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Sample records for fiji south pacific

  1. Fiji in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Rosalind; Semaan, Leslie

    This text introduces Fiji and other island nations located in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean. Cut off from the world by vast expanses of water, these people developed a unique culture. Contents include: Teacher Overview, Geography of the South Pacific Islands, History of the South Pacific, Fiji, Traditional Village Life, Yaquna Ceremony,…

  2. Fiji in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Rosalind; Semaan, Leslie

    This text introduces Fiji and other island nations located in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean. Cut off from the world by vast expanses of water, these people developed a unique culture. Contents include: Teacher Overview, Geography of the South Pacific Islands, History of the South Pacific, Fiji, Traditional Village Life, Yaquna Ceremony,…

  3. Genetic analysis of Black Tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) across its natural distribution range reveals more recent colonization of Fiji and other South Pacific islands

    PubMed Central

    Waqairatu, Salote S; Dierens, Leanne; Cowley, Jeff A; Dixon, Tom J; Johnson, Karyn N; Barnes, Andrew C; Li, Yutao

    2012-01-01

    The Black Tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) has a natural distribution range from East Africa to the South Pacific Islands. Although previous studies of Indo-Pacific P. monodon have found populations from the Indian Ocean and Australasia to differ genetically, their relatedness to South Pacific shrimp remains unknown. To address this, polymorphisms at eight shared microsatellite loci and haplotypes in a 418-bp mtDNA-CR (control region) sequence were examined across 682 P. monodon from locations spread widely across its natural range, including the South Pacific islands of Fiji, Palau, and Papua New Guinea (PNG). Observed microsatellite heterozygosities of 0.82–0.91, allele richness of 6.85–9.69, and significant mtDNA-CR haplotype variation indicated high levels of genetic diversity among the South Pacific shrimp. Analysis of microsatellite genotypes using a Bayesian STRUCTURE method segregated Indo-Pacific P. monodon into eight distinct clades, with Palau and PNG shrimp clustering among others from Southeast Asia and eastern Australia, respectively, and Fiji shrimp clustering as a distinct group. Phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA-CR haplotypes delineated shrimp into three groupings, with shrimp from Fiji again being distinct by sharing no haplotypes with other populations. Depending on regional location, the genetic structures and substructures identified from the genotyping and mtDNA-CR haplotype phylogeny could be explained by Metapopulation and/or Member–Vagrant type evolutionary processes. Neutrality tests of mutation-drift equilibrium and estimation of the time since population expansion supported a hypothesis that South Pacific P. monodon were colonized from Southeast Asia and eastern Australia during the Pleistocene period over 60,000 years ago when land bridges were more expansive and linked these regions more closely. PMID:22957205

  4. NASA follow-on on the Fiji South Pacific Severe Storm Warning System Project (SPSSD/WS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermillion, C.; Maurer, H.; Williams, M.; Kamowski, J.; Moore, T.; Maksimovich, W.; Hasler, A.

    1988-01-01

    The follow-on agreement will implement needed systems enhancements of the satellite ground station installed under the previous SPSSD/WS project. These enhancements include the purchase and installation of an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) and lightning protection unit, hardware modifications to provide system redundancy and increased data storage capacity, software modifications for the new Japanese GMS digital data, upgrades of the image processing software, and both hardware maintenance and tropical cyclone analysis training, and a non-renewable grant to provide emergency field repairs and replacement/spare parts. In March 1988, the UPS and lightning protection unit was installed at the Fiji Meteorological Service by NASA personnel. A tape recorder and demodulator was shipped to Fiji to record the new digital GMS data. Data tapes are not yet available from the Japanese Meteorological Service of the new digital format. This data is required to test the GMS digital software being developed for the Fiji SPSSD/WS facility.

  5. Population Education in the South Pacific. Report of a Sub-Regional Workshop (Suva, Fiji, October 1-12, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    The governments of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Tonga participated in a workshop designed to stimulate interest and understanding of population education and help the participating countries write proposals for national population education programs for financial and technical support from UNESCO and other agencies. This report is…

  6. A Fiji multi-coral δ18O composite approach to obtaining a more accurate reconstruction of the last two-centuries of the ocean-climate variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassié, Emilie P.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Corrège, Thierry; Wu, Henry C.; Lemley, Gavin M.; Howe, Steve; Cabioch, Guy

    2014-12-01

    The limited availability of oceanographic data in the tropical Pacific Ocean prior to the satellite era makes coral-based climate reconstructions a key tool for extending the instrumental record back in time, thereby providing a much needed test for climate models and projections. We have generated a unique regional network consisting of five Porites coral δ18O time series from different locations in the Fijian archipelago. Our results indicate that using a minimum of three Porites coral δ18O records from Fiji is statistically sufficient to obtain a reliable signal for climate reconstruction, and that application of an approach used in tree ring studies is a suitable tool to determine this number. The coral δ18O composite indicates that while sea surface temperature (SST) variability is the primary driver of seasonal δ18O variability in these Fiji corals, annual average coral δ18O is more closely correlated to sea surface salinity (SSS) as previously reported. Our results highlight the importance of water mass advection in controlling Fiji coral δ18O and salinity variability at interannual and decadal time scales despite being located in the heavy rainfall region of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The Fiji δ18O composite presents a secular freshening and warming trend since the 1850s coupled with changes in both interannual (IA) and decadal/interdecadal (D/I) variance. The changes in IA and D/I variance suggest a re-organization of climatic variability in the SPCZ region beginning in the late 1800s to period of a more dominant interannual variability, which could correspond to a southeast expansion of the SPCZ.

  7. The Language Situation in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangubhai, Francis; Mugler, France

    2003-01-01

    After Papua New Guinea (PNG), Fiji is the second largest island nation in the South-west Pacific and the hub of the region. Nearly all Fiji Islanders have either Fijian or Fiji Hindi as their first language, in roughly equal numbers, while the former colonial language, English, with very few native speakers, has retained an important role,…

  8. Accretion and hydrothermalism in North Fiji basin, Southwest Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Auzende, J.M.; Eissen, J.P.

    1986-07-01

    The North Fiji basin is a marginal basin surrounded by: (1) the New Hebrides island arc in the west, which ends at the Matthew-Hunter Ridge in the south; (2) the Hunter fracture zone in the southeast; (3) the Fiji Islands in the east; and (4) the complex Vitiaz Trench system in the north. The investigations in this area suggest a complex opening has been active for approximately the past 10 m.y. The detailed bathymetry and the structure of the central part of this basin are still poorly known. The major element consists of an axial ridge. The trend of this ridge is imprecise, but it is probably oriented north-south near 173.5/sup 0/E, at least between 21/sup 0/ and 15/sup 0/S. The other remarkable feature consists of a complex system of ridges and faulted blocks running along the western edge of the Fiji Archipelago. This system has been interpreted by some authors as an accretion ridge. The purposes of the third leg of SEAPSO cruise onboard the R/V Jean-Charcot (December 2-24, 1985) are as follows: (1) to explore the typical structures of the North Fiji basin between 21/sup 0/ and 17/sup 0/S (axial ridge, seamounts, fracture zones, and the complex border west of Fiji), using multibeam echo-sounder (Seabeam), seismic reflection, magnetic, and gravimetric surveys; and (2) to complete Seabeam coverage and samplings (such as dredging, coring, water sampling, and bottom photographs) of two to three small box-shaped areas on the axial ridge, in order to localize and eventually characterize hydrothermal vents. The various morphotectonic, petrologic, chemical, and geodynamic results of this survey will be discussed.

  9. Language Attitudes in Multilingual Primary Schools in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shameem, Nikhat

    2004-01-01

    Fiji is a multilingual country in the South Pacific with English, Fijian and Hindi being the official languages. As is inevitable in multilingual societies, language use is functional with Fiji Hindi and Fijian being the mother tongues of the two main ethnic groups in the country, the Indo-Fijians and the Fijians. English, because of Fiji's…

  10. Language Attitudes in Multilingual Primary Schools in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shameem, Nikhat

    2004-01-01

    Fiji is a multilingual country in the South Pacific with English, Fijian and Hindi being the official languages. As is inevitable in multilingual societies, language use is functional with Fiji Hindi and Fijian being the mother tongues of the two main ethnic groups in the country, the Indo-Fijians and the Fijians. English, because of Fiji's…

  11. The Diplommatinidae of Fiji – a hotspot of Pacific land snail biodiversity (Caenogastropoda, Cyclophoroidea)

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Eike; Bouchet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The minute (adult size 1.3–4.8 mm) land snail species of the family Diplommatinidae in the Fiji archipelago are revised based on historical material and modern (1998–99) collections targeting limestone outcrops on the largest island, Viti Levu, and several smaller islands in the Lau group. The forty-two species (including 30 new species) belong to the genera Moussonia Semper, 1865, Palaina Semper, 1865 and Diancta Martens, 1867, which are briefly characterized and keyed. The diagnostic structure of the inner lamellar system of each species is illustrated. All species except one are endemic to Fiji. In Viti Levu, the 12 localities surveyed each had 1–13 (average 5) species of Diplommatinidae; ten species were each found at a single site only. In the Lau islands, five islands were visited, with 1–4 species per island; four species are known from single islands. The number of historically known species not recollected in 1998–99 (7 species), the number of single-site occurrences (14 species), and the numerous islands — including limestone islands — that have not been surveyed at all, indicate that the 42 species of Diplommatinidae currently known from Fiji represent perhaps only half of the Fiji diplommatinid fauna. Such numbers approach the diplommatinid diversity of Palau (39 described and more than 60 undescribed species), and surpasses by far the diversity of other South Pacific archipelagos of comparable land area (New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Samoa). Nomenclatural acts: Lectotypes designated: Diplommatina fuscula, Diplommatina fuscula var. vitiana, Diplommatina godeffroyana, Diplommatina godeffroyana var. latecostata, Diplommatina tuberosa, Diplommatina martensi var. macrostoma, all Mousson, 1870. Neotypes designated: Diplommatina subregularis, Diplommatina ascendens, Diplommatina quadrata, all Mousson, 1870. New species: Diancta aurea sp. n., Diancta aurita sp. n., Diancta basiplana sp. n., Diancta controversa sp. n., Diancta densecostulata sp

  12. New reef exploration targets in Fiji, Southwest Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Rodd, J. )

    1994-03-07

    Fiji has two prospective shallow water Tertiary basins containing numerous reefal leads: Bligh Water basin, covering some 9,500 sq km, and Bau Waters basin having a shallow water area of about 1,600 sq km. Water is mostly 50--500 m deep and sediment as thick as 5 km. Source rocks outcrop on the main island of Viti Levu and have been drilled offshore, where they give rise to an oil seep. Over 20 new reefal leads have been identified on existing seismic data. Traps typically have estimated recoverable reserves of about 270 bbl of oil per structure. There is plenty of scope for additional traps in areas where seismic coverage is sparse and of poor quality. The government is actively encouraging oil companies to invest in exploration and reviewing the fiscal policy to offer more competitive terms. The paper describes the regional tectonic setting, Fiji geology, exploration history, prospective basins, source rocks, maturity, reef reservoirs, seals, reef play, limestone turbidite play, and legislation.

  13. Home Reef, South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the South Pacific, south of Late Island along the Tofua volcanic arc in Tonga, a new volcanic island Home Reef is being re-born. The island is thought to have emerged after a volcanic eruption in mid-August that has also spewed large amounts of floating pumice into Tongan waters and sweeping across to Fiji about 350 km (220 miles) to the west of where the new island has formed. In 2004 a similar eruption created an ephemeral island about 0.5 by 1.5 km (0.3 by 0.9 miles) in size; it was no longer visible in an ASTER image acquired November 2005. This simulated natural color image shows the vegetation-covered stratovolcanic island of Late in the upper right. Home Reef is found in the lower left. The two bluish plumes are hot seawater that is laden with volcanic ash and chemicals; the larger one can be traced for more than 14 km (8.4 miles) to the east. The image was acquired October 10, 2006 and covers an area of 24.3 by 30.2 km. It is located at 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  14. Providing University Education in Physical Geography across the South Pacific Islands: Multi-Modal Course Delivery and Student Grade Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, James P.; Poole, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Enormous distances across the vast South Pacific hinder student access to the main Fiji campus of the regional tertiary education provider, the University of the South Pacific (USP). Fortunately, USP has been a pioneer in distance education (DE) and promotes multi-modal delivery of programmes. Geography has embraced DE, but doubts remain about…

  15. NASA/NOAA/USAID implementation of the South Pacific severe storm detection and warning system project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, J.

    1984-01-01

    Implementation by NASA of the South Pacific severe storm detection and warning system project for the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS) in Nadi, Fiji, is discussed. A description of the need and use of the system by the FMS, of data reception, of interactive computer techniques, of training, and of the benefits to be derived from implementation of the system is given. The project allows precise tracking of all South Pacific tropical cyclones with frequent high-resolution reception of both the Japanese GMS and the U.S. GOES-West visible and IR cloud images.

  16. Tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin: UNCLOS helps tackle regional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzer, R.; Roest, W.; Barker, D.; Mortimer, N.; Mauffret, A.; Lafoy, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Marine surveys to study the evolution of remnant arcs and backarc basins north of New Zealand have been complemented by UNCLOS surveys by three countries - France, New Zealand and Australia - with potential extended continental shelf claims in the region. The UNCLOS factor allowed 9 cruises to focus on the region in the past 9 years, collecting approximately 30,000 km of seismic reflection (5,000 deep crustal), 263,700 sq km of swath bathymetry, and 70 dredge samples. Feedback through sharing or publishing data and joint participation allowed efficient planning and deployment of academic and UNCLOS cruises. Two models for South Fiji (SFB) and Norfolk (NB) basin evolution arise from current studies: at the level of the Three Kings Ridge - NB - southern SFB both involve Pacific trench roll-back and southward propagating spreading, but one also uses two subduction systems and arc-continent collision. Linked spreading of the NB and SFB is invoked in both models, but the veracity and geodynamics of the link are not investigated. A growing body of petrological and radiometric evidence and the tectonics of the New Zealand continental margin point to tandem Early Miocene spreading of the SFB and NB despite published magnetic interpretations that would confine SFB spreading to the Oligocene. The Franco-NZ NOUCAPLAC-1 cruise, the last cruise relevant to UNCLOS in this region, included a scientific objective to investigate the SFB-NB link in the critical area bounded by the Loyalty Ridge (LR), the Cook Fracture Zone (CFZ), the Bounty spreading centre (BSC) and the Julia Lineament (JL) with swath mapping, magnetics and seismic reflection. Initial results show a complex bathymetry where a possible link between the BSC and the CFZ involves ridge propagation, overlapping spreading centres, rift blocks and overprinting volcanoes. The link to the JL was not adequately tested due to sparse coverage. Closer to the LR, a thick, faulted sedimentary basin was found.

  17. Environmental Education in the South Pacific: An Evaluation of Progress in Three Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Neil; Topalian, Teny

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates formal environmental education in three countries in the South Pacific Region: Fiji (Melanesia); Kiribati (Micronesia); and Niue (Polynesia). Findings reveal that environmental education is at different stages of evolution in each of these countries and only Niue appears to deliver environmental education effectively when compared with…

  18. A variably enriched mantle wedge and contrasting melt types during arc stages following subduction initiation in Fiji and Tonga, southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Erin; Gill, James B.; Pearce, Julian A.

    2012-06-01

    The earliest subaerially exposed magmatic products of the Fiji-Tonga-Kermadec (FTK) arc are preserved in the Yavuna Group of Viti Levu, Fiji, and cobbles from 'Eua, Tonga. They are similar in age and magma types to the earliest rocks of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc. In Fiji they include typical island arc tholeiitic (IAT), boninitic (BON), and MORB-like early arc tholeiitic (EAT) pillow lavas that are interpreted as products of flux- and decompression-melting which occurred simultaneously during subduction initiation. Although the oldest rocks in the southwest Pacific (FTK) and the northwest Pacific (IBM) arcs are generally similar, they differ in two important respects. First, all magma types erupted simultaneously in the SW Pacific whereas a similar assemblage may have erupted sequentially in IBM. Second, the primary mantle wedge was "Pacific" in isotopic character in the SW Pacific, but "Indian" in the NW Pacific.

  19. Curriculum Plan for a Diploma Programme in Library/Information Studies To Be Offered by the University of the South Pacific Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Therese Bissen

    This curriculum plan for the Diploma Programme in Library/Information Studies at the University of the South Pacific was designed to meet the needs of undergraduate library/information education in the South Pacific region. The program is presented through distance education to students in the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Solomon…

  20. The South Pacific superswell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Marcia K.; Fischer, Karen M.

    Seafloor depths in a broad area of French Polynesia are 250 to 750 m shallower than lithosphere of the same age in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. The area of shallow seafloor also correlates with a region of high density of volcanoes, low seismic velocity in the upper mantle, and a reduction in the thickness of the elastic plate supporting the volcanoes. The Marquesas fracture zone marks an abrupt transition between normal lithosphere to the north which follows the thermal subsidence curve for a 125-km-thick plate and shallow lithosphere to the south which behaves as though it is only 75-km thick. This age dependence in the French Polynesian depth anomalies, the low elastic plate thickness, and the change in depth at the Marquesas fracture zone, a lithospheric discontinuity, require elevated temperatures in the lithosphere. The pattern and amplitude of the depth anomaly is not consistent with the notion that it results from lithospheric thinning beneath a number of overlapping hot spot swells. Rather, we propose that hot spot traces cluster in this region because the lithosphere is already thinner and more vulnerable to magma penetration. The reduction in the thickness of the thermal plate is presumably due to enhanced small-scale convection resulting from the thermal and/or chemical effect of a broad mantle up welling beneath the South Pacific as imaged by seismic tomography. The morphologic and petrologic characteristics of this superswell resemble those that existed in the mid-Cretaceous over H. W. Menard's Darwin Rise, a region of the Pacific which includes the Mid-Pacific Mountains, the Marshall Islands, Magellan Seamounts, and Wake Guyots. We propose that the South Pacific superswell is the modern-day equivalent of the Darwin Rise, and that it may be merely an extreme example of global variability in lithospheric thermal structure as a function of temperature, chemistry, and/or state-of-stress in the upper mantle.

  1. Silicic magmatism in an Island Arc, Fiji, Southwest Pacific: implications for continental growth

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The late Miocene silicic volcanics of the Udu Volcanic Group, Vanua Levu, Fiji are uncommonly voluminous for an intra-oceanic arc. Their eruption accompanied or shortly preceded (2 m.y.) the breakup of the Vanuatu-Fiji-Tonga arc system. Dacite and rhyolite occur in two series: a predominantly dacitic medium-K one, and a predominantly rhyolitic low-K one.

