction and updating our understanding on the global weapons tests 137Cs fallout. J Environ Monit 2006;8:431-438], respectively. The possible processes for higher 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout may be attributable to the inter-hemisphere dispersion of the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing 137Cs from

  17. National Profiles in Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific: Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This technical and vocational education (TVE) profile on Fiji is one in a series of profiles of UNESCO member countries. It is intended to be a handy reference on TVE systems, staff development, technical cooperation, and information networking. Part I, General Information, covers the following: location, area, and physical features; economic and…

  18. Perceptions, impacts and adaptation of tropical cyclones in the Southwest Pacific: an urban perspective from Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, A. D.; Verdon-Kidd, D. C.; Kiem, A. S.; Royle, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    To better understand perceptions, impacts and adaptation strategies related to tropical cyclones (TCs) in urban environments of the Southwest Pacific (SWP), a survey (with 130 participants) was conducted across three island nations; Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga. The key aims of this study include: (i) understanding local perceptions of TC activity, (ii) investigating physical impacts of TC activity, and (iii) uncovering adaptation strategies used to offset the impacts of TCs. It was found that current methods of adaptation generally occur at the local level immediately prior to a TC event (preparation of property, gathering of food, setting up of community centres). This method of adaptation appears to be effective, however higher level adaptation measures (such as the development of building codes as developed in Fiji) may reduce vulnerability further. The survey responses also highlight that there is significant scope to provide education programs specifically aimed at improving the understanding of weather related aspects of TCs. Finally, we investigate the potential to merge ecological traditional knowledge with the non-traditional knowledge of empirical and climate mode based weather forecasts to improve forecasting of TCs, which would ultimately reduce vulnerability and increase adaptive capacity.

  19. The Noucaplac-1 Survey, South Fiji Basin: an International Collaboration Combining UNCLOS and Science Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, W. R.; Herzer, R.; Barker, D. H.; Lafoy, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The UN Convention on the Law of the Sea allows coastal states to claim a legal continental shelf beyond the 200 nautical miles that constitutes the Exclusive Economic Zone. One of the opportunities presented by UNCLOS article 76 is to align essential - and expensive - data acquisition in poorly mapped shelf regions with scientific research interests, thus maximising data value. The Noucaplac-1 survey that took place in August 2004 in the South Fiji Basin is an example of collaboration between neighboring states aiming to address both UNCLOS article 76 requirements and scientific objectives. The Noucaplac-1 survey was designed by the French EXTRAPLAC (reasoned extension of the continental shelf) program to identify the natural prolongation of the New Caledonian territory along the Loyalty Ridge. At the same time, the environs of the potential extended continental shelf claim was identified by the New Zealand collaborators as a key region for study to improve understanding of the regional tectonic evolution and the survey scope was modified accordingly. This contribution describes the data acquired on board the French RV L'Atalante during the Noucaplac-1 cruise. In addition to the multibeam bathymetric data collected with the EM-12 multibeam echo sounder and showing basement tectonic fabric at the sea floor, high-speed seismic data are of particular interest, as they allow the interpretation of basement morphology in this area that is covered by relatively sparse sediments. Regional magnetic data provide additional evidence for distinct morphotectonic regions that may help a New Caledonian extended continental shelf claim

  20. Understanding the South Pacific Convergence Zone and Its Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Scott

    2011-02-01

    International Workshop on the South Pacific Convergence Zone; Apia, Samoa, 24-26 August 2010 ; During the Southern Hemisphere summer the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) in the southwestern Pacific Ocean produces the largest rainfall band in the world. The SPCZ tends to move northeast during southern winter and El Niño and move southwest during southern summer and La Niña. These changes in position have a profound influence on climate (e.g., rainfall, winds, and tropical cyclone frequencies) and life in most of the nations in the southwestern Pacific. Despite the importance of the SPCZ to the region and its prominence in the general circulation of the Southern Hemisphere, the SPCZ has been studied relatively little compared with convergence zones in the Northern Hemisphere. An international workshop on the SPCZ was held in Samoa and brought together 30 experts from Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, France, India, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Vanuatu.

  1. American Dissertations on Foreign Education: A Bibliography with Abstracts. Volume XVII. Pacific: American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Papua New Guinea, Ryukyu Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (Micronesia), Tubuai (French Polynesia), Western Samoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin, Ed.; Parker, Betty June, Ed.

    The editors attempt to examine and abstract all locatable doctoral dissertations completed in the United States, Canada, and some European countries that pertain to the Pacific area. Specifically, these dissertations deal with American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Papua New Guinea, Ryukyu Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trust Territory of the Pacific…

  2. Aflatoxin levels in foodstuffs in Fiji and Tonga islands.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, C E; Aalbersberg, W G

    1989-12-01

    Fungal growth is a major problem of food storage in humid environments, as occur in South Pacific countries for parts of the year. Major crops, including edible nuts, copra and root crops, are susceptible to Aspergillus growth and therefore potential contamination with aflatoxin. Liver cancer occurs in Fiji and Tonga, with the occurrence in Fijians being significantly higher than in the Indian population. Thirty-three peanut samples from farmers were analysed for aflatoxin and 50% of the samples from Fiji were positive but only 9% from Tonga, reflecting different storage practices. Local copra, cassava, and maize samples were found contaminated, with only the maize at a serious level. Twenty-five plate food samples from Fiji showed low contamination. When starch foods from the Fijian diet left after cooking were analysed to follow potential aflatoxin development only sweet potatoes showed some contamination.

  3. Fiscal and monetary policies in the South Pacific Island countries: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, T K

    2000-06-01

    This paper evaluates the fiscal and monetary policies of South Pacific Island Countries (SPICs) in terms of its efficacy on economic growth. To this effect, the backgrounds on the existing fiscal and monetary policies are discussed with emphasis on their inefficiencies and limitations. In addition, the findings of an empirical study conducted in the countries of Fiji, Tonga, Vanatau, and Samoa regarding the efficacy of the policies are presented. The results, which were subjected to various tests of statistical significance, indicate that both policies were ineffective in all four SPICs. However, monetary policy had a positive impact on growth in Fiji, Tonga, and Vanatau. In view of such, several policy implications are cited, including 1) that delays and inefficiencies involved in the execution of public projects should be minimized; 2) quality and components of public expenditures is of critical significance; and 3) financial sectors should be improved. PMID:12179461

  4. Fiscal and monetary policies in the South Pacific Island countries: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, T K

    2000-06-01

    This paper evaluates the fiscal and monetary policies of South Pacific Island Countries (SPICs) in terms of its efficacy on economic growth. To this effect, the backgrounds on the existing fiscal and monetary policies are discussed with emphasis on their inefficiencies and limitations. In addition, the findings of an empirical study conducted in the countries of Fiji, Tonga, Vanatau, and Samoa regarding the efficacy of the policies are presented. The results, which were subjected to various tests of statistical significance, indicate that both policies were ineffective in all four SPICs. However, monetary policy had a positive impact on growth in Fiji, Tonga, and Vanatau. In view of such, several policy implications are cited, including 1) that delays and inefficiencies involved in the execution of public projects should be minimized; 2) quality and components of public expenditures is of critical significance; and 3) financial sectors should be improved.

  5. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S.L.; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Swem, T.; Brimm, D.J.; White, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency. ?? 2011 The Authors.

  6. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, Sandra; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Swem, T.; Brimm, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency.

  7. Tropical cyclone perceptions, impacts and adaptation in the Southwest Pacific: an urban perspective from Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Andrew D.; Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Kiem, Anthony S.; Royle, Stephen A.

    2016-05-01

    The destruction caused by tropical cyclone (TC) Pam in March 2015 is considered one of the worst natural disasters in the history of Vanuatu. It has highlighted the need for a better understanding of TC impacts and adaptation in the Southwest Pacific (SWP) region. Therefore, the key aims of this study are to (i) understand local perceptions of TC activity, (ii) investigate impacts of TC activity and (iii) uncover adaptation strategies used to offset the impacts of TCs. To address these aims, a survey (with 130 participants from urban areas) was conducted across three SWP small island states (SISs): Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga (FVT). It was found that respondents generally had a high level of risk perception and awareness of TCs and the associated physical impacts, but lacked an understanding of the underlying weather conditions. Responses highlighted that current methods of adaptation generally occur at the local level, immediately prior to a TC event (preparation of property, gathering of food, finding a safe place to shelter). However higher level adaptation measures (such as the modification to building structures) may reduce vulnerability further. Finally, we discuss the potential of utilising weather-related traditional knowledge and non-traditional knowledge of empirical and climate-model-based weather forecasts to improve TC outlooks, which would ultimately reduce vulnerability and increase adaptive capacity. Importantly, lessons learned from this study may result in the modification and/or development of existing adaptation strategies.

  8. Deep earthquakes beneath the Fiji Basin, SW Pacific: Earth's most intense deep seismicity in stagnant slabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okal, E.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that many of the deep earthquakes beneath the Fiji Basin occur in slab material that has been detached and foundered to the bottom of the transition zone or has been laid down by trench migration in a similar recumbent position. Since nowhere else in the Earth do so many earthquakes occur in slabs stagnated in the transition zone, these earthquakes merit closer study. Accordingly, we have assembled from historical and modern data a comprehensive catalogue of the relocated hypocenters and focal mechanisms of well-located deep events in the geographic area between the bottoms of the main Vanuatu and Tonga Wadati-Benioff zones. Two regions of deep seismogenesis are recognized there: (i) 163 deep shocks have occurred north of 15??S in the Vityaz Group from 1949 to 1996. These seismological observations and the absence of other features characteristic of active subduction suggest that the Vityaz group represents deep failure in a detached slab that has foundered to a horizontal orientation near the bottom of the transition zone. (ii) Another group of nearly 50 'outboard' deep shocks occur between about 450 and 660 km depth, west of the complexly buckled and offset western edge of the Tonga Wadati-Benioff zone. Their geometry is in the form of two or possibly three small-circle arcs that roughly parallel the inferred motion of Tonga trench migration. Earthquakes in the southernmost of these arcs occur in a recumbent high-seismic-wavespeed slab anomaly that connects both to the main inclined Tonga anomaly to the east and a lower mantle anomaly to the west [Van der Hilst, R., 1995. Complex morphology of subducted lithosphere in the mantle beneath the Tonga trench. Nature, Vol. 374, pp. 154-157.]. Both groups show complexity in their focal mechanisms. The major question raised by these observations is the cause of this apparent temporary arrest in the descent of the Tonga slab into the lower mantle. We approach these questions by considering the

  9. Moving Up the Ranks: Chiefly Status, Prestige, and Schooling in Colonial Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carmen M.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a conflict analysis of colonial schooling in Fiji, tracing how imported schooling was incorporated into indigenous structures of status differentiation. It begins with a discussion of the chieftaincy system as the socio-political institution in place in this South Pacific archipelago when European explorers and missionaries…

  10. SRTM Anaglyph: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930s. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This shaded relief anaglyph image was generated using preliminary topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data from the top (north) to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. The stereoscopic effect was created by first draping the shaded relief image back over the topographic data and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    This image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar

  11. Coral oxygen isotope records of interdecadal climate variations in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnato, Stefan; Linsley, Braddock K.; Howe, Stephen S.; Wellington, Gerard M.; Salinger, Jim

    2005-06-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), a region of high rainfall, is a major feature of subtropical Southern Hemisphere climate and contributes to and interacts with circulation features across the Pacific, yet its past temporal variability and forcing remain only partially understood. Here we compare coral oxygen isotopic (δ18O) series (spanning A.D. 1997-1780 and A.D. 2001-1776) from two genera of hermatypic corals in Fiji, located within the SPCZ, to examine the fidelity of these corals in recording climate change and SPCZ interdecadal dynamics. One of these coral records is a new 225-year subannually resolved δ18O series from the massive coral Diploastreaheliopora. Diploastrea's use in climate reconstructions is still relatively new, but this coral has shown encouragingly similar interannual variability to Porites, the coral genus most commonly used in Pacific paleoclimate studies. In Fiji we observe that interdecadal δ18O variance is also similar in these two coral genera, and Diploastrea contains a larger-amplitude interdecadal signal that more closely tracks instrumental-based indices of Pacific interdecadal climate change and the SPCZ than Porites. Both coral δ18O series record greater interdecadal variability from ˜1880 to 1950, which is consistent with the observations of Folland et al. (2002), who reported higher variability in SPCZ position before 1945. These observations indicate that Diploastrea will likely provide a significant new source of long-term climate information from the SPCZ region.

  12. New host and distributional records for Cryptosporidium sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from lizards (Sauria: Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu, South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1993, 295 lizards, comprising 21 species in 2 families (Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands, Fiji, Palau, Takapoto, and Vanuatu in the South Pacific, were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Only 6 lizards (2%) were found to be passing Cryptosporidium oocysts in their feces, including 2 of 30 (7%) Oceania geckos, Gehyra oceanica, from Rarotonga, Cook Islands, and 4 of 26 (15%) Pacific blue-tailed skinks, Emoia caeruleocauda, from Efate Island, Vanuatu. This represents the largest survey for Cryptosporidium in Pacific island lizards, and we document 2 new host and 2 new locality records for this parasite genus.

  13. Elements of Pacific public health laws: an analysis of the public health acts of Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, and Fiji.

    PubMed

    Howse, Genevieve

    2012-09-01

    Pacific countries are sovereign nations with distinctive histories, ethnicity, customs, primary resources, economies, and health systems. Despite these and other acknowledged differences, similarities exist in many areas such as geography, legal history, and culture. Many share the experience of colonization, with imported British laws and the subsequent experience of independence. Most Pacific countries are also developing countries. This article broadly describes approaches to legislating in public health in Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands and notes common elements in their public health laws, in particular, in relation to administration, allocation of powers and responsibilities, interaction with local government, communicable disease control, and nuisance. The article concludes that many Pacific public health laws could deliver better support for current health policy, more sensitivity to the culture and customs of the region, and better management of public health risk through laws that are better suited to their Pacific environment, easier to understand, more flexible, and more relevant to current health policy. PMID:23093516

  14. Decadal and Lower Frequency South Pacific Climate Variability Since 1619 AD from Replicated Coral Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, B. K.; Wellington, G. M.; Kaplan, A.; Demenocal, P. B.

    2004-12-01

    both influenced to varying degrees by the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) one explanation for the \\delta18O trend is that the SPCZ has been intensifying over the last 200 years with increasing cloud cover and rainfall as the surface ocean warmed. On decadal-interdecadal time-scales, comparison of the Fiji and Rarotonga coral \\delta18O series to other coral \\delta18O records from New Caledonia and the Great Barrier Reef indicates that some interdecadal climate shifts apparently were related to changes in the SPCZ and others apparently were unrelated to the SPCZ. This observation suggests the possibility that decadal-interdecadal climate variability in the South Pacific has multiple sources, and may at times be related to higher latitude South Pacific processes.

  15. A new species of the genus Paracypria (Crustacea: Ostracoda: Cypridoidea) from the Fiji Islands.

    PubMed

    Chand, Prerna; Kamiya, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    A new marine species of the genus Paracypria (Paracypria fijiensis n. sp.) is reported from the Fiji Islands, a small island archipelago in the South Pacific Ocean. This is the first report of a Paracypria species from the Fiji Islands. Descriptions of soft parts and valves of Paracypria fijiensis n. sp. are presented herein, and morphological comparisons are made with existing Paracypria species from Australia, Japan and New Caledonia. Although eight coastal sites were sampled across the Fiji Islands, the new Paracypria species was found at only three sites. Large numbers of P. fijiensis n. sp. were recorded from intertidal flats, indicating it to be highly tolerant of the dynamic intertidal zone conditions. PMID:27615895

  16. Decadal and lower frequency changes in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) salinity front gradient over the last 210 years and relationship to Pacific-wide climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, B. K.; Dassie, E. P.; Wu, H. C.; Wellington, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Along the southeastern edge of the SPCZ near 170°W and 15°-20°S a surface ocean salinity frontal zone exists that separates fresher water under the SPCZ from significantly saltier and cooler waters to the east in the South Pacific central gyre. Instrumental sea surface salinity (SSS) data from this region indicate that temporal variability in the SSS difference between Fiji and Tonga is closely coupled to the phase of ENSO. The SSS difference increases by 1.0 to 1.5 p.s.s. during La Niña events and decreases by a comparable magnitude to no difference (0.0 p.s.s.) during El Niño events. The cause of this gradient change is directly related to the position of the salinity front. During La Niña events the salinity front shifts SE as the S. Equatorial Current (SEC) weakens and the zone of maximum rainfall in the SPCZ moves over Fiji, making Fiji fresher than Tonga. During El Niño events, the SEC advects higher salinity water from the east and the SPCZ shifts NE making the SSS difference between Fiji and Tonga close to zero. Using replicated coral δ18O and SSS records over the last 50 years, (Dassie et al., 2010, this meeting) demonstrate that Porites corals from Fiji and Tonga accurately record interannual changes in this SSS difference across the salinity front. Here we evaluate decadal-scale and lower frequency changes in the coral δ18O difference between Fiji and Tonga using replicated Porites coral δ18O records from Fiji (Savusavu Bay, n=2; Vanua Balavu (200km E. of Savusavu Bay, n=2) and Tonga (n=2). Our previous work with coral δ18O records from the region indicates that interannual and lower frequency changes in δ18O are predominantly driven by changes in SSS (Linsley et al., 2006, G^3). Earlier evidence from instrumental salinity data and coral δ18O records indicate that the SPCZ has been expanding SE since the mid 19th century. Our new coral δ18O reconstruction of the SSS gradient provides more details and indicates a reduced or non

  17. [West and South West Pacific Ocean Islands: General Information and a Bibliography of English-Language Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Robert

    This collection of 10 bibliographies covers islands located in the west and southwest region of the Pacific Ocean. The islands include American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Pohnpei, Tonga, Truk, Nauru and the New Hebrides (Vanuatu). All the bibliographies focus on education, and all except two (American Samoa and Fiji)…

  18. 2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW UPSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  19. 1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW DOWNSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  20. South Pacific Decadal Variability Since the 1790s and Changes in Earth Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, B. K.; Wu, H. C.; Dassie, E. P.; Schrag, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in oceanic heat storage may be partly responsible for the most recent stall (or hiatus) in rising Earth surface temperatures since ~2000 C.E. Instrumental data indicates that this most recent stall is coincident with a phase reversal of the North Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The main locations for this heat exchange with the atmosphere appear to be the tropical and mid-latitude regions of the surface ocean, primarily in the Pacific. We have been investigating poorly understood decadal surface ocean variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) region. Despite very sparse instrumental water temperature data in the South Pacific to define the decadal changes at the sea surface and in the upper water column, the available data suggests a disproportionately large role of the Southwest Pacific in decadal-scale changes in heat sequestration. We have generated coral Sr/Ca-derived sea surface temperature (SST) time-series extending back to 1791 C.E. from Fiji, Tonga and Rarotonga (FTR) in the SPCZ region of the subtropical Southwest Pacific and show that decadal-scale SST fluctuations in this broad region are concurrent with the PDO at least since ~1930 C.E. Beginning in the mid-20th century, when more reliable instrumental temperature and ocean heat content data exist, decades of warmer South Pacific subtropical SST co-occur with elevated South Pacific upper ocean (0-700m) heat content. These decadal-scale South Pacific warming events coincide with decadal-scale stalls or plateaus in rising global temperatures. Cross wavelet coherence analysis reveals an increase in the frequency of decadal SST variability from a period near 30 years throughout the 1800s to ~20 years in the later half of the 20th century. Our results provide strong supporting evidence that decadal-scale changes in global surface temperatures are in-part, related to heat storage in the upper water column in the subtropical Pacific. Our results also suggest that decadal-scale stalls

  1. The inclusivity of exclusion: isolation and community among leprosy-affected people in the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Jane

    2011-01-01

    From 1911 to 1969 those people diagnosed with leprosy in the South Pacific were gradually isolated and received medical treatment at the Central Lepers' Hospital, Makogai Island, Fiji. Until the discovery of sulfones in the 1940s leprosy was largely incurable and it was expected that those who went to the island would never return. This paper assumes that the stigma attendant on leprosy which provoked the isolation order is itself a form of disability. The paper draws on patients'stories to explore their individual and collective experience of isolation and suggests that for many, collective isolation on Makogai was an enabling experience. On Makogai, leprosy was the 'norm', the social disability of stigma was removed and people were able to be self-sufficient, to build community and social relationships and to live a fairly ordinary island life.

  2. SRTM Stereo Pair: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930s. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This stereoscopic view was generated using preliminary topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data from the top (north) to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Also, colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to pink at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1300 meters (4300 feet) of total relief. The stereoscopic effect was created by first draping the shading and colors back over the topographic data and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. The 3-D perception is achieved by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the

  3. Union List of Serials in Pacific Island Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlene G., Comp.; Yoshida, Patricia, Comp.

    This union list contains the serial holdings from Pacific Island libraries, including the University of the South Pacific Library (Fiji), the University of Guam Robert F. Kennedy Library, Guam Public Library, College of Micronesia-FSM Library, College of the Marshall Islands Library, Micronesian Seminar Library, Palau Community College Library,…

  4. Decadal changes in South Pacific sea surface temperatures and the relationship to the Pacific decadal oscillation and upper ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Wu, Henry C.; Dassié, Emilie P.; Schrag, Daniel P.

    2015-04-01

    Decadal changes in Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and upper ocean heat content (OHC) remain poorly understood. We present an annual average composite coral Sr/Ca-derived SST time series extending back to 1791 from Fiji, Tonga, and Rarotonga (FTR) in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) sensitive region of the southwest Pacific. Decadal SST maxima between 1805 and 1830 Common Era (C.E.) indicate unexplained elevated SSTs near the end of the Little Ice Age. The mean period of decadal SST variability in this region has a period near 25 years. Decades of warmer (cooler) FTR SST co-occur with PDO negative (positive) phases since at least ~1930 C.E. and positively correlate with South Pacific OHC (0-700 m). FTR SST is also inversely correlated with decadal changes in equatorial Pacific SST as measured by coral Sr/Ca. Collectively, these results support the fluctuating trade wind-shallow meridional overturning cell mechanism for decadal modulation of Pacific SSTs and OHC.

  5. Community structure and diversity of scavenging amphipods from bathyal to hadal depths in three South Pacific Trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Nichola C.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Clark, Malcolm R.; Kilgallen, Niamh M.; Linley, Thomas; Mayor, Dan J.; Jamieson, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    There are few biological datasets that span large bathymetric ranges with sufficient resolution to identify trends across the abyssal and hadal transition zone, particularly over multiple trenches. Here, scavenging Amphipoda were collected from three trenches in the South Pacific Ocean at bathyal to hadal depths. Diversity and community structure were examined from stations within the Kermadec Trench (1490-9908 m) and New Hebrides Trench (2000-6948 m) and additional data were included from the South Fiji Basin (4000 m) and Peru-Chile Trench (4602-8074 m). The hadal community structure of the Kermadec and New Hebrides trenches were distinct from the surrounding abyssal and bathyal depths and correlated to hydrostatic pressure and POC flux. Low POC flux in the New Hebrides Trench and South Fiji Basin best explained the dissimilarity in abyssal community structure from those of the disparate Kermadec and Peru-Chile trenches. POC flux also best explained patterns in hadal community structure with the Kermadec and New Hebrides Trench communities showing greater similarity to each other than to the eutrophic Peru-Chile Trench. Hydrostatic pressure was the strongest driver of intra-trench assemblage composition in all trench environments. A unimodal pattern of species diversity, peaking between 4000 and 5000 m, was best explained by hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  6. Tracking the extent of the South Pacific Convergence Zone since the early 1600s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Kaplan, Alexey; Gouriou, Yves; Salinger, Jim; Demenocal, Peter B.; Wellington, Gerard M.; Howe, Stephen S.

    2006-05-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is the largest and most persistent spur of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. At the southeastern edge of the SPCZ near 170°W and 15°-20°S a surface ocean salinity frontal zone exists that separates fresher Western Pacific Warm Pool water from saltier and cooler waters in the east. This salinity front is known to shift east and west with the phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation. We have generated subannually resolved and replicated coral oxygen isotopic time series from Fiji (17°S, 179°E) and Rarotonga (21.5°S, 160°W) that have recorded interannual displacements of the salinity front over the last 380 years and also indicate that at lower frequencies the decadal mean position of the salinity front, and eastern extent of the SPCZ, has shifted east-west through 10° to 20° of longitude three times during this interval. The most recent and largest shift began in the mid 1800s as the salinity front progressively moved eastward and salinity decreased at both sites. Our results suggest that sea surface salinity at these sites is now at the lowest levels recorded and is evidence for an unprecedented expansion of the SPCZ since the mid 1800s. The expansion of the SPCZ implies a gradual change in the South Pacific to more La Niña-like long-term mean conditions. This observation is consistent with the ocean thermostat mechanism for the Pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system, whereby exogenous heating of the atmosphere would result in greater warming in the western Pacific and a greater east-west surface temperature gradient.

  7. Automation of the University of the South Pacific Library and the Pacific Information Centre. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Daniel

    The Pacific Information Center (PIC) was established in 1983 to identify, collect, and record information about materials from and relating to the South Pacific region. The project involves sharing access and information among countries in this region. PIC, which works in conjunction with the University of the South Pacific (USP) Library, receives…

  8. Ambae Island, Vanuatu (South Pacific)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.

    Location: 15.4 degree south latitude, 167.9 degrees east longitude Orientation: North toward the top, Mercator projection Size: 36.8 by 27.8 kilometers (22.9 by 17.3 miles) Image Data: shaded and colored SRTM elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  9. A Geochemical Transect Across the Lau and North Fiji Basins: New Evidence for the Distribution of Multiple Mantle Plume Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. A.; Jackson, M. G.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Arculus, R. J.; Conatser, C. S.; Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Blusztajn, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lau and North Fiji backarc basins are located in a tectonically complex region of the South Pacific, where the upper mantle may have been modified by up to five hotspots (Samoa, Rurutu, Rarotonga, Macdonald, and Louisville), each with distinct geochemical fingerprints. We present new Hf, Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic data for basaltic samples dredged from seven areas along an east-west transect spanning the Lau and North Fiji basins to determine the possible influence and distribution of these various hotspot sources. We find that the isotope ratios of nearly all samples can be explained by mixing a depleted mantle component, which is ubiquitous in the Lau Basin, with a component similar to that found in Samoan shield (EMII) and/or rejuvenated (EMI) lavas. Lavas as far southwest as the Fiji Triple Junction (North Fiji Basin) show enriched geochemical signatures (87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb up to 0.7037 and 18.635 respectively, and 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf down to 0.51285 and 0.283023, respectively) trending toward Samoa. This observation extends the range of Samoan influence into the North Fiji Basin 400 km south of its previous observed extent at South Pandora Ridge. The few samples that cannot be explained solely by incorporation of Samoan material are from the northeastern Lau Basin (Falloon et al., 2007) and host a dilute HIMU component that may relate to the incorporation of material from the Rurutu hotspot. This component is not observed further to the west in the Lau and North Fiji basins. A ubiquitous EMI signature in the region may be linked to the Rarotonga hotspot. New dredges from the northeast Lau Basin may give clearer signals that will reveal the identity of the enriched plume component.

  10. Iron Fertilization in the Subantarctic South Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winckler, G.; Anderson, R. F.; Schwartz, R.; Park, J.; Pahnke, K.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Lamy, F.; Gersonde, R.

    2014-12-01

    The scarcity of iron limits marine export production and carbon uptake in about 25% of the global ocean where the concentration of major nutrients is high, yet phytoplankton growth is low. Of these, the Southern Ocean is the region where variations in iron availability can have the largest effect on Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystems, both in the modern and in the past. Recent work in the Subantarctic South Atlantic (Martínez-Garcia et al., 2009, 2014, Anderson et al., 2014) suggests that dust-driven iron fertilization lowered atmospheric CO2 from about 225 ppm to 185 ppm in the latter half of each glacial cycle of the late Pleistocene, with the increase in Subantarctic productivity consuming a greater fraction of the surface nutrients and thus driving more storage of carbon in the ocean interior. The opposite effect, reduced iron fertilization, has been hypothesized to drive the 15-20 ppm increase during Heinrich Events in the last glacial cycle (Martínez -Garcia et al, 2014). The vast majority of the information we have so far is from observations in the Subantarctic Atlantic and therefore our current estimates of the role of the Southern Ocean in lowering CO2 rely critically on the assumed extrapolation of the results from the Atlantic Sector to the entire Southern Ocean. However, the Pacific Sector of the Southern Ocean not only accounts for the largest surface area of the Subantarctic Southern Ocean, but the deep Pacific Ocean also can be inferred - based on its volume - to have stored the largest fraction of carbon that was extracted from the atmosphere and from the terrestrial biosphere during glacial periods. Here we report first results from a set of cores from the Subantarctic Pacific (PS75, Lamy et al 2014), including a high-resolution sediment core (PS75/056-1) from the flank of the East Pacific Rise that allows to resolve millennial year variability over the past glacial cycle. We test how tightly dust and

  11. Sedimentology of the Navosa Group (Miocene-Pliocene), SW Viti Levu, Fiji (South Pacific)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The Navosa Group consists of the Vunamaoli Conglomerate, newly defined Sovi Sandstone, and Tamanua Formation. The first two units are lateral-facies equivalents in a coarse-grained, volcaniclastic, slope apron-submarine fan depositional system. These marine rocks are restricted to a narrow, linear fault-bounded basin in southwest Viti Levu that opened and then deformed in an episode of late Miocene transform tectonics. The marine rocks are unconformably( ) overlain by the nonmarine, early Pliocene Tamanua Formation. Slope-apron deposits in the Vunamaoli Conglomerate consist of thick, laterally discontinuous, massive boulder diamictites, basement blocks, and slumps along the southern margin of the basin. The diamictites are interpreted as high-density gravelly mass-flow deposits resulting from basin-margin faulting. Along the basin edge these are interspersed with proximal submarine fan deposits. Inner fan regions contain prograding, lenticular, conglomeratic fan lobs composed of cobble-boulder diamictite, normal to inversely graded pebble-cobble conglomerate, pebbly mudstone, and coherent slump blocks with adjacent levee deposit and interdistributary channel thin-bedded turbidites. Mid-fan regions are composed of sheet-like to broadly lenticular high- and low-density sandy turbidites. Outer fan regions consist of poorly exposed, sheet-like, low-density sandy turbidites, and pelagic deposits. The Tamanua Formation represents deposits from north-flowing, gravel-bed load streams and colluvium. Recognizable features include channels, cutbanks, scours, cluster bed forms, cross-bedded gravels, intraclasts, overbank deposits, and paleosols. Paleocurrent and provenance data from the Tamanua Formation suggest there was little topographic relief across the faults that influenced earlier marine deposition.

  12. Variability of South Pacific Tropical Water Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Fine, R. A.; Qu, T.

    2014-12-01

    Collection of Argo data provides an opportunity to carefully examine South Pacific Tropical Water (SPTW) subduction rate variability. SPTW is characterized by a vertical salinity maximum exceeding 36.2 psu centered at 20°S and 120°W and lying in the upper thermocline between 24.0 and 25.0 σθ. Subduction rates for SPTW for two different periods are calculated using two methods. Monthly one degree by one degree Argo data covering the South Pacific are used to calculate subduction rates from September 2005 to August 2013, also lateral induction and vertical pumping are calculated. There are two spatial subduction maxima, and the lateral induction process dominates in both maxima. Subduction rates from Argo data vary from 15 to 26 m/yr +/- 7.5% during the 8 year period. Subduction rates are shown to be positively and highly correlated with Southern Oscillation Index. Additionally, using CFC-12 data from the 1990s World Ocean Circulation Experiment, average subduction rate is calculated to be 35 +/- 16.5 m/yr. Some of the difference between Argo and tracer rates is due to a difference in the methods, and some difference may be due to decadal variability. Thus, SPTW subduction rates are shown to vary on interannual and possible decadal time scales.

  13. Interdecadal-decadal climate variability from multicoral oxygen isotope records in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region since 1650 A.D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Zhang, Peipei; Kaplan, Alexey; Howe, Stephen S.; Wellington, Gerard M.

    2008-06-01

    In the South Pacific, interdecadal-decadal oceanic and atmospheric variability, referred to as the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), is most pronounced in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) salinity front region. Here we have used annual average oxygen isotope (δ18O) time series from five coral cores collected from Fiji and Tonga in this region to construct a Fiji-Tonga Interdecadal-Decadal Pacific Oscillation (F-T IDPO) index of low-frequency (>9 and <55 years) climate variability back to 1650 A.D. We first demonstrate the consistency between this F-T IDPO index and a mean sea level (MSL) pressure-based SPCZ position index (SPI) (1891-2000), thus verifying the ability of coral δ18O to record past interdecadal-decadal climatic variations in this region back to 1891. The F-T IDPO index is then shown to be synchronous with the IPO index (1856-2000), suggesting that this coral-based index effectively represents the interdecadal-decadal scale climate variance back to 1650. The regularity of the F-T IDPO index indicates that interdecadal-decadal variability in the SPCZ region has been relatively constant over the past 350 years with a mean frequency of ˜20 years (variance peaks near 11 and 35 years). There is a consistent antiphase correlation of the F-T IDPO index and the interdecadal-decadal components in equatorial Pacific coral δ18O series from Maiana and Palmyra. This observation indicates that the eastward expansion (westward contraction) of the eastern salinity front of the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) occurs simultaneously (±<1 year) with the westward (eastward) shift of the SPCZ salinity front during positive IPO (negative IPO) phases. This is the same relationship observed during the phases of the El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  14. Technical and Vocational Education and Training in Fiji--An Overview. Case Studies on Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delailomaloma, N. H.

    The Fiji economy has undergone structural transformation as the importance of agriculture, construction, social and community services, finance, and insurance declined, whereas that of hotels and catering, transportation, communication, and mining rose. Capacity utilization, including absorption of already trained and educated people into…

  15. 36. ORCHARD LINE, LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING PACIFIC FRUIT PACKING HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ORCHARD LINE, LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING PACIFIC FRUIT PACKING HOUSE NEAR END OF LINE - Yakima Valley Transportation Company Interurban Railroad, Connecting towns of Yakima, Selah & Wiley City, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  16. Higher Education in the South Pacific: A Political Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caston, Geoffrey

    1993-01-01

    The University of the South Pacific (USP) provides cost-effective higher education to a third of postsecondary students from 12 joint-proprietor Pacific Island countries. As the only regional world-status university, USP fulfills an important function, but that status is threatened by nationalist politics, diminishing international aid, and an…

  17. Seismic hazard of American Samoa and neighboring South Pacific Islands--methods, data, parameters, and results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Harmsen, Stephen C.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Mueller, Charles S.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Luco, Nicolas; Walling, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    American Samoa and the neighboring islands of the South Pacific lie near active tectonic-plate boundaries that host many large earthquakes which can result in strong earthquake shaking and tsunamis. To mitigate earthquake risks from future ground shaking, the Federal Emergency Management Agency requested that the U.S. Geological Survey prepare seismic hazard maps that can be applied in building-design criteria. This Open-File Report describes the data, methods, and parameters used to calculate the seismic shaking hazard as well as the output hazard maps, curves, and deaggregation (disaggregation) information needed for building design. Spectral acceleration hazard for 1 Hertz having a 2-percent probability of exceedance on a firm rock site condition (Vs30=760 meters per second) is 0.12 acceleration of gravity (1 second, 1 Hertz) and 0.32 acceleration of gravity (0.2 seconds, 5 Hertz) on American Samoa, 0.72 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 2.54 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on Tonga, 0.15 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 0.55 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on Fiji, and 0.89 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 2.77 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on the Vanuatu Islands.

  18. Shaded relief, color as height, Fiji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930's. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations top ink at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1300 meters(4300 feet) of total relief.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to

  19. Trends in extreme daily rainfall and temperature in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific: 1961-1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manton, M. J.; della-Marta, P. M.; Haylock, M. R.; Hennessy, K. J.; Nicholls, N.; Chambers, L. E.; Collins, D. A.; Daw, G.; Finet, A.; Gunawan, D.; Inape, K.; Isobe, H.; Kestin, T. S.; Lefale, P.; Leyu, C. H.; Lwin, T.; Maitrepierre, L.; Ouprasitwong, N.; Page, C. M.; Pahalad, J.; Plummer, N.; Salinger, M. J.; Suppiah, R.; Tran, V. L.; Trewin, B.; Tibig, I.; Yee, D.

    2001-03-01

    Trends in extreme daily temperature and rainfall have been analysed from 1961 to 1998 for Southeast Asia and the South Pacific. This 38-year period was chosen to optimize data availability across the region. Using high-quality data from 91 stations in 15 countries, significant increases were detected in the annual number of hot days and warm nights, with significant decreases in the annual number of cool days and cold nights. These trends in extreme temperatures showed considerable consistency across the region. Extreme rainfall trends were generally less spatially coherent than were those for extreme temperature. The number of rain days (with at least 2 mm of rain) has decreased significantly throughout Southeast Asia and the western and central South Pacific, but increased in the north of French Polynesia, in Fiji, and at some stations in Australia. The proportion of annual rainfall from extreme events has increased at a majority of stations. The frequency of extreme rainfall events has declined at most stations (but not significantly), although significant increases were detected in French Polynesia. Trends in the average intensity of the wettest rainfall events each year were generally weak and not significant.

  20. Tracking the extent of the South Pacific Convergence Zone since 1619 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, B. K.; Kaplan, A.; Gouriou, Y.; Salinger, J.; Demenocal, P. B.; Wellington, G. M.; Howe, S. S.

    2005-12-01

    Enhanced convection and rainfall in the oceanic sectors of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is one of the predicted outcomes of increasing greenhouse gas emissions and rising average global temperatures. However due to the current limited understanding of the past extent and variability of the convergence zones prior to ~1900, it has not been possible to determine pre-anthropogenic ``baseline'' convergence zone variability in order to test these predictions. Here we examine the past extent and variability of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the largest and most persistent spur of the ITCZ, using multiple cores from massive coral colonies extending back to 1619. At the southeastern edge of the SPCZ near 170°W and 15°-20°S a surface ocean salinity frontal zone exists that separates fresher Western Pacific Warm Pool water from saltier and cooler waters in the east. Previous analysis of instrumental sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), and precipitation records in the SPCZ - SSS front region beginning in 1976 indicate that the amplitudes of the interannual signals in SST and precipitation are an order of magnitude less than the amplitude of the seasonal cycle, whereas for SSS, the interannual signal of 1 to 1.5 p.s.u. is double the amplitude of the seasonal signal. This analysis confirms that in the SPCZ region, SSS is higher and SST and precipitation are lower during El Niño events. The opposite occurs during La Niña events. We have generated sub-annually resolved and replicated coral oxygen isotopic time-series from Fiji (17°S, 179°E) and Rarotonga (21.5°S, 160°W) that record this same relationship between annual SST and interannual SSS. Calibration of the trends in these oxygen isotope records against instrumental SST and coral Sr/Ca from Fiji demonstrates that at lower frequencies the decadal mean position of the salinity front, and eastern extent of the SPCZ, has shifted east-west through 10° to 20° of longitude

  1. Collaboration and Development of Radio Astronomy in Australasia and South-Pacific Region: New Zealand Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, S.; Natusch, T.

    2006-08-01

    Radio telescopes in the Asia-Pacific region form a natural network for VLBI observations, similar to the very successful networks in North America (Network Users Group) and Europe (European VLBI Network). New Zealand's VLBI facility, which we are developing since 2005, has the potential to strengthen the Asian-Pacific VLBI network and its role in astronomy, geodesy and geoscience. It will positively influence regional and international activities in geoscience and geodesy that advance New Zealand's national interests. A self-contained radio astronomy system for VLBI, including a 1.658 GHz (centre frequency), 16 MHz bandwidth RF system (feed and downconversion system locked to a Rubidium maser and GPS clock), an 8-bit sampler/digitisation system, and a disk-based recording system built around a commodity PC was developed in New Zealand Centre for Radiophysics and Space Research. This was designed as a portable system for use on various radio telescopes. A number of Trans-Tasman tests has been conducted in 2005-2006 between the CRSR system installed on a 6 metre dish located in Auckland and the Australia Telescope Compact Array in Narrabri, Australia. This work has been successful, with fringes located from the recorded data and high resolution image of the quasar PKS1921-231 obtained. Experiments were recently conducted with Japan; new tests are planned with Korea and Fiji. Plans have been made to build a new 16.5 m antenna in New Zealand's North Island and to upgrade an 11 m dish in the South Island. A possible future of New Zealand's participation in the SKA is being discussed.

  2. Relative influences of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation and ENSO on the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folland, C. K.; Renwick, J. A.; Salinger, M. J.; Mullan, A. B.

    2002-07-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), one of the most extensive features of the global atmospheric circulation, is shown to vary its location according to both the polarity of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). We first demonstrate that the IPO can be regarded as the quasi-symmetric Pacific-wide manifestation of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation that has been described for the North Pacific. Shifts in the position of the SPCZ related to ENSO on interannual time scales and to the IPO on decadal time scales appear to be of similar magnitude and are largely linearly independent. A station pressure-based index of variations in SPCZ latitude is shown to be significantly related to the polarity of the IPO when ENSO influences are accounted for. Movements of this sensitive section of the SPCZ have occurred in phase with those of the IPO since the 1890s.

  3. Present Status of Networking Conditions in Univ. of South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Fujinobu

    Three years program of Japanese Info-Communication Technology (ICT) Capacity Building Project in the University of South Pacific (USP) will terminate in June 2005. Japanese government has a plan of the new Pacific ICT Center program in USP from 2006. The author will introduce the recent status of USP networking conditions both of satellite and marine cable. The present global VLBI (and even GPS/IGS) network has a weak point of asymmetric distribution by very few number or luck of stations in the huge south Pacific/water hemisphere because of many difficulties such as narrow/poor telecommunication line. It is very important and urgent matters to enhance the space geodetic activities in USP.

  4. Communicable disease in the South Pacific Islands, 1.

    PubMed

    Hirshman, J H

    1976-11-13

    An outline is given of the pattern of communicable disease in the South Pacific, as far as it is known. Surveillance and research are imcomplete and the World Health Organization is assisting in carrying these out. Reporting and laboratory diagnosis of communicable disease are inadequate and sometimes inaccurate. This is being improved. Medical checks for intending migrants from the South Pacific are, in a number of cases, inadequately performed in the country of origin and this situation should be altered. The risks to surrounding developed countries from migrants, temporary workers and returning travellers are not tremendous but they cannot be neglected and vigilance has to be maintained. Tuberculosis importation does present risks, as does that of typhoid. Malaria importation carries risks for Northern Australia. Leprosy poses little real risk to Australia or New Zealand and neither does filariasis. Cholera would have to be watched for closely should there ever be a South Pacific outbreak, but the developed countries around the South Pacific which are cholera-non-receptive can control occasional cases. Other than malaria, tuberculosis, typhoid and possibly dengue, problems are thus mainly in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals.

  5. Is the South Pacific helium-3 plume dynamically active?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stommel, Henry

    1982-11-01

    It is suggested that the hydrothermal vents of the South Pacific Rise produce a beta-governed circulation at mid-depth, and that perhaps the associated plume of excess 3He (Lupton and Craig [1]) points westward because of the dynamics of this circulation rather than as a passive tracer.

  6. Australian and South Pacific External Studies Association: Odlaa's Regional Predecessor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bewley, Donald

    2008-01-01

    The Australian and South Pacific External Studies Association (ASPESA)-- the predecessor of the Open and Distance Learning Association of Australia, Inc. (ODLAA)--was founded in 1973. From the outset, ASPESA adopted a broader-than-Australia focus for open and distance learning that included New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and the member countries…

  7. Evaluation, Sustainable Development, and the Environment in the South Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turvey, Rosario

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the Results-Based Evaluation (RBE) framework proposed for the ex-post assessment of the National Environmental Management Strategies (NEMS) in 12 small-island developing states (SIDS) in the South Pacific. It gives an overview of the methods and basis of developing an evaluation framework in the context of SIDS in the region.…

  8. SPCZ migration and ENSO events during the 20th century as revealed by climate proxies from a Fiji coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Thiria, S.; Naveau, P.; Delcroix, T.; Le Bec, N.; Blamart, D.; Corrège, T.

    2006-09-01

    Instrumental sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) records since 1975 have indicated that migrations of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) are strongly related to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. To reconstruct independent SSS and SST time series for the past century and document this SPCZ and ENSO relationship prior to 1975, we apply a neural network analysis to seven climate proxies derived from a coral skeleton collected in Fiji. These reconstructions suggest that five SPCZ migrations linked to ENSO occurred between 1908 and 1970 while as many migrations occurred during the last three decades, highlighting the recent enhanced frequency of ENSO occurrence.

  9. The Pacific Way: Sustainability in Higher Education in the South Pacific Island Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Peter Blaze; Koshy, Kanayathu Chacko

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create an area profile of significant activity and possibility in higher education for sustainable development (ESD) in the island nations of the South Pacific Ocean. Design/methodology/approach: This is a descriptive research paper on philosophy, policy, and practice according to a methodology of…

  10. Understanding the SAM influence on the South Pacific ENSO teleconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogt, Ryan L.; Bromwich, David H.; Hines, Keith M.

    2011-04-01

    The relationship between the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode (SAM) is examined, with the goal of understanding how various strong SAM events modulate the ENSO teleconnection to the South Pacific (45°-70°S, 150°-70°W). The focus is on multi-month, multi-event variations during the last 50 years. A significant ( p < 0.10) relationship is observed, most marked during the austral summer and in the 1970s and 1990s. In most cases, the significant relationship is brought about by La Niña (El Niño) events occurring with positive (negative) phases of the SAM more often than expected by chance. The South Pacific teleconnection magnitude is found to be strongly dependent on the SAM phase. Only when ENSO events occur with a weak SAM or when a La Niña (El Niño) occurs with a positive (negative) SAM phase are significant South Pacific teleconnections found. This modulation in the South Pacific ENSO teleconnection is directly tied to the interaction of the anomalous ENSO and SAM transient eddy momentum fluxes. During La Niña/SAM+ and El Niño/SAM- combinations, the anomalous transient momentum fluxes in the Pacific act to reinforce the circulation anomalies in the midlatitudes, altering the circulation in such a way to maintain the ENSO teleconnections. In La Niña/SAM- and El Niño/SAM+ cases, the anomalous transient eddies oppose each other in the midlatitudes, overall acting to reduce the magnitude of the high latitude ENSO teleconnection.

  11. Use of ICT in Education in the South Pacific: Findings of the Pacific eLearning Observatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Pacific eLearning Observatory at the University of the South Pacific (USP) conducted an online survey of educational technologists (n = 60) to assess levels of access to information and communication technologies (ICT) in education and identify ways of lowering the barriers to ICT in the Pacific region. Almost half of USP's 22,000 students are…

  12. South Asian high and Asian-Pacific-American climate teleconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peiqun; Song, Yang; Kousky, Vernon E.

    2005-11-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the Asian monsoon plays an important role in affecting the weather and climate outside of Asia. However, this active role of the monsoon has not been demonstrated as thoroughly as has the variability of the monsoon caused by various impacting factors such as sea surface temperature and land surface. This study investigates the relationship between the Asian monsoon and the climate anomalies in the Asian-Pacific-American (APA) sector. A hypothesis is tested that the variability of the upper-tropospheric South Asian high (SAH), which is closely associated with the overall heating of the large-scale Asian monsoon, is linked to changes in the subtropical western Pacific high (SWPH), the mid-Pacific trough, and the Mexican high. The changes in these circulation systems cause variability in surface temperature and precipitation in the APA region. A stronger SAH is accompanied by a stronger and more extensive SWPH. The enlargement of the SWPH weakens the mid-Pacific trough. As a result, the southern portion of the Mexican high becomes stronger. These changes are associated with changes in atmospheric teleconnections, precipitation, and surface temperature throughout the APA region. When the SAH is stronger, precipitation increases in southern Asia, decreases over the Pacific Ocean, and increases over the Central America. Precipitation also increases over Australia and central Africa and decreases in the Mediterranean region. While the signals in surface temperature are weak over the tropical land portion, they are apparent in the mid latitudes and over the eastern Pacific Ocean.

  13. The glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of five commonly consumed foods of the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Lako, Jimaima; Sotheeswaran, Subramania; Aalbersberg, William; Sreekumar, K P

    2004-03-01

    Glycemic index (GI) has been widely used in the management of blood sugar levels among diabetes however; in the South Pacific very little information regarding the GI of local foods is made available. The objectives of this research were to determine the glycemic index and the glycemic load of 5 South Pacific foods, which have not been studied. The foods tested were plantain (Musa AAB), tannia (Xanthosoma sagittifolium), roti or chappati, homemade pancake and Lees cabin crackers. Glucose powder mixed in 200 mL of water was used as reference food. Eight apparently healthy indigenous Fijian males from the Fiji Military Forces aged 25-36 years old were recruited for this study. Participants were given a 50 g carbohydrate portion of the test foods to ingest after a 10-12 hour fast the night before the test and the standard reference food were administered to participants on different days for comparison. In the morning, capillary blood samples were drawn from the fingers at 0 min, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes postprandially and the blood glucose level was determined. The equation of Wolever using computer software was used to calculate the glycemic index and the glycemic load was calculated using the formular provided in the Harvard Health Online. The results showed that individuals respond to foods differently thus affecting the GI average values. The glycemic index has been categorized by Miller as low GI is pounds 55, moderate GI is between 56-69 and high GI is > or = 70. All the five carbohydrate foods understudy have moderate GI values ranging from 59 to 68. The Glycemic Load (GL) for cabin biscuit was the highest. PMID:18181442

  14. Apollo 17 command module splashdown in South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 17 command module, with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, nears splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean to conclude the final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program. This overhead view was taken from a recovery aircraft seconds before the spacecraft hit the water. The splashdown occurred at 304:31:59 ground elapsed time, 1:24:59 p.m. December 19, 1972 about 350 nautical miles southeast of the Samoan Islands.

  15. Verification of SPCZ and ENSO dynamics in the extended reanalysis period using the South Pacific Rainfall Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrey, Andrew; Dalu, Giovanni; Diamond, Howard; Gaetani, Marco; Renwick, James

    2010-05-01

    Ground-based rainfall observations during the pre-satellite era in the South West Pacific were examined for an extreme La Niña event that occurred in 1955-56. The rainfall observations were derived from the South Pacific Rainfall Atlas (SPRAT), a data compilation contributed by the regional meteorological services. The influence of tropical cyclone activity on both monthly and warm season rainfall anomalies were also accounted for using the International Best Tracks Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) tropical cyclone database. The rainfall anomalies from more than 60 southwest Pacific Island stations showed a region of enhanced rainfall in the southwest half of the south Pacific encompassing the Southern Cook Islands, Tonga, Fiji, New Caledonia, and Vanuatu. Suppressed rainfall was observed in the northeast corner of the region over the Marquesas, the Northern Cook Islands, Tokelau, and Tuvalu. This pattern is similar to what is expected for La Nina events that occurred during the classic re-analysis period (1958 onward). Elimination of anomalously high historical rainfall totals for individual islands using the IBTrACS data allowed a 'best guess' of the past SPCZ position, suggesting it was probably southwest of the its normal climatological position during the 1955-56 La Nina. A comparison of the 'best guess' SPCZ position fit derived from the rainfall anomalies to the omega velocity furnished by the NOAA-CIRES reanalysis show a remarkably similar position of the SPCZ during the 1955-56 ENSO event. Ground-based rainfall observations that support SPRAT (which extend into the early 1900s and beyond) can therefore confirm the fidelity of the NOAA-CIRES extended 20th century reanalysis and can help to reveal past ENSO and SPCZ dynamics. In addition, the high-resolution daily reanalysis data and IBTrACS information indicate a unique SPCZ control on regional tropical cyclone trajectories into the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes during ex-tropical transition

  16. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific and South East Asian Regions, 2010.

    PubMed

    Lahra, Monica M

    2012-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (GASP) has conducted continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific Region (WPR) to optimise antibiotic treatment and control of gonococcal disease since 1992. From 2007, this has been enhanced by the inclusion of data from the WHO South East Asian Region (SEAR). Over time, there has been recruitment of additional centres in both regions. This report provides an analysis of antimicrobial resistance in N. gonorrhoeae in the WHO WPR and SEAR derived from results of the 2010 GASP surveillance. In 2010 there were 9,744 N. gonorrhoeae isolates examined for their susceptibility to one or more of the antibiotics used for the treatment of gonorrhoea, incorporating External Quality Assurance controlled methods, from reporting centres in 19 countries and/or jurisdictions. A high proportion of penicillin and quinolone resistance was again detected amongst isolates tested in the 'Asian' countries of WHO WPR and SEAR. In contrast, lower levels of penicillin and quinolone resistance were reported from the Pacific Islands of Fiji and New Caledonia. The proportion of gonococci reported as having 'decreased susceptibility' to the third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic ceftriaxone varied widely, ranging from 1.3% to 55.8%. There is a continued need for revision and clarification of some of the in vitro criteria that are currently used to categorise the clinical importance of gonococci with different ceftriaxone and oral cephalosporin MIC levels, and to relate these to treatment outcome. Azithromycin resistance was very low in most countries reporting, except in Mongolia where it was 34%. The number of instances of spectinomycin resistance remained low. A high proportion of strains tested continued to exhibit high-level plasmid mediated resistance to tetracyclines. The continuing emergence and spread of antibiotic resistant gonococci in and

  17. Pleistocene dynamics of the Pacific South Equatorial Countercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuernberg, D.; Raddatz, J.; Rippert, N.; Tiedemann, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) with extremely high sea-surface-temperatures (SST) is a key area for global climate. It also acts as a crossroad for mode and intermediate water masses such as the South Equatorial Countercurrent (SECC) transporting water masses originating from higher latitudes. The SECC flows above the main thermocline and strongly interacts with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). To constrain changes in sea-surface and subsurface water mass dynamics affecting thermocline depth, we reconstruct SST, subSST and salinity conditions using combined δ18O and Mg/Ca signals of surface (Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer) and subsurface dwelling (Globorotalia tumida) planktonic foraminifera. Our study is based on RV SONNE SO-225 piston cores retrieved from Manihiki plateau, which is located at the southeastern margin of the WPWP (between ~ 5°S-15°S and 170-160°W). The proxy records cover the last ~ 3 Myr SSTMg/Ca remained nearly constant throughout the entire Pleistocene varying between ~30 to 32 (°C), while the subSSTMg/Ca reconstructions reveal pronounced variations from ~10 to 16 (°C). Our results imply that the WPWP thermocline depth has undergone significant vertical movements throughout the Pleistocene. Notably, thermocline depth is continuously decreasing from the early to the late Pleistocene, and coincides with the change from the 41 kyr to a dominant 100 kyr climate periodicity between 1 and 1.7 Ma. We hypothesize that the repeated change in thermocline depth is due to either 1) changes in mode or intermediate water masses advection from Southern Ocean sources via "ocean tunneling", 2) changes in the tropical Pacific wind regime, and/or 3) changes in the Western Pacific Monsoon sytem.

  18. Changes in South Pacific rainfall bands in a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widlansky, M. J.; Timmermann, A.; Stein, K.; McGregor, S.; Schneider, N.; England, M. H.; Lengaigne, M.; Cai, W.

    2012-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is the largest rainband in the Southern Hemisphere and provides most of the rainfall to Southwest Pacific island nations. In spite of various modeling efforts, it remains uncertain how the SPCZ will respond to greenhouse warming. A multi-model ensemble average of 21st century climate change projections from the current-generation of Coupled General Circulation Models (CGCMs) suggests a slightly wetter Southwest Pacific; however, inter-model uncertainty is greater than projected rainfall changes in the SPCZ region. Using a hierarchy of climate models we show that the uncertainty of SPCZ rainfall projections in the Southwest Pacific can be explained as a result of two competing mechanisms. Higher tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) lead to an overall increase of atmospheric moisture and rainfall while weaker SST gradients dynamically shift the SPCZ northeastward (see illustration) and promote summer drying in areas of the Southwest Pacific, similar to the response to strong El Niño events. Based on a multi-model ensemble of 55 greenhouse warming experiments and for moderate tropical warming of 2-3°C we estimate a 5% decrease of SPCZ rainfall, although uncertainty exceeds ±30% among CGCMs. For stronger tropical warming, a tendency for a wetter SPCZ region is identified.; Illustration of the "warmest gets wetter" response to projected 21st century greenhouse warming. Green shading depicts observed (1982-2009) rainfall during DJF (contour interval: 2 mm/day; starting at 1 mm/day). Blue (red) contours depict warming less (more) than the tropical mean (42.5°N/S) 21st century multi-model trend (contour interval: 0.2°C; starting at ±0.1°C).

  19. Investigations of the marine flora and fauna of the Fiji Islands.

    PubMed

    Feussner, Klaus-Dieter; Ragini, Kavita; Kumar, Rohitesh; Soapi, Katy M; Aalbersberg, William G; Harper, Mary Kay; Carte, Brad; Ireland, Chris M

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, approximately 140 papers have been published on marine natural products chemistry and related research from the Fiji Islands. These came about from studies starting in the early 1980s by the research groups of Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz, Ireland at the University of Utah, Gerwick from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the University of California at San Diego and the more recent groups of Hay at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and Jaspars from the University of Aberdeen. This review covers both known and novel marine-derived natural products and their biological activities. The marine organisms reviewed include invertebrates, plants and microorganisms, highlighting the vast structural diversity of compounds isolated from these organisms. Increasingly during this period, natural products chemists at the University of the South Pacific have been partners in this research, leading in 2006 to the development of a Centre for Drug Discovery and Conservation (CDDC).

  20. Global GIS database; digital atlas of South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, P.P.; Hare, T.M.; Schruben, P.; Sherrill, D.; LaMar, C.; Tsushima, P.

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a digital atlas of the countries of the South Pacific. This atlas is part of a global database compiled from USGS and other data sources at a nominal scale of 1:1 million and is intended to be used as a regional-scale reference and analytical tool by government officials, researchers, the private sector, and the general public. The atlas includes free GIS software or may be used with ESRI's ArcView software. Customized ArcView tools, specifically designed to make the atlas easier to use, are also included.

  1. Plutonium and 137Cs in surface water of the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Aoyama, M; Fukasawa, M; Kim, C S; Komura, K; Povinec, P P; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A

    2007-08-01

    The present plutonium and 137Cs concentrations in South Pacific Ocean surface waters were determined. The water samples were collected in the South Pacific mid-latitude region (32.5 degrees S) during the BEAGLE expedition conducted in 2003-04 by JAMSTEC. 239,240Pu concentrations in surface seawater of the South Pacific were in the range of 0.5 to 4.1 mBq m(-3), whereas 137Cs concentrations ranged from 0.07 to 1.7 Bq m(-3). The observed 239,240Pu and 137Cs concentrations in the South Pacific were almost of the same level as those in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. The surface 239,240Pu in the South Pacific subtropical gyre showed larger spatial variations than 137Cs, as it may be affected by physical and biogeochemical processes. The 239,240Pu/137Cs activity ratios, which reflect biogeochemical processes in seawater, were generally smaller than that observed in global fallout, except for the most eastern station. The 239,240Pu/137Cs ratios in the South Pacific tend to be higher than that in the North Pacific. The relationships between anthropogenic radionuclides and oceanographic parameters such as salinity and nutrients were examined. The 137Cs concentrations in the western South Pacific (the Tasman Sea) and the eastern South Pacific were negatively correlated with the phosphate concentration, whereas there is no correlation between the 137Cs and nutrients concentrations in the South Pacific subtropical gyre. The mutual relationships between anthropogenic radionuclides and oceanographic parameters are important for better understanding of transport processes of anthropogenic radionuclides and their fate in the South Pacific. PMID:17459459

  2. Plutonium and 137Cs in surface water of the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Aoyama, M; Fukasawa, M; Kim, C S; Komura, K; Povinec, P P; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A

    2007-08-01

    The present plutonium and 137Cs concentrations in South Pacific Ocean surface waters were determined. The water samples were collected in the South Pacific mid-latitude region (32.5 degrees S) during the BEAGLE expedition conducted in 2003-04 by JAMSTEC. 239,240Pu concentrations in surface seawater of the South Pacific were in the range of 0.5 to 4.1 mBq m(-3), whereas 137Cs concentrations ranged from 0.07 to 1.7 Bq m(-3). The observed 239,240Pu and 137Cs concentrations in the South Pacific were almost of the same level as those in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. The surface 239,240Pu in the South Pacific subtropical gyre showed larger spatial variations than 137Cs, as it may be affected by physical and biogeochemical processes. The 239,240Pu/137Cs activity ratios, which reflect biogeochemical processes in seawater, were generally smaller than that observed in global fallout, except for the most eastern station. The 239,240Pu/137Cs ratios in the South Pacific tend to be higher than that in the North Pacific. The relationships between anthropogenic radionuclides and oceanographic parameters such as salinity and nutrients were examined. The 137Cs concentrations in the western South Pacific (the Tasman Sea) and the eastern South Pacific were negatively correlated with the phosphate concentration, whereas there is no correlation between the 137Cs and nutrients concentrations in the South Pacific subtropical gyre. The mutual relationships between anthropogenic radionuclides and oceanographic parameters are important for better understanding of transport processes of anthropogenic radionuclides and their fate in the South Pacific.

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life Is Low in Secondary School Children in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Solveig; Mavoa, Helen; Swinburn, Boyd; Waqa, Gade; Goundar, Ramneek; Moodie, Marjory

    2012-01-01

    The health and wellbeing of children in lower-income countries is the focus of much international effort, yet there has been very little direct measurement of this. Objective. The current objective was to study the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a general population of secondary school children in Fiji, a low middle-income country in the Pacific. Methods. Self-reported HRQoL was measured by the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 in 8947 school children (aged 12–18 years) from 18 secondary schools on Viti Levu, the main island of Fiji. HRQoL in Fiji was compared to that of school-aged children in 13 high- and upper middle-income countries. Results. The school children in Fiji had lower HRQoL than the children in the 13 comparison countries, with consistently lower physical, emotional, social, and school functioning and wellbeing. HRQoL was particularly low amongst girls and Indigenous Fijians. Conclusions. These findings raise concerns about the general functioning and wellbeing of school children in Fiji. The consistently low HRQoL across all core domains suggests pervasive underlying determinants. Investigation of the potential determinants in Fiji and validation of the current results in Fiji and other lower-income countries are important avenues for future research. PMID:23304170

  4. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji.

    PubMed

    Glaus, Kerstin B J; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M

    2015-12-02

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji's inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers' identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji's inshore fisheries, suggests that the country's artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries.

  5. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji.

    PubMed

    Glaus, Kerstin B J; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M

    2015-01-01

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji's inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers' identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji's inshore fisheries, suggests that the country's artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries. PMID:26626561

  6. Venereal diseases in the islands of the South Pacific.

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, R R

    1980-01-01

    The island territories of the South Pacific vary considerably in area and in size of population; Pitcairn has a population of 100 in two square miles whereas Papua New Guinea has a population of 2,990,000 in approximately 175,000 square miles. Today the whole ocean is traversed by air routes. Recently, the prevalence of gonorrhoea has decreased in the northern region but increased in the eastern and western; in all these regions the reported prevalence exceeds 200 cases per 100,00 population. In an area where yaws was once widespread, syphilis is being increasingly recognised. Although the figures for syphilis are clearly higher because of the greater use of serological screening, many of the reported cases are of early infection. Yaws has been eliminated from most of the South Pacific Islands but is still present in the western region--more than 99% of the reported cases occurring in Papua New Guinea, particularly in the offshore islands. PMID:7427693

  7. [Arboviral diseases in South-West Pacific islands (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Le Gonidec, G; Fauran, P

    1981-01-01

    Islands of the south-west Pacific area belong to the melanesian group, excepted Niue, Tonga, Wallis and Futuna which are polynesian. Through New Guinea, there is a geographic relation to the eastern part of Australia, rich of 42 arbovirus types. Dengue and Ross River fever are the most important arboviral diseases in the region; both affect islanders after introduction of virus by travellers to localities where efficient vectors are present. Dengue types 1, 2 and 4 were isolated from man and from mosquitoes in this area. Successive outbreaks, transmitted by Aedes aegypti or by Ae. polynesiensis, resulted in thousands of cases with a few fatal hemorrhagic forms. Ross River virus, responsible of epidemic polyarthritis, evaded in 1979, from Australia to Fidji, Wallis, Futuna and New Caledonia. Suspected vectors are Aedes vigilax and Culex annulirostris. Aedes aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis are also possible carriers. Murray Valley encephalitis virus caused severe outbreaks in Australia and fatal cases in New Guinea; it is a possible invader when Culex annulirostris is abundant. Expansion of arboviral diseases is a major epidemiological problem in south-west Pacific islands. Research work on pathogeny and vectors control must be intensified in this area.

  8. Regional climate model projections of the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. P.; Bormann, K.; Katzfey, J.; Dean, S.; Arritt, R.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents results from regional climate model (RCM) projections for the south-west Pacific Ocean. The regional models used bias corrected sea surface temperatures. Six global climate models (GCMs) were used to drive a global variable resolution model on a quasi-uniform 60 km grid. One of these simulations was used to drive three limited area regional models. Thus a four member ensemble was produced by different RCMs downscaling the same GCM (GFDL2.1), and a six member ensemble was produced by the same RCM (Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model—CCAM) downscaling six different GCMs. Comparison of the model results with precipitation observations shows the differences to be dominated by the choice of RCM, with all the CCAM simulations performing similarly and generally having lower error than the other RCMs. However, evaluating aspects of the model representation of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) does not show CCAM to perform better in this regard. In terms of the future projections of the SPCZ for the December-January-February season, the ensemble showed no consensus change in most characteristics though a majority of the ensemble members project a decrease in the SPCZ strength. Thus, similar to GCM based studies, there is large uncertainty concerning future changes in the SPCZ and there is no evidence to suggest that future changes will be outside the natural variability. These RCM simulations do not support an increase in the frequency of zonal SPCZ events.

  9. Evolution of Interannual and Decadal/Interdecadal variability of the SPCZ since the late 18th century using a network of Fiji coral δ18O time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassie, E. P.; Linsley, B. K.; Correge, T.; Wu, H. C.; Lemley, G. M.; Cabioch, G.

    2012-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) region is of high interest due to its impact on tropical rainfall and the export of moisture from the tropics. Documenting the amplitude and periodicity of SPCZ displacements on interannual (mainly influenced by El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO)) and decadal/interdecadal (D/I) time-scales is of high importance not only for risk management but also for understanding the dynamics of the SPCZ and for improving General Circulation Model climate predictions. We have generated a unique regional coral δ18O network from the Fiji Islands, which are located just south of the main SPCZ rainfall axis. This network consists of five monthly-resolved coral δ18O time-series from different regions of Fiji. Evaluation of interseries correlation coefficients indicates that ENSO-band (2 to 9 years) and D/I-band (10 to 50 years) δ18O variability is highly reproducible. Correlation to instrumental surface salinity (SSS) data indicates that interannual coral δ18O variability in Fiji is the result of interannual changes in SSS that are coupled to ENSO. The composite reconstruction (arithmetic average of the five Fiji δ18O records), extending from 1790 to 2004 AD, was compared to known climatic indices such as the Southern Oscillation and Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation indices over the 20th century. Pearson Product-Moment correlations between the coral δ18O composite and these target indices of the Pacific basin are r= 0.71 and 0.41 for ENSO and D/I timescales respectively, with p-values better than 0.001. These high values indicate that our Fiji composite δ18O record is suitable for reconstructing past ENSO and D/I variability prior to the instrumental record. Our Fiji ENSO-band and D/I-band reconstructions from the Southwest Pacific also share important similarities with other Pacific coral δ18O records such as the δ18O record from Malo-Channel (Vanuatu). The Fiji composite δ18O reconstruction also correlates negatively with

  10. The longevity of the South Pacific isotopic and thermal anomaly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Park, K.-H.; Pringle, M.; Rubenstone, J.L.; Smith, W.H.F.; Zindler, A.