  2. Henderson Island, South Pacific

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-15

    Uninhabited Henderson Island is part of the United Kingdom's Pitcairn Islands group in the South Pacific. According to a study by the University of Tasmania published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, the island has the highest density of plastic waste anywhere in the world, an estimated 38 million pieces of rubbish. The island is near the center of an ocean current, so it collects rubbish from boats and South America. The image was acquired February 7, 2012, covers an area of 10.3 by 12.3 km, and is located at 24.3 degrees south, 128.3 degrees west. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21691

  3. Featuring the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Brian Terrence; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This thematic section includes "Community Education in the Cook Islands" (Brian Terrence Hagan); "Developing the Grassroots: A Community Education Program in Fiji" (Joseph Veramu); "Literacy in the Community: The Papua New Guinea Experience" (Vincent Manukayasi); "Young Aborigine People Learn about Life through…

  4. 137Cs in the western South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2007-09-01

    The 137Cs activities were determined for seawater samples from the East Caroline, Coral Sea, New Hebrides, South Fiji and Tasman Sea (two stations) Basins of the western South Pacific Ocean by gamma spectrometry using a low background Ge detector. The 137Cs activities ranged from 1.4 to 2.3 Bq m(-3) over the depth interval 0-250 m and decreased exponentially from the subsurface to 1000 m depth. The distribution profiles of 137Cs activity at these six western South Pacific Ocean stations did not differ from each other significantly. There was a remarkable difference for the vertical profiles of 137Cs activity between the East Caroline Basin station in this study and the GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Study) station at the same latitude in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean; the 137Cs inventory over the depth interval 100-1000 m increased from 400+/-30 Bq m(-2) to 560+/-30 Bq m(-2) during the period from 1973 to 1992. The total 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean ranged from 850+/-70 Bq m(-2) in the Coral Sea Basin to 1270+/-90 Bq m(-2) in the South Fiji Basin. Higher 137Cs inventories were observed at middle latitude stations in the subtropical gyre than at low latitude stations. The 137Cs inventories were 1.9-4.5 times (2.9+/-0.7 on average) and 1.7-4.3 times (3.1+/-0.7 on average) higher than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout at the same latitude and that of the estimated 137Cs deposition density in 10 degrees latitude by 10 degrees longitude grid data obtained by Aoyama et al. [Aoyama M, Hirose K, Igarashi Y. Re-construction and updating our understanding on the global weapons tests 137Cs fallout. J Environ Monit 2006;8:431-438], respectively. The possible processes for higher 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout may be attributable to the inter-hemisphere dispersion of the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing 137Cs from

  5. Security Trends in the South Pacific: Vanuatu and Fiji

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    issue at a high emotional level. THE ROLE OF THE CHURCHES Contrary to their pre -World War II policy of generally supporting the colonial governments...in a Melanesian Nation," doctoral dissertation, University of Auckland, Auckland, NZ , 1984. It also draws on conversations of the senior author with...killing Indians. 11 The Taukei believe Fijians should not hand over power to an alien group or they would go the way of the Maoris or other aborigines in

  6. National Profiles in Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific: Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This technical and vocational education (TVE) profile on Fiji is one in a series of profiles of UNESCO member countries. It is intended to be a handy reference on TVE systems, staff development, technical cooperation, and information networking. Part I, General Information, covers the following: location, area, and physical features; economic and…

  7. An Examination of the Potential for Conflict in the South Pacific Region.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-23

    might also turn to the South Pacific and Tasman Sea as an alternative route... 7 The conclusion is reached that US security interests are there- fore...occupation during the War. But Japanese naval plans did aim at eventually occupying Fiji, New Caledonia, and Samoa to block the sea routes between Australia...traditional freedoms of the high seas , and placed limita- tions on the ability of the US to continue to guarantee security within the Region. While the New

  8. Perceptions, impacts and adaptation of tropical cyclones in the Southwest Pacific: an urban perspective from Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, A. D.; Verdon-Kidd, D. C.; Kiem, A. S.; Royle, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    To better understand perceptions, impacts and adaptation strategies related to tropical cyclones (TCs) in urban environments of the Southwest Pacific (SWP), a survey (with 130 participants) was conducted across three island nations; Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga. The key aims of this study include: (i) understanding local perceptions of TC activity, (ii) investigating physical impacts of TC activity, and (iii) uncovering adaptation strategies used to offset the impacts of TCs. It was found that current methods of adaptation generally occur at the local level immediately prior to a TC event (preparation of property, gathering of food, setting up of community centres). This method of adaptation appears to be effective, however higher level adaptation measures (such as the development of building codes as developed in Fiji) may reduce vulnerability further. The survey responses also highlight that there is significant scope to provide education programs specifically aimed at improving the understanding of weather related aspects of TCs. Finally, we investigate the potential to merge ecological traditional knowledge with the non-traditional knowledge of empirical and climate mode based weather forecasts to improve forecasting of TCs, which would ultimately reduce vulnerability and increase adaptive capacity.

  9. 137Cs inventory in semi-isolated basins of the western South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Wang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    The main introduction routes of 137Cs into the Pacific Ocean are worldwide global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing and close-in fallout from U. S. tests conducted on the Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. The objectives of this study are to measure the 137Cs activities in water columns of the western South Pacific Ocean and to discuss the processes controlling the 137Cs inventory. The 137Cs activities were determined for seawater samples from the East Caroline, Coral Sea, New Hebrides, South Fiji and Tasman Sea Basins of the western South Pacific Ocean. The 137Cs activities in surface waters ranged from 1.7 Bq m- 3 in the Tasman Sea Basin to 2.3 Bq m-3 in the East Caroline Basin. The latitudinal 137Cs distributions in surface waters showed the opposite trend to the expected deposition density from global fallout. The distribution profiles of 137Cs activity at these six western South Pacific Ocean stations did not differ from each other significantly. The total 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean ranged from 850 Bq m-2 in the Coral Sea Basin to 1270 Bq m-2 in the South Fiji Basin. Higher 137Cs inventories were observed at middle latitude stations in the subtropical gyre than at low latitude stations. The 137Cs inventories were 1.9 - 4.5 times higher than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout at the same latitude. The possible sources of excess 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean might be attributable to both the inter-hemisphere dispersion of the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing 137Cs from the northern stratosphere to the southern one and its subsequent deposition, and water- bearing transport of 137Cs from the North Pacific Ocean to the South Pacific.

  10. Understanding the South Pacific Convergence Zone and Its Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Scott

    2011-02-01

    International Workshop on the South Pacific Convergence Zone; Apia, Samoa, 24-26 August 2010 ; During the Southern Hemisphere summer the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) in the southwestern Pacific Ocean produces the largest rainfall band in the world. The SPCZ tends to move northeast during southern winter and El Niño and move southwest during southern summer and La Niña. These changes in position have a profound influence on climate (e.g., rainfall, winds, and tropical cyclone frequencies) and life in most of the nations in the southwestern Pacific. Despite the importance of the SPCZ to the region and its prominence in the general circulation of the Southern Hemisphere, the SPCZ has been studied relatively little compared with convergence zones in the Northern Hemisphere. An international workshop on the SPCZ was held in Samoa and brought together 30 experts from Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, France, India, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Vanuatu.

  11. The Noucaplac-1 Survey, South Fiji Basin: an International Collaboration Combining UNCLOS and Science Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, W. R.; Herzer, R.; Barker, D. H.; Lafoy, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The UN Convention on the Law of the Sea allows coastal states to claim a legal continental shelf beyond the 200 nautical miles that constitutes the Exclusive Economic Zone. One of the opportunities presented by UNCLOS article 76 is to align essential - and expensive - data acquisition in poorly mapped shelf regions with scientific research interests, thus maximising data value. The Noucaplac-1 survey that took place in August 2004 in the South Fiji Basin is an example of collaboration between neighboring states aiming to address both UNCLOS article 76 requirements and scientific objectives. The Noucaplac-1 survey was designed by the French EXTRAPLAC (reasoned extension of the continental shelf) program to identify the natural prolongation of the New Caledonian territory along the Loyalty Ridge. At the same time, the environs of the potential extended continental shelf claim was identified by the New Zealand collaborators as a key region for study to improve understanding of the regional tectonic evolution and the survey scope was modified accordingly. This contribution describes the data acquired on board the French RV L'Atalante during the Noucaplac-1 cruise. In addition to the multibeam bathymetric data collected with the EM-12 multibeam echo sounder and showing basement tectonic fabric at the sea floor, high-speed seismic data are of particular interest, as they allow the interpretation of basement morphology in this area that is covered by relatively sparse sediments. Regional magnetic data provide additional evidence for distinct morphotectonic regions that may help a New Caledonian extended continental shelf claim

  12. American Dissertations on Foreign Education: A Bibliography with Abstracts. Volume XVII. Pacific: American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Papua New Guinea, Ryukyu Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (Micronesia), Tubuai (French Polynesia), Western Samoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin, Ed.; Parker, Betty June, Ed.

    The editors attempt to examine and abstract all locatable doctoral dissertations completed in the United States, Canada, and some European countries that pertain to the Pacific area. Specifically, these dissertations deal with American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Papua New Guinea, Ryukyu Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trust Territory of the Pacific…

  13. American Dissertations on Foreign Education: A Bibliography with Abstracts. Volume XVII. Pacific: American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Papua New Guinea, Ryukyu Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (Micronesia), Tubuai (French Polynesia), Western Samoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin, Ed.; Parker, Betty June, Ed.

    The editors attempt to examine and abstract all locatable doctoral dissertations completed in the United States, Canada, and some European countries that pertain to the Pacific area. Specifically, these dissertations deal with American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Papua New Guinea, Ryukyu Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Trust Territory of the Pacific…

  14. Identifying Precursors to the 2009 South Pacific tsunami?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, J. R.; Chague-Goff, C.; Etienne, S.; Lamarche, G.; Pelletier, B.; Richmond, B. M.; Strotz, L. C.; Buckley, M. L.; Wilson, K.; Dudley, W. C.; Urban, G.; Sale, M.; Dominey-Howes, D.

    2009-12-01

    The 29/30 September 2009 tsunami was a truly South Pacific event, spanning the dateline and affecting Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Fiji, Wallis & Futuna, and the Marquesas. Notable historical tsunamis in the region include the 1960 Chilean tsunami and a 1917 one from a source similar to the 2009 event. The historic record of large tsunamis varies between Pacific Island Countries (PICs), but it is short, rarely exceeding 200 years. It is sufficiently long however, to indicate that the tsunami hazard in the region may be high, but sufficiently short to give an extremely limited understanding of the hazard. Sadly, there are almost no South Pacific palaeotsunami data available to give a longer time and magnitude record of potential precursor events. Core and trench work in Samoa and Wallis & Futuna reveals evidence for several possible palaeotsunamis. There are up to six sand layers with associated paleosols in Samoa, and up to four in Futuna. At Tavai in Futuna, there is also an oral tradition associated with evidence of a surface boulder scatter field, and probably a sand layer overlying a past occupation site. These data are compelling and a tsunami source seems likely. This event is currently undated. On a note of caution however, sand and paleosol interbeds are common in the sandy coastal plains of tropical Pacific islands. Possible causes include cyclones and tsunamis, and it will therefore be necessary to establish diagnostic criteria to help distinguish between these different modes of formation. If these are palaeotsunamis then whether they relate to regional or distant events is also yet to be determined. Ultimately, more precise source identification will likely have to wait until a more comprehensive palaeotsunami dataset has been established for PICs. Mulivai - south coast of Samoa: Trench showing the 2009 South Pacific tsunami with at least two underlying sand unit and one palaeosol. Photo: C. Chagué-Goff

  15. Fiscal and monetary policies in the South Pacific Island countries: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, T K

    2000-06-01

    This paper evaluates the fiscal and monetary policies of South Pacific Island Countries (SPICs) in terms of its efficacy on economic growth. To this effect, the backgrounds on the existing fiscal and monetary policies are discussed with emphasis on their inefficiencies and limitations. In addition, the findings of an empirical study conducted in the countries of Fiji, Tonga, Vanatau, and Samoa regarding the efficacy of the policies are presented. The results, which were subjected to various tests of statistical significance, indicate that both policies were ineffective in all four SPICs. However, monetary policy had a positive impact on growth in Fiji, Tonga, and Vanatau. In view of such, several policy implications are cited, including 1) that delays and inefficiencies involved in the execution of public projects should be minimized; 2) quality and components of public expenditures is of critical significance; and 3) financial sectors should be improved.

  16. Tropical cyclone perceptions, impacts and adaptation in the Southwest Pacific: an urban perspective from Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Andrew D.; Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Kiem, Anthony S.; Royle, Stephen A.

    2016-05-01

    The destruction caused by tropical cyclone (TC) Pam in March 2015 is considered one of the worst natural disasters in the history of Vanuatu. It has highlighted the need for a better understanding of TC impacts and adaptation in the Southwest Pacific (SWP) region. Therefore, the key aims of this study are to (i) understand local perceptions of TC activity, (ii) investigate impacts of TC activity and (iii) uncover adaptation strategies used to offset the impacts of TCs. To address these aims, a survey (with 130 participants from urban areas) was conducted across three SWP small island states (SISs): Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga (FVT). It was found that respondents generally had a high level of risk perception and awareness of TCs and the associated physical impacts, but lacked an understanding of the underlying weather conditions. Responses highlighted that current methods of adaptation generally occur at the local level, immediately prior to a TC event (preparation of property, gathering of food, finding a safe place to shelter). However higher level adaptation measures (such as the modification to building structures) may reduce vulnerability further. Finally, we discuss the potential of utilising weather-related traditional knowledge and non-traditional knowledge of empirical and climate-model-based weather forecasts to improve TC outlooks, which would ultimately reduce vulnerability and increase adaptive capacity. Importantly, lessons learned from this study may result in the modification and/or development of existing adaptation strategies.

  17. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, Sandra; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Swem, T.; Brimm, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency.

  18. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S.L.; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Swem, T.; Brimm, D.J.; White, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency. ?? 2011 The Authors.

  19. A new species of iguana Brachylophus Cuvier 1829 (Sauria: Iguania: Iguanidae) from Gau Island, Fiji Islands.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert N; Niukula, Jone; Watling, Dick; Harlow, Peter S

    2017-06-06

    The south Pacific iguanas (Brachylophus) currently have three recognized living species in Fiji.  Recent surveys have uncovered more specific variation (morphological and genetic) within the genus and have better defined the geographic ranges of the named species.  One of these recent discoveries is a strikingly different iguana from all other island populations in Fiji which is restricted to Gau Island of the Lomaiviti Province.  Gau is the fifth largest island in Fiji and maintains excellent upland forests in the higher elevations.  We describe this population from Gau Island as a new species, Brachylophus gau sp. nov., in recognition of its type locality.

  20. Deep earthquakes beneath the Fiji Basin, SW Pacific: Earth's most intense deep seismicity in stagnant slabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okal, E.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that many of the deep earthquakes beneath the Fiji Basin occur in slab material that has been detached and foundered to the bottom of the transition zone or has been laid down by trench migration in a similar recumbent position. Since nowhere else in the Earth do so many earthquakes occur in slabs stagnated in the transition zone, these earthquakes merit closer study. Accordingly, we have assembled from historical and modern data a comprehensive catalogue of the relocated hypocenters and focal mechanisms of well-located deep events in the geographic area between the bottoms of the main Vanuatu and Tonga Wadati-Benioff zones. Two regions of deep seismogenesis are recognized there: (i) 163 deep shocks have occurred north of 15??S in the Vityaz Group from 1949 to 1996. These seismological observations and the absence of other features characteristic of active subduction suggest that the Vityaz group represents deep failure in a detached slab that has foundered to a horizontal orientation near the bottom of the transition zone. (ii) Another group of nearly 50 'outboard' deep shocks occur between about 450 and 660 km depth, west of the complexly buckled and offset western edge of the Tonga Wadati-Benioff zone. Their geometry is in the form of two or possibly three small-circle arcs that roughly parallel the inferred motion of Tonga trench migration. Earthquakes in the southernmost of these arcs occur in a recumbent high-seismic-wavespeed slab anomaly that connects both to the main inclined Tonga anomaly to the east and a lower mantle anomaly to the west [Van der Hilst, R., 1995. Complex morphology of subducted lithosphere in the mantle beneath the Tonga trench. Nature, Vol. 374, pp. 154-157.]. Both groups show complexity in their focal mechanisms. The major question raised by these observations is the cause of this apparent temporary arrest in the descent of the Tonga slab into the lower mantle. We approach these questions by considering the

  1. Moving Up the Ranks: Chiefly Status, Prestige, and Schooling in Colonial Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carmen M.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a conflict analysis of colonial schooling in Fiji, tracing how imported schooling was incorporated into indigenous structures of status differentiation. It begins with a discussion of the chieftaincy system as the socio-political institution in place in this South Pacific archipelago when European explorers and missionaries…

  2. Between Academic Theory and Folk Wisdom: Local Discourse on Differential Educational Attainment in Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carmen M.

    2001-01-01

    In the multiethnic South Pacific nation of Fiji--a former British colony--the impact of Western theoretical hegemony on educational discourse is evident. Results of extensive fieldwork show how themes of achievement motivation, differential valuation of education, and cultural deficit theory combine with surviving colonial discourse and…

  3. The South Pacific Forestry Development Programme

    Treesearch

    Tang Hon Tat

    1992-01-01

    Only a few countries in the South Pacific are large enough for industrial forestry to be a key component of the national economy, but forests provide benefits to many people. The United Nations FA0 South Pacific Forestry Development Programme was established in April 1988, at Port Vila, Vanuatu, with a $385,000 budget, and 14 nations participating. The Programme's...

  4. Apollo XIII Spacecraft - Splashdown - South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-17

    S70-35652 (17 April 1970) --- The Apollo 13 spacecraft heads toward a splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean. The Apollo 13 Command Module splashed down in the South Pacific at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970. Note the capsule and its parachutes just visible against a gap in the dark clouds.

  5. New host and distributional records for Cryptosporidium sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from lizards (Sauria: Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu, South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1993, 295 lizards, comprising 21 species in 2 families (Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands, Fiji, Palau, Takapoto, and Vanuatu in the South Pacific, were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Only 6 lizards (2%) were found to be passing Cryptosporidium oocysts in their feces, including 2 of 30 (7%) Oceania geckos, Gehyra oceanica, from Rarotonga, Cook Islands, and 4 of 26 (15%) Pacific blue-tailed skinks, Emoia caeruleocauda, from Efate Island, Vanuatu. This represents the largest survey for Cryptosporidium in Pacific island lizards, and we document 2 new host and 2 new locality records for this parasite genus.

  6. Decadal and Lower Frequency South Pacific Climate Variability Since 1619 AD from Replicated Coral Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, B. K.; Wellington, G. M.; Kaplan, A.; Demenocal, P. B.

    2004-12-01

    both influenced to varying degrees by the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) one explanation for the \\delta18O trend is that the SPCZ has been intensifying over the last 200 years with increasing cloud cover and rainfall as the surface ocean warmed. On decadal-interdecadal time-scales, comparison of the Fiji and Rarotonga coral \\delta18O series to other coral \\delta18O records from New Caledonia and the Great Barrier Reef indicates that some interdecadal climate shifts apparently were related to changes in the SPCZ and others apparently were unrelated to the SPCZ. This observation suggests the possibility that decadal-interdecadal climate variability in the South Pacific has multiple sources, and may at times be related to higher latitude South Pacific processes.

  7. A new species of iguana Brachylophus Cuvier 1829 (Sauria: Iguania: Iguanidae) from Gau Island, Fiji Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert N.; Niukula, Jone; Watling, Dick; Harlow, Peter S.

    2017-01-01

    The south Pacific iguanas (Brachylophus) currently have three recognized living species in Fiji.  Recent surveys have uncovered more specific variation (morphological and genetic) within the genus and have better defined the geographic ranges of the named species.  One of these recent discoveries is a strikingly different iguana from all other island populations in Fiji which is restricted to Gau Island of the Lomaiviti Province.  Gau is the fifth largest island in Fiji and maintains excellent upland forests in the higher elevations.  We describe this population from Gau Island as a new species, Brachylophus gau sp. nov., in recognition of its type locality.

  8. Changes in South Pacific anthropogenic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Jason F.; Millero, Frank J.; Sabine, Christopher L.

    2011-12-01

    The changes in anthropogenic CO2 are evaluated in the South Pacific, along the meridional line P18 (110°W) and the zonal line P06 (32°S), using the extended multiple linear regression (eMLR) method. The structure of the column inventory of anthropogenic CO2 on P18 is similar to the southern section of P16 in the central South Pacific (150°W), but the overall increase is greater by approximately 5-10 μmol kg-1. The value of the anthropogenic CO2 inventory on P18 is in agreement at the crossover point of an earlier evaluation of P06. Subsequent changes in pH due to the increase in anthropogenic CO2 are also evaluated. The change in pH is determined from the changes in anthropogenic CO2 and do not reflect variability in other decadal signals. For both cruise tracks, the average annual change in pH is -0.0016 mol kg-1 yr-1. This value is in good agreement with the average decrease in pH in the North Pacific, at the Hawaii Times Series and the subtropical North Atlantic. The uptake rates of anthropogenic CO2 are within reasonable agreement with similar studies in the South Pacific. There is evidence for greater uptake of anthropogenic CO2 in the western South Pacific and is attributed to the formation of subtropical Mode Water in the region.

  9. 1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW DOWNSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  10. 2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FORMER DENVER, SOUTH PARK AND PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE OVER CHALK CREEK, NEAR MT. PRINCETON HOT SPRINGS. VIEW UPSTREAM - Denver South Park & Pacific Railroad Bridge, Spanning Chalk Creek, near Mount Princeton Hot Spring, Romley (historical), Chaffee County, CO

  11. The University of the South Pacific: Context, Purpose and Prospect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Grant

    1984-01-01

    The history, development, and administration of the University of the South Pacific--a decade-old, multinational, Third World university serving the south Pacific region--are outlined, and issues of academic freedom and institutional purpose are discussed. (MSE)

  12. [West and South West Pacific Ocean Islands: General Information and a Bibliography of English-Language Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Robert

    This collection of 10 bibliographies covers islands located in the west and southwest region of the Pacific Ocean. The islands include American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Pohnpei, Tonga, Truk, Nauru and the New Hebrides (Vanuatu). All the bibliographies focus on education, and all except two (American Samoa and Fiji)…

  13. [West and South West Pacific Ocean Islands: General Information and a Bibliography of English-Language Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Robert

    This collection of 10 bibliographies covers islands located in the west and southwest region of the Pacific Ocean. The islands include American Samoa, Fiji, Guam, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Pohnpei, Tonga, Truk, Nauru and the New Hebrides (Vanuatu). All the bibliographies focus on education, and all except two (American Samoa and Fiji)…

  14. Agricultural Education in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, J. A.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a paper presenting the results of a survey conducted in 1967 by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations at the request of the South Pacific Commission. The survey included existing facilities for agricultural education in the several territories…

  15. INTELSAT et al. in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses services provided to the island countries of the South Pacific Basin by the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT), a 110 member-country cooperative that operates a global satellite system. The services include provision of basic satellite communications facilities, technical assistance and training, and free…

  16. Agricultural Education in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, J. A.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a paper presenting the results of a survey conducted in 1967 by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations at the request of the South Pacific Commission. The survey included existing facilities for agricultural education in the several territories…

  17. Interview: Mr. Stephen Chee, team leader, UNFPA country support team (CST) for the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    1993-09-01

    The UNFPA country support team (CST) for the South Pacific is the action-arm at the regional level of the new Technical Support Services arrangement introduced by the agency. Operational since April 1993, the CST currently covers the following Pacific island countries or territories: the Cook Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. The CST office is located in Suva, Fiji, with the main goal of strengthening national capacity and building self-reliance in the countries of the region. The office in Suva is currently staffed by six highly qualified advisors with extensive experience in the population and related fields; two more advisors are expected to join the Team in early 1994. The Team is well equipped to provide countries and territories of the region with a wide range of technical support services ranging from ad hoc technical advisory services to the conceptualization and development of comprehensive population policies and programs. Services are offered in the areas of basic data collection, processing, and research in population dynamics; population policy formulation, evaluation, and implementation; family planning and maternal-child health; information, education, and communication; women in population and development; and population program management. The team also plays an advocacy role in mainstreaming population concerns into the programs and activities of international, regional, and national organizations. The team leader responds to questions about population problems experienced by the countries served, the scope of UNFPA assistance to country governments in the subregion, the importance of population information in the subregion, and how Asia-Pacific POPIN may help the team and countries served.

  18. Union List of Serials in Pacific Island Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlene G., Comp.; Yoshida, Patricia, Comp.

    This union list contains the serial holdings from Pacific Island libraries, including the University of the South Pacific Library (Fiji), the University of Guam Robert F. Kennedy Library, Guam Public Library, College of Micronesia-FSM Library, College of the Marshall Islands Library, Micronesian Seminar Library, Palau Community College Library,…

  19. SRTM Stereo Pair: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930s. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This stereoscopic view was generated using preliminary topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data from the top (north) to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Also, colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to pink at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1300 meters (4300 feet) of total relief. The stereoscopic effect was created by first draping the shading and colors back over the topographic data and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. The 3-D perception is achieved by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the

  20. SRTM Stereo Pair: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930s. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This stereoscopic view was generated using preliminary topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data from the top (north) to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Also, colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to pink at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1300 meters (4300 feet) of total relief. The stereoscopic effect was created by first draping the shading and colors back over the topographic data and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. The 3-D perception is achieved by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the

  1. Decadal changes in South Pacific sea surface temperatures and the relationship to the Pacific decadal oscillation and upper ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Wu, Henry C.; Dassié, Emilie P.; Schrag, Daniel P.

    2015-04-01

    Decadal changes in Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and upper ocean heat content (OHC) remain poorly understood. We present an annual average composite coral Sr/Ca-derived SST time series extending back to 1791 from Fiji, Tonga, and Rarotonga (FTR) in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) sensitive region of the southwest Pacific. Decadal SST maxima between 1805 and 1830 Common Era (C.E.) indicate unexplained elevated SSTs near the end of the Little Ice Age. The mean period of decadal SST variability in this region has a period near 25 years. Decades of warmer (cooler) FTR SST co-occur with PDO negative (positive) phases since at least ~1930 C.E. and positively correlate with South Pacific OHC (0-700 m). FTR SST is also inversely correlated with decadal changes in equatorial Pacific SST as measured by coral Sr/Ca. Collectively, these results support the fluctuating trade wind-shallow meridional overturning cell mechanism for decadal modulation of Pacific SSTs and OHC.

  2. Sunglint in South Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-07-24

    AST-19-1555 (24 July 1975) --- A sunglint in the South Western Pacific Ocean, as photographed from the Apollo spacecraft in Earth orbit during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission. The island is Bougainville of the Solomon Islands group. The horizon of Earth is in the background. The picture was taken at an altitude of 231 kilometers (143 statute miles), with a 70mm Hasselblad camera using medium-speed Ektachrome QX-807 type film.

  3. Automation of the University of the South Pacific Library and the Pacific Information Centre. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Daniel

    The Pacific Information Center (PIC) was established in 1983 to identify, collect, and record information about materials from and relating to the South Pacific region. The project involves sharing access and information among countries in this region. PIC, which works in conjunction with the University of the South Pacific (USP) Library, receives…

  4. Community structure and diversity of scavenging amphipods from bathyal to hadal depths in three South Pacific Trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Nichola C.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Clark, Malcolm R.; Kilgallen, Niamh M.; Linley, Thomas; Mayor, Dan J.; Jamieson, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    There are few biological datasets that span large bathymetric ranges with sufficient resolution to identify trends across the abyssal and hadal transition zone, particularly over multiple trenches. Here, scavenging Amphipoda were collected from three trenches in the South Pacific Ocean at bathyal to hadal depths. Diversity and community structure were examined from stations within the Kermadec Trench (1490-9908 m) and New Hebrides Trench (2000-6948 m) and additional data were included from the South Fiji Basin (4000 m) and Peru-Chile Trench (4602-8074 m). The hadal community structure of the Kermadec and New Hebrides trenches were distinct from the surrounding abyssal and bathyal depths and correlated to hydrostatic pressure and POC flux. Low POC flux in the New Hebrides Trench and South Fiji Basin best explained the dissimilarity in abyssal community structure from those of the disparate Kermadec and Peru-Chile trenches. POC flux also best explained patterns in hadal community structure with the Kermadec and New Hebrides Trench communities showing greater similarity to each other than to the eutrophic Peru-Chile Trench. Hydrostatic pressure was the strongest driver of intra-trench assemblage composition in all trench environments. A unimodal pattern of species diversity, peaking between 4000 and 5000 m, was best explained by hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  5. Influence of South Pacific Subtropical Dipole on South Pacific Convergence Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.

    2016-12-01

    This study analyses the influence of the South Pacific Subtropical Dipole(SPSD) on South Pacific Convergence Zone(SPCZ) and explores its dynamic processes by using SST data HadISST of Hadley center and atmospheric reanalysis data of NCEP-NCAR. Analyses show that South Pacific Subtropical Dipole is linearly independent of ENSO, and SPSD with a strong phase locking peaks in summer(12 2). The location of SPCZ precipitation during January-March is remarkably affected by SPSD event during December-February, and SPCZ precipitation zone moves north and the location of precipitation moves south during negative dipole event. Northeast pole (warmer SST) has positive precipitation anomaly because of lower pressure and convergence of moisture in this area during positive dipole event years. However southwest pole (cooler SST) with higher pressure is dominated by divergence of moisture in order to less precipitation, so SPCZ precipitation zone moves north and the location of precipitation is opposite during negative dipole event. The results of this study provide more knowledge of relationship between SPSD and SPCZ, and it's better to understand climate change and air-sea interaction in south Pacific

  6. Ambae Island, Vanuatu (South Pacific)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.

    Location: 15.4 degree south latitude, 167.9 degrees east longitude Orientation: North toward the top, Mercator projection Size: 36.8 by 27.8 kilometers (22.9 by 17.3 miles) Image Data: shaded and colored SRTM elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  7. Ambae Island, Vanuatu (South Pacific)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.

    Location: 15.4 degree south latitude, 167.9 degrees east longitude Orientation: North toward the top, Mercator projection Size: 36.8 by 27.8 kilometers (22.9 by 17.3 miles) Image Data: shaded and colored SRTM elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  8. Growth increments and stable isotope variation in shells of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent bivalve mollusk Bathymodiolus brevior from the North Fiji Basin, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, Bernd R.; Giere, Olav

    2005-10-01

    Bathymodiolus brevior [von Cosel, R., Métivier, B., Hashimoto, J., 1994. Three new species of Bathymodiolus (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) from hydrothermal vents in the Lau Basin and the North Fiji Basin, western Pacific, and the Snake Pit Area, mid-Atlantic ridge. Veliger 37, 374-392] a bivalve mollusk living at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, exhibits daily microgrowth structures in its shell. This interpretation is substantiated by various lines of evidence: (1) similar shell portions of contemporaneous specimens from the same locality contain almost the same number of microincrements; (2) the number of microincrements coincides with the expected number of days in which shell portions of Bathymodiolus spp. form; (3) the width of such microincrements compares well with daily growth rates estimated for the close relative B. thermophilus [Kenk, V.C., Wilson, B.R., 1985. A new mussel (Bivalvia, Mytilidae) from hydrothermal vents in the Galapagos rift-zone. Malacologia 26, 253-271]; (4) different specimens from the same site show similar microgrowth curves. In addition, we found support for tide-controlled shell growth. Daily shell growth rates fluctuate on a fortnightly basis. Some shell portions also revealed the typical tide-controlled microgrowth pattern commonly observed in intertidal bivalves. Based on the analyses of lunar daily growth increments, a growth curve for B. brevior was computed: X t=14 cm-(14-0.04 cm) e -0.26t. This curve enables estimation of ontogenetic age from shell length. According to this equation, B. brevior reaches its maximum shell length of 14 cm at about age 18. Shell isotope analyses suggest that some major shell growth interruptions or retardations are related to extremely active hydrothermal venting activity. However, shell growth also stopped during periods of low venting implying physiological controls on shell formation. Results of the present study demonstrate that shells of B. brevior provide calendars and environmental data loggers that

  9. Iron Fertilization in the Subantarctic South Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winckler, G.; Anderson, R. F.; Schwartz, R.; Park, J.; Pahnke, K.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Lamy, F.; Gersonde, R.

    2014-12-01

    The scarcity of iron limits marine export production and carbon uptake in about 25% of the global ocean where the concentration of major nutrients is high, yet phytoplankton growth is low. Of these, the Southern Ocean is the region where variations in iron availability can have the largest effect on Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystems, both in the modern and in the past. Recent work in the Subantarctic South Atlantic (Martínez-Garcia et al., 2009, 2014, Anderson et al., 2014) suggests that dust-driven iron fertilization lowered atmospheric CO2 from about 225 ppm to 185 ppm in the latter half of each glacial cycle of the late Pleistocene, with the increase in Subantarctic productivity consuming a greater fraction of the surface nutrients and thus driving more storage of carbon in the ocean interior. The opposite effect, reduced iron fertilization, has been hypothesized to drive the 15-20 ppm increase during Heinrich Events in the last glacial cycle (Martínez -Garcia et al, 2014). The vast majority of the information we have so far is from observations in the Subantarctic Atlantic and therefore our current estimates of the role of the Southern Ocean in lowering CO2 rely critically on the assumed extrapolation of the results from the Atlantic Sector to the entire Southern Ocean. However, the Pacific Sector of the Southern Ocean not only accounts for the largest surface area of the Subantarctic Southern Ocean, but the deep Pacific Ocean also can be inferred - based on its volume - to have stored the largest fraction of carbon that was extracted from the atmosphere and from the terrestrial biosphere during glacial periods. Here we report first results from a set of cores from the Subantarctic Pacific (PS75, Lamy et al 2014), including a high-resolution sediment core (PS75/056-1) from the flank of the East Pacific Rise that allows to resolve millennial year variability over the past glacial cycle. We test how tightly dust and

  10. A Geochemical Transect Across the Lau and North Fiji Basins: New Evidence for the Distribution of Multiple Mantle Plume Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. A.; Jackson, M. G.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Arculus, R. J.; Conatser, C. S.; Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Blusztajn, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lau and North Fiji backarc basins are located in a tectonically complex region of the South Pacific, where the upper mantle may have been modified by up to five hotspots (Samoa, Rurutu, Rarotonga, Macdonald, and Louisville), each with distinct geochemical fingerprints. We present new Hf, Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic data for basaltic samples dredged from seven areas along an east-west transect spanning the Lau and North Fiji basins to determine the possible influence and distribution of these various hotspot sources. We find that the isotope ratios of nearly all samples can be explained by mixing a depleted mantle component, which is ubiquitous in the Lau Basin, with a component similar to that found in Samoan shield (EMII) and/or rejuvenated (EMI) lavas. Lavas as far southwest as the Fiji Triple Junction (North Fiji Basin) show enriched geochemical signatures (87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb up to 0.7037 and 18.635 respectively, and 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf down to 0.51285 and 0.283023, respectively) trending toward Samoa. This observation extends the range of Samoan influence into the North Fiji Basin 400 km south of its previous observed extent at South Pandora Ridge. The few samples that cannot be explained solely by incorporation of Samoan material are from the northeastern Lau Basin (Falloon et al., 2007) and host a dilute HIMU component that may relate to the incorporation of material from the Rurutu hotspot. This component is not observed further to the west in the Lau and North Fiji basins. A ubiquitous EMI signature in the region may be linked to the Rarotonga hotspot. New dredges from the northeast Lau Basin may give clearer signals that will reveal the identity of the enriched plume component.

  11. Variability of South Pacific Tropical Water Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Fine, R. A.; Qu, T.

    2014-12-01

    Collection of Argo data provides an opportunity to carefully examine South Pacific Tropical Water (SPTW) subduction rate variability. SPTW is characterized by a vertical salinity maximum exceeding 36.2 psu centered at 20°S and 120°W and lying in the upper thermocline between 24.0 and 25.0 σθ. Subduction rates for SPTW for two different periods are calculated using two methods. Monthly one degree by one degree Argo data covering the South Pacific are used to calculate subduction rates from September 2005 to August 2013, also lateral induction and vertical pumping are calculated. There are two spatial subduction maxima, and the lateral induction process dominates in both maxima. Subduction rates from Argo data vary from 15 to 26 m/yr +/- 7.5% during the 8 year period. Subduction rates are shown to be positively and highly correlated with Southern Oscillation Index. Additionally, using CFC-12 data from the 1990s World Ocean Circulation Experiment, average subduction rate is calculated to be 35 +/- 16.5 m/yr. Some of the difference between Argo and tracer rates is due to a difference in the methods, and some difference may be due to decadal variability. Thus, SPTW subduction rates are shown to vary on interannual and possible decadal time scales.

  12. Population explosion in the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Knowles, B

    1966-01-01

    The introduction of family planning in the populous Fiji Islands has lowered the birthrate from 41.8/1000 in 1959 to 35.9 in 1965. Studies of women taking oral contraceptives and wearing IUDs have shown that both methods are compatible with the Fiji women, although the author considers the IUD the most suitable method, being acceptable, cheap, safe, relatively free from side effects, and requiring only 1 act of motivation. Among the first 1000 IUD wearers, there were 36 pregnancies, 22 occurring with the IUD (Lippes loop) in place. Of the 67 users of oral contraceptives studied, there were no pregnancies among those who took the pills as directed. 2 women, who took them irregularly, got pregnant. Side effects were minimal and the withdrawal rate was low.