    1991-01-01

    The South Pacific is anomalous in terms of the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios of its hot spot basalts, a thermally enhanced lithosphere, and possibly a hotter mantle. We have studied the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics of 12 Cretaceous seamounts in the Magellans, Marshall and Wake seamount groups (western Pacific Ocean) that originated in this South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA). The range and values of isotope ratios of the Cretaceous seamount data are similar to those of the island chains of Samoa, Tahiti, Marquesas and Cook/Austral in the SOPITA. These define two major mantle components suggesting that isotopically extreme lavas have been produced at SOPITA for at least 120 Ma. Shallow bathymetry, and weakened lithosphere beneath some of the seamounts studied suggests that at least some of the thermal effects prevailed during the Cretaceous as well. These data, in the context of published data, suggest: 1. (1)|SOPITA is a long-lived feature, and enhanced heat transfer into the lithosphere and isotopically anomalous mantle appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of the anomaly. 2. (2)|The less pronounced depth anomaly during northwesterly plate motion suggests that some of the expressions of SOPITA may be controlled by the direction of plate motion. Motion parallel to the alignment of SOPITA hot spots focusses the heat (and chemical input into the lithosphere) on a smaller cross section than oblique motion. 3. (3)|The lithosphere in the eastern and central SOPITA appears to have lost its original depleted mantle characteristics, probably due to enhanced plume/lithosphere interaction, and it is dominated by isotopic compositions derived from plume materials. 4. (4)|We speculate (following D.L. Anderson) that the origin of the SOPITA, and possibly the DUPAL anomaly is largely due to focussed subduction through long periods of the geological history of the earth, creating a heterogeneous distribution of recycled components in the lower mantle

  11. From the South Pacific: experiences in the development of instructional materials in population education in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The population education program in the Pacific was established in 1980, a decade behind that in Asia. Some countries produced materials on population. Fiji produced excellent student and teacher guides, and the Marshall Islands conducted a workshop to develop curriculum materials for use in elementary schools and in an adult education program. In the Solomon Islands 10 modules on population education will be used in the "core" subject for all 1st year students of the new College of Higher Education. Of these 10 modules, 5 have been completed. Because other Pacific countries had not moved further from their plans of developing curriculum and instructional materials in this field a workshop was conducted during September 1983 to provide training in the development of population education materials. The workshop was aimed at preparing guidelines for the development of in-school and out-of-school curricula and sample instructional materials and developing prototype materials which can be adopted by the Pacific countries. While there may be many materials in population education developed in Asia which can be used in the Pacific, it was deemed helpful to have prototype instructional materials for the Pacific region developed by the Pacific islandes themselves. The following guidelines were suggested: stress the unfiqueness of the Pacific; emphasize culture and traditional lifestyle; use local examples; focus on the interrelationships of population factors; employ local or regional resources, materials, and expertise; and stay sensitive to what is aceptable in population education. The major work of developing draft prototype curricula and sample instructional materials was done by the participants in 2 teams, 1 for the in-school and the other for the out-of-school program. The in-school group developed sample units instead of sample lessons in population edcuation for social science, science, mathematics, environmental science, and home economics for the secondary

  12. Low health-related quality of life in school-aged children in Tonga, a lower-middle income country in the South Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Solveig; Swinburn, Boyd; Mavoa, Helen; Fotu, Kalesita; Tupoulahi-Fusimalohi, Caroline; Faeamani, Gavin; Moodie, Marjory

    2014-01-01

    Background Ensuring a good life for all parts of the population, including children, is high on the public health agenda in most countries around the world. Information about children's perception of their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its socio-demographic distribution is, however, limited and almost exclusively reliant on data from Western higher income countries. Objectives To investigate HRQoL in schoolchildren in Tonga, a lower income South Pacific Island country, and to compare this to HRQoL of children in other countries, including Tongan children living in New Zealand, a high-income country in the same region. Design A cross-sectional study from Tonga addressing all secondary schoolchildren (11–18 years old) on the outer island of Vava'u and in three districts of the main island of Tongatapu (2,164 participants). A comparison group drawn from the literature comprised children in 18 higher income and one lower income country (Fiji). A specific New Zealand comparison group involved all children of Tongan descendent at six South Auckland secondary schools (830 participants). HRQoL was assessed by the self-report Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0. Results HRQoL in Tonga was overall similar in girls and boys, but somewhat lower in children below 15 years of age. The children in Tonga experienced lower HRQoL than the children in all of the 19 comparison countries, with a large difference between children in Tonga and the higher income countries (Cohen's d 1.0) and a small difference between Tonga and the lower income country Fiji (Cohen's d 0.3). The children in Tonga also experienced lower HRQoL than Tongan children living in New Zealand (Cohen's d 0.6). Conclusion The results reveal worrisome low HRQoL in children in Tonga and point towards a potential general pattern of low HRQoL in children living in lower income countries, or, alternatively, in the South Pacific Island countries. PMID:25150029

  13. Cast the Net a Little Wider: Australian Aid in the South Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassity, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the development of Australia's bilateral aid program to higher education in the South Pacific, specifically at the University of the South Pacific (USP). The premise is primarily historical, focusing on the important decades of USP's expansion and Australian aid policy development in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This article…

  14. Conservation and management of the endangered Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clare; Rounds, Isaac; Watling, Dick

    2012-05-01

    Recovery planning is a key component of many threatened species conservation initiatives and can be a powerful awareness raising tool. One of the largest impediments to conservation efforts in the Pacific region however, is the lack of ecological data and its subsequent effects on the development of feasible and useful recovery plans for threatened species. Without these plans, the understaffed, underfunded and often technically ill-equipped conservation agencies face huge difficulties in planning, prioritizing and conducting conservation activities to adequately protect biodiversity. The Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, is an endemic endangered palm species whose survival is heavily dependent on a feasible species recovery plan. It is geographically restricted and threatened by habitat destruction and overexploitation for thatch for the tourism industry and palm heart consumption by local consumers. Despite its threatened status, M. vitiense is not currently protected by national or international legislation. Recent field surveys and extensive stakeholder consultation have resulted in the production of a species recovery plan highlighting the importance of the species and advocating sustainable harvesting rather than complete bans to promote conservation. This article summarizes the recovery plan and its current effects on the status of M. vitiense in Fiji. We also discuss the role of different stakeholders in the conservation of M. vitiense, including the absence of significant behavioral changes by the largest consumer - the tourism industry, and the importance of recovery plans for biodiversity conservation in the Pacific.

  15. Conservation and Management of the Endangered Fiji Sago Palm, Metroxylon vitiense, in Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Clare; Rounds, Isaac; Watling, Dick

    2012-05-01

    Recovery planning is a key component of many threatened species conservation initiatives and can be a powerful awareness raising tool. One of the largest impediments to conservation efforts in the Pacific region however, is the lack of ecological data and its subsequent effects on the development of feasible and useful recovery plans for threatened species. Without these plans, the understaffed, underfunded and often technically ill-equipped conservation agencies face huge difficulties in planning, prioritizing and conducting conservation activities to adequately protect biodiversity. The Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, is an endemic endangered palm species whose survival is heavily dependent on a feasible species recovery plan. It is geographically restricted and threatened by habitat destruction and overexploitation for thatch for the tourism industry and palm heart consumption by local consumers. Despite its threatened status, M. vitiense is not currently protected by national or international legislation. Recent field surveys and extensive stakeholder consultation have resulted in the production of a species recovery plan highlighting the importance of the species and advocating sustainable harvesting rather than complete bans to promote conservation. This article summarizes the recovery plan and its current effects on the status of M. vitiense in Fiji. We also discuss the role of different stakeholders in the conservation of M. vitiense, including the absence of significant behavioral changes by the largest consumer - the tourism industry, and the importance of recovery plans for biodiversity conservation in the Pacific.

  16. Conservation and management of the endangered Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clare; Rounds, Isaac; Watling, Dick

    2012-05-01

    Recovery planning is a key component of many threatened species conservation initiatives and can be a powerful awareness raising tool. One of the largest impediments to conservation efforts in the Pacific region however, is the lack of ecological data and its subsequent effects on the development of feasible and useful recovery plans for threatened species. Without these plans, the understaffed, underfunded and often technically ill-equipped conservation agencies face huge difficulties in planning, prioritizing and conducting conservation activities to adequately protect biodiversity. The Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, is an endemic endangered palm species whose survival is heavily dependent on a feasible species recovery plan. It is geographically restricted and threatened by habitat destruction and overexploitation for thatch for the tourism industry and palm heart consumption by local consumers. Despite its threatened status, M. vitiense is not currently protected by national or international legislation. Recent field surveys and extensive stakeholder consultation have resulted in the production of a species recovery plan highlighting the importance of the species and advocating sustainable harvesting rather than complete bans to promote conservation. This article summarizes the recovery plan and its current effects on the status of M. vitiense in Fiji. We also discuss the role of different stakeholders in the conservation of M. vitiense, including the absence of significant behavioral changes by the largest consumer - the tourism industry, and the importance of recovery plans for biodiversity conservation in the Pacific. PMID:22441695

  17. The 2009 South Pacific tsunami - implications for tsunami hazard in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, William; Wilson, Kate; Prasetya, Gegar; Bradley, Brendon; Wang, Xiaoming; Beavan, John; Holden, Caroline

    2010-05-01

    On 29 September 2009 a Mw8.0 earthquake at the northern end of the Tonga Trench created a tsunami with a devastating impact on the islands of Tutuila (American Samoa), Upolu (Samoa) and Niuatoputapu (Tonga). The intensity of the tsunami impact on islands close to the source was surprising for an earthquake of this magnitude, which is presumably a consequence of an unusual earthquake source. Moment tensor solutions suggest a mechanism of normal faulting in the outer-rise though this is not fully consistent with the polarity of waves observed at DART buoys within the Pacific. The written history of tsunami in the southwest Pacific is relatively short, especially for the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi trench, and includes few events; consequently the question ‘How typical is this event of tsunami from this subduction zone?' is critical for understanding the tsunami hazard of the region. An important source of information on the tsunami comes from post-event surveys. Researchers from GNS Science participated in survey teams on each of the three strongly affected islands. Information collected by these surveys is very varied, and includes: estimates of physical parameters such as the distribution of run-up heights, flow depths, and inundation distances; engineering observations regarding the damage to, and relative fragility of, different types of buildings and infrastructure; observations of environmental impact and the role of the environmental factors, such as coral reefs, forests, and sand dunes, on influencing the tsunami impact; and observations of the response to the events by the local communities. This presentation will include a summary of the main findings from these surveys. The earthquake source for this event appears to have an unusual mechanism for a tsunamigenic earthquake, and to be relatively complex. Attempts to invert for the source using any one of the various collected datasets - the survey data described above, DART buoy sea level records, geodetic

  18. Radiolytic Hydrogen Production in the South Pacific Subseafloor Basaltic Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzaugis, M. E.; Spivack, A. J.; Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is produced in geological settings by dissociation of water due to radiation from natural radioactive decay of uranium (238U, 235U), thorium (232Th) and potassium (40K). To quantify the potential significance of radiolytic H2 as an electron donor for microbes within the South Pacific subseafloor basaltic aquifer, we calculate radiolytic H2 production rates in basement fractures utilizing measured radionuclide concentrations in 42 basalt samples from IODP Expedition 329. The samples are from three sites with very different basement ages and a wide range of alteration types. Major and trace element concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude from sample to sample. Comparison of our samples to each other and to previous studies of fresh East Pacific Rise basalt suggests that between-sample variation in radionuclide concentrations is primarily due to differences in initial (pre-alteration) concentrations (which can vary between eruptive events), rather than to alteration type or extent. Local maxima in radionuclide (U, Th, and K) concentrations produce 'hotspots' of radiolytic H2 production; calculated radiolytic rates differ by up to a factor of 80 from sample to sample. Fracture width also greatly influences H2 production. Due to the low penetration distance of alpha radiation, microfractures are 'hotpots' for radiolytic H2 production. For example, radiolytic H2 production rates normalized to water volume are 170 times higher in 1μm-wide fractures than in 10cm-wide fractures.

  19. Ageing in the South Pacific. Physical changes with urbanization.

    PubMed

    Finau, S A; Prior, I A; Evans, J G

    1982-01-01

    The process of ageing, the place the elderly hold in the South Pacific societies and the care they receive as they move from adult independence to geriatric dependence varies considerably in different Pacific Polynesian populations. This provides unusual opportunity to examine the physical changes of ageing in people of the same broad genetic make-up exposed to environmental changes brought about by urbanization. Epidemiological surveys carried out since 1962 among New Zealand Maoris, Tongans, Cook Island Maoris in Rarotonga and Pukapuka, and Tokelauans living in Tokelau and following migration to New Zealand, provide the main data base for this presentation. The pattern of blood pressure, body weight, serum lipids and clinical disorders show considerable variation which relate most closely to the adoption of westernized life-style and moving into an urban environment. Analysis of the ECG pattern, in Pukapukans, in whom blood pressure shows only a minor increase with age, compared with age and sex-matched subjects studied in Newcastle, England provide insights into the ageing heart. An examination of mortality based on risk factors at entry shows an inverse relationship of serum cholesterol to total mortality in New Zealand Maori men and women, in Tokelau men but not women. Increasing systolic blood pressure was related to mortality in New Zealand Maori men, Tokalau men and Caucasian women, but not in the other race sex groups. The pattern of ageing and risk factors must clearly be examined in individual populations because while death is the end the pathways vary. PMID:7135028

  20. On the formation of the South Pacific quadrupole mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian; Wang, Faming

    2016-08-01

    The formation process of the South Pacific (SP) quadrupole (SPQ) mode was investigated in this study based on observations and reanalysis data. The SPQ is the dominant mode of the sea surface temperature (SST)-surface wind covariability in the SP after removing the ENSO-related signals. The positive phase of the SPQ is characterized by a warm SST anomaly (SSTA) west of the South American coast, a cool SSTA in its southwest, a positive SSTA southeast of New Zealand, and a negative SSTA off the southeast coast of Australia, overlain by cyclonic wind anomalies. The anomalous cyclonic winds weaken the mean southeast trade winds in the southeast SP and the westerlies in the high latitudes of the SP, increasing the SSTAs at the two positive poles through decreased evaporation and latent heat flux (LHF) loss. The southeast wind anomalies advect dry and cold air to the negative pole in the central SP, which reduces the SSTA there by increasing the LHF loss. Off the southeast coast of Australia, the southwest wind anomalies induce equatorward Ekman currents and advect cold water. The resulting oceanic horizontal advection is the main contributor to the negative SSTAs there. In addition to the above processes, cloud cover change can enhance the initial SSTAs in the southeast SP by affecting shortwave radiation. The decay of the SPQ is mainly due to LHF changes.

  1. Traditional coping strategies and disaster response: examples from the South Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephanie M; Thiessen, Jodi; Gero, Anna; Rumsey, Michele; Kuruppu, Natasha; Willetts, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    The Pacific Islands are vulnerable to climate change and increased risk of disasters not only because of their isolated and often low lying geographical setting but because of their economic status which renders them reliant on donor support. In a qualitative study exploring the adaptive capacity of Pacific Island Countries (PICs) across four countries, Cook Islands, Fiji, Samoa, and Vanuatu, it was clear that traditional coping strategies are consistently being applied as part of response to disasters and climate changes. This paper describes five common strategies employed in PICs as understood through this research: recognition of traditional methods; faith and religious beliefs; traditional governance and leadership; family and community involvement; and agriculture and food security. While this study does not trial the efficacy of these methods, it provides an indication of what methods are being used and therefore a starting point for further research into which of these traditional strategies are beneficial. These findings also provide important impetus for Pacific Island governments to recognise traditional approaches in their disaster preparedness and response processes. PMID:24454413

  2. Traditional Coping Strategies and Disaster Response: Examples from the South Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Stephanie M.; Kuruppu, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    The Pacific Islands are vulnerable to climate change and increased risk of disasters not only because of their isolated and often low lying geographical setting but because of their economic status which renders them reliant on donor support. In a qualitative study exploring the adaptive capacity of Pacific Island Countries (PICs) across four countries, Cook Islands, Fiji, Samoa, and Vanuatu, it was clear that traditional coping strategies are consistently being applied as part of response to disasters and climate changes. This paper describes five common strategies employed in PICs as understood through this research: recognition of traditional methods; faith and religious beliefs; traditional governance and leadership; family and community involvement; and agriculture and food security. While this study does not trial the efficacy of these methods, it provides an indication of what methods are being used and therefore a starting point for further research into which of these traditional strategies are beneficial. These findings also provide important impetus for Pacific Island governments to recognise traditional approaches in their disaster preparedness and response processes. PMID:24454413

  3. Traditional coping strategies and disaster response: examples from the South Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephanie M; Thiessen, Jodi; Gero, Anna; Rumsey, Michele; Kuruppu, Natasha; Willetts, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    The Pacific Islands are vulnerable to climate change and increased risk of disasters not only because of their isolated and often low lying geographical setting but because of their economic status which renders them reliant on donor support. In a qualitative study exploring the adaptive capacity of Pacific Island Countries (PICs) across four countries, Cook Islands, Fiji, Samoa, and Vanuatu, it was clear that traditional coping strategies are consistently being applied as part of response to disasters and climate changes. This paper describes five common strategies employed in PICs as understood through this research: recognition of traditional methods; faith and religious beliefs; traditional governance and leadership; family and community involvement; and agriculture and food security. While this study does not trial the efficacy of these methods, it provides an indication of what methods are being used and therefore a starting point for further research into which of these traditional strategies are beneficial. These findings also provide important impetus for Pacific Island governments to recognise traditional approaches in their disaster preparedness and response processes.

  4. Infection Frequency of Hepatitis C Virus and IL28B Haplotypes in Papua New Guinea, Fiji, and Kiribati

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, G. L. Abby; Pryor, Jan; Malani, Joji; Supuri, Mathias; Masta, Andrew; Teriboriki, Burentau; Toatu, Tebuka; Penny, David; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Barnes, Eleanor; Pybus, Oliver G.; Klenerman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that there are more than 60 million Hepatitis C virus (HCV) carriers in the World Health Organisation's Western Pacific region (WHO-WPR), where liver cancer is among the top three causes of cancer death. WHO and the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention report the prevalence of HCV in the South Pacific islands (countries within the WHO-WPR) to be high (5–10% and >2% respectively). However, since HCV is not tested for in many of these countries, there is sparse data available to support this assertion. We screened ∼2000 apparently healthy individuals from Papua New Guinea, Fiji and Kiribati and found a sero-prevalence of 2.0%, 0.1% and 0%, respectively. All sero-positive samples tested negative for HCV RNA. Curious as to why all the sero-positive individuals were negative for HCV-RNA, we also screened them for the HCV protective IL28B SNP markers rs12979860 and rs8099917. All antibody-positive participants bar one had HCV protective haplotypes. Our results suggest that HCV is present in these Pacific island countries, albeit at a prevalence lower than previous estimates. As none of our participants had undergone antiviral treatment, and therefore must have cleared infection naturally, we hypothesise that genotypes 1 and/or 4 are circulating in South Pacific Island people and that these peoples are genetically predisposed to be more likely to spontaneous resolve HCV infection than to become chronic carriers. PMID:23976941

  5. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-03-01

    During 2002-2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25-44 years of age.

  6. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002–2013

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    During 2002–2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25–44 years of age. PMID:26890215

  7. Human Leptospirosis Infection in Fiji: An Eco-epidemiological Approach to Identifying Risk Factors and Environmental Drivers for Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Colleen L.; Watson, Conall H.; Lowry, John H.; David, Michael C.; Craig, Scott B.; Wynwood, Sarah J.; Kama, Mike; Nilles, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an important zoonotic disease in the Pacific Islands. In Fiji, two successive cyclones and severe flooding in 2012 resulted in outbreaks with 576 reported cases and 7% case-fatality. We conducted a cross-sectional seroprevalence study and used an eco-epidemiological approach to characterize risk factors and drivers for human leptospirosis infection in Fiji, and aimed to provide an evidence base for improving the effectiveness of public health mitigation and intervention strategies. Antibodies indicative of previous or recent infection were found in 19.4% of 2152 participants (81 communities on the 3 main islands). Questionnaires and geographic information systems data were used to assess variables related to demographics, individual behaviour, contact with animals, socioeconomics, living conditions, land use, and the natural environment. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, variables associated with the presence of Leptospira antibodies included male gender (OR 1.55), iTaukei ethnicity (OR 3.51), living in villages (OR 1.64), lack of treated water at home (OR 1.52), working outdoors (1.64), living in rural areas (OR 1.43), high poverty rate (OR 1.74), living <100m from a major river (OR 1.41), pigs in the community (OR 1.54), high cattle density in the district (OR 1.04 per head/sqkm), and high maximum rainfall in the wettest month (OR 1.003 per mm). Risk factors and drivers for human leptospirosis infection in Fiji are complex and multifactorial, with environmental factors playing crucial roles. With global climate change, severe weather events and flooding are expected to intensify in the South Pacific. Population growth could also lead to more intensive livestock farming; and urbanization in developing countries is often associated with urban and peri-urban slums where diseases of poverty proliferate. Climate change, flooding, population growth, urbanization, poverty and agricultural intensification are important drivers of zoonotic

  8. Human Leptospirosis Infection in Fiji: An Eco-epidemiological Approach to Identifying Risk Factors and Environmental Drivers for Transmission.

    PubMed

    Lau, Colleen L; Watson, Conall H; Lowry, John H; David, Michael C; Craig, Scott B; Wynwood, Sarah J; Kama, Mike; Nilles, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an important zoonotic disease in the Pacific Islands. In Fiji, two successive cyclones and severe flooding in 2012 resulted in outbreaks with 576 reported cases and 7% case-fatality. We conducted a cross-sectional seroprevalence study and used an eco-epidemiological approach to characterize risk factors and drivers for human leptospirosis infection in Fiji, and aimed to provide an evidence base for improving the effectiveness of public health mitigation and intervention strategies. Antibodies indicative of previous or recent infection were found in 19.4% of 2152 participants (81 communities on the 3 main islands). Questionnaires and geographic information systems data were used to assess variables related to demographics, individual behaviour, contact with animals, socioeconomics, living conditions, land use, and the natural environment. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, variables associated with the presence of Leptospira antibodies included male gender (OR 1.55), iTaukei ethnicity (OR 3.51), living in villages (OR 1.64), lack of treated water at home (OR 1.52), working outdoors (1.64), living in rural areas (OR 1.43), high poverty rate (OR 1.74), living <100m from a major river (OR 1.41), pigs in the community (OR 1.54), high cattle density in the district (OR 1.04 per head/sqkm), and high maximum rainfall in the wettest month (OR 1.003 per mm). Risk factors and drivers for human leptospirosis infection in Fiji are complex and multifactorial, with environmental factors playing crucial roles. With global climate change, severe weather events and flooding are expected to intensify in the South Pacific. Population growth could also lead to more intensive livestock farming; and urbanization in developing countries is often associated with urban and peri-urban slums where diseases of poverty proliferate. Climate change, flooding, population growth, urbanization, poverty and agricultural intensification are important drivers of zoonotic

  9. Migration and remittances in the South Pacific: towards new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Connell, J; Brown, R P

    1995-06-01

    The South Pacific region is comprised of 22 states. The indigenous populations are Melanesians, Micronesians, and Polynesians. Polynesian states have largely international emigration, Melanesians have considerable internal migration, and Micronesians have both internal and international migration. This article reviews recent research on some issues relating to migration, particularly remittances. Migration includes movement away from small, remote islands, movement down mountains to coastal areas, movement to urban areas, and international migration. Migration has tended to be circular, but it is becoming more permanent. A major influence on migration is identified as changes in aspirations about a suitable standard of living. In the quest for material goods remittances play an important role. Remittances not only satisfy material need, such as debt repayment, but serve as social ties and as insurance premiums. Remittances reinforce the social hierarchy and mainly go to senior family members. In some contexts remittances have reduced the pressure on national governments to provide employment opportunities and welfare services. In the short-term, benefits go to migrant families and sending countries. Remittances are usually cash flows through the banking system, but there is considerable hand-carrying of remittances or transporting of gifts and goods, particularly due to the limited value of money in remote areas. Remittances are bi-directional. Limited evidence suggests that remittances are intended for subsistence, church donations, family occasions, and school fees. "Modern" housing and airfares for relatives are other primary uses of remittances. It is expected that remittances would decline over time. Women tend to be more frequent remitters. Remittances tend to be a high proportion of income. Studies of remittance use in the Pacific suggest diversity of use, but a primary use is for consumption needs. When there is little domestic investment from remittances

  10. Recent introduction of an allodapine bee into Fiji: A new model system for understanding biological invasions by pollinators.

    PubMed

    Groom, Scott V C; Tuiwawa, Marika V; Stevens, Mark I; Schwarz, Michael P

    2015-08-01

    Morphology-based studies have suggested a very depauperate bee fauna for islands in the South West Pacific, and recent genetic studies since have indicated an even smaller endemic fauna with many bee species in this region resulting from human-aided dispersal. These introduced species have the potential to both disrupt native pollinator suites as well as augment crop pollination, but for most species the timings of introduction are unknown. We examined the distribution and nesting biology of the long-tongued bee Braunsapis puangensis that was first recorded from Fiji in 2007. This bee has now become widespread in Fiji and both its local abundance and geographical range are likely to increase dramatically. The impacts of this invasion are potentially enormous for agriculture and native ecosystems, but they also provide opportunities for understanding how social insect species adapt to new environments. We outline the major issues associated with this recent invasion and argue that a long-term monitoring study is needed.

  11. The Upper Mantle Under the South Pacific Super-Swell from Multimode Surface Waveform Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, A.; Debayle, E.; Priestley, K.; Barruol, G.; Fontaine, F.; Reymond, D.

    2003-12-01

    The South Pacific contains a swarm of volcanic island chains superimposed on a broad bathymetric high known as the South Pacific Superswell. The islands and swell are thought to be the surface manifestation of a ``superplume'' beneath the the region. We present a Sv-wave speed tomographic model for the South Pacific derived from multi-mode waveform inversion of more than 17,000 vertical component seismograms. Most of the data are from the Global Digital Seismic Network but we include important data from ten broadband seismographs deployed in French Polynesia as part of the PLUME experiment (Polynesia Lithosphere and Upper Mantle Experiment). We use preferentially short propagation paths (Δ < 54o) to minimize off great circle path propagation, but increase the path length in areas of insufficient coverage. We resolve the subduction zones bounding the South Pacific to the east and west with a width compatible with the smoothing used in the tomographic inversion. The slow wave speed structure associated with the East Pacific Rise is offset to the west as has previously been noted in more detailed local studies. There seems to be no pervasive low wave speed feature in the upper mantle beneath the South Pacific. However, low wave speed structures extend from shallow depth to the transition zone beneath the Society hotspot, the Austral hotspot and Easter Island. The presence of similar structures beneath other Pacific hotspots is currently masked by lack of resolution.

  12. Plastic pollution in the South Pacific subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Marcus; Maximenko, Nikolai; Thiel, Martin; Cummins, Anna; Lattin, Gwen; Wilson, Stiv; Hafner, Jan; Zellers, Ann; Rifman, Samuel

    2013-03-15

    Plastic marine pollution in the open ocean of the southern hemisphere is largely undocumented. Here, we report the result of a (4489 km) 2424 nautical mile transect through the South Pacific subtropical gyre, carried out in March-April 2011. Neuston samples were collected at 48 sites, averaging 50 nautical miles apart, using a manta trawl lined with a 333 μm mesh. The transect bisected a predicted accumulation zone associated with the convergence of surface currents, driven by local winds. The results show an increase in surface abundance of plastic pollution as we neared the center and decrease as we moved away, verifying the presence of a garbage patch. The average abundance and mass was 26,898 particles km(-2) and 70.96 g km(-2), respectively. 88.8% of the plastic pollution was found in the middle third of the samples with the highest value of 396,342 particles km(-2) occurring near the center of the predicted accumulation zone. PMID:23324543

  13. Plastic pollution in the South Pacific subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Marcus; Maximenko, Nikolai; Thiel, Martin; Cummins, Anna; Lattin, Gwen; Wilson, Stiv; Hafner, Jan; Zellers, Ann; Rifman, Samuel

    2013-03-15

    Plastic marine pollution in the open ocean of the southern hemisphere is largely undocumented. Here, we report the result of a (4489 km) 2424 nautical mile transect through the South Pacific subtropical gyre, carried out in March-April 2011. Neuston samples were collected at 48 sites, averaging 50 nautical miles apart, using a manta trawl lined with a 333 μm mesh. The transect bisected a predicted accumulation zone associated with the convergence of surface currents, driven by local winds. The results show an increase in surface abundance of plastic pollution as we neared the center and decrease as we moved away, verifying the presence of a garbage patch. The average abundance and mass was 26,898 particles km(-2) and 70.96 g km(-2), respectively. 88.8% of the plastic pollution was found in the middle third of the samples with the highest value of 396,342 particles km(-2) occurring near the center of the predicted accumulation zone.

  14. The oxygen minimum zone of the eastern South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Pantoja, Silvio

    2009-07-01

    In spite of the fact that oxygen-deficient waters with ⩽20 μM of dissolved oxygen—known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs)—occupy only ˜1% of the volume of the global ocean, they disproportionately affect global biogeochemical cycles, particularly the nitrogen cycle. The macrobiota diversity in OMZs is low, but the fauna that do inhabit these regions present special adaptations to the low-oxygen conditions. Conversely, microbial communities in the OMZ water column and sediments are abundant and phylogenetically and metabolically very diverse, and microbial processes occurring therein (e.g., denitrification, anammox, and organic matter degradation) are important for global marine biogeochemical cycles. In this introductory article, we present the collection of papers for the special volume on the OMZ of the eastern South Pacific, one of the three main open-ocean oxygen-deficient regions of the global ocean. These papers deal with aspects of regional oceanography, inorganic and organic geochemistry, ecology, and the biochemistry of micro and macro organisms—both in the plankton and in the sediments—and past changes in the fish scales preserved in the sediments bathed by OMZ waters.

  15. Can Indian Ocean SST variability impact TC activity in the South Pacific? A Spatial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Andrew D.; Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Kiem, Anthony S.

    2015-04-01

    Tropical Cyclones (TCs) represent a significant natural hazard to the 15 island nations and 2.7 million inhabitants of the South Pacific, accounting for 76% of reported disasters in the region since 1950. This vast area, dominated by the coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions of the South Pacific fuels the highly variable nature of TCs (both spatially and temporally), leading to difficulties in planning for and responding to these extreme events. While it is well known that the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) plays a significant role in modulating the background state on which TCs form, there are other large-scale climate drivers operating on annual timescales or longer within the South Pacific (e.g. ENSO Modoki and the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation) and outside the Pacific Basin (e.g. the Indian Ocean Dipole and the Southern Annular Mode) that may also influence TC formation. In response to this issue, the impact of these large-scale climate drivers upon the spatial characteristics of tropical cyclogenesis is assessed for the South Pacific region (5o-35oS, 145oE-130oW) over a 67-year period (1945-2011). It is shown, that in addition to the impact of 'Pacific-centric' climate drivers, eastern Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures significantly impact the spatial characteristics of tropical cyclogenesis in the South Pacific. In particular, warming (cooling) in the eastern Indian Ocean is found to result in an eastward (westward) shift in the average location of tropical cyclogenesis in the South Pacific (up to 712km between extreme phases). One mechanism that may account for this east/west modulation of TC activity in the South Pacific is the propagation of warmer water from the Timor Sea through the Coral Sea to the Pacific, resulting in a strengthening of the Pacific Warm Pool and associated meteorological characteristics connected with tropical cyclogenesis. Understanding how other large-scale climate modes interact with Indian Ocean processes is important

  16. Digital Divide within Society: An Account of Poverty, Community and E-Governance in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Mohammad Habibur; Naz, Rafia

    2006-01-01

    The importance and potential of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to develop economies has been demonstrated through various studies around the globe. For the Pacific, especially Fiji, where development is hampered by dispersed populations, small sizes and vast ocean distances, ICT can help overcome these restrictive circumstances,…

  17. Meteorology of the Southern Global Plume: African and South American Fires Pollute the South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Z.; Chatfield, R. B.

    1999-01-01

    An immense global plume of CO meanders widely around the world in the Southern Hemisphere. It arises over Southern America and Africa and flows eastward. The first emissions are in tropical Brazil, and the plume circulates around the world to South America again. The plume was largely unexpected until there were aircraft studies made in NASA's Pacific Exploratory Mission - Tropics (Part A). This paper describes the meteorology of the Global Plume, as our simulation, with a synoptic model adapted to global transport, reveals it with a tracer-CO simulation. The observations and their simulation require a particular set of conditions of pollutant accumulation, cumulonimbus venting with required strengths at a narrow range of altitude. Additionally, a particular subtropical conduction region, over the Indian Ocean, Australia, and the westeRNmost South Pacific, relatively free of storms, appears to be a key part of the mechanism. These conclusions are the results of a synoptic reconstruction of the PEMT-A period, September- October, 1996.

  18. Impacts of tropical cyclones on Fiji and Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; Prakash, Bipendra; Atalifo, Terry; Waqaicelua, Alipate; Seuseu, Sunny; Ausetalia Titimaea, Mulipola

    2013-04-01

    Weather and climate hazards have significant impacts on Pacific Island Countries. Costs of hazards such as tropical cyclones can be astronomical making enormous negative economic impacts on developing countries. We highlight examples of extreme weather events which have occurred in Fiji and Samoa in the last few decades and have caused major economic and social disruption in the countries. Destructive winds and torrential rain associated with tropical cyclones can bring the most damaging weather conditions to the region causing economic and social hardship, affecting agricultural productivity, infrastructure and economic development which can persist for many years after the initial impact. Analysing historical data, we describe the impacts of tropical cyclones Bebe and Kina on Fiji. Cyclone Bebe (October 1972) affected the whole Fiji especially the Yasawa Islands, Viti Levu and Kadavu where hurricane force winds have been recorded. Nineteen deaths were reported and damage costs caused by cyclone Bebe were estimated as exceeding F20 million (F 1972). Tropical cyclone Kina passed between Fiji's two main islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, and directly over Levuka on the night of 2 January 1993 with hurricane force winds causing extensive damage. Twenty three deaths have been reported making Kina one of the deadliest hurricanes in Fiji's recent history. Severe flooding on Viti Levu, combined with high tide and heavy seas led to destruction of the Sigatoka and Ba bridges, as well as almost complete loss of crops in Sigatoka and Navua deltas. Overall, damage caused by cyclone Kina was estimated as F170 million. In Samoa, we describe devastation to the country caused by tropical cyclones Ofa (February 1990) and Val (December 1991) which were considered to be the worst cyclones to affect the Samoan islands since the 1889 Apia cyclone. In Samoa, seven people were killed due to cyclone Ofa, thousands of people were left homeless and entire villages were destroyed. Damage

  19. Paleoceanography in Pelagic Clay of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S.

    2014-12-01

    A spatially and temporally expansive record of early Cenozoic high-latitude ocean history resides in the pelagic clay of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). At the beginning of the Cenozoic, four sites drilled during IODP Expedition 329 were located between 40-62°S, which may have been the center of an ancient polar gyre. As the Pacific Plate migrated northward, these sites were subjected to major paleoceanographic changes including the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, Australian desertification, and Southern Hemisphere volcanism. The SPG sediment is homogenous brown, zeolitic, metalliferous pelagic clay. Such sediment can be challenging for paleooceanographic research due its ultrafine grain size, slow accumulation rate, post-depositional alteration, and lack of biogenic material. However, our geochemical techniques embrace the authigenic nature of SPG clay to develop a constant-Co age model and track variations in sediment origin and accumulation. By combining sedimentation patterns with backtracked site paths, we produce an unprecedented characterization of the Cenozoic paleoceanographic evolution of the SPG. We analyzed 47 major, trace, REE concentrations in 206 bulk sediment samples from 7 sites across the SPG, deposited as long ago as 100 Ma. For each sample, traditional geochemical partitioning techniques, Q-mode factor analyses, and multiple linear regressions allowed us to quantify contributions of six end-members: post-Archean average Australian shale (PAAS), Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, apatite, biogenic Si, and two distinct types of altered volcanic ash. Mass accumulation of the PAAS end-member increased 12-18% throughout the Cenozoic, with the most rapid increase occurring just after the mid-Miocene when Australia became more arid. The Paleogene/Neogene boundary also marks a change in sedimentation, likely caused by a change in eolian activity and/or a change in authigenic processes due to changing bottom water conditions. Contributions from one kind of

  20. Meiofauna hotspot in the Atacama Trench, eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danovaro, R.; Gambi, C.; Della Croce, N.

    2002-05-01

    Meiofaunal assemblages were investigated (in terms of abundance, biomass, individual size and community structure) at bathyal and hadal depths (from 1050 to 7800 m) in the Atacama Trench in the upwelling sector of the eastern South Pacific Ocean, in relation to the distribution and availability of potential food sources (phytopigments, biochemical compounds and bacterial biomass) in this highly productive region. Meiofaunal density and biomass in the Atacama Trench were one to two orders of magnitude higher than values reported in other "oligotrophic" hadal systems. The Atacama Trench presented very high concentrations of nutritionally rich organic matter at 7800-m depth and displayed characteristics typical of eutrophic systems. Surprisingly, despite a decrease in chlorophyll- a and organic matter concentrations of about 50% from bathyal to hadal depths, meiofaunal abundance in hadal sediments was 10-fold higher than at bathyal depths. As indicated by the higher protein to carbohydrate ratio observed in trench sediments, the extraordinarily high meiofaunal density reported in the Atacama Trench was more dependent upon organic matter quality than on its quantity. The trophic richness of the system was reflected by a shift of the size structure of the benthic organisms. In contrast with typical trends of deep-sea systems, the ratio of bacterial to meiofaunal biomass decreased with increasing depth and, in the Atacama Trench, meiofaunal biomass largely dominated total benthic biomass. Nematodes at 7800-m depth accounted for more than 80% of total density and about 50% of total meiofaunal biomass. In hadal sediments a clear meiofaunal dwarfism was observed: the individual body size of nematodes and other taxa was reduced by 30-40% compared to individuals collected at bathyal depths. The peculiarity of this trophic-rich system allows rejection of previous hypotheses, which explained deep-sea dwarfism by the extremely oligotrophic conditions typical of deep-sea regions.

  1. Wave Upon Wave: Fiji's Experiments in Decentralizing Its Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Jalal; Ashton, Toni; North, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Decentralization in the health sector has been widely implemented since the 1970s as a reform mechanism with mixed results. This study describes Fiji's 2 attempts at decentralizing its health sector and examines the implications they have had for the functions of planning, financing, and delivery of health services. The first wave attempted a major restructure by devolving Fiji's health system. Political instability, along with a lack of acceptance, stalled its implementation resulting in a delegated system. While the functions of planning and financing remained centralized, the function of delivery was delegated to geographic regions. The second wave was a more focused effort that targeted the deconcentration of outpatient services in one division. This attempt also decentralized the delivery function while keeping the other 2 functions centralized. Fiji's incremental approach to decentralization could provide lessons for Asia-Pacific countries that have had failed attempts in large scale decentralization efforts.

  2. Radiocarbon Signature and Cycling of Dissolved Organic Carbon in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druffel, E. R.; Griffin, S.

    2010-12-01

    The average radiocarbon (Delta14C) measurements of bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the deep ocean range from -390 per mil in the deep Sargasso Sea to -550 per mil in the deep Northeast Pacific. The data set used to estimate this range is based on only four sites in the world ocean. We participated in the P-6 Repeat Hydrography cruise in January to February 2010 along 30-32°S in the South Pacific and collected samples from four depth profiles. High-precision Delta14C measurements of bulk DOC are ongoing using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) techniques at the Keck Carbon Cycle AMS Laboratory. We will report completed Delta14C measurements from these South Pacific sites and compare them to those available from two other sites in the North Pacific and one in the Southern Ocean. It is anticipated that Delta14C values of deep South Pacific DOC are intermediate between those in the Southern Ocean (Delta14C = -500‰) and those in the North central Pacific (-525‰). These DOC Delta14C values will be used to assess the residence time and overall cycling of bulk DOC in deep waters of the Pacific.

  3. Ocean transport and variability studies of the South Pacific, Southern, and Indian Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, John A.; Cresswell, G. R.; Nilsson, C. S.; Mcdougall, T. J.; Coleman, R.; Rizos, C.; Penrose, J.; Hunter, J. R.; Lynch, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyze ocean dynamics in the western South Pacific and the adjacent Southern Ocean and the eastern Indian Ocean. Specifically, our objectives for these three regions are, for the South Pacific Ocean: (1) To estimate the volume transport of the east Australian Current (EAC) along the Australian coast and in the Tasman Front, and to estimate the time variability (on seasonal and interannual time scales) of this transport. (2) To contribute to estimating the meridional heat and freshwater fluxes (and their variability) at about 30 deg S. Good estimates of the transport in the western boundary current are essential for accurate estimates of these fluxes. (3) To determine how the EAC transport (and its extension, the Tasman Front and the East Auckland Current) closes the subtropical gyre of the South Pacific and to better determine the structure at the confluence of this current and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. (4) To examine the structure and time variability of the circulation in the western South Pacific and the adjacent Southern Ocean, particularly at the Tasman Front. For the Indian Ocean: (5) To study the seasonal interannual variations in the strength of the Leeuwin Current. (6) To monitor the Pacific-Indian Ocean throughflow and the South Equatorial and the South Java Currents between northwest Australia and Indonesia. (7) To study the processes that form the water of the permanent oceanic thermocline and, in particular, the way in which new thermocline water enters the permanent thermocline in late winter and early spring as the mixed layer restratifies. For the Southern Ocean: (8) To study the mesoscale and meridional structure of the Southern Ocean between 150 deg E and 170 deg E; in particular, to describe the Antarctic frontal system south of Tasmania and determine its interannual variability; to estimate the exchanges of heat, salt, and other properties between the Indian and Pacific Oceans; and to investigate the

  4. Horizontal and vertical deformation field in New Caledonia, South West Pacific, derived from more than 20 years of GNSS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, V.; Calmant, S.; Valty, P.; Gravelle, M.; Sakic, P.; Aucan, J.; Pelletier, B.

    2015-12-01

    New Caledonia is located in the South West Pacific Ocean, on the Australian Plate just before its subduction under the North Fiji Basin. Because it is on the subducting side of the plate interface, New Caledonia is considered to be stable to first order and not to undergo rapid deformation. However, moderate seismicity is recorded close to the plate interface, in the southern part of the main land and along the Loyalty ridge. In addition, the main island and Loyalty ridge are subjected to long-term vertical deformation due to the flexure of the plate entering subduction. A geodetic network was installed since the early days of GPS (~1990) and has been further developed and occasionally measured since. Due to the low number of global GNSS recording stations in the early 1990s, the positioning accuracy that can be achieved with these data is poor compared to present-day standards, and expected movements are slow (possibly less than 1 mm/yr). However, the >20 year length of the time series may allow us to determine the current deformation field in New Caledonia and Loyalty Ridge. We pay special care in using older GNSS data for characterizing ground motions, reprocessing all available data using a range of different processing strategies and products. We calculated daily positions from double-differenced ionosphere-free carrier phase data in a global network using the GAMIT software and combined and aligned the results on the ITRF2008 using the CATREF software, according to the processing strategy developed as part of the current ULR6 (www.sonel.org) reprocessing campaign for IGS. We compare the double difference results with those obtained in PPP mode using JPL GIPSY software as well as CNES GINS software and different products (MIT, JPL and GRG orbits and clocks provided in the framework of the IGS2 reprocessing campaign). We present both the results for New Caledonia and an analysis of the applicability of these different processing strategies to older GNSS

  5. Nitrate in the atmospheric boundary layer of the tropical South Pacific - Implications regarding sources and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoie, Dennis L.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Merrill, John T.; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    Weekly bulk aerosol samples collected at three sites in the tropical South Pacific from 1983 to 1987 are analyzed. The mean nitrate concentrations obtained for the sites range from 0.107 to 0.117 microg/cu m. The results suggest that the region is minimally affected by the transport of soil material and pollutants from the continents. Measurements from sites in the tropical North Pacific show mean nitrate concentrations that are about three times higher than those in the South Pacific, showing that the North Pacific is significantly impacted by the transport of material from Asia and North America. The relationships between the nitrate concentrations to other constituents at American Samoa are discussed, including nonseasalt sulfate, Pb-210, and Be-7.

  6. Palaeotectonic implications of increased late Eocene-early Oligocene volcanism from South Pacific DSDP sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennett, J.P.; Von Der Borch, C.; Baker, P.A.; Barton, C.E.; Boersma, A.; Cauler, J.P.; Dudley, W.C.; Gardner, J.V.; Jenkins, D.G.; Lohman, W.H.; Martini, E.; Merrill, R.B.; Morin, R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Robert, C.; Srinivasan, M.S.; Stein, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Late Eocene-early Oligocene (42-35 Myr) sediments cored at two DSDP sites in the south-west Pacific contain evidence of a pronounced increase in local volcanic activity, particularly in close association with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This pulse of volcanism is coeval with that in New Zealand and resulted from the development of an Indo- Australian / Pacific Plate boundary through the region during the late Eocene. The late Eocene / earliest Oligocene was marked by widespread volcanism and tectonism throughout the Pacific and elsewhere, and by one of the most important episodes of Cenozoic climatic cooling. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. A dissolved cobalt plume in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawco, Nicholas J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Resing, Joseph A.; Twining, Benjamin S.; Saito, Mak A.

    2016-10-01

    Cobalt is a nutrient to phytoplankton, but knowledge about its biogeochemical cycling is limited, especially in the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report sections of dissolved cobalt and labile dissolved cobalt from the US GEOTRACES GP16 transect in the South Pacific. The cobalt distribution is closely tied to the extent and intensity of the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific with highest concentrations measured at the oxycline near the Peru margin. Below 200 m, remineralization and circulation produce an inverse relationship between cobalt and dissolved oxygen that extends throughout the basin. Within the oxygen minimum zone, elevated concentrations of labile cobalt are generated by input from coastal sources and reduced scavenging at low O2. As these high cobalt waters are upwelled and advected offshore, phytoplankton export returns cobalt to low-oxygen water masses underneath. West of the Peru upwelling region, dissolved cobalt is less than 10 pM in the euphotic zone and strongly bound by organic ligands. Because the cobalt nutricline within the South Pacific gyre is deeper than in oligotrophic regions in the North and South Atlantic, cobalt involved in sustaining phytoplankton productivity in the gyre is heavily recycled and ultimately arrives from lateral transport of upwelled waters from the eastern margin. In contrast to large coastal inputs, atmospheric deposition and hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise appear to be minor sources of cobalt. Overall, these results demonstrate that oxygen biogeochemistry exerts a strong influence on cobalt cycling.

  8. Connection of sea level height between Western Pacific and South Indian Ocean in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DU, Y.; Wang, T.; Zhuang, W.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Based on merged altimetry data and in site observations from tide gauges, we analyzed the fast increasing trend of sea surface height (SSH) in the recent two decades in the tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean. The results of analysis indicated a dynamic connection of SSH between the tropical western Pacific and the southeastern Indian Ocean. The low-frequency variations of SSH propagate westward in the tropical Pacific, enter the Indonesian Seas through the waveguide, and influence the southeastern India Ocean with the Kelvin-Rossby wave transformation. The thermal structure of upper ocean reveals the above adjustment mainly occur in the thermocline. However, the impacts from the Pacific are limited in the southeast Indian Ocean. In the central and west of the south Indian Ocean, local wind dominates the SSH changes in the last two decades. By lead-lag statistic analyses, we identified the cause of interdecadal from the interannual SSH variations. The interannual SSH variations is dominated by ENSO, forced by the anomalous wind along the equatorial Pacific. Whereas, the interdecadal SSH variations results from the off-equatorial wind stress curl, which is closely related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The dynamic connections between the western Pacific and the south Indian Ocean were tested in the baroclinic Rossby wave solution and the numerical experiments based on the nonlinear reduced-gravity dynamics model.

  9. The Lonchaeidae of fiji (Diptera: schizophora) .

    PubMed

    Macgowan, Iain

    2014-01-01

    The status of the family Lonchaeidae on the islands of the Fiji group is reviewed. Data are provided from trapping undertaken as part of the NSF-Fiji Terrestrial Arthropod Survey and from Fijian Lonchaeidae in the collections of the Bishop Museum, Hawaii and the Natural History Museum, London. Five new species, Lonchaea fiji sp. nov., Lonchaea melanesia sp. nov., Lonchaea vanua sp. nov., Silba kadavu sp. nov. and Silba setiphallus sp. nov. are described. Two species new to Fiji, Dasiops ruidifrons McAlpine, 1964 amd Lamprolonchaea lustrata McAlpine, 1964, are recorded. Five species previously recorded, Lamprolonchaea brouniana (Bezzi, 1919), Lamprolonchaea smaragdi (Walker, 1849), Lonchaea cyaneoneitens Kertész, 1901, Silba calva (Bezzi, 1913) and Silba setifera (de Meijere, 1910) are re-evaluated and are removed from the checklist. The fauna is now considered to comprise of 11 species in 4 genera. A key is provided to the Lonchaeidae present on the islands.

  10. South China Sea hydrological changes and Pacific Walker Circulation variations over the last millennium.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Sun, Liguang; Oppo, Delia W; Wang, Yuhong; Liu, Zhonghui; Xie, Zhouqing; Liu, Xiaodong; Cheng, Wenhan

    2011-01-01

    The relative importance of north-south migrations of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) versus El Niño-Southern Oscillation and its associated Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) variability for past hydrological change in the western tropical Pacific is unclear. Here we show that north-south ITCZ migration was not the only mechanism of tropical Pacific hydrologic variability during the last millennium, and that PWC variability profoundly influenced tropical Pacific hydrology. We present hydrological reconstructions from Cattle Pond, Dongdao Island of the South China Sea, where multi-decadal rainfall and downcore grain size variations are correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index during the instrumental era. Our downcore grain size reconstructions indicate that this site received less precipitation during relatively warm periods, AD 1000-1400 and AD 1850-2000, compared with the cool period (AD 1400-1850). Including our new reconstructions in a synthesis of tropical Pacific records results in a spatial pattern of hydrologic variability that implicates the PWC.

  11. South Pacific hydrologic and cyclone variability during the last 3000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, Michael R.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Tierney, Jessica E.

    2016-04-01

    Major excursions in the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and/or changes in its intensity are thought to drive tropical cyclone (TC) and precipitation variability across much of the central South Pacific. A lack of conventional sites typically used for multimillennial proxy reconstructions has limited efforts to extend observational rainfall/TC data sets and our ability to fully assess the risks posed to central Pacific islands by future changes in fresh water availability or the frequency of storm landfalls. Here we use the sedimentary record of Apu Bay, offshore the island of Tahaa, French Polynesia, to explore the relationship between SPCZ position/intensity and tropical cyclone overwash, resolved at decadal time scales, since 3200 years B.P. Changes in orbital precession and Pacific sea surface temperatures best explain evidence for a coordinated pattern of rainfall variability at Tahaa and across the Pacific over the late Holocene. Our companion record of tropical cyclone activity from Tahaa suggests major storm activity was higher between 2600-1500 years B.P., when decadal scale SPCZ variability may also have been stronger. A transition to lower storm frequency and a shift or expansion of the SPCZ toward French Polynesia around 1000 years B.P. may have prompted Polynesian migration into the central Pacific.

  12. An Assessment of Vocational and Technical Education in the South Pacific Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, David

    Technical and vocational education in the developing countries of the South Pacific region vary from the well-established to just commencing. Within the region as a whole, facilities exist to meet all the needs for semiskilled and skilled workers as well as for most middle and higher level needs; additional needs not catered to within the region…

  13. Distance Education Regulatory Frameworks: Readiness for Openness in Southwest Pacific/South East Asia Region Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Belinda; James, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports in brief the pilot study, Distance Education Regulatory Frameworks, undertaken by the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) in 2010-2012 and the implications for openness for higher education in Southwest Pacific/South East Asia region nations. The project developed a methodological approach to…

  14. Population forecasts for South Pacific nations using autoregressive models, 1985-2000.

    PubMed

    Ahlburg, D A

    1987-11-01

    "This paper uses an autoregressive statistical model to forecast population for Fiji, Western Samoa, Tonga, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu and compares these forecasts with those obtained from other methods. The growth rate of population is predicted to continue to fall in Fiji and Tonga, rise a little for Western Samoa, and rise considerably in Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. The implications of the forecasts for recent government development plans are also discussed." PMID:12314995

  15. Hazardous Metal Pollution in the Republic of Fiji and the Need to Elicit Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Kee; Choi, Hyun-Ju; Wilson, Colleen Turaga; Ueno, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    The fact that hazardous metals do not bio-degrade or bio-deteriorate translates to long-lasting environmental effects. In the context of evidently rapid global industrialization, this ought to warrant serious caution, particularly in developing countries. In the Republic of Fiji, a developing country in the South Pacific, several different environmental studies over the past 20 years have shown levels of lead, copper, zinc and iron in sediments of the Suva Harbor to be 6.2, 3.9, 3.3 and 2.1 times more than the accepted background reference levels, respectively. High levels of mercury have also been reported in lagoon shellfish. These data inevitably warrant thorough assessment of the waste practices of industries located upstream from the estuaries, but in addition, an exposure and health impact assessment has never been conducted. Relevant government departments are duty-bound, at least to the general public that reside in and consume seafood from the vicinities of the Suva Harbor, to investigate possible human effects of the elevated hazardous metal concentrations found consistently in 20 years of surface sediment analysis. Furthermore, pollution of the intermediate food web with hazardous metals should be investigated, regardless of whether human effects are eventually confirmed present or not. PMID:24498594

  16. Fiji

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ... June 12, 2001 - The green archipelago with many plant species. project:  MISR category:  ...

  17. Location of South Georgia and potential impact on early Pacific-Atlantic through flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, A.; Curtis, M.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most significant Cenozoic reconfigurations of global ocean circulation involved the initiation of Pacific to Atlantic exchange that led to the isolation of Antarctica by the Antarctica Circumpolar Current though the separation of South America and Antarctica and the opening of the Scotia Sea and Drake Passage. Whether significant Pacific to Atlantic through-flow was possible in the early Cenozoic has remained unclear because it is not certain where continental fragments such as South Georgia, a potential barrier, were located before seafloor spreading created the Scotia Sea. Establishing where South Georgia was located is also critical to reconstructing the Scotia arc and understanding its evolution. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and apatite thermochronometry are used to constrain the pre-drift location of South Georgia. Data from Cretaceous turbidites exposed on South Georgia are consistent with a former connection to the Rocas Verdes back-arc basin giving support to models that have argued for a pre- tectonic translation location southeast of Tierra del Fuego. Following an early phase of rock uplift, thermal history models of the apatite chronometry data indicate that the South Georgia continental fragment underwent burial related heating and was therefore not a significant topographic feature until it emerged c. 10-7 Ma coeval with the cessation of spreading at the West Scotia Ridge and collision between the South Georgia continental block and the Northeast Georgia Rise.

  18. Are South Texas Streamflow Variations Influenced by Sea Surface Temperature Changes in Pacific and Atlantic Oceans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, V.; Hay, R.; Ard, R.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on several major river basins in the continental U. S. has recently become well documented. Clear relationships have been identified between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and continental U. S. streamflow. Because these relationships can be potentially used to predict streamflow variability, it would also be of great importance to evaluate whether these climate phenomena affect river basins at the sub-regional and/or local scale, objectives that are not usually addressed in previous studies. Therefore, this study is focused on the basin river system of South Texas, an area that encompasses approximately 30,000 km2 and is climatologically defined as subtropical subhumid. Streamflow data (1940-2011) from sixteen unimpaired U.S. Geological Survey gage stations were normalized into a South Texas streamflow data set and evaluated with respect to ENSO, PDO and AMO index time series. The comparison of South Texas annual streamflow with Pacific Decadal Oscillation and El Niño Southern Oscillation Indices shows that the warm phases of ENSO and PDO are generally associated with increased streamflow, whereas cold phases of ENSO and PDO result in lower streamflow volumes. In addition, cross-correlation analyses show a 7-8 month delayed streamflow response to sea surface temperature signals. Furthermore, annual streamflow variability in the South Texas river basins can be also due to sea surface temperature anomalies in the Atlantic Ocean. Higher streamflow values are shown during the cold phase of AMO, while relatively low streamflow values are illustrated during the warm phase of AMO. Thus, preliminary results show that SST anomalies in both Pacific and Atlantic Oceans influence the streamflow variability in the South Texas area. Current research is also focused on evaluating if these climate phenomena

  19. Dental caries in South Pacific populations: a review.

    PubMed

    Cutress, T W

    2003-03-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) was uncommon in Pacific Island communities before European trading and migration expanded into the Region. The etiology of this oral microbial disease is a consequence of changed diets, food preparation and lifestyle. In particular, the easy availability of a high level of frequent dietary supplementation with refined sucrose (sugar) and carbohydrates is the key factor in the etiology of tooth decay. While tooth decay initially developed as a health problem in the more accessible Pacific islands over a century ago, it has spread increasingly as trading, travel and cash economies have developed to include even the more geographically remote communities. In this review selected epidemiological data are presented to show the magnitude, variation and secular changes in the prevalence of tooth decay in different communities. Tooth decay in conjunction with the historically endemic adult gum diseases poses a major public health problem in terms of pain, premature loss of teeth and the need for oral rehabilitation. Implementation and monitoring of caries control programs is a priority need in most communities. It is impractical to consider a return to indigenous diets and lifestyles as a strategy for caries prevention. Instead promotion of proven modern community preventive programmes, notably appropriate use of fluorides, 'fissure sealants' together with control of excessive consumption of diets rich in refined sugar is required if a significant increase in the levels of tooth decay is to be avoided.

  20. Dental caries in South Pacific populations: a review.

    PubMed

    Cutress, T W

    2003-03-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) was uncommon in Pacific Island communities before European trading and migration expanded into the Region. The etiology of this oral microbial disease is a consequence of changed diets, food preparation and lifestyle. In particular, the easy availability of a high level of frequent dietary supplementation with refined sucrose (sugar) and carbohydrates is the key factor in the etiology of tooth decay. While tooth decay initially developed as a health problem in the more accessible Pacific islands over a century ago, it has spread increasingly as trading, travel and cash economies have developed to include even the more geographically remote communities. In this review selected epidemiological data are presented to show the magnitude, variation and secular changes in the prevalence of tooth decay in different communities. Tooth decay in conjunction with the historically endemic adult gum diseases poses a major public health problem in terms of pain, premature loss of teeth and the need for oral rehabilitation. Implementation and monitoring of caries control programs is a priority need in most communities. It is impractical to consider a return to indigenous diets and lifestyles as a strategy for caries prevention. Instead promotion of proven modern community preventive programmes, notably appropriate use of fluorides, 'fissure sealants' together with control of excessive consumption of diets rich in refined sugar is required if a significant increase in the levels of tooth decay is to be avoided. PMID:16276946

  1. Marine biodiversity in the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America: knowledge and gaps.

    PubMed

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Klein, Eduardo; Díaz, Juan M; Hernández, Cristián E; Bigatti, Gregorio; Campos, Lucia; Artigas, Felipe; Castillo, Julio; Penchaszadeh, Pablo E; Neill, Paula E; Carranza, Alvar; Retana, María V; Díaz de Astarloa, Juan M; Lewis, Mirtha; Yorio, Pablo; Piriz, María L; Rodríguez, Diego; Yoneshigue-Valentin, Yocie; Gamboa, Luiz; Martín, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The marine areas of South America (SA) include almost 30,000 km of coastline and encompass three different oceanic domains--the Caribbean, the Pacific, and the Atlantic--ranging in latitude from 12∘N to 55∘S. The 10 countries that border these coasts have different research capabilities and taxonomic traditions that affect taxonomic knowledge. This paper analyzes the status of knowledge of marine biodiversity in five subregions along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America (SA): the Tropical East Pacific, the Humboldt Current,the Patagonian Shelf, the Brazilian Shelves, and the Tropical West Atlantic, and it provides a review of ecosystem threats and regional marine conservation strategies. South American marine biodiversity is least well known in the tropical subregions (with the exception of Costa Rica and Panama). Differences in total biodiversity were observed between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans at the same latitude. In the north of the continent, the Tropical East Pacific is richer in species than the Tropical West Atlantic, however, when standardized by coastal length, there is very little difference among them. In the south, the Humboldt Current system is much richer than the Patagonian Shelf. An analysis of endemism shows that 75% of the species are reported within only one of the SA regions, while about 22% of the species of SA are not reported elsewhere in the world. National and regional initiatives focusing on new exploration, especially to unknown areas and ecosystems, as well as collaboration among countries are fundamental to achieving the goal of completing inventories of species diversity and distribution.These inventories will allow accurate interpretation of the biogeography of its two oceanic coasts and latitudinal trends,and will also provide relevant information for science based policies. PMID:21304960

  2. Hydroacoustic monitoring of drifting icebergs in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, J.; Hyvernaud, O.; Reymond, D.

    2009-12-01

    The french Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique has settled in French Polynesia a 'T-Wave' seismic network since 1960. These 10 high sensitivity broad band stations transmitted in real time enable to monitor natural submarine processes such as volcanic eruptions, colliding icebergs and seismic activity in the Pacific. During the 2008-2009 summer season in Antarctic, we have tracked the giant drifting iceberg B15a in the roaring fifties. During 4 months, we have recorded and located the hydroacoustic cracks which accompany the progressive breaking-up of B15a into small bergs and growlers. The use of arrival times and azimuth of IMS hydrophones triplet and enhanced hydroacoustic velocity model reduced significantly the error ellipse of locations. The locations have been compared with well-dated visible and infrared satellite images of iceberg B15a, providing some insights into the fracturation process.

  3. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-10-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations. PMID:25066005

  4. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations. PMID:25066005

  5. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-10-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations.

  6. First record of the genus Wilkinsonellus (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) from Fiji with description of three new species

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Penna, Diana Carolina; Zhang, Yali; Whitfield, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Wilkinsonellus Mason is a relatively small Pantropical genus of braconid parasitoid wasps within the subfamily Microgastrinae. Most of the currently described species are from the Palaeotropics; however, previous records were absent from Fiji. Here, the first three Wilkinsonellus species from Fiji are described: Wilkinsonellus corpustriacolor sp. n., Wilkinsonellus fijienis sp. n. and Wilkinsonellus nescalpura sp. n. The material was collected by Malaise traps set up in a quite variety of ecosystems (wet zone, dry zone and coastal forests) throughout the archipelago. With these records, Fiji represents the easternmost known distribution of the genus in the Indo-Pacific Region. A key to all of the currently known Wilkinsonellus species is included to facilitate species identification. PMID:24715796

  7. First record of the genus Wilkinsonellus (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) from Fiji with description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Arias-Penna, Diana Carolina; Zhang, Yali; Whitfield, James B

    2014-01-01

    Wilkinsonellus Mason is a relatively small Pantropical genus of braconid parasitoid wasps within the subfamily Microgastrinae. Most of the currently described species are from the Palaeotropics; however, previous records were absent from Fiji. Here, the first three Wilkinsonellus species from Fiji are described: Wilkinsonellus corpustriacolor sp. n., Wilkinsonellus fijienis sp. n. and Wilkinsonellus nescalpura sp. n. The material was collected by Malaise traps set up in a quite variety of ecosystems (wet zone, dry zone and coastal forests) throughout the archipelago. With these records, Fiji represents the easternmost known distribution of the genus in the Indo-Pacific Region. A key to all of the currently known Wilkinsonellus species is included to facilitate species identification.

  8. Comparison of elemental accumulation rates between ferromanganese deposits and sediments in the South Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.; Schornick, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of accumulation of Fe and Mn, as well as Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn, Hg, U and Th have been determined for five ferromanganese deposits from four localities in the South Pacific Ocean. Manganese is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate roughly equivalent to that found to be accumulating in sediments in the same area. Iron shows a deficiency in accumulation in nodules and crusts with respect to sediments, especially near the continents, but also in the central and south-central Pacific. Copper is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate one order of magnitude less than the surrounding sediments. This is interpreted as meaning that most of the Mn is supplied as an authigenic phase to both sediments and nodules while Fe is supplied mostly by ferromanganese micro-nodules and by detrital and adsorbed components of sediments; and Cu is enriched in sediments relative to nodules and crusts most probably through biological activity. ?? 1974.

  9. The human bioclimates of Western and South Pacific islands and climate change.

    PubMed

    McGregor, G R

    1995-08-01

    The current bioclimates of equatorial Western and tropical South Pacific have been assessed, using the concepts of effective temperature and relative strain as a basis for evaluating likely changes in human comfort regimes as a consequence of global warming. Current bioclimates may be considered marginally stressful for indigenous populations. Global warming will result in changes in the frequency, duration and intensity of physioclimatically stressful conditions.

  10. Temporal Variability of Tropical Cyclogenesis: A Climatology of the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Andrew D.; Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Kiem, Anthony S.

    2015-04-01

    The total number of tropical cyclones (TCs) occurring across the South Pacific each year traditionally exhibits significant temporal variability. For example, in 1998, 24 TCs were recorded, whilst in 1988, only eight TCs were recorded. Socially, this temporal variability results in increased vulnerability for the 15 island nations of the South Pacific. Therefore understanding what causes this year to year variability is particularly important in combatting this issue. In this study, the South Pacific Basin is analysed in its entirety and across a series of zones over a 67-year period (1945-2011) using the Joint Typhoon Warning Centre (JTWC) Best-Track Dataset. Based on the Overall Mean Centre of Cyclogenesis (OMCC) (15oS, 167.5oE), the Basin was zoned by drawing axis based on the four cardinal directions from the OMCC, creating four quadrants; north-east, south-east, south-west and north-west. Trend analysis was then completed to establish if the number of TCs have changed over time over the entire Basin and within these quadrants. It is shown that, Basin-wide, the number of TCs has decreased over time, a result consistent with many studies. However, when the same analysis was completed for each of the four quadrants, two were actually shown to have increasing TC activity over the same time period, (the north-east and south-east quadrants). Interannual variability was also particularly evident across all four quadrants. The attribution of climate driver induced variability on the frequency of TCs is also explored. The various phases of Pacific and Indian Ocean climate drivers (positive, negative, neutral) are used in this study, including; El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), ENSO Modoki (EMI), Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and Indonesian SST variability (II). In comparison with the overall mean of 11.2 TCs per year, TCs that occurred during a positive IOD and negative IPO saw the two most

  11. Pacific Exploratory Mission in the Tropical Pacific: PEM-Tropics B, March-April 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raper, James L.; Kleb, Mary M.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Davis, Douglas D.; Newell, Reginald E.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Bendura, Richard J.; Hoell, James M.; McNeal, Robert J.

    2001-12-01

    The Pacific Exploratory Mission - Tropics B (PEM-Tropics B) was conducted by the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) over the tropical Pacific Ocean in March-April 1999. It used the NASA DC-8 and P-3B aircraft equipped with extensive instrumentation for measuring numerous chemical compounds and gases. Its central objective was to improve knowledge of the factors controlling ozone, OH, aerosols, and related species over the tropical Pacific. Geographical coverage ranged from 38°N to 36°S and 148°W to 76°E. Major deployment sites included Hilo, Hawaii, Christmas Island, Tahiti, Fiji, and Easter Island. PEM-Tropics B was a sequel to PEM-Tropics A, which was conducted in September-October 1996 and encountered considerable biomass burning. PEM-Tropics B, conducted in the wet season of the southern tropics, observed an exceedingly clean atmosphere over the South Pacific but a variety of pollution influences over the tropical North Pacific. Photochemical ozone loss over both the North and the South Pacific exceeded local photochemical production by about a factor of 2, implying a major deficit in the tropospheric ozone budget. Dedicated flights investigated the sharp air mass transitions at the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Extensive OH observations permitted the first large-scale comparisons with photochemical model predictions. High concentrations of oxygenated organics were observed ubiquitously in the tropical Pacific atmosphere and may have important implications for global HOx and NOx budgets. Extensive equatorial measurements of dimethyl sulfide and OH suggest that important aspects of marine sulfur chemistry are still poorly understood.

  12. Short-lived and discontinuous intraplate volcanism in the South Pacific: Hot spots or extensional volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Staudigel, Hubert; Pringle, Malcolm S.; Wijbrans, Jan R.