  13. Services for people with communication disability in Fiji: barriers and drivers of change.

    PubMed

    Hopf, Suzanne C; McLeod, Sharynne

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization's World report on disability calls upon all nations to 'remove the barriers which prevent [people with disabilities] from participating in their communities; getting a quality education, finding decent work, and having their voices heard' (p. 5). People with communication disability (PWCD), as a consequence of their atypical communication, may be more likely to be excluded from society, and denied their basic human rights, than other people with disability. Fiji, a multicultural and multilingual nation in the south-western Pacific Ocean, has limited services for PWCD. Service providers in Fiji include disability care workers, special education teachers, traditional healers, and a small number of visiting volunteer speech-language pathologists. This paper outlines the historical and current barriers to, and drivers of change for, service development for PWCD in Fiji. Five barriers to service development for PWCD in Fiji were identified. (1) A major structural barrier is the small population size to develop appropriate infrastructure including professional education programs. (2) Geographical barriers include the dispersed geography across 300 islands, low population density, the rural-urban divide, and risk of disaster from cyclones and flooding. (3) Linguistic diversity, while culturally important, can present a barrier to the provision of quality services that are available in the languages spoken by PWCD. (4) Cultural barriers include historical political instability, although Fiji has become more stable due to the recent democratic elections. The social climate affects development of services that are appropriate for different dominant cultural groups. (5) Financial barriers include low gross domestic product, low financial security and low human development index; however, the financial outlook for Fiji is steadily improving due to the change in political stability. Three levels of drivers of change were identified. Macro

  14. Revision of the ant genus Proceratium Roger (Hymenoptera, Proceratiinae) in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Hita Garcia, Francisco; Sarnat, Eli M.; Economo, Evan P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Fiji archipelago harbours a surprisingly diverse and endemic ant fauna, despite its isolated and remote location in the South Pacific. The ant genus Proceratium is present on Fiji with three endemic species, of which Proceratium oceanicum De Andrade, 2003 and Proceratium relictum Mann, 1921 were previously known. In this study we describe the third species: Proceratium vinaka sp. n. All three species are members of the widespread and species-rich Proceratium silaceum clade. In order to integrate the new species into the current taxonomic system, we present an illustrated identification key to the worker caste of the three Fijian species. In addition, we provide a detailed description of Proceratium vinaka, as well as species accounts for the other two species, which include diagnoses, taxonomic discussions, specimen photographs, and a distribution map. PMID:25684999

  15. Piezomagnetic monitoring in the South Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin, Michael T.

    1984-11-01

    Data from an array of piezomagnetic stations in the South Pacific Islands indicate that noise limitations on piezomagnetic stress monitoring reported for California ( Mueller and Johnston, 1981; Johnston et al., 1984) are probably pessimistic since they seem to include significant diurnal residual. Raw station differences could be significant at the 1.0 nT level out to distances of several hundred kilometres. Two large earthquakes have occurred within the network, and no coseismic anomalies were observed. However, changes in observed magnetic field for several stations within 200 km of the earthquakes indicate that stress propagation effects are observable prior to the events, and that these effects dominate the simple elastic effects previously investigated which accompany the stress drops for moderate to large earthquakes.

  16. Technical and Vocational Education and Training in Fiji--An Overview. Case Studies on Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delailomaloma, N. H.

    The Fiji economy has undergone structural transformation as the importance of agriculture, construction, social and community services, finance, and insurance declined, whereas that of hotels and catering, transportation, communication, and mining rose. Capacity utilization, including absorption of already trained and educated people into…

  17. Masculinity, mental health and Violence in Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Fiji and Kiribati.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Graham

    2007-09-01

    This paper presents the findings of a four country study conducted by the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific-International through its affiliates in Fiji Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea and Kiribati to demonstrate the linkage between young men, mental health and violence in the Pacific. The findings common among the four studies arise from the sociocultural and economic transitions occurring across the Pacific Region, where recent years have shown that the Pacific lifestyle has become increasingly stressful and violent. Limited opportunity to participate in the modern lifestyle and its economy has led to personal mental stress, social exclusion, unemployment and the growth of a subgroup of disaffected young people, who resort to a range of means to acquire their daily needs and, among whom, the norms that govern the use of violence differ from those of the general community.

  18. Interweaving Ideas and Patchwork Programmes: Nutrition Projects in Colonial Fiji, 1945-60.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Sarah Clare

    2017-04-01

    The influence of a range of actors is discernible in nutrition projects during the period after the Second World War in the South Pacific. Influences include: international trends in nutritional science, changing ideas within the British establishment about state responsibility for the welfare of its citizens and the responsibility of the British Empire for its subjects; the mixture of outside scrutiny and support for projects from post-war international and multi-governmental organisations, such as the South Pacific Commission. Nutrition research and projects conducted in Fiji for the colonial South Pacific Health Service and the colonial government also sought to address territory-specific socio-political issues, especially Fiji's complex ethnic poli,tics. This study examines the subtle ways in which nutrition studies and policies reflected and reinforced these wider socio-political trends. It suggests that historians should approach health research and policy as a patchwork of territorial, international, and regional ideas and priorities, rather than looking for a single causality.

  19. Tectonic Evolution and Midplate Volcanism in the South Pacific

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    Changes in morphology of the Marquesas Fracture Zone are correlated with small changes in Pacific- Farallon relative motion. The simple flexural...vertical slip after leaving the active transform. One such small change in plate motion is documented in the Southern Austral Island region of the South...Pacific. A twelve degree clockwise change in Pacific- Farallon relative motion occurred around fifty million years ago. This Eocene change in spreading

  20. Boron isotopes in Fiji corals and precise ocean acidification reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, E.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Cabioch, G.; Louvat, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Gehlen, M.; Bopp, L.; Paterne, M.

    2009-12-01

    Within the framework of EPOCA (European Project on OCean Acidification ) and the French INSU project PHARE, we are adapting the boron isotope technique to ancient corals with the scope to reconstruct “past” ocean pH changes. In this study, we applied the technique to surface seawater pH reconstructions based on tropical 20th century corals from Fiji. Models estimated a pH drop close to 0.07 pH units in the South Western Equatorial Pacific since the onset of the industrial era (Sabine et al., 2004). To reconstruct such a change in pH, the isotopic composition of boron (δ11B) in coral material has to be determined with a precision better than ±0.2‰. This analytical criteria was meet on a Multi-Collector ICPMS Neptune. We selected a Porites coral for the reconstruction of the time dependent evolution of pH. Our results show a progressive decrease of seawater pH between 1900 and 2000 of 0.08 +/- 0.02 pH units. This decrease in pH agrees with projections of surface ocean pH for the Fiji area obtained with the biogeochemical ocean circulation model NEMO-PISCES. Our results further reveal that seawater pH changes in the Fiji area are strongly affected by regional processes such as the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) tightly linked the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). This last observation highlights the potential of the δ11B-pH technique for studying past changes of ocean dynamics. Hönisch, B., Hemming, N. G., Grottoli, A. G., Amat, A., Hanson, G. N. & Bijma, J. (2004). Assessing scleractinian corals as recoders for paleo-pH: Empirical calibration and vital effects. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 68(18), 3675-3685. Sabine, C. L., Feely, R. A., Gruber, N., Key, R. M., Lee, K., Bullister, J. L., Wanninkhof, R., Wong, C. S., Wallace, D. W. R., Tilbrook, B., Millero, F. J., Peng, T. H., Kozyr, A., Ono, T. & Rios, A. F. (2004). The Oceanic Sink for Anthropogenic CO2. Science, 305, 367-371.

  1. 36. ORCHARD LINE, LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING PACIFIC FRUIT PACKING HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ORCHARD LINE, LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING PACIFIC FRUIT PACKING HOUSE NEAR END OF LINE - Yakima Valley Transportation Company Interurban Railroad, Connecting towns of Yakima, Selah & Wiley City, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  2. Cyberspace News on Campus: The South Pacific Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robie, David

    2002-01-01

    Explains that since 1998, the Pacific Journalism Online training website at the University of the South Pacific has provided a problem-based approach to Internet news gathering and production based on real media assignments. Outlines the "reality" course methodology and strategies for providing news training from a campus-based newsroom.…

  3. The future of surgery in Papua New Guinea and the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Watters, D A

    1996-09-01

    Surgery in the South Pacific is different in many respects from surgery in Australia and New Zealand. It is primarily the surgery of trauma, infection, advanced malignancy, hollow-tube obstruction and congenital abnormalities. Specific tropical infections such as tuberculosis, typhoid, pigbel and amoebiasis occur regularly but constitute only a small proportion of all cases. The patients tend to be young, rural and poor, and often present late because access to surgical services is limited. The treatment patients receive is also compromised by a lack of resources--the result of underfunding and inefficient administration. Standards for appropriate surgical practice should be determined in-country and based at least on surgical audit and clinical studies. Even though Western diseases are emerging in the tropics, the best management may sometimes be different. Training of national surgeons is a priority if a sustainable surgical service is to be established. Such training is more effectively carried out in the home country, or at least in one with similar pathology and problems, rather than overseas. Project aid should support these schemes and encourage regional co-operation through the Fiji and Papua New Guinea medical schools. There remains an important role for visiting surgical specialists, but they need to ensure that they transfer skills and encourage the professional development of promising local doctors rather than simply focusing on treating patients.

  4. Seismic hazard of American Samoa and neighboring South Pacific Islands--methods, data, parameters, and results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Harmsen, Stephen C.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Mueller, Charles S.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Luco, Nicolas; Walling, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    American Samoa and the neighboring islands of the South Pacific lie near active tectonic-plate boundaries that host many large earthquakes which can result in strong earthquake shaking and tsunamis. To mitigate earthquake risks from future ground shaking, the Federal Emergency Management Agency requested that the U.S. Geological Survey prepare seismic hazard maps that can be applied in building-design criteria. This Open-File Report describes the data, methods, and parameters used to calculate the seismic shaking hazard as well as the output hazard maps, curves, and deaggregation (disaggregation) information needed for building design. Spectral acceleration hazard for 1 Hertz having a 2-percent probability of exceedance on a firm rock site condition (Vs30=760 meters per second) is 0.12 acceleration of gravity (1 second, 1 Hertz) and 0.32 acceleration of gravity (0.2 seconds, 5 Hertz) on American Samoa, 0.72 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 2.54 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on Tonga, 0.15 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 0.55 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on Fiji, and 0.89 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 2.77 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on the Vanuatu Islands.

  5. Shaded relief, color as height, Fiji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930's. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations top ink at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1300 meters(4300 feet) of total relief.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to

  6. Shaded relief, color as height, Fiji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930's. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations top ink at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1300 meters(4300 feet) of total relief.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to

  7. Health-Related Research Projects in Fiji and Papua New Guinea: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Fiji and Papua New Guinea Health Research Portals.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Kannan; Gowri, S

    2016-06-10

    Evidence-based medicine and evidence-based public health rely on the best available evidence generated in a specific area for it to be implemented in healthcare practice. This study assesses the range of research studies conducted in Fiji and Papua New Guinea (PNG) islands by reviewing the types of studies now registered with the respective health research registry portals. We assessed all studies registered on the Fiji Health Research Portal (FHRP) and Papua New Guinea Health Research Portal (PNGHRP) since 2014 for the following details: year of registration; study type and participants; field of research; basic statistical analyses; and multicentric or single center study. A total of 99 studies were registered in the FHRP and 6 in PNGHRP during the period under review. Nearly, one fourth of the studies from Fiji and one third from PNG islands are studies evaluating various health policies without involving or collecting data from human subjects. All the registered studies in both the islands were observational (rather than experimental). A total of 58.2% of the registered studies in FHRP and 66.7% in PNGHRP were performed as student projects. A geographic scope of 21.2% of the proposed studies in FHRP and 33.3% in PNGHRP was limited to the respective islands. We conclude from the present analysis that there is a clear need for conducting more high-quality research in both Fiji and PNG in order to meet the health needs of the respective nations. More research focusing on health needs and contributing factors to both communicable and noncommunicable diseases are the need of the hour in both of these south Pacific islands.

  8. Neon distribution in South Atlantic and South Pacific waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Roland; Roether, Wolfgang

    2003-06-01

    We present and assess the distribution of neon in South Atlantic and South Pacific waters, on the basis of more than 3000 mostly new neon data which were obtained primarily under the hydrographic program of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (predominantly southern summer to fall cruises). Data precision is better than±0.5%, and the set is internally consistent within±0.3% and partly better, and compatible with reported high-quality neon values. Using suitably averaged data (precision 0.1-0.3%), we find that the total range of neon anomalies relative to a solubility equilibrium with atmospheric neon at the observed potential temperature and salinity (using the solubilities of Weiss, J. Chem. Eng. Data 16 (1971) 235) is approximately 0-4%, and below 2000 m depth, 3-4% only. We consistently observe two types of neon depth profiles, one for the temperate-latitudes ocean, which is characterized by a near-surface maximum and a minimum in Antarctic Intermediate Water, and one for the Southern Ocean that essentially displays a steady increase with depth. The neon distribution reflects the influence of air injected by submerged air bubbles, the areal distribution of atmospheric pressure, seasonal temperature changes in the mixed layer and solar heating below it, and interaction with sea ice and glacial ice, largely in keeping with previous work. However, it appears that interaction with sea ice reduces neon anomalies distinctly less than the literature suggests. The temperate-ocean shallow maxima point to widespread subsurface heating in the course of the summer season by roughly 1 K. Among the major source water masses of the deep waters, the neon anomalies are lowest in Antarctic Intermediate Water (˜1.5%), intermediate in North Atlantic Deep Water (˜3%, confirming previous work) and similarly in Circumpolar Deep Water, and highest in Antarctic Bottom Water (˜3.8%). The anomalies in Southeast Pacific deep waters (>2500 m) are comparatively less (only˜3.3%), as

  9. Characteristics of the South Pacific subtropical surface salinity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, F.; Busecke, J. J. M.; Gordon, A. L.; Giulivi, C. F.

    2016-02-01

    The surface salinity (SSS) in the eastern South Pacific has a large maximum centered near (21°S, 120°W). It extends approximately 5000 km in the east-west direction and is bounded by the Humboldt Current on the east and the South Pacific Convergence Zone on the west. It is distinct from another much smaller and less distinct SSS maximum feature in the western South Pacific near Australia. It is associated with High evaporation and surface Ekman convergence Weak variability and seasonality on the northern side Fluctuating size driven by changes in southward extent Mean surface currents flowing toward and through the feature from the north Higher tendency for fresh anomalies on northern side These characteristics highlight the role of mesoscale stirring and northward Ekman transport in the formation and maintenance of this prominent feature.

  10. A crustal model for Zealandia and Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segev, Amit; Rybakov, Michael; Mortimer, Nick

    2012-06-01

    Existing maps of satellite (free-air) gravity and bathymetry, and the CRUST 2.0 global crustal structure model have been used to make new Bouguer gravity anomaly and crustal thickness maps of the SW Pacific region to analyse the region's crustal structure. The new maps clearly outline the limits of the rifted, largely submerged continent of Zealandia. The Bouguer gravity anomalies of ocean crust, large igneous provinces and backarc basins vary simply and predictably with age. The bathymetric Fiji Platform lies in a water depth of <500 m and is some 400 × 200 km in size. This is significantly broader than the nearby volcanic Lau-Colville or Tonga-Kermadec ridges. Prominent low Bouguer anomalies (+20 to -10 mGal) typify the Fiji Platform, New Caledonia and the northwest of Lord Howe Rise. Our analysis confirms a crustal thickness of >19 km for the entire Fiji Platform, comparable to stretched and submerged parts of Zealandia. The question whether the continental crustal thickness of Fiji is due to its actually being a rifted part of Gondwana-Zealandia or due to enhanced Eocene-Pliocene magmatism remains open, but testable, with the latter more likely. Using the new accurate 3-D crustal thickness and published radiometric dating of lavas, we estimate that the magmatic portions of Southwest Pacific Cenozoic subduction-related arcs (three Kings, Tonga and Vanuatu) have grown at net volumes which vary from 263 to ˜1400 km3 km-1 with net addition rates of 17-31 km3 km-1 Ma-1.

  11. Dissolved Neodymium Isotopes and Concentrations in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, C.; Pahnke, K.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic composition of dissolved Neodymium (expressed as ɛNd) in seawater is becoming increasingly established as a tracer for present and past water mass structure and flow paths. The South Pacific represents the largest sector of the Southern Ocean and harbors major areas of bottom and intermediate water mass formation and is therefore a key area for understanding present and past deep ocean circulation. While more dissolved Nd data are becoming available from different ocean basins, the South Pacific is still understudied with respect to the distribution of Nd isotopes and concentrations. In this study we have analyzed dissolved Nd isotopes and concentrations from 11 water column profiles across the South Pacific between 46°S and 69°S that sample all water masses. Our data show that the bottom water in the vicinity of the Ross Sea (Ross Sea Bottom water, RSBW) is represented by an ɛNd value of ~ -7, while the overlying Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) carries a signature of ɛNd = -8 to -9. The characteristic Nd isotopic signal of RSBW can be tracked along its flow path into the southeast Pacific where it progressively looses its signal through interaction with ambient CDW. The easternmost stations, closer to South America, exhibit an excursion towards radiogenic ɛNd at ≤2000 m water depth. This change towards more positive ɛNd coincides with low oxygen and high phosphate concentrations representing Pacific Deep Water (PDW) and possibly indicates water mass mixing of CDW with more radiogenic PDW. While the Nd isotopic composition shows apparent variations between stations and different water masses, the concentration profiles show a rather uniform and gradual increase with depth, a pattern typical for open ocean settings. Spatial and vertical contrasts in Nd isotopic values throughout the South Pacific indicate that Nd isotopes can be used as a water mass tracer in this region. It is reasonable to infer that local lithology in the Ross Sea influenced

  12. The northern New Hebrides back-arc troughs: history and relation with the North Fiji basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvis, Philippe; Pelletier, Bernard

    1989-12-01

    The New Hebrides back-arc troughs (southwest Pacific) are located between the New Hebrides trench-arc system and the active North Fiji marginal basin. They are restricted to the southern and northern segments of the arc and were generally related to effects of the Indo-Australian subducting plate (rolling-back and/or subduction of the d'Entrecasteaux ridge). A detailed bathymetric and magnetic survey over the northern back-arc troughs is used to propose a new model for the origin of the New Hebrides back-arc troughs. The northern troughs extend over a width of 60 km and are composed of N-S trending grabens and horsts, discontinuous along strike and associated with volcanism. The troughs are disrupted southward at 13° 30'S, where the Hazel Holme fracture zone intercepts the New Hebrides island arc. The E-W trending Hazel Holme fracture zone is an extensional feature bisecting the North Fiji basin. In its western end, the Hazel Hohne fracture zone is composed of a succession of horsts and grabens striking N90 ° -N100 ° E. Geometrical and structural relationships between the back-arc troughs and the Hazel Holme fracture zone suggest that both these extensional features result from the same process and are closely linked. The northern troughs-western end of the Hazel Holme fracture zone region is dominated by N130°-135°E trending magnetic lineations typical of oceanic crust. These lineations are oblique to the horsts and grabens systems, and are characteristic of the old North Fiji basin oceanic crust. Consequently we conclude that the northern back-arc troughs are partly developed on the North Fiji basin oceanic basement and that extensional tectonic processes postdate the oldest North Fiji basin oceanic crust. Morphological and structural evidence suggests that both the back-arc troughs and the Hazel Holme fracture zone are recent, still active and result from NE-SW extensional tectonics. Because other tectonic features throughout the North Fiji basin are

  13. Present Status of Networking Conditions in Univ. of South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Fujinobu

    Three years program of Japanese Info-Communication Technology (ICT) Capacity Building Project in the University of South Pacific (USP) will terminate in June 2005. Japanese government has a plan of the new Pacific ICT Center program in USP from 2006. The author will introduce the recent status of USP networking conditions both of satellite and marine cable. The present global VLBI (and even GPS/IGS) network has a weak point of asymmetric distribution by very few number or luck of stations in the huge south Pacific/water hemisphere because of many difficulties such as narrow/poor telecommunication line. It is very important and urgent matters to enhance the space geodetic activities in USP.