    2003-10-01

    South Pacific intraplate volcanoes have been active since the Early Cretaceous. Their HIMU-EMI-EMII mantle sources can be traced back into the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP) using plate tectonic reconstructions, implying that these distinctive components are enduring features within the Earth's mantle for, at least, the last 120 Myr. These correlations are eminent on the scale of the WPSP and the South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly (SOPITA), but the evolution of single hot spots emerges notably more complicated. Hot spots in the WPSP and SOPITA mantle regions typically display intermittent volcanic activity, longevities shorter than 40 Myr, superposition of hot spot volcanism, and motion relative to other hot spots. In this review, we use 40Ar/39Ar seamount ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures to map out Cretaceous volcanism in the WPSP and to characterize its evolution with respect to the currently active hot spots in the SOPITA region. Our plate tectonic reconstructions indicate cessation of volcanism during the Cretaceous for the Typhoon and Japanese hot spots; whereas the currently active Samoan, Society, Pitcairn and Marquesas hot spots lack long-lived counterparts in the WPSP. These hot spots may have become active during the last 20 Myr only. The other WPSP seamount trails can be only "indirectly" reconciled with hot spots in the SOPITA region. Complex age distributions in the Magellan, Anewetak, Ralik and Ratak seamount trails would necessitate the superposition of multiple volcanic trails generated by the Macdonald, Rurutu and Rarotonga hot spots during the Cretaceous; whereas HIMU-type seamounts in the Southern Wake seamount trail would require 350-500 km of hot spot motion over the last 100 Myr following its origination along the Mangaia-Rurutu "hotline" in the Cook-Austral Islands. These observations, however, violate all assumptions of the classical Wilson-Morgan hot spot hypothesis, indicating that long-lived, deep and fixed mantle

  13. Historic accounts of Mansonella parasitaemias in the South Pacific and their relevance to lymphatic filariasis elimination efforts today.

    PubMed

    Crainey, J Lee; Ribeiro da Silva, Túllio Romão; Luz, Sérgio Luiz Bessa

    2016-03-01

    There are two species of filarial parasites with sheathless microfilariae known to commonly cause parasitaemias in humans: Mansonella perstans and Mansonella ozzardi. In most contemporary accounts of the distribution of these parasites, neither is usually considered to occur anywhere in the Eastern Hemisphere. However, Sir Patrick Manson, who first described both parasite species, recorded the existence of sheathless sharp-tailed Mansonella ozzardi-like parasites occurring in the blood of natives from New Guinea in each and every version of his manual for tropical disease that he wrote before his death in 1922. Manson's reports were based on his own identifications and were made from at least two independent blood sample collections that were taken from the island. Pacific region Mansonella perstans parasitaemias were also later (in 1923) reported to occur in New Guinea and once before this (in 1905) in Fiji. Although Mansonella-parasitaemias are generally regarded as benign, they are thought to be of public health importance because they can affect the epidemiological monitoring of other filarial diseases. In this article, we reviewed the historic literature concerning Pacific-origin Mansonella-parasitaemias in an attempt to explain how, despite repeated reports of Pacific-region Mansonella-parasitaemias, by as early as the 1970s, the WHO had arrived at the present-day view that Wuchereria bancrofti is the only cause of filarial parasitaemias in Papua New Guinea. We have also evaluated the evidence supporting the contemporary existence of Pacific-area parasitaemia-causing Mansonella parasites and assessed the relevance such parasites could have for present-day lymphatic filariasis elimination efforts in the region.

  14. Historic accounts of Mansonella parasitaemias in the South Pacific and their relevance to lymphatic filariasis elimination efforts today.

    PubMed

    Crainey, J Lee; Ribeiro da Silva, Túllio Romão; Luz, Sérgio Luiz Bessa

    2016-03-01

    There are two species of filarial parasites with sheathless microfilariae known to commonly cause parasitaemias in humans: Mansonella perstans and Mansonella ozzardi. In most contemporary accounts of the distribution of these parasites, neither is usually considered to occur anywhere in the Eastern Hemisphere. However, Sir Patrick Manson, who first described both parasite species, recorded the existence of sheathless sharp-tailed Mansonella ozzardi-like parasites occurring in the blood of natives from New Guinea in each and every version of his manual for tropical disease that he wrote before his death in 1922. Manson's reports were based on his own identifications and were made from at least two independent blood sample collections that were taken from the island. Pacific region Mansonella perstans parasitaemias were also later (in 1923) reported to occur in New Guinea and once before this (in 1905) in Fiji. Although Mansonella-parasitaemias are generally regarded as benign, they are thought to be of public health importance because they can affect the epidemiological monitoring of other filarial diseases. In this article, we reviewed the historic literature concerning Pacific-origin Mansonella-parasitaemias in an attempt to explain how, despite repeated reports of Pacific-region Mansonella-parasitaemias, by as early as the 1970s, the WHO had arrived at the present-day view that Wuchereria bancrofti is the only cause of filarial parasitaemias in Papua New Guinea. We have also evaluated the evidence supporting the contemporary existence of Pacific-area parasitaemia-causing Mansonella parasites and assessed the relevance such parasites could have for present-day lymphatic filariasis elimination efforts in the region. PMID:26972389

  15. Computers in Education. Inventory of Training Institutions, Publications, Societies in Asia and the Pacific: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Fiji, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    This directory provides a listing of computer training institutions, computer associations, and computer publications in 14 nations of Asia and the Pacific Region. The listing of 70 training institutions provides contact information and details on programs, research, and major innovations for each institution. The listing of 15 computer…

  16. Relationship Between Intraseasonal Oscillation and Subtropical Wind Maxima Over the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Dayton G.; Hurrell, James W.; Speth, P.; Sperling, T.; Funk, A.; Zube, S.

    1991-01-01

    The significance of tropical heat sources on higher latitude jet streams has been examined by numerous investigators. Hurrell and Vincent (1990) provide a summary of many of these investigations in their observational case study of the relationship between tropical heating and subtropical wind maxima in the Southern Hemisphere during SOP-1, FGGE. They showed that the divergent outflow from tropical heating associated with the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), acted on by the coriolis force, was an important factor in maintaining the subtropical jet on the poleward side of the SPCZ during the period, 6-20 January 1979. They found a similar, but weaker relationship, over the southern Indian Ocean from 3-17 February 1979, a period when the SPCZ heating was greatly reduced and the jet was essentially non-existent. Since their findings were based on a case study and involved the use of the highly-specialized FGGE data set, the natural questions which arose were: (1) Is this relationship a regular feature of the circulation over the South Pacific? and, (2) If so, can it be detected with a routine data set? Another question posed by Hurrell and Vincent in their papers was:(3) How important was the intraseasonal oscillation in causing the enhanced heating and divergent outflow in the Pacific Ocean in January and southern Indian Ocean in February? The purpose of the present paper is to address the answer to these three questions. To accomplish this, some circulation features for an entire warm season in the Southern Hemisphere were examined. The year selected was 1984-85, and the warm season consisted of the 6-month period, 1 November 1984 - 30 April 1985. This period was chosen because there were numerous cases of the westerly wind maxima over the South Pacific and the intraseasonal oscillation was well documented.

  17. The evolution of primary heath care in Fiji: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Negin, Joel; Roberts, Graham; Lingam, Dharam

    2010-09-01

    Health policy initiatives are under-analysed in the Pacific region. Understanding how health policies develop and evolve is a first step towards improving their quality and contextual appropriateness. Through a document review and key informant interviews, this paper examines the evolution of primary health care in Fiji from 1975 to 2009 focusing on priority-setting, funding, implementation, political economy, the cultural context and interactions among communities, government and donors. Lessons learned from more than 30 years of experience with community health in Fiji are highlighted and reveal high levels of contestation over health policy processes. The paper identifies factors for consideration in renewed primary health interventions and calls for greater government ownership of priority-setting processes, more clarity on the links between policy and funding, more focus on evidence-based policy, greater awareness by development partners of the risks of policy imposition, and a deeper analysis of political economy and culture in relation to health sector policies.

  18. Situation Report [--Fiji, Indonesia, Israel, and Philippines].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This is a series of four situation reports prepared by the International Planned Parenthood Federation for informational and consultative purposes. The countries reported on are Fiji, Indonesia, Israel, and the Philippines. Some of the latest statistical figures for each country are listed. They are area, population and growth rate, birth, death,…

  19. Rethinking Ethnic Conflict: Somalia and Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerson, Hazel M.

    1996-01-01

    Compares and contrasts the recent years of ethnic conflict in Somali and Fiji. The widely divergent reactions of both populations dispels the belief that ethnic pluralism is both a necessary and sufficient condition for violent conflict in a society. Provides succinct portraits of both societies and their cultures. (MJP)

  20. Dynamics and mechanisms of decadal variability of the Pacific-South America mode over the 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Ma, Hao; Wu, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, decadal variability of the Pacific-South America (PSA) mode is examined from year 1871 to 2008 based on the newly developed ocean and atmosphere reanalysis products. The PSA mode, mirroring the Pacific-North America mode in the Northern Hemisphere, emerges as the second EOF mode of 500 mb geopotential height anomalies. The mode displays substantial interannual-decadal variability with distinct timescales between 3-8 and 10-18 years, respectively. The decadal variability of the PSA mode is found to be associated with the coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction over the subtropical South and tropical Pacific. The subduction of the subtropical temperature anomalies in the South Pacific in conjunction with the tropical-subtropical atmospheric teleconnection plays important role in the decadal variability of the PSA mode.

  1. The Impact of Bilateral Aid on Educational Development: The Case of Australia and the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maglen, Leo R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes Australian financial aid for education to Fiji, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Western Samoa, Tonga, Kiribati, Tuvalu, and Nauru, and its impact on access to education, higher education options, "nationalization" of education, and educational quality. Concludes that Australian aid serves Australian interests and does not address crucial…

  2. Post-Primary School Non-Academic Alternatives: A South Pacific Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindson, Colin

    1985-01-01

    Compares attempts and outcomes in Fiji junior secondary schools and in Kiribati community high schools to provide alternative schooling of either vocational or local/practical orientation. Focuses on nature of educational decision-making process and influence of public pressures on planners and politicians. Identifies new and influential factors…

  3. ENSO related SST anomalies and relation with surface heat fluxes over south Pacific and Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Nuncio, M.; Satheesan, K.

    2016-09-01

    The role of surface heat fluxes in Southern Pacific and Atlantic Ocean SST anomalies associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is studied using observation and ocean reanalysis products. A prominent dipole structure in SST anomaly is found with a positive (negative) anomaly center over south Pacific (65S-45S, 120W-70W) and negative (positive) one over south Atlantic (50S-30S, 30W-0E) during austral summer (DJF) of El Nino (LaNina). During late austral spring-early summer (OND) of El Nino (LaNina), anomalous northerly (southerly) meridional moisture transport and a positive (negative) sea level pressure anomaly induces a suppressed (enhanced) latent heat flux from the ocean surface over south Pacific. This in turn results in a shallower than normal mixed layer depth which further helps in development of the SST anomaly. Mixed layer thins further due to anomalous shortwave radiation during summer and a well developed SST anomaly evolves. The south Atlantic pole exhibits exactly opposite characteristics at the same time. The contribution from the surface heat fluxes to mixed layer temperature change is found to be dominant over the advective processes over both the basins. Net surface heat fluxes anomaly is also found to be maximum during late austral spring-early summer period, with latent heat flux having a major contribution to it. The anomalous latent heat fluxes between atmosphere and ocean surface play important role in the growth of observed summertime SST anomaly. Sea-surface height also shows similar out-of-phase signatures over the two basins and are well correlated with the ENSO related SST anomalies. It is also observed that the magnitude of ENSO related anomalies over the southern ocean are weaker in LaNina years than in El Nino years, suggesting an intensified tropics-high latitude tele-connection during warm phases of ENSO.

  4. Secondary Hotspots in the South Pacific as a Result of Mantle Plumelets and Lithospheric Extension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Wijbrans, J.; Pringle, M.

    2003-12-01

    By far the largest number of secondary hotspots (cf. Courtillet et al., 2003) can be found in the "South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly" (SOPITA) or "Superswell" region. Its Cretaceous counterpart is preserved in a large range of seamounts and guyots found in the "West Pacific Seamount Province" (WPSP). The seamounts in these regions display very distinct and long-lived isotopic signatures (Staudigel et al., 1991; Koppers et al., 2003) that can be used to combine source region chemistry and seamount geochronology to map out mantle melting anomalies over geological time. These mappings may resolve many important questions regarding the stationary character, continuity and longevity of the melting anomalies in the South Pacific mantle - and its secondary hotspots. Of all secondary hotspots that are currently active in the SOPITA we could identify only two hotspots that appear to be long-lived and that have Cretaceous counterparts in the WPSP. Plate reconstructions show that the "HIMU-type" Southern Wake seamounts may have originated from the Mangaia-Rurutu "hotline" in the Cook-Austral Islands, whereas the "EMI-type" Magellan seamounts may have originated from the Rarotonga hotspot. All other hotspots in the SOPITA and WPSP are short-lived (or intermittently active) as evidenced by the presence of numerous seamount trail "segments" representing no more than 10-40 Myr of volcanism. Our observations violate one or more assumptions of the classical Wilson-Morgan hotspot hypothesis: (1) none of the South Pacific hotspots are continuously active, (2) most are short-lived, (3) some show evidence of hotspot motion, and (4) most of them have poor linear age progressions, if any at all. On top of this we have evidence for volcanism along "hotlines" and the "superposition" of hotspots. The simple and elegant "hotspot" model, therefore, seems insufficient to explain the age distribution and source region characteristics of intra-plate volcanoes in the South Pacific. This

  5. Radiocarbon constraints on the extent and evolution of the South Pacific glacial carbon pool.

    PubMed

    Ronge, T A; Tiedemann, R; Lamy, F; Köhler, P; Alloway, B V; De Pol-Holz, R; Pahnke, K; Southon, J; Wacker, L

    2016-01-01

    During the last deglaciation, the opposing patterns of atmospheric CO2 and radiocarbon activities (Δ(14)C) suggest the release of (14)C-depleted CO2 from old carbon reservoirs. Although evidences point to the deep Pacific as a major reservoir of this (14)C-depleted carbon, its extent and evolution still need to be constrained. Here we use sediment cores retrieved along a South Pacific transect to reconstruct the spatio-temporal evolution of Δ(14)C over the last 30,000 years. In ∼2,500-3,600 m water depth, we find (14)C-depleted deep waters with a maximum glacial offset to atmospheric (14)C (ΔΔ(14)C=-1,000‰). Using a box model, we test the hypothesis that these low values might have been caused by an interaction of aging and hydrothermal CO2 influx. We observe a rejuvenation of circumpolar deep waters synchronous and potentially contributing to the initial deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. These findings constrain parts of the glacial carbon pool to the deep South Pacific. PMID:27157845

  6. Radiocarbon constraints on the extent and evolution of the South Pacific glacial carbon pool

    PubMed Central

    Ronge, T. A.; Tiedemann, R.; Lamy, F.; Köhler, P.; Alloway, B. V.; De Pol-Holz, R.; Pahnke, K.; Southon, J.; Wacker, L.

    2016-01-01

    During the last deglaciation, the opposing patterns of atmospheric CO2 and radiocarbon activities (Δ14C) suggest the release of 14C-depleted CO2 from old carbon reservoirs. Although evidences point to the deep Pacific as a major reservoir of this 14C-depleted carbon, its extent and evolution still need to be constrained. Here we use sediment cores retrieved along a South Pacific transect to reconstruct the spatio-temporal evolution of Δ14C over the last 30,000 years. In ∼2,500–3,600 m water depth, we find 14C-depleted deep waters with a maximum glacial offset to atmospheric 14C (ΔΔ14C=−1,000‰). Using a box model, we test the hypothesis that these low values might have been caused by an interaction of aging and hydrothermal CO2 influx. We observe a rejuvenation of circumpolar deep waters synchronous and potentially contributing to the initial deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. These findings constrain parts of the glacial carbon pool to the deep South Pacific. PMID:27157845

  7. Changes in the South Pacific deep water Nd isotope composition over the last 140 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröllje, Henning; Basak, Chandranath; Lamy, Frank; Gersonde, Rainer; Ullermann, Johannes; Pahnke, Katharina

    2015-04-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a central role in the global overturning circulation of the ocean through the formation of intermediate and bottom waters and the import and redistribution of deep waters from all major ocean basins that make up Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). The South Pacific is an ideal location to study the evolution of CDW over the last glacial-interglacial cycles with little direct overprint by fluctuating North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) input. Here were present a 140ky-long record of neodymium isotope ratios (143Nd/144Nd, expressed as ɛNd) analyzed on fossil fish teeth and debris from sediment core PS75/056-1 (55° 09.74 S, 114° 47.31 W, 3581 m water depth) in the open South Pacific that is bathed today by Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) with a small contribution from Pacific Deep Water. The Late Holocene and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 ɛNd values of -7.5 to -7.7 are close to the modern seawater isotopic composition near the core site [1]. Glacial ɛNd of about -6 is observed during MIS 2 and 6. The decrease in the ɛNd record during the penultimate deglaciation is more gradual compared to that during the last deglaciation and the most negative values of the last interglacial are reached during MIS 5c. The transition from MIS 5 into MIS 4 is characterized by a shift towards more negative ɛNd (-6.5) but full glacial values are not reached. The change to more positive ɛNd at the MIS 4/3 transition is followed by a long-term increase to maximum values reached during the last glacial maximum. The timing of the observed transitions is comparable to a nearby δ13C record (core E11-2) [2] and to published ɛNd records from the deep South Atlantic and Indian Oceans [3, 4]. We observe consistently more positive absolute ɛNd values in the South Pacific compared to the Atlantic. The offset is around one ɛNd unit during cold periods (MIS 2, 4, 6) and 1.5 ɛNd units during the interglacials. During MIS 3, on the other hand, there is little difference

  8. Forest Plant and Bird Communities in the Lau Group, Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Janet; Steadman, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Background We examined species composition of forest and bird communities in relation to environmental and human disturbance gradients on Lakeba (55.9 km2), Nayau (18.4 km2), and Aiwa Levu (1.2 km2), islands in the Lau Group of Fiji, West Polynesia. The unique avifauna of West Polynesia (Fiji, Tonga, Samoa) has been subjected to prehistoric human-caused extinctions but little was previously known about this topic in the Lau Group. We expected that the degree of human disturbance would be a strong determinant of tree species composition and habitat quality for surviving landbirds, while island area would be unrelated to bird diversity. Methodology/Principal Findings All trees >5 cm diameter were measured and identified in 23 forest plots of 500 m2 each. We recognized four forest species assemblages differentiated by composition and structure: coastal forest, dominated by widely distributed species, and three forest types with differences related more to disturbance history (stages of secondary succession following clearing or selective logging) than to environmental gradients (elevation, slope, rockiness). Our point counts (73 locations in 1 or 2 seasons) recorded 18 of the 24 species of landbirds that exist on the three islands. The relative abundance and species richness of birds were greatest in the forested habitats least disturbed by people. These differences were due mostly to increased numbers of columbid frugivores and passerine insectivores in forests on Lakeba and Aiwa Levu. Considering only forested habitats, the relative abundance and species richness of birds were greater on the small but completely forested (and uninhabited) island of Aiwa Levu than on the much larger island of Lakeba. Conclusions/Significance Forest disturbance history is more important than island area in structuring both tree and landbird communities on remote Pacific islands. Even very small islands may be suitable for conservation reserves if they are protected from human

  9. South Pacific influence on the termination of El Niño in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Imada, Yukiko; Tatebe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kimoto, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of climate variability affecting worldwide extreme weather events; therefore, improving ENSO prediction is an important issue. In this regard, a peculiar time evolution of ENSO in 2014 posed a challenge to the climate science community. Despite the observance of several precursors for a strong El Niño to develop during the summer and autumn, cold sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies appeared unexpectedly to the south of the equatorial cold tongue, which prevented development of an El Niño event in the late summer. Several hypotheses have been raised to explain the unmaterialized El Niño in 2014, but complete understanding of processes responsible for terminating this event has not yet been obtained. Here we show, using observations and extended seasonal prediction experiments with a climate model, that cold off-equatorial subsurface water in the South Pacific Ocean penetrated into the equatorial region along the slanted isopycnal surface via the mean advection, and it prevented the El Niño evolution in 2014. The negative subsurface temperature anomalies in the off-equatorial South Pacific Ocean were persistent throughout the last decade, and additional numerical simulations indicated that they contributed to the suppression of El Niño events during the 2000s. PMID:27464581

  10. South Pacific influence on the termination of El Niño in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Yukiko; Tatebe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kimoto, Masahide

    2016-07-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of climate variability affecting worldwide extreme weather events; therefore, improving ENSO prediction is an important issue. In this regard, a peculiar time evolution of ENSO in 2014 posed a challenge to the climate science community. Despite the observance of several precursors for a strong El Niño to develop during the summer and autumn, cold sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies appeared unexpectedly to the south of the equatorial cold tongue, which prevented development of an El Niño event in the late summer. Several hypotheses have been raised to explain the unmaterialized El Niño in 2014, but complete understanding of processes responsible for terminating this event has not yet been obtained. Here we show, using observations and extended seasonal prediction experiments with a climate model, that cold off-equatorial subsurface water in the South Pacific Ocean penetrated into the equatorial region along the slanted isopycnal surface via the mean advection, and it prevented the El Niño evolution in 2014. The negative subsurface temperature anomalies in the off-equatorial South Pacific Ocean were persistent throughout the last decade, and additional numerical simulations indicated that they contributed to the suppression of El Niño events during the 2000s.

  11. South Pacific influence on the termination of El Niño in 2014.

    PubMed

    Imada, Yukiko; Tatebe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kimoto, Masahide

    2016-07-28

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of climate variability affecting worldwide extreme weather events; therefore, improving ENSO prediction is an important issue. In this regard, a peculiar time evolution of ENSO in 2014 posed a challenge to the climate science community. Despite the observance of several precursors for a strong El Niño to develop during the summer and autumn, cold sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies appeared unexpectedly to the south of the equatorial cold tongue, which prevented development of an El Niño event in the late summer. Several hypotheses have been raised to explain the unmaterialized El Niño in 2014, but complete understanding of processes responsible for terminating this event has not yet been obtained. Here we show, using observations and extended seasonal prediction experiments with a climate model, that cold off-equatorial subsurface water in the South Pacific Ocean penetrated into the equatorial region along the slanted isopycnal surface via the mean advection, and it prevented the El Niño evolution in 2014. The negative subsurface temperature anomalies in the off-equatorial South Pacific Ocean were persistent throughout the last decade, and additional numerical simulations indicated that they contributed to the suppression of El Niño events during the 2000s.

  12. South Pacific influence on the termination of El Niño in 2014.

    PubMed

    Imada, Yukiko; Tatebe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kimoto, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of climate variability affecting worldwide extreme weather events; therefore, improving ENSO prediction is an important issue. In this regard, a peculiar time evolution of ENSO in 2014 posed a challenge to the climate science community. Despite the observance of several precursors for a strong El Niño to develop during the summer and autumn, cold sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies appeared unexpectedly to the south of the equatorial cold tongue, which prevented development of an El Niño event in the late summer. Several hypotheses have been raised to explain the unmaterialized El Niño in 2014, but complete understanding of processes responsible for terminating this event has not yet been obtained. Here we show, using observations and extended seasonal prediction experiments with a climate model, that cold off-equatorial subsurface water in the South Pacific Ocean penetrated into the equatorial region along the slanted isopycnal surface via the mean advection, and it prevented the El Niño evolution in 2014. The negative subsurface temperature anomalies in the off-equatorial South Pacific Ocean were persistent throughout the last decade, and additional numerical simulations indicated that they contributed to the suppression of El Niño events during the 2000s. PMID:27464581

  13. Dissolved methane distribution in the South Pacific and the Southern Ocean in austral summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Osamu; Inoue, Hisayuki Y.; Watanabe, Shuichi; Suzuki, Koji; Noriki, Shinichiro

    2011-07-01

    Oceanic methane (CH4) was examined in the South Pacific and the Southern Ocean from December 2001 to February 2002. From the oligotrophic South Pacific (10°S) to the Subtropical Front (STF), we observed the maximum concentrations of CH4 in the subsurface layer which ranged from 2.7 to 3.9 nmol kg-1. South of the STF, higher levels of CH4 were often detected in both the surface and the subsurface layers. Elevated surface CH4 concentrations (3.4-6.1 nmol kg-1) south of the STF tended to be higher than those north of the STF. Higher CH4 were often concomitant with an increase in chlorophyll a levels in the Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ). Considering that phytoplankton does not generate methane directly, the high CH4 production probably resulted from the grazing processes of Antarctic krill and/or zooplankton fed on phytoplankton and the subsequent microbial methanogenesis in addition to the aerobic CH4 production in the water column. Present results showed a good relation between surface CH4 data (<50 m) and σθ between 10°S and the Polar Front (PF), which allow us to provide interpolation/extrapolation schemes for CH4 concentration and sea-air CH4 flux in the wide area ([CH4] = 0.15 σθ - 0.98 (RMS = 0.21 nmol kg-1, r = 0.68, n = 49, p < 0.001). The sea-air fluxes estimated during our survey were from 2.4 to 4.9 mol CH4 km-2 d-1 between 10°S and the PF (54°S), and from 0.8 to 2.3 mol CH4 km-2 d-1 south of the PF, where the sea-air CH4 flux was largely affected by the wind speed.

  14. Reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to the deep central South Pacific during the last two glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Kescher, Mario; Frank, Martin; Tapia, Raúl; Ronge, Thomas A.; Nürnberg, Dirk; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The South Pacific is a sensitive location for the variability of the global oceanic thermohaline circulation given that deep waters from the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and the Pacific Basin are exchanged. Here we reconstruct the deep water circulation of the central South Pacific for the last two glacial cycles (from 240,000 years ago to the Holocene) based on radiogenic neodymium (Nd) and lead (Pb) isotope records complemented by benthic stable carbon data obtained from two sediment cores located on the flanks of the East Pacific Rise. The records show small but consistent glacial/interglacial changes in all three isotopic systems with interglacial average values of -5.8 and 18.757 for ɛNd and 206Pb/204Pb, respectively, whereas glacial averages are -5.3 and 18.744. Comparison of this variability of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) to previously published records along the pathway of the global thermohaline circulation is consistent with reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to CDW during cold stages. The absolute values and amplitudes of the benthic δ13C variations are essentially indistinguishable from other records of the Southern Hemisphere and confirm that the low central South Pacific sedimentation rates did not result in a significant reduction of the amplitude of any of the measured proxies. In addition, the combined detrital Nd and strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope signatures imply that Australian and New Zealand dust has remained the principal contributor of lithogenic material to the central South Pacific.

  15. Physical and chemical characterization of marine atmospheric aerosols over the North and South Pacific Oceans using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Jung, J.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of marine atmospheric aerosols were characterized and compared over the North and South Pacific Ocean during two trans-Pacific cruises (from Japan to Chile and Australia to Japan) during the period of January-June 2009, which cover broad region of Pacific Ocean from 40°N to 55°S and 140°E to 70°W. The measured parameters of aerosol properties were single particle size-resolved chemical composition (D = 100 ~ 1500 nm), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, size distribution from 10 nm to 5 μm, total aerosol nitrate and sulfate concentrations, and filter-based chemical composition. Trace gas concentrations of O3 and CO were also measured to aid air parcel categorization during the cruises. Reflecting larger anthropogenic emission in the Northern Hemisphere, pronounced concentration gradient between the North and South Pacific Ocean was observed for aerosol nitrate, CO, and O3. Aerosol sulfate also showed a similar concentration drop in the equatorial region, relatively higher sulfate concentration was observed in 30°S-40°S and 55°S regions, which was associated with increased aerosol methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration but little increase in local marine chlorophyll concentration, suggesting contribution of long-range transported marine biogenic sulfur from the high primary production area over the South Pacific high latitude region. Aerosol chemical classification by single particle chemical analysis revealed that certain aerosol types, such as biomass burning, elemental carbon, and elemental/organic carbon mixed type, were mainly observed in the North Pacific region, while several specific organic aerosol types with abundant aged organic and disulfur composition were identified in the South Pacific region. Further comparison of aerosol properties, aerosol sources, and atmospheric aerosol processing in the North and South Pacific Oceans will be discussed.

  16. Glacial disparities in Intermediate Mode Water advection in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, R.; Nuernberg, D.; Ronge, T.; Tiedemann, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Intermediate Mode Waters formed in the Southern Ocean are critical for the lower thermocline ventilation process in the Southern Hemisphere Gyres. They also might have served as the most relevant pathways transporting climatic signals from high to low latitudes via the "oceanic tunneling" on glacial/interglacial time scales. Despite the importance of the Southern Ocean Intermediate Waters (SOIWs), our understanding on the long-term evolution, exact advection paths, and impact on the South Pacific Gyre's thermocline is still fragmentary. Here, we present a 200 kyr record of paired Mg/Ca ratios and stable oxygen isotope from surface dweller and deep dwelling planktonic foraminifera, from the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). On average, the Mg/Ca-derived sea Surface Temperatures (Globigerina bulloides) show similar conditions during the LGM and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 (9.4 °C versus 9.9 °C). In contrast, our Mg/Ca-derived subsurface temperatures (Globorotalia inflata and Globorotalia truncatulinoides) suggest LGM from ~3 to ~2 °C colder than MIS 6. The reconstructed subsurface ice volume corrected stable oxygen isotope ratio of seawater (δ18Osw-ivc, proxy for local salinity changes) suggests opposing glacial subsurface conditions, i.e., slightly saltier-than-Holocene during MIS 6 to fresher-than-Holocene during MIS 2. Considering that subsurface hydrography at the core site is plausibly driven by the formation and/or advection of SOIWs from the South East Pacific, our results provide further support on the relevance of subsurface processes in the Southern Ocean transferring climatic signals (temperature and salinity) to the SPG. Furthermore, the contrasting subsurface glacial scenarios at the SPG's thermocline imply that the advection of SOIWs during glacial stages could be highly variable during different glacial stages.

  17. Nitrogen isotope ratios of nitrate and N* anomalies in the subtropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Chisato; Makabe, Akiko; Shiozaki, Takuhei; Toyoda, Sakae; Yoshida, Osamu; Furuya, Ken; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen isotopic ratios of nitrate (δ15N-NO3-) were analyzed above 1000 m water depth along 17°S in the subtropical South Pacific during the revisit WOCE P21 cruise in 2009. The δ15N-NO3- and N* values were as high as 17‰ and as low as -18 μmol N L-1, respectively, at depths around 250 m east of 115°W, but were as low as 5‰ and as high as +1 μmol N L-1, respectively, in subsurface waters west of 170°W. The relationships among NO3- concentrations, N* values, δ15N-NO3- values, and oxygen and nitrite concentrations suggest that a few samples east of 90°W were from suboxic and nitrite-accumulated conditions and were possibly affected by in situ water column denitrification. Most of the high-δ15N-NO3- and negative-N* waters were probably generated by mixing between Subantarctic Mode Water from the Southern Ocean and Oxygen Deficit Zone Water from the eastern tropical South Pacific, with remineralization of organic matter occurring during transportation. Moreover, the relationship between δ15N-NO3- and N* values, as well as Trichodesmium abundances and size-specific nitrogen fixation rates at the surface, suggest that the low-δ15N-NO3- and positive-N* subsurface waters between 160°E and 170°W were generated by the input of remineralized particles created by in situ nitrogen fixation, mainly by Trichodesmium spp. Therefore, the δ15N values of sediments in this region are expected to reveal past changes in nitrogen fixation or denitrification rates in the subtropical South Pacific. The copyright line for this article was changed on 5 JUN 2015 after original online publication.

  18. Economic valuation of ecosystem services from coral reefs in the South Pacific: taking stock of recent experience.

    PubMed

    Laurans, Yann; Pascal, Nicolas; Binet, Thomas; Brander, Luke; Clua, Eric; David, Gilbert; Rojat, Dominique; Seidl, Andrew

    2013-02-15

    The economic valuation of coral reefs ecosystem services is currently seen as a promising approach to demonstrate the benefits of sustainable management of coral ecosystems to policymakers and to provide useful information for improved decisions. Most coral reefs economic studies have been conducted in the United States, Southeast Asia and the Caribbean, and only a few have covered the South Pacific region. In this region, coral reefs are essential assets for small island developing states as well as for developed countries. Accordingly, a series of ecosystem services valuations has been carried out recently in the South Pacific, to try and supply decision-makers with new information. Applying ecosystem services valuation to the specific ecological, social, economic and cultural contexts of the South Pacific is however not straightforward. This paper analyses how extant valuations address the various management challenges of coral reef regions in general and more specifically for the South Pacific. Bearing in mind that economic valuation has to match policy-making contexts, we emphasize a series of specific considerations when conducting and applying ecosystem services valuation in South Pacific ecological and social contexts. Finally, the paper examines the decision-making situations in which extant valuations took place. We conclude that, although ecosystem valuations have been effectively used as a means to raise awareness with respect to coral reef conservation, methodologies will have to be further developed, with multidisciplinary inputs, if they are to provide valuable inputs in local and technical decision-making.

  19. Economic valuation of ecosystem services from coral reefs in the South Pacific: taking stock of recent experience.

    PubMed

    Laurans, Yann; Pascal, Nicolas; Binet, Thomas; Brander, Luke; Clua, Eric; David, Gilbert; Rojat, Dominique; Seidl, Andrew

    2013-02-15

    The economic valuation of coral reefs ecosystem services is currently seen as a promising approach to demonstrate the benefits of sustainable management of coral ecosystems to policymakers and to provide useful information for improved decisions. Most coral reefs economic studies have been conducted in the United States, Southeast Asia and the Caribbean, and only a few have covered the South Pacific region. In this region, coral reefs are essential assets for small island developing states as well as for developed countries. Accordingly, a series of ecosystem services valuations has been carried out recently in the South Pacific, to try and supply decision-makers with new information. Applying ecosystem services valuation to the specific ecological, social, economic and cultural contexts of the South Pacific is however not straightforward. This paper analyses how extant valuations address the various management challenges of coral reef regions in general and more specifically for the South Pacific. Bearing in mind that economic valuation has to match policy-making contexts, we emphasize a series of specific considerations when conducting and applying ecosystem services valuation in South Pacific ecological and social contexts. Finally, the paper examines the decision-making situations in which extant valuations took place. We conclude that, although ecosystem valuations have been effectively used as a means to raise awareness with respect to coral reef conservation, methodologies will have to be further developed, with multidisciplinary inputs, if they are to provide valuable inputs in local and technical decision-making. PMID:23295680

  20. Is population growth a deterrent to development in the South Pacific?

    PubMed

    Ahlburg, D A

    1988-05-01

    "Some have argued that population growth deters development, while others claim that population growth either aids development or has no significant effect on development. In a sample of South Pacific nations, population growth and size were found to be unrelated to economic development, defined as GDP per capita. However, when indices of quality of life or social development such as mortality, health services and education were used, population growth and size were found to be negatively related to these indices. If these 'quality of life' indices are valued by nations, an argument may exist for policy support for family planning."

  1. Plant regeneration in vitro of South Pacific taro (Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta cv. Akalomamale, Aracea).

    PubMed

    Yam, T W; Hsu, G I; Arditti, J

    1990-08-01

    Axillary bud expiants from South Pacific (Solomon Islands) taro, Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta cv. Akalomamale (Araceae) cultured on a modified Murashige-Skoog medium containing 1 mg NAA 1(-1) and TE formed callus and produced multiple plantlets. Explants died if NAA was present at levels lower than 0.1 mg 1(-1). BA was not required and may have been inhibitory. Plantlets developed faster and became larger following transfer to a hormone-free medium two weeks after the start of culture. Fully grown plants were established in a potting mix and are growing well in a greenhouse.

  2. Plant regeneration in vitro of South Pacific taro (Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta cv. Akalomamale, Aracea).

    PubMed

    Yam, T W; Hsu, G I; Arditti, J

    1990-08-01

    Axillary bud expiants from South Pacific (Solomon Islands) taro, Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta cv. Akalomamale (Araceae) cultured on a modified Murashige-Skoog medium containing 1 mg NAA 1(-1) and TE formed callus and produced multiple plantlets. Explants died if NAA was present at levels lower than 0.1 mg 1(-1). BA was not required and may have been inhibitory. Plantlets developed faster and became larger following transfer to a hormone-free medium two weeks after the start of culture. Fully grown plants were established in a potting mix and are growing well in a greenhouse. PMID:24226709

  3. Accounting for health in climate change policies: a case study of Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Georgina; Bowen, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Background Climate change is expected to affect the health of most populations in the coming decades, having the greatest impact on the poorest and most disadvantaged people in the world. The Pacific islands, including Fiji, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Objective The three major health impacts of climate change in Fiji explored in this study were dengue fever, diarrhoeal disease, and malnutrition, as they each pose a significant threat to human health. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent the Fiji National Climate Change Policy, and a selection of relevant sectoral policies, account for these human health effects of climate change. Design The study employed a three-pronged policy analysis to evaluate: 1) the content of the Fijian National Climate Change Policy and to what extent health was incorporated within this; 2) the context within which the policy was developed; 3) the relevant processes; and 4) the actors involved. A selection of relevant sectoral policies were also analysed to assess the extent to which these included climate change and health considerations. Results The policy analysis showed that these three health impacts of climate change were only considered to a minor extent, and often indirectly, in both the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and the corresponding National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, as well as the Public Health Act. Furthermore, supporting documents in relevant sectors including water and agriculture made no mention of climate change and health impacts. Conclusions The projected health impacts of climate change should be considered as part of reviewing the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, and the Public Health Act. In the interest of public health, this should include strategies for combating dengue fever, malnutrition, and water-borne disease. Related sectoral policies in water and agriculture should also be revised to

  4. Range extension and morphological characterization of rhodolith-forming species (Corallinales, Rhodophyta) from shallow water in the Mexican South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-García, Edith Concepción; Rosas-Alquicira, Edgar Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Living rhodolith beds are widely distributed along the Eastern Pacific ocean. Despite their widespread distribution, little is known about the rhodolith-forming species from shallow water in the Mexican South Pacific. Many taxonomic and morphological studies about rhodoliths have been carried out in the Gulf of California, where the forming species belong to the Hapalidiaceae and Corallinaceae families. This paper is the first report on the occurrence of the rhodolith-forming Hapalidiaceae species Lithothamnion muelleri and Phymatolithon repandum at three sites in the Mexican South Pacific. The branch density, maximum length and sphericity were measured for each determined species. Rhodoliths were distributed between 4 and 6 m depth, but differences in the branch density between species and sites were not found. Finally, the present record of L. muelleri fills the gap in the species distribution along the Eastern Pacific ocean, while the record of P. repandum is the first of the species in the region.

  5. Long-lived but Discontinuous Hotspot Volcanism of the South Pacific Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Wijbrans, J.; Pringle, M.

    2001-12-01

    Hotspots of the South Pacific have been operating since the Early Cretaceous. We present evidence that their heterogeneous geochemical character and, hence, their respective HIMU-EMI-EMII mantle sources, can be traced back into the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP) using plate tectonic reconstructions. This implies that the HIMU, EMI and EMII mantle components are enduring features within the Earth's mantle, at least, for the last 140 Myr. These correlations are eminent on the scale of the WPSP and the South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly (SOPITA) although the evolution of individual hotspots emerges notably more complicated. Hotspots in the WPSP and SOPITA mantle regions typically display intermittent volcanic activity, longevities shorter than 70 Myr, superposition of hotspot volcanism, and indirectly the motion of their mantle plumes through time. In our plate tectonic reconstructions, we use 40Ar/39Ar seamount ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures to map out Cretaceous hotspot volcanism in the WPSP and to characterize its evolution with respect to the currently active hotspots in the SOPITA region. EM-type Magellan, Anewetak, Ralik and Ratak seamount trails can be traced back to the magmatic activity of the Macdonald, Rurutu and Rarotonga hotspots during the Cretaceous; the HIMU-type seamounts within the Southern Wake seamount trail (97-120 Ma) most likely originated from the Mangaia-Rurutu "hot-line" in the Cook-Austral Islands. The Typhoon and Japanese guyots terminated their volcanism during the Early Cretaceous and have no presently active hot spot. However, the currently active Samoan, Society, Pitcairn and Marquesas hotspots may be traced back only to about 30-70 Myr and lack long-lived counterparts in the WPSP. These hotspots may have become active over the last 30-70 Myr only. All in all hotspot volcanism in the South Pacific seems to be controlled by a "superplume" type of mantle convection giving rise to multiple weak mantle plumes, each

  6. Basin-Scale Transport of Hydrothermal Iron, Manganese and Aluminum Across the Eastern South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedwick, P. N.; Resing, J. A.; Sohst, B. M.; Jenkins, W. J.; German, C. R.; Moffett, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruise (GEOTRACES GP06) examined the water-column distribution of trace elements between Peru and Tahiti, crossing the southern East Pacific Rise (EPR) midway along the cruise track. Shipboard measurements made along this ocean section reveal the mid-depth lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron (dFe), manganese (dMn) and aluminum (dAl) over a distance of more than 4,000 km, from the EPR westward into the deep South Pacific basin. Post-cruise measurements of the conservative hydrothermal tracer helium-3 indicate the loss of at least 85% of the hydrothermal dFe over a distance of ~80 km west from the ridge axis, presumably as a result of oxidation, scavenging and precipitation. Further west of the ridge axis, dFe and excess helium-3 (3Hexs) are linearly correlated (r2 = 0.99), showing a more than 4-fold conservative dilution of hydrothermal dFe over a distance of ~4000 km. This behavior may reflect the lateral transport of iron as relatively unreactive, colloidal oxyhydroxides; ongoing analyses of cruise samples by other groups will provide data to test this hypothesis. The loss of hydrothermal dMn relative to 3Hexs extends over a greater distance than for dFe, as far as ~250 km to the west of the ridge axis, beyond which dMn exhibits nearly conservative behavior. The hydrothermal dAl anomaly appears to extend over 3,000 km west of the EPR, and is not readily explained based on the known composition of ridge-axis vent fluids. The linear dFe versus 3Hexs relationship in the off-axis hydrothermal plume has a slope of 5.6 x 106 mol/mol, which falls roughly between values estimated for the western South Pacific and the South Atlantic basins. If we assume that our dFe and 3He data are generally representative of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal emissions, then the estimated global hydrothermal 3He efflux of 530 mol/y yields an effective hydrothermal dFe input of 2.9 Gmol/y to the ocean interior.

  7. Stratigraphic potential of Bolboforma significantly increased by new finds in the North Atlantic and South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Karowe, A. I.

    1986-01-01

    Until now, the genus Bolboforma, a problematic group of calcareous microfossils, has been recorded only in Oligocene to Pliocene marine sedimentary rocks, chiefly in the eastern North Atlantic region. We add to this eastern North Atlantic record six new sites and eleven undescribed species from the continental slopes of Ireland and Morocco. More significantly, we record, for the first time, abundant assemblages of Bolboforma on the western side of the North Atlantic and in the western South Pacific. Seven boreholes on the continental shelf and slope of New Jersey and Virginia contain ten species, three of which are new. Two species are present in two outcrops in eastern Mississippi and four are present in a borehole in the coastal plain of Virginia. On the Lord Howe Rise, west of New Zealand, a DSDP corehole has yielded a rich assemblage including four undescribed species. In addition to expanding the geographic distribution of Bolboforma, our work extends the known stratigraphic range downward into the upper Eocene on both sides of the North Atlantic and in the western South Pacific. Our findings firmly support the inference of a planktonic life style for Bolboforma, which implies a significant potential for biostratigraphic, paleobiogeographic, and paleoenvironmental studies, on both a local and global scale. We recommend a concerted effort to further document the nature and distribution of Bolboforma.

  8. Cobalt-based age models of pelagic clay in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, Ann G.; Murray, Richard W.; Sauvage, Justine; Pockalny, Robert A.; Spivack, Arthur J.; Harris, Robert N.; D'Hondt, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Dating pelagic clay can be a challenge due to its slow sedimentation rate, post-depositional alteration, and lack of biogenic deposition. Co-based dating techniques have the potential to create age models in pelagic clay under the assumption that the flux of non-detrital Co to the seafloor is spatially and temporally constant, resulting in the non-detrital Co concentrations being inversely proportional to sedimentation rate. We apply a Co-based method to the pelagic clay sequences from Sites U1365, U1366, U1369, and U1370 drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329 in the South Pacific Gyre. We distinguished non-detrital Co from detrital Co using multivariate statistical partitioning techniques. We found that the non-detrital flux of Co at Site U1370 is approximately twice as high as that at the other sites, implying that the non-detrital Co flux is not regionally constant. This regional variation reflects the heterogeneous distribution of Co in the water column, as is observed in the present day. We present an improved approach to Co-based age modeling throughout the South Pacific Gyre and determine that the Co-based method can effectively date oxygenated pelagic clay deposited in the distal open ocean, but is less reliable for deposition closer to continents. When extending the method to geologically old sediment, it is important to consider the paleolocation of a given site to ensure these conditions are met.

  9. Analogous nutrient limitations in unicellular diazotrophs and Prochlorococcus in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Moisander, Pia H; Zhang, Ruifeng; Boyle, Edward A; Hewson, Ian; Montoya, Joseph P; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2012-04-01

    Growth limitation of phytoplankton and unicellular nitrogen (N(2)) fixers (diazotrophs) were investigated in the oligotrophic Western South Pacific Ocean. Based on change in abundances of nifH or 23S rRNA gene copies during nutrient-enrichment experiments, the factors limiting net growth of the unicellular diazotrophs UCYN-A (Group A), Crocosphaera watsonii, γ-Proteobacterium 24774A11, and the non-diazotrophic picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, varied within the region. At the westernmost stations, numbers were enhanced by organic carbon added as simple sugars, a combination of iron and an organic chelator, or iron added with phosphate. At stations nearest the equator, the nutrient-limiting growth was not apparent. Maximum net growth rates for UCYN-A, C. watsonii and γ-24774A11 were 0.19, 0.61 and 0.52 d(-1), respectively, which are the first known empirical growth rates reported for the uncultivated UCYN-A and the γ-24774A11. The addition of N enhanced total phytoplankton biomass up to 5-fold, and the non-N(2)-fixing Synechococcus was among the groups that responded favorably to N addition. Nitrogen was the major nutrient-limiting phytoplankton biomass in the Western South Pacific Ocean, while availability of organic carbon or iron and organic chelator appear to limit abundances of unicellular diazotrophs. Lack of phytoplankton response to nutrient additions in the Pacific warm pool waters suggests diazotroph growth in this area is controlled by different factors than in the higher latitudes, which may partially explain previously observed variability in community composition in the region. PMID:22094348

  10. Circulation, eddies, oxygen, and nutrient changes in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeschel, R.; Stramma, L.; Weller, R. A.; Fischer, T.

    2015-06-01

    A large subsurface oxygen deficiency zone is located in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean (ETSP). The large-scale circulation in the eastern equatorial Pacific and off the coast of Peru in November/December 2012 shows the influence of the equatorial current system, the eastern boundary currents, and the northern reaches of the subtropical gyre. In November 2012 the equatorial undercurrent (EUC) is centered at 250 m depth, deeper than in earlier observations. In December 2012, the equatorial water is transported southeastward near the shelf in the Peru-Chile undercurrent (PCUC) with a mean transport of 1.4 Sv. In the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), the flow is overlaid with strong eddy activity on the poleward side of the OMZ. Floats with parking depth at 400 m show fast westward flow in the mid-depth equatorial channel and sluggish flow in the OMZ. Floats with oxygen sensors clearly show the passage of eddies with oxygen anomalies. The long-term float observations in the upper ocean lead to a net community production estimate at about 18° S of up to 16.7 mmol C m-3 yr-1 extrapolated to an annual rate and 7.7 mmol C m-3 yr-1 for the time period below the mixed layer. Oxygen differences between repeated ship sections are influenced by the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), by the phase of El Niño, by seasonal changes, and by eddies, and hence have to be interpreted with care. At and south of the Equator the decrease in oxygen in the upper ocean since 1976 is related to an increase in nitrate, phosphate, and in part silicate.

  11. Interdecadal modulation of ENSO-related spring rainfall over South China by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaofei; Mao, Jiangyu

    2016-02-01

    The interdecadal modulation of the relationship between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the South China spring rainfall (SCSR) by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is investigated using long-term observational datasets. When ENSO and PDO are in-phase [i.e., El Niño events during warm PDO (EN_WPDO) and La Niña events during cold PDO (LN_CPDO)], the positive correlations between ENSO and SCSR are enhanced significantly, with above-normal (below-normal) SCSR generally following EN_WPDO (LN_CPDO) events. In contrast, the ENSO-SCSR relationship becomes ambiguous when ENSO and PDO are out-of-phase [i.e., El Niño events during cold PDO (EN_CPDO) and La Niña events during warm PDO (LN_WPDO)]. The PDO modulates the ENSO-SCSR relationship through the impact of variations in the lower-tropospheric subtropical anticyclone over the western North Pacific (WNP) and upper-tropospheric westerly jets over East Asia and the midlatitude North Pacific. An EN_WPDO (LN_CPDO) event induces an enhanced subtropical anticyclone (cyclone) over the WNP and intensified (weakened) subtropical westerly jet around the southern Tibetan Plateau due to modification by the PDO-forced anomalous circulation. Thus, South China falls just under the influence of the anomalous lower-tropospheric southwesterlies (northeasterlies) and upper-tropospheric divergent (convergent) environment, leading to above-normal (below-normal) SCSR. In contrast, the SCSR anomalies exhibit no wet or dry preference following EN_CPDO (LN_CPDO) events, because ENSO-induced and PDO-forced circulation anomalies tend to cancel each other out. These modulating effects by the PDO on the ENSO-SCSR relationship and related physical processes are also examined with coupled model simulations.

  12. More extreme swings of the South Pacific convergence zone due to greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenju; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Borlace, Simon; Collins, Matthew; Cowan, Tim; McPhaden, Michael J; Timmermann, Axel; Power, Scott; Brown, Josephine; Menkes, Christophe; Ngari, Arona; Vincent, Emmanuel M; Widlansky, Matthew J

    2012-08-16

    The South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) is the Southern Hemisphere's most expansive and persistent rain band, extending from the equatorial western Pacific Ocean southeastward towards French Polynesia. Owing to its strong rainfall gradient, a small displacement in the position of the SPCZ causes drastic changes to hydroclimatic conditions and the frequency of extreme weather events--such as droughts, floods and tropical cyclones--experienced by vulnerable island countries in the region. The SPCZ position varies from its climatological mean location with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), moving a few degrees northward during moderate El Niño events and southward during La Niña events. During strong El Niño events, however, the SPCZ undergoes an extreme swing--by up to ten degrees of latitude toward the Equator--and collapses to a more zonally oriented structure with commensurately severe weather impacts. Understanding changes in the characteristics of the SPCZ in a changing climate is therefore of broad scientific and socioeconomic interest. Here we present climate modelling evidence for a near doubling in the occurrences of zonal SPCZ events between the periods 1891-1990 and 1991-2090 in response to greenhouse warming, even in the absence of a consensus on how ENSO will change. We estimate the increase in zonal SPCZ events from an aggregation of the climate models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phases 3 and 5 (CMIP3 and CMIP5) multi-model database that are able to simulate such events. The change is caused by a projected enhanced equatorial warming in the Pacific and may lead to more frequent occurrences of extreme events across the Pacific island nations most affected by zonal SPCZ events.

  13. The Relation between Sea Surface Temperature at the Subtropical South-Central Pacific and Precipitation in Southeastern South America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Vicente R.; Silvestri, Gabriel E.

    2002-02-01

    This paper deals with the relationship between the interannual variability of sea surface temperature (SST) and its associated atmospheric circulation and rainfall variability over southeastern South America (SSA), namely the subtropical region east of the Andes between 20° and 40°S, during the austral spring. Rainfall in SSA and SST interannual variability is studied using canonical correlation analysis. The first two modes show the well-known warm-wet and cold-dry pattern between the equatorial SST and rainfall over most of this part of the world. However, SST in the equatorial regions does not modulate rainfall variability among El Niño (EN) years or among La Niña (LN) years. On the other hand, it does modulate this variability between EN and LN cases as a whole and among neutral cases indicating that the SSA rainfall response to equatorial Pacific SST is not linear over the observed SST range, having no dependence on the extremes of this range. In contrast, among EN events, SST in the subtropical south-central Pacific (SSCP) modulates the seasonal rainfall over most of SSA. Also, when all the years are considered, this SST has a correlation with precipitation of magnitude similar to those corresponding to the SST in EN regions. Consistent with this, the circulation field has enhanced cyclonic (anticyclonic) advection over subtropical SSA when SST in the SSCP is cold (warm).SSTs in EN-3 or EN-3.4 regions and in the SSCP are negatively correlated, but their correlation is practically zero when only EN cases or only neutral cases are considered, and very small in LN cases. This allows a stratification analysis composing cases according to different SSTs in EN-3 and EN-3.4 regions with almost constant SST in the SSCP and similarly according to different SST in the SSCP with approximately constant SST in EN regions. The composite difference fields with constant equatorial SST and with constant SST in the SSCP have a wave train in the Pacific similar to the ENSO

  14. Circulation, eddies and oxygen changes in the Oxygen Minimum Zone of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeschel, Rena; Stramma, Lothar; Weller, Robert; Fischer, Tim

    2016-04-01

    A large, subsurface oxygen deficiency zone is located in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) revealing a decrease in oxygen over the past decades. Oxygen time series from historical measurements augmented with float data reveal a significant negative trend between 50 to 300 m depth since 1976, averaged in the region of the westward flowing South Equatorial Current and the South Equatorial Intermediate Current between 2-5°S, 84-87°W. This long-term trend, which is related to increasing nutrients might be modified by climate signals such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. To understand the ongoing changes in the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) it is necessary to understand the circulation in the ETSP and its variability, which is still not well described. In the frame of the research initiative 'Climate-Biogeochemistry Interactions in the Tropical Ocean' hydrographic data from an open ocean and a near shelf cruise leg in November and December 2012 and from floats are used to investigate the large-scale circulation in subsurface layers of the ETSP showing the influence of the equatorial current system, the eastern boundary, and the northern reaches of the subtropical gyre. On the poleward side of the OMZ the mean flow is overlaid with strong eddy activity. Coherent/isolated mesoscale eddies can exist over periods of several months propagating westwards after formation in the coastal regions. Float data as well as data from the Stratus mooring (~86°W, 20°S) are used to describe the passage of eddies by anomalies in oxygen and hydrographic data.

  15. Ross River Virus Disease Reemergence, Fiji, 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Klapsing, Philipp; Glaze, Sarah; McClean, Karen L.; Drebot, Michael A.; Lanciotti, Robert S.; Campbell, Grant L.

    2005-01-01

    We report 2 clinically characteristic and serologically positive cases of Ross River virus infection in Canadian tourists who visited Fiji in late 2003 and early 2004. This report suggests that Ross River virus is once again circulating in Fiji, where it apparently disappeared after causing an epidemic in 1979 to 1980. PMID:15829203

  16. Distribution and bacterial availability of dissolved neutral sugars in the South East Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempéré, R.; Tedetti, M.; Panagiotopoulos, C.; Charrière, B.; van Wambeke, F.

    2008-02-01

    The distribution and bacterial availability of dissolved neutral sugars were studied in the South East Pacific from October to December 2004 during the BIOSOPE cruise. Four contrasted sites were investigated: Marquesas Islands (MAR), the hyper-oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre (GYR), the eastern part of the Gyre (EGY), and the coastal waters associated to upwelling of Chile (UPW). Total (free and combined) dissolved neutral sugar (TDNS) concentrations were higher in UPW (149-329 nM) and MAR (111-540 nM), than in GYR (79-390 nM) and EGY (58-492 nM). Nevertheless, their contribution to dissolved organic carbon (TDNS-C/DOC%) was generally low for all sites varying from 0.5% to 4% indicating that our South East Pacific surface waters were relatively poor in neutral sugars. Free dissolved neutral sugar (FDNS; e.g. sugars analyzed without hydrolysis) concentrations were very low within the detection of our method (5-10 nM) accounting <5% of the TDNS. In general, the predominant sugars within the TDNS pool were glucose, xylose, arabinose, and galactose while in the FDNS pool only glucose was present. TDNS stock to bacterial production ratios (integrated values from the surface to the deep chlorophyll maximum) were relatively high in GYR with respect to the low primary production, whereas the opposite trend was observed in the highly productive area of UPW. Intermediate situations were observed for MAR and EGY. Bioavailability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exposed to natural solar radiation was also experimentally studied and compared to dark treatments. Our results showed no or little detectable effect of sunlight on DOM bacterial assimilation in UPW and in GYR while a significant stimulation was found in MAR and EGY. The overall results clearly suggest the semi-labile character of DOM in GYR compared to the labile of UPW and are consistent with dissolved organic carbon accumulation and the elevated C/N ratios reported by Raimbault et al. (2007).

  17. Distribution and bacterial availability of dissolved neutral sugars in the South East Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempéré, R.; Tedetti, M.; Panagiotopoulos, C.; Charrière, B.; van Wambeke, F.

    2008-08-01

    The distribution and bacterial availability of dissolved neutral sugars were studied in the South East Pacific from October to December 2004 during the BIOSOPE cruise. Four contrasting stations were investigated: Marquesas Islands (MAR), the hyper-oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre (GYR), the eastern part of the Gyre (EGY), and the coastal waters associated to the upwelling area off Chile (UPW). Total (free and combined) dissolved neutral sugar (TDNS) concentrations were in the same order of magnitude at MAR (387±293 nM), GYR (206±107 nM), EGY (269±175 nM), and UPW (231±73 nM), with the highest and lowest concentrations found at MAR (30 m, 890 nM) and EGY (250 m, 58 nM), respectively. Their contribution to dissolved organic carbon (TDNS-C×DOC-1%) was generally low for all sites varying from 0.4% to 6.7% indicating that South East Pacific surface waters were relatively poor in neutral sugars. Free dissolved neutral sugar (FDNS; e.g. sugars analyzed without hydrolysis) concentrations were very low within the detection limit of our method (5 10 nM) accounting for <5% of the TDNS. In general, the predominant sugars within the TDNS pool were glucose, xylose, arabinose, and galactose, while in the FDNS pool only glucose was present. TDNS stock to bacterial production ratios (integrated values from the surface to the deep chlorophyll maximum) were high at GYR with respect to the low primary production, whereas the opposite trend was observed in the highly productive area of UPW. Intermediate situations were observed for MAR and EGY. Bioavailability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exposed to natural solar radiation was also experimentally studied and compared to dark treatments. Our results showed no or little detectable effect of sunlight on DOM bacterial assimilation in surface waters of UPW and GYR, while a significant stimulation was found in MAR and EGY. The overall results clearly suggest that DOM is less labile at GYR compared to UPW, which is consistent with

  18. Student Expectations of Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of the Fiji National University (FNU)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Shana Nigar

    2012-01-01

    Education is a human right and Fiji's tertiary education board recently declared that all tertiary institutions in Fiji must abide by the framework in order to meet student-customers' needs. The Fiji National University's (FNU's) destiny to be Fiji's leading higher education provider could be a reality if students and staff's expectations are…

  19. Solomon Islands: Summary Report. Educational Experience Survey: Education, Language and Literacy Experience. Asia-South Pacific Education Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Sylvia

    2007-01-01

    The Education Watch initiative is being implemented in the Solomon Islands by the Coalition on Education Solomon Islands (COESI) in partnership with Asian South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education (ASPBAE). COESI aims to generate a reliable body of information that will: (1) Accurately explain how much the national government has done and can do to…

  20. Neothalassius, a new genus of Parathalassiinae (Diptera: Dolichopodidae s.lat.) from the Pacific coast of South America.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Scott E; Cumming, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    A new genus, Neothalassius gen. nov., and two new species, Neothalassius triton sp. nov. and Neothalassius villosus sp. nov., are described from rocky shorelines along the Pacific seacoast of South America. The phylogenetic placement of Neothalassius within the subfamily Parathalassiinae is discussed. PMID:27395554

  1. Characterization of the variability of the South Pacific Convergence Zone using satellite and reanalysis wind products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Autumn; Lee, Tong; Jo, Young-Heon; Yan, Xiao-hai

    2016-04-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the largest rain band worldwide during austral summer, is important to atmospheric circulation (including cyclone genesis) and ocean circulation. Previous studies of the SPCZ have focused on parameters such as outgoing longwave radiation or precipitation. However, wind convergence is fundamental causing the variations of these parameters. In this study, the SPCZ variability is examined using ocean surface wind products derived from NASA's QuickSCAT (1999-2009) and ESA's ASCAT (2007 onward) satellite scatterometers and ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis (1981 onward). From these products, indices were developed to characterize the SPCZ strength, area, and centroid location. Excellent agreement is found in terms of the temporal variations of the indices derived from the satellites and reanalysis wind products, despite some small differences in the time-mean SPCZ strength. The SPCZ strength, area, and centroid latitude have a dominant seasonal cycle. In contrast, the SPCZ centroid longitude is dominated by intraseasonal variability due to the influence by the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The SPCZ indices are all correlated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. Interannual and intraseasonal variations of SPCZ strength during strong El Niño are approximately twice as large as the respective seasonal variations. SPCZ strength depends more on the intensity of El Niño rather than the central- vs. eastern-Pacific type. The longer ERA-Interim product is also used to examine decadal variations of the SPCZ indices. The change from positive to negative Pacific Decadal Oscillation phase around 1999 resulted in a westward shift of the SPCZ centroid longitude, much smaller interannual swing in centroid latitude, and a decrease in SPCZ area. This study improves the understanding of the variations of the SPCZ on multiple time scales and reveals the variations of SPCZ strength not reported previously. The diagnostics analyses can be

  2. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Resing, Joseph A; Sedwick, Peter N; German, Christopher R; Jenkins, William J; Moffett, James W; Sohst, Bettina M; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  3. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, Joseph A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; German, Christopher R.; Jenkins, William J.; Moffett, James W.; Sohst, Bettina M.; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  4. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  5. Comparison of synoptic and climatologically mapped sections in the south Pacific ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Bindoff, N.L.; Wunsch, C. )

    1992-06-01

    To understand the extent to which oceanic climate shifts could be detected, a South Pacific climatology has been used to create pseudosections of temperature, salinity, and other tracers along a zonal and meridional lines at 15[degrees]S and 90[degrees]W, respectively. Interpolations from the climatology were made using combined empirical orthogonal functions and objective mapping. Comparisons are made with independent measurements, taken in 1987, of temperature and salinity at 15[degrees]S. Temperature and salinity fields between the surface and 300 db along the 15[degrees]S section are predicted with an uncertainty sufficiently small to display significant differences in temperature and salinity related to El Nino of 1987. The 90[degrees]W pseudosection is a forecast of a synoptic section to be obtained as part of WOCE in 1992. Explicit values for the smallest temperature shift with depth that could be detected are produced. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Is seasonal net community production in the South Pacific Subtropical Gyre anomalously low?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Michael L.; Jönsson, Bror

    2016-09-01

    The region of the South Pacific Subtropical Gyre (SPSG) at 20°-30°S, 140°-110°W is the oceanic area with the lowest chlorophyll concentration and the deepest nutricline, O2 saturation horizon, and euphotic zone. We analyze the limited available data from this region to determine if rates of net community production (NCP) are systematically lower than elsewhere. We present limited mixed layer O2/Ar data constraining mixed layer NCP, examine hydrographic data from the CLIVAR repeat hydrography P18 line to assess seasonal dissolved inorganic carbon drawdown, and review results from the literature. While it is not possible to formalize uncertainties, the evidence suggests that euphotic zone NCP is around the lower end (~1 mol m-2 yr-1) of rates observed elsewhere. However, NCP is shifted to unusually deep depths, a change enabled by the very low extinction coefficients of these waters.

  7. [Emerging viral infections in South East Asia and the Pacific region].

    PubMed

    Barboza, P; Tarantola, A; Lassel, L; Mollet, T; Quatresous, I; Paquet, C

    2008-10-01

    The epidemiology of several viral diseases underwent profound changes in South-East Asia and Oceania over the past decades. This was due to several factors, including the geographical distribution of vectors and the viruses they transmit; increasing traveling and trade; increasing ecological and demographic pressure. We reviewed the current state of knowledge based on published sources and available epidemiological data. The review was limited to potentially emerging viruses in Southeast Asia and the Pacific reported in human cases. Dengue, Chikungunya, and Japanese Encephalitis viruses have recurred on a yearly basis with a steady increase in these regions. Ross River and Barmah viruses now appear regularly in Australia, in an increasing number of cases. Nipah virus strikes regularly with limited but deadly epidemics in Southeast Asia. Finally, infections by lyssaviruses, Kunjin, Murray Valley, or Zika viruses were also reviewed.

  8. Litter and seabirds found across a longitudinal gradient in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Urbina, Diego; Thiel, Martin; Luna-Jorquera, Guillermo

    2015-07-15

    Abundances and composition of marine litter and seabirds were estimated in the central South Pacific (SP) Ocean between the Chilean continental coast and the Easter Island Ecoregion. Litter was dominated by plastics throughout the study area, but the proportion of plastics was higher at sea and on the oceanic islands than in coastal waters and on continental beaches. Litter densities were higher close to the center of the SP subtropical gyre compared to the continental coast. The seabird assemblage was diverse (28 species), and several endemic species were recorded. Seabird abundances were higher in the coastal waters and around Juan Fernández Islands off the continental coast than in the Oceanic and Polynesian sectors. Endangered species breeding on Salas & Gómez Island were observed in the Polynesian sector, which suggests a high potential for negative interactions between seabirds and floating litter, both occurring in high densities in this sector. PMID:25998727

  9. Inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene in the South Pacific: how might it be impacting children?

    PubMed

    Barrington, Dani J

    2016-03-01

    It is detrimental to anyone's health to live with conditions of inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH). Research suggests that the impact is greatest on children, and that poor WaSH conditions during the formative years can lead to decreased physical, mental and social well-being throughout one's life. Little research has investigated how such poor WaSH conditions are negatively impacting children in the South Pacific region, and hence contributing to disease and social burden. To increase children's opportunities to develop physically and intellectually in a healthy and sustained manner, it is important that practitioners take a holistic approach to improving WaSH by acknowledging it as a core component of environmental health. PMID:26812758

  10. Large genetic distances among Aedes aegypti populations along the South Pacific coast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Franco, Francisco; Muńoz, Maria De Lourdes; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Garcia-Rejon, Julian; Beaty, Barry J; Black, William C

    2002-05-01

    A population genetic analysis was conducted among 20 Aedes aegypti collections from 19 cities along the south Pacific coast in the Mexican states of Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas and in Coatepeque, Guatemala. Genetic variation was scored at 131 random amplified polymorphic DNA loci. The amount of genetic differentiation among collections was approximately 3 times as great as detected among collections in an earlier study in northeastern Mexico. Regression analysis of linear or road distances on linearized F(ST) indicated that collections are genetically isolated by distance. Cluster analysis failed to group collections in geographic proximity, and there was as much genetic variation among collections 60 km apart as there was among all collections (approximately 900-km range). The large genetic differentiation in southern Mexico reflects reduced gene flow among mosquitoes arising in a greater diversity of habitats and altitudes than exists among northeastern collections. It is likely that dispersal via human commerce in the northeast confounds patterns of natural gene flow.

  11. A structural outline of the Yenkahe volcanic resurgent dome (Tanna Island, Vanuatu Arc, South Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, O.; Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Bachèlery, P.; Garaébiti, E.

    2013-12-01

    A structural study has been conducted on the resurgent Yenkahe dome (5 km long by 3 km wide) located in the heart of the Siwi caldera of Tanna Island (Vanuatu arc, south Pacific). This spectacular resurgent dome hosts a small caldera and a very active strombolian cinder cone - the Yasur volcano - in the west and exhibits an intriguing graben in its central part. Detailed mapping and structural observations make it possible to unravel the volcano-tectonic history of the dome. It is shown that, following the early formation of a resurgent dome in the west, a complex collapse (caldera plus graben) occurred and this was associated with the recent uplift of the eastern part of the present dome. Eastward migration of the underlying magma related to regional tectonics is proposed to explain this evolution.