  14. Australian and South Pacific External Studies Association: Odlaa's Regional Predecessor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bewley, Donald

    2008-01-01

    The Australian and South Pacific External Studies Association (ASPESA)-- the predecessor of the Open and Distance Learning Association of Australia, Inc. (ODLAA)--was founded in 1973. From the outset, ASPESA adopted a broader-than-Australia focus for open and distance learning that included New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and the member countries…

  15. Evaluation, Sustainable Development, and the Environment in the South Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turvey, Rosario

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the Results-Based Evaluation (RBE) framework proposed for the ex-post assessment of the National Environmental Management Strategies (NEMS) in 12 small-island developing states (SIDS) in the South Pacific. It gives an overview of the methods and basis of developing an evaluation framework in the context of SIDS in the region.…

  16. Evaluation, Sustainable Development, and the Environment in the South Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turvey, Rosario

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the Results-Based Evaluation (RBE) framework proposed for the ex-post assessment of the National Environmental Management Strategies (NEMS) in 12 small-island developing states (SIDS) in the South Pacific. It gives an overview of the methods and basis of developing an evaluation framework in the context of SIDS in the region.…

  17. Dengue virus type 3, South Pacific Islands, 2013.

    PubMed

    Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Roche, Claudine; Musso, Didier; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Dofai, Alfred; Nogareda, Francisco; Nilles, Eric J; Aaskov, John

    2014-06-01

    After an 18-year absence, dengue virus serotype 3 reemerged in the South Pacific Islands in 2013. Outbreaks in western (Solomon Islands) and eastern (French Polynesia) regions were caused by different genotypes. This finding suggested that immunity against dengue virus serotype, rather than virus genotype, was the principal determinant of reemergence.

  18. Is the South Pacific helium-3 plume dynamically active?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stommel, Henry

    1982-11-01

    It is suggested that the hydrothermal vents of the South Pacific Rise produce a beta-governed circulation at mid-depth, and that perhaps the associated plume of excess 3He (Lupton and Craig [1]) points westward because of the dynamics of this circulation rather than as a passive tracer.

  19. Providing Cultural Context with Educational Multimedia in the South Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    A recent research and development project conducted at the University of the South Pacific (USP) examined how educational multimedia can be built according to the learning approaches of the region. Through interviews, questionnaires and usability tests with staff and students at USP, the research team drafted a set of recommendations for the…

  20. Apollo 13 spacecraft splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The Apollo 13 Command Module splashed down in the South Pacific at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970. In this view the capsule is in the water and its three parachutes are crumpling into the ocean in a row.

  1. Retrospective seroepidemiological study of chikungunya infection in South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Ngwe Tun, M M; Inoue, S; Thant, K Z; Talemaitoga, N; Aryati, A; Dimaano, E M; Matias, R R; Buerano, C C; Natividad, F F; Abeyewickreme, W; Thuy, N T T; Mai, L T Q; Hasebe, F; Hayasaka, D; Morita, K

    2016-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Ross River virus (RRV) of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae are mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and the symptoms they cause in patients are similar to dengue. A chikungunya (CHIK) outbreak re-emerged in several Asian countries during 2005-2006. This study aimed to clarify the prevalence of CHIKV infection in suspected dengue patients in six countries in South Asia and Southeast Asia. Seven hundred forty-eight serum samples were from dengue-suspected patients in South Asia and Southeast Asia, and 52 were from patients in Fiji. The samples were analysed by CHIKV IgM capture ELISA, CHIKV IgG indirect ELISA and focus reduction neutralization test against CHIKV or RRV. CHIK-confirmed cases in South Asia, particularly Myanmar and Sri Lanka, were 4·6%, and 6·1%, respectively; and in Southeast Asia, particularly Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam, were 27·4%, 26·8% and 25·0%, respectively. It suggests that CHIK was widely spread in these five countries in Asia. In Fiji, no CHIK cases were confirmed; however, RRV-confirmed cases represented 53·6% of suspected dengue cases. It suggests that RRV is being maintained or occasionally entering from neighbouring countries and should be considered when determining a causative agent for dengue-like illness in Fiji.

  2. The Pacific Way: Sustainability in Higher Education in the South Pacific Island Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Peter Blaze; Koshy, Kanayathu Chacko

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create an area profile of significant activity and possibility in higher education for sustainable development (ESD) in the island nations of the South Pacific Ocean. Design/methodology/approach: This is a descriptive research paper on philosophy, policy, and practice according to a methodology of…

  3. The Pacific Way: Sustainability in Higher Education in the South Pacific Island Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Peter Blaze; Koshy, Kanayathu Chacko

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create an area profile of significant activity and possibility in higher education for sustainable development (ESD) in the island nations of the South Pacific Ocean. Design/methodology/approach: This is a descriptive research paper on philosophy, policy, and practice according to a methodology of…

  4. Use of ICT in Education in the South Pacific: Findings of the Pacific eLearning Observatory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Pacific eLearning Observatory at the University of the South Pacific (USP) conducted an online survey of educational technologists (n = 60) to assess levels of access to information and communication technologies (ICT) in education and identify ways of lowering the barriers to ICT in the Pacific region. Almost half of USP's 22,000 students are…

  5. South Asian high and Asian-Pacific-American climate teleconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peiqun; Song, Yang; Kousky, Vernon E.

    2005-11-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the Asian monsoon plays an important role in affecting the weather and climate outside of Asia. However, this active role of the monsoon has not been demonstrated as thoroughly as has the variability of the monsoon caused by various impacting factors such as sea surface temperature and land surface. This study investigates the relationship between the Asian monsoon and the climate anomalies in the Asian-Pacific-American (APA) sector. A hypothesis is tested that the variability of the upper-tropospheric South Asian high (SAH), which is closely associated with the overall heating of the large-scale Asian monsoon, is linked to changes in the subtropical western Pacific high (SWPH), the mid-Pacific trough, and the Mexican high. The changes in these circulation systems cause variability in surface temperature and precipitation in the APA region. A stronger SAH is accompanied by a stronger and more extensive SWPH. The enlargement of the SWPH weakens the mid-Pacific trough. As a result, the southern portion of the Mexican high becomes stronger. These changes are associated with changes in atmospheric teleconnections, precipitation, and surface temperature throughout the APA region. When the SAH is stronger, precipitation increases in southern Asia, decreases over the Pacific Ocean, and increases over the Central America. Precipitation also increases over Australia and central Africa and decreases in the Mediterranean region. While the signals in surface temperature are weak over the tropical land portion, they are apparent in the mid latitudes and over the eastern Pacific Ocean.

  6. A map-based South Pacific rainfall climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrey, A.; Diamond, H.; Renwick, J.; Salinger, J.; Gergis, J.; Dalu, G.

    2008-12-01

    The lives of more than four million people that reside in the South Pacific are greatly affected by rainfall variability. This region is subjected to large rainfall anomalies on seasonal timescales due to tropical cyclone occurrences, ENSO activity, and the AAO. Regional climate anomalies are also dictated by the IPO on multi- decadal scales that alter the motions of large-scale circulation features like the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Strong climate change impacts are anticipated for this region, so gauging the severity of rainfall variations that can occur are paramount for implementing appropriate climate change adaptation measures. Lack of historical rainfall records and documentation of other climate data hinders our current understanding of South Pacific climate variability. Climate data rescue activities are currently aimed at recovering, archiving, and digitising this information to rectify this issue. This research aims to examine the rainfall database administered by the Island Climate Update (ICU) project, which is contributed to by all Pacific Island national meteorological services (NMS), Meteo-France (New Caledonia and French Polynesia), NIWA (New Zealand), NOAA (USA), the IRI (USA), and the Bureau of Meteorology (Australia). Monthly rainfall totals for all stations in the ICU database were assessed, and allowed construction of master rainfall chronologies for all or portions of the major South Pacific Island nations. Climatic norms were then calculated over common time periods, and monthly-resolved rainfall anomaly maps for the South Pacific covering 1951-2008 were undertaken. Immediate benefits of this exercise have pointed out holes in the rainfall network that can be specifically targeted for data rescue in the near future, which can be achieved by providing financial assistance to Pacific Island NMSs. In addition, there is ample scope to extend the rainfall anomaly map time series into the early 1900s using a spatially degraded data

  7. Evidence for a broadly distributed Samoan-plume signature in the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Allison A.; Jackson, Matthew G.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Hall, Paul S.; Sinton, John M.; Kurz, Mark D.; Blusztajn, Jerzy

    2014-04-01

    enrichment of lavas in the northern Lau Basin may reflect the influx of Samoan-plume mantle into the region. We report major and trace element abundances and He-Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-isotopic measurements for 23 submarine volcanic glasses covering 10 locations in the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins, and for three samples from Wallis Island, which lies between Samoa and the Lau Basin. These data extend the western limit of geochemical observations in the Basins and improve the resolution of North-South variations in isotopic ratios. The Samoan hot spot track runs along the length of the northern trace of the Lau and North Fiji Basins. We find evidence for a Samoan-plume component in lavas as far West as South Pandora Ridge (SPR), North Fiji Basin. Isotopic signatures in SPR samples are similar to those found in Samoan Upolu shield lavas, but show a slight shift toward MORB-like compositions. We explain the origin of the enriched signatures by a model in which Samoan-plume material and ambient depleted mantle undergo decompression melting during upwelling after transiting from beneath the thick Pacific lithosphere to beneath the thin lithosphere in the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins. Other lavas found in the region with highly depleted isotopic signatures may represent isolated pockets of depleted mantle in the basins that evaded this enrichment process. We further find that mixing between the two components in our model, a variably degassed high-3He/4He Samoan component and depleted MORB, can explain the diversity among geochemical data from the northern Lau Basin.

  8. Kava dermopathy in Fiji: an acquired ichthyosis?

    PubMed

    Hannam, Sarah; Murray, Michael; Romani, Lucia; Tuicakau, Meciusela; J Whitfeld, Margot

    2014-12-01

    Kava dermopathy is a common cutaneous effect of regular or heavy use of Kava, a psychoactive beverage consumed widely throughout the Pacific. In Fiji in 2012, over 1000 study participants underwent full skin examination, and kava dermopathy was a common cutaneous finding. The clinical manifestations of kava dermopathy share similarities with the spectrum of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses, predominantly lamellar ichthyosis. The pathogenesis of Kava dermopathy may be associated with a functional defect in one or more cytochrome P450 enzymes implicated in epidermal integrity, thus mimicking the genetic defect as seen in lamellar ichthyosis type 3.

  9. NASA Spacecraft Images Fiji Flooding

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-10

    This image, acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft, shows Fiji, hard hit by heavy rains in early 2012, causing flooding and landslides. Hardest hit was the western part of the main Island of Viti Levu, Fiji, and the principal city of Nadi.

  10. Harmonization of regional health data requirements in the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Souarès, Y; Sauve, L

    1997-01-01

    The South Pacific has 22 diverse countries and territories that receive various levels of assistance, training, and financial support from International, regional, and national agencies. To support various aspects of these activities, the agencies currently request health data from the Pacific Island countries and territories on systematic bases in two major fields: health program monitoring and disease surveillance. There currently is little consultation or integration between the agencies. Communication exists mostly in terms of the exchange of various types of processed information such as reports, circulars, and other publications. The Interagency Meeting on Health Information Requirements in the South Pacific took place in December 1995 in Noumea, New Caledonia, to discuss the potential for more integration and cooperation in order to ease the pressure on the data providers (the countries) and to improve the relevance, quality, and timeliness of regional health information in the Pacific. As part of the effort to deal with the problems of both the pressure on data providers and the low quality and availability of good health information, we have developed methodological tools for evaluating both health indicators and diseases subject to surveillance in order to ascertain those most suitable for public health surveillance.

  11. Apollo 14 Command Module approaches touchdown in South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-09

    S71-18753 (9 Feb. 1971) --- The Apollo 14 Command Module (CM), with astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, aboard, approaches touchdown in the South Pacific Ocean to successfully end a 10-day lunar landing mission. The splashdown occurred at 3:04:39 p.m. (CST), Feb. 9, 1971, approximately 765 nautical miles south of American Samoa. The three crew men were flown by helicopter to the USS New Orleans prime recovery ship.

  12. Wind-driven zonal jets in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, William S.; Gourdeau, Lionel

    2006-02-01

    Zonal jets west of the large islands of the South Pacific Ocean are predicted by theory, commonly seen in ocean models with sufficiently high resolution, and are beginning to be observed. These jets are often taken to reflect the blocking effect of the islands in the South Equatorial Current through ``Island Rule'' dynamics. Here it is shown that quasi-permanent structures of the basin-wide wind field imply the existence of jets formed independently of the islands. Evidence for the existence of the wind-driven jets is found in climatological geostrophic currents. The hydrographic structures that produce the jets occur well below the thermocline.

  13. Verification of SPCZ and ENSO dynamics in the extended reanalysis period using the South Pacific Rainfall Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrey, Andrew; Dalu, Giovanni; Diamond, Howard; Gaetani, Marco; Renwick, James

    2010-05-01

    Ground-based rainfall observations during the pre-satellite era in the South West Pacific were examined for an extreme La Niña event that occurred in 1955-56. The rainfall observations were derived from the South Pacific Rainfall Atlas (SPRAT), a data compilation contributed by the regional meteorological services. The influence of tropical cyclone activity on both monthly and warm season rainfall anomalies were also accounted for using the International Best Tracks Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) tropical cyclone database. The rainfall anomalies from more than 60 southwest Pacific Island stations showed a region of enhanced rainfall in the southwest half of the south Pacific encompassing the Southern Cook Islands, Tonga, Fiji, New Caledonia, and Vanuatu. Suppressed rainfall was observed in the northeast corner of the region over the Marquesas, the Northern Cook Islands, Tokelau, and Tuvalu. This pattern is similar to what is expected for La Nina events that occurred during the classic re-analysis period (1958 onward). Elimination of anomalously high historical rainfall totals for individual islands using the IBTrACS data allowed a 'best guess' of the past SPCZ position, suggesting it was probably southwest of the its normal climatological position during the 1955-56 La Nina. A comparison of the 'best guess' SPCZ position fit derived from the rainfall anomalies to the omega velocity furnished by the NOAA-CIRES reanalysis show a remarkably similar position of the SPCZ during the 1955-56 ENSO event. Ground-based rainfall observations that support SPRAT (which extend into the early 1900s and beyond) can therefore confirm the fidelity of the NOAA-CIRES extended 20th century reanalysis and can help to reveal past ENSO and SPCZ dynamics. In addition, the high-resolution daily reanalysis data and IBTrACS information indicate a unique SPCZ control on regional tropical cyclone trajectories into the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes during ex-tropical transition

  14. Indian Languages and Identity in Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Jeff

    1992-01-01

    Describes origins of Fiji Indians and their unique language, Fiji Hindi, and discusses this language as a marker of identity in modern dialects brought to Fiji by Indian indentured laborers. The mixed dialect, Fiji Hindi, developed from these original forms of speech, is highlighted, and the role of Hindi and English in the development of Fiji…

  15. Indian Languages and Identity in Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Jeff

    1992-01-01

    Describes origins of Fiji Indians and their unique language, Fiji Hindi, and discusses this language as a marker of identity in modern dialects brought to Fiji by Indian indentured laborers. The mixed dialect, Fiji Hindi, developed from these original forms of speech, is highlighted, and the role of Hindi and English in the development of Fiji…

  16. Phospholipid synthesis rates in the eastern subtropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mooy, B. A. S.; Moutin, T.; Duhamel, S.; Rimmelin, P.; van Wambeke, F.

    2008-02-01

    Membrane lipid molecules are a major component of planktonic organisms and this is particularly true of the microbial picoplankton that dominate the open ocean; with their high surface-area to volume ratios, the synthesis of membrane lipids places a major demand on their overall cell metabolism. Specifically, the synthesis of cell membrane phospholipids creates a demand for the nutrient phosphorus, and we sought to refine our understanding of the role of phospholipids in the upper ocean phosphorus cycle. We measured the rates of phospholipid synthesis in a transect of the eastern subtropical South Pacific from Easter Island to Concepcion, Chile as part of the BIOSOPE program. Our approach combined standard phosphorus radiotracer incubations and lipid extraction methods. We found that phospholipid synthesis rates varied from less than 1 to greater than 200 pmol P L-1 h-1, and that phospholipid synthesis contributed between less than 5% to greater than 22% of the total PO43- incorporation rate. Changes in the percentage that phospholipid synthesis contributed to total PO43- uptake were strongly correlated with the ratio of primary production to bacterial production, which supported our hypothesis that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary agents of phospholipid synthesis. The spatial variation in phospholipid synthesis rates underscored the importance of heterotrophic bacteria in the phosphorus cycle of the eastern subtropical South Pacific, particularly the hyperoligotrophic South Pacific subtropical gyre.

  17. Phospholipid synthesis rates in the eastern subtropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mooy, B. A. S.; Moutin, T.; Duhamel, S.; Rimmelin, P.; van Wambeke, F.

    2007-08-01

    Membrane lipid molecules are a major component of planktonic organisms and this is particularly true of the microbial picoplankton that dominate the open ocean; with their high surface-area to volume ratios, the synthesis of membrane lipids places a major demand on their overall cell metabolism. The synthesis of one class of membrane lipids, the phospholipids, also creates a demand for the nutrient phosphorus, and we sought to refine our understanding of the role of phospholipids in the upper ocean phosphorus cycle. We measured the rates of phospholipid synthesis in a transect of the eastern subtropical South Pacific from Easter Island to Concepcion, Chile as part of the BIOSOPE program. Our approach combined standard phosphorus radiotracer incubations and lipid extraction methods. We found that phospholipid synthesis rates varied from less than 1 to greater than 200 pmol P L-1 h-1, and that phospholipid synthesis contributed between less than 5% to greater than 22% of the total PO43- incorporation rate. Changes in the percentage that phospholipid synthesis contributed to total PO43- incorporation were strongly correlated with the ratio of primary production to bacterial production, which supported our hypothesis that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary agents of phospholipid synthesis. The spatial variation in phospholipid synthesis rates underscored the importance of heterotrophic bacteria in the phosphorus cycle of the eastern subtropical South Pacific, particularly the hyperoligotrophic South Pacific subtropical gyre.