  12. Preferences for female body size in Britain and the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Knight, Daniel; Tovée, Martin J; Davies, Patrick; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-06-01

    To assess current attitudes to body weight and shape in the South Pacific, a region characterised by relatively high levels of obesity and traditionally positive views of large bodies, 38 high socio-economic status (SES) adolescent males and 38 low SES adolescent males in Independent Samoa were asked to rate a set of images of real women for physical attractiveness. Participants in both SES settings preferred women with a slender figure, as did a comparison group in Britain, suggesting that the traditional veneration of large bodies is no longer apparent in Samoa. However, the results also showed that low SES adolescents were more likely to view overweight figures as attractive, which suggests that the veneration of slim figures may be associated with increasing SES. Implications of this finding are discussed in conclusion. PMID:18089268

  13. Litter and seabirds found across a longitudinal gradient in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Urbina, Diego; Thiel, Martin; Luna-Jorquera, Guillermo

    2015-07-15

    Abundances and composition of marine litter and seabirds were estimated in the central South Pacific (SP) Ocean between the Chilean continental coast and the Easter Island Ecoregion. Litter was dominated by plastics throughout the study area, but the proportion of plastics was higher at sea and on the oceanic islands than in coastal waters and on continental beaches. Litter densities were higher close to the center of the SP subtropical gyre compared to the continental coast. The seabird assemblage was diverse (28 species), and several endemic species were recorded. Seabird abundances were higher in the coastal waters and around Juan Fernández Islands off the continental coast than in the Oceanic and Polynesian sectors. Endangered species breeding on Salas & Gómez Island were observed in the Polynesian sector, which suggests a high potential for negative interactions between seabirds and floating litter, both occurring in high densities in this sector.

  14. A new deep-water goatfish of the genus Upeneus (Mullidae) from Vanuatu, South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Uiblein, Franz; Causse, Romain

    2013-01-01

    A new goatfish, Upeneus vanuatu (Mullidae), is described based on five specimens collected off two islands of Vanuatu (South Pacific), at depths of 191-321 m, and compared with five closely related species: Upeneus davidaroni (Red Sea), U. mascareinsis (Western Indian Ocean), U. stenopsis (northern Australia, Philippines, 127-275 m), and the more shallow-occurring Indo-West Pacific species U. subvittatus (26-120 m) and U. vittatus (

  15. New Zealand's impact on health in the South Pacific: scope for improvement?

    PubMed

    Wyber, Rosemary; Wilson, Nick; Baker, Michael

    2009-03-13

    We examined how New Zealand activities impact on health in Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) in two domains: the provision of development assistance and the impact of trade. The available evidence suggests that New Zealand's official development assistance (ODA) is capably and strategically administered by its development agency, NZAID. However, New Zealand contributes comparatively little of its economic capacity to ODA; only 0.30% of gross national income, with a relatively small proportion spent in the health sector. Increasing this level of ODA and proportional spending on health is likely to be important for enhancing the long-term impact and credibility of the country's development assistance programme. New Zealand has a liberalised trade policy toward the PICTs which is likely to provide economic benefits. However, the country also exports health-damaging products to PICTs such as high-fat mutton flaps and tobacco. Permitting such exports may undermine non-communicable disease control strategies and are a significant area of policy incoherence given other support provided (e.g. for tobacco control). Overall there remains significant scope for New Zealand to contribute more effectively via aid and trade to health in the South Pacific. PMID:19322256

  16. Shallow genetic and morphological divergence among seaperches in the South Pacific (family Scorpaenidae; genus Helicolenus).

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Struthers, C D; Paulin, C D; McVeagh, S M; Daley, R K

    2009-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among populations of seaperch, Helicolenus spp., in the south-west Pacific were examined with mtDNA markers. Parts of the cytochrome b gene [459 base pair (bp)] and the control region (448 bp) were sequenced in 58 specimens from the south-west Pacific and four specimens of Helicolenus lengerichi from Chile. Only one clade was recognized in New Zealand coastal waters, despite a wide range of colour morphs. This clade also occurred in the mid Tasman Sea on the Norfolk Ridge and around Tasmania and Victoria. A second sympatric clade was identified around Tasmania and Victoria and to the west of New Zealand. A third allopatric clade was identified to the north of New Zealand and in deep water on the Chatham Rise and a fourth clade on the Foundation Seamounts and the Louisville Ridge. Helicolenus lengerichi from Chile formed a fifth clade. Assuming a molecular clock, the clades were estimated to have diverged c. 0.7-2.6 million years ago. Only two clades, around Tasmania and Victoria, were separated using morphology, colour (in live) and dorsal-fin soft ray counts and were confirmed as Helicolenus percoides and Helicolenus barathri. Two characters, orbit diameter and colour variation, previously used to identify two species in New Zealand waters were unreliable characters for species discrimination. Principle component analyses of 11 morphological measures from 67 individuals did not delineate the clades. A canonical discriminant analysis was able to separate four of the five clades, but mean discriminate probabilities were low (77.6%), except for the five Chilean specimens of H. lengerichi (100%). PMID:20735622

  17. Shallow genetic and morphological divergence among seaperches in the South Pacific (family Scorpaenidae; genus Helicolenus).

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Struthers, C D; Paulin, C D; McVeagh, S M; Daley, R K

    2009-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among populations of seaperch, Helicolenus spp., in the south-west Pacific were examined with mtDNA markers. Parts of the cytochrome b gene [459 base pair (bp)] and the control region (448 bp) were sequenced in 58 specimens from the south-west Pacific and four specimens of Helicolenus lengerichi from Chile. Only one clade was recognized in New Zealand coastal waters, despite a wide range of colour morphs. This clade also occurred in the mid Tasman Sea on the Norfolk Ridge and around Tasmania and Victoria. A second sympatric clade was identified around Tasmania and Victoria and to the west of New Zealand. A third allopatric clade was identified to the north of New Zealand and in deep water on the Chatham Rise and a fourth clade on the Foundation Seamounts and the Louisville Ridge. Helicolenus lengerichi from Chile formed a fifth clade. Assuming a molecular clock, the clades were estimated to have diverged c. 0.7-2.6 million years ago. Only two clades, around Tasmania and Victoria, were separated using morphology, colour (in live) and dorsal-fin soft ray counts and were confirmed as Helicolenus percoides and Helicolenus barathri. Two characters, orbit diameter and colour variation, previously used to identify two species in New Zealand waters were unreliable characters for species discrimination. Principle component analyses of 11 morphological measures from 67 individuals did not delineate the clades. A canonical discriminant analysis was able to separate four of the five clades, but mean discriminate probabilities were low (77.6%), except for the five Chilean specimens of H. lengerichi (100%).

  18. Fiji's largest marine reserve benefits reef sharks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, J. S.; Fullwood, L. A. F.

    2013-03-01

    To provide more information about whether sharks benefit from no-take marine reserves, we quantified the relative abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside and outside of Namena, Fiji's largest reserve (60.6 km2). Using stereo baited remote underwater video systems (stereo-BRUVs), we found that the abundance and biomass of sharks was approximately two and four times greater in shallow and deep locations, respectively, within the Namena reserve compared to adjacent fished areas. The greater abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside Namena is likely a result of greater prey availability rather than protection from fishing. This study demonstrates that marine reserves can benefit sharks.

  19. Adsorption of a hydrophobic mutagen to dietary fiber from taro (Colocasia esculenta), an important food plant of the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Roberton, A M; McKenzie, R J; Watson, M E; Harris, P J

    1992-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is lower in Polynesian populations of the South Pacific than in European populations. This difference in incidence of the disease may be, at least partly, related to diet. Dietary fiber is believed to protect against colorectal cancer, and one of the ways it may act is by adsorbing mutagens that are carcinogenic. Very little is known about the chemical composition or the ability to adsorb mutagens of these dietary fibers from South Pacific food plants. In contrast to European food plants, which are mostly dicotyledons, South Pacific food plants are mainly monocotyledons. We isolated cell walls (dietary fiber) from the three edible parts of taro (Colocasia esculenta), which is a monocotyledon and a major South Pacific food plant. The ability of these three unlignified cell-wall preparations to adsorb the hydrophobic environmental mutagen 1,8-dinitropyrene was studied. The greatest adsorption occurred with walls from leaf blade, followed by petiole and corm walls, although the differences were not major. The amount of adsorption was intermediate between the low adsorption previously found with unlignified dicotyledon walls (from the flesh of potato tubers and immature cabbage leaves) and the much higher adsorption found with unlignified walls from monocotyledons of the grass and cereal family (Poaceae) (from leaves of seedling Italian ryegrass). These data are consistent with the monosaccharide compositions of the taro wall preparations, which were more similar to those of unlignified walls of dicotyledons than to unlignified walls of the Poaceae. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the composition of the dietary fiber determines its adsorptive properties and that there may be important differences between the major dietary fibers of South Pacific and European food plants.

  20. Geocemical provinces of magmatism in the south-eastern part of the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushchevskaya, Nadezhda; Belyatsky, Boris; Teterin, Dmitry

    2010-05-01

    Comparison of geochemical signatures of island magmatism in the south-eastern part of the Pacific Ocean and tholeiites of the Bransfield and Powell rift zones revealed the similar character of the enrichment which reflects the melting of a close mantle source. But alkaline magmatism of the islands in the west of Antarctic and Marie Byrd Land differs from the enriched basalts of the northern province (Bransfield, Powell, BTJ) by showing more radiogenic Sr values and non-radiogenic Nd. The tectonic development of the South Ocean is characterized by its formation under stationary conditions of Antarctic continent. As a result of this, for the volcanic islands distributed at the western part of the Antarctic we observe no long mountain ridges typical for their development under conditions of the moving plate. Intraplate magmatism evolution was coincided with the extinction of the old subduction zones, formation of the new rift zones and separation of South America from Antarctic [Udintsev, Schenke, 2007; Teterin, 2008]. Such complicated geodynamics caused the possibility of formation of rupture cracks reaching the underlying metasomatizated mantle and decompression melting with further island formation. In Oligocene due to migration of asthenospheric flow from the west to east in the result of destruction of previously united continental blocks there was formed the Scotia Sea, South Sandwich island arc as well as Drake Passage. This caused the mechanical weakening of South Atlantic lithosphere and the starting at the end of Oligocene - beginning Miocene of the new plate border formation - American-Antarctic ridge, which propagated in the eastern direction till the Bouvet triple junction [Dubinin et al., 1999]. The close geochemical signatures of mantle source for islands basalts including the Bouvet Island and the enriched tholeiites of the western extremity of the SW Indian Ridge proves the development of a specific geochemical province enveloping the southeastern

  1. Reconstructing the South Pacific upper water column structure during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, R. I.; Nuernberg, D.; Frank, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current system (ACCs) is the most important current system in the Southern Ocean, characterized by strong zonal variations in specific surface water properties, variations used to classify regions whose edges are defined by fronts. The past changes in the strength and latitudinal position of the ACC frontal system are supposed to play a major role on the global oceanic circulation and thus the Earth's climate through their impact on atmospheric CO2 contents by changes in water stratification conditions, Therefore the study of variability in the surface characteristics of the ACCs provides crucial information to understand and to reconstruct the global climate evolution. The dynamics of the upper-ocean vertical structure, primarily defined by vertical changes in salinity and temperature from the mixed layer down to the seasonal and permanent thermocline, can be tracked using the differences in stable oxygen isotopes (Δδ18O) and Mg/Ca-based temperatures (ΔT) recorded in the test of planktic foraminifera. Only Mg/Ca thermometry coupled with δ18O can guarantee a common source of signal, averaging the same environmental conditions (season and spatial habitat), where, the combined measurements of Mg/Ca and δ18O allow to extract the δ18O record of past upper ocean water, and accordingly salinity variations In this study we present paired measurements of Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotopes of shallow-living and deeper-living planktic foraminifera preserved in core top and downcore samples from the South Pacific (36° to 45° S) retrieved during the SOPATRA cruise (South Pacific Paleoceanographic Transect) Chile-New Zealand. The total Mg/Ca values preserved in the foraminiferal calcite from 31 core top samples ranged from ~2 to 1.3 mmol/mol, allowing estimate SSTs between 16° and 12° C. Additionally, to evaluate the reliability of the Mg/Ca signal paleothermometry for long term reconstruction we determined the effect of calcite saturation

  2. Biogenic particle flux and benthic remineralization in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berelson, W. M.; Haskell, W. Z.; Prokopenko, M.; Knapp, A. N.; Hammond, D. E.; Rollins, N.; Capone, D. G.

    2015-05-01

    We studied biogenic rain to the ocean interior and sea floor in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP), a region at the intersection of three oceanic regimes; coastal upwelling, equatorial divergence and the South Pacific oligotrophic gyre. Sediment cores from ocean depths >4000 m were collected, pore water was expressed using both whole core squeezing and rhizon techniques, and profiles of nitrate and dissolved Si were modeled to estimate remineralization fluxes. Nitrate modeling was interpreted as representative of Corg remineralization assuming the oxic transformation of ammonium to nitrate. A broad range of TCO2 fluxes were determined: 0.008-0.34 mmol C m-2 d-1. The range in biogenic silica (bSi) remineralization flux was also large: 0.007-0.15 mmol Si m-2 d-1. The pattern of TCO2 flux showed higher particulate organic carbon (POC) inputs at sites closest to coastal and equatorial upwelling and lowest fluxes at the most oligotrophic site. Moored sediment traps, suspended at ~3700 m at 10°S, 100°W and 20°S, 100°W captured the annual pattern of mass and biogenic rain. The annual average mass flux was over five times greater at a 10°S site (30.8 mg m-2 d-1) compared to a 20°S site (5.5 mg m-2 d-1). The relative wt% of POC, PIC and bSi at these two stations were 4.9, 8.0, 15.5 and 6.6, 8.3, 2.7, respectively. The deep trap POC and bSi annual rain rates were within 0.5-4 times the benthic fluxes estimated from pore water models. The annual averaged surface ocean chlorophyll concentration estimated from satellites is a good predictor of POC rain to the ocean interior at the ETSP sites studied, as is 14C primary production (PP). However, the POC rain into the deep ocean at ETSP sites per unit chlorophyll or per 14C PP is significantly less than values obtained from the equatorial Pacific at 140°W or subtropical gyre station HOT. It appears that the ETSP, although underlain by an intense oxygen minimum zone, is inefficient at transferring Corg production to

  3. Distinct patterns of marine bacterial communities in the South and North Pacific Oceans.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Park, Mirye; Hwang, Jinik; Lee, Sukchan; Chung, Youngjae; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2014-10-01

    The study of oceanic microbial communities is crucial for our understanding of the role of microbes in terms of biomass, diversity and ecosystem function. In this study, 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing was used to investigate change in bacterial community structure between summer and winter water masses from Gosung Bay in the South Sea of Korea and Chuuk in Micronesia, located in the North and South Pacific Oceans, respectively. Summer and winter sampling from each water mass revealed highly diverse bacterial communities, containing ~900 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). The microbial distribution and highly heterogeneous composition observed at both sampling sites were different from those of most macroorganisms. The bacterial communities in the seawater at both sites were most abundant in Proteobacteria during the summer in Gosung and in Bacterioidetes during the winter. The proportion of Cyanobacteria was higher in summer than in winter in Chuuk and similar in Gosung. Additionally, the microbial community during summer in Gosung was significantly different from other communities observed based on the unweighted UniFrac distance. These data suggest that in both oceanic areas sampled, the bacterial communities had distinct distribution patterns with spatially- and temporally-heterogeneous distributions. PMID:25269604

  4. A climatological interpretation of the circulation in the western South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, T.; Lindstrom, E. J.

    2002-05-01

    Time-averaged circulation is examined using historical hydrographic data near the Australia and Papua New Guinea coast in the Pacific. By averaging the data along isopycnal surfaces in a 0.5øby 0.5ø grid, we are able to show many detailed phenomena associated with the narrow western boundary currents, including the vertical structure of the bifurcation latitude of the South Equatorial Current (SEC) and the connection between the Solomon and Coral Seas. The bifurcation latitude of the SEC is found to move southward from about 15øS near the surface to south of 22øS in the intermediate layers. The origin of the Great Barrier Reef Undercurrent (GBRUC) is identified to be at about 22øS. Farther to the north, the GBRUC intensifies underlying the surface East Australian Current, and merges with the North Queensland Current (NQC) at about 15øS. The NQC turns eastward to flow along the Papua New Guinea coast and feeds into the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent (NGCUC) through the Louisiade Archipelago. Further analysis shows that there is a strong water property connection between the Coral and Solomon Seas, confirming the earlier speculation on the water-mass origins of the NGCUC.

  5. Applications of SEASAT altimeter data in seismotectonic studies of the South-Central Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, R.V.; Okal, E.A.

    1983-02-28

    Individual tracks of SEASAT altimeter data can be used effectively to identify significant bathymetric features in remote and unsurveyed ocean areas. It is especially important, for studies of oceanic seismicity, to identify correlation (or lack of correlation) between seismicity and bathymetric features. However, in many seismically active regions, bathymetric data are sparse or nonexistent. A typical example is the south-central Pacific, an area studied by Okal et al. (1980), who identified several sites of active intraplate seismicity. The purpose of the present paper is to demonstrate how SEASAT data can be used to aid in bathymetric and seismotectonic interpretation of this remote ocean area. We present two illustrations: (1) SEASAT observations of Macdonald seamount, a volcanically active seamount representing the youngest member in the Austral Island chain, and (2) SEASAT observation of a previously undiscovered fracture zone located at approximately 21.4 /sup 0/S and trending east-west between 232 /sup 0/E and 236 /sup 0/E. This fracture zone is located approximately 70 km to the south of a small region of active seismicity (96 events of magnitude greater than 2.7 from 1976 to 1980). On the basis of the demonstrated ability to observe active seamounts such as Macdonald and small fracture zones, we conclude that the observed seismicity in the region near 21 /sup 0/S, 233 /sup 0/E is due to intraplate stresses but is not associated with large-scale volcanism or with an active or fossil fracture zone.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus 'Down Under': contemporary epidemiology of S. aureus in Australia, New Zealand, and the South West Pacific.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D A; Coombs, G W; Nimmo, G R

    2014-07-01

    The clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus disease has changed considerably over the past two decades, particularly with the emergence and spread of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) clones. Indeed, some of the first global descriptions of CA-MRSA were from remote indigenous communities in Western Australia, and from Pacific Peoples in New Zealand. The epidemiology of S. aureus infections in the South West Pacific has several unique features, largely because of the relative geographical isolation and unique indigenous communities residing in this region. In particular, a number of distinct CA-MRSA clones circulate in Australia and New Zealand, such as sequence type (ST) 93 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (Queensland clone) and clonal complex 75 S. aureus (Staphylococcus argenteus) in Australia, and ST30 MRSA (Southwest Pacific clone) in New Zealand. In addition, there is a disproportionate burden of S. aureus disease in indigenous paediatric populations, particularly in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia, and in Pacific Peoples and Maori in New Zealand. In this review, we provide a contemporary overview of the clinical and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus disease in the South West Pacific region, with a particular focus on features distinct to this region.

  7. Concentrations, isotopic compositions, and sources of lead in the surface waters of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, R.; Zurbrick, C. M.; Flegal, A. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured in surface and subsurface waters across the Eastern Tropical South Pacific as part of the 2013 US GEOTRACES Zonal Transect from Peru to Tahiti. Surface waters were collected throughout the transect, and subsurface waters were collected to a depth of 1,000 m at 36 vertical profile stations. Aliquots of some of those samples, as well as samples from greater depths, were used in intercalibrations with Ed Boyle's group, which focused on lead fluxes from hydrothermal vents and at the benthic boundary layer. In contrast, our group focused on aeolian lead fluxes to surface waters from natural and industrial sources. Preliminary data indicate that lead concentrations in those South Pacific surface waters are low compared to the more contaminated North Pacific. Moreover, complementary lead isotopic compositions indicate distinguishing between natural and industrial lead fluxes in the South Pacific will be more difficult now that the use of gasoline with lead alkyls from Australia have been eliminated.

  8. Tales from the South (and West) Pacific in the Common Era: A Climate Proxy Perspective (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Partin, J. W.; Maupin, C. R.; Hereid, K. A.; Gorman, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    The southwest Pacific is a major source of tropical climate variability through heat and moisture exchanges associated with the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) and the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). These variations are especially significant at the annual, interannual (El Niño-Southern Oscillation, ENSO), and multi-decadal timescales. Gridded SST data products are available in the pre-satellite era in this region for the past ~130 years, although data density is a significant issue for the older half of these records. Time series of salinity (SSS) and rainfall from this region are exceedingly rare. Thus, climate proxy records must be used to reconstruct SST, SSS, and rainfall variations in the Common Era (CE) in the tropical Pacific. The analytical laboratory for paleoclimate studies at UT has focused its research efforts into producing climate proxy time series from southwest tropical Pacific using modern and fossil corals, and speleothems. Our most recent results are summarized in this presentation, although much of this work is still in progress. Coral climate records have been generated from Sabine Bank, Vanuatu (16°S, 166°E) and Misima Island, Papua New Guinea (10.6°S, 152.8°E). The Vanuatu coral record of monthly resolved Sr/Ca variations extends back to the late 18th century. All strong ENSO warm phase events of the 20th century observed in the instrumental record are also observed in the coral record. We note that several ENSO warm phase events in the 19th century portion of the coral record are comparable in size to that recorded in response to the 1982/1983 and 1997/1998 events. The Misima coral record of monthly resolved δ18O and Sr/Ca variations spans the interval ~1414-1645 CE — the heart of the Little Ice Age. Amplitude modulation of interannual variability is observed in this LIA record, much like what is observed during the relatively quiescent period of 1920-1950 in the 20th century instrumental and proxy records of ENSO. However

  9. The bladed Bangiales (Rhodophyta) of the South Eastern Pacific: Molecular species delimitation reveals extensive diversity.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Marie-Laure; Contreras-Porcia, Loretto; Ramírez, María Eliana; Macaya, Erasmo C; Contador, Cristian Bulboa; Woods, Helen; Wyatt, Christopher; Brodie, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    A molecular taxonomic study of the bladed Bangiales of the South Eastern Pacific (coast of Chile) was undertaken based on sequence data of the mitochondrial COI and chloroplast rbcL for 193 specimens collected from Arica (18°S) in the north to South Patagonia (53°S) in the south. The results revealed for the first time that four genera, Porphyra, Pyropia, Fuscifolium and Wildemania were present in the region. Species delimitation was determined based on a combination of a General Mixed Yule Coalescence model (GMYC) and Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) coupled with detection of monophyly in tree reconstruction. The overall incongruence between the species delimitation methods within each gene was 29%. The GMYC method led to over-splitting groups, whereas the ABGD method had a tendency to lump groups. Taking a conservative approach to the number of putative species, at least 18 were recognized and, with the exception of the recently described Pyropia orbicularis, all were new to the Chilean flora. Porphyra and Pyropia were the most diverse genera with eight 'species' each, whereas only a 'single' species each was found for Fuscifolium and Wildemania. There was also evidence of recently diverging groups: Wildemania sp. was distinct but very closely related to W. amplissima from the Northern Hemisphere and raises questions in relation to such disjunct distributions. Pyropia orbicularis was very closely related to two other species, making species delimitation very difficult but provides evidence of an incipient speciation. The difference between the 'species' discovered and those previously reported for the region is discussed in relation to the difficulty of distinguishing species based on morphological identification. PMID:26484942

  10. Transition from slab stagnation to penetration beneath the northwestern Pacific and South America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Y.; Obayashi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Subducting slabs tend to once deflect horizontally in the transition zone as stagnant slabs and then to penetrate into the lower mantle across the 660-km discontinuity. Here we present the detailed tomographic images of transition from stagnant-slab mode to penetrating-slab mode, based on the global ISC travel time data to which regional network data and long-term array observation data including ocean bottom data are added. The targets are the subducted slabs beneath South America and the northwestern Pacific. In South America the transition occurs across the northeastward extension of the sharp bend of the Peru-Chili trench. The slab to the south of this extension is stagnant above the 660, and to the north it plunges into the lower mantle across the 660. The transition is sharp as if the originally flat slab in the northern part was rotated into the present configuration by hinge faulting along the extension. We suspect that this hinge faulting either triggered the northward propagation of or truncated the southward propagation of the plunging motion of the slab into the lower mantle. Along the Kurile arc, the slab is flattened above the 660 in the southwest, penetrating in the northeast, with a transitional feature in between. In southern Kurile the flattened part has a deepest bottom near the junction with the dipping part. Such an along-arc change of slab configuration is indicative of a process of transition from stagnant-slab mode to penetrating-slab mode: the flattened part and dipping part of the slab begin to sink into the lower mantle at their junction so that the horizontal part is progressively dragged to and is eventually united to the dipping part as a penetrating slab. Along the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc, the slab is flattened above the 660 in the north (Izu-Bonin) and is penetrating the 660 in the south (Mariana) leaving the horizontal part in the transition zone. In the Izu-Bonin the flattened part has a deepest bottom near the junction with

  11. Reviewing the circulation and mixing of Antarctic Intermediate Water in the South Pacific using evidence from geochemical tracers and Argo float trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, Helen C.; Sutton, Phil J.; Williams, Michael J. M.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2013-03-01

    Evidence from physical and geochemical tracers measured during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) shows that there are four sub-types of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the South Pacific. The main formation region of AAIW is the southeast Pacific, where fresh, cold, high oxygen, low nutrient, intermediate waters are created. This AAIW is transported north and mixes with Equatorial Pacific Intermediate Waters (EqPIW), themselves a combination of AAIW and nutrient rich, old North Pacific deep waters. 'Tasman' AAIW found in the Coral and Tasman Seas is more saline and warmer than the main subtropical gyre, and appears to have formed from mixing of AAIW with thermocline waters in the Tasman Gyre. Tasman AAIW leaks out of the Tasman basin to the north of New Zealand and along Chatham Rise, and also in the South Tasman Sea via the Tasman Leakage. Another source of relatively fresh, high oxygen, low nutrient, young AAIW comes directly from the Southern Ocean, flowing into the southwest and central South Pacific Basin, west of the East Pacific Rise. This 'Southern Ocean' (SO) AAIW is most likely a mixture of AAIW formed locally at the Subantarctic Front (SAF), and AAIW formed along the SAF in the southeast Pacific or Indian oceans and transported by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Interpreting physical and geochemical tracers, combined with velocity estimates from Argo floats, and previous research, has allowed us to refine the detailed circulation pattern of AAIW in the South Pacific, especially in the topographically complex southwest Pacific.

  12. Blue whale population structure along the eastern South Pacific Ocean: evidence of more than one population.

    PubMed

    Torres-Florez, J P; Hucke-Gaete, R; LeDuc, R; Lang, A; Taylor, B; Pimper, L E; Bedriñana-Romano, L; Rosenbaum, H C; Figueroa, C C

    2014-12-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were among the most intensively exploited species of whales in the world. As a consequence of this intense exploitation, blue whale sightings off the coast of Chile were uncommon by the end of the 20th century. In 2004, a feeding and nursing ground was reported in southern Chile (SCh). With the aim to investigate the genetic identity and relationship of these Chilean blue whales to those in other Southern Hemisphere areas, 60 biopsy samples were collected from blue whales in SCh between 2003 and 2009. These samples were genotyped at seven microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region was sequenced, allowing us to identify 52 individuals. To investigate the genetic identity of this suspected remnant population, we compared these 52 individuals to blue whales from Antarctica (ANT, n = 96), Northern Chile (NCh, n = 19) and the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP, n = 31). No significant differentiation in haplotype frequencies (mtDNA) or among genotypes (nDNA) was found between SCh, NCh and ETP, while significant differences were found between those three areas and Antarctica for both the mitochondrial and microsatellite analyses. Our results suggest at least two breeding population units or subspecies exist, which is also supported by other lines of evidence such as morphometrics and acoustics. The lack of differences detected between SCh/NCh/ETP areas supports the hypothesis that eastern South Pacific blue whales are using the ETP area as a possible breeding area. Considering the small population sizes previously reported for the SCh area, additional conservation measures and monitoring of this population should be developed and prioritized. PMID:25492593

  13. Blue whale population structure along the eastern South Pacific Ocean: evidence of more than one population.

    PubMed

    Torres-Florez, J P; Hucke-Gaete, R; LeDuc, R; Lang, A; Taylor, B; Pimper, L E; Bedriñana-Romano, L; Rosenbaum, H C; Figueroa, C C

    2014-12-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were among the most intensively exploited species of whales in the world. As a consequence of this intense exploitation, blue whale sightings off the coast of Chile were uncommon by the end of the 20th century. In 2004, a feeding and nursing ground was reported in southern Chile (SCh). With the aim to investigate the genetic identity and relationship of these Chilean blue whales to those in other Southern Hemisphere areas, 60 biopsy samples were collected from blue whales in SCh between 2003 and 2009. These samples were genotyped at seven microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region was sequenced, allowing us to identify 52 individuals. To investigate the genetic identity of this suspected remnant population, we compared these 52 individuals to blue whales from Antarctica (ANT, n = 96), Northern Chile (NCh, n = 19) and the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP, n = 31). No significant differentiation in haplotype frequencies (mtDNA) or among genotypes (nDNA) was found between SCh, NCh and ETP, while significant differences were found between those three areas and Antarctica for both the mitochondrial and microsatellite analyses. Our results suggest at least two breeding population units or subspecies exist, which is also supported by other lines of evidence such as morphometrics and acoustics. The lack of differences detected between SCh/NCh/ETP areas supports the hypothesis that eastern South Pacific blue whales are using the ETP area as a possible breeding area. Considering the small population sizes previously reported for the SCh area, additional conservation measures and monitoring of this population should be developed and prioritized.

  14. A magneto- and chemostratigraphically calibrated dinoflagellate cyst zonation of the early Palaeogene South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Peter K.; Sluijs, Appy; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2013-09-01

    Investigation of the early Palaeogene palaeoecological and palaeoclimatological evolution of the Polar Regions is hindered by the absence of calcite microfossils in sedimentary archives, which are conventionally the main dating tool. To overcome this problem, we have generated large datasets of organic dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblages from Southern Ocean shelf sediments over the past decade, and we here calibrate these to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) using magnetostratigraphy and stable isotope stratigraphy. This now for the first time allows a high-resolution Southern Pacific Ocean dinocyst zonation for the late Palaeocene to late Eocene (58-36 million years ago; Ma). We compile published dinocyst chronologies from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1171D on the South Tasman Rise, Hole 1172A/D on the East Tasman Plateau and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hole U1356A on the Wilkes Land margin. Correlation to dinocyst zonations from New Zealand lead to revisions of the magnetostratigraphic age model at Holes 1171D and 1172A/D. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope records reveal the stratigraphic location of the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (~ 56 Ma) and the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (~ 40 Ma), respectively. The resulting zonation consists of thirteen dinocyst zones, calibrated to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) of Vandenberghe et al. (2012), which can likely be applied to the entire Southern Ocean. Finally, we apply the revised stratigraphy to all published TEX86 data, a biomarker-based proxy for sea surface temperature (SST), from ODP Site 1172 to assess long-term climate evolution. This shows that Southwest Pacific SST trends mimic the global compilation of benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotopes even better than previously appreciated.

  15. Oxygen distribution and aerobic respiration in the north and south eastern tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiano, Laura; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Dalsgaard, Tage; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E.; Peter Revsbech, Niels

    2014-12-01

    Highly sensitive STOX O2 sensors were used for determination of in situ O2 distribution in the eastern tropical north and south Pacific oxygen minimum zones (ETN/SP OMZs), as well as for laboratory determination of O2 uptake rates of water masses at various depths within these OMZs. Oxygen was generally below the detection limit (few nmol L-1) in the core of both OMZs, suggesting the presence of vast volumes of functionally anoxic waters in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Oxygen was often not detectable in the deep secondary chlorophyll maximum found at some locations, but other secondary maxima contained up to ~0.4 μmol L-1. Directly measured respiration rates were high in surface and subsurface oxic layers of the coastal waters, reaching values up to 85 nmol L-1 O2 h-1. Substantially lower values were found at the depths of the upper oxycline, where values varied from 2 to 33 nmol L-1 O2 h-1. Where secondary chlorophyll maxima were found the rates were higher than in the oxic water just above. Incubation times longer than 20 h, in the all-glass containers, resulted in highly increased respiration rates. Addition of amino acids to the water from the upper oxycline did not lead to a significant initial rise in respiration rate within the first 20 h, indicating that the measurement of respiration rates in oligotrophic Ocean water may not be severely affected by low levels of organic contamination during sampling. Our measurements indicate that aerobic metabolism proceeds efficiently at extremely low oxygen concentrations with apparent half-saturation concentrations (Km values) ranging from about 10 to about 200 nmol L-1.

  16. Distal transport of hydrothermal iron in the deep Eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Jenkins, W. J.; Lee, J.; Kayser, R. A.; Boyle, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    While dust deposition and transport from continental margin sediments are usually thought to be the main inputs of iron to the surface ocean dissolved Fe (dFe) pool, Fe input to the deep ocean has been attributed mostly to remineralization of sinking biogenic particles. Hydrothermal vents are known to emit large amounts of Fe to the deep ocean, but most of this Fe precipitates near the ridge crest, so it is not clear that vents supply a significant amount of dFe to the deep ocean. Several recent studies have seen dFe maxima in the deep ocean near ridge crests and attributed this dFe to hydrothermal activity (Boyle & Jenkins, 2008; Klunder et al. 2011; Wu et al. 2011; Klunder et al. 2012; Noble et al. 2012). Hydrothermally-derived Fe is believed to be maintained in the dissolved phase by a combination of binding by organic ligands (Bennett et al. 2008; Sander & Koschinsky, 2012) and a nanoparticle/colloidal contribution to the dFe class (Yucel et al. 2011). Modeling efforts using the distribution of excess He-3 in deep waters arising from hydrothermal activity have predicted that deep ocean dFe may be much higher than currently believed, especially in the southern hemisphere (Tagliabue et al. 2010). In this presentation, we show the first deep ocean dFe data from two stations in the Eastern South Pacific Ocean (Station 7 at 26.3degS, 104degW and Station 4 at 23.5degS, 88.8degW). He-3 and dissolved manganese (dMn) distributions at these stations imply that hydrothermal activity is a significant source of dFe to the deep ocean in this region. Maximum deep dFe concentrations at 2250m reach 1.5 nmol/kg at Station 7 and are still 0.86 nmol/kg at Station 4, thousands of kilometers from presumed East Pacific Rise hydrothermal sources. Excess He-3 and dFe are correlated in the plume maximum by comparison of the measured dFe with nearby WOCE He-3 stations spatially interpolated on isopycnals. We observe a slope of 1.1-2.0 x 10^6 mol Fe/mol He-3, similar to but somewhat

  17. Asia and the Pacific: Issues of Educational Policy, Curriculum, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donald C., Ed.; And Others

    The Pacific region is growing in worldwide importance in terms of politics, economics, and culture. The emergence of this area of the world provides an opportunity for new directions in social studies education. This book addresses the Pacific Rim issues from the viewpoints of educators from 9 Pacific nations: Australia, Canada, Fiji, Japan,…

  18. Review of solutions for 3D hydrodynamic modeling applied to aquaculture in South Pacific atoll lagoons.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, S; Ouillon, S; Brinkman, R; Falter, J; Douillet, P; Wolk, F; Smith, R; Garen, P; Martinez, E; Laurent, V; Lo, C; Remoissenet, G; Scourzic, B; Gilbert, A; Deleersnijder, E; Steinberg, C; Choukroun, S; Buestel, D

    2006-10-01

    A workshop organized in French Polynesia in November 2004 allowed reviewing the current methods to model the three-dimensional hydrodynamic circulation in semi-enclosed atoll lagoons for aquaculture applications. Mollusk (e.g. pearl oyster, clam) aquaculture is a major source of income for South Pacific countries such as French Polynesia or Cook Islands. This aquaculture now requires a better understanding of circulation patterns to improve the spatial use of the lagoons, especially to define the best area to set larvae collectors. The pelagic larval duration of the relevant species (<20 days) and the size of the semi-closed lagoons (few hundreds of km2) drive the specifications of the model in terms of the spatial and temporal scale. It is considered that, in contrast with fish, mollusk larvae movements are limited and that their cycle occurs completely in the lagoon, without an oceanic stage. Atolls where aquaculture is productive are generally well-bounded, or semi-closed, without significant large and deep openings to the ocean. Nevertheless part of the lagoon circulation is driven by oceanic water inputs through the rim, ocean swells, tides and winds. Therefore, boundary conditions of the lagoon system are defined by the spatial structure of a very shallow rim (exposition and number of hoas), the deep ocean swell climate, tides and wind regimes. To obtain a realistic 3D numerical model of lagoon circulation with adequate forcing, it is thus necessary to connect in an interdisciplinary way a variety of methods (models, remote sensing and in situ data collection) to accurately represent the different components of the lagoon system and its specific boundary conditions. We review here the current methods and tools used to address these different components for a hypothetical atoll of the Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia), representative of the semi-closed lagoons of the South Pacific Ocean. We hope this paper will serve as a guide for similar studies

  19. Seasonal oceanography from physics to micronekton in the south-west Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menkes, C. E.; Allain, V.; Rodier, M.; Gallois, F.; Lebourges-Dhaussy, A.; Hunt, B. P. V.; Smeti, H.; Pagano, M.; Josse, E.; Daroux, A.; Lehodey, P.; Senina, I.; Kestenare, E.; Lorrain, A.; Nicol, S.

    2015-03-01

    Tuna catches represent a major economic and food source in the Pacific Ocean, yet are highly variable. This variability in tuna catches remains poorly explained. The relationships between the distributions of tuna and their forage (micronekton) have been mostly derived from model estimates. Observations of micronekton and other mid-trophic level organisms, and their link to regional oceanography, however are scarce and constitute an important gap in our knowledge and understanding of the dynamics of pelagic ecosystems. To fill this gap, we conducted two multidisciplinary cruises (Nectalis1 and Nectalis2) in the New Caledonian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) at the southeastern edge the Coral Sea, in 2011 to characterize the oceanography of the region during the cool (August) and the hot (December) seasons. The physical and biological environments were described by hydrology, nutrients and phytoplankton size structure and biomass. Zooplankton biomass was estimated from net sampling and acoustics and micronecton was estimated from net sampling, the SEAPODYM ecosystem model, a dedicated echosounder and non-dedicated acoustics. Results demonstrated that New Caledonia is located in an oligotrophic area characterized by low nutrient and low primary production which is dominated by a high percentage of picoplankton cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus (>90%). The area exhibits a large-scale north-south temperature and salinity gradient. The northern area is influenced by the equatorial Warm Pool and the South Pacific Convergence Zone and is characterized by higher temperature, lower salinity, lower primary production and micronekton biomass. The southern area is influenced by the Tasman Sea and is characterized by cooler temperature, higher salinity, higher primary production and micronekton biomass. The dynamic oceanography and the complex topography create a myriad of mesoscale features including eddies, inducing patchy structures in the ecosystem. During the cool season, a

  20. Biogeochemical characteristics of a long-lived anticyclonic eddy in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, M.; Bravo, L.; Ramos, M.; Pizarro, O.; Karstensen, J.; Gallegos, M.; Correa-Ramirez, M.; Silva, N.; Farias, L.; Karp-Boss, L.

    2015-09-01

    Eastern boundary upwelling systems are characterized by high productivity that often leads to subsurface hypoxia on the shelf. Mesoscale eddies are important, frequent, and persistent features of circulation in these regions, transporting physical, chemical and biological properties from shelves to the open ocean. In austral fall of 2011, during the Tara Oceans expedition, a subsurface layer (200-400 m) in which the concentration of oxygen was very low (< 2 μmol kg-1 of O2) was observed in the eastern South Pacific, ~ 900 km offshore (30° S, 81° W). Satellite altimetry combined with CTD observations associated the local oxygen anomaly with an intrathermocline, anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy with a diameter of about 150 km. The eddy contained Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) that at this latitude is normally restricted near the coast. Undersaturation (44 %) of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrite accumulation (> 0.5 μM) gave evidence for denitrification in this water mass. Based on satellite altimetry, we tracked the eddy back to its region of formation on the coast of central Chile (36.1° S, 74.6° W). We estimate that the eddy formed in April 2010. Field studies conducted on the Chilean shelf in June 2010 provided approximate information on initial O2 and N2O concentrations of "source water" in the region at the time of eddy formation. Concentrations of both O2 and N2O in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the offshore eddy were lower than its surroundings or "source water" on the shelf, suggesting that these chemical species were consumed as the eddy moved offshore. Estimates of apparent oxygen utilization rates at the OMZ of the eddy ranged from 0.29 to 44 nmol L-1 d-1 and the rate of N2O consumption was 3.92 nmol L-1 d-1. Our results show that mesoscale eddies in the ESP not only transport physical properties of the ESSW from the coast to the ocean interior, but also export and transform biogeochemical properties, creating suboxic environments in the oligotrophic

  1. Modelling the impact of climate change on South Pacific albacore tuna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehodey, Patrick; Senina, Inna; Nicol, Simon; Hampton, John

    2015-03-01

    The potential impact of climate change under the IPCC AR4-A2 scenario (close to the AR5-RCP8.5 scenario) on south Pacific albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) is simulated with the Spatial Ecosystem And Population Dynamics Model (SEAPODYM) and environmental forcing variables provided by the Earth Climate model IPSL-CM4. Parameters controlling the habitat and dynamics of the population were optimized by fitting the model, using maximum likelihood, to a complete fishing data set for the historical fishing period since 1950. Albacore undertake clear seasonal migrations between feeding and spawning grounds, as evidenced by seasonal catch and size composition changes. This seasonality was well predicted by the SEAPODYM albacore simulations. The total biomass estimate of south Pacific albacore was predicted to have decreased from ~1.8 million tonnes (Mt) at the beginning of industrial fisheries in 1950 to 1.25 Mt in 2006, in good agreement with an independent estimate from stock assessment analysis. A simulation without fishing indicated an equivalent contribution of environmental variability and fishing to the historical decrease of the stock biomass. The parameterized SEAPODYM model was used to project the dynamics of the population until the end of the 21st century with an average fishing effort based on recent years. Under this fishing and climate change scenario, the population was predicted to decrease and to stabilize after 2035 just below 0.8 Mt, i.e., 55% below the initial biomass of 1960. After 2080 however, the trend was reversed when a new spawning ground emerged in the north Tasman Sea. A test simulation highlighted the sensitivity of the model results to projected dissolved oxygen concentration for which there is large uncertainty in the tropical region. A second test simulation showed that genetic selection favouring albacore with preferences for higher optimal ambient spawning temperature would maintain a reduced level of spawning in current tropical spawning

  2. Diel variability of heterotrophic bacterial production and UV doses in the South East Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wambeke, F.; Tedetti, M.; Duhamel, S.; Sempéré, R.

    2008-01-01

    Diel variability of heterotrophic bacterial production (BP) was investigated in the South East Pacific from October to December 2004 during the BIOSOPE cruise. Three sites differing by their trophic status were studied: Marquesas Islands (MAR; 08° S, 141° W), the centre of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) (GYR; 26° S, 114° W) and the eastern part of the SPG (EGY; 32° S, 91° W). At the three sites, diel variability of BP ranged from 17 to 40% and from 13 to 22% for volumetric surface (5 m) and integrated (to Ze and Zm) data, respectively. The main feature we observed was at 5 m, an abrupt increase (×2 to ×4) in leucine activity during the afternoon-sunset period (12:00-18:00 at the site MAR and 15:00-21:00 at the site GYR) and lowest activities recorded between 10:00 and 14:00. To assess the potential influence of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR: 280-400 nm) on this BP diel variability, we determined, from in situ optical measurements, the mean tri-hourly ultraviolet B (UVB, 305 nm) and ultraviolet A (UVA, 380 nm) doses (irradiances integrated over time) within the mixed layer (Hm(UVB) and Hm(UVA), respectively). The wavelengths 305 nm and 380 nm were used as biologically effective wavelengths for the induction of DNA damages (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers: CPDs) and photoenzymatic repairs (PERs), respectively. In the SPG, daily Hm(UVB) and Hm(UVA) were 0.6 and 14 kJ m-2 nm-1, respectively. The latter were probably the highest daily doses ever measured in the marine environment. The Hm(UVB)/Hm(UVA) ratio (Q) increased by 58, 117 and 46% from 06:00-09:00 to 12:00-15:00, and decreased by 36, 26 and 16% from 12:00-15:00 to 15:00-18:00 at the sites MAR, GYR and EGY, respectively. The relationship between Q and BP suggested a significant influence of UVR on the diel variability of BP (BP decreased when Q increased) at the site GYR from the surface waters to Zm, likely in relation with its hyper-oligotrophic status. Therefore, possible alternance of CPD and PER

  3. Evaluating the Influence of Solar Radiation, Coral Extension Rate and Anthropogenic CO2 on Skeletal δ13C in a Network of Fiji and Tonga Porites Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassie, E. P.; Lemley, G. M.; Linsley, B. K.; Howe, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    While stable oxygen isotope signatures in coral reefs have proven to be reliable recorders of temperature and salinity, it is difficult to interpret their skeletal 13C/12C signatures. Various studies have suggested that coral skeletal δ13C is primarily controlled by complex physiological mechanisms. However, it has also been proposed that δ13C variations in coral skeletons are related to more apparent factors such as solar radiation, skeletal extension rate, and the anthropogenic addition of 13C-depleted CO2 into the atmosphere and surface ocean ("Suess Effect"). We will present time-series variations of δ13C in six coral cores from Fiji and Tonga (South Pacific Ocean). On seasonal timescales, increases in solar radiation are correlated to increases in skeletal δ13C and visa-versa. Annually averaged data shows a correlation between increased coral δ13C and reduced coral extension rate, while a decrease in δ13C is associated with an increased extension rate. In the most recent portion of four of the coral δ13C records (from around 1900 to the core top), the value progressively decreases - a trend that is not present in either the skeletal extension rate or solar radiation data. We conclude that this decreasing δ13C trend is a consequence of the Suess Effect, as reported in other coral δ13C records. However, two of the six corals do not show this decreasing trend, which may be a result of their residence in especially shallow water (sub-tidal environments). The onset of the Suess effect in the four corals may help constrain the timing of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon by the western South Pacific Ocean. Although all factors controlling δ13C variation in corals are not completely understood, this study works towards an understanding of their relative contribution to δ13C variation.

  4. A novel clade of Prochlorococcus found in high nutrient low chlorophyll waters in the South and Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    West, Nyree J; Lebaron, Philippe; Strutton, Pete G; Suzuki, Marcelino T

    2011-01-01

    A novel high-light (HL)-adapted Prochlorococcus clade was discovered in high nutrient and low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters in the South Pacific Ocean by phylogenetic analyses of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 16S–23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. This clade, named HNLC fell within the HL-adapted Prochlorococcus clade with sequences above 99% similarity to one another, and was divided into two subclades, HNLC1 and HNLC2. The distribution of the whole HNLC clade in a northwest to southeast transect in the South Pacific (HNLC-to-gyre) and two 8°N to 8°S transects in the Equatorial Pacific was determined by quantitative PCR using specific primers targeting ITS regions. HNLC was the dominant HL Prochlorococcus clade (2–9% of bacterial 16S rRNA genes) at the three westernmost stations in the South Pacific but decreased to less than 0.1% at the other stations being replaced by the eMIT9312 ecotype in the hyperoligotrophic gyre. The highest contributions of HNLC Prochlorococcus in both Equatorial Pacific transects along the latitudinal lines of 170°W and 155°W were observed at the southernmost stations, reaching 16 and 6% of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, respectively, whereas eMIT9312 dominated near the Equator. Spearman Rank Order correlation analysis indicated that although both the HNLC clade and eMIT9312 were correlated with temperature, they showed different correlations with regard to nutrients. HNLC only showed significant correlations to ammonium uptake and regeneration rates, whereas eMIT9312 was negatively correlated with inorganic nutrients. PMID:21124492

  5. Collaborative Action Research Involving Fiji and Solomon Islands Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Gurmit

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the Basic Education and Life Skills program, which involves University of the South Pacific member countries, highlighting teacher involvement in collaborative action research to promote professional development at the school level. The paper describes the nature of teachers' involvement and shares insights from their experiences as…

  6. IODP Expedition 329: Life and Habitability Beneath the Seafloor of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, S.; Inagaki, F.; Alvarez Zarikian, C.; IODP Expedition 329 Scientific Party, the

    2013-03-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329 made major strides toward fulfilling its objectives. Shipboard studies documented (1) fundamental aspects of habitability and life in this very low activity subseafloor sedimentary ecosystem and (2) first-order patterns of habitability within the igneous basement. A broad range of postexpedition studies will complete the expedition objectives. Throughout the South Pacific Gyre (SPG; Sites U1365-U1370), dissolved oxygen and nitrate are present throughout the entire sediment sequence, and sedimentary microbial cell counts are lower than at all previously drilled IODP/ Ocean Drilling Program (ODP)/Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) sites. In contrast, at Site U1371 in the upwelling zone just south of the gyre, detectable oxygen and nitrate are limited to the top and bottom of the sediment column, manganese reduction is a prominent electron-accepting process, and cell concentrations are higher than at the same depths in the SPG sites throughout the sediment column. Geographic variation in subseafloor profiles of dissolved and solid-phase chemicals are consistent with the magnitude of organic-fueled subseafloor respiration declining from outside the gyre to the gyre center. Chemical profiles in the sedimentary pore water and secondary mineral distributions in the basaltic basement indicate that basement alteration continues on the timescale of formation fluid replacement, even at the sites with the oldest basement (84-120 Ma at Sites U1365 and U1366). doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.15.01.2013

  7. A comparative study of Taiwan's short-term medical missions to the South Pacific and Central America

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Taiwan has been dispatching an increasing number of short-term medical missions (STMMs) to its allied nations to provide humanitarian health care; however, overall evaluations to help policy makers strengthen the impact of such missions are lacking. Our primary objective is to identify useful strategies by comparing STMMs to the South Pacific and Central America. Methods The data for the evaluation come from two main sources: the official reports of 46 missions to 11 countries in Central America and 25 missions to 8 countries in the South Pacific, and questionnaires completed by health professionals who had participated in the above missions. In Central America, STMMs were staffed by volunteer health professionals from multiple institutions. In the South Pacific, STMMs were staffed by volunteer health professionals from single institutions. Results In comparison to STMMs to Central America, STMMs to the South Pacific accomplished more educational training for local health providers, including providing heath-care knowledge and skills (p<0.05), and training in equipment administration (p<0.001) and drug administration (p<0.005). In addition, language constraints were more common among missions to Central America (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the performance of clinical service between the two regions. Conclusions Health-care services provided by personnel from multiple institutions are as efficient as those from single institutions. Proficiency in the native language and provision of education for local health-care workers are essential for conducting a successful STMM. Our data provide implications for integrating evidence into the deployment of STMMs. PMID:23270459

  8. Health, widowhood, and family support in the North and South Pacific: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    McNally, James W

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares the impacts of health and widowhood on the level of support received by elderly women living in small island communities within the Philippines and Fiji. Using a theoretical perspective of ongoing reciprocal exchange as opposed to altruistic support within household economies, this paper reviews the impacts of disability and economic contributions on the level of support an elderly female receives. It is hypothesized that as the health of the widow declines her access to care will also diminish due to an inability to contribute to the household economies of the extended family. This paper extends existing work on health and family support of widowed females in the developing world by performing a cross-national comparative analysis as well as by explicitly testing the assumptions of altruism that are a central assumption of most models of long-term care in underdeveloped nations.

  9. Dissolved organic carbon in the South China Sea and its exchange with the Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Dai, Minhan; Chen, Junhui; Meng, Feifei; Li, Xiaolin; Liu, Zhiyu; Du, Chuanjun; Gan, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Based on a large and high quality dataset of total organic carbon (TOC, an approximation of dissolved organic carbon) collected from three cruises in spring, fall and winter in 2009-2011, we examined the distribution of TOC and its seasonality in the oligotrophic regime of the Northern South China Sea (NSCS) as well as its exchanges with the West Philippine Sea (WPS) in the Northwest Pacific Ocean through the Luzon Strait, the only deep channel linking the South China Sea (SCS) and the Pacific Ocean. Surface TOC concentration in the slope and basin areas of the NSCS varied from 65 to 75 μmol L-1 with relatively high values in the northeast part (southwest of Taiwan Island) in spring, and in the eastern parts of the NSCS during fall and winter. The TOC inventory in the upper 100 m of the water column ranged from 6.0-7.5 mol m-2 with a similar distribution pattern as the surface TOC concentration. There were two most significant differences in the TOC profiles between the SCS and the WPS. One was in the upper 200 m, where more TOC was accumulated in the WPS; the other was in the intermediate layer at ~1000-1500 m, where the gradient of TOC concentration was still persistent below 1000 m in the SCS, a feature which did not exist in the WPS. At this intermediate layer, there also appeared an excess of TOC in the SCS as compared with that in the WPS. The TOC concentration below 2000 m in the SCS was identical to that in the Northwestern Pacific, both of which were ~40 μmol L-1 without significant difference among stations and seasons, suggesting that this deep water TOC was homogeneously distributed in the deep SCS basin owing to the fast replenishment of the deep water from the WPS. We adopted an isopycnal mixing model to derive the water proportion contributed respectively from the SCS and Kuroshio along individual isopycnal plane and examined the impact of the Kuroshio intrusion on the TOC in the NSCS. The upper 100 m TOC inventory in the NSCS was overall

  10. Measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO2 at the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, J.; Song, D.; Lee, J. S.; Rhee, T. S.; Park, K.; Lee, G.

    2014-12-01

    We measured peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO2 in remote marine boundary area during the SHIPPO (Shipborne Pole to Pole Observation). The measurements were made on the R/V Araon from Christ church, New Zealand to Gwangyang, South Korea along the western Pacific Ocean from March 30th to April 25th, 2014. Both PAN and NO2 were analyzed every 2 minute by a fast chromatograph with luminol-based chemiluminescence detection. In order to improve their detection limits, random noise from PMT has been successfully reduced by ensembled chromatograms with every 30 samples. Additionally, we replaced Nylon membrane surface with reflective aluminum surface and applied the new Luminol solution, which enhanced the signals significantly with detection limits of 6 pptv and 40 ppbv for PAN and NO2, respectively. Average concentrations of PAN and NO2 were 8 pptv for PAN and 80 pptv for NO2 during the experiment. The back trajectory analysis showed that the directly influenced air masses from anthropogenic activities were rare except the latitudes higher than 20°N. Relatively good correlations between PAN and NO2 were consistently observed, while PAN and O3 were not clearly correlated except in the air masses recently originated from land masses.

  11. Calcite production by Coccolithophores in the South East Pacific Ocean: from desert to jungle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufort, L.; Couapel, M.; Buchet, N.; Claustre, H.

    2007-09-01

    BIOSOPE cruise achieved an oceanographic transect from the Marquise Islands to the Peru-Chili upwelling (PCU) via the centre of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). Water samples from 6 depths in the euphotic zone were collected at 20 stations. The concentrations of suspended calcite particles, coccolithophores cells and detached coccoliths were estimated together with size and weight using an automatic polarizing microscope, a digital camera, and a collection of softwares performing morphometry and pattern recognition. Some of these softwares are new and described here for the first time. The coccolithophores standing stocks are usually low and reach maxima west of the PCU. The coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa spp. and Crenalithus spp. (Order Isochrysidales) represent 50% of all the suspended calcite particles detected in the size range 0.1-46 μm (21% of PIC in term of the calcite weight). The latter species are found to grow preferentially in the Chlorophyll maximum zone. In the SPG their maximum concentrations was found to occur between 150 and 200 m, which is very deep for these taxa. The weight and size of coccoliths and coccospheres are correlated. Large and heavy coccoliths and coccospheres are found in the regions with relative higher fertility in the Marquises Island and in the PCU. Small and light coccoliths and coccospheres are found west of the PCU. This distribution may correspond to that of the concentration of calcium and carbonate ions.

  12. Environmental rock-magnetism of Cenozoic red clay in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, Takaya; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu

    2016-04-01

    Nonfossiliferous red clay can be used for elucidating long-range environmental changes, although such studies were limited so far because of the difficulty in precise age estimation and extremely low sedimentation rates. We conducted an environmental rock-magnetic study of Cenozoic red clay at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1365 in the South Pacific Gyre. Magnetostratigraphy could be established only above ˜6 m below the seafloor (mbsf) (˜5 Ma). Below ˜6 mbsf, the ages of the cores were transferred from the published ages of nearby Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 596, which is based mainly on a constant Cobalt flux model, by intercore correlation using magnetic susceptibility and rare earth element content variation patterns. Rock-magnetic analyses including first-order reversal curve diagrams, the ratio of anhysteretic remanent magnetization susceptibility to saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), and IRM component analyses revealed that magnetic minerals consist mainly of biogenic magnetite and terrigenous maghemite, and that the proportion of the terrigenous component increased since ˜23 Ma. We consider that the increase reflects a growth of eolian dust flux associated with a northward shift of Australia and the site to an arid region of the middle latitudes. The increase of the terrigenous component accelerated after ˜5 Ma, which may be associated with a further growth of the Antarctic glaciation at that time. This is coeval with the onset of the preservation of magnetostratigraphy, suggesting that the primary remanent magnetization is carried by the terrigenous component.

  13. Dolomitization of atolls by sea water convection flow: test of a hypothesis at Niue, South Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Aharon, P.; Socki, R.A.; Chan, L.

    1987-03-01

    The core of the former atoll on Niue Island, South Pacific, is extensively dolomitized. A detailed stable isotope study reveals that the dolomites are uniformly enriched in /sup 18/O and /sup 13/C(delta /sup 18/O = 2.8 per thousand +/- 0.5; delta /sup 13/C = 2.0 per thousand +/- 0.3) relative to their carbonate precursor. The Sr isotope ratios are equally constant with depth yielding /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values between 0.70912 and 0.70916. The observed isotopic compositions point to sea water as the dominant dolomitizing fluid. The Sr age of the dolomites is younger than the biostratigraphic age (Mid to Late Miocene) placing the dolomitization event at Plio-Pleistocene time. A model of sea water convection is proposed for atoll dolomitization on the basis of a thermal gradient between the atoll and the ambient ocean water. Sea water is drawn through the atoll margin and transferred upward by convective flow delivering Mg to the sites of dolomite precipitation. Transported with the sea water are volcano-derived metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn) as evidenced by the chemical gradient in the dolomite unit. It is suggested that the thermal convection model can find general application in atolls and other carbonate platforms containing dolomite where thermal instability exists. 70 references.

  14. Nitrous oxide production by nitrification and denitrification in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qixing; Babbin, Andrew R.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    The Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (ETSP-OMZ) is a site of intense nitrous oxide (N2O) flux to the atmosphere. This flux results from production of N2O by nitrification and denitrification, but the contribution of the two processes is unknown. The rates of these pathways and their distributions were measured directly using 15N tracers. The highest N2O production rates occurred at the depth of peak N2O concentrations at the oxic-anoxic interface above the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) because slightly oxygenated waters allowed (1) N2O production from both nitrification and denitrification and (2) higher nitrous oxide production yields from nitrification. Within the ODZ proper (i.e., anoxia), the only source of N2O was denitrification (i.e., nitrite and nitrate reduction), the rates of which were reflected in the abundance of nirS genes (encoding nitrite reductase). Overall, denitrification was the dominant pathway contributing the N2O production in the ETSP-OMZ.

  15. High abundances of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lami, Raphaël; Cottrell, Matthew T; Ras, Joséphine; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Claustre, Hervé; Kirchman, David L; Lebaron, Philippe

    2007-07-01

    Little is known about the abundance, distribution, and ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, particularly in oligotrophic environments, which represent 60% of the ocean. We investigated the abundance of AAP bacteria across the South Pacific Ocean, including the center of the gyre, the most oligotrophic water body of the world ocean. AAP bacteria, Prochlorococcus, and total prokaryotic abundances, as well as bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and divinyl-chlorophyll a concentrations, were measured at several depths in the photic zone along a gradient of oligotrophic conditions. The abundances of AAP bacteria and Prochlorococcus were high, together accounting for up to 58% of the total prokaryotic community. The abundance of AAP bacteria alone was up to 1.94 x 10(5) cells ml(-1) and as high as 24% of the overall community. These measurements were consistent with the high BChl a concentrations (up to 3.32 x 10(-3) microg liter(-1)) found at all stations. However, the BChl a content per AAP bacterial cell was low, suggesting that AAP bacteria are mostly heterotrophic organisms. Interestingly, the biovolume and therefore biomass of AAP bacteria was on average twofold higher than that of other prokaryotic cells. This study demonstrates that AAP bacteria can be abundant in various oligotrophic conditions, including the most oligotrophic regime of the world ocean, and can account for a large part of the bacterioplanktonic carbon stock.

  16. Impact of the Madden-Jullian oscillation on Rainfall over the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariyar, Sunil Kumar; Keenlyside, Noel; Bhatt, Bhuwan Chandra; Koseki, Shunya; Spengler, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Impacts of Madden-Jullian oscillation (MJO) on southern summertime rainfall over the south Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) is investigated. For this, the real-time multivariate daily MJO series 1 (RMM1) and 2 (RMM2) are used to measure the intensity and different phases of the MJO. For rainfall, daily 3B42 TRMM rainfall data are used and composite analysis is done in all eight different phases of the MJO. By analyzing the daily rainfall for the period 1998-2014, it is found that the MJO significantly modulates the distribution of rainfall over the SPCZ region. Multiple regression analysis (daily rainfall regressed with RMM1 and RMM2) shows noticeable impact of the MJO on rainfall over the SPCZ with explained variance of up to 14%. The phase composite analysis shows considerable changes in rainfall over the SPCZ region during the MJO life cycle with episodes of enhanced and supressed convection. When the MJO is in phase 2,3, and 4 negative rainfall anomalies (up to 6 mm day-1) are observed along the SPCZ. While during phase 6,7,and 8, SPCZ experiences positive rainfall anomaly (up to 8 mm day-1). Spectral analysis of daily rainfall data over the SPCZ (160E-180E,5S-15S) shows the maximum spectral peak within the range of intraseasonal periods of 30-90 days. This indicates that the intraseasonal variation in rainfall over the SPCZ is typically associated with the MJO.

  17. Epidemiology of hepatitis B infection in the Western Pacific and South East Asia.

    PubMed Central

    Gust, I D

    1996-01-01

    The Western Pacific and South East Asia regions are the largest and most populous of the six World Health Organisation regions and include more than 40 countries. More than 75% of the world's estimated 350 million carriers are located here. The region has therefore provided many insights into the epidemiology, natural history, and control of hepatitis B infection and has been home to the first national control programmes. Hepatitis B is hyperendemic in most countries of the region, with carrier rates ranging from 5-35% except in Australia, New Zealand, and Japan, where the mean carrier rate is less than 2%. Patterns of infection vary considerably from country to country, city to city, and even village to village, and can change with time. Most infections are acquired early in childhood or in early adult life. A variety of control measures are in place and many countries in the region have introduced widespread or universal childhood immunisation policies with significant success. While it is theoretically possible that hepatitis B infection could be eradicated by universal childhood immunisation, there are several biological and practical issues that make this extremely difficult, suggesting that, for the foreseeable future, control may be a more realisable goal. PMID:8786047

  18. Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghu; Fan, Xiaoyang; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, motile bacterium with a subpolar or lateral flagellum, designated strain XH089(T), was isolated from deep-sea sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41°51' S 153°06' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH089(T) belonged to the genus Achromobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Achromobacter ruhlandii ATCC 15749(T) (96.95%), Achromobacter denitrificans DSM 30026(T) (96.70%) and Achromobacter marplatensis B2(T) (96.66%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH089(T) was 66.5 mol%. The major fatty acids were C16: 0 and C17: 0 cyclo. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH089(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Achromobacter, for which the name Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH089(T) ( = DSM 27279(T) = JCM 19223(T)). PMID:24711589

  19. Empirical building fragilities from observed damage in the 2009 South Pacific tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Stefan; Bradley, Brendon A.; Bind, Jochen; Smart, Graeme; Power, William; Sturman, James

    2011-07-01

    This manuscript presents empirical building fragility functions that were developed based on data obtained from the 29th September 2009 South Pacific tsunami. A multi-disciplinary reconnaissance team involving topographic surveyors, tsunami/hydrology modellers, structural engineers, and risk analysts collected observational and quantitative data on building damage and the tsunami demand. A diverse range of collected data, which included a topographic survey, observed water depths, predominant flow directions, inundation limits, building damage, and eyewitness reports, were used to recreate the peak tsunami-induced demands on structures at each of the survey locations. Using the interpreted data, fragility functions were developed for a variety of building classes using logistic regression. It was observed that residential timber structures were more fragile (i.e. have a higher likelihood of damage for a given water depth) than masonry residential structures for severe and collapse damage states. Conversely, residential reinforced concrete structures were observed to be less fragile than residential masonry structures for severe and collapse damage states. The influence of 'shielding' and 'entrained debris' effects on fragility functions were also quantified using the empirical data. Other parameters such as velocity or impact duration were not considered due to the paucity of data. The results of this study contribute to the ongoing development of robust methods for explicitly estimating tsunami-induced risk to coastal communities.

  20. Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghu; Fan, Xiaoyang; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, motile bacterium with a subpolar or lateral flagellum, designated strain XH089(T), was isolated from deep-sea sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41°51' S 153°06' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH089(T) belonged to the genus Achromobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Achromobacter ruhlandii ATCC 15749(T) (96.95%), Achromobacter denitrificans DSM 30026(T) (96.70%) and Achromobacter marplatensis B2(T) (96.66%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH089(T) was 66.5 mol%. The major fatty acids were C16: 0 and C17: 0 cyclo. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH089(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Achromobacter, for which the name Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH089(T) ( = DSM 27279(T) = JCM 19223(T)).

  1. Magmatic evolution of the Easter microplate-Crough Seamount region (South East Pacific)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hekinian, R.; Stoffers, P.; Akermand, D.; Binard, N.; Francheteau, Jean; Devey, C.; Garbe-Schonberg, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Easter microplate-Crough Seamount region located between 25?? S-116?? W and 25?? S-122?? W consists of a chain of seamounts forming isolated volcanoes and elongated (100-200 km in length) en echelon volcanic ridges oriented obliquely NE (N 065??), to the present day general spreading direction (N 100??) of the Pacific-Nazca plates. The extension of this seamount chain into the southwestern edge of the Easter microplate near 26??30??? S-115?? W was surveyed and sampled. The southern boundary including the Orongo fracture zone and other shallow ridges ( 0.25) MORBs which are similar in composition to other more recent basalts from the Southwest and East Rifts spreading axes of the Easter microplate. Incompatible element ratios normalized to chondrite values [(Ce/Yb)N = 1-2.5}, {(La/Sm)N = 0.4-1.2} and {(Zr/Y)N = 0.7-2.5} of the basalts are also similar to present day volcanism found in the Easter microplate. The volcanics from the Easter microplate-Crough region are unrelated to other known South Pacific intraplate magmatism (i.e. Society, Pitcairn, and Salas y Gomez Islands). Instead their range in incompatible element ratios is comparable to the submarine basalts from the recently investigated Ahu and Umu volcanic field (Easter hotspot) (Scientific Party SO80, 1993) and centered at about 80 km west of Easter Island. The oblique ridges and their associated seamounts are likely to represent ancient leaky transform faults created during the initial stage of the Easter microplate formation (??? 5 Ma). It appears that volcanic activity on seamounts overlying the oblique volcanic ridges has continued during their westward drift from the microplate as shown by the presence of relatively fresh lava observed on one of these structures, namely the first Oblique Volcanic Ridge near 25?? S-118?? W at about 160 km west of the Easter microplate West Rift. Based on a reconstruction of the Easter microplate, it is suggested that the Crough seamount (< 800 m depth) was formed

  2. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Managing the Papuana uninodis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Taro Beetle in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Brown, P; Daigneault, A

    2014-10-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) plays a prominent role in the economies and cultures of Pacific Island countries such as Fiji. Unfortunately, taro is highly susceptible to invasion from taro beetles, which burrow into the corms and weaken the plants, rendering them unmarkable and prone to rot. Papuana uninodis Prell, an invasive alien species that is native to the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, was first reported on Viti Levu (Fiji's largest island) in 1984. Since that time, taro production on Viti Levu has fallen substantially. In this paper, we employ data from surveys of households and communities to document the impacts of P. uninodis on Viti Levu. We then identify three management approaches-chemical controls, cultural controls, and switching from taro to another staple crop-and conduct a cost-benefit analysis of each. We find strong arguments for pursuing chemical control, which derives a net present value of monetised benefits of about FJ$139,500 per hectare over 50 yr, or >FJ$21 for each FJ$1 spent. Still, any of the three management options is more efficient than no management, even without any attempt to quantify the benefits to biodiversity or forest protection, underscoring the value of actively managing this invasive alien species.

  3. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Managing the Papuana uninodis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Taro Beetle in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Brown, P; Daigneault, A

    2014-10-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) plays a prominent role in the economies and cultures of Pacific Island countries such as Fiji. Unfortunately, taro is highly susceptible to invasion from taro beetles, which burrow into the corms and weaken the plants, rendering them unmarkable and prone to rot. Papuana uninodis Prell, an invasive alien species that is native to the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, was first reported on Viti Levu (Fiji's largest island) in 1984. Since that time, taro production on Viti Levu has fallen substantially. In this paper, we employ data from surveys of households and communities to document the impacts of P. uninodis on Viti Levu. We then identify three management approaches-chemical controls, cultural controls, and switching from taro to another staple crop-and conduct a cost-benefit analysis of each. We find strong arguments for pursuing chemical control, which derives a net present value of monetised benefits of about FJ$139,500 per hectare over 50 yr, or >FJ$21 for each FJ$1 spent. Still, any of the three management options is more efficient than no management, even without any attempt to quantify the benefits to biodiversity or forest protection, underscoring the value of actively managing this invasive alien species. PMID:26309277

  4. Low Prevalence of Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis Infection and Active Trachoma in the Western Division of Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Umesh; Natutusau, Kinisimere; Pavluck, Alexandre L.; Willis, Rebecca; Alexander, Neal; Mabey, David C. W.; Cikamatana, Luisa; Kama, Mike; Rafai, Eric; Roberts, Chrissy H.; Solomon, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness and is caused by ocular infection with the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct). While the majority of the global disease burden is found in sub-Saharan Africa, the Western Pacific Region has been identified as trachoma endemic. Population surveys carried out throughout Fiji have shown an abundance of both clinically active trachoma and trachomatous trichiasis in all divisions. This finding is at odds with the clinical experience of local healthcare workers who do not consider trachoma to be highly prevalent. We aimed to determine whether conjunctival infection with Ct could be detected in one administrative division of Fiji. Methods A population-based survey of 2306 individuals was conducted using the Global Trachoma Mapping Project methodology. Population prevalence of active trachoma in children and trichiasis in adults was estimated using the World Health Organization simplified grading system. Conjunctival swabs were collected from 1009 children aged 1–9 years. DNA from swabs was tested for the presence of the Ct plasmid and human endogenous control. Results The prevalence of active trachoma in 1–9 year olds was 3.4%. The age-adjusted prevalence was 2.8% (95% CI: 1.4–4.3%). The unadjusted prevalence of ocular Ct infection in 1–9 year-olds was 1.9% (19/1009), and the age-adjusted infection prevalence was 2.3% (95% CI: 0.4–2.5%). The median DNA load was 41 Ct plasmid copies per swab (min 20, first quartile 32, mean 6665, third quartile 161, max 86354). There was no association between current infection and follicular trachoma. No cases of trachomatous trichiasis were identified. Discussion The Western Division of Fiji has a low prevalence of clinical trachoma. Ocular Ct infections were observed, but they were predominantly low load infections and were not correlated with clinical signs. Our study data suggest that trachoma does not meet the WHO definition of a public health problem in

  5. U-series disequilibria in volcanic rocks from the Futuna spreading centre (North Fiji Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Faouder, A.; Hemond, C.; Benoit, M.; Lagabrielle, Y.; Guivel, C.; Pelletier, B.; Bollinger, C.

    2005-05-01

    The North Fiji basin is the largest active back arc basin of the SW Pacific. It is 12 m.y. old and characterised by a regional upper mantle thermal anomaly (Garel, 2001). The 200Km long Futuna spreading centre (Pelletier et al., 2001) is located west of Futuna and Alofi islands at the border between Lau and North Fijian Basins. This ridge is composed of an axial valley spotted with numerous seamounts. It starts from the north of the Fiji platform (15° 40'S) and ends in the north Fiji transform zone, northwest of the Futuna and Alofi islands (13° 35'S). New U series measurements were performed by TIMS on fresh dredged glassy samples. As the topography of this spreading centre exhibits a peculiar structure, the geochemical signature is also unusual. U and Th concentrations range between 0,0930%, six have a 230Th excess within 25 ± 5% and three have 230Th excess of about 15%. These 230Th excesses are typical of MORB or OIB source melting and not a back arc volcanic processes. It is also symptomatic of a melting in presence of garnet. In the equiline diagram, samples fall on a linear correlation indicating a mixing between two end-members with different Th/Usources ratios. The trend observed in this diagram requires the involvement of an enriched component, likely an EMII component, as defined by the trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions (Benoit et al., in prep). This trend falls within the OIB field and plots close to Samoan samples analysed by Newman et al. (1984). This trend demonstrates the influence of a melt may be even more enriched than the samples of Savai'i volcano. This EMII melt mixes, within the upper mantle, with the Indian ocean like component as it was already established that

  6. Supply chain and marketing of sea grapes, Caulerpa racemosa (Forsskål) J. Agardh (Chlorophyta: Caulerpaceae) in Fiji, Samoa and Tonga.

    PubMed

    Morris, C; Bala, S; South, G R; Lako, J; Lober, M; Simos, T

    2014-01-01

    This report describes for the first time the supply chain of Caulerpa racemosa in three Pacific Island countries. The harvesting and marketing of C. racemosa are important subsistence activities for villagers in Fiji and Samoa, less so in Tonga. At least 150 harvesters are involved in Fiji, some 100 in Samoa and only a handful in Tonga. The annual combined crop is of some 123 t valued at around US$266,492. In Fiji, it is projected that supply does not meet local demand and there is a potential export market that is currently operating at a pilot project level. In Samoa, the supply is considered adequate for the current market. In Tonga, harvesting is carried out by a few families and supplies a niche market in that country. The possibilities of field cultivation of Caulerpa have been explored but, at present, with only limited success in Samoa. The supply chain is simple in all three countries, and only in Fiji are middlemen involved in the distribution process. The limitations for marketing include the fact that only a few sites supply most of the crop in all the three countries, that all sites need to be conserved through sustainable harvesting methods, the short shelf life of the crop and a lack of information on the carrying capacity of harvest sites. Caulerpa remains a crop that fulfils a niche market but has the potential to be scaled up for additional livelihood development in the future. PMID:24771972

  7. Supply chain and marketing of sea grapes, Caulerpa racemosa (Forsskål) J. Agardh (Chlorophyta: Caulerpaceae) in Fiji, Samoa and Tonga.

    PubMed

    Morris, C; Bala, S; South, G R; Lako, J; Lober, M; Simos, T

    2014-01-01

    This report describes for the first time the supply chain of Caulerpa racemosa in three Pacific Island countries. The harvesting and marketing of C. racemosa are important subsistence activities for villagers in Fiji and Samoa, less so in Tonga. At least 150 harvesters are involved in Fiji, some 100 in Samoa and only a handful in Tonga. The annual combined crop is of some 123 t valued at around US$266,492. In Fiji, it is projected that supply does not meet local demand and there is a potential export market that is currently operating at a pilot project level. In Samoa, the supply is considered adequate for the current market. In Tonga, harvesting is carried out by a few families and supplies a niche market in that country. The possibilities of field cultivation of Caulerpa have been explored but, at present, with only limited success in Samoa. The supply chain is simple in all three countries, and only in Fiji are middlemen involved in the distribution process. The limitations for marketing include the fact that only a few sites supply most of the crop in all the three countries, that all sites need to be conserved through sustainable harvesting methods, the short shelf life of the crop and a lack of information on the carrying capacity of harvest sites. Caulerpa remains a crop that fulfils a niche market but has the potential to be scaled up for additional livelihood development in the future.

  8. A Sea-Surface Radiation Data Set for Climate Applications in the Tropical Western Pacific and South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Yan, Michael M.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The sea-surface shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes have been retrieved from the radiances measured by Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5. The surface radiation data set covers the domain 40S-40N and 90E-170W. The temporal resolution is 1 day, and the spatial resolution is 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg latitude-longitude. The retrieved surface radiation have been validated with the radiometric measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measuring (ARM) site on Manus island in the equatorial western Pacific for a period of 15 months. It has also been validated with the measurements at the radiation site on Dungsha island in the South China Sea during the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) Intensive Observing Period (May and June 1998). The data set is used to study the effect of El Nino and East Asian Summer monsoon on the heating of the ocean in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. Interannual variations of clouds associated with El Nino and the East Asian Summer monsoon have a large impact on the radiative heating of the ocean. It has been found that the magnitude of the interannual variation of the seasonal mean surface radiative heating exceeds 40 W/sq m over large areas. Together with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) shortwave fluxes at top of the atmosphere and the radiative transfer calculations of clear-sky fluxes, this surface radiation data set is also used to study the impact of clouds on the solar heating of the atmosphere. It is found that clouds enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approx. 20 W/sq m in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. This result is important for evaluating the accuracy of solar flux calculations in clear and cloudy atmospheres.

  9. A Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic reconstruction of the Southwest Pacific region: Tectonics controlled by subduction and slab rollback processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, W. P.; Lister, G. S.; Toy, V. G.

    2006-06-01

    A Cenozoic tectonic reconstruction is presented for the Southwest Pacific region located east of Australia. The reconstruction is constrained by large geological and geophysical datasets and recalculated rotation parameters for Pacific-Australia and Lord Howe Rise-Pacific relative plate motion. The reconstruction is based on a conceptual tectonic model in which the large-scale structures of the region are manifestations of slab rollback and backarc extension processes. The current paradigm proclaims that the southwestern Pacific plate boundary was a west-dipping subduction boundary only since the Middle Eocene. The new reconstruction provides kinematic evidence that this configuration was already established in the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleogene. From ˜ 82 to ˜ 52 Ma, subduction was primarily accomplished by east and northeast-directed rollback of the Pacific slab, accommodating opening of the New Caledonia, South Loyalty, Coral Sea and Pocklington backarc basins and partly accommodating spreading in the Tasman Sea. The total amount of east-directed rollback of the Pacific slab that took place from ˜ 82 Ma to ˜ 52 Ma is estimated to be at least 1200 km. A large percentage of this rollback accommodated opening of the South Loyalty Basin, a north-south trending backarc basin. It is estimated from kinematic and geological constraints that the east-west width of the basin was at least ˜ 750 km. The South Loyalty and Pocklington backarc basins were subducted in the Eocene to earliest Miocene along the newly formed New Caledonia and Pocklington subduction zones. This culminated in southwestward and southward obduction of ophiolites in New Caledonia, Northland and New Guinea in the latest Eocene to earliest Miocene. It is suggested that the formation of these new subduction zones was triggered by a change in Pacific-Australia relative motion at ˜ 50 Ma. Two additional phases of eastward rollback of the Pacific slab followed, one during opening of the South Fiji

  10. Behavioral risk factors for obesity during health transition in Vanuatu, South Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Dancause, Kelsey Needham; Vilar, Miguel; Wilson, Michelle; Soloway, Laura E; DeHuff, Christa; Chan, Chim; Tarivonda, Len; Regenvanu, Ralph; Kaneko, Akira; Lum, J Koji; Garruto, Ralph M

    2012-01-01

    The South Pacific archipelago of Vanuatu, like many developing countries, is currently experiencing a shift in disease burdens from infectious to chronic diseases with economic development. A rapid increase in obesity prevalence represents one component of this “health transition.” We sought to identify behaviors associated with measures of obesity in Vanuatu. We surveyed 534 adults from three islands varying in level of economic development. We measured height; weight; waist and hip circumferences; triceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfolds; and percent body fat (%BF) by bioelectrical impedance. We assessed diet through 24-hour dietary recall and physical activity patterns using a survey. We calculated prevalence of obesity and central obesity based on multiple indicators (body mass index, %BF, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio), and analyzed differences among islands and associations with behavioral patterns. Obesity prevalence was lowest among rural and highest among suburban participants. Prevalence of central obesity was particularly high among women (up to 73.9%), even in rural areas (ranging from 14.7% to 41.2% depending on the measure used). Heavier reliance on animal protein and incorporation of Western foods in the diet – specifically, tinned fish and instant noodles – was significantly associated with increased obesity risk. Even in rural areas where diets and lifestyles remain largely traditional, modest incorporation of Western foods in the diet can contribute to increased risk of obesity. Early prevention efforts are thus particularly important during health transition. Where public health resources are limited, education about dietary change could be the best target for prevention. PMID:23505203

  11. What prevents nitrogen depletion in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Pahlow, M.; Wagner, H.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-02-01

    Local coupling between nitrogen fixation and denitrification in current biogeochemical models could result in runaway feedback in open-ocean oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), eventually stripping OMZ waters of all fixed nitrogen. This feedback does not seem to operate at full strength in the ocean, as nitrate does not generally become depleted in open-ocean OMZs. To explore in detail the possible mechanisms that prevent nitrogen depletion in the OMZ of the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP), we develop a box model with fully prognostic cycles of carbon, nutrients and oxygen in the upwelling region and its adjacent open ocean. Ocean circulation is calibrated with Δ14C data of the ETSP. The sensitivity of the simulated nitrogen cycle to nutrient and oxygen exchange and ventilation from outside the model domain and to remineralization scales inside an OMZ is analysed. For the entire range of model configurations explored, we find that the fixed-N inventory can be stabilized at non-zero levels in the ETSP OMZ only if the remineralization rate via denitrification is slower than that via aerobic respiration. In our optimum model configuration, lateral oxygen supply into the model domain is required at rates sufficient to oxidize at least about one fifth of the export production in the model domain to prevent anoxia in the deep ocean. Under these conditions, our model is in line with the view of phosphate as the ultimate limiting nutrient for phytoplankton, and implies that for the current notion of nitrogen fixation being favoured in N-deficit waters, the water column of the ETSP could even be a small net source of nitrate.

  12. Beach development on an uplifted coral atoll: Niue, south west Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsters, Teuvirihei Helene; Kennedy, David M.

    2014-10-01

    Niue is an uplifted coral atoll in the south western Pacific characterised by erosional terraces on its coastal margin. Beaches are found around the island located in pockets at the rear of erosional shore platforms. The beaches in Niue are < 100 m long, < 25 m wide and generally less than 0.5 m thick. The beaches sit on top of an abrasion ramp that dips seaward at a similar angle to the beach. The morphology, stability and sedimentology of these beaches are investigated through laser surveying, aerial photo analysis and petrographic techniques. Surveying was undertaken in 2008 and 2010 with data compared to previous work conducted in the 1990s in order to assess the controls on sediment deposition on uplifted coral atolls. There is a high potential for sediment transport on the island. The beaches are entirely removed during tropical cyclone events and even under calm conditions sediment is mobile. The restriction of beaches to pockets along the rocky coast suggests that these areas temporally interrupt sediment transport allowing beaches to form. All the beaches are composed of a typical chlorozoan assemblage of carbonate grains dominated by coral (20-50%), coralline algae (18%) and foraminifera (up to 81%). These sediments are produced on the platforms in the immediate vicinity of the beaches with little longshore transport between embayments being evident. The close relationship between source and depositional zones, combined with the high transport potential across the platforms indicates that the beaches are highly vulnerable to any change in either energy conditions or sediment supply.

  13. Dust, volcanic ash, and the evolution of the South Pacific Gyre through the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, Ann G.; Murray, Richard W.; Sauvage, Justine; Spivack, Arthur J.; Harris, Robert N.; D'Hondt, Steven

    2015-08-01

    We examine the 0-100 Ma paleoceanographic record retained in pelagic clay from the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) by analyzing 47 major, trace, and rare earth elements in bulk sediment in 206 samples from seven sites drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329. We use multivariate statistical analyses (Q-mode factor analysis and multiple linear regression) of the geochemical data to construct a model of bulk pelagic clay composition and mass accumulation rates (MAR) of six end-members, (post-Archean average Australian shale, rhyolite, basalt, Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, apatite, and excess Si). Integrating the results with Co-based age models at Sites U1365, U1366, U1369, and U1370, we link changes in MAR of these components to global oceanographic, terrestrial, and climatic transformations through the Cenozoic. Our results track the spatial extent (thousands of kilometers) of dust deposition in the SPG during the aridification of Australia. Dispersed ash is a significant component of the pelagic clay, often comprising >50% by mass, and records episodes of Southern Hemisphere volcanism. Because both are transported by wind, the correlation of dust and ash MAR depends on the site's latitude and suggests meridional shifts in the position of atmospheric circulation cells. The hydrothermal MARs provide evidence for rapid deposition from the Osbourn Trough spreading ridge before it went extinct. Excess Si MARs show that the abrupt increase in siliceous productivity observed at Site U1371 also extended at least as far north as Sites U1369 and U1370, suggesting large-scale reorganizations of oceanic Si distributions ~10-8 Ma in the southern SPG.

  14. What prevents nitrogen depletion in the OMZ of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Pahlow, M.; Wagner, H.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-07-01

    Local coupling between nitrogen fixation and denitrification in current biogeochemical models could result in a run-away feedback in open-ocean oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), eventually stripping OMZ waters of all fixed nitrogen. This feedback does not seem to operate at full strength in the ocean, as nitrate does not generally become depleted in open-ocean OMZs. To explore in detail the mechanism that prevents nitrogen depletion in the OMZ of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP), we develop a box model with fully prognostic cycles of carbon, nutrients, and oxygen in the upwelling region and its adjacent open ocean. Ocean circulation is calibrated with Δ14C data of the ETSP. The sensitivity of the simulated nitrogen cycle to nutrient and oxygen exchange and ventilation from outside the model domain and remineralization scales inside an OMZ is analysed. For the entire range of model configurations explored, we find that the fixed-N inventory can be stabilized at non-zero levels in the ETSP OMZ only if the remineralization rate via denitrification is slower than that via aerobic respiration. In our optimum model configuration, lateral oxygen supply to the model domain required at rates sufficient to oxidize at least about a fifth of the export production in the model domain to prevent anoxia in the deep ocean. Under these conditions, our model is in line with the view of phosphate as the ultimate limiting nutrient for phytoplankton, and implies that for the current notion of nitrogen fixation being favored in N-deficit waters, the water column of the ETSP could even be a small net source of fixed-N.

  15. Low rates of nitrogen fixation in eastern tropical South Pacific surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Angela N.; Casciotti, Karen L.; Berelson, William M.; Prokopenko, Maria G.; Capone, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    An extensive region of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) Ocean has surface waters that are nitrate-poor yet phosphate-rich. It has been proposed that this distribution of surface nutrients provides a geochemical niche favorable for N2 fixation, the primary source of nitrogen to the ocean. Here, we present results from two cruises to the ETSP where rates of N2 fixation and its contribution to export production were determined with a suite of geochemical and biological measurements. N2 fixation was only detectable using nitrogen isotopic mass balances at two of six stations, and rates ranged from 0 to 23 µmol N m−2 d−1 based on sediment trap fluxes. Whereas the fractional importance of N2 fixation did not change, the N2-fixation rates at these two stations were several-fold higher when scaled to other productivity metrics. Regardless of the choice of productivity metric these N2-fixation rates are low compared with other oligotrophic locations, and the nitrogen isotope budgets indicate that N2 fixation supports no more than 20% of export production regionally. Although euphotic zone-integrated short-term N2-fixation rates were higher, up to 100 µmol N m−2 d−1, and detected N2 fixation at all six stations, studies of nitrogenase gene abundance and expression from the same cruises align with the geochemical data and together indicate that N2 fixation is a minor source of new nitrogen to surface waters of the ETSP. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that, despite a relative abundance of phosphate, iron may limit N2 fixation in the ETSP. PMID:26976587

  16. Biochemical characteristics and bacterial community structure of the sea surface microlayer in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obernosterer, I.; Catala, P.; Lami, R.; Caparros, J.; Ras, J.; Bricaud, A.; Dupuy, C.; van Wambeke, F.; Lebaron, P.

    2008-05-01

    The chemical and biological characteristics of the surface microlayer were determined during a transect across the South Pacific Ocean in October-December 2004. Concentrations of particulate organic carbon (1.3 to 7.6-fold) and nitrogen (1.4 to 7-fold), and POC:PON ratios were consistently higher in the surface microlayer as compared to surface waters (5 m). The large variability in particulate organic matter enrichment was negatively correlated to wind speed. No enhanced concentrations of dissolved organic carbon were detectable in the surface microlayer as compared to 5 m, but chromophoric dissolved organic matter was markedly enriched (by 2 to 4-fold) at all sites. Based on pigment analysis and cell counts, no consistent enrichment of any of the major components of the autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial community was detectable. CE-SSCP fingerprints and CARD FISH revealed that the bacterial communities present in the surface microlayer had close similarity (>76%) to those in surface waters. By contrast, bacterial heterotrophic production (3H-leucine incorporation) was consistently lower in the surface microlayer than in surface waters. By applying CARD-FISH and microautoradiography, we observed that Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria dominated leucine uptake in the surface microlayer, while in surface waters Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria were the major groups accounting for leucine incorporation. Our results demonstrate that the microbial community in the surface microlayer closely resembles that of the surface waters of the open ocean. Even a short residence in the surface microlayer influences leucine incorporation by different bacterial groups, probably as a response to the differences in the physical and chemical nature of the two layers.

  17. Biochemical characteristics and bacterial community structure of the sea surface microlayer in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obernosterer, I.; Catala, P.; Lami, R.; Caparros, J.; Ras, J.; Bricaud, A.; Dupuy, C.; van Wambeke, F.; Lebaron, P.

    2007-08-01

    The chemical and biological characteristics of the surface microlayer were determined during a transect across the South Pacific Ocean in October-December 2004. Concentrations of particulate organic carbon (1.3 to 7.6-fold) and nitrogen (1.4 to 7), and POC:PON ratios were consistently higher in the surface microlayer as compared to subsurface waters (5 m). The large variability in particulate organic matter enrichment was negatively correlated to wind speed. No enhanced concentrations of dissolved organic carbon were detectable in the surface microlayer as compared to 5 m, but chromophoric dissolved organic matter was markedly enriched (by 2 to 4-fold) at all sites. Based on pigment analysis and cell counts, no consistent enrichment of any of the major components of the autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial community was detectable. CE-SSCP fingerprints and CARD FISH revealed that the bacterial communities present in the surface microlayer had close similarity (>76%) to those in subsurface waters. By contrast, bacterial heterotrophic production (3H-leucine incorporation) was consistently lower in the surface microlayer than in subsurface waters. By applying CARD-FISH and microautoradiography, we observed that Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria dominated leucine uptake in the surface microlayer, while in subsurface waters Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria were the major groups accounting for leucine incorporation. Our results demonstrate that the microbial community in the surface microlayer closely resembles that of the surface waters of the open ocean. However, even short time periods in the surface microlayer result in differences in bacterial groups accounting for leucine incorporation, probably as a response to the differences in the physical and chemical nature of the two layers.

  18. Gammaproteobacterial diazotrophs and nifH gene expression in surface waters of the South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Moisander, Pia H; Serros, Tracy; Paerl, Ryan W; Beinart, Roxanne A; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the cyanobacterial N2-fixers (diazotrophs), there is a high nifH gene diversity of non-cyanobacterial groups present in marine environments, yet quantitative information about these groups is scarce. N2 fixation potential (nifH gene expression), diversity and distributions of the uncultivated diazotroph phylotype γ-24774A11, a putative gammaproteobacterium, were investigated in the western South Pacific Ocean. γ-24774A11 gene copies correlated positively with diazotrophic cyanobacteria, temperature, dissolved organic carbon and ambient O2 saturation, and negatively with depth, chlorophyll a and nutrients, suggesting that carbon supply, access to light or inhibitory effects of DIN may control γ-24774A11 abundances. Maximum nifH gene-copy abundance was 2 × 104 l−1, two orders of magnitude less than that for diazotrophic cyanobacteria, while the median γ-24774A11 abundance, 8 × 102 l−1, was greater than that for the UCYN-A cyanobacteria, suggesting a more homogeneous distribution in surface waters. The abundance of nifH transcripts by γ-24774A11 was greater during the night than during the day, and the transcripts generally ranged from 0–7%, but were up to 26% of all nifH transcripts at each station. The ubiquitous presence and low variability of γ-24774A11 abundances across tropical and subtropical oceans, combined with the consistent nifH expression reported in this study, suggest that γ-24774A11 could be one of the most important heterotrophic (or photoheterotrophic) diazotrophs and may need to be considered in future N budget estimates and models. PMID:24722632

  19. A proposed time transfer experiment between the USA and the South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luck, John; Dunkley, John; Armstrong, Tim; Gifford, Guy A.; Landis, Paul; Rasmussen, Scott; Wheeler, Paul J.; Bartholomew, Thomas R.; Stein, Samuel R.

    1992-01-01

    Described here are the concept, architecture and preliminary details of an experiment directed towards providing continuous Ultra High Precision (UHP) time transfer between Washington, DC; Salisbury, SA Australia; Orroral Valley, ACT Australia; and Lower Hutt, New Zealand. A proposed method of distributing UTC(USNO) at a high level of precision to passive users over a broad area of the South Pacific is described. The concept is based on active two-way satellite time transfer from the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) to the proposed USNO Master Clock West (MCW) in Wahiwa, HI at the 1 nanosecond level using active satellite two-way time transfer augmented by Precise Positioning Service (PPS) of the Global Positioning System (GPS). MCW would act as an intermediate transfer/reference station, again linked to Salisbury at the 1 nanosecond level using active satellite two-way time transfer augmented by PPS GPS. From this point, time would be distributed within the region by two methods. The first is an existing TV line sync system using an Australian communications satellite (AUSSAT K1) which is useful to the 20 nanosecond level. The second approach is RF ranging and multilateration between Salisbury, Orroral Observatory, Lower Hutt and the AUSSAT B1 and B2 to be launched in 1992. Orroral Observatory will provide precise laser ranging to the AUSSAT B1/B2 retro reflectors which will reduce ephemeris related time transfer errors to below 1 nanosecond. The corrected position will be transmitted by both the time transfer modem and the existing TV line sync dissemination process. Multilateration has the advantage of being an all weather approach and when used with the laser ranging technique will provide a precise measurement of the propagation path delays. This will result in time transfer performance levels on the order of 10 nanoseconds to passive users in both Australia and New Zealand.

  20. Predicting cetacean and seabird habitats across a productivity gradient in the South Pacific gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannocci, Laura; Catalogna, Maxime; Dorémus, Ghislain; Laran, Sophie; Lehodey, Patrick; Massart, Wendy; Monestiez, Pascal; Van Canneyt, Olivier; Watremez, Pierre; Ridoux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Oligotrophic regions are expected to host low densities of top predators. Nevertheless, top predators with contrasting energetic costs might respond differently to the productivity of their habitats. Predators with high energetic demands might be constrained to select the most productive habitats to meet their high energetic requirements, whereas less active predators would be able to satisfy their needs by exploiting either high or low productivity habitats. Although situated in the core of the South Pacific oligotrophic gyre, French Polynesia is characterized by a fairly marked productivity gradient from the extremely oligotrophic Australs area to the more productive Marquesas area. The aim of this study was to investigate cetacean and seabird habitats in French Polynesia in light of their general energetic constraints. We collected cetacean and seabird sightings from an aerial survey across French Polynesian waters during the austral summer 2011. We classified cetaceans and seabirds into energetic guilds according to the literature. For each guild, we built generalized additive models along with static covariates and oceanographic covariates at the seasonal and climatological resolutions. We provided regional habitat predictions for Delphininae, Globicephalinae, sperm and beaked whales, tropicbirds, grey terns, noddies, white terns, boobies, petrels and shearwaters, sooty terns and frigatebirds. Explained deviances ranged from 5% to 30% for cetaceans and from 14% to 29% for seabirds. Cetaceans clearly responded to the productivity gradient, with the highest predicted densities around the productive waters of the Marquesas. However, Delphininae and Globicephalinae, characterized by higher energetic demands, depended more strongly on productivity, showing a ratio of 1-26 and 1-31 between their lowest and highest density areas respectively, compared to the less active sperm and beaked whales (showing only a ratio of 1-3.5 in predicted densities). In contrast

  1. Hyunsoonleella pacifica sp. nov., isolated from seawater of South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Zhang, Zenghu; Dai, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-04-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, non-flagellated, non-gliding, oxidase- and catalase-positive and rod-shaped yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated strain SW033(T) was isolated from a surface seawater sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (GPS position: 26° 29' S 137° 56' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SW033(T) belonged to the genus Hyunsoonleella and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Hyunsoonleella jejuensis CNU004(T) (96.8%). It showed 94.7-95.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with respect to members of the genera Jejuia , Arenitalea and Algibacter in the family Flavobacteriaceae . Optimal growth occurred in the presence of 2-3% (w/v) NaCl, at pH 8.0 and at 28 °C. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain SW033(T) was 36.1 mol%. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 1) G, iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH, iso-C(15 : 0) 3-OH and summed feature 3 (comprising C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c). The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-6. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids and four unidentified lipids. On the basis of the polyphasic analyses, strain SW033(T) is considered to represent a member of a novel species in the genus Hyunsoonleella , for which the name Hyunsoonleella pacifica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SW033(T) ( = CGMCC 1.11009(T) = JCM 17860(T)). PMID:25604336

  2. Luteococcus sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Zenghu; Li, Zhao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-08-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, coccus-shaped, non-motile, yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated strain XH208(T), was isolated from a deep subseafloor sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41° 58' S 163° 11' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH208(T) belonged to the genus Luteococcus and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Luteococcus peritonei CCUG 38120(T) (96.9%), Luteococcus japonicus DSM 10546(T) (95.4%) and Luteococcus sanguinis CCUG 33897(T) (95.2%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH208(T) was 66.9 mol%. The cell wall of strain XH208(T) possessed a type A3γ peptidoglycan (ll-diaminopimelic acid-glycine), and ribose, glucose and galactose as the major whole-cell sugars. The major fatty acids were C(17 : 1)ω8c, C(17 : 1)ω6c, and C(16 : 1)ω6c and/or C(16 : 1)ω7c (summed feature 3). The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone MK-9(H4). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH208(T) is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Luteococcus, for which the name Luteococcus sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH208(T) ( = DSM 27277(T) = JCM 19259(T)). PMID:24812361

  3. Biological N2O fixation in the Eastern South Pacific Ocean and marine cyanobacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Farías, Laura; Faúndez, Juan; Fernández, Camila; Cornejo, Marcela; Sanhueza, Sandra; Carrasco, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the global radiative balance and atmospheric ozone chemistry, its sources and sinks within the Earth's system are still poorly understood. In the ocean, N2O is produced by microbiological processes such as nitrification and partial denitrification, which account for about a third of global emissions. Conversely, complete denitrification (the dissimilative reduction of N2O to N2) under suboxic/anoxic conditions is the only known pathway accountable for N2O consumption in the ocean. In this work, it is demonstrated that the biological assimilation of N2O could be a significant pathway capable of directly transforming this gas into particulate organic nitrogen (PON). N2O is shown to be biologically fixed within the subtropical and tropical waters of the eastern South Pacific Ocean, under a wide range of oceanographic conditions and at rates ranging from 2 pmol N L(-1) d(-) to 14.8 nmol N L(-1) d(-1) (mean ± SE of 0.522 ± 1.06 nmol N L(-1) d(-1), n = 93). Additional assays revealed that cultured cyanobacterial strains of Trichodesmium (H-9 and IMS 101), and Crocosphaera (W-8501) have the capacity to directly fix N2O under laboratory conditions; suggesting that marine photoautotrophic diazotrophs could be using N2O as a substrate. This metabolic capacity however was absent in Synechococcus (RCC 1029). The findings presented here indicate that assimilative N2O fixation takes place under extreme environmental conditions (i.e., light, nutrient, oxygen) where both autotrophic (including cyanobacteria) and heterotrophic microbes appear to be involved. This process could provide a globally significant sink for atmospheric N2O which in turn affects the oceanic N2O inventory and may also represent a yet unexplored global oceanic source of fixed N. PMID:23717516

  4. Dust, Volcanic Ash, and the Evolution of the South Pacific Gyre through the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S.; Higgins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust and volcanic ash play a critical role in past global climate by affecting cloud cover and ocean nutrients as well as responding to changes in tectonics, aridity, and wind. Because the eolian fluxes in the Southern Hemisphere are so low, subtle changes in the absolute flux of dust and volcanic ash may have a disproportionally large impact on climate. Our multi-site record of eolian dust and volcanic ash accumulation in pelagic clay of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG), gathered during IODP Expedition 329, shows that eolian fluxes varied by an order of magnitude over the Cenozoic and correlate with changes of tectonic processes and global climate. We analyzed the concentrations of 37 elements in 138 bulk pelagic clay samples from 6 sites drilled throughout the SPG. Using multivariate statistical modeling of the geochemical dataset (e.g. Q-mode factor analysis and multiple linear regression) and a cobalt-based age model, we quantified the mass accumulation rate (MAR) of 6 end-members that comprise the SPG pelagic clay: dust, rhyolite, altered basalt, Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, excess Si, and apatite. Our record shows that Australian dust MAR begins at the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum ~50 Ma as global temperatures began to cool and Australia began to tectonically separate from Antarctica. The mid-Miocene has noticeably higher MAR of dust and ash at multiple sites. While a simultaneous increase in production is possible (i.e., more aridity and volcanic activity), the synchronicity may be more indicative of stronger winds in the Southern Hemisphere and increased material in the atmosphere during this time. Heavier Mg isotopes occur at Site U1366 in samples that are composed primarily of hydrothermal deposition, excess Si, and volcanic ash. The Mg isotopic enrichment suggests that these components have undergone alterations to form authigenic aluminosilicates.

  5. N2 fixation in eddies of the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscher, Carolin R.; Bourbonnais, Annie; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Charoenpong, Chawalit N.; Altabet, Mark A.; Bange, Hermann W.; Czeschel, Rena; Hoffmann, Chris; Schmitz, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Mesoscale eddies play a major role in controlling ocean biogeochemistry. By impacting nutrient availability and water column ventilation, they are of critical importance for oceanic primary production. In the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean off Peru, where a large and persistent oxygen-deficient zone is present, mesoscale processes have been reported to occur frequently. However, investigations into their biological activity are mostly based on model simulations, and direct measurements of carbon and dinitrogen (N2) fixation are scarce.We examined an open-ocean cyclonic eddy and two anticyclonic mode water eddies: a coastal one and an open-ocean one in the waters off Peru along a section at 16° S in austral summer 2012. Molecular data and bioassay incubations point towards a difference between the active diazotrophic communities present in the cyclonic eddy and the anticyclonic mode water eddies.In the cyclonic eddy, highest rates of N2 fixation were measured in surface waters but no N2 fixation signal was detected at intermediate water depths. In contrast, both anticyclonic mode water eddies showed pronounced maxima in N2 fixation below the euphotic zone as evidenced by rate measurements and geochemical data. N2 fixation and carbon (C) fixation were higher in the young coastal mode water eddy compared to the older offshore mode water eddy. A co-occurrence between N2 fixation and biogenic N2, an indicator for N loss, indicated a link between N loss and N2 fixation in the mode water eddies, which was not observed for the cyclonic eddy. The comparison of two consecutive surveys of the coastal mode water eddy in November 2012 and December 2012 also revealed a reduction in N2 and C fixation at intermediate depths along with a reduction in chlorophyll by half, mirroring an aging effect in this eddy. Our data indicate an important role for anticyclonic mode water eddies in stimulating N2 fixation and thus supplying N offshore.

  6. Phosphorus burial in ultra-oligotrophic sediments of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhammer, Tobias; Ahrens, Janis; Marshall, Joseph; Ferdelman, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Marine phosphorus (P) biogeochemistry has a certain affection towards continental margins and shallow oceans. There, ocean currents re-cycle the major share of the standing P stock, and the formation of phosphate mineral phases and their burial is most intense. The seabed below the open ocean has received considerably less attention, but in fact is a major player in global P cycling alone for its sheer extent. Processes controlling P sequestration and regeneration in these environments remain to be explored, and P budgets of these oceanic provinces are yet poorly constrained. Here, we present data from the seafloor beneath the nutrient-depleted South Pacific Gyre (SPG), characterized by ultra low primary production, inferior sedimentation rates, and barely detectable microbial activity and biomass. We have investigated P phases and binding forms in surface-near samples from sediment cores retrieved by IODP Expedition 329, covering a productivity transect from the ultra-oligotrophic center of the SPG to the mesotrophic waters east of New Zealand, employing different sequential extraction protocols for sedimentary phosphate and bulk elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. In these samples, we find sedimentary P contents that are unexpectedly large and in an order of magnitude as values known from upwelling sediments. Furthermore, the highest P contents are located beneath the center of the gyre, and the depth trends of P speciation are highly variable across the productivity transect. In our contribution, we will discuss (1) the balance of P burial vs. regeneration in the SPG seabed, (2) the contribution of biogenic P to the overall P pool and the formation of stable burial phases, (3) the potential of zeolitic phases to efficiently retain P and represent an alternative burial pathway for P in these ultra-oligotrophic sediments.

  7. Revisiting nitrification in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific: A focus on controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Warner, Mark J.; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2016-03-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonium (NH4+) to nitrite (NO2-) and to nitrate (NO3-), is a component of the nitrogen (N) cycle internal to the fixed N pool. In oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hotspots for oceanic fixed N loss, nitrification plays a key role because it directly supplies substrates for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox), and may compete for substrates with these same processes. However, the control of oxygen and substrate concentrations on nitrification are not well understood. We performed onboard incubations with 15N-labeled substrates to measure rates of NH4+ and NO2- oxidation in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP). The spatial and depth distributions of NH4+ and NO2- oxidation rates were primarily controlled by NH4+ and NO2- availability, oxygen concentration, and light. In the euphotic zone, nitrification was partially photoinhibited. In the anoxic layer, NH4+ oxidation was negligible or below detection, but high rates of NO2- oxidation were observed. NH4+ oxidation displayed extremely high affinity for both NH4+ and oxygen. The positive linear correlations between NH4+ oxidation rates and in situ NH4+ concentrations and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene abundances in the upper oxycline indicate that the natural assemblage of ammonia oxidizers responds to in situNH4+ concentrations or supply by adjusting their population size, which determines the NH4+ oxidation potential. The depth distribution of archaeal and bacterial amoA gene abundances and N2O concentration, along with independently reported simultaneous direct N2O production rate measurements, suggests that AOA were predominantly responsible for NH4+ oxidation, which was a major source of N2O production at oxygen concentrations > 5 µM.

  8. Cyclone effects on coral reef habitats in New Caledonia (South Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, N.; Chabanet, P.; Le Pape, O.

    2010-06-01

    The impacts of the unusually strong Cyclone Erica (March 2003) on coral reef habitats at a site located on the northwest coast of New Caledonia (South Pacific) were assessed using a 6-year data set (2002-2007). We examined the interannual variations of key variables describing reef habitats (live hard and soft corals, dead corals in place, coral debris, algae and relative proportion of mechanically vulnerable and resistant live hard corals). The cyclone-induced disturbances of habitats differed according to three reef types: patch reefs, barrier reefs far from passes (more than 3 km from the nearest pass) and barrier reefs near passes (less than 3 km from the nearest pass). Short-term mechanical damage was detected on the three-dimensional structure of reef habitats with a notable shift from a community dominated by mechanically vulnerable corals to one dominated by resistant corals on barrier reefs far from passes. The history of habitats and their pre-disturbance characteristics, in link with local hydrodynamics, was found to influence their short-term susceptibility to extreme events such as cyclones. However, the most significant effects appeared in the midterm (within 2 years after the cyclone) as the cover of live hard corals significantly decreased by approximately 45% between 2002 and 2004 on all reef types. The short- and midterm disturbances of coral reef habitats are discussed with regard to published temporal variations in reef fish assemblages, underlining the delayed effects of this cyclonic event on fish as well as benthic habitats. Coral reef habitats and live corals had shown significant patterns of recovery 4 years after the cyclone, followed by similar recovery in fish community, suggesting good resilience in a face of this major natural disturbance in an area under moderate anthropogenic pressure.

  9. Low rates of nitrogen fixation in eastern tropical South Pacific surface waters.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Angela N; Casciotti, Karen L; Berelson, William M; Prokopenko, Maria G; Capone, Douglas G

    2016-04-19

    An extensive region of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) Ocean has surface waters that are nitrate-poor yet phosphate-rich. It has been proposed that this distribution of surface nutrients provides a geochemical niche favorable for N2fixation, the primary source of nitrogen to the ocean. Here, we present results from two cruises to the ETSP where rates of N2fixation and its contribution to export production were determined with a suite of geochemical and biological measurements. N2fixation was only detectable using nitrogen isotopic mass balances at two of six stations, and rates ranged from 0 to 23 µmol N m(-2)d(-1)based on sediment trap fluxes. Whereas the fractional importance of N2fixation did not change, the N2-fixation rates at these two stations were several-fold higher when scaled to other productivity metrics. Regardless of the choice of productivity metric these N2-fixation rates are low compared with other oligotrophic locations, and the nitrogen isotope budgets indicate that N2fixation supports no more than 20% of export production regionally. Although euphotic zone-integrated short-term N2-fixation rates were higher, up to 100 µmol N m(-2)d(-1), and detected N2fixation at all six stations, studies of nitrogenase gene abundance and expression from the same cruises align with the geochemical data and together indicate that N2fixation is a minor source of new nitrogen to surface waters of the ETSP. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that, despite a relative abundance of phosphate, iron may limit N2fixation in the ETSP. PMID:26976587

  10. Low rates of nitrogen fixation in eastern tropical South Pacific surface waters.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Angela N; Casciotti, Karen L; Berelson, William M; Prokopenko, Maria G; Capone, Douglas G

    2016-04-19

    An extensive region of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) Ocean has surface waters that are nitrate-poor yet phosphate-rich. It has been proposed that this distribution of surface nutrients provides a geochemical niche favorable for N2fixation, the primary source of nitrogen to the ocean. Here, we present results from two cruises to the ETSP where rates of N2fixation and its contribution to export production were determined with a suite of geochemical and biological measurements. N2fixation was only detectable using nitrogen isotopic mass balances at two of six stations, and rates ranged from 0 to 23 µmol N m(-2)d(-1)based on sediment trap fluxes. Whereas the fractional importance of N2fixation did not change, the N2-fixation rates at these two stations were several-fold higher when scaled to other productivity metrics. Regardless of the choice of productivity metric these N2-fixation rates are low compared with other oligotrophic locations, and the nitrogen isotope budgets indicate that N2fixation supports no more than 20% of export production regionally. Although euphotic zone-integrated short-term N2-fixation rates were higher, up to 100 µmol N m(-2)d(-1), and detected N2fixation at all six stations, studies of nitrogenase gene abundance and expression from the same cruises align with the geochemical data and together indicate that N2fixation is a minor source of new nitrogen to surface waters of the ETSP. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that, despite a relative abundance of phosphate, iron may limit N2fixation in the ETSP.

  11. Metagenomic and Phylogenetic Analysis of Deep-Sea Ferromanganese Nodules from the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, B.; Horn, G.; Edwards, K. J.; Nelson, W.; Heidelberg, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ferromanganese/polymetallic nodules form at the sediment-water interface in deep-sea environments (4,000-6,000 m). They are primarily composed of manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and other metals including copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), and rare trace metals, but composition can vary from nodule to nodule and area to area. Globally, it is estimated that ferromanganese nodules contain more than 2 × 10E14 kg of Mn and Fe. There is much debate as to how these nodules form and the extent to which the process is controlled/mediated by microorganisms, specifically bacteria and archaea. Ferromanganese nodules from 3 different sites (4 different nodules; 59 subsamples) were aseptically collected on the site survey expedition to the South Pacific Gyre (KNOX-02RR, Dec. 2006 - Jan. 2007). Microbial community structure was determined using high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing. Subsequently, samples were subjected to multiple displacement amplification (MDA) and shotgun metagenomics was performed using both the GS FLX Titanium XL+ chemistry. Metagenomic sequences were assembled and analyzed. Preliminary results have revealed a high abundance of sequences related to 'marine group-1' Thaumarchaea, to date, a group that contains only autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing organisms. Furthermore, there appears to be limited correlation between community composition and the layer of the nodule from which DNA was extracted. The community composition of the nodule from area with the lowest sedimentation and organic carbon burial rates was significantly different from the other nodules, with a community dominated by heterotrophic organisms. Metagenomic results support the community structure and produced several scaffolds (longest ~12 kbp) that have begun to reveal the genomic potential in the microbial community. Further, the data has been used to identify two previously unsequenced Microviridae viral genomes. And further metagenomic analysis is currently ongoing. Community

  12. Assessment of equity in healthcare financing in Fiji and Timor-Leste: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Asante, Augustine D; Price, Jennifer; Hayen, Andrew; Irava, Wayne; Martins, Joao; Guinness, Lorna; Ataguba, John E; Limwattananon, Supon; Mills, Anne; Jan, Stephen; Wiseman, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Equitable health financing remains a key health policy objective worldwide. In low and middle-income countries (LMICs), there is evidence that many people are unable to access the health services they need due to financial and other barriers. There are growing calls for fairer health financing systems that will protect people from catastrophic and impoverishing health payments in times of illness. This study aims to assess equity in healthcare financing in Fiji and Timor-Leste in order to support government efforts to improve access to healthcare and move towards universal health coverage in the two countries. Methods and analysis The study employs two standard measures of equity in health financing increasingly being applied in LMICs—benefit incidence analysis (BIA) and financing incidence analysis (FIA). In Fiji, we will use a combination of secondary and primary data including a Household Income and Expenditure Survey, National Health Accounts, and data from a cross-sectional household survey on healthcare utilisation. In Timor-Leste, the World Bank recently completed a health equity and financial protection analysis that incorporates BIA and FIA, and found that the distribution of benefits from healthcare financing is pro-rich. Building on this work, we will explore the factors that influence the pro-rich distribution. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of University of New South Wales, Australia (Approval number: HC13269); the Fiji National Health Research Committee (Approval # 201371); and the Timor-Leste Ministry of Health (Ref MS/UNSW/VI/218). Results Study outcomes will be disseminated through stakeholder meetings, targeted multidisciplinary seminars, peer-reviewed journal publications, policy briefs and the use of other web-based technologies including social media. A user-friendly toolkit on how to analyse healthcare financing equity will be developed for use by policymakers and

  13. Fiji Hindustani. Working Papers in Linguistics, Vol. 7, No. 3, May-June 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    More than 250,000 of Fiji's citizens are descendants of Indian indentured laborers of diverse origins. There are still distinct social groups based on language, religion, and place of origin. However, nearly all Fiji Indians speak one language called Fiji Hindustani. Other languages, such as Gujarati, Panjabi, Tamil, and Telugu, are still spoken,…

  14. Mosquito-borne infections in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Mataika, J. U.; Dando, B. C.; Spears, G. F. S.; Macnamara, F. N.

    1971-01-01

    A survey of microfilaraemia among the population of Vanua Levu, Taveuni and Koro islands in northern Fiji was conducted in 1968 and 1969 as a prelude to a campaign of mass treatment with diethylcarbamazine. The prevalences of microfilaraemia were found in the more moist conditions of Taveuni and Koro and on the windward southern side of Vanua Levu to be higher than on the drier northern side of Vanua Levu. On both sides of Vanua Levu prevalences were lower inland than near the coast. Under apparently similar environmental conditions those of Fijian ethnic origin exhibited a higher prevalence of microfilaraemia than that shown by Indians. This ethnic difference and a difference between the prevalences in male and female Fijians are considered to be due more to higher rates of recovery from microfilaraemia in Indians and Fijian women than to diminished exposure to mosquitoes. Mathematical models have been used as an aid to the interpretation of the data, and, where appropriate, comparison has been made with the prevalence of antibodies to dengue, an arbovirus having the same vectors. Household infections were analysed by computer techniques. Infections in large households were not proportionately higher than in small households, indicating that transmission was not intrafamilial. The clustering of infections within households, though present, was not marked. Among the occupants of outlying settlements the prevalence of microfilaraemia was relatively low indicating a lower risk of infection due to isolation. PMID:4397424

  15. Mosquito-borne infections in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Mataika, J. U.; Dando, B. C.; Spears, G. F. S.; Macnamara, F. N.

    1971-01-01

    During a filariasis survey conducted in northern Fiji in 1968-9 examinations were made for microfilaraemia, enlarged lymph nodes and elephantiasis. Analysis of the microfilarial densities at different ages and the number of anatomical sites showing lymph gland enlargement or elephantiasis have been used to provide evidence on the clustering of infections and pathogenesis. Although there is no evidence of clustering of risk of infection, there is evidence favouring the clustering of adult filariae in individuals. Nevertheless the number of sites of lymph node enlargement do not correspond with this finding and statistical evidence suggests that lymph-node enlargement is not necessarily associated with the near presence in the body of adult filariae, whether dead or alive. Males of Indian ethnic origin showed a higher prevalence of elephantiasis than males of Fijian ethnic origin, but women of either ethnic race showed prevalences lower than those of men. The onset of elephantiasis at a site does not directly reflect the number of infections sustained in the local area, but it appears that filariasis first induces for a limited period a proneness to elephantiasis. During this period a random and discrete event may induce the onset of elephantiasis. The nature of the event is unknown, but it probably is not trauma. PMID:4397426

  16. Distribution of micro-organisms along a transect in the South-East Pacific Ocean (BIOSOPE cruise) from epifluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masquelier, S.; Vaulot, D.

    2007-08-01

    The distribution of selected groups of micro-organisms was analyzed along a South-East Pacific Ocean transect sampled during the BIOSOPE cruise in 2004. The transect could be divided into four regions of contrasted trophic status: a high Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) region (mesotrophic) near the equator, the South-East Pacific Ocean gyre (hyper-oligotrophic), the transition region between the gyre and the coast of South America (moderately oligotrophic), and the Chile upwelling (eutrophic). The abundance of phycoerythrin containing picocyanobacteria, autotrophic and heterotrophic eukaryotes in different size ranges, dinoflagellates, and ciliates was determined by epifluorescence microscopy after DAPI staining. All populations reached a maximum in the Chile upwelling and a minimum near the centre of the gyre. Picocyanobacteria reached a maximum abundance of 70×10³ cell mL-1. In the HNLC zone, up to 50% of picocyanobacteria formed colonies. Autotrophic eukaryote and dinoflagellate abundance reached 24.5×10³ and 200 cell mL-1, respectively. We observed a shift in the size distribution of autotrophic eukaryotes from 2-5 μm in eutrophic and mesotrophic regions to less than 2 μm in the central region. The contribution of autotrophic eukaryotes to total eukaryotes was the lowest in the central gyre. Maximum concentration of ciliates (18 cell ml-1) also occurred in the Chile upwelling, but, in contrast to the other groups, their abundance was very low in the HNLC zone and near the Marquesas Islands.

  17. 'Are you prepared?' Representations and management of floods in Lomanikoro, Rewa (Fiji).

    PubMed

    Nolet, Emilie

    2016-10-01

    The islands of Fiji, in the Western Pacific, are exposed to a wide range of natural hazards. Tropical storms and associated floods are recurring natural phenomena, but it has been regularly alleged that Fijians lack preparation, over-rely on state assistance in post-disaster situations or engage in risky behaviours that aggravate the negative impact of floods. Risk reduction strategies, which are now implemented by government authorities and international organisations, heavily promote the principle of 'community preparedness'. Both community awareness programmes and capacity-building programmes are conducted throughout the country in the most vulnerable communities. This paper analyses how the inhabitants of Lomanikoro village, in the low areas of the Rewa Delta, perceive and manage existing flood risks. It examines social and cultural factors that contribute to shape risk response locally-in particular, why villagers may be reluctant to adopt some recommended preparedness measures and resettle in higher, safer zones. PMID:26749532

  18. Inter-annual precipitation variabiity inferred from late Holocene speleothem records from Fiji: implications for SPCZ localisation and ENSO behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattey, D.; Stephens, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Brett, M.

    2015-12-01

    The modern tropical Fiji climate is characterised by seasonal rainfall controlled by the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Interannual rainfall is strongly modulated on decadal timescales by ENSO with higher rainfall associated with La Nina events. Voli Voli cave near Sigatoga (Viti Levu) is a stream passage that has been monitored since 2009. A U-Th dated laminated speleothem spans a 1500 year interval across the transition from the Medieval Warm Period into the Little Ice Age marked by a fabric change from finely laminated calcite with thin clay layers, to white well-laminated calcite. The older record is characterised by rising δ13C values followed by a rapid decrease in δ13C around 1200 AD. Evidence from cave monitoring shows that cave air CO2 levels are strongly seasonal as a result of greater ventilation by winter trade winds and high resolution δ13C record shows regularly spaced peaks correlated with paired laminae and cycles in P and S which provide annual markers driven by rainfall and seasonal ventilation. δ18O values remain relatively unchanged throughout the record but micromilling at sub-annual resolution reveals systematic cycles in δ18O that span groups of paired laminae with an inferred periodicity of 3-7 years i.e. a similar frequency to modern ENSO. The presence of these sub-decadal cycles in δ18O may be a result of a combination of factors. The amplitude of 2-3‰ would be equivalent to an amount-effect related change in annual precipitation of around 50% but an additional smoothing process, perhaps a result of aquifer storage, is required to attenuate interannual variance in precipitation. The Voli Voli record provides evidence of an underlying climatic change to more frequent La Niña conditions from 1200 AD and may be associated with increased conflict, shifts in settlements and changes in subsistence strategies on the island. Coeval speleothem isotope records from tropical Pacific Islands provide a provide a

  19. Three-year atmospheric monitoring of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in polar regions and the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Baek, Song-Yee; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-05-15

    XAD-2 resin based passive air samplers (PAS) were deployed for three one-year periods at the Korean polar and South Pacific research stations at Ny-Ålesund (2005-2009), King George Island (2005-2007), and Chuuk (2006-2009) to investigate long-range transport, local sources, and temporal trends of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The highest hexachlocyclohexane (HCH) concentration (35.2-78.9 pg·m(-3)) over the entire sampling period was detected at Ny-Ålesund, in the Arctic. α-HCH was the dominant OCP (31.1-67.1 pg·m(-3)), contributing about 50% of the total OCP load. Additionally, a high and consistent α/γ-HCH ratio was observed at Ny-Ålesund. HCHs might reach Arctic sites more easily than other OCPs from surrounding countries through long-range atmospheric transport (LRAT). Interestingly, high levels of the current-use OCP endosulfan-particularly endosulfan-I--were detected at almost all sampling sites, including in Antarctica, ranging 12.2-88.5, 17.7-130, and ND-59.7 pg·m(-3) at King George Island, Ny-Ålesund, and Chuuk, respectively. Specific OCP and PCB patterns, such as low trans/cis-chlordane ratios and a prevalence of lighter PCB congeners, were observed in all three regions (excepting one site at Ny-Ålesund and one site in the South Pacific affected by local sources) during all sampling periods. This indicates that these Polar and remote South Pacific sites are mainly influenced by LRAT. Over the entire sampling period, a decreasing trend of HCHs (α- and γ-HCH) and an increasing trend of endosulfan-I were observed at the Ny-Ålesund sites.

  20. ENSO regimes and the late 1970's climate shift: The role of synoptic weather and South Pacific ocean spiciness

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kane, Terence J.; Matear, Richard J.; Chamberlain, Matthew A.; Oke, Peter R.

    2014-08-15

    South Pacific subtropical density compensated temperature and salinity (spiciness) anomalies are known to be associated with decadal equatorial variability, however, the mechanisms by which such disturbances are generated, advect and the degree to which they modulate the equatorial thermocline remains controversial. During the late 1970's a climate regime transition preceded a period of strong and sustained El Nino events. Using an ocean general circulation model forced by the constituent mechanical and thermodynamic components of the reanalysed atmosphere we show that the late 1970's transition coincided with the arrival of a large-scale, subsurface cold and fresh water anomaly in the central tropical Pacific. An ocean reanalysis for the period 1990–2007 that assimilates subsurface Argo, XBT and CTD data, reveals that disturbances occur due to the subduction of negative surface salinity anomalies from near 30° S, 100° W which are advected along the σ=25–26 kgm{sup −3} isopycnal surfaces. These anomalies take, on average, seven years to reach the central equatorial Pacific where they may substantially perturb the thermocline before the remnants ultimately ventilate in the region of the western Pacific warm pool. Positive (warm–salty) disturbances, known to occur due to late winter diapycnal mixing and isopycnal outcropping, arise due to both subduction of subtropical mode waters and subsurface injection. On reaching the equatorial band (10° S–0° S) these disturbances tend to deepen the thermocline reducing the model's ENSO. In contrast the emergence of negative (cold–fresh) disturbances at the equator are associated with a shoaling of the thermocline and El Nino events. Process studies are used to show that the generation and advection of anomalous density compensated thermocline disturbances critically depend on stochastic forcing of the intrinsic ocean by weather. We further show that in the absence of the inter-annual component of the atmosphere

  1. Ozone in the Pacific Troposphere from Ozonesonde Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Harris, J. M.; Voemel, H.; Koshy, K.; Simon, P.; Bendura, R.; Thompson, A. M.; Logan, J. A.; Hasebe, F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ozone vertical profile measurements obtained from ozonesondes flown at Fiji, Samoa, Tahiti and the Galapagos are used to characterize ozone in the troposphere over the tropical Pacific. There is a significant seasonal variation at each of these sites. At sites in both the eastern and western Pacific, ozone is highest at almost all levels in the troposphere during the September-November season and lowest during, March-May. There is a relative maximum at all of the sites in the mid-troposphere during all seasons of the year (the largest amounts are usually found near the tropopause). This maximum is particularly pronounced during, the September-November season. On average, throughout the troposphere at all seasons, the Galapagos has larger ozone amounts than the western Pacific sites. A trajectory climatology is used to identify the major flow regimes that are associated with the characteristic ozone behavior at various altitudes and seasons. The enhanced ozone seen in the mid-troposphere during September-November is associated with flow from the continents. In the western Pacific this flow is usually from southern Africa (although 10-day trajectories do not always reach the continent), but also may come from Australia and Indonesia. In the Galapagos the ozone peak in the mid-troposphere is seen in flow from the South American continent and particularly from northern Brazil. The time of year and flow characteristics associated with the ozone mixing ratio peaks seen in both the western and eastern Pacific suggest that these enhanced ozone values result from biomass burning. In the upper troposphere low ozone amounts are seen with flow that originates in the convective western Pacific.

  2. Relative roles of genetic factors, dietary deficiency, and infection in anaemia in Vanuatu, South-West Pacific.

    PubMed

    Bowden, D K; Hill, A V; Higgs, D R; Weatherall, D J; Clegg, J B

    1985-11-01

    Hypochromic anaemia is very common among the island populations of Vanuatu in the South-West Pacific. Results of a large-scale survey show that, unexpectedly, this form of anaemia is seldom due to iron deficiency or coexistent parasitic disease. Rather, it results from a previously unsuspected high incidence of alpha-thalassaemia which has been identified only by application of DNA analysis to the populations studied. These findings suggest that hypochromic anaemia in tropical or subtropical populations should not necessarily be attributed to iron deficiency; detailed studies of iron status should be carried out before major dietary changes or fortification of food with iron are implemented.

  3. Egg capsules of the dusky catshark Bythaelurus canescens (Carcharhiniformes, Scyliorhinidae) from the south-eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Concha, F; Bustamante, C; Oddone, M C; Hernández, S; Lamilla, J

    2010-09-01

    The external morphology of the egg capsule of Bythaelurus canescens and its fixation to the substratum are described. Bythaelurus canescens egg capsules are typically vase-shaped, dorso-ventrally flattened, pale yellow in colour when fresh and covered by 12-15 longitudinal ridges. The anterior border of the capsule is straight, whereas the posterior border is semicircular. Two horns bearing long, coiled tendrils arise from the anterior and posterior ends of the capsule. The presence of longitudinal ridges and long coiled tendrils at both anterior and posterior ends of the capsule readily distinguish these egg capsules from those of other chondrichthyans occurring in the south-east Pacific Ocean.

  4. Labour circulation and the village economy in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Sofer, M

    1992-12-01

    The author examines circular labor migration in Fiji. "This paper is organized into five sections. The first section provides a brief discussion of two major perspectives of labour circulation in developing countries. The second section presents the state of the Fijian village in the context of the current pattern of uneven development in Fiji. The practice of labour circulation by Fijian villagers is dealt with in the third section. In the last two sections, issues concerning the maintenance of the polarized pattern and the preservation of the village mode of production are discussed."

  5. NEON Collaborative Data Collection Campaign at Pacific South West Site in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Musinsky, J.; Petroy, S. B.; Wasser, L. A.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Serbin, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale observatory that will collect biological, chemical and geophysical data over the continental United States in order to study biodiversity, landcover change, climate change and invasive species. In June 2013, a large-scale data collection took place over NEON's Pacific South West (PSW) site 17 in CA, USA. Data were collected in the San Joaquin Experimental Range and the Sierra National Forest. NEON's AOP (Airborne Observation Platform) acquired high spatial resolution hyperspectral data (~1m pixels), waveform lidar, discrete lidar, and RGB imagery over all three sites. A field team simultaneously collected atmospheric and vegetation inventory data, including tree locations, height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), species, and spectral data. The NEON collect was centered within a collaboration of multiple research entities, including NASA, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), University of Massachusetts (Boston; UMB, and Lowell; UML), Boston University (BU), and the University of Wisconsin, Madison (UWM). NASA's AVIRIS and MASTER sensors were flown over a wider area encompassing the NEON sites, with AVIRIS acquiring hyperspectral data (224 bands) at approximately 30m spatial resolution, and MASTER acquiring multispectral thermal data (50 bands) at approximately 50m spatial resolution. These data will be downscaled to approximate theoretical HyspIRI data (60m spatial resolution) as part of a large collection of preparatory research. Concurrently, a variety of university teams were active in the field: RIT collected ground-based lidar, leaf area index (LAI), herbaceous biomass measurements, wide-angle photographs, and spectral measurements. Data were collected over 20 80x80m sites, centered on existing 20x20m NEON sites. This data set will be used to inform synthetic scene design and to study the impact of sub-pixel structural variation on pixel-level spectral response; The BU, UMB, and UML

  6. Volatiles in Submarine HIMU Basalts from the Austral Islands, South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. R.; Hanyu, T.; Shimizu, K.; Dosso, L.

    2014-12-01

    Submarine basalts have been collected from the slopes of Rurutu and Tubuai in the Austral Islands, South Pacific with the manned submersible Shinkai 6500. Previous work on the bulk radiogenic isotope and trace element chemistry of these samples suggests that the basalts were generated from a HIMU reservoir derived from an ancient subducted slab that was entrained and mixed with the depleted asthenospheric mantle. Olivines and glasses from the submarine basalts show lower 3He/4He than MORB, similar to subaerial basalts from these islands. Sixteen glass chips from the same submarine samples have now undergone in-situ analysis for major elements (including S and Cl) by EPMA, trace elements by LA-ICP-MS, H2O and CO2 by FTIR, and bulk volatile analysis (S, Cl, F) by ion chromatography combined with pyrohydrolysis. H2O ranges from 0.62-2.44 wt%, while CO2 is below detection (<20 ppm). S measured by EPMA ranges from 612-1889 ppm and by bulk analysis from 582-1301 ppm and, with the exception of one sample, concentrations agree well. Cl measured by EPMA ranges from 151-538 ppm, and by bulk analysis from 188-980 ppm. The higher values suggest that the bulk samples may be contaminated by seawater; otherwise Cl correlates strongly with incompatible elements. F measured in the bulk samples ranges from 221-1243 ppm. S correlates positively with FeO and Cu, but not with incompatible elements, suggesting sulfide saturation. While the highest H2O contents may reflect late-stage hydration and are oversaturated at the depth of collection, the low H2O contents (11 samples with 0.62-0.96 wt%) are undersaturated, and there is a positive correlation between the H2O contents of all chips and their incompatible element concentrations. This suggests that H2O/Ce and Cl/Ce filtered for shallow level processes may reflect source compositions, providing constraints on volatiles in the sources of Rurutu and Tubuai, and indications about the efficiency of subduction-related volatile-loss in the

  7. Geologic Signatures of the September 2009 South Pacific Tsunami (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, B. M.; Buckley, M. L.; Etienne, S.; Strotz, L. C.; Chague-Goff, C.; Wilson, K.; Goff, J. R.; Dudley, W. C.; Sale, F.

    2009-12-01

    The September 29th 2009 tsunami caused widespread destruction along the shorelines of Samoa in the South Pacific. Preliminary measurements indicate maximum runup values of around 12 m (average ~3-6 m) and shore-normal inundation distances of up to ~ 400m. Geological field reconnaissance studies were conducted within three weeks of the event in order to document the erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment by the tsunami. Types of data collected included: a) general morphology and characteristics of the coast, b) tsunami water level measurements (inundation, flow depth and direction, and wave height, c) surficial and subsurface sediment samples, d) topographic mapping, and e) boulder size and location measurements. Where available for transport, mud, sand, and gravel size material was moved by the tsunami and formed distinct sedimentary deposits. Four main sedimentary deposits were identified: 1) Gravel deposits that typically occurred as either isolated coral boulders derived from the adjacent reef system and deposited on the lower beach face, or, fields of basalt boulders derived from coastal engineering structures and deposited inland on the coastal plain. In both cases the boulders were found either on the surface or partially buried by sand. Patchy accumulations of staghorn corals (Acropora sp?) occurred along some shorelines, presumably where there was a nearby reef source. 2) Sand deposits that ranged from very thin patches (< 1 cm) to broad sand sheets up to 10’s of cm thick. Localized thick sand accumulations were common in the lee of structures, such as low walls, and in topographic depressions. The thicker sand deposits had multiple laminations with varying degrees of particle segregation. In some localities clusters of the green alga Halimeda were incorporated in sand deposits. The sand appeared to be derived from the reef flats, beaches, and in some cases erosion of the land surface (i.e. from sandy soil). 3) Organic debris of over 10 cm

  8. Influence of mesoscale eddies on the distribution of nitrous oxide in the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, Damian L.; Kock, Annette; Löscher, Carolin R.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Stramma, Lothar; Bange, Hermann W.

    2016-02-01

    Recent observations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) have shown the key role of meso- and submesoscale processes (e.g. eddies) in shaping its hydrographic and biogeochemical properties. Off Peru, elevated primary production from coastal upwelling in combination with sluggish ventilation of subsurface waters fuels a prominent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Given that nitrous oxide (N2O) production-consumption processes in the water column are sensitive to oxygen (O2) concentrations, the ETSP is a region of particular interest to investigate its source-sink dynamics. To date, no detailed surveys linking mesoscale processes and N2O distributions as well as their relevance to nitrogen (N) cycling are available. In this study, we present the first measurements of N2O across three mesoscale eddies (two mode water or anticyclonic and one cyclonic) which were identified, tracked, and sampled during two surveys carried out in the ETSP in November-December 2012. A two-peak structure was observed for N2O, wherein the two maxima coincide with the upper and lower boundaries of the OMZ, indicating active nitrification and partial denitrification. This was further supported by the abundances of the key gene for nitrification, ammonium monooxygenase (amoA), and the gene marker for N2O production during denitrification, nitrite reductase (nirS). Conversely, we found strong N2O depletion in the core of the OMZ (O2 < 5 µmol L-1) to be consistent with nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and low levels of nitrate (NO3-), thus suggesting active denitrification. N2O depletion within the OMZ's core was substantially higher in the centre of mode water eddies, supporting the view that eddy activity enhances N-loss processes off Peru, in particular near the shelf break where nutrient-rich, productive waters from upwelling are trapped before being transported offshore. Analysis of eddies during their propagation towards the open ocean showed that, in general, "ageing" of mesoscale eddies

  9. Cenozoic sedimentation rates and provenance variations in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Pelagic clays are traditionally difficult to date due to the scarcity of biogenic deposition and the prevalence of homogenous, altered, very fine-grain sediment. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 recovered completely oxic, brown, pelagic zeolitic metalliferous clay from the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). Despite post-depositional alteration, the sediment retains enough of its original chemical signature to track downcore changes in provenance. Of particular interest is the cosmogenic portion of the sediment (e.g., Co), which we use to determine sedimentation rates and explore the paleoceanographic implications of changing sedimentation in the SPG throughout the Cenozoic. Under the assumption that the flux of extraterrestrial cosmogenic dust is spatially and temporally constant (or can at least be constrained), the concentration of cosmic dust in the sediment is inversely proportional to the sedimentation rate. Previous studies have used this premise to successfully date pelagic clays and Fe-Mn crusts, using Co as a proxy for cosmic dust deposition. The SPG has the slowest marine sedimentation rates in the world (as low as 0.1 m/Myr) and subsequently has the highest concentration of cosmic dust in the seafloor, making it an ideal region to apply this techniques. Building upon Zhou and Kyte (1992, Paleocean., 7, 441-465) at the single location of DSDP Site 596, we are dating SPG pelagic clays and identifying provenance variations throughout the SPG using a combined analytical and statistical approach. We analyze bulk sediment from Exp. 329 for a wide suite of major, trace, and rare earth elements by ICP-ES/MS. We apply multivariate statistical methods to quantify the contributions through time from various sources, aiming to distinguish a cosmogenic component. From the cosmogenic abundances, we produce a high-resolution record of instantaneous sedimentation rates of SPG pelagic clays during the Cenozoic. Our preliminary constant cosmogenic Co models show

  10. Influence of mesoscale eddies on the distribution of nitrous oxide in the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, D. L.; Kock, A.; Löscher, C. R.; Schmitz, R. A.; Stramma, L.; Bange, H. W.