  18. Double-saloon-door tectonics in the North Fiji Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    Fiji Platform rotated counter clockwise from at least 10.2 Ma until 1.56 Ma, while Vanuatu Arc rotated clockwise from 12/10 Ma until the present. A revised model incorporating these opposite rotations explains the distribution of magnetic anomalies in the North Fiji Basin (NFB). The conjugate margin of southwest Fiji Platform is southeast Vanuatu Arc. Previous models which associate NW-oriented anomalies off southwest Fiji with similarly oriented anomalies northeast of Vanuatu Arc are therefore wrong. Secondly, these models propose a NW-oriented spreading ridge extending to 19°S, 177.5°E, almost 500 km southeast of the mapped extension of rifted island-arc crust on Vanuatu Arc. This creates an unacceptable overlap with Fiji Platform in pre-rift reconstructions. Thirdly, anomalies off SW Fiji which are NW-oriented in their present-day position were oriented NNE during initial breakup. Rather than aligning with NW-oriented anomalies in the western NFB, they are matched by NNE-oriented anomalies off SE Vanuatu Arc. With further rotation, these conjugate anomaly sets form a fan shape in the southern NFB. Fourthly, previous models which recognise a triple junction only from 3 Ma do not explain early WNW-ESE separation of Vanuatu Arc and Fiji Platform required by well-documented opposite rotations. NFB characteristics which match the double-saloon-door tectonic model include opposite rotations of island arc terranes, backarc seafloor spreading which is both arc-parallel and arc-perpendicular, and rifts propagating north, south, northeast and northwest. Features which do not match the double-saloon-door model include the North Fiji Fracture Zone and the West Fiji spreading centre. Both initiated post-1.5 Ma, when Fiji Platform stopped rotating, and only one terrane, Vanuatu Arc, continued to rotate. The NFB developed via double saloon door tectonics from 12/10 Ma until 1.5 Ma, whereas post-1.5 Ma opening constitutes single saloon door rotation.

  19. Interweaving Ideas and Patchwork Programmes: Nutrition Projects in Colonial Fiji, 1945–60

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Sarah Clare

    2017-01-01

    The influence of a range of actors is discernible in nutrition projects during the period after the Second World War in the South Pacific. Influences include: international trends in nutritional science, changing ideas within the British establishment about state responsibility for the welfare of its citizens and the responsibility of the British Empire for its subjects; the mixture of outside scrutiny and support for projects from post-war international and multi-governmental organisations, such as the South Pacific Commission. Nutrition research and projects conducted in Fiji for the colonial South Pacific Health Service and the colonial government also sought to address territory-specific socio-political issues, especially Fiji’s complex ethnic poli,tics. This study examines the subtle ways in which nutrition studies and policies reflected and reinforced these wider socio-political trends. It suggests that historians should approach health research and policy as a patchwork of territorial, international, and regional ideas and priorities, rather than looking for a single causality. PMID:28260564

  20. Maternal infanticides in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Adinkrah, M

    2000-12-01

    This essay contributes to the cross-cultural literature on childhood homicides by examining 16 infanticidal homicides that occurred in Fiji over an 11-year period. The results are compared with infanticide studies conducted in other societies. Official police data recorded in a Homicide and Manslaughter register are analyzed. These are supplemented by newspaper reports of infanticides and semi-structured interviews conducted with key criminal justice and medical personnel intimately associated with infanticide cases. The findings show that most infanticide defendants were young, poor, Fijian, with little formal education, living with nonparental kin at the time of the crime. The infanticides were precipitated by unwanted pregnancies brought on by nonmarital and extramarital sex. Pregnancy is carried to full gestation without knowledge of family, friends and neighbors of offenders and the infant is killed immediately following birth. The current findings demonstrate that the patterns of maternal infant killings in Fiji are congruous in many significant ways with those in advanced industrialized societies. It is concluded that additional research in non-Western, nonindustrialized nations is imperative to contribute to the development of sound conclusions about, and remedies for infanticide.

  1. Why the South Pacific Convergence Zone is diagonal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, Karin; Matthews, Adrian J.; Joshi, Manoj M.; Stevens, David P.

    2016-03-01

    During austral summer, the majority of precipitation over the Pacific Ocean is concentrated in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The surface boundary conditions required to support the diagonally (northwest-southeast) oriented SPCZ are determined through a series of experiments with an atmospheric general circulation model. Continental configuration and orography do not have a significant influence on SPCZ orientation and strength. The key necessary boundary condition is the zonally asymmetric component of the sea surface temperature (SST) distribution. This leads to a strong subtropical anticyclone over the southeast Pacific that, on its western flank, transports warm moist air from the equator into the SPCZ region. This moisture then intensifies (diagonal) bands of convection that are initiated by regions of ascent and reduced static stability ahead of the cyclonic vorticity in Rossby waves that are refracted toward the westerly duct over the equatorial Pacific. The climatological SPCZ is comprised of the superposition of these diagonal bands of convection. When the zonally asymmetric SST component is reduced or removed, the subtropical anticyclone and its associated moisture source is weakened. Despite the presence of Rossby waves, significant moist convection is no longer triggered; the SPCZ disappears. The diagonal SPCZ is robust to large changes (up to ±6 °C) in absolute SST (i.e. where the SST asymmetry is preserved). Extreme cooling (change <-6 °C) results in a weaker and more zonal SPCZ, due to decreasing atmospheric temperature, moisture content and convective available potential energy.

  2. Pleistocene dynamics of the Pacific South Equatorial Countercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuernberg, D.; Raddatz, J.; Rippert, N.; Tiedemann, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) with extremely high sea-surface-temperatures (SST) is a key area for global climate. It also acts as a crossroad for mode and intermediate water masses such as the South Equatorial Countercurrent (SECC) transporting water masses originating from higher latitudes. The SECC flows above the main thermocline and strongly interacts with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). To constrain changes in sea-surface and subsurface water mass dynamics affecting thermocline depth, we reconstruct SST, subSST and salinity conditions using combined δ18O and Mg/Ca signals of surface (Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer) and subsurface dwelling (Globorotalia tumida) planktonic foraminifera. Our study is based on RV SONNE SO-225 piston cores retrieved from Manihiki plateau, which is located at the southeastern margin of the WPWP (between ~ 5°S-15°S and 170-160°W). The proxy records cover the last ~ 3 Myr SSTMg/Ca remained nearly constant throughout the entire Pleistocene varying between ~30 to 32 (°C), while the subSSTMg/Ca reconstructions reveal pronounced variations from ~10 to 16 (°C). Our results imply that the WPWP thermocline depth has undergone significant vertical movements throughout the Pleistocene. Notably, thermocline depth is continuously decreasing from the early to the late Pleistocene, and coincides with the change from the 41 kyr to a dominant 100 kyr climate periodicity between 1 and 1.7 Ma. We hypothesize that the repeated change in thermocline depth is due to either 1) changes in mode or intermediate water masses advection from Southern Ocean sources via "ocean tunneling", 2) changes in the tropical Pacific wind regime, and/or 3) changes in the Western Pacific Monsoon sytem.

  3. The role of the South Indian and Pacific oceans in South American monsoon variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumond, A. R. De M.; Ambrizzi, T.

    2008-11-01

    This work has investigated the impact of three different low-frequency sea surface temperature (SST) variability modes located in the Indian and the Pacific Oceans on the interannual variability of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS) using observed and numerical data. Rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (REOF) analysis and numerical simulations with a General Circulation Model (GCM) were used. One of the three SST variability modes is located close to southeastern Africa. According to the composites, warmer waters over this region are associated with enhanced austral summer precipitation over the sub-tropics. The GCM is able to reproduce this anomalous precipitation pattern, simulating a wave train emanating from the Indian Ocean towards South America (SA). A second SST variability mode was located in the western Pacific Ocean. REOF analysis indicates that warmer waters are associated with drought conditions over the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) and enhanced precipitation over the sub-tropics. The GCM indicates that the warmer waters over Indonesia generate drought conditions over tropical SA through a Pacific South America-like (PSA) wave pattern emanating from the western Pacific. Finally, the third SST variability mode is located over the southwestern South Pacific. The composites indicate that warmer waters are associated with enhanced precipitation over the SACZ and drought conditions over the sub-tropics. There is a PSA-like wave train emanating from Indonesia towards SA, and another crossing the Southern Hemisphere in the extra-tropics, probably associated with transient activity. The GCM is able to reproduce the anomalous precipitation pattern, although it is weaker than observed. The PSA-like pattern is simulated, but the model fails in reproducing the extra-tropical wave activity.

  4. Joint impact of North and South Pacific extratropical atmospheric variability on the onset of ENSO events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ruiqiang; Li, Jianping; Tseng, Yu-heng; Sun, Cheng; Xie, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that boreal winter subtropical and extratropical sea surface pressure (SLP) anomalies over both the North and South Pacific are significantly related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) state in the following boreal winter. Here we use observational data and model simulations to show that the ability of the boreal winter North Pacific SLP anomalies to initiate ENSO events a year later may strongly depend on the state of the simultaneous South Pacific SLP anomalies and vice versa. When the boreal winter North Pacific SLP anomalies are of the opposite sign to the simultaneous South Pacific anomalies, the correlation of the North or South Pacific anomalies with the following ENSO state becomes much weaker, and the strength of the ENSO events also tends to be weaker. One possible reason for this is that when the boreal winter North and South Pacific SLP anomalies have the opposite sign, the westerly anomalies over the western-central equatorial Pacific during the following boreal summer are greatly reduced by the interference between the antecedent North and South Pacific SLP anomalies, thereby not favoring the development of ENSO events. Further analysis indicates that a combination of North and South Pacific precursor signals may serve to enhance the ENSO prediction skill.

  5. Apollo 13 spacecraft splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-17

    S70-35638 (17 April 1970) --- A perilous space mission comes to a smooth ending with the safe splashdown of the Apollo 13 Command Module (CM) in the South Pacific, only four miles from the prime recovery ship. The spacecraft with astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., John L. Swigert Jr., and Fred W. Haise Jr. aboard, splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m. (CST) April 17, 1970, to conclude safely the problem-plagued flight. The crewmen were transported by helicopter from the immediate recovery area to the USS Iwo Jima, prime recovery vessel.

  6. Apollo 13 spacecraft splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-17

    S70-35644 (17 April 1970) --- The Apollo 13 Command Module (CM) splashes down and its three main parachutes collapse, as the week-long problem-plagued Apollo 13 mission comes to a premature, but safe end. The spacecraft, with astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., commander; John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot; and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot, aboard splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m. (CST) April 17, 1970, in the South Pacific Ocean, only about four miles from the USS Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship.

  7. Global GIS database; digital atlas of South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, P.P.; Hare, T.M.; Schruben, P.; Sherrill, D.; LaMar, C.; Tsushima, P.

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a digital atlas of the countries of the South Pacific. This atlas is part of a global database compiled from USGS and other data sources at a nominal scale of 1:1 million and is intended to be used as a regional-scale reference and analytical tool by government officials, researchers, the private sector, and the general public. The atlas includes free GIS software or may be used with ESRI's ArcView software. Customized ArcView tools, specifically designed to make the atlas easier to use, are also included.

  8. The South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ): A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Dayton G.

    1994-01-01

    The circulation features associated with the South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) and its accompanying cloud band are reviewed and discussed. The paper focuses on the following topics: location, structure, and characteristics of the SPCZ; theories and observations concerning its existence; the significance and scope of the SPCZ in global-scale circulation patterns; quasi-periodic changes in its location and strength; and synoptic-scale features within its regional influence (e.g., cyclones, subtropical jets). It concludes with some challenging problems for the future.

  9. Investigations of the marine flora and fauna of the Fiji Islands.

    PubMed

    Feussner, Klaus-Dieter; Ragini, Kavita; Kumar, Rohitesh; Soapi, Katy M; Aalbersberg, William G; Harper, Mary Kay; Carte, Brad; Ireland, Chris M

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, approximately 140 papers have been published on marine natural products chemistry and related research from the Fiji Islands. These came about from studies starting in the early 1980s by the research groups of Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz, Ireland at the University of Utah, Gerwick from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the University of California at San Diego and the more recent groups of Hay at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and Jaspars from the University of Aberdeen. This review covers both known and novel marine-derived natural products and their biological activities. The marine organisms reviewed include invertebrates, plants and microorganisms, highlighting the vast structural diversity of compounds isolated from these organisms. Increasingly during this period, natural products chemists at the University of the South Pacific have been partners in this research, leading in 2006 to the development of a Centre for Drug Discovery and Conservation (CDDC).

  10. Plutonium and 137Cs in surface water of the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Aoyama, M; Fukasawa, M; Kim, C S; Komura, K; Povinec, P P; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A

    2007-08-01

    The present plutonium and 137Cs concentrations in South Pacific Ocean surface waters were determined. The water samples were collected in the South Pacific mid-latitude region (32.5 degrees S) during the BEAGLE expedition conducted in 2003-04 by JAMSTEC. 239,240Pu concentrations in surface seawater of the South Pacific were in the range of 0.5 to 4.1 mBq m(-3), whereas 137Cs concentrations ranged from 0.07 to 1.7 Bq m(-3). The observed 239,240Pu and 137Cs concentrations in the South Pacific were almost of the same level as those in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. The surface 239,240Pu in the South Pacific subtropical gyre showed larger spatial variations than 137Cs, as it may be affected by physical and biogeochemical processes. The 239,240Pu/137Cs activity ratios, which reflect biogeochemical processes in seawater, were generally smaller than that observed in global fallout, except for the most eastern station. The 239,240Pu/137Cs ratios in the South Pacific tend to be higher than that in the North Pacific. The relationships between anthropogenic radionuclides and oceanographic parameters such as salinity and nutrients were examined. The 137Cs concentrations in the western South Pacific (the Tasman Sea) and the eastern South Pacific were negatively correlated with the phosphate concentration, whereas there is no correlation between the 137Cs and nutrients concentrations in the South Pacific subtropical gyre. The mutual relationships between anthropogenic radionuclides and oceanographic parameters are important for better understanding of transport processes of anthropogenic radionuclides and their fate in the South Pacific.

  11. Apollo XVII Command Module (CM) - Splashdown - South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-19

    S72-55834 (19 Dec. 1972) --- The Apollo 17 Command Module (CM), with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, nears splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean to successfully concludes the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo program. This overhead view was taken from a recovery aircraft seconds before the spacecraft hit the water. The splashdown occurred at 304:31:59 ground elapsed time, 1:24:59 p.m. (CST) Dec. 19, 1972, at coordinates of 166 degrees 8 minutes west longitude and 27 degrees 53 minutes south latitude, about 350 nautical miles southeast of the Samoan Islands. The splashdown was only .8 miles from the target point. Later, the three crewmen were picked up by a helicopter from the prime recovery ship, USS Ticonderoga.

  12. Abrupt axial variations along the slow to ultra-slow spreading centers of the northern North Fiji Basin (SW Pacific): Evidence for short wave heterogeneities in a back-arc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, Erwan; Lagabrielle, Yves; Pelletier, Bernard

    2003-09-01

    This study presents results of surveys conducted along the slow to ultra-slow spreading axis of the Northern North Fiji Basin (NNFB), including the Hazel Holmes, Tripartite and South Pandora Ridges, and the newly discovered Futuna and North Cikobia spreading centers. Spreading segments along these axes display highly contrasted axial morphologies, ranging from a rift valley to a prominent axial high. In some places, abrupt inversions of topography are observed between neighboring segments. Detailed analyses of bathymetry and backscatter maps reveal that axial highs are spotted with numerous coalescent volcanoes forming features ranging from irregular terrains to well-organized ridges. The volcanic edifices are distributed over a wide neovolcanic zone, which corresponds to the axial relief, suggesting on important contribution of volcanism to the relief construction. Comparisons between various ridge-shaped segments reveal that axial volcano-tectonic patterns are directly related to the local magma production and delivery, in a context of tectonic extension related to plate divergence, and suggest that coalescent volcanoes are fed from multiples short-lived and unconnected magma lenses. In the competition between horizontal and vertical accretion of oceanic crust, the spreading centers of the NNFB represent a special case where lava production is locally high enough and spreading rate is low enough to allow prominent axial highs to develop. The along axis morphologic variability is related to intermittent volcanic activity that may result from rapid temporal and spatial variations in the distribution of upper mantle convection cells below accretion centers, superimposed on the regional thermal anomaly located under the whole basin.

  13. Interspecific Hybridization Yields Strategy for South Pacific Filariasis Vector Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Brelsfoard, Corey L.; Séchan, Yves; Dobson, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a leading cause of disability in South Pacific regions, where >96% of the 1.7 million population are at risk of LF infection. As part of current global campaign, mass drug administration (MDA) has effectively reduced lymphatic filiariasis prevalence, but mosquito vector biology can complicate the MDA strategy. In some regions, there is evidence that the goal of LF elimination cannot be attained via MDA alone. Obligate vector mosquitoes provide additional targets for breaking the LF transmission cycle, but existing methods are ineffective for controlling the primary vector throughout much of the South Pacific, Aedes polynesiensis. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate that interspecific hybridization and introgression results in an A. polynesiensis strain (‘CP’ strain) that is stably infected with the endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria from Aedes riversi. The CP strain is bi-directionally incompatible with naturally infected mosquitoes, resulting in female sterility. Laboratory assays demonstrate that CP males are equally competitive, resulting in population elimination when CP males are introduced into wild type A. polynesiensis populations. Conclusions/Significance The findings demonstrate strategy feasibility and encourage field tests of the vector elimination strategy as a supplement to ongoing MDA efforts. PMID:18235849

  14. Venereal diseases in the islands of the South Pacific.

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, R R

    1980-01-01

    The island territories of the South Pacific vary considerably in area and in size of population; Pitcairn has a population of 100 in two square miles whereas Papua New Guinea has a population of 2,990,000 in approximately 175,000 square miles. Today the whole ocean is traversed by air routes. Recently, the prevalence of gonorrhoea has decreased in the northern region but increased in the eastern and western; in all these regions the reported prevalence exceeds 200 cases per 100,00 population. In an area where yaws was once widespread, syphilis is being increasingly recognised. Although the figures for syphilis are clearly higher because of the greater use of serological screening, many of the reported cases are of early infection. Yaws has been eliminated from most of the South Pacific Islands but is still present in the western region--more than 99% of the reported cases occurring in Papua New Guinea, particularly in the offshore islands. PMID:7427693

  15. Transmission potential of Zika virus infection in the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Ryo; Mizumoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Yohei; Nah, Kyeongah

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus has spread internationally through countries in the South Pacific and Americas. The present study aimed to estimate the basic reproduction number, R0, of Zika virus infection as a measurement of the transmission potential, reanalyzing past epidemic data from the South Pacific. Incidence data from two epidemics, one on Yap Island, Federal State of Micronesia in 2007 and the other in French Polynesia in 2013-2014, were reanalyzed. R0 of Zika virus infection was estimated from the early exponential growth rate of these two epidemics. The maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of R0 for the Yap Island epidemic was in the order of 4.3-5.8 with broad uncertainty bounds due to the small sample size of confirmed and probable cases. The MLE of R0 for French Polynesia based on syndromic data ranged from 1.8 to 2.0 with narrow uncertainty bounds. The transmissibility of Zika virus infection appears to be comparable to those of dengue and chikungunya viruses. Considering that Aedes species are a shared vector, this finding indicates that Zika virus replication within the vector is perhaps comparable to dengue and chikungunya. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji.

    PubMed

    Glaus, Kerstin B J; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M

    2015-12-02

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji's inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers' identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji's inshore fisheries, suggests that the country's artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries.

  17. The longevity of the South Pacific isotopic and thermal anomaly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Park, K.-H.; Pringle, M.; Rubenstone, J.L.; Smith, W.H.F.; Zindler, A.

    1991-01-01

    The South Pacific is anomalous in terms of the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios of its hot spot basalts, a thermally enhanced lithosphere, and possibly a hotter mantle. We have studied the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics of 12 Cretaceous seamounts in the Magellans, Marshall and Wake seamount groups (western Pacific Ocean) that originated in this South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA). The range and values of isotope ratios of the Cretaceous seamount data are similar to those of the island chains of Samoa, Tahiti, Marquesas and Cook/Austral in the SOPITA. These define two major mantle components suggesting that isotopically extreme lavas have been produced at SOPITA for at least 120 Ma. Shallow bathymetry, and weakened lithosphere beneath some of the seamounts studied suggests that at least some of the thermal effects prevailed during the Cretaceous as well. These data, in the context of published data, suggest: 1. (1)|SOPITA is a long-lived feature, and enhanced heat transfer into the lithosphere and isotopically anomalous mantle appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of the anomaly. 2. (2)|The less pronounced depth anomaly during northwesterly plate motion suggests that some of the expressions of SOPITA may be controlled by the direction of plate motion. Motion parallel to the alignment of SOPITA hot spots focusses the heat (and chemical input into the lithosphere) on a smaller cross section than oblique motion. 3. (3)|The lithosphere in the eastern and central SOPITA appears to have lost its original depleted mantle characteristics, probably due to enhanced plume/lithosphere interaction, and it is dominated by isotopic compositions derived from plume materials. 4. (4)|We speculate (following D.L. Anderson) that the origin of the SOPITA, and possibly the DUPAL anomaly is largely due to focussed subduction through long periods of the geological history of the earth, creating a heterogeneous distribution of recycled components in the lower mantle

  18. From the South Pacific: experiences in the development of instructional materials in population education in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The population education program in the Pacific was established in 1980, a decade behind that in Asia. Some countries produced materials on population. Fiji produced excellent student and teacher guides, and the Marshall Islands conducted a workshop to develop curriculum materials for use in elementary schools and in an adult education program. In the Solomon Islands 10 modules on population education will be used in the "core" subject for all 1st year students of the new College of Higher Education. Of these 10 modules, 5 have been completed. Because other Pacific countries had not moved further from their plans of developing curriculum and instructional materials in this field a workshop was conducted during September 1983 to provide training in the development of population education materials. The workshop was aimed at preparing guidelines for the development of in-school and out-of-school curricula and sample instructional materials and developing prototype materials which can be adopted by the Pacific countries. While there may be many materials in population education developed in Asia which can be used in the Pacific, it was deemed helpful to have prototype instructional materials for the Pacific region developed by the Pacific islandes themselves. The following guidelines were suggested: stress the unfiqueness of the Pacific; emphasize culture and traditional lifestyle; use local examples; focus on the interrelationships of population factors; employ local or regional resources, materials, and expertise; and stay sensitive to what is aceptable in population education. The major work of developing draft prototype curricula and sample instructional materials was done by the participants in 2 teams, 1 for the in-school and the other for the out-of-school program. The in-school group developed sample units instead of sample lessons in population edcuation for social science, science, mathematics, environmental science, and home economics for the secondary

  19. Educational, Social and Financial Development in Communities in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Tony

    This paper examines some of the South Western Pacific Island nations and considers their economic and social development and the ways in which education can play a role in future development. Excluding Australia, Papua New Guinea, and New Zealand, the south-western part of the Pacific is home to 20 small nations. This paper focuses on five of…

  20. Apollo 13 spacecraft heads toward a splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The Apollo 13 spacecraft heads toward a splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean. The Apollo 13 Command Module splashed down in the South Pacific at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970. Note the capsule and its parachutes just visible against a gap in the dark clouds.

  1. Low health-related quality of life in school-aged children in Tonga, a lower-middle income country in the South Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Solveig; Swinburn, Boyd; Mavoa, Helen; Fotu, Kalesita; Tupoulahi-Fusimalohi, Caroline; Faeamani, Gavin; Moodie, Marjory

    2014-01-01

    Background Ensuring a good life for all parts of the population, including children, is high on the public health agenda in most countries around the world. Information about children's perception of their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its socio-demographic distribution is, however, limited and almost exclusively reliant on data from Western higher income countries. Objectives To investigate HRQoL in schoolchildren in Tonga, a lower income South Pacific Island country, and to compare this to HRQoL of children in other countries, including Tongan children living in New Zealand, a high-income country in the same region. Design A cross-sectional study from Tonga addressing all secondary schoolchildren (11–18 years old) on the outer island of Vava'u and in three districts of the main island of Tongatapu (2,164 participants). A comparison group drawn from the literature comprised children in 18 higher income and one lower income country (Fiji). A specific New Zealand comparison group involved all children of Tongan descendent at six South Auckland secondary schools (830 participants). HRQoL was assessed by the self-report Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0. Results HRQoL in Tonga was overall similar in girls and boys, but somewhat lower in children below 15 years of age. The children in Tonga experienced lower HRQoL than the children in all of the 19 comparison countries, with a large difference between children in Tonga and the higher income countries (Cohen's d 1.0) and a small difference between Tonga and the lower income country Fiji (Cohen's d 0.3). The children in Tonga also experienced lower HRQoL than Tongan children living in New Zealand (Cohen's d 0.6). Conclusion The results reveal worrisome low HRQoL in children in Tonga and point towards a potential general pattern of low HRQoL in children living in lower income countries, or, alternatively, in the South Pacific Island countries. PMID:25150029

  2. Oceania and the United States: An Analysis of US Interests and Policy in the South Pacific,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    STATES 0Ot An Analysis of US Interests and Policy in the South Pacific JOHN C. DORRANCE C5 L~iC LA IDo. . V A the national defense university* 80 9...4 032 4 4CEANIA AND THE UNITED STATES: An Analysis of US Interests and Policy in the South Pacific by -io)- John C/Dorrance The National War College...xi Section I: The Pacific Islands Policy Environment .......... 1 Background

  3. Conservation and Management of the Endangered Fiji Sago Palm, Metroxylon vitiense, in Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Clare; Rounds, Isaac; Watling, Dick

    2012-05-01

    Recovery planning is a key component of many threatened species conservation initiatives and can be a powerful awareness raising tool. One of the largest impediments to conservation efforts in the Pacific region however, is the lack of ecological data and its subsequent effects on the development of feasible and useful recovery plans for threatened species. Without these plans, the understaffed, underfunded and often technically ill-equipped conservation agencies face huge difficulties in planning, prioritizing and conducting conservation activities to adequately protect biodiversity. The Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, is an endemic endangered palm species whose survival is heavily dependent on a feasible species recovery plan. It is geographically restricted and threatened by habitat destruction and overexploitation for thatch for the tourism industry and palm heart consumption by local consumers. Despite its threatened status, M. vitiense is not currently protected by national or international legislation. Recent field surveys and extensive stakeholder consultation have resulted in the production of a species recovery plan highlighting the importance of the species and advocating sustainable harvesting rather than complete bans to promote conservation. This article summarizes the recovery plan and its current effects on the status of M. vitiense in Fiji. We also discuss the role of different stakeholders in the conservation of M. vitiense, including the absence of significant behavioral changes by the largest consumer - the tourism industry, and the importance of recovery plans for biodiversity conservation in the Pacific.

  4. Conservation and management of the endangered Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clare; Rounds, Isaac; Watling, Dick

    2012-05-01

    Recovery planning is a key component of many threatened species conservation initiatives and can be a powerful awareness raising tool. One of the largest impediments to conservation efforts in the Pacific region however, is the lack of ecological data and its subsequent effects on the development of feasible and useful recovery plans for threatened species. Without these plans, the understaffed, underfunded and often technically ill-equipped conservation agencies face huge difficulties in planning, prioritizing and conducting conservation activities to adequately protect biodiversity. The Fiji sago palm, Metroxylon vitiense, is an endemic endangered palm species whose survival is heavily dependent on a feasible species recovery plan. It is geographically restricted and threatened by habitat destruction and overexploitation for thatch for the tourism industry and palm heart consumption by local consumers. Despite its threatened status, M. vitiense is not currently protected by national or international legislation. Recent field surveys and extensive stakeholder consultation have resulted in the production of a species recovery plan highlighting the importance of the species and advocating sustainable harvesting rather than complete bans to promote conservation. This article summarizes the recovery plan and its current effects on the status of M. vitiense in Fiji. We also discuss the role of different stakeholders in the conservation of M. vitiense, including the absence of significant behavioral changes by the largest consumer - the tourism industry, and the importance of recovery plans for biodiversity conservation in the Pacific.

  5. A Trace-Element and Radiogenic-Isotopic Pattern of Oceanic Arc Inception, Maturity, Demise, and Rejuvenation: Viti Levu, Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, E.; Gill, J.; Pearce, J.; Kempton, P.

    2007-12-01

    Viti Levu, Fiji and \\textquoteleftEua, Tonga have the oldest subaerial exposures of the remnant Vitiaz Arc which formed when subduction initiated (≥45Ma) as the result of a Pacific Plate motion change. We present new high-precision ICP-MS trace element and MC-ICP-MS isotope data for newly collected Fiji rocks and previously analyzed (XRF,TIMS) Viti Levu basalts and \\textquoteleftEua gabbro that represent proto- to mature-arc, syn- rifting prior to opening of the South Fiji Basin (SFB), and post-SFB magmatic stages of early Vitiaz arc evolution. Earliest Fiji arc rocks make up the Yavuna formation in southwestern Viti Levu and are mostly basalt to basaltic andesite pillows, dikes, and flows. Most analyzed \\textquoteleftEua and Yavuna rocks have chondritic Sm/Hf, but both have populations with negative Hf anomalies. \\textquoteleftEua is LREE depleted whereas Yavuna ranges broadly from LREE-depleted to LREE-enriched (LaN/YbN from 0.2 to ~4). Both include boninitic lavas with HREE & HFSE concentrations only about twice those of primitive mantle. Both show similar ranges for 143Nd/144Nd, but Yavuna is slightly more radiogenic and less variable in 176Hf/177Hf. Both are "Pacific" in isotopic character. The demise of the early Yavuna arc (~20-30 Ma) resulted from a shift from arc volcanism to rifting and backarc spreading and, eventually, opening of the SFB. Volcanism associated with rifting is preserved as a bi- modal suite of dacitic (edifice) and basaltic (basin) rocks (Kalaka and Dakadaka formations, respectively) that crop out west and south of Yavuna and adjacent to SFB crust. Edifice rocks are flat to slightly LREE-depleted and basinal rocks are all LREE-enriched. Both are sub-chondritic to Hf-enriched with respect to REE. Post-SFB volcanism (Wainimala Group) is bi-modal basalt plus dacite and included at least one major plutonic event. These rocks comprise most of modern Viti Levu basement. Wainimala rocks have a range of Sm/Hf similar to Yavuna but are

  6. Epidemiology of spinal cord paralysis in Fiji: 1985-1994.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, J C

    1996-09-01

    This descriptive analytical ten year (1985-1994) retrospective study assessed the pattern of spinal cord paralysis (SCP) in the Fiji Islands utilising medical rehabilitation hospital data. Fiji Islands is an archipelago of 300 islands in the south western Pacific with a multi-ethnic population of over three quarters of a million. Rehabilitation of all SCP is provided at the Medical Rehabilitation Unit (MRU). Data was collected from medical records of new SCP (n = 140) admitted to MRU and analysed with Epi Info 5 assessing associations between cause and other variables. The incidence of new SCP admitted to the MRU was 18.7/million/year. There were 75 (53.6%) traumatic and 65 (46.4%) non-traumatic SCP. The incidence varied according to gender and ethnicity with Fijian male being at the highest (41.85) risk. Amongst traumatic SCP, 38.7% were due to falls, 25.3% motor vehicle accidents, 20% sports, 8% shallow water dive and 4% each deep sea diving and others, whereas among non-traumatic SCP, 52.3% were due to unknown causes, 32.3% infections, 9.2% neoplasms and 6.2% others. The male/female ratio was 4:1. The 16-30 year age group accounted for 35% of SCP. 31% had tetraplegia and 52.1% had complete lesions. The subset of the sample who experienced traumatic SCP were more likely to be employed, aged between 16-30 years at the time of paralysis and to have complete tetraplegia. Those who experienced incomplete paraplegia were more likely to be unemployed, aged 46-60 years and educated to primary level at the time of paralysis. There was a high proportion of complete spinal lesion when compared with other studies. The incidence of secondary complications such as pressure sores and UTI was also found to be high when compared with other studies. The results support the view that young Fijian males are most prone to sustaining traumatic spinal cord paralysis, and that there is a high incidence of secondary preventable complications. The need for preventative measures and

  7. The 2009 South Pacific tsunami - implications for tsunami hazard in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, William; Wilson, Kate; Prasetya, Gegar; Bradley, Brendon; Wang, Xiaoming; Beavan, John; Holden, Caroline

    2010-05-01

    On 29 September 2009 a Mw8.0 earthquake at the northern end of the Tonga Trench created a tsunami with a devastating impact on the islands of Tutuila (American Samoa), Upolu (Samoa) and Niuatoputapu (Tonga). The intensity of the tsunami impact on islands close to the source was surprising for an earthquake of this magnitude, which is presumably a consequence of an unusual earthquake source. Moment tensor solutions suggest a mechanism of normal faulting in the outer-rise though this is not fully consistent with the polarity of waves observed at DART buoys within the Pacific. The written history of tsunami in the southwest Pacific is relatively short, especially for the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi trench, and includes few events; consequently the question ‘How typical is this event of tsunami from this subduction zone?' is critical for understanding the tsunami hazard of the region. An important source of information on the tsunami comes from post-event surveys. Researchers from GNS Science participated in survey teams on each of the three strongly affected islands. Information collected by these surveys is very varied, and includes: estimates of physical parameters such as the distribution of run-up heights, flow depths, and inundation distances; engineering observations regarding the damage to, and relative fragility of, different types of buildings and infrastructure; observations of environmental impact and the role of the environmental factors, such as coral reefs, forests, and sand dunes, on influencing the tsunami impact; and observations of the response to the events by the local communities. This presentation will include a summary of the main findings from these surveys. The earthquake source for this event appears to have an unusual mechanism for a tsunamigenic earthquake, and to be relatively complex. Attempts to invert for the source using any one of the various collected datasets - the survey data described above, DART buoy sea level records, geodetic

  8. Eastern margin variability of the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintner, Benjamin R.; Neelin, J. David

    2008-08-01

    The influence of low-level inflow wind and its high-frequency variability on the spatial characteristics of the eastern margin of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is examined. Compositing daily and 5-day mean low-level wind, precipitation, and tropospheric moisture data reveals a clear relationship between high-frequency zonal inflow variations and the eastern SPCZ margin, with relaxation of trade wind intensity associated with increased moisture near the mean eastern SPCZ margin and an eastward displacement of the convection. An idealized 2-dimensional model demonstrates that variations in dry air inflow cause tropospheric moisture and precipitation variations akin to those observed. In this prototype, factors affecting the extent of SPCZ variability are also important to the mean margin position. SPCZ margin shifts under natural variability thus offer an observational target against which to evaluate simulated interactions of inflow air mass characteristics with convection.

  9. APOLLO 13 - COMMAND MODULE - RECOVERY - SPLASHDOWN - SOUTH PACIFIC OCEAN

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-17

    S70-35632 (17 April 1970) --- Crewmen aboard the USS Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission, guide the Command Module (CM) atop a dolly onboard the ship. The CM is connected by strong cable to a hoist on the vessel. The Apollo 13 crewmembers, astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., commander; John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot; and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot, were already aboard the USS Iwo Jima when this photograph was made. The CM, with the three tired crewmen aboard, splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m. (CST), April 17, 1970, only about four miles from the recovery vessel in the South Pacific Ocean.

  10. Radionuclides in plankton from the South Pacific Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1984-03-23

    We have initiated an investigation of the utility of marine plankton as bioconcentrating samplers of low-level marine radioactivity in the southern hemisphere. A literature review has shown that both freshwater and marine plankton have trace element and radionuclide concentration factors (relative to water) of up to 10/sup 4/. We participated in Operations Deepfreeze 1981 and 1982, collecting a total of 48 plankton samples from the USCGC Glacier on its Antarctic cruises. Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories sampled air, water, rain, and fallout. We were able to measure concentrations in plankton of the naturally-occurring radionuclides /sup 7/Be, /sup 40/K, and the U and Th series, and we believe that we have detected low levels of /sup 144/Ce and /sup 95/Nb in seven samples ranging as far south as 68/sup 0/. Biological identification of the plankton suggests a possible correlation between radionuclide concentration and the protozoa content of the samples. 7 references, 5 figures.

  11. Navy Helicopter - Arrival - Recovery - Apollo X Astronauts - South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-26

    S69-21036 (26 May 1969) --- A Navy helicopter arrives to recover the Apollo 10 astronauts, seen entering a life raft, as their spacecraft floats in the South Pacific immediately after touchdown. U.S. Navy underwater demolition team swimmers assist in the recovery operations. Already in the life raft are astronauts Thomas P. Stafford (left), commander, and John W. Young (right), command module pilot. Splashdown occurred at 11:53 a.m., May 26, 1969, about 400 miles east of American Samoa and about four miles from the recovery ship to conclude a successful eight-day lunar orbit mission. Note that in this photo the divers have attached a flotation collar to the spacecraft.

  12. Radiolytic Hydrogen Production in the South Pacific Subseafloor Basaltic Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzaugis, M. E.; Spivack, A. J.; Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is produced in geological settings by dissociation of water due to radiation from natural radioactive decay of uranium (238U, 235U), thorium (232Th) and potassium (40K). To quantify the potential significance of radiolytic H2 as an electron donor for microbes within the South Pacific subseafloor basaltic aquifer, we calculate radiolytic H2 production rates in basement fractures utilizing measured radionuclide concentrations in 42 basalt samples from IODP Expedition 329. The samples are from three sites with very different basement ages and a wide range of alteration types. Major and trace element concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude from sample to sample. Comparison of our samples to each other and to previous studies of fresh East Pacific Rise basalt suggests that between-sample variation in radionuclide concentrations is primarily due to differences in initial (pre-alteration) concentrations (which can vary between eruptive events), rather than to alteration type or extent. Local maxima in radionuclide (U, Th, and K) concentrations produce 'hotspots' of radiolytic H2 production; calculated radiolytic rates differ by up to a factor of 80 from sample to sample. Fracture width also greatly influences H2 production. Due to the low penetration distance of alpha radiation, microfractures are 'hotpots' for radiolytic H2 production. For example, radiolytic H2 production rates normalized to water volume are 170 times higher in 1μm-wide fractures than in 10cm-wide fractures.