    2015-06-01

    Recent observations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) demonstrated the key role of meso- and submesoscale processes (e.g. eddies) in shaping its hydrographic and biogeochemical properties. Off Peru, elevated primary production from coastal upwelling in combination with sluggish ventilation of subsurface waters fuels a prominent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Given that nitrous oxide (N2O) production/consumption processes on the water column are sensitive to oxygen (O2) concentrations, the ETSP is a region of particular interest to investigate its source-sink dynamics. To date, no detailed surveys linking mesoscale processes and N2O distributions as well as their relevance to nitrogen (N) cycling are available. In this study, we present the first measurements of N2O across three mesoscale eddies (two mode water or anticyclonic and one cyclonic) which were identified, tracked and sampled during two surveys carried out in the ETSP in November-December 2012. A "two peak" structure was observed for N2O, wherein the two maxima coincide with the upper and lower boundaries of the OMZ, indicating active nitrification and partial denitrification. This was further supported by the abundances of the key gene for nitrification amoA and the gene marker for N2O production during denitrification, nirS. Conversely, we found strong N2O depletion in the core of the OMZ (O2 < 5 μmol L-1) to be consistent with nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and low levels of nitrate (NO3-), thus suggesting active denitrification. N2O depletion within the OMZ's core was substantially higher in the center of mode water eddies, supporting the view that eddy activity enhances N-loss processes off Peru, in particular near the shelf break where nutrient-rich, productive waters from upwelling are trapped before being transported offshore. Analysis of eddies during their propagation towards the open ocean showed that, in general, "aging" of mesoscale eddies tends to decrease N2O concentrations through the

  11. Biogeochemical characteristics of a long-lived anticyclonic eddy in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo D'Ottone, Marcela; Bravo, Luis; Ramos, Marcel; Pizarro, Oscar; Karstensen, Johannes; Gallegos, Mauricio; Correa-Ramirez, Marco; Silva, Nelson; Farias, Laura; Karp-Boss, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Mesoscale eddies are important, frequent, and persistent features of the circulation in the eastern South Pacific (ESP) Ocean, transporting physical, chemical and biological properties from the productive shelves to the open ocean. Some of these eddies exhibit subsurface hypoxic or suboxic conditions and may serve as important hotspots for nitrogen loss, but little is known about oxygen consumption rates and nitrogen transformation processes associated with these eddies. In the austral fall of 2011, during the Tara Oceans expedition, an intrathermocline, anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy with a suboxic (< 2 µmol kg-1 of O2), subsurface layer (200-400 m) was detected ˜ 900 km off the Chilean shore (30° S, 81° W). The core of the eddy's suboxic layer had a temperature-salinity signature characteristic of Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) that at this latitude is normally restricted to an area near the coast. Measurements of nitrogen species within the eddy revealed undersaturation (below 44 %) of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrite accumulation (> 0.5 µM), suggesting that active denitrification occurred in this water mass. Using satellite altimetry, we were able to track the eddy back to its region of formation on the coast of central Chile (36.1° S, 74.6° W). Field studies conducted in Chilean shelf waters close to the time of eddy formation provided estimates of initial O2 and N2O concentrations of the ESSW source water in the eddy. By the time of its offshore sighting, concentrations of both O2 and N2O in the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the eddy were lower than concentrations in surrounding water and "source water" on the shelf, indicating that these chemical species were consumed as the eddy moved offshore. Estimates of apparent oxygen utilization rates at the OMZ of the eddy ranged from 0.29 to 44 nmol L-1 d-1 and the rate of N2O consumption was 3.92 nmol L-1 d-1. These results show that mesoscale eddies affect open-ocean biogeochemistry in the ESP

  12. Radiolyis and life in deep subseafloor sediment of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Smith, D. C.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 revealed the occurrence of a fundamentally different subsurface world below the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) compared to previously drilled sites. The organic-poor sediment that underlies this vast ultra-oligotrophic region harbors microbial communities characterized by cell abundances three to four orders of magnitude lower than has been found at similar depths outside the gyre. The sediment column is oxic and rich in major nutrients from the seafloor to beneath the sediment-basement interface. Statistical analysis of the dissolved O2 profiles for the six sites within the SPG (U1365 through U1370) demonstrates that measurable organic-fuelled O2 reduction is limited to the upper meters of SPG sediment. At greater depths, maximum mean organic-fueled respiration rates range from 10-5 to 10-3 fmol O2 cell-1 day-1, representing a tremendously low cellular metabolism. Hydrogen is continuously produced in this sedimentary environment by radioactive splitting of water, a process known as water radiolysis. However, measured dissolved hydrogen abundances are below detection in most samples at all six sites. This combination of continuous production and low concentration suggests that radiolytic hydrogen may be a biological electron donor in the organic-poor sediment of the SPG. Gibbs energy of reaction calculations for the knallgas reaction (H2 + ½ O2 = H2O) and other hydrogen-consuming reactions show that where hydrogen concentration is above detection in SPG sediment, hydrogen oxidation is energetically favorable for microbial life (in-situ ΔGreaction averaging -210, -190, and -12 kJ/mol H2 throughout the sequence for oxygen, nitrate and sulfate reduction, respectively). By applying the water radiolysis model of Blair et al. (2007) to our preliminary data from Site U1366, we presently estimate that on average 10-5 fmol radiolytic H2 cell-1 day-1 is available throughout the site's sediment column. By measuring the radioactive

  13. Projected Future Changes in Westerly Winds Associated the South Pacific Winter Split Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracegirdle, T.

    2015-12-01

    Projected changes in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) mid-latitude near-surface westerly winds and associated storm tracks are key influences on Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, with, for example, significant implications for ice sheet stability. Climate model projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model ensemble generally exhibit a poleward shift of the SH tropospheric westerly jet under increased greenhouse gas concentrations. However, the picture is more complex over the South Pacific in winter, when the climatological tropospheric jet is split into two components: a sub-tropical jet (STJ) (at around 25-30°S) and a higher-latitude polar front jet (PFJ) (at around 55-60°S) which is more directly related to the main mid-latitude lower-tropospheric storm track. On average the CMIP5 models project an equatorward shift of the winter PFJ which consequently becomes more merged with a poleward-shifted STJ. A key question is the extent to which this ensemble-mean picture is robust across the CMIP5 models, many of which poorly reproduce the observed split jet structure. To address this question CMIP5 output has been used to conduct the first detailed evaluation of future projections of the winter split jet. The PFJ dominates the surface signature of the split jet, but is too weak in historically-forced simulations of most CMIP5 models. It is found that this has important implications for future projections, since the ensemble mean projected equatorward shift is mainly attributable to models with weak PFJs. A subset of 10 CMIP5 models with the weakest surface expression of the PFJ (on average 39% weaker than reanalysis estimates) exhibit an equatorward shift of 2.5° over the 21st century following the high emissions RCP8.5 scenario. In contrast, a subset of 10 models with the smallest historical biases (on average 6% weaker than reanalysis) exhibit no shift in the PFJ, but do show a strengthening of approximately 1 m/s that

  14. Geochemically tracking provenance changes in marine sediment from the South Pacific Gyre throughout the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The South Pacific Gyre (SPG), characterized by extremely slow sedimentation rates, is the world's largest oceanic desert. The little eolian dust from continents in the Southern Hemisphere must traverse great distances to reach the SPG, and the ultra-oligotrophic waters minimize the biogenic flux of sediment to the seafloor. However sparse, the pelagic sediment that is ultimately found on the seafloor retains a chemical record that can be used to trace its origin. Using cores from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329, we trace downcore fluctuations in major, trace, and rare earth element (REE) composition and flux to yield clues to the geological, chemical, and biological evolution of the SPG throughout the Cenozoic. The shipboard scientific party generally described the completely oxic, brown pelagic clays recovered during Exp. 329 as zeolitic metalliferous clay. The homogenous, very fine-grained nature of these sediments speaks to the challenges we face in resolving eolian detrital material ("dust"), fine-grained ash (commonly altered), and authigenic aluminosilicates from one another. Based on ICP-ES and ICP-MS analyses followed by multivariate statistical treatments, we are developing chemical records from a number of sites located throughout the SPG. Building on earlier work at DSDP Site 596 (Zhou and Kyte, 1992, Paleocean., 7, 441-465), and based on backtrack paths from 100 Ma forward, we are working to construct a regionally and temporally continuous paleoclimatological history of the SPG. Preliminary La-Th-Sc concentrations from Sites U1367, U1368, and U1369 show a distinct authigenic influence, but several refractory elements retain their original provenance signature. Sediment ages are constrained using a constant-Co model, based on the geochemically similar work that Zhou and Kyte (1992) performed in the SPG. REE concentrations normalized to post-archean average shale (PAAS) reveal a negative Ce anomaly that becomes more pronounced closer to

  15. Declining reliance on marine resources in remote South Pacific societies: ecological versus socio-economic drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. A.; Cakacaka, A.; Graham, N. A. J.; Polunin, N. V. C.; Pratchett, M. S.; Stead, S. M.; Wilson, S. K.

    2007-12-01

    Degraded coral reef ecosystems yield limited goods and services, which is expected to have significant socio-economic impacts on isolated tropical island communities with strong reliance on coral reefs. This study investigates socio-economic changes, specifically in fresh fish consumption and fishing activities, associated with environmental degradation at five fishing grounds ( qoliqoli) in the Lau Islands (Fiji). Semi-structured interviews with fishers and senior household members revealed that the importance of fishing was low relative to other occupations, and consumption of fresh fish has declined over the last decade. Reduced fishing and choice of fresh fish is largely attributable to an increased need to derive income as well as new income-generating opportunities. A possible consequence of reduced reliance on marine resources was limited awareness of recent environmental degradation caused by climate-induced coral bleaching and outbreaks of coral-feeding crown-of-thorns starfish. Limited use and reduced awareness of the local marine environment in the short term may erode social memory and local ecological knowledge, reducing opportunities to fall back on marine resources. This may also compromise long-term economic and social stability. Conversely, low reliance on marine resources may confer greater flexibility to adapt to future ecological change in the marine environment. Importantly, changes in fish consumption and exploitation of marine resources were linked to socio-economic factors rather than a consequence of recent degradation of marine environments. Greater knowledge of the dynamics driving change in marine resource use is necessary to understand how societies respond to ecological and socio-economic change, and to identify opportunities for adaptive sustainable ecosystem management.

  16. Changes in the D region associated with three recent solar eclipses in the South Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Abhikesh; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Singh, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    We estimate D region changes due to 22 July 2009 total solar eclipse (SE), 13-14 November 2012 total SE, and 9-10 May 2013 annular SE, using VLF navigational transmitters signal observations at Suva, Fiji. The North West Cape (NWC) signal (19.8 kHz) showed an amplitude and phase decrease of 0.70 dB and 23° during November SE and 2.0 dB and 90° during May SE. The modeling using Long Wave Propagation Capability code for NWC-Suva path during November and May SEs showed an increase in average D region reflection height (H') and sharpness factor (β) by 0.6 and 0.5 km and 0.012 and 0.015 km-1, respectively. The July total SE for JJI-Suva path showed an increase in H' of 1.5 km and a decrease in β of 0.055 km-1. The decrease in the electron density calculated using SE time H' and β is maximum for July total SE and minimum for May annular SE. The effective recombination coefficient estimated from the decay and recovery of signal phase associated with May annular SE was higher (27%) than normal daytime value 5.0 × 10-7 cm-3 s-1 and varied between 1.47 × 10-6 and 1.15 × 10-7 cm-3 s-1 in the altitude 70 to 80 km. Morlet wavelet analysis of signals amplitude shows strong wave-like signatures (WLS) associated with three SEs with period ranging 24-66 min, but the intensity and duration of WLS show no clear dependence on SE magnitude and type. Apart from the cooling spot, the eclipse shadow can also generate WLS associated with atmospheric gravity waves.

  17. Response to UVB radiation and oxidative stress of marine bacteria isolated from South Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Matallana-Surget, S; Villette, C; Intertaglia, L; Joux, F; Bourrain, M; Lebaron, P

    2012-12-01

    Marine bacterial strains isolated from South Pacific and Mediterranean Sea were studied for their resistance to UVB radiation, their repair capacity under photoreactivating light, as well as their oxidative stress response using concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), as an oxidizer. A total of 30 marine bacteria were isolated from the hyper-oligotrophic waters of the South Pacific Gyre to the eutrophic waters of the Chilean coast during the BIOSOPE cruise (2004), and 10 strains from surface Mediterranean coastal waters. One third of bacteria presented a high resistance to UVB and almost all isolates presented an efficient post-irradiation recovery. Only few strains showed cell survival to high concentration of H(2)O(2). No correlation between the sampling sites and the bacterial UVB resistance was observed. Two marine bacteria, Erythrobacter flavus and Ruegeria mobilis, were of particular interest, presenting a good response to the three parameters (UVB and H(2)O(2) resistance/efficient repair). Unexpectedly, two resistant strains were again identified as Ruegeria species underlining that this geographically widespread genus, resist to UVB regardless the environment from which the isolates originate.

  18. Yams (Dioscorea spp.) from the South Pacific Islands contain many novel badnaviruses: implications for international movement of yam germplasm.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Lawrence; Lebas, B S M; Seal, S E

    2008-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) samples (n = 690) from seven South Pacific Islands were screened for badnavirus infection by ELISA using two antisera to African badnaviruses. Positive readings were obtained for 26.4-34.6% of samples representing both known (D. bulbifera, D. nummularia and D. pentaphylla) and unreported host species (D. alata, D. esculenta, D. rotundata and D. trifida) in this region. Total DNAs were extracted from 25 ELISA-positive plants and 4 ELISA-negative controls and subjected to PCR amplification with badnavirus-specific primers targeting the reverse transcriptase (RT)-RNaseH genes. All 29 samples yielded the expected size PCR-product for badnaviruses, which were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the resulting 45 partial (500-527 bp) RT-RNaseH sequences revealed 11 new sequence groups with <79% nucleotide identity to each other or any EMBL sequence. Three sequences (two groups) were highly divergent to the other nine new South Pacific yam badnavirus groups (47.9-57.2% identity) and probably represent either new Caulimoviridae genera or endogenous pararetrovirus sequences. Some sequence groups appeared specific to particular Dioscorea host species. Four 99.9% identical RT-RNaseH sequences possessing nine amino acid deletions from D. esculenta from three islands represent a putative integrated sequence group. The distribution of sequence groups across the islands indicates that badnaviruses have spread extensively between islands and continents through infected germplasm.

  19. Modelling the impact of a La Niña event on a South West Pacific Lagoon.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, R; Dupouy, C; Douillet, P; Caillaud, M; Mangin, A; Pinazo, C

    2012-08-01

    In view of increasing environmental awareness and biodiversity conservation, understanding the main forcing mechanism driving biogeochemical cycles in coral reefs and lagoon coastal areas is a priority. La Niña events cause unbalanced situations in the Equatorial Pacific and result in enhanced precipitation in South West Pacific coastal areas. We investigated the impact of heavy rainfalls during the 2008 La Niña event on the New Caledonia lagoon using a 3D coupled on-line hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model. Simulations and data showed that the whole lagoon was impacted by river inputs and stronger hydrodynamics, enhancing chlorophyll-a concentration by a factor between 1.7 and 1.9. The coupled model provided new insights into plume transport, highlighting that eastern plumes can be advected northwards or can reach the South West Lagoon, depending on the balance between regional, tide-induced, and wind-induced surface currents. It also provided a synoptic view of lagoon biogeochemical-hydrodynamic response, when remote sensing data are not available due to cloud coverage. PMID:22721694

  20. Response to UVB radiation and oxidative stress of marine bacteria isolated from South Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Matallana-Surget, S; Villette, C; Intertaglia, L; Joux, F; Bourrain, M; Lebaron, P

    2012-12-01

    Marine bacterial strains isolated from South Pacific and Mediterranean Sea were studied for their resistance to UVB radiation, their repair capacity under photoreactivating light, as well as their oxidative stress response using concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), as an oxidizer. A total of 30 marine bacteria were isolated from the hyper-oligotrophic waters of the South Pacific Gyre to the eutrophic waters of the Chilean coast during the BIOSOPE cruise (2004), and 10 strains from surface Mediterranean coastal waters. One third of bacteria presented a high resistance to UVB and almost all isolates presented an efficient post-irradiation recovery. Only few strains showed cell survival to high concentration of H(2)O(2). No correlation between the sampling sites and the bacterial UVB resistance was observed. Two marine bacteria, Erythrobacter flavus and Ruegeria mobilis, were of particular interest, presenting a good response to the three parameters (UVB and H(2)O(2) resistance/efficient repair). Unexpectedly, two resistant strains were again identified as Ruegeria species underlining that this geographically widespread genus, resist to UVB regardless the environment from which the isolates originate. PMID:23165168

  1. Tthe Non-Linear Characterization of the 22 Years Seismic Series Occurred Along the Mexican South Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Marquez, L. E.; Valverde-Esparza, S. M.; Ramírez-Rojas, A.

    2011-12-01

    In order to make a non-linear characterization of the seismicity occurred along the Mexican South Pacific coast, two approaches were followed: the first analysis, the power-law statistics, is used to describe a fractal stochastic point processes, and therefore, are suited to model the time-occurrence sequence of seismic events, that are generally characterized by a time-clustering phenomenon. Then, the measure of the temporal clustering in earthquake sequences, by means of the Fano factor (FF) can be used to reveal the fractality of such processes. This method has shown the presence of temporal clusterization and variations in values linked to the occurrence of high magnitude events. The second analysis is to characterize the earthquakes by their magnitude. This non-extensivity approach, based in the Tsallis entropy has been show effectively into characterizes seismic processes around the world. In this work we analyze the seismicity occurred within the period of 1988-2010 along the Mexican South Pacific coast using this approach. To make the analysis we distinguish four regions along the coast and comprising the subduction zone, because previous works found different subduction patterns for those regions. Our results indicate a possible relationship between the obtained parameters with the seismicity pattern associated to the inclination angle of each subduction region studied. The obtained parameters depict different q-values and FF in the already mentioned regions, that show the statistical parameters also present each region having different dynamic pattern too.

  2. Predictable variability in the neutral sugar composition of DOM in the North Atlantic and South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, S. J.; Carlson, C. A.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Nelson, N. B.; Siegel, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Variability in the percent contribution of dissolved combined neutral sugars (DCNS) to total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (i.e. DCNS yields) and the relative composition of individual neutral sugars (i.e. mol percent DCNS) provides useful information pertaining to the processing and diagenetic state of ambient DOM pools. Here, we assess variability in the relative contributions of individual neutral sugars within spatially and temporally robust datasets from U.S. CLIVAR Repeat Hydrography program transects in the North Atlantic (A20 cruise) and South Pacific Ocean (P16S cruise) and the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series site, respectively. Novel trends in DCNS concentrations, composition, and the diagenetic state of DOM will be presented for the South Pacific Ocean. Additionally, systematic variability in the relative contributions of glucose, mannose + xylose, and galactose between basins will be discussed in relation to processes of DCNS production and degradation. A conceptual framework for the application of this ratio in the open ocean will also be discussed.

  3. Relationship of the South Asian Monsoon and Regional Drought with Distinct Equatorial Pacific SST Patterns on Interannual and Decadal Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, M.; Ummenhofer, C.; Anchukaitis, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Asian monsoon system influences the lives of over 60% of the planet's population, with widespread socioeconomic effects resulting from weakening or failure of monsoon rains. Spatially broad and temporally extended drought episodes have been known to dramatically influence human history, including the Strange Parallels Drought in the mid-18th century. Here, we explore the dynamics of sustained monsoon failure using the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas - a high-resolution network of hydro-climatically sensitive tree-ring records - and a 1300-year pre-industrial control run of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Spatial drought patterns in the instrumental and model-based Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) during years with extremely weakened South Asian monsoon are similar to those reconstructed during the Strange Parallels Drought in the MADA. We further explore how the large-scale Indo-Pacific climate during weakened South Asian monsoon differs between interannual and decadal timescales. The Strange Parallels Drought pattern is observed during March-April-May primarily over Southeast Asia, with decreased precipitation and reduced moisture fluxes, while anomalies in June-July-August are confined to the Indian subcontinent during both individual and decadal events. Individual years with anomalous drying exhibit canonical El Niño conditions over the eastern equatorial Pacific and associated shifts in the Walker circulation, while decadal events appear to be related to anomalous warming around the dateline in the equatorial Pacific, typical of El Niño Modoki events. The results suggest different dynamical processes influence drought at different time scales through distinct remote ocean influences.

  4. Sulphur compounds, methane, and phytoplankton: interactions along a north-south transit in the western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zindler, C.; Bracher, A.; Marandino, C. A.; Taylor, B.; Torrecilla, E.; Kock, A.; Bange, H. W.

    2012-10-01

    Here we present results of the first comprehensive study of sulphur compounds and methane in the oligotrophic tropical West Pacific Ocean. The concentrations of dimethylsuphide (DMS), dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), and methane (CH4), as well as various phytoplankton marker pigments in the surface ocean were measured along a north-south transit from Japan to Australia in October 2009. DMS (0.9 nmol l-1), dissolved DMSP (DMSPd, 1.6 nmol l-1) and particulate DMSP (DMSPp, 2 nmol l-1) concentrations were generally low, while dissolved DMSO (DMSOd, 4.4 nmol l-1) and particulate DMSO (DMSOp, 11.5 nmol l-1) concentrations were comparably enhanced. Positive correlations were found between DMSO and DMSP as well as DMSP and DMSO with chlorophyll a, which suggests a similar source for both compounds. Similar phytoplankton groups were identified as being important for the DMSO and DMSP pool, thus, the same algae taxa might produce both DMSP and DMSO. In contrast, phytoplankton seemed to play only a minor role for the DMS distribution in the western Pacific Ocean. The observed DMSPp : DMSOp ratios were very low and seem to be characteristic of oligotrophic tropical waters representing the extreme endpoint of the global DMSPp : DMSOp ratio vs. SST relationship. It is most likely that nutrient limitation and oxidative stress in the tropical West Pacific Ocean triggered enhanced DMSO production leading to an accumulation of DMSO in the sea surface. Positive correlations between DMSPd and CH4, as well as between DMSO (particulate and total) and CH4, were found along the transit. We conclude that both DMSP and DMSO serve as substrates for methanogenic bacteria in the western Pacific Ocean.

  5. Vitilevumyia, an enigmatic new genus of Stratiomyidae from Fiji (Diptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new genus of Stratiomyidae, Vitilevumyia gen. nov. (type species, V. bobwoodleyi, sp. nov.) is described from the island of Viti Levu, Fiji. It exhibits an unusual combination of character states, but is tentatively placed in the tribe Prosopochrysini of the subfamily Stratiomyinae. ...

  6. FIJI: Fighting Implicit Jamming in 802.11 WLANs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broustis, Ioannis; Pelechrinis, Konstantinos; Syrivelis, Dimitris; Krishnamurthy, Srikanth V.; Tassiulas, Leandros

    The IEEE 802.11 protocol inherently provides the same long-term throughput to all the clients associated with a given access point (AP). In this paper, we first identify a clever, low-power jamming attack that can take advantage of this behavioral trait: the placement of a low-power jammer in a way that it affects a single legitimate client can cause starvation to all the other clients. In other words, the total throughput provided by the corresponding AP is drastically degraded. To fight against this attack, we design FIJI, a cross-layer anti-jamming system that detects such intelligent jammers and mitigates their impact on network performance. FIJI looks for anomalies in the AP load distribution to efficiently perform jammer detection. It then makes decisions with regards to optimally shaping the traffic such that: (a) the clients that are not explicitly jammed are shielded from experiencing starvation and, (b) the jammed clients receive the maximum possible throughput under the given conditions. We implement FIJI in real hardware; we evaluate its efficacy through experiments on a large-scale indoor testbed, under different traffic scenarios, network densities and jammer locations. Our measurements suggest that FIJI detects such jammers in real-time and alleviates their impact by allocating the available bandwidth in a fair and efficient way.

  7. Open and Flexible TVET in Commonwealth Pacific Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the current state of open and flexible technical-vocational education and training (TVET) in nine Pacific Commonwealth countries: Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) has commissioned the Open Polytechnic to complete this report to…

  8. Ocean Colour Radiometry across the Southern Atlantic and South-Eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudorff, N. D.; Kampel, M.; Frouin, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    An oceanographic cruise across the Southern Atlantic and South-eastern Pacific was undertaken from February 20th to March 14th, 2011, on board the R/V Melville (MV1102). The research vessel crossed highly dynamic regions with important roles on regional and global biogeochemical cycles, such as: the Benguela Upwelling System, the Subtropical Convergence Zone, the Patagonian Shelf, the Magellan Strait, and the Chilean Eastern Boundary Upwelling Zone. The Southern Ocean has been focus of many ocean colour studies due to the high spatio-temporal variability of bio-optical constituents and its biogeochemical importance. Nevertheless, the high latitudes and rough seas of the Southern Ocean are a great challenge for the estimation of these properties from in situ and satellite sensors. The present work shows the first results of the MV1102 cruise with the aim to access the magnitude and possible sources of errors for the estimation of in situ above water remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). Simultaneous measurements were taken at 18 stations with two hyperspectral radiometers: the Fieldspec HandHeld ASD Inc. (350-1100nm) for above water measurements, and the HyperOCR II Satlantic Inc. (380-800 nm) for in-water profiles. Above water measurements were performed with a sensor viewing geometry of 45o zenith and 137o azimuth solar angles, and the downwelling solar irradiance (ED) was estimated using a white Spectralon plaque. The Rrs was estimated with an average of 10 casts per station, and different sky reflectance factors were used to adjust to environmental conditions. Two methods were used to retrieve the Rrs: M01, without the residual sky correction (RSC); and M02, with the RSC, subtracting the Rrs at 870 nm, as a white spectral offset. The M02 was applied for all stations except in the Magellan Strait (coastal waters). For the profiler, the above water Rrs was estimated using two methods: MP01, with the ED measured from the profiler; and MP02, with ED measured from the

  9. Export Fluxes in Contrasting Environments of the South-East Pacific Ocean Derived From Drifting Sediment traps (BIOSOPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, J.; Gasser, B.; Claustre, H.

    2006-12-01

    The South-East Pacific presents contrasting oceanographic environments related to different oceanographic features such as High Nutrient Low Chlorophyl (HNLC) zones, upwelling of eastern boundaries or ultra- oligotrophy of the central gyre. This results in significant differences in particle production in surface waters and export to the deeper ocean. During the BIOSOPE (BIogeochemistry and Optics SOuth Pacific Experiment) cruise held in October-December 2004, particle flux in upper waters was assessed using drifting sediment traps. Traps were deployed at 2 depths (below the maximum chl.a and at the base of the euphotic layer) in six geographical areas, ranging from the oligotrophic central gyre through the mesotrophic area off Marquesas Islands to the eutrophic waters off the South-American coast. For all analyzed parameters fluxes were contrastingly different at the various sites, with lowest fluxes at the central gyre area and highest fluxes at the upwelling sites. Mass flux ranged from 2-7 mg m-2 d-1 to 410-630 mg m-2 d-1, POC flux from less than 1 mg POC m-2 d-1 up to 63 mg POC m^{- 2} d-1, and Th-234 from 35-47 dpm m-2 d-1 to >5000 dpm m-2 d-1. Fluxes were always lower at the deeper horizon except for Th-234 flux which was variable. Also, fluxes were very different at the two upwelling sites studied. The relation between the environmental and trophic characteristics of the sites visited and the two orders of magnitude in fluxes observed is discussed.

  10. Characteristics and mechanism of sub-seasonal zonal oscillation of western Pacific subtropical high and South Asian high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xuejuan

    2016-04-01

    The Asian monsoon circulations, like the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) at 500hPa and South Asian high (SAH) in the upper level, demonstrate sub-seasonal zonal oscillation. The WPSH is characterized by anomalously westward extension of its western edge with anomalous low-level anti-cyclonic circulation over the coastal region prior and eastward retreat with low-level cyclonic anomalies afterward, contributing persistent heavy rainfall over the Middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River Valley. The coastal SST anomalies linked with zonal movement of WPSH shows cooling phase to warming phase variations. A local air-sea interaction on sub-seasonal time-scale in the western North Pacific region, which may be responsible for generating WPSH's sub-seasonal zonal oscillation. The SAH's eastward extension is featured by eastward propagation of wavetrain across the Eurasian continent. When the SAH extends to its easternmost position, a strong negative PV (positive geopotential height) center prevails to the east of the Tibetan Plateau at 200hPa. The causes of SAH's eastward extension are examined by performing potential vorticity (PV) diagnosis with emphasis on the joint role of diabatic heating feedback/rainfall and midlatitude wavetrain. The PV diagnosis indicates that the anomalous heating/rainfall and ascending motion generate negative PV anomalies at 200hPa directly over north China-east Mongolia. While anomalous cooling and descending motion produce positive PV anomalies over south China. Those south/north dipolar structure of PV generation indicates large value of meridional gradient of PV anomalies. As a consequence, the negative PV anomalies over the north lobe are transported southwardly by the advection of climatological northerly located to the east and southeast of the Tibetan Plateau.

  11. The Pacific Center for Emergency Health--an anatomy of collaborative development and change--the Palau perspective.

    PubMed

    Yano, Victor; Ueda, Masao; Tellei, Julie; Wally, Willy; Kuartei, Stevenson; Tokon, Willie; Lalabalavu, Selaima; Otto, Caleb; Pierantozzi, Sandra; Dever, Greg; Finau, Sitalekl

    2006-09-01

    Many Pacific Islands Countries (PICs) by their geographic location, isolation, and lack of resources, are at risk for both environmental and man-made disasters. Disaster management (DM) and mitigation is frustrated by the general underdevelopment of DM planning and lack of adequate emergency medical services (EMS) to deal with daily emergencies let alone large-scale emergencies and disasters. To address this, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed and implemented the Pacific Emergency Health Initiative (PEHI) to review and make recommendations regarding the current level of DM/EMS development of select PICs. As a practical next step, a collaborative demonstration project--the CDC--Palau Community College Pacific Center for Emergency Health--was established in the Republic of Palau with the purpose of providing training and technical assistance in DM/EMS development for the region. In September 2001 the Center conducted two simultaneous training programs addressing Public Health Disaster Planning (one-week) and pre-hospital First Responder Care (two-weeks). Sixty participants included public health planners, physicians, and fire and police officials from eleven PIC jurisdictions and representatives from the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, South Pacific Applied Geoscience Commission, and the Fiji School of Medicine. Eleven country and state public health disaster plans were initiated. Post 9-11 the Center has increased relevance. Through CDC's PEHI additional Center training programs are planned through FY 2003.

  12. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure within Florida coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) germplasm using microsatellite DNA, with special emphasis on the Fiji Dwarf cultivar.

    PubMed

    Meerow, Alan W; Wisser, Randall J; Brown, J Steven; Kuhn, David N; Schnell, Raymond J; Broschat, Timothy K

    2003-02-01

    Using 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) microsatellite DNA loci, we analyzed genetic variation within Cocos nucifera germplasm collections at two locations in south Florida, representing eight cultivars. The loci were also used in a parentage analysis of progeny of the 'Fiji Dwarf' variety at both locations. A total of 67 alleles were detected, with eight the highest number at any one locus. These loci identified 83 of the 110 individual palms. Gene diversity of the 15 loci ranged from 0.778 to 0.223, with a mean of 0.574. 'Fiji Dwarf', 'Malayan Dwarf', 'Green Niño' and 'Red Spicata' cultivars resolve as distinct clusters in a neighbor joining tree using modified Rogers distance, while the tall varieties form two aggregates. The highest gene diversity was found in the tall cultivars (H = 0.583 cumulatively), and the lowest in the 'Malayan Dwarf' (H = 0.202). After the tall coconuts, the 'Fiji Dwarf' was most genetically diverse (H = 0.436), and had the largest number of unique alleles. Genetic identity is highest among the 'Malayan Dwarf' phenotypes, and between the tall varieties. The 'Red Malayan Dwarf' is genetically distinct from the 'Green' and 'Yellow Malayan Dwarf' phenotypes, which cannot be distinguished with the SSR loci used. Off-type 'Malayan Dwarf' phenotypes (putative hybrids with talls) can be identified genotypically. Parentage analyses of 30 'Fiji Dwarf' progeny propagated from five adults surrounded by other cultivars estimate that only 20% of the progeny were out-crossed to the other varieties, while 40-46% were possible selfs. This suggests that a seed-production orchard of the variety maintained at reasonable distance from other varieties, will likely yield only 'Fiji Dwarf' genotypes. Our data are discussed in the context of hypotheses of coconut dissemination around the world.

  13. Initial Visions of Paradise: Antebellum U.S. Government Documents on the South Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Bert

    2004-01-01

    During the first half of the 19th century, the United States grew from a nation confined to the Atlantic seaboard to a country on the verge of becoming a global power. One factor prompting this growth was the United States' growing intellectual, economic, and strategic interests in the Pacific Ocean. These growing interests were fueled by the…

  14. Quantifying storm tide risk in Fiji due to climate variability and change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Kathleen L.; Walsh, Kevin J. E.; Hoeke, Ron K.; O'Grady, Julian G.; Colberg, Frank; Hubbert, Graeme D.

    2014-05-01

    Extreme sea level events due to tropical cyclone storm surge combined with astronomical tide (storm tides) severely impact Pacific Island communities and these impacts are expected to increase with projected sea level rise. However, these sea level extremes are not well characterised by available tide gauge records owing to the low frequency of occurrence of tropical cyclones, the sparse array of tide gauges and the short time frame over which many gauges in this region have been operating. In this study, a combined statistical/dynamical method for estimating storm tide risk is presented. Tropical cyclones in the Fiji region over the period 1969-2007 are characterised in a statistical model that represents cyclone frequency, intensity and movement. The statistical model is then used to develop a population of “synthetic” cyclones that provide boundary conditions to a hydrodynamic storm surge and tidal model. This Monte-Carlo method is applied to the coasts of the Fiji archipelago. It is found that storm tide risk is higher on the northwest coasts of both the southern and northern main islands Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, respectively. Modelling suggests that there is a greater tendency for higher storm surges to occur on southwest Viti Levu under El Niño and La Niña years compared with average years, but elsewhere on Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, there is a tendency for slightly lower storm surges in La Niña years. Imposing perturbations to the cyclone statistical model that represent projected tropical cyclone changes in intensity and frequency for mid to late 21st Century, leads to storm tide return period curves that are steeper such that sea levels associated with return periods of 200 years or more become higher, those with return periods of 50 years and less become lower and the 1-in-100 year heights are little changed. Projected changes in sea level are found to make the largest contribution to increased extreme sea level risk.

  15. Whistle vocalizations of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) inhabiting the south-west Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Tess; Berggren, Per; Cockcroft, Victor G; Janik, Vincent M

    2012-12-01

    Populations of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) are distributed along coastal regions of the south-west Indian Ocean (SWIO), from South Africa to Kenya. An account of whistles from wild T. aduncus inhabiting the SWIO is provided here. Recordings were made at Plettenberg Bay (South Africa) and Zanzibar Island (Tanzania) and the frequency trace of whistle contours (n = 1677) was extracted. Multiple parameters were measured from each whistle and compared between regions and encounters. Regional variation was significant in all parameters assessed except for start and middle frequency (frequency at half the duration). Whistles from Zanzibar Island ended on average 4 kHz higher than those from Plettenberg Bay, and had a steeper frequency gradient. However, mean frequencies differed by <1 kHz and population averages for the adopted frequency distribution showed similar patterns, with a peak between 5 and 7 kHz. Whistle parameters were strongly influenced by recording encounter, likely reflecting the presence of different individuals, group compositions and behavioral contexts during recording occasions. Comparisons within the genus showed that T. aduncus from the SWIO have amongst the lowest start and minimum frequency of whistles within Tursiops.

  16. Teleseismic P wave tomography of South Island, New Zealand upper mantle: Evidence of subduction of Pacific lithosphere since 45 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietlow, Daniel W.; Molnar, Peter H.; Sheehan, Anne F.

    2016-06-01

    A P wave speed tomogram produced from teleseismic travel time measurements made on and offshore the South Island of New Zealand shows a nearly vertical zone with wave speeds that are 4.5% higher than the background average reaching to depths of approximately 450 km under the northwestern region of the island. This structure is consistent with oblique west-southwest subduction of Pacific lithosphere since about 45 Ma, when subduction beneath the region began. The high-speed zone reaches about 200-300 km below the depths of the deepest intermediate-depth earthquakes (subcrustal to ~200 km) and therefore suggests that ~200-300 km of slab below them is required to produce sufficient weight to induce the intermediate-depth seismicity. In the southwestern South Island, high P wave speeds indicate subduction of the Australian plate at the Puysegur Trench to approximately 200 km depth. A band with speeds ~2-3.5% lower than the background average is found along the east coast of the South Island to depths of ~150-200 km and underlies Miocene or younger volcanism; these low speeds are consistent with thinned lithosphere. A core of high speeds under the Southern Alps associated with a convergent margin and mountain building imaged in previous investigations is not well resolved in this study. This could suggest that such high speeds are limited in both width and depth and not resolvable by our data.

  17. Carving out Institutional Space for Multilingualism in the World's Most Multilingual Region: The Role of Linguistics at the University of the South Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willans, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    The University of the South Pacific is a regional university catering for 12 countries. Its location situates it within unparalleled linguistic diversity, and its regional structure creates a highly multilingual body of staff and students interacting either face-to-face on the major campuses or remotely via e-learning and satellite communications.…

  18. Archives and Manuscripts, Libraries, and Librarianship in the South and Central Pacific: Survey and a Bibliography of English-Language Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Robert

    Two hundred eighty-three sources are included in this bibliography dealing with libraries, archives, and librarianship in the islands of the South and Central Pacific. Twenty-six island nations are covered, with brief narrative summaries of the library situation given in some cases: (1) American Samoa, (2) Belau, (3) Cook Islands, (4) Easter…

  19. School Library Development: Unesco Workshop on Training Courses for Teachers and Teacher Librarians. South Pacific Region. Contribution to the Development of Information Infrastructures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trask, Margaret

    As part of the Unesco School Library Development Project in the South Pacific, a selected group of librarians and a coordinator of extension studies from the region met with Unesco consultants to design and develop a general course or courses for teachers and teacher librarians on the design, production, use, and organization of learning…

  20. Asian-South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education Special Issue in Preparation for the Fourth International Conference on Adult Education Convened by Unesco, Paris, 1985. Courier No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This special issue was developed by the Asian-South Pacific Bureau for Adult Education (ASPBAE) in preparation for Unesco's fourth international conference on adult education. A section on "Literacy--A Great Challenge and Important Debate" includes "Why Literacy? (Paul Fordham); "Cooperating or Campaigning for Literacy" (Heribert Hinzen, Jakob…

  1. Post-Secondary Education in the South Pacific: Present Patterns and Future Options. Educational Development in the Small States of the Commonwealth Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocombe, Ron; Crocombe, Marjorie Tuainekore

    This book contains the results of a study examining post-secondary education in the South Pacific by surveying the number of educational opportunities currently offered, by analyzing key trends, and by comparing developments in the Cook Islands and the Solomon Islands. Following an introductory section on terminology and the region, the first main…

  2. Large-scale impact of the island mass effect through nitrogen fixation in the western South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Kodama, Taketoshi; Furuya, Ken

    2014-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism for the island mass effect fueled by nitrogen fixation. The nitrogen fixation activities and δ15N of suspended particles in the surface water in the South Pacific were examined. Active nitrogen fixation and abundant Trichodesmium spp. were observed near islands in the western subtropical region, which was attributable to the material supplied by land runoff. High primary production was extensively centered around the islands and was characterized by low δ15N of suspended particles and a reduction in phosphate concentrations at the surface compared with the subtropical gyre and eastern equatorial upwelling. This suggested that Trichodesmium spp. were advected to areas remote from these islands, and consequently, the elevated primary production fueled by nitrogen fixation extended over a large area around them. Because the proposed island mass effect is triggered by a terrigenous nutrient supply, this ecosystem is potentially vulnerable to human activity on small islands.

  3. An antipodal link between the North Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Alexander I.; Laptikhovsky, Vladimir V.; Brickle, Paul

    2010-08-01

    We report on the extraordinary findings of several endemic species of North Pacific deepwater fish and squid on the continental slope of the Falkland Islands in the Southwest Atlantic, namely the giant rattail grenadier Albatrossia pectoralis (Macrouridae), pelagic eelpout Lycodapus endemoscotus (Zoarcidae) and squid Gonatopsis octopedatus (Gonatidae). These deepwater dwellers might have moved more than 15,000 km from their common species ranges with Pacific Deep Water along the western slopes of both Americas and through the Drake Passage. Our findings provide further evidence of the possible role of deepwater currents in the dispersal of bathypelagic and benthopelagic animals from one polar region to another across various climatic zones of the world ocean.

  4. Unlocking the Secrets of the Geodynamo: the Southwest Pacific Key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, G. M.; Greve, A.; Kinger, R.; de Gelder, G.; Fitzsimons, S.; Howarth, J. D.; Hill, M. J.; Nilsson, A.; Sheppard, P.

    2014-12-01

    Three years ago we embarked on a project to boost the coverage of palaeosecular variation data from the Southwest Pacific region, and so to provide the means to enhance global and regional field models, dating tools derived from them, and understanding of features of the geodynamo, particularly beneath this region of the Earth's surface. Here we present our progress to date, including lake sediment records covering the entire Holocene, archaeomagnetic data from Maori cooking ("hangi") stones dating back to the earliest occupation of New Zealand, archaeointensities from Lapita pottery from the Pacific Islands (Fiji, Tonga and Papua New Guinea) dating back to ca 3000 BP, and palaeomagnetic directions and intensities from volcanic rocks and lava flows of the North Island of New Zealand. Central to the project is a composite lake sediment record, constrained by a high-resolution radiocarbon-based chronology, which provides a complete record of declination, inclination and relative palaeointensity for New Zealand through the Holocene. This is complemented by directions and absolute intensities from archaeological materials, most of which have associated radiocarbon age control, and lavas with 40Ar-39Ar age constraints, the rock magnetism and analytical details of which are discussed in accompanying posters. The overall picture reveals several large amplitude directional swings in the early Holocene magnetic field, followed by relatively low amplitude secular variation for several thousand years leading to the present trend to increasingly easterly declination and steep inclination as the south magnetic pole moves further off the Antarctic continent towards New Zealand.

  5. Apollo 17 command module in South Pacific Ocean before recovery operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A water-level view of the Apollo 17 command module floating in the Pacific following splashdown and prior to recovery. The prime recovery ship, U.S.S. Ticonderoga, is in the background. A U.S. Navy UDT swimmer stands on the flotation collar. Apollo 17 splashdown occured at 1:24:59 p.m., December 19, 1972, about 350 nautical miles southeast of Samoa.

  6. Rat eradication comes within a whisker! A case study of a failed project from the South Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Amos, W.; Churchyard, T.; Brooke, M. de L.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance their conservation value, several hundred islands worldwide have been cleared of invasive alien rats, Rattus spp. One of the largest projects yet undertaken was on 43 km2 Henderson Island in the Pitcairn group, South Pacific, in August 2011. Following massive immediate mortality, a single R. exulans was observed in March 2012 and, subsequently, rat numbers have recovered. The survivors show no sign of resistance to the toxicant used, brodifacoum. Using pre- and post-operation rat tissue samples from Henderson, plus samples from around the Pacific, we exclude re-introduction as the source of continued rat presence. Microsatellite analysis of 18 loci enabled comparison of genetic diversity of Henderson rats before and after the bait drop. The fall in diversity measured by allele frequency change indicated that the bottleneck (Ne) through which the breeding population passed was probably around 50 individuals, representing a census population of about 60–80 animals. This is the first failed project that has estimated how close it was to success. PMID:27152226

  7. Unraveling The Complex Interaction Between The Southern Caribbean, Northwest South America And The Pacific Plates During The Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez, D.; Spikings, R.

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the prominent Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta Massif (the highest peak in the world whose local base is at sea level, ~5.75km) in Northern Colombia and we are interested in quantifying the thermal and tectonic history of the Northernmost Andes during the Cenozoic in order to understand the complex interaction between the Caribbean, the South American and the Pacific plates. In order to do so, apatite fission track data (by the LA-ICP-MS method) has been used, collected along several traverses and a single vertical profile within the massif. Our results show that the easternmost part of Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta exhumed at elevated rates (≥0.2 Km/My) during 65-58 Ma in response to the collision of the Caribbean Plateau with north-western South America. A second pulse of exhumation (≥0.32 Km/My) during 50-40 Ma was probably driven by the underthrusting of the Caribbean Plate beneath northern South America. More southern portions of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (the Sierra Nevada Province) exhumed rapidly during 26-29 Ma (~0.7 Km/My), whereas farther north, the northwestermost corner of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (the Santa Marta Province) exhumed at elevated rates during 30-25 Ma and 25-16 Ma. Our thermochronological data show that the highest exhumation rates within the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta progressed towards the northwest via the propagation of NW-verging thrusts. The late Oligocene-Miocene exhumation was mainly a consequence of compression originating at the Pacific margin of South America that also gave rise to uplift and exhumation in other regions of Eastern Colombia (e.g. in the Santander Massif). Major continental faults such as the left-lateral Santa Marta-Bucaramanga Fault have played an important role transferring the deformation, Exhumation of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta Massif is not recorded after ~16 Ma, which is unexpected, given the high elevation and high erosive power of the climate, implying that rock and

  8. Hematozoa of forest birds in American Samoa - Evidence for a diverse, indigenous parasite fauna from the South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, C.T.; Utzurrum, R.C.; Seamon, J.O.; Savage, Amy F.; Lapointe, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduced avian diseases pose a significant threat to forest birds on isolated island archipelagos, especially where most passerines are endemic and many groups of blood-sucking arthropods are either absent or only recently introduced. We conducted a blood parasite survey of forest birds from the main islands of American Samoa to obtain baseline information about the identity, distribution and prevalence of hematozoan parasites in this island group. We examined Giemsa-stained blood smears from 857 individual birds representing 20 species on Tutuila, Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u islands. Four hematozoan parasites were identified - Plasmodium circumflexum (1%, 12/857), Trypanosoma avium (4%, 32/857), microfilaria (9%, 76/857), and an Atoxoplasma sp. (<1%, 2/857). Infections were found in seven indigenous bird species from the archipelago. Overall prevalence of infection varied significantly among bird species, individual islands, and between Tutuila and the more isolated Manu'a group of islands. Infections with Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, and filarial worms occurred throughout the archipelago, including islands without introduced birds. There was a statistically significant difference in the overall prevalence of infection before and after Hurricane Olaf in February 2005, suggesting that catastrophic hurricanes may influence the dynamics of parasite infections. Given the central location of American Samoa in the South Pacific, it is likely that avian malaria and other hematozoan parasites are indigenous and widespread at least as far as the central South Pacific. Their natural occurrence may provide some immunological protection to indigenous birds in the event that other closely related parasites are accidentally introduced to the region.

  9. Helium- and lead-isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Glassy basalts erupted at young Pacific seamounts and along the mid-ocean ridge in the South Atlantic, and volcanic rocks from the island of St. Helena were studied for He and Pb isotopes. (U+TH)/He ages of seamount alkali basalts were determined from the isotope disequilibrium of (3)He/(4)He between He trapped in vesicles and that dissolved in the glass phase. The method allows alkalic lavas to be dated in the age range of 103 to 106 years. Tholclites at the EPR seamounts have He, Pb, Sr and Nd isotope compositions indistinguishable from MORB, while associated alkali basalts show more radiogenic signatures. The low (3)He/(4)He in the vesicles of alkali basalts (1.2-2.6 RA), their low helium concentrations, and systematic variations with extent of differentiation suggest that magmatic processes influence (3)He/(4)He in these alkalic lavas. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopes at Shimada seamount (17 deg N, 117 deg W) indicate the presence of enriched mantle beneath the East Pacific which resembles that beneath Samoa. Low (3)He/(4)He (4-5 RA) appears to be an inherent characteristic of the component. Much of the South Atlantic ridge axis displays (3)He/(4)He lower than normal MORB, and is apparently contaminated by off-axis hotspots. He-Pb systematics along the ridge suggest that (3)He/(4)He at St. Helena is less than MORB, consistent with values measured by in vacuo crushing of olivine and pyroxene in St. Helena rocks (approx. 5.8 RA).

  10. The Indo-Pacific Coral Diploastrea: A New Archive of Western Pacific Temperature and Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnato, S.; Linsley, B. K.; Wellington, G. M.; Howe, S. S.

    2002-12-01

    The Western Pacific has been sparsely sampled with respect to coral paleoclimate records and not all those that exist greatly extend the historical climate record of this important region. The massive coral Diploastrea, a western and central Pacific coral genus, vertically accretes skeleton at only 3 to 5 mm per year. Growing at a rate less than half of the genus Porites, the most common coral used for paleoclimate studies, Diploastrea colonies preserve temporally longer geochemical proxy records of sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity than Porites colonies of the same length. Its long lifespan and fossil history give this genus great potential, however no assessment has been made of the paleoclimatic utility of Diploastrea skeletons. We have retrieved coral cores from colonies of both Diploastrea and Porites from Savusavu Bay in Fiji (17.5°S, 178.5°E), a region likely sensitive to SST and precipitation changes due to activity of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To calibrate Diploastrea, we have analyzed δ18O and δ13C on subannual samples from Diploastrea and Porites cores (period of overlap, 1941-1997). Sampling of Diploastrea's exothecal material results in annual variations most similar to Porites. Variable seasonal growth rates coupled with a constant sampling interval have preferentially captured winter conditions in the geochemical composition of Diploastrea's skeleton. These winter-biased δ18O time series appear to track SPCZ activity as recorded by both pressure and precipitation-based indices, along with activity of the Southern Oscillation, as effectively as Porites for the period of comparison.

  11. Nd isotopic composition from seawater and sediments of the South China Sea and the Philippine Sea : implications for hydrology of the Pacific Ocean during the last 25 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Colin, Christophe; Liu, Zhifei; Thil, Francois; Douville, Eric; Frank, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    Nd isotopic compositions (ɛNd) of foraminifera from one gravity core (MD05-2904; 19°27.32' 116°15.15', 2066 m water depth) and 10 seawater profiles from the northern South China Sea (SCS) and the Philippine Sea (western Pacific Ocean) were measured to (1) constrain the Nd isotopic composition of water masses along the western Pacific and the SCS that are still poorly documented ; (2) track hydrological exchange between the SCS and western Pacific trough the Luzon strait ; (3) to test the ability of foraminifera to establish seawater ɛNd ; (4) to establish past hydrological changes of deep-water circulation in the western Pacific Ocean during the last 25 kyr. Distribution of ɛNd seawater of the Northern SCS and west Pacific indicate that the SCS is dominated by three water masses, the South China Sea Tropical Water (SCSTW) (~-7.7), South China Sea Intermediate Water (SCSIW) (~-3.6) and the Pacific Deep Water (PDW) (~-4). Our results indicate that at present time ɛNd of deep and intermediate waters of the SCS is representative of the PDW. Different analytical procedures to extract seawater ɛNd from foraminiferas (benthic and planktonic) and Fe-Mn coatings precipitated on the sediments have been tested and permit to determine that only ɛNd obtained from foraminiferas are reliable to seawater ɛNd in the South China Sea. A first record of past seawater ɛNd obtained from foraminifera of the core MD05-2904 (northern part of the SCS) indicate major change of the hydrology of the West Pacific during the last 25 kyr. ɛNd values variations indicate two negative excursion during at Heinrich Stadial 1(~16 kyr BP) and ~10 kyr BP implying a reorganization of the deep circulation in the Pacific. Such results are compared with other proxies of deep-water circulation to propose new insight in the role of the southern deep-water pacific circulation on climate during the last deglaciation.

  12. Low Decision Space Means No Decentralization in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Faguet, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mohammed, North, and Ashton find that decentralization in Fiji shifted health-sector workloads from tertiary hospitals to peripheral health centres, but with little transfer of administrative authority from the centre. Decision-making in five functional areas analysed remains highly centralized. They surmise that the benefits of decentralization in terms of services and outcomes will be limited. This paper invokes Faguet’s (2012) model of local government responsiveness and accountability to explain why this is so – not only for Fiji, but in any country that decentralizes workloads but not the decision space of local governments. A competitive dynamic between economic and civic actors that interact to generate an open, competitive politics, which in turn produces accountable, responsive government can only occur where real power and resources have been devolved to local governments. Where local decision space is lacking, by contrast, decentralization is bound to fail because it has not really happened in the first place. PMID:27801361

  13. Fiji's worst natural disaster: the 1931 hurricane and flood.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Stephen W; Blong, Russell J

    2010-07-01

    At least 225 people in the Fiji Islands died as a result of the 1931 hurricane and flood, representing the largest loss of life from a natural disaster in Fiji's recent history. This paper explores the causes of disaster and the potential for recurrence. The disaster occurred because a rare event surprised hundreds of people-especially recently settled Indian farmers-occupying highly exposed floodplains in north-west Viti Levu island. The likelihood of a flood disaster of such proportions occurring today has been diminished by changed settlement patterns and building materials; however, a trend towards re-occupancy of floodplains, sometimes in fragile dwellings, is exposing new generations to flood risks. The contribution of this paper to the global hazards literature is set out in three sections: the ethnicity, gender and age of flood fatalities; the naturalness of disasters; and the merit of choice and constraint as explanations for patterns of vulnerability.

  14. Developing an enhanced tropical cyclone data portal for the Southern Hemisphere and the Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; de Wit, Roald; Atalifo, Terry; Prakash, Bipendra; Waqaicelua, Alipate; Kunitsugu, Masashi; Caroff, Philippe; Chane-Ming, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    Tropical cyclones are the most extreme weather phenomena which severely impact coastal communities and island nations. There is an ongoing research (i) on accurate analysis of observed trends in tropical cyclone occurrences, and (ii) how tropical cyclone frequency and intensity may change in the future as a result of climate change. Reliable historical records of cyclone activity are vital for this research. The Pacific Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning (PACCSAP) program is dedicated to help Pacific Island countries and Timor Leste gain a better understanding of how climate change will impact their regions. One of the key PACCSAP projects is focused on developing a tropical cyclone archive, climatology and seasonal prediction for the regions. As part of the project, historical tropical cyclone best track data have been examined and prepared to be subsequently displayed through the enhanced tropical cyclone data portal for the Southern Hemisphere and the Western Pacific Ocean. Data from the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC) Nadi, Fiji and Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs) in Brisbane, Darwin and Wellington for 1969-1970 to 2010-2011 tropical cyclone seasons have been carefully examined. Errors and inconsistencies which have been found during the quality control procedure have been corrected. To produce a consolidated data set for the South Pacific Ocean, best track data from these four centres have been used. Specifically, for 1969-1970 to 1994-1995 tropical cyclone seasons, data from TCWCs in Brisbane, Darwin and Wellington have been used. In 1995, RSMC Nadi, Fiji has been established with responsibilities for issuing tropical cyclone warnings and preparing best track data for the area south of the equator to 25°S, 160°E to 120°W. Consequently, data from RSMC Nadi have been used as a primary source for this area, starting from the 1995-1996 tropical cyclone season. These data have been combined with the data from

  15. Mission Accomplished: Deep Submergence Science Routinely Supported Using Multiple Vehicles Throughout the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory's 2005 South Pacific Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, T.; Smith, J. R.; Shackelford, R.; Wiltshire, J. C.; Malahoff, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) recently completed an internationally partnered 5-month, 14,500 nautical mile multiple leg expedition to the South Pacific that included 21 study sites in the waters of American Samoa, New Zealand, Tonga, and the U.S. Line Islands to commemorate its 25th anniversary of supporting deep submergence science in the Pacific Ocean. During this voyage, HURL successfully operated its two human occupied vehicles ( Pisces IV and Pisces V) each capable of diving to 2000 m from their support ship, the R/V Ka'imikai-o-Kanaloa ( KoK). In addition, a remotely operated vehicle ( RCV-150) with a nearly 1000-m depth limit was utilized alternately with the Pisces HOV's. The size and organized placement of these vehicles on the compact but efficiently run KoK (70-m length, 2000-tons displacement, 14 crew) allowed for deployment of a CTD rosette system and recovery of instrument package moorings during the same cruise leg. The Pisces submersibles are 20-ft long, 13-ton, 3-person vehicles with 7-10 hours duration, up to 350-lb payload capacities, and three forward looking viewports. The small size of the Pisces' relative to much larger deeper diving HOV's increases their agility, thus allowing maneuvering into more difficult sampling site terrain. The smaller package also facilitates rapid launch (8 min avg, stdev=1) and recovery (12 min avg, stdev=2) in heavier seas (up to sea state 5), as routinely experienced in the South Pacific during the austral winter. In addition to the enhanced safety aspect of having two compatible submersibles aboard, scientific efficiency has benefited by allowing the rotation of vehicles on extended deployments prior to battery servicing, thus maintaining an overall dive time average of 7.1 hr (stdev=1.52) for an average dive depth of 891 m (stdev=431) in 2005. Having the two fully operational submersibles also provides a contingency for equipment malfunction while on site that saved 7 dive days in 2005 alone

  16. Distal transport of dissolved hydrothermal iron in the deep South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Boyle, Edward A.; Jenkins, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, hydrothermal vents were not considered to be an important source to the marine dissolved Fe (dFe) inventory because hydrothermal Fe was believed to precipitate quantitatively near the vent site. Based on recent abyssal dFe enrichments near hydrothermal vents, however, the leaky vent hypothesis [Toner BM, et al. (2012) Oceanography 25(1):209–212] argues that some hydrothermal Fe persists in the dissolved phase and contributes a significant flux of dFe to the global ocean. We show here the first, to our knowledge, dFe (<0.4 µm) measurements from the abyssal southeast and southwest Pacific Ocean, where dFe of 1.0–1.5 nmol/kg near 2,000 m depth (0.4–0.9 nmol/kg above typical deep-sea dFe concentrations) was determined to be hydrothermally derived based on its correlation with primordial 3He and dissolved Mn (dFe:3He of 0.9–2.7 × 106). Given the known sites of hydrothermal venting in these regions, this dFe must have been transported thousands of kilometers away from its vent site to reach our sampling stations. Additionally, changes in the size partitioning of the hydrothermal dFe between soluble (<0.02 µm) and colloidal (0.02–0.4 µm) phases with increasing distance from the vents indicate that dFe transformations continue to occur far from the vent source. This study confirms that although the southern East Pacific Rise only leaks 0.02–1% of total Fe vented into the abyssal Pacific, this dFe persists thousands of kilometers away from the vent source with sufficient magnitude that hydrothermal vents can have far-field effects on global dFe distributions and inventories (≥3% of global aerosol dFe input). PMID:25349389

  17. Distal transport of dissolved hydrothermal iron in the deep South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N; Boyle, Edward A; Jenkins, William J

    2014-11-25

    Until recently, hydrothermal vents were not considered to be an important source to the marine dissolved Fe (dFe) inventory because hydrothermal Fe was believed to precipitate quantitatively near the vent site. Based on recent abyssal dFe enrichments near hydrothermal vents, however, the leaky vent hypothesis [Toner BM, et al. (2012) Oceanography 25(1):209-212] argues that some hydrothermal Fe persists in the dissolved phase and contributes a significant flux of dFe to the global ocean. We show here the first, to our knowledge, dFe (<0.4 µm) measurements from the abyssal southeast and southwest Pacific Ocean, where dFe of 1.0-1.5 nmol/kg near 2,000 m depth (0.4-0.9 nmol/kg above typical deep-sea dFe concentrations) was determined to be hydrothermally derived based on its correlation with primordial (3)He and dissolved Mn (dFe:(3)He of 0.9-2.7 × 10(6)). Given the known sites of hydrothermal venting in these regions, this dFe must have been transported thousands of kilometers away from its vent site to reach our sampling stations. Additionally, changes in the size partitioning of the hydrothermal dFe between soluble (<0.02 µm) and colloidal (0.02-0.4 µm) phases with increasing distance from the vents indicate that dFe transformations continue to occur far from the vent source. This study confirms that although the southern East Pacific Rise only leaks 0.02-1% of total Fe vented into the abyssal Pacific, this dFe persists thousands of kilometers away from the vent source with sufficient magnitude that hydrothermal vents can have far-field effects on global dFe distributions and inventories (≥3% of global aerosol dFe input).

  18. PP-precursor study of the lithosphere and upper mantle in the South Pacific using transportable array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, K.; Gurrola, H.; Duncan, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    PP bounce point precursor data are a valuable source of information about the mantle structure in ocean environments where seismic stations are sparse. This method has been most successful in imaging the 410 km discontinuity. The presence of the EarthScope transportable (TA) array has, however, enabled processing techniques that have resulted in images with frequency content to more than 1 Hz. This improved resolution is making it possible to image mantle structure to more shortened wavelengths than previously possible and with depth resolution of about 1 km. PP bounce point precursor data will be used to study the lithosphere under the Tahiti/Society hotspot chain. Three profiles were considered thorough a cluster of data in the part of the hot spot chain North of Tahiti. These profile lines originate and terminate around the same locations, but they differ in course: one generally running to the northeast of the hot spot chain (profile T), one along the axis of the hot spot chain (M), and one to the southwest of the chain (L). As a control, similar analysis will be performed using data from an area further south in the Pacific that has not been affected by hot spot activity (profile C). Data from the chain north of Tahiti suggests lithospheric discontinuities at around 30 km (shallowing to around 20 km to the northeast), at about 40 km, and between 50 km and 60 km. The general south pacific data seems to show some support for the first of these discontinuities but not for the deeper 40 km boundary. The 40 km boundary appears as a negative pulse and may suggest a warm body or partial melt in the region. Generally, all the images show considerable reflectivity at depths shallower than 200 km but exhibit little structure between the 200 and the 410 km depths. There was a phase in the M profile (beneath the hot spot chain) that appeared at a depth of 260 km at the south end but shallowed to 230 km to the north. The 410 km discontinuity was clearly present but occurs

  19. The Nature of the Medieval Warm Period - Little Ice Ace Transition in an Annually Resolved Speleothem Record from Voli Voli Cave, Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattey, D.; Stephens, M.; Garcia-Anton, E.; Hoffmann, D.; Dredge, J. A.; Fisher, R. E.; Lowry, D.

    2011-12-01

    The modern tropical Fiji climate is characterised by seasonal rainfall controlled by the position of the South Pacific Convergance Zone, which is closest to the islands during the wet summer season and weakens when migrating north during the drier winter season. Annual rainfall is strongly modulated on decadal timescales by ENSO with higher rainfall associated with La Nina events with dry spells sometimes leading to drought conditions during El Nino events. A laminated speleothem from Voli Voli cave Fiji spans a 1500 year interval across the transition from the Medieval Warm Period into the Little Ice Age. Fabrics change from calcite with thin clay layers at the base to white laminated calcite and the older record is characterised by elevated δ13C values then a rapid decrease in δ13C, dated at 1200-1300 AD, coinciding with the onset of clean calcite deposition. δ18O values define a simpler trend that monotonically decreases by ≈1% across the transition but high resolution micromilling at 100 micron resolution reveals smooth oscillations in δ18O and a key question is whether these cycles are annual or multi-annual features. To understand relationships between local cave processes and seasonal weather patterns, a program of cave monitoring has been underway since 2009. Voli Voli cave is a descending passage that terminates near a fissured cliff facing the SE trade winds; these are more persistent during the winter and weaken during the summer and cave monitoring shows that high cave air CO2 levels decline near the cave termination as a result of weak incoming ventilation by atmosphere driven by wind strength or chimney ventilation. The high resolution δ13C record shows regular peaks that are correlated with cycles in P and Sr and are interpreted as annual markers driven by rainfall and seasonal ventilation. The smooth δ18O cycles are quasi-decadal features possessing a similar frequency to ENSO with an amplitude of 2-3% equivalent to an amount-effect related

  20. Biomass Burning Influences on the Composition of the Remote South Pacific Troposphere: Analysis Based on Observations from PEM Tropics-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; Viezee, W.; Chen, Y.; Bradshaw, J.; Sandholm, S.; Blake, D.; Blake, N.; Heikes, B.; Snow, J.; Talbot, R.; Sachse, G.; Vay, S.

    1999-01-01

    Airborne, in-situ measurements from PEM-Tropics-A (September/October 1996) are analyzed to show the presence of distinct pollution plumes in the middle-tropical troposphere of the remote South Pacific (10-30degS). These elevated plumes cause a relative maximum at about 5-7km attitude in the vertical distribution of primary and secondary species characteristic of fuel combustion and biomass burning (CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH3Cl, PAN, O3). Similar plumes were also observed at mid-latitudes in the middle troposphere during three flights east of New Zealand (40-45degS). In all, pollution plumes with CO larger than 100 ppb were observed 24 times on 7 separate flight days south of the equator. The observed plumes were generally embedded in very dry air. Ten-day back trajectory analysis supports the view that these originated from the biomass burning regions of South Africa (and South America) and were transported to the South Pacific along long-distance subsiding trajectories. The chemical composition of the southern Pacific troposphere analyzed from the PEM-Tropics-A data is compared with data from the tropical regions of the northern Pacific (PEM-West-A) and southern Atlantic (TRACE-A) during the same Sept/Oct time period. Sizable perturbations in the abundance of ozone and its key precursors, resulting from the transport of pollution originating from biomass burning sources, are observed in much of the Southern Hemispheric troposphere.

  1. Fe, Zn, and Cd stable isotopes from the eastern tropical South Pacific from GEOTRACES cruise GP16 - Methods and data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgoe, J. M.; Townsend, E.; John, S.

    2014-12-01

    A new method has been developed for the rapid analysis of metal concentrations and stable isotope ratios using a prepFAST automated sample processing robot. Although concentrations and isotopes are processed separately, similar methods are used for both. Initially all seawater is acidified to pH 2. Then Nobias resin with EDTA/IDA functional groups is added to either 10mL of sample for concentrations or ~1L samples for isotopes. Fe binds to the resin at low pH, and the pH is subsequently raised to allow Zn and Cd to bind. For concentration analyses, all subsequent chemistry is automated on the prepFAST including removal of seawater, rinsing of resin, and elution of resin into acid. For isotope samples these extraction techniques are performed manually, but the subsequent purification of Fe, Zn, and Cd by anion exchange chromatography is automated using the prepFAST. With these new methods, samples from the US GEOTRACES cruise GP16, in the eastern tropical South Pacific, are being analyzed. High concentrations of dissolved Fe are observed near the continental shelf and near submarine hydrothermal vents. Interestingly, isotope data show that dissolved Fe near the continental shelf generally has a δ56Fe close to 0 ‰. This δ56 Fe signature is suggestive of a non-reductive dissolution source for Fe, as Fe(II) released by reductive dissolution is typically closer to -2 ‰. Preliminary data show nutrient-type profiles for Zn and Cd, with Zn matching Si and Cd having a similar distribution to P. An increase in dissolved Zn near hydrothermal vents suggests a possible hydrothermal zinc source to the deep ocean. Continuing analysis of isotope data will reveal more about the source and biogeochemical cycling of these three chemically and biologically important trace metals throughout the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean.

  2. Biweekly Sea Surface Temperature over the South China Sea and its association with the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, B. H.

    2015-10-01

    The association of the biweekly intraseasonal (BWI) oscillation in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) over the South China Sea (SCS) and the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon is authenticated using version 4 the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager data (SST and rain) and heat fluxes from Ocean Atmosphere Flux project data during 1998-2012. The results suggest that the SCS involves ocean-atmosphere coupling on biweekly timescales. The positive biweekly SST anomalies lead the rain anomalies over the SCS by 3 days, with a significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.6, at 99 % significance levels) between the SST-rain anomalies. It is evident from lead/lag correlation between biweekly SST and zonal wind shear that warm ocean surface induced by wind shear may contribute to a favorable condition of the convective activity over the SCS. The present study suggests that ocean-to-atmospheric processes induced by the BWI oscillation in the SCS SST results in enhanced sea level pressure and surface shortwave radiation flux during the summer monsoon. Besides, it is observed that the SCS BWI oscillation in the changes of SST causes a feedback in the atmosphere by modifying the atmospheric instability. This suggests that the active/break biweekly cycle of the SST over the SCS is related by sea level pressure, surface heat fluxes and atmospheric instability. The potential findings here indicate that the biweekly SST over the SCS play an important role in the eastward and the southward propagation of the biweekly anomalies in the Western North Pacific.

  3. Investigating Rainfall Variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone using the Geochemistry of Stalagmites from the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhon, N.; Quinn, T. M.; Partin, J. W.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.

    2015-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), which extends southeastward from New Guinea to Tahiti, is the largest perennial rainfall feature in the Southern Hemisphere. The position of the SPCZ and its associated rainfall varies significantly on multidecadal timescales, as documented by instrumental and climate proxy data. For example, stalagmite δ18O records (rainfall proxy) from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu (Partin et al., 2013) and Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands (Maupin et al., 2014), document large (~1‰), abrupt changes in stalagmite δ18O on multidecadal timescales over the past 600 years that arise from internal variability in the climate system. The proxy data agree with the type of rainfall changes observed in the instrumental record, such as the change across 1976/77, but the older changes are larger in relative magnitude. We expand on these earlier studies of rainfall variability in the SPCZ system using stable isotope variations in stalagmites from two other locations in the Solomon Islands (Munda, New Georgia, 8.3°S, 157.3°E; Suku, Nggela Pile (9.8° S, 160.2° E). These stalagmites range in age from about 400 CE to 1850 CE, based on U-Th dating, and have relatively fast growth rates (60 to 300 µm/yr). Stalagmite δ18O time series were generated from sub-samples milled every 500 µm, or approximately 1 to 8 years per data point. Initial results from these two new Solomon Island stalagmites not only confirm the presence of multidecadal variability in stalagmite δ18O identified in previous studies, but suggest that the same amplitude of variability has occurred over several windows of time during the past 1600 years. When complete, these new proxy rainfall records from Munda and Suku will further constrain the pattern and mechanism of SPCZ rainfall variability in western tropical Pacific region.

  4. A New Holocene Lake Sediment Archive from Samoa (Tropical South Pacific) Reveals Millennial Scale Changes in Hydroclimate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sear, D. A.; Hassall, J. D.; Langdon, P. G.; Croudace, I. W. C.; Maloney, A. E.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the strongest source of interannual climate variability on the planet. Its behaviour leads to major hydro-climate impacts around the world, including flooding, drought, and altering cyclone frequency. Simulating ENSO behaviour is difficult using climate models, as it is a complex non-linear system, and hence predicting its future variability under changing climate is challenging. Using palaeoclimate data thus allows an insight into long-term ENSO behaviour against a range of different forcings throughout the Holocene. To date long, coherent, high resolution records from lake sediment archives have been limited to the Pacific Rim. We present new data from the closed crater Lake Lanoto'o, on Upolu Island, Samoa, located within the tropical South Pacific. The lake sediment record extends back into the early Holocene with an average sedimentation rate 0.4mm a-1. We demonstrate a strong correspondence between precipitation at the study site and measures of the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI)1. We compare geochemical proxies of precipitation to a long-term reconstruction of the SOI2. The resulting proxy SOI record extends over the last 9000 years, revealing scales of change in ENSO that match those recorded from sites located on the Pacific rim3,4. A major period of La-Nina dominance occurs around 4.5ka BP before abruptly switching to El-Nino dominance around 3.2ka. Thereafter, phases of El-Nino - La Nina dominance, alternate every c. 400yrs. The results point to prolonged phases of enhanced or reduced precipitation - conditions that may influence future population resilience to climate change, and may also have been triggers for the colonisation of more remote eastern Polynesia. 1. http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/cas/catalog/climind/SOI.signal.annstd.ascii. 2. Yan, H. et al. (2011) Nature Geoscience, 4, p.611. 3. Conroy J. L. et al. (2008) Quaternary Science Reviews, 27, p.1166 4. Moy, C. M. et al. (2002) Nature, 420, p.162

  5. Who stole my δ14N? Local vs. remote drivers of the South Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zone during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazen, C.; Herbert, T.; Altabet, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The waters underlying the Peru margin upwelling region represent the largest of the world’s three oxygen minimum/denitrification zones. Situated at the interface between the poleward Peru Undercurrent and the equatorward Peru Coastal current, Peru margin upwelling represents the final stages of a ventilation process that begins in the southern high latitudes, extends to the western subtropics, before traveling across the pacific basin to the eastern tropical pacific. Microbial denitrification under these oxygen-depleted conditions represents the major loss of nitrate from the global ocean. During denitrification, light nitrate (14NO3-) is preferentially removed leaving the remaining nitrate pool enriched in heavy nitrate (15NO3-). This heavy nitrate signal is transferred to the surface through upwelling where it is used by biota and eventually transferred to the underlying sediments. Using a multi proxy approach and an annually laminated sediment core from the heart of the Peru margin OMZ we explore the possible sources of nitrogen isotopes across the Holocene. Central to our investigation is understanding the dual contributions of local carbon flux verses remote ventilation of the Peru Undercurrent. Waters at 200 to 800 meters depth are depleted in oxygen through a combination of high respiration rates driven by upwelling- induced surface productivity, and poor ventilation. If the oxygen demand imposed by local respiration dominated the subsurface low oxygen signal we would expect to see a positive correlation between indicators of local surface production (C37total and Biogenic Silica) and (δ15N). Instead we find a strong decoupling between local carbon flux (productivity) and remote ventilation, particularly during the early Holocene. To find the source of this enriched δ15N signal we look to climatic processes originating outside the tropics, including the equatorial undercurrent waters that feed the Peru Undercurrent and the circulation of the south

  6. South Asian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Variability and Trend: Its Links to Indo-Pacific SST Anomalies and Moist Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna, V.

    2016-06-01

    The warm (cold) phase of El Niño (La Niña) and its impact on all Indian Summer Monsoon rainfall (AISMR) relationship is explored for the past 100 years. The 103-year (1901-2003) data from the twentieth century reanalysis datasets (20CR) and other major reanalysis datasets for southwest monsoon season (JJAS) is utilized to find out the simultaneous influence of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-AISMR relationship. Two cases such as wet, dry monsoon years associated with ENSO(+) (El Niño), ENSO(-) (La Niña) and Non-ENSO (neutral) events have been discussed in detail using observed rainfall and three-dimensional 20CR dataset. The dry and wet years associated with ENSO and Non-ENSO periods show significant differences in the spatial pattern of rainfall associated with three-dimensional atmospheric composite, the 20CR dataset has captured the anomalies quite well. During wet (dry) years, the rainfall is high (low), i.e. 10 % above (below) average from the long-term mean and this wet or dry condition occur both during ENSO and Non-ENSO phases. The Non-ENSO year dry or wet composites are also focused in detail to understand, where do the anomalous winds come from unlike in the ENSO case. The moisture transport is coherent with the changes in the spatial pattern of AISMR and large-scale feature in the 20CR dataset. Recent 50-year trend (1951-2000) is also analyzed from various available observational and reanalysis datasets to see the influence of Indo-Pacific SST and moist processes on the South Asian summer monsoon rainfall trend. Apart from the Indo-Pacific sea surface temperatures (SST), the moisture convergence and moisture transport among India (IND), Equatorial Indian Ocean (IOC) and tropical western pacific (WNP) is also important in modifying the wet or dry cycles over India. The mutual interaction among IOC, WNP and IND in seasonal timescales is significant in modifying wet and dry cycles over the Indian region and the seasonal anomalies.

  7. Estimation of hydrothermal deposits location from magnetization distribution and magnetic properties in the North Fiji Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Kim, C.; Park, C.; Kim, H.

    2013-12-01

    The North Fiji Basin is belong to one of the youngest basins of back-arc basins in the southwest Pacific (from 12 Ma ago). We performed the marine magnetic and the bathymetry survey in the North Fiji Basin for finding the submarine hydrothermal deposits in April 2012. We acquired magnetic and bathymetry datasets by using Multi-Beam Echo Sounder EM120 (Kongsberg Co.) and Overhouser Proton Magnetometer SeaSPY (Marine Magnetics Co.). We conducted the data processing to obtain detailed seabed topography, magnetic anomaly, reduce to the pole(RTP), analytic signal and magnetization. The study areas composed of the two areas(KF-1(longitude : 173.5 ~ 173.7 and latitude : -16.2 ~ -16.5) and KF-3(longitude : 173.4 ~ 173.6 and latitude : -18.7 ~ -19.1)) in Central Spreading Ridge(CSR) and one area(KF-2(longitude : 173.7 ~ 174 and latitude : -16.8 ~ -17.2)) in Triple Junction(TJ). The seabed topography of KF-1 existed thin horst in two grabens that trends NW-SE direction. The magnetic properties of KF-1 showed high magnetic anomalies in center part and magnetic lineament structure of trending E-W direction. In the magnetization distribution of KF-1, the low magnetization zone matches well with a strong analytic signal in the northeastern part. KF-2 area has TJ. The seabed topography formed like Y-shape and showed a high feature in the center of TJ. The magnetic properties of KF-2 displayed high magnetic anomalies in N-S spreading ridge center and northwestern part. In the magnetization distribution of KF-2, the low magnetization zone matches well with a strong analytic signal in the northeastern part. The seabed topography of KF-3 presented a flat and high topography like dome structure at center axis and some seamounts scattered around the axis. The magnetic properties of KF-3 showed high magnetic anomalies in N-S spreading ridge center part. In the magnetization of KF-2, the low magnetization zone mismatches to strong analytic signal in this area. The difference of KF-3

  8. Biomass Carbon in the South Mexican Pacific Coast: Exploring Mangrove Potential to REDD+ Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano, M.; Amezcua-Torrijos, I.

    2014-12-01

    Mangroves have the highest carbon stocks amongst tropical forests. In Mexico, however, little is known about their potential to mitigate climate change. In this work, we estimated biomass carbon stocks in the Southern Mexican Pacific Coast (~69,000 ha). We quantified above and belowground biomass carbon stocks at (1) the regional scale along two environmental strata (i.e. dry and wet), and (2) at the local scale along three geomorphological types of mangroves (i.e. fringe, estuarine and basin). Regional strata were defined using intensity and influence of rivers and, the mean annual precipitation and evapotranspiration ratio (i.e., wet < 1 > dry). By lowering the stressing environmental conditions (e.g., low salinity and high sediment accumulation), we expected the highest stocks in mangroves growing in wet and estuarine strata at the regional scale and local scale, respectively. Quantifications were carried out in sixty-six sites chosen through stratified randomized design in which six strata were obtained by a full combination of regional and local strata. In all strata, aboveground carbon represents 64-67% of total carbon. Total biomass carbon was higher in wet than dry stratum (W: 87.3 ± 6.9, D: 47.0 ± 5.0, p<0.001). While at local scale, total biomass carbon was high in estuarine mangroves of both wet and dry regions (W: 91.6 ± 7.8, D: 77.6 ± 14.8, p<0.001), and these were statistically similar to fringe wet mangroves (110.9 ± 24.2, p<0.001), the stratum with the highest total carbon. Following a conservative approach, the Mexican Southern Pacific Coast is storing near 20,344 Gg CO2e. If the historical annual deforestation rate of 0.54% continues, this region could emit between 0.03 and 14.4 Gg of CO2e ha/year, out of which wet estuarine mangroves would have the highest emission values. Evidence suggests that these mangroves are the most important strata in which REDD+ mechanisms could be implemented due to (1) their carbon stocks, and (2) their highest

  9. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaus, Kerstin B. J.; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T.; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M.

    2015-12-01

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji’s inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers’ identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji’s inshore fisheries, suggests that the country’s artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries.

  10. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Glaus, Kerstin B. J.; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T.; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M.

    2015-01-01

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji’s inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers’ identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji’s inshore fisheries, suggests that the country’s artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries. PMID:26626561

  11. Millennial-scale precipitation variability over Easter Island (South Pacific) during MIS 3: inter-hemispheric teleconnections with North Atlantic abrupt cold events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalef, O.; Cacho, I.; Pla-Rabes, S.; Cañellas-Boltà, N.; Pueyo, J. J.; Sáez, A.; Pena, L. D.; Valero-Garcés, B. L.; Rull, V.; Giralt, S.

    2015-04-01

    Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3, 59.4-27.8 kyr BP) is characterized by the occurrence of rapid millennial-scale climate oscillations known as Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles (DO) and by abrupt cooling events in the North Atlantic known as Heinrich events. Although both the timing and dynamics of these events have been broadly explored in North Atlantic records, the response of the tropical and subtropical latitudes to these rapid climatic excursions, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere, still remains unclear. The Rano Aroi peat record (Easter Island, 27° S) provides a unique opportunity to understand atmospheric and oceanic changes in the South Pacific during these DO cycles because of its singular location, which is influenced by the South Pacific Anticyclone (SPA), the Southern Westerlies (SW), and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) linked to the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The Rano Aroi sequence records 6 major events of enhanced precipitation between 38 and 65 kyr BP. These events are compared with other hydrological records from the tropical and subtropical band supporting a coherent regional picture, with the dominance of humid conditions in Southern Hemisphere tropical band during Heinrich Stadials (HS) 5, 5a and 6 and other Stadials while dry conditions prevailed in the Northern tropics. This antiphased hydrological pattern between hemispheres has been attributed to ITCZ migration, which in turn might be associated with an eastward expansion of the SPCZ storm track, leading to an increased intensity of cyclogenic storms reaching Easter Island. Low Pacific Sea Surface Temperature (SST) gradients across the Equator were coincident with the here-defined Rano Aroi humid events and consistent with a reorganization of Southern Pacific atmospheric and oceanic circulation also at higher latitudes during Heinrich and Dansgaard-Oeschger stadials.

  12. The South Pacific epidemic strain of Zika virus replicates efficiently in human epithelial A549 cells leading to IFN-β production and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Frumence, Etienne; Roche, Marjolaine; Krejbich-Trotot, Pascale; El-Kalamouni, Chaker; Nativel, Brice; Rondeau, Philippe; Missé, Dorothée; Gadea, Gilles; Viranaicken, Wildriss; Desprès, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging flavivirus since the first epidemics in South Pacific in 2007. The recent finding that ZIKV is now circulating in Western Hemisphere and can be associated to severe human diseases, warrants the need for its study. Here we evaluate the susceptibility of human lung epithelial A549 cells to South Pacific epidemic strain of ZIKV isolated in 2013. We showed that ZIKV growth in A549 cells is greatly efficient. ZIKV infection resulted in the secretion of IFN-β followed by the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, and transcriptional activity of IFIT genes. At the maximum of virus progeny production, ZIKV triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through activation of caspases-3 and -9. Whereas at early infection times, the rapid release of IFN-β which exerts an antiviral effect against ZIKV might delay apoptosis in infected cells.

  13. [Inshore cetaceans from the North and South Pacific coast of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, Damián; Montero-Cordero, Andrea; May-Collado, Laura

    2011-03-01

    Twenty nine cetacean species occur in Costa Rican waters but extensive research has been conducted only for three species. The latter shows there is a lack of general and local information about these mammals, even when the country, has shown a remarkable growth in whale watching activities. The increasing use of marine resources in coastal areas has also developed the need to determine the occurrence of cetaceans in areas showing high tourist presence, in order to propose sound conservation measures. In this study, environmental variables were determined and subsequently related to the presence of the species recorded, out of 166 sightings, between 2005 and 2006. The species with highest proportion of sightings were Stenella attenuata (68%), followed by Megaptera novaeangliae (13%) and Tursiops truncatus (10%). The presence of spotted dolphins is related to changes in salinity and water transparency, while that of the humpback whale was related to wave height (Beaufort scale) and water temperature. The presence of seven species of cetaceans was confirmed in two coastal areas of the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, from which three are present throughout the year. Environmental variables were found related to the presence of at least two species. PMID:21516651

  14. Organochlorine pollutants in small cetaceans from the Pacific and south Atlantic Oceans, November 1968-June 1976

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, T.J.; Brownell, R.L. Jr.; Clark, D.R. Jr.; Walker, W.A.; Gay, M.L.; Lamont, T.G.

    1980-09-01

    Organochlorine residues were analyzed in blubber, brain, or muscle tissues of 69 individuals representing 10 species of small cetaceans. Collections were made from November 1968 through June 1976 at localities in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and along the coasts of California, Hawaii, Japan, and Uruguay, Relations of residue concentrations between tissues are described for DDE and PCBs in two dolphin species. sigma DDT and PCB residues in blubber of most of the 19 individuals of the five southern California species sampled exceed concentrations that are associated with reproductive impairment in pinnipeds, although the nature of such associations is not well defined. The sigma DDT residue of 2,695 ppm in blubber of one California coastal Tursiops truncatus is one of the highest concentrations reported in tissues of members of any population of wild mammals. Except for one rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis) from Maui, Hawaii, all individuals from all localities surveyed were contaminated with organochlorine compounds. Seventeen different organochlorines were detected; greatest diversity occurred near Japan and California. This is the first report of several of these compounds in tissues of any species of marine mammals. The o,p'-isomers and metabolites of DDT were detected unusually frequently. Ratios of p,p'-DDT to p,p'-DDE in blubber of cetaceans from waters off countries where use of this pesticide has been relatively recent and ongoing were at least an order of magnitude higher than in cetaceans from United States waters.

  15. Organochlorine pollutants in small cetaceans from the Pacific and south Atlantic Oceans, November 1968-June 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, T.J.; Brownell, R.L.; Clark, D.R.; Walker, W.A.; Gay, M.L.; Lamont, T.G.

    1980-01-01

    Organochlorine residues were analyzed in blubber, brain, or muscle tissues of 69 individuals representing 10 species of small cetaceans. Collections were made from November 1968 through June 1976 at localities in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and along the coasts of California, Hawaii, Japan, and Uruguay, Relations of residue concentrations between tissues are described for DDE and PCBs in two dolphin species. sigma DDT and PCB residues in blubber of most of the 19 individuals of the five southern California species sampled exceed concentrations that are associated with reproductive impairment in pinnipeds, although the nature of such associations is not well defined. The sigma DDT residue of 2,695 ppm in blubber of one California coastal Tursiops truncatus is one of the highest concentrations reported in tissues of members of any population of wild mammals. Except for one rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis) from Maui, Hawaii, all individuals from all localities surveyed were contaminated with organochlorine compounds. Seventeen different organochlorines were detected; greatest diversity occurred near Japan and California. This is the first report of several of these compounds in tissues of any species of marine mammals. The o,p'-isomers and metabolites of DDT were detected unusually frequently. Ratios of p,p'-DDT to p,p'-DDE in blubber of cetaceans from waters off countries where use of this pesticide has been relatively recent and ongoing were at least an order of magnitude higher than in cetaceans from United States waters.

  16. Variation in responses to spawning Pacific salmon among three south-eastern Alaska streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaloner, D.T.; Lamberti, G.A.; Merritt, R.W.; Mitchell, N.L.; Ostrom, P.H.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    1. Pacific salmon are thought to stimulate the productivity of the fresh waters in which they spawn by fertilising them with marine-derived nutrients (MDN). We compared the influence of salmon spawners on surface streamwater chemistry and benthic biota among three southeastern Alaska streams. Within each stream, reaches up- and downstream of barriers to salmon migration were sampled during or soon after spawners entered the streams. 2. Within streams, concentrations of dissolved ammonium and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), abundance of epilithon (chlorophyll a and ash-free dry mass) and biomass of chironomids were significantly higher in reaches with salmon spawners. In contrast, biomass of the mayflies Epeorus spp. and Rhithrogena spp. was significantly higher in reaches lacking spawners. 3. Among streams, significant differences were found in concentrations of dissolved ammonium, dissolved organic carbon, nitrate and SRP, abundance of epilithon, and the biomass of chironomids and Rhithrogena. These differences did not appear to reflect differences among streams in spawner density, nor the changes in water chemistry resulting from salmon spawners. 4. Our results suggest that the 'enrichment' effect of salmon spawners (e.g. increased streamwater nutrient concentrations) was balanced by other concurrent effects of spawners on streams (e.g. sediment disturbance). Furthermore, the collective effect of spawners on lotic ecosystems is likely to be constrained by conditions unique to individual streams, such as temperature, background water chemistry and light attenuation.

  17. Exposure of coastal built assets in the South Pacific to climate risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lalit; Taylor, Subhashni

    2015-11-01

    Pacific island countries (PICs) are situated in a highly dynamic ocean-atmosphere interface, are dispersed over a large ocean area, and have highly populated urban centres located on the coastal margin. The built infrastructure associated with urban centres is also located within close proximity to the coastlines, exposing such infrastructure to a variety of natural and climate change-related hazards. In this research we undertake a comprehensive analysis of the exposure of built infrastructure assets to climate risk for 12 PICs. We show that 57% of the assessed built infrastructure for the 12 PICs is located within 500 m of their coastlines, amounting to a total replacement value of US$21.9 billion. Eight of the 12 PICs have 50% or more of their built infrastructure located within 500 m of their coastlines. In particular, Kiribati, Marshall Islands and Tuvalu have over 95% of their built infrastructure located within 500 m of their coastlines. Coastal adaptation costs will require substantial financial resources, which may not be available in developing countries such as the PICs, leaving them to face very high impacts but lacking the adaptive capacity.

  18. Soluble trace metals in aerosols over the tropical south east Pacific offshore of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. R.; Thomas, M.; Bange, H. W.; Plasencia Sánchez, E.

    2015-10-01

    Bulk aerosol samples collected during cruise M91 of FS Meteor off the coast of Peru in December 2012 were analysed for their soluble trace metal (Fe, Al, Mn, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Cu, Co, Cd, Pb, Th) and major ion (including NO3- and NH4+) content. These data are among the first recorded for trace metals in this relatively poorly studied region of the global marine atmosphere. To the north of ∼ 13° S, the concentrations of several elements (Fe, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Pb) appear to be related to distance from the coast. At the south of the transect (∼ 15-16° S), elevated concentrations of Fe, Cu, Co and Ni were observed. These may be related to the activities of the large smelting facilities in the south of Peru or northern Chile. Calculated dry deposition fluxes (3370-17 800 and 16-107 nmol m-2 d-1 for inorganic nitrogen and soluble Fe respectively) indicated that atmospheric input to the waters of the Peru upwelling system contains an excess of Fe over N, with respect to phytoplankton requirements. This may be significant as primary production in these waters has been reported to be limited by Fe availability, but atmospheric deposition is unlikely to be the dominant source of Fe to the system.

  19. Malaria survey and malaria control detachments in the South-West Pacific Area in World War 2.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Denton W

    2009-01-01

    Malaria among troops in the South-West Pacific Area (SWPA) in World War 2 affected the military effort to the degree that special units were formed to combat it. These malaria survey detachments (MSDs) and malaria control detachments (MCDs) were self-contained and so could move quickly to wherever their services were needed. In SWPA by 25 September 1944 there were 32 MSDs and 65 MCDs. Tables of organization called for 11 enlisted men in MSDs and MCDs, two officers in MSDs and one in MCDs. Detachments served throughout the SWPA. Detailed records of the 31st MSD show that in addition to antimalarial efforts it worked at control of scrub typhus, dengue and venereal disease, at reduction of rat populations and in experimental work involving DDT and schistosomiasis. Specific locations of the 31st MSD were New Guinea (3 sites), Morotai, Leyte, Mindoro, Okinawa and Japan. The detachment served overseas for 21 months. Experience in combating malaria in SWPA in World War 2 points to the need for better and continuous training of both medical and line officers in malaria prevention and control.

  20. Insights on the 2009 South Pacific tsunami in Samoa and Tonga from field surveys and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Borrero, Jose C.; Synolakis, Costas E.; Okal, Emile A.; Weiss, Robert; Titov, Vasily V.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Foteinis, Spyros; Lynett, Patrick J.; Chan, I.-Chi; Liu, Philip L.-F.

    2011-07-01

    An M w ≈ 8.1 earthquake south of the Samoan Islands on 29 September 2009 generated a tsunami that killed 189 people. From 4 to 11 October, an International Tsunami Survey Team surveyed the seven major islands of the Samoan archipelago. The team measured locally focused runup heights of 17 m at Poloa and inundation of more than 500 m at Pago Pago. A follow-up expedition from 23 to 28 November surveying the three main islands of Tonga's northernmost Niua group revealed surprising 22 m runup and 1 km inundation. We analyze the extreme tsunami runup and complex impact distribution based on physical and societal observations combined with numerical modeling. That an outer rise/outer trench slope (OR/OTS) event is responsible for a tsunami disaster in the Pacific calls for care in identifying and defining tsunami hazards. Evacuation exercises conducted in Samoa in the preceding year may have limited the human toll; however, cars were identified as potential death traps during tsunami evacuations. This event highlights the extreme hazards from near source tsunamis when the earthquake's shaking constitutes the de facto warning, and further underscores the importance of community based education and awareness programs as essential in saving lives.

  1. Deposits, flow characteristics, and landscape change resulting from the September 2009 South Pacific tsunami in the Samoan islands

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Bruce M.; Buckley, Mark; Etienne, Samuel; Chagué-Goff, Catherine; Clark, Kate; Goff, James; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Strotz, Luke

    2011-01-01

    The September 29th 2009 tsunami caused widespread coastal modification within the islands of Samoa and northern Tonga in the South Pacific. Preliminary measurements indicate maximum runup values of around 17 m (Okal et al., 2010) and shore-normal inundation distances of up to ~ 620 m (Jaffe et al., 2010). Geological field reconnaissance studies were conducted as part of an UNESCO-IOC International Tsunami Survey Team survey within three weeks of the event in order to document the erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment by the tsunami. Data collected included: a) general morphology and geological characteristics of the coast, b) evidence of tsunami flow (inundation, flow depth and direction, wave height and runup), c) surficial and subsurface sediment samples including deposit thickness and extent, d) topographic mapping, and e) boulder size and location measurements. Four main types of sedimentary deposits were identified: a) gravel fields consisting mostly of isolated cobbles and boulders, b) sand sheets from a few to ~ 25 cm thick, c) piles of organic (mostly vegetation) and man-made material forming debris ramparts, and d) surface mud deposits that settled from suspension from standing water in the tsunami aftermath. Tsunami deposits within the reef system were not widespread, however, surficial changes to the reefs were observed. PMID:27065478

  2. An Unprecedented High Incidence of Leptospirosis in Futuna, South Pacific, 2004 - 2014, Evidenced by Retrospective Analysis of Surveillance Data.

    PubMed

    Massenet, Denis; Yvon, Jean-François; Couteaux, Clément; Goarant, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    Futuna is a small Polynesian island in the South Pacific with a population of 3,612 in 2013. The first human leptospirosis case was confirmed in 1997. Active surveillance started in 2004. Cases were confirmed by PCR or real time PCR, or by serology using MAT or a combination of IgM-ELISA and MAT. A retrospective analysis of surveillance data shows that the disease was endemic with a mean annual incidence of 844 cases per 100,000 over an 11-year period from 2004 to 2014. An epidemic peak as high as 1,945 cases per 100,000 occurred in 2008. Serogroup Australis was predominant until 2007, Icterohaemorrhagiae was dominant afterwards. Cluster analysis revealed different hot spots over time. Lifestyle habits, such as walking barefoot in irrigated taro fields or pig pens probably contributed to contamination from the swine and rodent reservoirs to humans. Severe forms were rare, and the case fatality rate was 0.5%. The medical community and general population were aware of leptospirosis and rapid treatment with amoxycillin was the main treatment, probably contributing to this low fatality rate. PMID:26528546

  3. Water column biogeochemistry of oxygen minimum zones in the eastern tropical North Atlantic and eastern tropical South Pacific Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löscher, C. R.; Bange, H. W.; Schmitz, R. A.; Callbeck, C. M.; Engel, A.; Hauss, H.; Kanzow, T.; Kiko, R.; Lavik, G.; Loginova, A.; Melzner, F.; Neulinger, S. C.; Pahlow, M.; Riebesell, U.; Schunck, H.; Thomsen, S.; Wagner, H.

    2015-03-01

    Recent modeling results suggest that oceanic oxygen levels will decrease significantly over the next decades to centuries in response to climate change and altered ocean circulation. Hence the future ocean may experience major shifts in nutrient cycling triggered by the expansion and intensification of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). There are numerous feedbacks between oxygen concentrations, nutrient cycling and biological productivity; however, existing knowledge is insufficient to understand physical, chemical and biological interactions in order to adequately assess past and potential future changes. We investigated the pelagic biogeochemistry of OMZs in the eastern tropical North Atlantic and eastern tropical South Pacific during a series of cruise expeditions and mesocosm studies. The following summarizes the current state of research on the influence of low environmental oxygen conditions on marine biota, viruses, organic matter formation and remineralization with a particular focus on the nitrogen cycle in OMZ regions. The impact of sulfidic events on water column biogeochemistry, originating from a specific microbial community capable of highly efficient carbon fixation, nitrogen turnover and N2O production is further discussed. Based on our findings, an important role of sinking particulate organic matter in controlling the nutrient stochiometry of the water column is suggested. These particles can enhance degradation processes in OMZ waters by acting as microniches, with sharp gradients enabling different processes to happen in close vicinity, thus altering the interpretation of oxic and anoxic environments.

  4. Water column biogeochemistry of oxygen minimum zones in the eastern tropical North Atlantic and eastern tropical South Pacific oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löscher, Carolin R.; Bange, Hermann W.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Callbeck, Cameron M.; Engel, Anja; Hauss, Helena; Kanzow, Torsten; Kiko, Rainer; Lavik, Gaute; Loginova, Alexandra; Melzner, Frank; Meyer, Judith; Neulinger, Sven C.; Pahlow, Markus; Riebesell, Ulf; Schunck, Harald; Thomsen, Sören; Wagner, Hannes

    2016-06-01

    Recent modeling results suggest that oceanic oxygen levels will decrease significantly over the next decades to centuries in response to climate change and altered ocean circulation. Hence, the future ocean may experience major shifts in nutrient cycling triggered by the expansion and intensification of tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are connected to the most productive upwelling systems in the ocean. There are numerous feedbacks among oxygen concentrations, nutrient cycling and biological productivity; however, existing knowledge is insufficient to understand physical, chemical and biological interactions in order to adequately assess past and potential future changes. In the following, we summarize one decade of research performed in the framework of the Collaborative Research Center 754 (SFB754) focusing on climate-biogeochemistry interactions in tropical OMZs. We investigated the influence of low environmental oxygen conditions on biogeochemical cycles, organic matter formation and remineralization, greenhouse gas production and the ecology in OMZ regions of the eastern tropical South Pacific compared to the weaker OMZ of the eastern tropical North Atlantic. Based on our findings, a coupling of primary production and organic matter export via the nitrogen cycle is proposed, which may, however, be impacted by several additional factors, e.g., micronutrients, particles acting as microniches, vertical and horizontal transport of organic material and the role of zooplankton and viruses therein.

  5. An Unprecedented High Incidence of Leptospirosis in Futuna, South Pacific, 2004 – 2014, Evidenced by Retrospective Analysis of Surveillance Data

    PubMed Central

    Massenet, Denis; Yvon, Jean-François; Couteaux, Clément; Goarant, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    Futuna is a small Polynesian island in the South Pacific with a population of 3,612 in 2013. The first human leptospirosis case was confirmed in 1997. Active surveillance started in 2004. Cases were confirmed by PCR or real time PCR, or by serology using MAT or a combination of IgM-ELISA and MAT. A retrospective analysis of surveillance data shows that the disease was endemic with a mean annual incidence of 844 cases per 100,000 over an 11-year period from 2004 to 2014. An epidemic peak as high as 1,945 cases per 100,000 occurred in 2008. Serogroup Australis was predominant until 2007, Icterohaemorrhagiae was dominant afterwards. Cluster analysis revealed different hot spots over time. Lifestyle habits, such as walking barefoot in irrigated taro fields or pig pens probably contributed to contamination from the swine and rodent reservoirs to humans. Severe forms were rare, and the case fatality rate was 0.5%. The medical community and general population were aware of leptospirosis and rapid treatment with amoxycillin was the main treatment, probably contributing to this low fatality rate. PMID:26528546

  6. Factors of severity at admission during an epidemic of dengue 1 in New Caledonia (South Pacific) in 2003.

    PubMed

    Bouldouyre, M A; Baumann, F; Berlioz-Arthaud, A; Chungue, E; Lacassin, F

    2006-01-01

    We report a retrospective study of an epidemic of dengue in New-Caledonia (South Pacific) in 2003 among adult inpatients. The aim was to establish clinical and biological criteria for the severity of the infection at the time of admission. During 7 months, all inpatients older than 15 y having a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of dengue fever (IgM or PCR) were included (n=170). Two groups were defined: severe cases (death and/or transfer to intensive care unit, n=24) and benign cases (n=146). Data were analysed using Epi-Info software. Univariate analysis showed that shock, haemorrhage and neurological complications were significantly more frequent in serious cases, respectively 37.5% vs 0.7%, 62.5% vs 32.2%, 25% vs 9.6% (p<0.05). Relevant biological criteria were: creatinine > 140 micromol/l (OR 12 (95% CI 3.93-37.44)), free bilirubin > 18 micromol/l (OR 12.69 ( 95% CI 2.88-59.5)), amylase > 220 UI/l (OR 27.34 (95% CI 4.57-210)) and platelets < 45,000/mm3 (OR 4.35 (95% CI 1.43-14.2)) with p<0.005 (VPP = 100% for association of 3 criteria). We suggest this combination of 4 biological criteria inclines to severity.

  7. Two aspects along the continuum of pigeon evolution: A South-Pacific radiation and the relationship of pigeons within Neoaves.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Gillian C; Penny, David

    2010-08-01

    Phylogenetics explores the continuum of shallower to deeper genetic divergences between taxa. Along this continuum increasing lengths of DNA sequence can be used to answer deeper and deeper questions about biological relationships. We use shorter, and then longer mitochondrial DNA sequences to address two aspects of pigeon evolution. Firstly, we examine the phylogenetic relationships of the eight genera within the South Pacific Ducula-Ptilinopus radiation, and examine how this radiation fits into pigeons generally. Within Ducula, taxa are closely related, whereas Ptilinopus is very diverse, and paraphyletic. One third of all pigeon species are within the Ducula-Ptilinopus radiation, however all are very similar ecologically. Secondly, we study the deeper phylogenetic question regarding the relationship of pigeons to other birds. To this end, we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Hemiphaganovaeseelandiae, a member of the Ducula-Ptilinopus radiation. We use this mitochondrial genome, along with additional sandgrouse (Pterocles namaqua) mitochondrial genes to assess various candidates for the closest relative of pigeons. Of parrots, shorebirds, and sandgrouse, we find highest support for the sandgrouse-pigeon grouping. Furthermore in these analyses the pigeon and sandgrouse group closer to the falcons than any other included taxon. The finding that pigeons and sandgrouse may be more closely related to falcons than to previous candidates such as shorebirds or parrots invites further investigation.

  8. Risk factors for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections at a tertiary care hospital in New Caledonia, South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Falcot, Virginie; Lacassin, Flore; Mikulski, Marc; Baumann, Francine

    2010-12-01

    In New Caledonia, South Pacific, Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen. OXA-23 carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) has been ranked third among all multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria at the main hospital of Nouméa in New Caledonia (24.8%, 50/202 isolates). In the present study, risk factors and outcomes for 50 patients with CRAB infection were compared with those of 152 patients infected with other MDR bacteria. Independent risk factors for infection with CRAB were respiratory ward admission (odds ratio 2.8, 95% confidence interval 1.1-7.1) and previous treatment with quinolones, β-lactams and anti-MRSA antibiotics. The 30-day mortality was higher for CRAB infections compared with other MDR infections (14% vs 3.3%, p = 0.006). These findings highlight the importance of knowing specific local characteristics relating to the ecology and patterns of resistance of MDR bacteria so as to avoid the emergence of unexpected pan-resistant bacteria.

  9. Adolescents Perceptions of Pro- and Antitobacco Imagery and Marketing: Qualitative Study of Students from Suva, Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Waqa, Gade; McCool, Judith; Snowdon, Wendy; Freeman, Becky

    2015-01-01

    Background. Many studies examining smoking uptake among young people in the Pacific have not included their exposure to tobacco control promotions in the media in their assessment. This study examines how Fijian students view tobacco and tobacco-related media depictions to gain insight into both drivers of smoking uptake and potential directions for prevention interventions. Methods. A sample of thirty Fijian students (15 male and 15 female) aged 14–17 years, was recruited from a Suva school between September and October 2013 and participated in a one-to-one in-depth interview about their views on tobacco use, media consumption patterns and preferences and awareness of tobacco use in media. Results. Despite radical developments in access to media, television remains the most popular. Yet, the majority of participants were unaware of any protobacco imagery on television or other entertainment media. Tobacco-related imagery was more likely to be seen in connection with point of sale advertising and branding. The advertising potential of the shop counter was acutely apparent to some participants and this space was considered highly influential. Conclusions. Despite the fact that the recently introduced graphic health warnings were generally well received, more can be done to extend the use of media for tobacco control benefits in Fiji. PMID:26380285

  10. Morphodynamics of the Pacific and Caribbean deltas of Colombia, South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan D.; López, Sergio A.

    2008-02-01

    This paper analyzes the physical factors controlling the recent morphology of major deltas along the Pacific and Caribbean coasts of Colombia. The study considers the fluvial, coastal, and oceanographic contributions to changes in delta morphology and uses different approaches, including (1) remote sensing techniques; (2) time series analysis of river discharge, sea level, wave climate and tidal variability; (3) analysis of the relationship between monthly mean sea level anomalies near the deltas related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO); (4) development of a database of key physical variables; (5) series of correlation calculations to examine which environmental factors control delta morphology; (6) analysis of shoreline changes for the 1986-2000 yr-period; and (7) classification of each delta system based on the relationship between water and sediment discharges and wave and tidal energies. Overall, Colombian deltas are built under destructive physical conditions. The Pacific deltas, San Juan, Mira, and Patía, are tide-influenced deltas although they exhibit definite characteristics of wave-dominated systems such as the presence of barriers and beach ridges. Also, these deltas exhibit the highest marine energy conditions of all Colombian deltas (marine power values between 9.1 and 11.6) due to the interplay of (1) moderate wave conditions as a result of the effect of swells from the SW with a significant height varying from 1.7 in the San Juan delta to 3.0 m and 3.1 m in the Mira and Patía deltas, respectively; (2) meso-tidal ranges; (3) steep subaqueous profiles; (4) low attenuation indexes of deep-water waves; and (5) strong oceanographic manifestations associated with the ENSO, causing regional sea level rises of 20-44 cm during El Niño events. The Caribbean deltas, Magdalena, Sinú and to a lesser extent, the Atrato, are wave-influenced deltas. The Magdalena, with deep and nearshore wave power values of 45 × 10 6 erg s -1 and 35 × 10 6 erg s -1

  11. The vague volcano-seismic clock of the South American Pacific margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalera, G.

    2013-08-01

    During his trip on the Beagle, Charles Darwin wrote about the eruptions associated with the Concepción earthquake of 1835. A later survey by Lorenzo Casertano, following the great 1960 Chilean earthquake, identified some unclear evidence of a link between eruptions and the seismic event, although some reservations were also raised. Using data available in 2006 in the Smithsonian Institution Catalogue of volcanic eruptions, Scalera revealed grounded evidence that South-American Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes of magnitudes greater than 8.4 are associated with an increased rate of volcanic eruptions, but it was still impossible to determine a causal link between the two phenomena. An average return period of about 50 yr was deducible from the data for the time window 1800-1999. After 2006, the Smithsonian Institution's effort to improve our knowledge of this region has greatly increased the completeness of the catalogue, adding the eruptions from the 2000-2010 interval, together with 50 % more new entries in the list of Andean volcanoes. The great Chilean Maule earthquake of 27 February 2010 (M=8.8), occurring exactly five decades after the 1960 event, provided an occasion to reanalyse this updated database. The results suggest a preferential causal eruptions-earthquake relationship, but additional future volcano-seismic events should be studied to arrive at a definitive conclusion, within the perspective of using this phenomenon for Civil Protection. The possible correlation of South American volcano-seismic events with the Markowitz oscillation of the Polar Motion is another good reason for trying to establish an integrated geodynamic explanation.

  12. Soluble trace metals in aerosols over the tropical south-east Pacific offshore of Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. R.; Thomas, M.; Bange, H. W.; Plasencia Sánchez, E.

    2016-02-01

    Bulk aerosol samples collected during cruise M91 of FS Meteor off the coast of Peru in December 2012 were analysed for their soluble trace metal (Fe, Al, Mn, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Cu, Co, Cd, Pb, Th) and major ion (including NO3- and NH4+) content. These data are among the first recorded for trace metals in this relatively poorly studied region of the global marine atmosphere. To the north of ˜ 13° S, the concentrations of several elements (Fe, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Pb) appear to be related to distance from the coast. At the south of the transect ( ˜ 15-16° S), elevated concentrations of Fe, Cu, Co, and Ni were observed, and we calculated dry deposition fluxes of soluble Cu approximately an order of magnitude higher than a recent model-based estimate of total Cu deposition to the region. The model did not take account of emissions from the large smelting facilities in the south of Peru and northern Chile, and our results may indicate that these facilities constitute an important source of trace metals to the region. Calculated dry deposition fluxes (3370-17800 and 16-107 nmol m-2 d-1 for inorganic nitrogen and soluble Fe respectively) indicated that atmospheric input to the waters of the Peru upwelling system contains an excess of Fe over N, with respect to phytoplankton requirements. This may be significant as primary production in these waters has been reported to be limited by Fe availability, but atmospheric deposition is unlikely to be the dominant source of Fe to the system.

  13. Building operational research capacity in the Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Viney, K.; Brostrom, R.; Gounder, S.; Khogali, M.; Kishore, K.; Kool, B.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Manzi, M.; Marais, B.; Marks, G.; Linh, N. N.; Ram, S.; Reid, S.; Roseveare, C.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Van den Bergh, R.; Harries, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Operational research (OR) in public health aims to investigate strategies, interventions, tools or knowledge that can enhance the quality, coverage, effectiveness or performance of health systems. Attention has recently been drawn to the lack of OR capacity in public health programmes throughout the Pacific Islands, despite considerable investment in implementation. This lack of ongoing and critical reflection may prevent health programme staff from understanding why programme objectives are not being fully achieved, and hinder long-term gains in public health. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) has been collaborating with Pacific agencies to conduct OR courses based on the training model developed by The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg in 2009. The first of these commenced in 2011 in collaboration with the Fiji National University, the Fiji Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization and other partners. The Union and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community organised a second course for participants from other Pacific Island countries and territories in 2012, and an additional course for Fijian participants commenced in 2013. Twelve participants enrolled in each of the three courses. Of the two courses completed by end 2013, 18 of 24 participants completed their OR and submitted papers by the course deadline, and 17 papers have been published to date. This article describes the context, process and outputs of the Pacific courses, as well as innovations, adaptations and challenges. PMID:26477282

  14. Building operational research capacity in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Bissell, K; Viney, K; Brostrom, R; Gounder, S; Khogali, M; Kishore, K; Kool, B; Kumar, A M V; Manzi, M; Marais, B; Marks, G; Linh, N N; Ram, S; Reid, S; Roseveare, C; Tayler-Smith, K; Van den Bergh, R; Harries, A D

    2014-06-21

    Operational research (OR) in public health aims to investigate strategies, interventions, tools or knowledge that can enhance the quality, coverage, effectiveness or performance of health systems. Attention has recently been drawn to the lack of OR capacity in public health programmes throughout the Pacific Islands, despite considerable investment in implementation. This lack of ongoing and critical reflection may prevent health programme staff from understanding why programme objectives are not being fully achieved, and hinder long-term gains in public health. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) has been collaborating with Pacific agencies to conduct OR courses based on the training model developed by The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg in 2009. The first of these commenced in 2011 in collaboration with the Fiji National University, the Fiji Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization and other partners. The Union and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community organised a second course for participants from other Pacific Island countries and territories in 2012, and an additional course for Fijian participants commenced in 2013. Twelve participants enrolled in each of the three courses. Of the two courses completed by end 2013, 18 of 24 participants completed their OR and submitted papers by the course deadline, and 17 papers have been published to date. This article describes the context, process and outputs of the Pacific courses, as well as innovations, adaptations and challenges. PMID:26477282

  15. Building operational research capacity in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Bissell, K; Viney, K; Brostrom, R; Gounder, S; Khogali, M; Kishore, K; Kool, B; Kumar, A M V; Manzi, M; Marais, B; Marks, G; Linh, N N; Ram, S; Reid, S; Roseveare, C; Tayler-Smith, K; Van den Bergh, R; Harries, A D

    2014-06-21

    Operational research (OR) in public health aims to investigate strategies, interventions, tools or knowledge that can enhance the quality, coverage, effectiveness or performance of health systems. Attention has recently been drawn to the lack of OR capacity in public health programmes throughout the Pacific Islands, despite considerable investment in implementation. This lack of ongoing and critical reflection may prevent health programme staff from understanding why programme objectives are not being fully achieved, and hinder long-term gains in public health. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) has been collaborating with Pacific agencies to conduct OR courses based on the training model developed by The Union and Médecins Sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg in 2009. The first of these commenced in 2011 in collaboration with the Fiji National University, the Fiji Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization and other partners. The Union and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community organised a second course for participants from other Pacific Island countries and territories in 2012, and an additional course for Fijian participants commenced in 2013. Twelve participants enrolled in each of the three courses. Of the two courses completed by end 2013, 18 of 24 participants completed their OR and submitted papers by the course deadline, and 17 papers have been published to date. This article describes the context, process and outputs of the Pacific courses, as well as innovations, adaptations and challenges.

  16. Stress Drops of Earthquakes on the Subducting Pacific Plate in the South-East off Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yamada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Large earthquakes have been occurring repeatedly in the South-East of Hokkaido, Japan, where the Pacific Plate subducts beneath the Okhotsk Plate in the north-west direction. For example, the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3 determined by USGS) took place in the region on September 26, 2003. Yamanaka and Kikuchi (2003) analyzed the slip distribution of the earthquake and concluded that the 2003 earthquake had ruptured the deeper half of the fault plane of the 1952 Tokachi-oki earthquake. Miyazaki et al. (2004) reported that a notable afterslip was observed at adjacent areas to the coseismic rupture zone of the 2003 earthquake, which suggests that there would be significant heterogeneities of strength, stress and frictional properties on the surface of the Pacific Plate in the region. In addition, some previous studies suggest that the region with a large slip in large earthquakes permanently have large difference of strength and the dynamic frictional stress level and that it would be able to predict the spatial pattern of slip in the next large earthquake by analyzing the stress drop of small earthquakes (e.g. Allmann and Shearer, 2007 and Yamada et al., 2010). We estimated stress drops of 150 earthquakes (4.2 ≤ M ≤ 5.0), using S-coda waves, or the waveforms from 4.00 to 9.11 seconds after the S wave arrivals, of Hi-net data. The 150 earthquakes were the ones that occurred from June, 2002 to December, 2010 in south-east of Hokkaido, Japan, from 40.5N to 43.5N and from 141.0E to 146.5E. First we selected waveforms of the closest earthquakes with magnitudes between 3.0 and 3.2 to individual 150 earthquakes as empirical Green's functions. We then calculated source spectral ratios of the 150 pairs of interested earthquakes and EGFs by deconvolving the individual S-coda waves. We finally estimated corner frequencies of earthquakes from the spectral ratios by assuming the omega-squared model of Boatwright (1978) and calculated stress drops of the earthquakes by

  17. Picoplankton diversity in the South-East Pacific Ocean from cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, F.; Rigaut-Jalabert, F.; Marie, D.; Garczarek, L.; Viprey, M.; Gobet, A.; Vaulot, D.

    2007-08-01

    In late 2004, the BIOSOPE cruise sailed between the equatorial influenced waters off Marquesas islands and the nutrient enriched waters of the Chilean upwelling. Along the way, it explored the Southeast Pacific gyre centred around Easter Island, which is probably the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth. During this cruise, we undertook a vigorous effort to isolate novel photosynthetic picoplanktonic eukaryotes. Two strategies were attempted on board: enrichment of samples with culture medium and sorting of specific populations by flow cytometry based on chlorophyll fluorescence. Over 1900 pre-cultures were started and then further purified by flow cytometry, serial dilution or pipette isolation to yield a total of 212 strains. These strains were characterized morphologically and for more than 50% of them, genetically, through partial sequencing of the 18 S rRNA gene. Among the characterized strains, the largest number are stramenopiles (Heterokontophyta) with a record of 38 strains belonging to the species Pelagomonas calceolata (Pelagophyceae). Strains from the recently described genera Bolidomonas and Florenciella have been re-isolated for the first time since their description. Two other abundant groups are the Chlorophyta, especially Prasinophyceae, and the Haptophyta, especially the genera Phaeocystis and Emiliania. A limited number of heterotrophic flagellates have also been isolated, all of them closely related to known species. Finally over a dozen of unicellular cyanobacteria strains have been obtained, some forming unusual short chains. Overall our strategy was quite successful since it allowed us to isolate a large number of picoplankton strains but failed in two respects. First, apparently very few novel taxa have been obtained. One set of strains is related to Prasinoderma coloniale (Prasinococcales, Prasinophyceae) but their sequences are sufficiently different from the latter to probably belong to a new genus or species. The sequences of two

  18. Picoplankton diversity in the South-East Pacific Ocean from cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, F.; Rigaut-Jalabert, F.; Marie, D.; Garczarek, L.; Viprey, M.; Gobet, A.; Vaulot, D.

    2008-02-01

    In late 2004, the BIOSOPE cruise sailed between the equatorial influenced waters off the Marquesas Islands and the nutrient enriched waters of the Chilean upwelling. Along the way, it explored the Southeast Pacific gyre centred around Easter Island, which is probably the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth. During this cruise, we undertook a vigorous effort to isolate novel photosynthetic picoplanktonic eukaryotes. Two strategies were attempted on board: enrichment of filtered samples with culture medium and sorting of specific populations by flow cytometry based on size and chlorophyll fluorescence. Over 1900 pre-cultures were started and then further purified by flow cytometry, serial dilution or pipette isolation to yield a total of 212 strains. These strains were characterized morphologically and for more than 50% of them, genetically, through partial sequencing of the 18 S rRNA gene. Among the characterized strains, the largest number belongs to stramenopiles (Heterokontophyta) with a record of 38 strains belonging to the species Pelagomonas calceolata (Pelagophyceae). Strains from the recently described genera Bolidomonas and Florenciella have been re-isolated for the first time since their description. Two other abundant groups are the Chlorophyta, especially Prasinophyceae, and the Haptophyta, especially the genera Phaeocystis and Emiliania. A limited number of heterotrophic flagellates have also been isolated, all of them belonging to groups containing known species. Finally, over a dozen of unicellular cyanobacterial Synechococcus strains have been obtained, some forming unusual short chains. Overall our strategy was quite successful since it allowed us to isolate a large number of picoplankton strains. Still it failed in two respects. First, apparently very few novel taxa have been obtained. One set of strains is related to Prasinoderma coloniale (Prasinococcales, Prasinophyceae) but their sequences are sufficiently different from the latter to

  19. Lagoon islets as indicators of recent environmental changes in the South Pacific - The New Caledonian example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Manuel; Vendé-Leclerc, Myriam; Maurizot, Pierre; Le Cozannet, Gonéri; Robineau, Bernard; Nicolae-Lerma, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    The question of the impacts of climate change and sea level rise on small islands is currently much discussed. The many thousands of Pacific islands in their different contexts (geodynamic, climatic, etc.) and the insufficient data available explain why it is difficult to clearly discern the specific role of climate change in the recent evolution of these islands. To address this question, we investigated the recent changes affecting 21 islets in New Caledonia's lagoon. These islets are either located on small patch-reefs inside the New Caledonia Island lagoon or lie directly on the barrier reef. Based on the studies we conducted (field surveys, reconstruction of changes in the islets over the last decades, shoreline changes) we were able to define a typology of the islets that includes 6 stages and a life expectancy index. Using the life expectancy index, we found that of the 21 islets studied, 19% are in a highly critical situation, meaning they are very likely to be endangered in the short term (within the next few years), 9.5% are in a critical situation, i.e., likely to disappear in the near future and very likely to disappear in the medium term (next few decades), 19% are evolving rapidly, which could lead to their disappearance in the medium term but not in the short term, 9.5% are not endangered in the short and medium term and 43% are not endangered at all (stable or accreting, large area, relatively higher altitude). In this context, the rise in sea level induced by climate change is an adverse factor which is likely to lower the resilience of the islets to erosion processes. Other factors like the degradation of the reef ecosystem due to variations in ocean salinity, temperature and acidity, lower sediment stocks on the beaches and foreshores, human visitors, coastal development and so on are other adverse factors that could modify the capacity for resilience of these islets. Due to their variety and sensitivity, New Caledonia's islets could thus serve

  20. Case Studies on Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific. An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Adrian

    A project considered issues that might contribute toward raising the status of technical and vocational education (TVE) in Asia and the Pacific region. It also provided a review of TVE in Australia, Bangladesh, China, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Iran, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Researchers involved in the…

  1. Factors Contributing to the Implementation of Inclusive Education in Pacific Island Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Macanawai, Setareki

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the outcomes of focus group discussions reflected in presentations of concept maps relating to the implementation of inclusive education in the Pacific based on the views of 39 stakeholders from four countries (Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu). Five themes emerged, with one of the strongest being that of culture,…

  2. Early Learning and Development Standards in East Asia and the Pacific: Experiences from Eight Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyahara, Junko; Meyers, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses how countries in UNICEF's East Asia and Pacific Region (EAPR) have engaged in the Early Learning and Development Standards (ELDS) process. ELDS has been developed by the governments of Cambodia, China, Fiji, Lao PDR, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam over the last 3 years with technical and financial support from…

  3. Scenario-based numerical modelling and the palaeo-historic record of tsunamis in Wallis and Futuna, Southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarche, G.; Popinet, S.; Pelletier, B.; Mountjoy, J.; Goff, J.; Delaux, S.; Bind, J.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the tsunami hazard in the remote French territory of Wallis and Futuna, Southwest Pacific, using the Gerris flow solver to produce numerical models of tsunami generation, propagation and inundation. Wallis consists of the inhabited volcanic island of Uvéa that is surrounded by a lagoon delimited by a barrier reef. Futuna and the island of Alofi form the Horn Archipelago located ca. 240 km east of Wallis. They are surrounded by a narrow fringing reef. Futuna and Alofi emerge from the North Fiji Transform Fault that marks the seismically active Pacific-Australia plate boundary. We generated 15 tsunami scenarios. For each, we calculated maximum wave elevation (MWE), inundation distance and expected time of arrival (ETA). The tsunami sources were local, regional and distant earthquake faults located along the Pacific Rim. In Wallis, the outer reef may experience 6.8 m-high MWE. Uvéa is protected by the barrier reef and the lagoon, but inundation depths of 2-3 m occur in several coastal areas. In Futuna, flow depths exceeding 2 m are modelled in several populated areas, and have been confirmed by a post-September 2009 South Pacific tsunami survey. The channel between the islands of Futuna and Alofi amplified the 2009 tsunami, which resulted in inundation distance of almost 100 m and MWE of 4.4 m. This first ever tsunami hazard modelling study of Wallis and Futuna compares well with palaeotsunamis recognised on both islands and observation of the impact of the 2009 South Pacific tsunami. The study provides evidence for the mitigating effect of barrier and fringing reefs from tsunamis.

  4. Scenario-based numerical modelling and the palaeo-historic record of tsunamis in Wallis and Futuna, Southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarche, G.; Popinet, S.; Pelletier, B.; Mountjoy, J.; Goff, J.; Delaux, S.; Bind, J.

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the tsunami hazard in the remote French territory of Wallis and Futuna, Southwest Pacific, using the Gerris flow solver to produce numerical models of tsunami generation, propagation and inundation. Wallis consists of the inhabited volcanic island of Uvéa that is surrounded by a lagoon delimited by a barrier reef. Futuna and the island of Alofi forms the Horn Archipelago located ca. 240 km east of Wallis. They are surrounded by a narrow fringing reef. Futuna and Alofi emerge from the North Fiji Transform Fault that marks the seismically active Pacific-Australia plate boundary. We generated fifteen tsunami scenarios. For each, we calculated maximum wave elevation (MWE), inundation distance, and Expected Time of Arrival (ETA). The tsunami sources were local, regional and distant earthquake faults located along the Pacific Rim. In Wallis, the outer reef may experience 6.8 m-high MWE. Uvéa is protected by the barrier reef and the lagoon, but inundation depths of 2-3 m occur in several coastal areas. In Futuna, flow depths exceeding 2 m are modelled in several populated areas, and have been confirmed by a post-September 2009 South Pacific tsunami survey. The channel between the islands of Futuna and Alofi amplified the 2009 tsunami, which resulted in inundation distance of almost 100 m and MWE of 4.4 m. This first-ever tsunami hazard modelling study of Wallis and Futuna compares well with palaeotsunamis recognised on both islands and observation of the impact of the 2009 South Pacific tsunami. The study provides evidence for the mitigating effect of barrier and fringing reefs from tsunamis.

  5. Hindcast of the 2009 South Pacific tsunami - validation of GIS methodologies for local vulnerability and risk assessment in American Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbitz, C. B.; Sverdrup-Thygeson, K.; Kaiser, G.; Swarny, R.; Gruenburg, L.; Glimsdal, S.; Løvholt, F.; McAdoo, B. G.; Frauenfelder, R.

    2010-12-01

    the location of the population at a given time of the day, and the mortality is a function of flow depth and building vulnerability. Normally a certain tsunami scenario with a corresponding return period is applied for vulnerability and risk assessments. However, in this study the maximum flow depth was obtained by back modeling the 2009 South Pacific earthquake and tsunami, aiming at validating the GIS model approach for building vulnerability and mortality only. Our model successfully estimated the degree of mortality resulting from this tsunami, based on comparisons with the observed deaths.

  6. Role of atmospheric heating over the South China Sea and western Pacific regions in modulating Asian summer climate under the global warming background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bian; Yang, Song; Li, Zhenning

    2016-05-01

    The response of monsoon precipitation to global warming, which is one of the most significant climate change signals at the earth's surface, exhibits very distinct regional features, especially over the South China Sea (SCS) and adjacent regions in boreal summer. To understand the possible atmospheric dynamics in these specific regions under the global warming background, changes in atmospheric heating and their possible influences on Asian summer climate are investigated by both observational diagnosis and numerical simulations. Results indicate that heating in the middle troposphere has intensified in the SCS and western Pacific regions in boreal summer, accompanied by increased precipitation, cloud cover, and lower-tropospheric convergence and decreased sea level pressure. Sensitivity experiments show that middle and upper tropospheric heating causes an east-west feedback pattern between SCS and western Pacific and continental South Asia, which strengthens the South Asian High in the upper troposphere and moist convergence in the lower troposphere, consequently forcing a descending motion and adiabatic warming over continental South Asia. When air-sea interaction is considered, the simulation results are overall more similar to observations, and in particular the bias of precipitation over the Indian Ocean simulated by AGCMs has been reduced. The result highlights the important role of air-sea interaction in understanding the changes in Asian climate.

  7. Coral reefs as buffers during the 2009 South Pacific tsunami, Upolu Island, Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, Brian G.; Ah-Leong, Joyce Samuelu; Bell, Lui; Ifopo, Pulea; Ward, Juney; Lovell, Edward; Skelton, Posa

    2011-07-01

    The coral reef bordering the coastline of Samoa affected by the 29 September 2009 tsunami provides a variety of ecosystem services — from nurseries for fisheries and inshore source of food for local communities, to aesthetics for tourists, and the width of the lagoon may have been a factor in reducing the onshore wave height. To understand the complex interactions between the onshore human population and the offshore coral, we formed an interdisciplinary survey team to document the effects the tsunami had on the nearshore coral reef, and how these changes might affect local inhabitants. The scale of reef damage varied from severe, where piles of freshly-killed coral fragments and mortality were present, to areas that exhibited little impact, despite being overrun by the tsunami. We found that many coral colonies were impacted by tsunami-entrained coral debris, which had been ripped up and deposited on the fore reef by repeated cyclones and storm waves. In other places, large surface area tabular coral sustained damage as the tsunami velocity increased as it was funneled through channels. Areas that lacked debris entrained by the waves as well as areas in the lee of islands came through relatively unscathed, with the exception of the delicate corals that lived on a sandy substrate. In the lagoon on the south coast with its steep topography, coral colonies were damaged by tsunami-generated debris from onshore entrained in the backwash. Despite the potential for severe tsunami-related damage, there were no noticeable decreases in live coral cover between successive surveys at two locations, although algal cover was higher with the increased nutrients mobilized by the tsunami. While there was an immediate decrease in fish takes in the month following the tsunami, when supporting services were likely impacted, both volume and income have rapidly increased to pre-tsunami levels. Long-term monitoring should be implemented to determine if nursery services were affected.

  8. Decentralisation of Health Services in Fiji: A Decision Space Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Jalal; North, Nicola; Ashton, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Decentralisation aims to bring services closer to the community and has been advocated in the health sector to improve quality, access and equity, and to empower local agencies, increase innovation and efficiency and bring healthcare and decision-making as close as possible to where people live and work. Fiji has attempted two approaches to decentralisation. The current approach reflects a model of deconcentration of outpatient services from the tertiary level hospital to the peripheral health centres in the Suva subdivision. Methods: Using a modified decision space approach developed by Bossert, this study measures decision space created in five broad categories (finance, service organisation, human resources, access rules, and governance rules) within the decentralised services. Results: Fiji’s centrally managed historical-based allocation of financial resources and management of human resources resulted in no decision space for decentralised agents. Narrow decision space was created in the service organisation category where, with limited decision space created over access rules, Fiji has seen greater usage of its decentralised health centres. There remains limited decision space in governance. Conclusion: The current wave of decentralisation reveals that, whilst the workload has shifted from the tertiary hospital to the peripheral health centres, it has been accompanied by limited transfer of administrative authority, suggesting that Fiji’s deconcentration reflects the transfer of workload only with decision-making in the five functional areas remaining largely centralised. As such, the benefits of decentralisation for users and providers are likely to be limited. PMID:26927588

  9. Screening tuberculosis patients for diabetes mellitus in Fiji: notes from the field.

    PubMed

    Gounder, S; Harries, A D

    2012-12-21

    Diabetes (DM) is a problem in Fiji and threatens tuberculosis (TB) control efforts. A review was conducted of all TB patients registered in Fiji in 2011 to assess routine practices of screening for DM. Of 221 TB patients, 138 (62%) had their DM status recorded in their case folders; 18 (13%) had a known history of DM. Random blood glucose (RBG) was performed in 91 (76%) of the remaining 120 patients: 47(52%) had RBG ≥ 6.1 mmol/l, but only three were further investigated, of whom one was diagnosed with DM. There are deficiencies in screening TB patients for DM in Fiji, and improvements are needed.

  10. Satellites for Commonwealth Education: Some Policy Issues. Case Studies: AUSSAT, Australia; Knowledge Network, Canada; INSAT, India; University of the South Pacific; University of the West Indies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, A. W.

    This report presents case studies on the use of satellites for education in five Commonwealth countries: Australia, Canada, India, Fiji, and Jamaica. Information provided in each of the case studies includes geography, production, the distribution system, regulation and management, and costs. Additional information given for the Australian…

  11. News insights of the hydrology of the Northwestern subtropical Pacific Ocean from ɛNd investigations of the South China Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Christophe, C.; Liu, Z.; Douville, E.; Dubois-Dauphin, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Seawater Nd isotopic composition (ɛNd) extracted from planktonic foraminifera G. ruber have been investigated on core MD05-2904 located on the northwestern margin of the South China Sea (SCS) at 2000 m water depth to reconstruct hydrological variations since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) of the western subtropical North Pacific that still poorly documented. For the last 25 kyr, ɛNd values obtained on foraminifera present large range from -4 to -6.7 suggesting large changes in the contribution of the NPDW (ɛNd = -4) and the UCDW (ɛNd -6 to -8) in the western Pacific. The glacial ɛNd values (~ -6.5) are interestingly similar to those obtained in the South Atlantic and in the Indian Ocean during the LGM and indicate a strong northward propagation of the Southern Sourced Water (SSW) in the subtropical western North Pacific. During the deglaciation, ɛNd records indicate a relatively decreased proportion of the SSW in the deep-water component of the western subtropical Pacific interrupted by two negative excursions of the ɛNd implying higher proportion of SSW during the time intervals 17 - 15 cal kyr BP and 10 - 8 cal kyr BP coeval to the Heinrich Statial 1 (HS1) and the early Holocene. The seawater ɛNd record is also well correlated to δ13C record obtained on benthic foraminifera Cibicides wuellerstorfi of the SCS and Southern Ocean confirming that ɛNd record reflect global circulation changes. The negative shifts centered on the Heinrich Statial 1 (HS1) is coeval with an enhanced upwelling in the Southern Ocean associated to pole wards shifts of the southern westerly inducing a enhanced formation of the SSW that propagate to the subtropical western Pacific. The negative excursion of the ɛNd during the Early Holocene (~10 - 8 cal kyr BP) indicate a relatively higher proportion of the SSW that could be associated to a higher production of the SSW as it was already recently observed in the South Atlantic and/or a possible reduction of the NPIW in the North

  12. Does Herbivorous Fish Protection Really Improve Coral Reef Resilience? A Case Study from New Caledonia (South Pacific)

    PubMed Central

    Carassou, Laure; Léopold, Marc; Guillemot, Nicolas; Wantiez, Laurent; Kulbicki, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Parts of coral reefs from New Caledonia (South Pacific) were registered at the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2008. Management strategies aiming at preserving the exceptional ecological value of these reefs in the context of climate change are currently being considered. This study evaluates the appropriateness of an exclusive fishing ban of herbivorous fish as a strategy to enhance coral reef resilience to hurricanes and bleaching in the UNESCO-registered areas of New Caledonia. A two-phase approach was developed: 1) coral, macroalgal, and herbivorous fish communities were examined in four biotopes from 14 reefs submitted to different fishing pressures in New Caledonia, and 2) results from these analyses were challenged in the context of a global synthesis of the relationship between herbivorous fish protection, coral recovery and relative macroalgal development after hurricanes and bleaching. Analyses of New Caledonia data indicated that 1) current fishing pressure only slightly affected herbivorous fish communities in the country, and 2) coral and macroalgal covers remained unrelated, and macroalgal cover was not related to the biomass, density or diversity of macroalgae feeders, whatever the biotope or level of fishing pressure considered. At a global scale, we found no relationship between reef protection status, coral recovery and relative macroalgal development after major climatic events. These results suggest that an exclusive protection of herbivorous fish in New Caledonia is unlikely to improve coral reef resilience to large-scale climatic disturbances, especially in the lightly fished UNESCO-registered areas. More efforts towards the survey and regulation of major chronic stress factors such as mining are rather recommended. In the most heavily fished areas of the country, carnivorous fish and large targeted herbivores may however be monitored as part of a precautionary approach. PMID:23577123

  13. Does herbivorous fish protection really improve coral reef resilience? A case study from new caledonia (South Pacific).

    PubMed

    Carassou, Laure; Léopold, Marc; Guillemot, Nicolas; Wantiez, Laurent; Kulbicki, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Parts of coral reefs from New Caledonia (South Pacific) were registered at the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2008. Management strategies aiming at preserving the exceptional ecological value of these reefs in the context of climate change are currently being considered. This study evaluates the appropriateness of an exclusive fishing ban of herbivorous fish as a strategy to enhance coral reef resilience to hurricanes and bleaching in the UNESCO-registered areas of New Caledonia. A two-phase approach was developed: 1) coral, macroalgal, and herbivorous fish communities were examined in four biotopes from 14 reefs submitted to different fishing pressures in New Caledonia, and 2) results from these analyses were challenged in the context of a global synthesis of the relationship between herbivorous fish protection, coral recovery and relative macroalgal development after hurricanes and bleaching. Analyses of New Caledonia data indicated that 1) current fishing pressure only slightly affected herbivorous fish communities in the country, and 2) coral and macroalgal covers remained unrelated, and macroalgal cover was not related to the biomass, density or diversity of macroalgae feeders, whatever the biotope or level of fishing pressure considered. At a global scale, we found no relationship between reef protection status, coral recovery and relative macroalgal development after major climatic events. These results suggest that an exclusive protection of herbivorous fish in New Caledonia is unlikely to improve coral reef resilience to large-scale climatic disturbances, especially in the lightly fished UNESCO-registered areas. More efforts towards the survey and regulation of major chronic stress factors such as mining are rather recommended. In the most heavily fished areas of the country, carnivorous fish and large targeted herbivores may however be monitored as part of a precautionary approach. PMID:23577123

  14. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  15. Degradation properties of various macromolecules of cultivable psychrophilic bacteria from the deep-sea water of the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yan; Liang, Jing; Song, Qinghao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The deep-sea water of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG, 20°S-45°S) is a cold and ultra-oligotrophic environment that is the source of cold-adapted enzymes. However, the characteristic features of psychrophilic enzymes derived from culturable microbes in the SPG remained largely unknown. In this study, the degradation properties of 174 cultures from the deep water of the SPG were used to determine the diversity of cold-adapted enzymes. Thus, the abilities to degrade polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and DNA at 4, 16, and 28 °C were investigated. Most of the isolates showed one or more extracellular enzyme activities, including amylase, chitinase, cellulase, lipase, lecithinase, caseinase, gelatinase, and DNase at 4, 16, and 28 °C. Moreover, nearly 85.6 % of the isolates produced cold-adapted enzymes at 4 °C. The psychrophilic enzyme-producing isolates distributed primarily in Alteromonas and Pseudoalteromonas genera of the Gammaproteobacteria. Pseudoalteromonas degraded 9 types of macromolecules but not cellulose, Alteromonas secreted 8 enzymes except for cellulase and chitinase. Interestingly, the enzymatic activities of Gammaproteobacteria isolates at 4 °C were higher than those observed at 16 or 28 °C. In addition, we cloned and expressed a gene encoding an α-amylase (Amy2235) from Luteimonas abyssi XH031(T), and examined the properties of the recombinant protein. These cold-active enzymes may have huge potential for academic research and industrial applications. In addition, the capacity of the isolates to degrade various types of organic matter may indicate their unique ecological roles in the elemental biogeochemical cycling of the deep biosphere.

  16. Plastid 16S rRNA Gene Diversity among Eukaryotic Picophytoplankton Sorted by Flow Cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J.; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image. PMID:21552558

  17. Extending our understanding of South Pacific gyre "spin-up": Modeling the East Australian Current in a future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, E. C. J.; Holbrook, N. J.

    2014-05-01

    The western Tasman Sea represents a global warming marine "hot spot," where the waters are warming at almost 4 times the global average rate, argued in the literature to be due to a "spin-up" of the South Pacific subtropical gyre and extension of the East Australian Current (EAC). To further investigate and test this paradigm, we analyze climate change simulations of Tasman Sea circulation and metrics on output from the Ocean Forecasting Australia Model for the 20th and 21st centuries, forced by a global climate model simulation under the A1B carbon emissions scenario. First, we show that the 1990s simulation estimates of mean dynamic topography, present-day location of the EAC separation point, and volume transports of the EAC, EAC extension, and flow along the Tasman Front, are consistent with recent observations. We further demonstrate that between the 1990s and 2060s, the volume transport of the EAC extension is projected to increase by 4.3 Sv at the expense of the flow along the Tasman Front (projected to decrease by 2.7 Sv). The transport of the EAC core flow (equatorward of the separation point) is projected to change very little (increase of 0.2 Sv). The model projects a Tasman Sea-wide warming, with mean increases of up to 3°C. These results are interpreted using a simple linear, barotropic model which captures both the sign and meridional distribution of the projected changes in mean transport, including negligible change in core EAC transport but enhanced EAC extension. This meridional asymmetry in the transports is consistent with the wind-forced ocean response to changes in the basin-wide wind stress curl.

  18. Particle optical backscattering along a chlorophyll gradient in the upper layer of the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Y.; Morel, A.; Twardowski, M. S.; Stramski, D.; Reynolds, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The particulate scattering, bp, and backscattering, bbp, coefficients are determined by the concentration and physical properties of suspended particles in the ocean. They provide a simple description of the influence of these particles on the scattering of light within the water column. For the remote observation of ocean color, bbp along with the total absorption coefficient govern the amount and spectral qualities of light leaving the sea surface. However, for the construction and validation of ocean color models measurements of bbp are still lacking, especially at low chlorophyll a concentrations ([Chl]). Here, we examine the relationships between spectral bbp and bp vs. [Chl] along an 8000 km transect crossing the Case 1 waters of the eastern South Pacific Gyre. In these waters, over the entire range of [Chl] encountered (~0.02-2 mg m-3), both bbp and bp can be related to [Chl] by power functions (i.e. bp or bbp=α[Chl]β) Regression analyses are carried out to provide the parameters α and β for several wavelengths throughout the visible for both bbp and bp. When applied to the data, these functions retrieve the same fraction of variability in bbp and bp (determination coefficients between 0.82 and 0.88). The bbp coefficient fall within the bounds of previous measurements at intermediate and high [Chl] recently published. Its dependence on [Chl] below ~0.1 mg m-3 is described for the first time with in situ data. At these low and decreasing [Chl] a continuous trend with data at higher [Chl] is observed, i.e. a decrease in bbp. The backscattering ratio (i.e. bbp/bp) with values averaging 0.008 is found to have a weak dependence on [Chl]. These results should foster the development of improved forward models of the mean optical properties for oceanic Case 1 waters as well as inverse models based upon them.

  19. Particle optical backscattering along a chlorophyll gradient in the upper layer of the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Y.; Morel, A.; Twardowski, M. S.; Stramski, D.; Reynolds, R. A.

    2008-04-01

    The particulate scattering, bp, and backscattering, bbp, coefficients are determined by the concentration and physical properties of suspended particles in the ocean. They provide a simple description of the influence of these particles on the scattering of light within the water column. For the remote observation of ocean color, bbp along with the total absorption coefficient govern the amount and spectral qualities of light leaving the sea surface. However, for the construction and validation of ocean color models measurements of bbp are still lacking, especially at low chlorophyll a concentrations ([Chl]). Here, we examine the relationships between spectral bbp and bp vs. [Chl] along an 8000 km transect crossing the Case 1 waters of the eastern South Pacific Gyre. In these waters, over the entire range of [Chl] encountered (~0.02-2 mg m3), both bbp and bp can be related to [Chl] by power functions (i.e. bp or bbp=α[Chl]β). Regression analyses are carried out to provide the parameters α and β for several wavelengths throughout the visible for both bbp and bp. When applied to the data, these functions retrieve the same fraction of variability in bbp and bp (coefficients of determination between 0.82 and 0.88). The bbp coefficient fall within the bounds of previous measurements at intermediate and high [Chl] recently published. Its dependence on [Chl] below ~0.1 mg m-3 is described for the first time with in situ data. The backscattering ratio (i.e. bbp/bp) with values near 0.01 for all stations appears to be spectrally neutral and not significantly dependent on [Chl]. These results should foster the development of improved forward models of the mean optical properties for oceanic Case 1 waters as well as inverse models based upon them.

  20. Spongiibacterium pacificum sp. nov., isolated from seawater of South Pacific Gyre and emended description of the genus Spongiibacterium.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Zhang, Zenghu; Dai, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, non-flagellated, non-gliding, oxidase-positive and yellow-pigmented rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain SW169(T), was isolated from a surface seawater sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (27° 55' S 123° 10' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SW169(T) belonged to the genus Spongiibacterium and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Spongiibacterium flavum A11(T) (95.9 %). It showed 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 93.2-94.8 % with members of the genera Croceitalea and Flagellimonas in the family Flavobacteriaceae. Optimal growth occurred in the presence of 3-4 % (w/v) NaCl, at pH 8.0 and at 28 °C. The DNA G+C content of strain SW169(T) was 43.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 1 G, iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, iso-C15 : 0 3-OH and summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c,). The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-6. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminolipid and one unidentified lipid. On the basis of the polyphasic analyses, strain SW169(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Spongiibacterium, for which the name Spongiibacterium pacificum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SW169(T) ( = JCM 18379(T) = LMG 26997(T)). An emended description of the genus Spongiibacterium is also provided. PMID:25301541

  1. Population structure of humpback whales in the western and central South Pacific Ocean as determined by vocal exchange among populations.

    PubMed

    Garland, Ellen C; Goldizen, Anne W; Lilley, Matthew S; Rekdahl, Melinda L; Garrigue, Claire; Constantine, Rochelle; Hauser, Nan Daeschler; Poole, M Michael; Robbins, Jooke; Noad, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    For cetaceans, population structure is traditionally determined by molecular genetics or photographically identified individuals. Acoustic data, however, has provided information on movement and population structure with less effort and cost than traditional methods in an array of taxa. Male humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) produce a continually evolving vocal sexual display, or song, that is similar among all males in a population. The rapid cultural transmission (the transfer of information or behavior between conspecifics through social learning) of different versions of this display between distinct but interconnected populations in the western and central South Pacific region presents a unique way to investigate population structure based on the movement dynamics of a song (acoustic) display. Using 11 years of data, we investigated an acoustically based population structure for the region by comparing stereotyped song sequences among populations and years. We used the Levenshtein distance technique to group previously defined populations into (vocally based) clusters based on the overall similarity of their song display in space and time. We identified the following distinct vocal clusters: western cluster, 1 population off eastern Australia; central cluster, populations around New Caledonia, Tonga, and American Samoa; and eastern region, either a single cluster or 2 clusters, one around the Cook Islands and the other off French Polynesia. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that each breeding aggregation represents a distinct population (each occupied a single, terminal node) in a metapopulation, similar to the current understanding of population structure based on genetic and photo-identification studies. However, the central vocal cluster had higher levels of song-sharing among populations than the other clusters, indicating that levels of vocal connectivity varied within the region. Our results demonstrate the utility and value of

  2. Population structure of humpback whales in the western and central South Pacific Ocean as determined by vocal exchange among populations.

    PubMed

    Garland, Ellen C; Goldizen, Anne W; Lilley, Matthew S; Rekdahl, Melinda L; Garrigue, Claire; Constantine, Rochelle; Hauser, Nan Daeschler; Poole, M Michael; Robbins, Jooke; Noad, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    For cetaceans, population structure is traditionally determined by molecular genetics or photographically identified individuals. Acoustic data, however, has provided information on movement and population structure with less effort and cost than traditional methods in an array of taxa. Male humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) produce a continually evolving vocal sexual display, or song, that is similar among all males in a population. The rapid cultural transmission (the transfer of information or behavior between conspecifics through social learning) of different versions of this display between distinct but interconnected populations in the western and central South Pacific region presents a unique way to investigate population structure based on the movement dynamics of a song (acoustic) display. Using 11 years of data, we investigated an acoustically based population structure for the region by comparing stereotyped song sequences among populations and years. We used the Levenshtein distance technique to group previously defined populations into (vocally based) clusters based on the overall similarity of their song display in space and time. We identified the following distinct vocal clusters: western cluster, 1 population off eastern Australia; central cluster, populations around New Caledonia, Tonga, and American Samoa; and eastern region, either a single cluster or 2 clusters, one around the Cook Islands and the other off French Polynesia. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that each breeding aggregation represents a distinct population (each occupied a single, terminal node) in a metapopulation, similar to the current understanding of population structure based on genetic and photo-identification studies. However, the central vocal cluster had higher levels of song-sharing among populations than the other clusters, indicating that levels of vocal connectivity varied within the region. Our results demonstrate the utility and value of

  3. Degradation properties of various macromolecules of cultivable psychrophilic bacteria from the deep-sea water of the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yan; Liang, Jing; Song, Qinghao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The deep-sea water of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG, 20°S-45°S) is a cold and ultra-oligotrophic environment that is the source of cold-adapted enzymes. However, the characteristic features of psychrophilic enzymes derived from culturable microbes in the SPG remained largely unknown. In this study, the degradation properties of 174 cultures from the deep water of the SPG were used to determine the diversity of cold-adapted enzymes. Thus, the abilities to degrade polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and DNA at 4, 16, and 28 °C were investigated. Most of the isolates showed one or more extracellular enzyme activities, including amylase, chitinase, cellulase, lipase, lecithinase, caseinase, gelatinase, and DNase at 4, 16, and 28 °C. Moreover, nearly 85.6 % of the isolates produced cold-adapted enzymes at 4 °C. The psychrophilic enzyme-producing isolates distributed primarily in Alteromonas and Pseudoalteromonas genera of the Gammaproteobacteria. Pseudoalteromonas degraded 9 types of macromolecules but not cellulose, Alteromonas secreted 8 enzymes except for cellulase and chitinase. Interestingly, the enzymatic activities of Gammaproteobacteria isolates at 4 °C were higher than those observed at 16 or 28 °C. In addition, we cloned and expressed a gene encoding an α-amylase (Amy2235) from Luteimonas abyssi XH031(T), and examined the properties of the recombinant protein. These cold-active enzymes may have huge potential for academic research and industrial applications. In addition, the capacity of the isolates to degrade various types of organic matter may indicate their unique ecological roles in the elemental biogeochemical cycling of the deep biosphere. PMID:27342115

  4. Typhoid Fever surveillance and vaccine use - South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa D; Fox, Kimberley K; Abeysinghe, Nihal; Mintz, Eric D; Khan, M Imran; Sahastrabuddhe, Sushant; Hyde, Terri B

    2014-10-01

    Typhoid fever is a serious, systemic infection resulting in nearly 22 million cases and 216,500 deaths annually, primarily in Asia. Safe water, adequate sanitation, appropriate personal and food hygiene, and vaccination are the most effective strategies for prevention and control. In 2008, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended use of available typhoid vaccines to control endemic disease and outbreaks and strengthening of typhoid surveillance to improve disease estimates and identify high-risk populations (e.g., persons without access to potable water and adequate sanitation). This report summarizes the status of typhoid surveillance and vaccination programs in the WHO South-East Asia (SEAR) and Western Pacific regions (WPR) during 2009-2013, after the revised WHO recommendations. Data were obtained from the WHO/United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Joint Reporting Form on Immunization, a supplemental survey of surveillance and immunization program managers, and published literature. During 2009-2013, 23 (48%) of 48 countries and areas of SEAR (11) and WPR (37) collected surveillance or notifiable disease data on typhoid cases, with most surveillance activities established before 2008. Nine (19%) countries reported implementation of typhoid vaccination programs or recommended vaccine use during 2009-2013. Despite the high incidence, typhoid surveillance is weak in these two regions, and vaccination efforts have been limited. Further progress toward typhoid fever prevention and control in SEAR and WPR will require country commitment and international support for enhanced surveillance, targeted use of existing vaccines and availability of newer vaccines integrated within routine immunization programs, and integration of vaccination with safe water, sanitation, and hygiene measures.

  5. Does herbivorous fish protection really improve coral reef resilience? A case study from new caledonia (South Pacific).

    PubMed

    Carassou, Laure; Léopold, Marc; Guillemot, Nicolas; Wantiez, Laurent; Kulbicki, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Parts of coral reefs from New Caledonia (South Pacific) were registered at the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2008. Management strategies aiming at preserving the exceptional ecological value of these reefs in the context of climate change are currently being considered. This study evaluates the appropriateness of an exclusive fishing ban of herbivorous fish as a strategy to enhance coral reef resilience to hurricanes and bleaching in the UNESCO-registered areas of New Caledonia. A two-phase approach was developed: 1) coral, macroalgal, and herbivorous fish communities were examined in four biotopes from 14 reefs submitted to different fishing pressures in New Caledonia, and 2) results from these analyses were challenged in the context of a global synthesis of the relationship between herbivorous fish protection, coral recovery and relative macroalgal development after hurricanes and bleaching. Analyses of New Caledonia data indicated that 1) current fishing pressure only slightly affected herbivorous fish communities in the country, and 2) coral and macroalgal covers remained unrelated, and macroalgal cover was not related to the biomass, density or diversity of macroalgae feeders, whatever the biotope or level of fishing pressure considered. At a global scale, we found no relationship between reef protection status, coral recovery and relative macroalgal development after major climatic events. These results suggest that an exclusive protection of herbivorous fish in New Caledonia is unlikely to improve coral reef resilience to large-scale climatic disturbances, especially in the lightly fished UNESCO-registered areas. More efforts towards the survey and regulation of major chronic stress factors such as mining are rather recommended. In the most heavily fished areas of the country, carnivorous fish and large targeted herbivores may however be monitored as part of a precautionary approach.

  6. Exploring Genomic Diversity Using Metagenomics of Deep-Sea Subsurface Microbes from the Louisville Seamount and the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, B. J.; Sylvan, J. B.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Huber, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are many limitations involved with sampling microbial diversity from deep-sea subsurface environments, ranging from physical sample collection, low microbial biomass, culturing at in situ conditions, and inefficient nucleic acid extractions. As such, we are continually modifying our methods to obtain better results and expanding what we know about microbes in these environments. Here we present analysis of metagenomes sequences from samples collected from 120 m within the Louisville Seamount and from the top 5-10cm of the sediment in the center of the south Pacific gyre (SPG). Both systems are low biomass with ~102 and ~104 cells per cm3 for Louisville Seamount samples analyzed and the SPG sediment, respectively. The Louisville Seamount represents the first in situ subseafloor basalt and the SPG sediments represent the first in situ low biomass sediment microbial metagenomes. Both of these environments, subseafloor basalt and sediments underlying oligotrophic ocean gyres, represent large provinces of the seafloor environment that remain understudied. Despite the low biomass and DNA generated from these samples, we have generated 16 near complete genomes (5 from Louisville and 11 from the SPG) from the two metagenomic datasets. These genomes are estimated to be between 51-100% complete and span a range of phylogenetic groups, including the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, and unclassified bacterial groups. With these genomes, we have assessed potential functional capabilities of these organisms and performed a comparative analysis between the environmental genomes and previously sequenced relatives to determine possible adaptations that may elucidate survival mechanisms for these low energy environments. These methods illustrate a baseline analysis that can be applied to future metagenomic deep-sea subsurface datasets and will help to further our understanding of microbiology within these environments.

  7. Dense microbial community on a ferromanganese nodule from the ultra-oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre: Implications for biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Fumito; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329, a deep-sea ferromanganese nodule and surrounding sediment were collected from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic environment on earth. Using a combination of cryo-sectioning and fluorescence-based cell counting techniques, we determined that the microbial cell density at the very surface of the nodule was ∼108 cells cm-3, three orders of magnitude higher than that in the surrounding sediment. Analysis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences (∼1400 bp) indicated that the taxonomic composition of the nodule-associated community differed markedly from that of the sediment-associated community. Members of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota are potentially crucial for sustaining the high cell density because both ammonia and Cu were available on the nodule surface, making it suitable for ammonia-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophy mediated by copper enzymes. Combined cryo-sectioning and synchrotron analysis of the nodule surface revealed both hexagonal birnessite resembling δ-MnO2 and triclinic birnessite, minerals characteristic of biogenic oxide and its secondary product, respectively. Regardless of these possible biogenic features, only one gene sequence exhibited some similarity to previously identified manganese-oxidizing bacteria. On the other hand, MGI Thaumarchaeota were assumed as potential candidate of manganese oxidizers because they have multi-copper oxidase that is utilized by most known manganese oxidizers. Therefore, this archaeal group is considered to play a significant ecological role as a primary producer in biogeochemical elemental cycles in the ultra-oligotrophic abyssal plain.

  8. Measurements of the total CO[sub 2] concentration and partial pressure of CO[sub 2] in seawater during WOCE expeditions in the South Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Goddard, J.G.; Chipman, D.W.; Rubin, S.I.

    1993-06-29

    During the first year of the grant, we participated in three WOCE expeditions (a total of 152 days at sea) in the South Pacific Ocean, and the field phase of the proposed investigation has been successfully completed. The total CO[sub 2] concentration and pCO[sub 2] were determined at sea in 4419 water samples collected at 422 stations. On the basis of the shipboard analyses of SIO Reference Solutions for CO, and a comparison with the results of previous expeditions, the overall precision of our total CO[sub 2] determinations is estimated to be about [plus minus]2 uM/kg. The deep water data indicate that there is a CO[sub 2] maximum centered about 2600 meters deep. This appears to represent a southward return flow from the North Pacific. The magnitude and distribution of the CO, maximum observed along the 135.0[degrees]W meridian differ from those observed along the 150.5[degrees]W meridian due to Tuamotu Archipelago, a topographic high which interferes with the southward return flow. The surface water pCO[sub 2] data indicate that the South Pacific sub-tropical gyre water located between about 15[degrees]S and 50[degrees]S is a sink for atmospheric CO[sub 2].

  9. VLF Perturbations Associated with Solar Eclipses of November 2012 and may 2013 IN the South Pacific Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-ionospheric VLF signals from the NWC (19.8 kHz), NPM (21.4 kHz) and NLK (24.8 kHz) MSK VLF transmitters are monitored at Suva, Fiji, with a time resolution of 0.1s using GPS based timing and SoftPAL VLF system. Here one minute averaged amplitude and phase data have been used for analysis. We present perturbations in VLF propagation and D-region changes associated with 13 November 2012 total solar eclipse (SE) and 9-10 May 2013 annular SE using VLF observations at Suva, Fiji. During 13-14 November 2012 total SE, the totality shadow intercepted NWC-Suva path and NWC signal amplitude and phase decreased by about 0.70 dB and 23°, respectively. NPM signal amplitude during 9-10 May 2013 SE decreased by about 2.0 dB. The amplitude perturbation of ~1.8 dB on NLK signal was measured from the unperturbed level associated with 9-10 May 2013 SE. The decrease in the amplitude at the site can be understood in terms of destructive interference of modes converted at the discontinuity created by the eclipse intercepting the different Transmitter-receiver great circle paths (TRGCPs) and changes in the propagation conditions along TRGCPs. The decrease in the amplitude and phase of NWC signal for 13-14 November 2012 SE has been modeled using Long Wave Propagation Capability code to estimate the changes in D-region reflection height (H') and sharpness factor (β) which shows that H' and β were increased by 0.95 km and 0.01 km-1, respectively. The phase changes on NWC signal associated with 9-10 May 2013 SE have been used to estimate the recombination coefficient value, for 75 km height where electron density reduction due to SE was about 40%. The changes in the D-region parameters and the electron density are due to sudden decrease of the photo-ionization creating nighttime like conditions in the D-region ionosphere.

  10. Comparison of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water formation rates in the South Pacific between NCAR-CCSM4 and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Fine, Rana A.; Kamenkovich, Igor; Sloyan, Bernadette M.

    2014-01-01

    Average formation rates for Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the South Pacific are calculated from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model version 4 (NCAR-CCSM4), using chlorofluorocarbon inventories (CFC-12). When compared to observations, CCSM4 accurately simulates the southeast Pacific as the main formation region for SAMW and AAIW. Formation rates for SAMW in CCSM4 are 3.4 sverdrup (Sv), about half of the observational rate, due in part to shallow mixed layers, a thinner SAMW layer, and insufficient meridional transport. A formation rate of 8.1 Sv for AAIW in CCSM4 is higher than observations due to higher inventories in the southwest and central Pacific and surface concentrations within CCSM4. Also, a lack of data in the southwest Pacific may bias the observational rate low. This model-observation comparison is useful for understanding the uptake and transport of other gases, e.g., CO2 by the model.

  11. Mesozoic possibilities seen on Tonga islands in Southwest Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Helu, S.P. ); Khanna, S.N.

    1992-11-16

    This paper reports that the Kingdom of Tonga in the southwestern Pacific Ocean comprises 171 islands of which only 37 are inhabited. There are four main groups of islands: Tongatapu, H'apai, Vava'u, and the Niuas. The total land area is 700 sq km, and the territorial waters extend to 700,000 sq km. The kingdom is bordered by New Zealand, Fiji, Walhis and Fortuna, the Samoas, and Niue.

  12. The history of brucellosis in the Pacific Island Countries and Territories and its re-emergence.

    PubMed

    Tukana, Andrew; Warner, Jeffrey; Hedlefs, Robert; Gummow, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    There are few publications on brucellosis within the Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs). The reason is possibly because the cattle population has been reportedly free of the disease for many years until a re-emergence occurred in the Fiji Islands (Viti Levu) in 2009. This paper reports on the outbreak of brucellosis in Fiji and its progression between 2009 and 2013 in the context of an overview of brucellosis in the Pacific Island community. Review of the literature found only 28 articles with the oldest record of brucellosis being in 1965 in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and from human cases in Tonga in 1980. The Fiji outbreak of Brucella abortus occurred in cattle in 2009 (Wainivesi basin) in the Tailevu province. Prior to the outbreak, Fiji declared freedom from B. abortus to OIE in 1996 after a successful eradication campaign. During the course of the outbreak investigation, serum samples were collected from between 9790 and 21,624 cattle per annum between 2009 and 2013 from 87 farms on the main island of Fiji (Viti Levu). Blood samples were tested for brucellosis using the Rose Bengal Test (RBT) in 2009 and the indirect ELISA test in subsequent years. At the time of the outbreak in Fiji (2009) the apparent prevalence in cattle was 1.50% and this has fluctuated since the outbreak. The True Prevalence (TP) for the main island in Fiji for the indirect ELISA tests was 2.40% in 2010, reached a peak of 3.49% in 2011 then reduced to 0.12% by 2013. The significant reduction in prevalence compared to 2010 is most likely due to the control programs being implemented in Fiji. The re-emergence of B. abortus in Fiji could be attributed to the lack of monitoring for the disease until 2009 combined with inadequate management of exposed animals, thus illustrating how important it is for authorities not to become complacent. Continued awareness and monitoring for brucellosis is essential if future outbreaks are to be avoided.

  13. Athenian and Shakespearean Tragedies in Oceania: Teaching Dramatic Literatures in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anae, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a theorised classroom-based narrative discussing the author's interdisciplinary approach to the teaching of English dramatic literatures--in particular, Sophocles' "Oedipus the King" and Shakespeare's "Macbeth"--to i-Taukei, Indo-Fijian and Pacific Islander tertiary students at a South Pacific…

  14. Saving the Plants That Save Lives. SPACHEE/Fiji Department of Forestry Women and Forests Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strathy, Kerrie

    1995-01-01

    The South Pacific Action Committee for Human Ecology and Environment (SPACHEE) involved women in experiential workshops to explore forest ecosystems. The first phase focused on the forest environment, the second on documenting and promoting traditional medicine and medicinal plants, valuable local knowledge that can persuade people to protect the…

  15. Oligocene-Miocene relative (geomagnetic) paleointensity correlated from the equatorial Pacific (IODP Site U1334 and ODP Site 1218) to the South Atlantic (ODP Site 1090)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E. T.; Lanci, L.

    2014-02-01

    Late Oligocene to Early Miocene relative paleointensity (RPI) proxies can be correlated from the equatorial Pacific (IODP Site U1334 and ODP Site 1218) to the South Atlantic (ODP Site 1090). Age models are constrained by magnetic polarity stratigraphy through correlation to a common geomagnetic polarity timescale. The RPI records do not contain significant power at specific (orbital) frequencies, and hence there is no significant coherency between RPI proxies and the normalizers used to construct the proxies, although orbital power is present in some normalizers. There is no obvious control on RPI proxies from mean sedimentation rate within polarity chrons, magnetic grain size proxies or magnetic concentration parameters. The salient test is whether the equatorial Pacific records can be correlated one to another, and to the records from the South Atlantic. All records are dominated by RPI minima at polarity reversals, as expected, although the comparison within polarity chrons is compelling enough to conclude that the intensity of the Earth's axial dipole is being recorded. This is supported by the fit of RPI data from Sites U1334 and 1218 after correlation of the two sites using diverse core-scanning data, rather than polarity reversals alone. We do not see a consistent relationship between polarity-chron duration and mean RPI, and no consistent skewness (“saw-tooth” pattern) for RPI within polarity chrons. Stacks of RPI records for 17.5-26.5 Ma include long-term changes in RPI on Myr timescales that are superimposed on RPI minima associated with polarity reversals, and shorter-term variations in RPI with an apparent pacing of ∼50 kyr. The equatorial Pacific to South Atlantic correlations indicate that RPI can be used as a (global) stratigraphic tool in pre-Quaternary sediments with typical pelagic sedimentation rates of a few cm/kyr.

  16. Celestial Navigation in the USA, Fiji, and Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita C.

    2015-05-01

    Today there are many coastal communities that are home to navigators who use stars for position finding at night; I was, however, unaware of this fact when I began researching celestial navigation practices in 1997. My project focused on three communities: the Moce Islanders of Fiji, the Kerkennah Islanders in Tunisia, and the U.S. Navy officers and students at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. My goal was to answer the question of why people continue to navigate by the stars, but also to understand the role of technology in their navigation practices. Using anthropology techniques of ethnography including participant observation, formal and informal interviews, audio and videotaping, I gathered data over five years at the three communities. I began by learning the details of how they use the stars for navigation. Next, I learned about who did the navigation and where they learned to navigate. I gathered opinions on various navigation aids and instruments, and opinions about the future of using the stars for navigation. I listened to the stories that they told about navigating. In the United States I worked in English, in Fiji, in Fijian and English, and in Tunisia, French and English. For the formal interviews I worked with translators. The navigators use stars for navigating today but the future of their techniques is not certain. Though practiced today, these celestial navigation traditions have undergone and continue to undergo changes. New navigational technologies are part of the stimulation for change, thus 'a meeting of different worlds' is symbolized by peoples encounters with these technologies.

  17. Arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases continue to be one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions. Both epidemics and sporadic cases occur. In some years, outbreaks of dengue haemorrhagic fever and Japanese encephalitis reached alarming proportions. The significance of other arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases has still to be determined. Therefore, continuous epidemiological surveillance, diagnosis, and control of these groups of diseases remains an urgent task. The objectives, targets, priority areas, and strategies for future plans of action have been identified and recommendations formulated. PMID:6603917

  18. First record of the hermit crab genus Cestopagurus Bouvier, 1897 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Paguridae) from the South Pacific Ocean and description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Clark, Malcolm R

    2014-01-01

    A fifth species of the pagurid genus Cestopagurus Bouvier, 1897, is described and illustrated on the basis of a single male specimen collected at a depth of 499 m from Hinepuia submarine volcano in the Kermadec Arc, New Zealand. The new species, C. hinepuia, appears similar to C. puniceus Komai & Takeda, 2005 known from waters off Japan, but the different armature of chelipeds distinguishes the new species. It is the first representative of the genus recorded from the South Pacific Ocean. A key for identification of species of the genus is presented.  PMID:25283293

  19. Arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    Arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases continue to be one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions. Both epidemics and sporadic cases occur. In some years, outbreaks of dengue haemorrhagic fever and Japanese encephalitis reached alarming proportions. The significance of other arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases has still to be determined. Therefore, continuous epidemiological surveillance, diagnosis, and control of these groups of diseases remains an urgent task.The objectives, targets, priority areas, and strategies for future plans of action have been identified and recommendations formulated.

  20. Trace Element Inputs to the Upper West Pacific from Nd Isotopes and Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, M. K.; Pahnke, K.; Schnetger, B.; Brumsack, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    Neodymium isotopes (143Nd/144Nd, expressed as ɛNd) and rare earth element (REE) concentrations in the ocean trace water mass transport and margin-seawater exchange processes. The distinct ɛNd and REE signatures of the lithogenic components of margin sediments of the West Pacific allow characterization of trace element inputs to the Pacific Ocean. We present dissolved ɛNdand REE concentrations from twelve vertical profiles of a transect from South Korea to Fiji. Near South Korea, surface waters are marked by unradiogenic ɛNd (as low as -7.3), high REE concentrations (e.g., Nd = 15.3 pmol/kg) and low salinity. Towards the open ocean, these parameters gradually change towards typical Pacific open ocean values (ɛNd = -3.3, [Nd] = 5.55 pmol/kg). Subsurface waters show REE depletions, followed by the typical REE increase with increasing water depth. These distributions indicate trace element input near South Korea and enhanced subsurface scavenging, as indicated by strong heavy REE to light REE fractionation. In the tropical West Pacific (10°N-15°S), high surface and subsurface water ɛNd values (+0.7) and positive Eu anomalies trace the influence of volcanic islands. Yet, absolute REE concentrations are extremely low at these depths (e.g., Nd = 2.77 pmol/kg). Using shale-normalized Nd/Er and Ho/Dy ratios, that show a much stronger surface to subsurface decrease in coastal waters compared to the open ocean, we suggest enhanced scavenging in this area. Eastward flowing intermediate waters (NPIW, AAIW) have ɛNd values up to +1.9 (NPIW) and +3.7 (AAIW) higher than those entering the tropical West Pacific from north and south, respectively. Modified ɛNd at intermediate depths and no change in REE patterns suggest that boundary exchange along volcanic island margins modifies the seawater ɛNd without changing the REE budget.

  1. Biodiversity of nematode assemblages from deep-sea sediments of the Atacama Slope and Trench (South Pacific Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambi, C.; Vanreusel, A.; Danovaro, R.

    2003-01-01

    Nematode assemblages were investigated (in terms of size spectra, sex ratio, Shannon diversity, trophic structure and diversity, rarefaction statistics, maturity index, taxonomic diversity and taxonomic distinctness) at bathyal and hadal depths (from 1050 to 7800 m) in the deepest trench of the South Pacific Ocean: the Trench of Atacama. This area, characterised by very high concentrations of nutritionally-rich organic matter also at 7800-m depth, displayed characteristics typical of eutrophic systems and revealed high nematode densities (>6000 ind. 10 cm -2). Nematode assemblages from the Atacama Trench displayed a different composition than at bathyal depths. At bathyal depths 95 genera and 119 species were found (Comesomatidae, Cyatholaimidae, Microlaimidae, Desmodoridae and Xyalidae being dominant), whereas in the Atacama Trench only 29 genera and 37 species were encountered (dominated by Monhysteridae, Chromadoridae, Microlaimidae, Oxystominidae and Xyalidae). The genus Monhystera (24.4%) strongly dominated at hadal depths and Neochromadora, and Trileptium were observed only in the Atacama Trench, but not at bathyal depths. A reduction of the mean nematode size (by ca. 67%) was observed between bathyal and hadal depths. Since food availability was not a limiting factor in the Atacama Trench sediments, other causes are likely to be responsible for the reduction of nematode species richness and body size. The presence of a restricted number of families and genera in the Atacama Trench might indicate that hadal sediments limited nematode colonisation. Most of the genera reaching very high densities in Trench sediments (e.g., Monhystera) are opportunistic and were responsible for the significant decrease of the maturity index. The dominance of opportunists, which are known to be characterised by small sizes, might have contributed to the reduced nematode size at hadal depths. Shannon diversity and species richness decreased in hadal water depth and this pattern

  2. Vertical behavior and diet of albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) vary with latitude in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ashley J.; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J.; Evans, Karen J.; Hoyle, Simon D.; Dupoux, Cyndie; Vourey, Elodie; Dubosc, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) are an important upper tropic-level oceanic predator with a circum-global distribution. Little is known of the movements and diet of albacore tuna in the South Pacific Ocean and how variability in both might influence the vulnerability of albacore tuna to fisheries across their range. We coupled data derived from satellite-tagged albacore tuna with stomach samples collected from individuals at the same locations to characterize the vertical behavior, thermal and dietary habits of albacore tuna at tropical (New Caledonia and Tonga) and temperate (New Zealand) latitudes. A total of 18 pop-up satellite archival tags deployed on albacore tuna remained attached for 0-50 days. Position estimates, calculated from 11 tags, described short-term movements of predominantly less than 500 km, although one fish moved more than 1000 km over a period of 50 days. Vertical behavior and diet differed substantially between tropical and temperate latitudes. At tropical latitudes, albacore tuna showed a distinct diel pattern in vertical habitat use, occupying shallower, warmer waters above the mixed layer depth (MLD) at night, and deeper, cooler waters below the MLD during the day. In contrast, there was little evidence of a diel pattern of vertical behavior in albacore tuna at temperate latitudes, with fish limited to shallow waters above the MLD almost all of the time. Spatial patterns of species composition in stomach contents were consistent with vertical movement patterns, with significantly more deepwater prey species consumed in tropical waters than in temperate waters. Albacore in tropical waters also consumed significantly greater diversities of prey than in temperate waters, predominately preying on fish species, whereas those in temperate waters predominately preyed on crustacea. Our results indicate that the vertical distribution of albacore is constrained either by thermal preferences with diet reflecting these preferences, by the vertical

  3. Oligocene to mid-Pliocene deep sea Ostracoda from the South Pacific Gyre and their paleoceanographic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.; Wade, B. S.; Villarejo, J.; Firth, J. V.

    2012-12-01

    We report on the taxonomic, biostratigraphical and paleoceanographic significance of early Paleocene, Oligocene, and middle Miocene to middle Pliocene ostracod faunas from IODP Sites U1367, U1368 and U1370. Sites U1367 (4289 m water depth) and U1368 (3740 water depth) are located near the center of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) along ~26° S latitude, whereas Site U1370 (5074 m water depth) is located in the southwestern region of the SPG at 41° S latitude. The SPG is the largest of the ocean gyres, its center farther from continents and productive ocean regions than the center of any other gyre, and is considered Earth's largest oceanic desert. According to the magnetic sea floor lineations the crustal age has been estimated to be between 33.3 and 33.7 Ma at Site U1367, between 13.4 and 13.6 Ma at U1368, and between 73.6 and 79.5 Ma at U1370. Carbonate ooze are the dominant lithology at Sites U1367 and U1368, whereas at Site U1370 carbonate ooze was present only within a short (<2 m) interval near the base of the cored sequence. Planktonic foraminifer and calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy established that the carbonate ooze at U1367 extends from ~33.7 Ma to ~26 Ma; at U1368 from ~13 Ma to ~1.9 Ma; and the short carbonate sequence at U1370 is 64 My old. The Oligocene ostracod assemblage consists of a relatively diverse fauna characterized by higher occurrences of Krithe, Poseidonamicus, Argilloecia and Cytheropteron, and suggests increased food supply to the ocean floor during the early Oligocene. The mid-Miocene to mid-Pliocene ostracod assemblage is comparatively less diverse and dominated by Krithe, Poseidonamicus, Henryhowella and Bradleya suggesting more oligotrophic conditions and a fauna more adapted to the corrosive bottom waters. Only one specimen of Marwickcythereis was found in a Paleocene sample at U1370. Preservation of ostracods and their stratigraphic variability are affected by the position of each site with respect to the lysocline and the

  4. Revision and Microtomography of the Pheidole knowlesi Group, an Endemic Ant Radiation in Fiji (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Myrmicinae)Myrmicinae).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Georg; Sarnat, Eli M; Economo, Evan P

    2016-01-01

    The Fijian islands, a remote archipelago in the southwestern Pacific, are home to a number of spectacular endemic radiations of plants and animals. Unlike most Pacific archipelagos, these evolutionary radiations extend to social insects, including ants. One of the most dramatic examples of ant radiation in Fiji has occurred in the hyperdiverse genus Pheidole. Most of the 17 native Fijian Pheidole belong to one of two species groups that descended from a single colonization, yet have evolved dramatically contrasting morphologies: the spinescent P. roosevelti species group, and the more morphologically conservative P. knowlesi species group. Here we revise the knowlesi group, in light of recent phylogenetic results, and enhanced with modern methods of X-ray microtomography. We recognize six species belonging to this group, including two of which we describe as new: Pheidole caldwelli Mann, Pheidole kava sp. n., Pheidole knowlesi Mann, P. ululevu sp. n., P. vatu Mann, and P. wilsoni Mann. Detailed measurements and descriptions, identification keys, and high-resolution images for queens, major and minor workers are provided. In addition, we include highly detailed 3D surface reconstructions for all available castes. PMID:27462877

  5. Risk and Protective Factors Affecting Sexual Risk Behavior Among School-Aged Adolescents in Fiji, Kiribati, Samoa, and Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2016-07-01

    There are limited studies on the prevalence and correlates of sexual risk behavior among adolescents in Pacific Island countries. In order to inform public sexual and reproductive health interventions, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of various sexual risk behaviors among in-school adolescents in 4 Pacific Island countries using data from the Global School-Based Health Survey. In a cross-sectional study, 6792 school-going adolescents (49.7% boys and 50.3% girls; 13-16 years old) from Fiji, Kiribati, Samoa, and Vanuatu were surveyed with a self-administered questionnaire. Overall, 18.9% of students reported to ever had sex (ranging from 12.9% in Vanuatu to 57.5% in Samoa), and of those sexually active, 38.0% had an early sexual debut (<14 years), 38.1% had 2 or more sexual partners during their lifetime, 39.5% had not used a condom at last sex, 50.9% had not used birth control at last sex, and 77.8% engaged in sexually risky behavior using a composite measure. Multivariate logistic regression found that male sex, older age, tobacco use, alcohol use, mental distress, having no close friends, and truancy were associated with several of 5 or all 5 sexual risk behaviors. Sexual and reproductive health promotion programs are indicated to address the high risk of sexually transmitted infection, HIV, and pregnancy in this adolescent population. PMID:27242369

  6. Revision and Microtomography of the Pheidole knowlesi Group, an Endemic Ant Radiation in Fiji (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Myrmicinae)

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat, Eli M.; Economo, Evan P.

    2016-01-01

    The Fijian islands, a remote archipelago in the southwestern Pacific, are home to a number of spectacular endemic radiations of plants and animals. Unlike most Pacific archipelagos, these evolutionary radiations extend to social insects, including ants. One of the most dramatic examples of ant radiation in Fiji has occurred in the hyperdiverse genus Pheidole. Most of the 17 native Fijian Pheidole belong to one of two species groups that descended from a single colonization, yet have evolved dramatically contrasting morphologies: the spinescent P. roosevelti species group, and the more morphologically conservative P. knowlesi species group. Here we revise the knowlesi group, in light of recent phylogenetic results, and enhanced with modern methods of X-ray microtomography. We recognize six species belonging to this group, including two of which we describe as new: Pheidole caldwelli Mann, Pheidole kava sp. n., Pheidole knowlesi Mann, P. ululevu sp. n., P. vatu Mann, and P. wilsoni Mann. Detailed measurements and descriptions, identification keys, and high-resolution images for queens, major and minor workers are provided. In addition, we include highly detailed 3D surface reconstructions for all available castes. PMID:27462877

  7. Reshaping US Navy Pacific response in mitigating disaster risk in South Pacific Island nations: adopting community-based disaster cycle management.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Erik J; Termini, Michael; Burkle, Frederick M

    2014-02-01

    The US Department of Defense continues to deploy military assets for disaster relief and humanitarian actions around the world. These missions, carried out through geographically located Combatant Commands, represent an evolving role the US military is taking in health diplomacy, designed to enhance disaster preparedness and response capability. Oceania is a unique case, with most island nations experiencing "acute-on-chronic" environmental stresses defined by acute disaster events on top of the consequences of climate change. In all Pacific Island nation-states and territories, the symptoms of this process are seen in both short- and long-term health concerns and a deteriorating public health infrastructure. These factors tend to build on each other. To date, the US military's response to Oceania primarily has been to provide short-term humanitarian projects as part of Pacific Command humanitarian civic assistance missions, such as the annual Pacific Partnership, without necessarily improving local capacity or leaving behind relevant risk-reduction strategies. This report describes the assessment and implications on public health of large-scale humanitarian missions conducted by the US Navy in Oceania. Future opportunities will require the Department of Defense and its Combatant Commands to show meaningful strategies to implement ongoing, long-term, humanitarian activities that will build sustainable, host nation health system capacity and partnerships. This report recommends a community-centric approach that would better assist island nations in reducing disaster risk throughout the traditional disaster management cycle and defines a potential and crucial role of Department of Defense's assets and resources to be a more meaningful partner in disaster risk reduction and community capacity building. PMID:24360285

  8. Reshaping US Navy Pacific response in mitigating disaster risk in South Pacific Island nations: adopting community-based disaster cycle management.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Erik J; Termini, Michael; Burkle, Frederick M

    2014-02-01

    The US Department of Defense continues to deploy military assets for disaster relief and humanitarian actions around the world. These missions, carried out through geographically located Combatant Commands, represent an evolving role the US military is taking in health diplomacy, designed to enhance disaster preparedness and response capability. Oceania is a unique case, with most island nations experiencing "acute-on-chronic" environmental stresses defined by acute disaster events on top of the consequences of climate change. In all Pacific Island nation-states and territories, the symptoms of this process are seen in both short- and long-term health concerns and a deteriorating public health infrastructure. These factors tend to build on each other. To date, the US military's response to Oceania primarily has been to provide short-term humanitarian projects as part of Pacific Command humanitarian civic assistance missions, such as the annual Pacific Partnership, without necessarily improving local capacity or leaving behind relevant risk-reduction strategies. This report describes the assessment and implications on public health of large-scale humanitarian missions conducted by the US Navy in Oceania. Future opportunities will require the Department of Defense and its Combatant Commands to show meaningful strategies to implement ongoing, long-term, humanitarian activities that will build sustainable, host nation health system capacity and partnerships. This report recommends a community-centric approach that would better assist island nations in reducing disaster risk throughout the traditional disaster management cycle and defines a potential and crucial role of Department of Defense's assets and resources to be a more meaningful partner in disaster risk reduction and community capacity building.

  9. Influence of Assimilation of Subsurface Temperature Measurements on Simulations of Equatorial Undercurrent and South Equatorial Current Along the Pacific Equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Leetmaan, Ants; Reynolds, Richard W.; Ji, Ming

    1997-01-01

    Equatorial Pacific current and temperature fields were simulated with and without assimilation of subsurface temperature measurements for April 1992 - March 1995, and compared with moored bouy and research vessel current measurements.

  10. Argo Float Trajectories at Mid-Depth in the Southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanderbeg, M.; Roemmich, D.

    2007-12-01

    Trajectories from Argo floats have been used for a preliminary estimate of the mean ocean circulation of the southwest Pacific at 1000 m and to study zonal jets in the South Equatorial Current (SEC) where it encounters island chains and ridges in that region. Since 2004, 240 Argo floats have passed through the southwest Pacific, producing over 9800 trajectories. Most floats stay submerged for 9 days before ascending to telemeter their data and record their position at the sea surface. The World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) also deployed floats in this region and data from these floats are being added to the dataset. Accuracy of the submerged velocities depends on knowing the position and time of the float sinking and rising to the surface again. An extrapolation method was used to estimate the rise and fall locations and times from the series of position fixes and the known residence time on the sea surface. Near Fiji and New Caledonia, zonal jets appear on the north side of these islands. The mean velocity of the jet at 1000 m around the north of Fiji is 5 cm/s with a maximum velocity of approximately 18cm/s. The mean velocity of the jet around the north of New Caledonia is 5cm/s with a maximum of near 15cm/s. At present, not many floats have passed near the southern side of these islands, and it is difficult to confirm whether zonal jets are present at these locations as well. Other island chains also show trajectories that are steered by the topography. A map of dynamic height from Argo profile data shows reasonable agreement of geostrophic velocity with the mean velocity vectors calculated from the trajectories in the SEC region. The present Argo dataset shows the main circulation features of the southwest Pacific, and a strong influence of topography on the intermediate-depth circulation, but there is not yet enough data to produce a detailed description of the flow field.

  11. Seismic attenuation tomography of the Tonga-Fiji region using phase pair methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Erich G.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Dorman, Leroy M.; Hildebrand, John; Webb, Spahr C.

    1999-03-01

    The anelastic structure of the region surrounding the Tonga slab and Lau back arc spreading center in the southwest Pacific is studied using data from 12 broadband island stations and 30 ocean bottom seismographs. Two differential attenuation methods determine δt* over the frequency band 0.1 to 3.5 Hz for earthquakes in the Tonga slab. The S-P method measures the difference in spectral decay between P and S waves arriving at the same station. The P-P method measures the difference in spectral decay for P waves with different paths through the upper mantle. Eight hundred sixty phase pairs are used to invert for two-dimensional 1/Qα structure using a nonnegative least squares algorithm. A grid search method determines the Qα/Qβ ratio most compatible with both the S-P and P-P differential measurements. The highest attenuation (Qα = 90) is found within the upper 100 km beneath the active portions of the Lau Basin extending westward to the Lau Ridge. These regions probably delineate the source region for the back arc spreading center magmas, expected to be within the upper 100 km based on petrological considerations. The high attenuation regions also correlate well with zones of low P wave velocity determined by regional velocity tomography. Somewhat lower attenuation is found beneath the Fiji Plateau than beneath the Lau Basin. The entire back arc is characterized by a gradual decrease in attenuation to a depth of 300 to 400 km. The slab is imaged as a region of low attenuation (Qα > 900) material. A Qα/Qβ ratio of 1.75 provides the best fit between the S-P and P-P data sets upon inversion. Spectral stacking shows no frequency dependence within the frequency band analyzed.

  12. Receiver DCB estimation and GPS vTEC study at a low latitude station in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ramendra; Kumar, Sushil; Jayachandran, P. T.

    2016-11-01

    The statistical estimation of receiver differential code bias (DCB) of the GSV4004B receiver at a low latitude station, Suva (lat. 18.15°S, long. 178.45°E, Geomag. Lat. 21.07°S), Fiji, and the subsequent behaviour of vTEC, are presented. By means of least squares linear regression fitting technique, the receiver DCB was determined using the GPS vTEC data recorded during the year 2010, CODE TEC and IRI-2012 model for 2010. To substantiate the results, minimization of the standard deviation (SD) method was also used for GPS vTEC data. The overall monthly DCB was estimated to be in the range of 62.6 TECU. The vTEC after removing the resultant monthly DCB was consistent with other low latitude observations. The GPS vTEC 2010 data after eliminating the resultant DCB were lower in comparison to Faraday rotation vTEC measurements at Suva during 1984 primarily due to higher solar activity during 1984 as compared to 2010. Seasonally, vTEC was maximum during summer and minimum during winter. The winter showed least vTEC variability whereas equinox showed the largest daytime variability. The geomagnetic disturbances effect showed that both vTEC and its variability were higher on magnetically disturbed days as compared to quiet days with maximum variability in the daytime. Two geomagnetic storms of moderate strengths with main phases in the local daytime showed long duration (∼52 h) increase in vTEC by 33-67% which can be accounted by changes in E×B drifts due to prompt penetration of storm-time auroral electric field in the daytime and disturbance dynamo electric field in the nighttime to low latitudes.

  13. Predictors of warfarin non-adherence in younger adults after valve replacement surgery in the South Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheyab, Nihaya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Globally, mechanical valves are predominant as replacements for adolescents and younger adults with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Mechanical valve implantation necessitates lifelong antithrombotic management (warfarin) and associated lifestyle modification, with event-free survival largely dependent on international normalised therapeutic ratios (INRs) remaining within the target therapeutic range. There is limited information on factors that may influence warfarin adherence among younger people or those in resource-limited settings. This study sought to identify predictors of warfarin adherence after valve replacement surgery for RHD in Fiji (n=127). Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. Results The sample had a mean age of 31.23 years (SD 13.34) and a mean time-since-surgery of 3.72 years (SD 3.95). Just over half were women (n=71, 56%) and almost two-thirds were indigenous (I-taukei, n=78, 61%). Most had an isolated valve procedure (n=94, 74%) and at the time of survey, they were in New York Heart Association Class I (n=97, 76%). A quarter (n=33, 26%) reported poor adherence with anticoagulation therapy and 13.38% (n=17) reported complete warfarin cessation. While younger age was significantly associated with non-adherence to warfarin therapy (p=0.008), the independent predictors of people who discontinue warfarin completely were those not understanding why warfarin was needed (OR=9.97, p=0.006); a history of forgetting to take warfarin (OR=8.64, p=0.0013) and travel time to heart clinic >1 hour (OR=5.80, p=0.039). Conclusions While medication adherence is complex and multifactorial, the consequences of warfarin non-adherence are potentially catastrophic. These results provide an important first step towards the development of country-specific and disease-specific strategies to improve warfarin adherence. PMID:27347009

  14. Molecular and histological identification of Marteilioides infection in Suminoe Oyster Crassostrea ariakensis, Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum and Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the south coast of Korea.

    PubMed

    Limpanont, Yanin; Yanin, Limpanont; Kang, Hyun-Sil; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jeung, Hee-Do; Kim, Bong-Kyu; Le, Thanh Cuong; Kim, Young-Ok; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    The oyster ovarian parasite Marteilioides chungmuensis has been reported from Korea and Japan, damaging the oyster industries. Recently, Marteilioides-like organisms have been identified in other commercially important marine bivalves. In this study, we surveyed Marteilioides infection in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, Suminoe oyster Crassostrea ariakensis, and Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, using histology and Marteilioides-specific small subunit (SSU) rDNA PCR. The SSU rDNA sequence of M. chungmuensis (1716 bp) isolated from C. gigas in Tongyoung bay was 99.9% similar to that of M. chungmuensis reported in Japan. Inclusions of multi-nucleated bodies in the oocytes, typical of Marteilioides infection, were identified for the first time in Suminoe oysters. The SSU rDNA sequence of a Marteilioides-like organism isolated from Suminoe oysters was 99.9% similar to that of M. chungmuensis. Marteilioides sp. was also observed from 7 Manila clams of 1840 individuals examined, and the DNA sequences of which were 98.2% similar to the known sequence of M. chungmuensis. Unlike Marteilioides infection of Pacific oysters, no remarkable pathological symptoms, such as large multiple lumps on the mantle, were observed in infected Suminoe oysters or Manila clams. Distribution of the infected Manila clams, Suminoe oysters and Pacific oysters was limited to small bays on the south coast, suggesting that the southern coast is the enzootic area of Marteilioides infection.

  15. Comparison of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water formation rates in the South Pacific between NCAR-CCSM4 and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Fine, Rana A.; Kamenkovich, Igor; Sloyan, Bernadette M.

    2014-01-28

    Average formation rates for Subantarctic Mode (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW) in the South Pacific are calculated from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model version 4 (NCAR-CCSM4), using chlorofluorocarbon inventories. CFC-12 inventories and formation rates are compared to ocean observations. CCSM4 accurately simulates the southeast Pacific as the main formation region for SAMW and AAIW. CCSM4 formation rates for SAMW are 3.4 Sv, about half of the observational rate. Shallow mixed layers and a thinner SAMW in CCSM4 are responsible for lower formation rates. A formation rate of 8.1 Sv for AAIW in CCSM4 is higher than observations. Higher inventories in CCSM4 in the southwest and central Pacific, and higher surface concentrations are the main reasons for higher formation rates of AAIW. This comparison of model and observations is useful for understanding the uptake and transport of other gases, e.g., CO2 by the model.

  16. Introduction to the project VAHINE: VAriability of vertical and tropHIc transfer of diazotroph derived N in the south wEst Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Sophie; Moutin, Thierry; Rodier, Martine; Grisoni, Jean-Michel; Louis, Francis; Folcher, Eric; Bourgeois, Bertrand; Boré, Jean-Michel; Renaud, Armelle

    2016-05-01

    On the global scale, N2 fixation provides the major external source of reactive nitrogen to the surface ocean, surpassing atmospheric and riverine inputs, and sustains ˜ 50 % of new primary production in oligotrophic environments. The main goal of the VAriability of vertical and tropHIc transfer of diazotroph derived N in the south wEst Pacific (VAHINE) project was to study the fate of nitrogen newly fixed by diazotrophs (or diazotroph-derived nitrogen) in oceanic food webs, and how it impacts heterotrophic bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton dynamics, stocks and fluxes of biogenic elements and particle export. Three large-volume ( ˜ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed in a tropical oligotrophic ecosystem (the New Caledonia lagoon, south-eastern Pacific) and intentionally fertilized with ˜ 0.8 µM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate diazotrophy and follow subsequent ecosystem changes. VAHINE was a multidisciplinary project involving close collaborations between biogeochemists, molecular ecologist, chemists, marine opticians and modellers. This introductory paper describes in detail the scientific objectives of the project as well as the implementation plan: the mesocosm description and deployment, the selection of the study site (New Caledonian lagoon), and the logistical and sampling strategy. The main hydrological and biogeochemical conditions of the study site before the mesocosm deployment and during the experiment itself are described, and a general overview of the papers published in this special issue is presented.

  17. Tectonic fabric of northern North Fiji and Lau basins from GLORIA sidescan

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffin, D.L. ); Clarke, J.E.H.; Johnson, D. ); Jarvis, P. ); Hill, P. ); Huggett, Q.; Pearson, L. ); Price, R. )

    1990-06-01

    GLORIA mosaics, Seabeam, and seismic data over parts of the backarc New Hebrides arc, northwest and central North Fiji basin, Fiji Fracture Zone north of Fiji, Peggy Ridge, northeast Lau basin, northern Tonga arc, northwestern Tonga Trench, and Western Samoa reveal a complex tectonic framework for the region. Two triple junctions and several rifts are clearly delineated by outcrops and ridges of neovolcanic rocks. Backarc troughs in the New Hebrides Arc are commonly floored by volcanic rocks with little sediment cover. The locus of major faults are well defined in places by volcanic ridges and scarps. On the Fiji Fracture Zone north of Fiji, scarps indicate the trace, but west of Fiji it disappears for about 100 km, becoming well pronounced again near the central North Fiji basin triple junction. At Peggy Ridge a very extensive area of sheet-like volcanics indicates activity extends northeast from Peggy Ridge toward the western extension of the Tonga Trench passing west of Niuafo'ou Island, possibly marking a fault-to-trench transition. East of Niuafo'ou Island, backarc spreading close to the Tofua Arc is seen at a nascent triple junction, its northern arm approaching close to the western Tonga Trench. Long linear fault scarps in the trench result from bending of the crust. Only a few areas, including the seafloor north of Samoa, are mainly sediment covered. Two known hydrothermal deposits near the two triple junctions have been imaged, but other mapped areas of extensive neo-volcanics in the vicinity of propagators and pull-apart basins suggest sites for further investigation. The prevalence of ridge propagators and extensional basins suggests their significant role in the development of the region.

  18. Atmospheric salt deposition in a tropical mountain rain forest at the eastern Andean slopes of South Ecuador - Pacific or Atlantic origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski Giannoni, S.; Trachte, K.; Rollenbeck, R.; Lehnert, L.; Fuchs, J.; Bendix, J.

    2015-10-01

    Salt (NaCl) is recently proven to be of highest importance for ecosystem functioning of the Amazon lowland forests because of its importance for herbivory, litter decomposition and thus, carbon cycling. Salt deposition should generally decline with distance from its marine sources. For tropical South America, a negative east-west salt availability gradient is assumed in the Amazon as a consequence of the barrier effect of the Andes for Pacific air masses. However, this generalized pattern may not hold for the tropical mountain rain forest in the Andes of southern Ecuador. To analyze salt availability, we investigate the deposition of Na+ and Cl- which are good proxies of sea spray aerosol. Because of the complexity of the terrain and related cloud and rain formation processes, salt deposition was analyzed from both, rain and occult precipitation (OP) water along an altitudinal gradient over a period from 2004 to 2009. To assess the influence of Atlantic and Pacific air masses on the locally observed deposition of sodium and chloride, sea-salt aerosol concentration data from the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis dataset and back-trajectory statistical methods were combined. Our results based on deposition time series and 2192 generated trajectories show a clear difference in the temporal variation of sodium and chloride concentration due to height and exposure to winds. The sea-salt transport was highly seasonal where higher locations revealed a stronger seasonality. Although the influence of the easterlies were predominant regarding atmospheric circulation, the statistical analysis of trajectories and hybrid receptor models revealed a stronger impact of the Pacific sea-salt sources on the deposition at the study area. The highest concentration in rain and cloud water was found between September and February originating from both, the equatorial Pacific and Atlantic. However, the Pacific sources contributed with up to 25 % to the

  19. Preliminary assessment of the impacts and effects of the South Pacific tsunami of September 2009 in Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominey-Howes, D.

    2009-12-01

    The September 2009 tsunami was a regional South Pacific event of enormous significance. Our UNESCO-IOC ITST Samoa survey used a simplified version of a ‘coupled human-environment systems framework’ (Turner et al., 2003) to investigate the impacts and effects of the tsunami in Samoa. Further, the framework allowed us to identify those factors that affected the vulnerability and resilience of the human-environment system before, during and after the tsunami - a global first. Key findings (unprocessed) include: Maximum run-up exceeded 14 metres above sea level Maximum inundation (at right angles to the shore) was approximately 400 metres Maximum inundation with the wave running parallel with the shore (but inland), exceeded 700 metres Buildings sustained varying degrees of damage Damage was correlated with depth of tsunami flow, velocity, condition of foundations, quality of building materials used, quality of workmanship, adherence to the building code and so on Buildings raised even one metre above the surrounding land surface suffered much less damage Plants, trees and mangroves reduced flow velocity and flow depth - leading to greater chances of human survival and lower levels of building damage The tsunami has left a clear and distinguishable geological record in terms of sediments deposited in the coastal landscape The clear sediment layer associated with this tsunami suggests that older (and prehistoric) tsunamis can be identified, helping to answer questions about frequency and magnitude of tsunamis The tsunami caused widespread erosion of the coastal and beach zones but this damage will repair itself naturally and quickly The tsunami has had clear impacts on ecosystems and these are highly variable Ecosystems will repair themselves naturally and are unlikely to preserve long-term impacts It is clear that some plant (tree) species are highly resilient and provided immediate places for safety during the tsunami and resources post-tsunami People of Samoa are

  20. Mineral-Association and Activity of Bacteria and Archaea in the Deep Subsurface South Pacific Gyre Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. A.; Dekas, A. E.; Harrison, B. K.; Morono, Y.; Inagaki, F.; Ziebis, W.; Orphan, V. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although the subsurface biosphere is now recognized as an important reservoir of life on our planet, until recently the microbial community beneath open-ocean oligotrophic gyres (making up the majority of the seafloor) has just begun to be studied in detail. IODP Expedition 329 and the KNOX-022RR site survey cruise have taken some of the first steps at characterizing the microbial community beneath the South Pacific Gyre, a region with low organic carbon burial rates (10-8 and 10-10 moles C cm-1 yr-1), deep oxygen penetration (sediments are oxidized to the basement), and low prokaryotic cell counts (106 cells cm-3 to <103 cells cm-3). In these sediments, the dominant fraction of organic carbon may be aggregated or adsorbed to minerals, suggesting that microbes that are able to grow on the minerals may create potential "hotspots" of activity. In this study, we performed magnetic separation on oligotrophic sediment samples and examined the bacterial and archaeal communities using 16S rRNA tag sequencing. To determine if the mineral-associated cells were autotrophic and/or utilizing nitrate, we performed long-term (20 month) incubations with 13CO2 and 15NO3- from sediment taken at depths ~2-70 mbsf beneath the oligotrophic gyre and outside of the oligotrophic gyre (IODP Exp. 329 stations U1368-U1371). Subsequently we used the DNA stain SYBR Green I, and CARD-FISH-NanoSIMS to identify cells which were actively taking up the isotopic label. We then used SEM-EDS to identify the mineral particle composition. Preliminary results found the magnetic fraction in oligotrophic sediment (KNOX-022RR station SPG-5) from 1.2-2.6 mbsf showed a greater diversity of both bacteria and archaea. OTUs from Chloroflexi groups SO85 and SAR202 were dominant in the magnetic fraction. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, δ-Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Deferribacteres, WS3, OP10, and OP1 OTUs were found only in the magnetic fraction. Crenarchaeal OTUs from Marine Benthic Group B and Marine Group I

  1. Iron mineral structure, reactivity, and isotopic composition in a South Pacific Gyre ferromanganese nodule over 4 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Matthew A.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Gueguen, Bleuenn; Fakra, Sirine C.; Horn, Gregory; Jelinski, Nicolas A.; Rouxel, Olivier; Sorensen, Jeffry; Toner, Brandy M.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea ferromanganese nodules accumulate trace elements from seawater and underlying sediment porewaters during the growth of concentric mineral layers over millions of years. These trace elements have the potential to record past ocean geochemical conditions. The goal of this study was to determine whether Fe mineral alteration occurs and how the speciation of trace elements responds to alteration over ∼3.7 Ma of marine ferromanganese nodule (MFN) formation, a timeline constrained by estimates from 9Be/10Be concentrations in the nodule material. We determined Fe-bearing phases and Fe isotope composition in a South Pacific Gyre (SPG) nodule. Specifically, the distribution patterns and speciation of trace element uptake by these Fe phases were investigated. The time interval covered by the growth of our sample of the nodule was derived from 9Be/10Be accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The composition and distribution of major and trace elements were mapped at various spatial scales, using micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Fe phases were characterized by micro-extended X-ray absorption fine structure (μEXAFS) spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction (μXRD). Speciation of Ti and V, associated with Fe, was measured using micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy. Iron isotope composition (δ56/54Fe) in subsamples of 1-3 mm increments along the radius of the nodule was determined with multiple-collector ICP-MS (MC-ICP-MS). The SPG nodule formed through primarily hydrogeneous inputs at a rate of 4.0 ± 0.4 mm/Ma. The nodule exhibited a high diversity of Fe mineral phases: feroxyhite (δ-FeOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), and poorly ordered ferrihydrite-like phases. These findings provide evidence that Fe oxyhydroxides within the nodule undergo alteration to more stable phases over millions of years. Trace Ti and V were

  2. Exploratory analysis of extremely low tropical cyclone activity during the late-season of 2010 and 1998 over the western North Pacific and the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haikun; Chu, Pao-Shin; Hsu, Pang-Chi; Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    This study attempts to understand why the tropical cyclone (TC) frequency over the western North Pacific and the South China Sea was so low in 2010 and 1998 even though a strong La Niña signal occurred in both years. We found that the TC frequency during the late-season (October to December), not in the peak season (July to September), makes 2010 a record low year; the next lowest year is 1998. Specifically, four TCs were observed over the South China Sea (SCS) in the late-season of 1998, but no TCs occurred over the SCS in the same season during 2010. The genesis potential index is used to help diagnose changes in environmental conditions for TC genesis frequency. Results indicate that the decreased low-level vorticity makes the largest contribution to the decreased TC formation over the SCS. The second largest contribution comes from the enhanced vertical wind shear, with relatively small contributions from the negative anomaly in potential intensity and reduction in midlevel relative humidity. These observational results are consistent with numerical simulations using a state of the art model from the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI-AGCM 3.2 Model). Numerical experiments show that the unfavorable conditions for sharply decreased TC formation during the late-season over the SCS in 2010 mainly results from the sea surface temperature anomaly over the western North Pacific basin. This effect is partly offset by the sea surface temperature anomaly in the South Indian Ocean and Northern Indian Ocean basins.

  3. South West Pacific climate at c. 6600-6000 BP inferred from giant clam Tridacna maxima and massive coral Porites sp. records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprey, N.; Pujol, N.; Lazareth, C. E.; Cabioch, G.; Correge, T.; Le Cornec, F.; Maes, C.; Galipaud, J.; Caquineau, S.; Madeng-Yogo, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the last three decades, the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has been characterized by more frequent and stronger El Niño events. Recent paleo-climate studies demonstrated that ENSO periodicity was lower during the Mid-Holocene and that it increased towards present-day. While a better knowledge on such past changes is necessary to reliably predict future climate, the origin of the Mid-Holocene ENSO regime shift remains controversial. The present study is focused on the climate in the Southwest Pacific c. 6 600-6 000 BP. This period precedes the Mid-Holocene ENSO-shift, and is essential to understand the ENSO evolution. The Vanuatu archipelago (South West Pacific; 15° 40'S; 167°00' E) is characteristic of an open ocean context and climatic conditions are strongly linked to the ENSO variability in relation with the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) are highly correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and the Niño 3.4 index. Consequently, high-resolution SSS and SST records from massive corals and giant clams provide reliable tools to track ENSO variability back in time in this region. Two massive Porites sp. coral colonies, dated at 6758 - 6544 14C cal. BP, and one giant Tridacna maxima clam dated at 6257-6056 14C cal. BP, were collected on Espiritu Santo Island. These archives were sampled at monthly resolution and analyzed for Sr/Ca ratio and δ18O. SST was reconstructed from corals Sr/Ca and the giant clam δ18O. The δ18O composition of seawater (δw), calculated from the coral δ18O record, was used as a proxy for evaporation/precipitation (E/P) budget. Compared to present-day conditions, reconstructed SST are 2.5°C lower at ~6600 BP and 1°C lower at ~6100 BP, and both archives present a slightly higher (+0.5°C) seasonal amplitude. Fossil Porites sp. from Vanuatu showed that the E/P budget was positively correlated to the SST c. 6600BP whereas the inverse