  13. Remote Sensing of the Night-time Lower Ionosphere from Lightning Generated Sferics Recorded in the South Pacific Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushil, K.; Ramachandran, V.

    The lightning generated Extremely Low Frequency ELF and Very Low Frequency VLF radio signals tweeks recorded using the lightning detection system under Word Wide Lightning Location WWLL Network at Suva 18 2 o S 178 3 o E Fiji a low latitude ground wave station in the South Pacific region are used to determine the lower ionospheric electron content and its variation during night-time Due to its least relative inaccessibility the lower ionosphere consisting of D-region is among the least studied regions of the Earth s atmosphere The lightning generated sferics which are short pulses typically of 1-10 ms with significant spectral contents over the ELF VLF can be used in the study of the lower ionosphere A total of 400 tweeks recoded in the time period of 1800-0600 hrs FST during 2003- 2004 have been analysed Matlab codes are used to analyse the data files recorded using lightning software and each of data file is of 11 MB with one minute duration The value of ionospheric reflecting height h calculated using waveguide mode theory of electromagnetic wave propagation in the spherical cell Earth-ionosphere waveguide having perfectly conducting boundaries is found to vary from 80-95 km in the night-time To estimate the electron density at the ionospheric reflection heights i e lower ionosphere we perform a qualitative analysis based on the propagation theory of radio waves in an infinite collisionless anisotropic ionospheric plasma Shvets and Hayakawa J Atmos Sol -Terr Phys 60 461

  14. Morphostructure and magnetic fabric of the northwestern North Fiji Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Bernard; Lafoy, Yves; Missegue, Francois

    1993-06-01

    Four successive spreading phases are distinguished in the northwestern part of the North Fiji Basin. After an initial NE-SW opening, a N-S spreading phase took place, up to the northwesternmost tip of the basin, along the South Pandora, Tikopia and 9 deg 30 Ridges. The N-S spreading phase in the northern North Fiji Basin was followed by an E-W opening phase along the central North Fiji Basin axis. A triple junction was probably active during an intermediate stage between the two phases. E-W spreading underwent a reorganization that induced the functioning of the 16 deg 40 min S triple junction and the development of the E-W trending Hazel Holme Extensional Zone from the active central spreading axis to the southern tip of the New Hebrides Back-Arc Troughs. Active extension also occurs along the E-W Santa Cruz Trough which crosscuts the arc platform at the northern end of the N-S trending Back-Arc Troughs. The existence of the Back-Arc Troughs is mainly due to the construction of the 400 km-long volcanic Duff Ridge which trapped a piece of the old North Fiji Basin oceanic crust.

  15. Tectonic evolution of the Pacific Phoenix Farallon triple junction in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viso, Richard F.; Larson, Roger L.; Pockalny, Robert A.

    2005-04-01

    Analysis of multibeam and gravity data reveals the tectonic history of the mid-Cretaceous (119-107 Ma) Penrhyn basin in the equatorial south Pacific Ocean. The basin formed during a period of heightened geodynamic activity and cessation of magnetic reversals. Similarities in the geometry of the Tongareva triple junction and the Rodriguez triple junction in the Indian Ocean make this study an interesting comparison between modern and ancient tectonics. Changes in abyssal hill trends during the formation of the basin suggest either a change in the location of the Euler pole describing the relative motion between the Pacific and Farallon plates, or a significant period of oblique spreading. Interaction between the local stress field associated with the break-up of the Manihiki plateau and the regional stress field controlling major plate motions complicated the tectonic evolution of the Penrhyn basin. Construction of velocity triangles from abyssal hill trends and measurements of the triple junction trace suggests that the triple junction oscillated between ridge-ridge-ridge and ridge-ridge-fault configurations. At least two reorganizations in the geometry of the triple junction occurred within 10 Ma of the initial rifting of the Manihiki plateau. Both changes in triple junction geometry coincide with discontinuities in the triple junction trace and result in right-lateral displacements of the triple junction trace. Changes in the bathymetric expression of the triple junction trace suggest a period of triple junction propagation controlled by rift propagation shortly after the change in Euler pole location.

  16. Eocene and Oligocene basins and ridges of the Coral Sea-New Caledonia region: Tectonic link between Melanesia, Fiji, and Zealandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, Nick; Gans, Phillip B.; Palin, J. Michael; Herzer, Richard H.; Pelletier, Bernard; Monzier, Michel

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents 34 geochemical analyses, 24 Ar-Ar ages, and two U-Pb ages of igneous rocks from the back-arc basins and submarine ridges in the Coral Sea-New Caledonia region. The D'Entrecasteaux Ridge is a composite structural feature. Primitive arc tholeiites of Eocene age (34-56 Ma) are present along a 200 km length of the ridge and arguably were part of the initial line of subduction inception between Fiji and the Marianas; substantial Eocene arc edifices are only evident at the eastern end where Bougainville Guyot andesite breccias are dated at 40 ± 2 Ma. The South Rennell Trough is confidently identified as a 28-29 Ma (early Oligocene) fossil spreading ridge, and hence, the flanking Santa Cruz and D'Entrecasteaux basins belong in the group of SW Pacific Eocene-Early Miocene back-arc basins that include the Solomon Sea, North Loyalty, and South Fiji basins. The rate and duration of spreading in the North Loyalty Basin is revised to 43 mm/yr between 28 and 44 Ma, longer and faster than previously recognized. The direction of its opening was to the southeast, that is, parallel to the continent-ocean boundary and perpendicular to the direction of coeval New Caledonia ophiolite emplacement. Medium- and high-K alkaline lavas of 23-25 Ma (late Oligocene) age on the northern Norfolk Ridge are an additional magmatic response to Pacific trench rollback.

  17. On the formation of the South Pacific quadrupole mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian; Wang, Faming

    2016-08-01

    The formation process of the South Pacific (SP) quadrupole (SPQ) mode was investigated in this study based on observations and reanalysis data. The SPQ is the dominant mode of the sea surface temperature (SST)-surface wind covariability in the SP after removing the ENSO-related signals. The positive phase of the SPQ is characterized by a warm SST anomaly (SSTA) west of the South American coast, a cool SSTA in its southwest, a positive SSTA southeast of New Zealand, and a negative SSTA off the southeast coast of Australia, overlain by cyclonic wind anomalies. The anomalous cyclonic winds weaken the mean southeast trade winds in the southeast SP and the westerlies in the high latitudes of the SP, increasing the SSTAs at the two positive poles through decreased evaporation and latent heat flux (LHF) loss. The southeast wind anomalies advect dry and cold air to the negative pole in the central SP, which reduces the SSTA there by increasing the LHF loss. Off the southeast coast of Australia, the southwest wind anomalies induce equatorward Ekman currents and advect cold water. The resulting oceanic horizontal advection is the main contributor to the negative SSTAs there. In addition to the above processes, cloud cover change can enhance the initial SSTAs in the southeast SP by affecting shortwave radiation. The decay of the SPQ is mainly due to LHF changes.

  18. Traditional Coping Strategies and Disaster Response: Examples from the South Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Stephanie M.; Kuruppu, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    The Pacific Islands are vulnerable to climate change and increased risk of disasters not only because of their isolated and often low lying geographical setting but because of their economic status which renders them reliant on donor support. In a qualitative study exploring the adaptive capacity of Pacific Island Countries (PICs) across four countries, Cook Islands, Fiji, Samoa, and Vanuatu, it was clear that traditional coping strategies are consistently being applied as part of response to disasters and climate changes. This paper describes five common strategies employed in PICs as understood through this research: recognition of traditional methods; faith and religious beliefs; traditional governance and leadership; family and community involvement; and agriculture and food security. While this study does not trial the efficacy of these methods, it provides an indication of what methods are being used and therefore a starting point for further research into which of these traditional strategies are beneficial. These findings also provide important impetus for Pacific Island governments to recognise traditional approaches in their disaster preparedness and response processes. PMID:24454413

  19. Traditional coping strategies and disaster response: examples from the South Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephanie M; Thiessen, Jodi; Gero, Anna; Rumsey, Michele; Kuruppu, Natasha; Willetts, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    The Pacific Islands are vulnerable to climate change and increased risk of disasters not only because of their isolated and often low lying geographical setting but because of their economic status which renders them reliant on donor support. In a qualitative study exploring the adaptive capacity of Pacific Island Countries (PICs) across four countries, Cook Islands, Fiji, Samoa, and Vanuatu, it was clear that traditional coping strategies are consistently being applied as part of response to disasters and climate changes. This paper describes five common strategies employed in PICs as understood through this research: recognition of traditional methods; faith and religious beliefs; traditional governance and leadership; family and community involvement; and agriculture and food security. While this study does not trial the efficacy of these methods, it provides an indication of what methods are being used and therefore a starting point for further research into which of these traditional strategies are beneficial. These findings also provide important impetus for Pacific Island governments to recognise traditional approaches in their disaster preparedness and response processes.

  20. Human Leptospirosis Infection in Fiji: An Eco-epidemiological Approach to Identifying Risk Factors and Environmental Drivers for Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Colleen L.; Watson, Conall H.; Lowry, John H.; David, Michael C.; Craig, Scott B.; Wynwood, Sarah J.; Kama, Mike; Nilles, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an important zoonotic disease in the Pacific Islands. In Fiji, two successive cyclones and severe flooding in 2012 resulted in outbreaks with 576 reported cases and 7% case-fatality. We conducted a cross-sectional seroprevalence study and used an eco-epidemiological approach to characterize risk factors and drivers for human leptospirosis infection in Fiji, and aimed to provide an evidence base for improving the effectiveness of public health mitigation and intervention strategies. Antibodies indicative of previous or recent infection were found in 19.4% of 2152 participants (81 communities on the 3 main islands). Questionnaires and geographic information systems data were used to assess variables related to demographics, individual behaviour, contact with animals, socioeconomics, living conditions, land use, and the natural environment. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, variables associated with the presence of Leptospira antibodies included male gender (OR 1.55), iTaukei ethnicity (OR 3.51), living in villages (OR 1.64), lack of treated water at home (OR 1.52), working outdoors (1.64), living in rural areas (OR 1.43), high poverty rate (OR 1.74), living <100m from a major river (OR 1.41), pigs in the community (OR 1.54), high cattle density in the district (OR 1.04 per head/sqkm), and high maximum rainfall in the wettest month (OR 1.003 per mm). Risk factors and drivers for human leptospirosis infection in Fiji are complex and multifactorial, with environmental factors playing crucial roles. With global climate change, severe weather events and flooding are expected to intensify in the South Pacific. Population growth could also lead to more intensive livestock farming; and urbanization in developing countries is often associated with urban and peri-urban slums where diseases of poverty proliferate. Climate change, flooding, population growth, urbanization, poverty and agricultural intensification are important drivers of zoonotic

  1. Human Leptospirosis Infection in Fiji: An Eco-epidemiological Approach to Identifying Risk Factors and Environmental Drivers for Transmission.

    PubMed

    Lau, Colleen L; Watson, Conall H; Lowry, John H; David, Michael C; Craig, Scott B; Wynwood, Sarah J; Kama, Mike; Nilles, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an important zoonotic disease in the Pacific Islands. In Fiji, two successive cyclones and severe flooding in 2012 resulted in outbreaks with 576 reported cases and 7% case-fatality. We conducted a cross-sectional seroprevalence study and used an eco-epidemiological approach to characterize risk factors and drivers for human leptospirosis infection in Fiji, and aimed to provide an evidence base for improving the effectiveness of public health mitigation and intervention strategies. Antibodies indicative of previous or recent infection were found in 19.4% of 2152 participants (81 communities on the 3 main islands). Questionnaires and geographic information systems data were used to assess variables related to demographics, individual behaviour, contact with animals, socioeconomics, living conditions, land use, and the natural environment. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, variables associated with the presence of Leptospira antibodies included male gender (OR 1.55), iTaukei ethnicity (OR 3.51), living in villages (OR 1.64), lack of treated water at home (OR 1.52), working outdoors (1.64), living in rural areas (OR 1.43), high poverty rate (OR 1.74), living <100m from a major river (OR 1.41), pigs in the community (OR 1.54), high cattle density in the district (OR 1.04 per head/sqkm), and high maximum rainfall in the wettest month (OR 1.003 per mm). Risk factors and drivers for human leptospirosis infection in Fiji are complex and multifactorial, with environmental factors playing crucial roles. With global climate change, severe weather events and flooding are expected to intensify in the South Pacific. Population growth could also lead to more intensive livestock farming; and urbanization in developing countries is often associated with urban and peri-urban slums where diseases of poverty proliferate. Climate change, flooding, population growth, urbanization, poverty and agricultural intensification are important drivers of zoonotic

  2. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-03-01

    During 2002-2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25-44 years of age.

  3. Migration and remittances in the South Pacific: towards new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Connell, J; Brown, R P

    1995-06-01

    The South Pacific region is comprised of 22 states. The indigenous populations are Melanesians, Micronesians, and Polynesians. Polynesian states have largely international emigration, Melanesians have considerable internal migration, and Micronesians have both internal and international migration. This article reviews recent research on some issues relating to migration, particularly remittances. Migration includes movement away from small, remote islands, movement down mountains to coastal areas, movement to urban areas, and international migration. Migration has tended to be circular, but it is becoming more permanent. A major influence on migration is identified as changes in aspirations about a suitable standard of living. In the quest for material goods remittances play an important role. Remittances not only satisfy material need, such as debt repayment, but serve as social ties and as insurance premiums. Remittances reinforce the social hierarchy and mainly go to senior family members. In some contexts remittances have reduced the pressure on national governments to provide employment opportunities and welfare services. In the short-term, benefits go to migrant families and sending countries. Remittances are usually cash flows through the banking system, but there is considerable hand-carrying of remittances or transporting of gifts and goods, particularly due to the limited value of money in remote areas. Remittances are bi-directional. Limited evidence suggests that remittances are intended for subsistence, church donations, family occasions, and school fees. "Modern" housing and airfares for relatives are other primary uses of remittances. It is expected that remittances would decline over time. Women tend to be more frequent remitters. Remittances tend to be a high proportion of income. Studies of remittance use in the Pacific suggest diversity of use, but a primary use is for consumption needs. When there is little domestic investment from remittances

  4. Dynamics and energetics of the South Pacific convergence zone during FGGE SOP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, D. G.; Robertson, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The major objectives are to: (1) diagnose the physical processes responsible for the maintenance of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ); and (2) examine the role of the SPCZ in the large-scale circulation patterns of the Southern Hemisphere.

  5. The role of South Pacific atmospheric variability in the development of different types of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yujia; Furtado, Jason C.

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in tropical Pacific climate variability have focused on understanding the development of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, specifically the types or "flavors" of ENSO (i.e., central versus eastern Pacific events). While precursors to ENSO events exist, distinguishing the particular flavor of the expected ENSO event remains unresolved. This study offers a new look at ENSO predictability using South Pacific atmospheric variability during austral winter as an indicator. The positive phase of the leading mode of South Pacific sea level pressure variability, which we term the South Pacific Oscillation (SPO), exhibits a meridional dipole with with a(n) (anti)cyclonic anomaly dominating the subtropics (extratropics/high latitudes). Once energized, the cyclonic anomalies in the subtropical node of the SPO weaken the southeasterly trade winds and promote the charging of the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, giving rise to eastern Pacific ENSO events. Indeed, the type of ENSO event can be determined accurately using only the magnitude and phase of the SPO during austral winter as a predictor (17 out of 23 cases). The SPO may also play a role in explaining the asymmetry of warm and cold events. Collectively, our findings present a new perspective on ENSO-South Pacific interactions that can advance overall understanding of the ENSO system and enhance its predictability across multiple timescales.

  6. The Upper Mantle Under the South Pacific Super-Swell from Multimode Surface Waveform Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, A.; Debayle, E.; Priestley, K.; Barruol, G.; Fontaine, F.; Reymond, D.

    2003-12-01

    The South Pacific contains a swarm of volcanic island chains superimposed on a broad bathymetric high known as the South Pacific Superswell. The islands and swell are thought to be the surface manifestation of a ``superplume'' beneath the the region. We present a Sv-wave speed tomographic model for the South Pacific derived from multi-mode waveform inversion of more than 17,000 vertical component seismograms. Most of the data are from the Global Digital Seismic Network but we include important data from ten broadband seismographs deployed in French Polynesia as part of the PLUME experiment (Polynesia Lithosphere and Upper Mantle Experiment). We use preferentially short propagation paths (Δ < 54o) to minimize off great circle path propagation, but increase the path length in areas of insufficient coverage. We resolve the subduction zones bounding the South Pacific to the east and west with a width compatible with the smoothing used in the tomographic inversion. The slow wave speed structure associated with the East Pacific Rise is offset to the west as has previously been noted in more detailed local studies. There seems to be no pervasive low wave speed feature in the upper mantle beneath the South Pacific. However, low wave speed structures extend from shallow depth to the transition zone beneath the Society hotspot, the Austral hotspot and Easter Island. The presence of similar structures beneath other Pacific hotspots is currently masked by lack of resolution.

  7. Comparison between the South Pacific Convergence Zone and South Atlantic Convergence Zone in January 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Dayton G.; Hurrell, James W.; Huang, Huo-Jin

    1986-01-01

    Using one of the FGGE data sets, the eddy potential and eddy kinetic energy budgets during the period of January 10-27, 1979 were derived for the regions containing the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and the South Atlantic Convergence Zone. A complete set of energy equations developed by Brennan and Vincent (1980) was partitioned into zonal and eddy components; the eddy forms of energy were derived from a grid point's departure from the zonal average over a 5-deg latitude belt. The results of the analysis indicate that the eddy kinetic energy content (KE) is greater than the eddy available potential energy content (AE) throughout the period. Both AE and KE show large losses beginning when the SPCZ enters a decaying state: AE shows a gradual but slow decrease until after January 22, when it decreases rapidly; KE oscillates, reaching a maximum on January 22 before a rapid decrease.

  8. Can Indian Ocean SST variability impact TC activity in the South Pacific? A Spatial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Andrew D.; Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Kiem, Anthony S.

    2015-04-01

    Tropical Cyclones (TCs) represent a significant natural hazard to the 15 island nations and 2.7 million inhabitants of the South Pacific, accounting for 76% of reported disasters in the region since 1950. This vast area, dominated by the coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions of the South Pacific fuels the highly variable nature of TCs (both spatially and temporally), leading to difficulties in planning for and responding to these extreme events. While it is well known that the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) plays a significant role in modulating the background state on which TCs form, there are other large-scale climate drivers operating on annual timescales or longer within the South Pacific (e.g. ENSO Modoki and the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation) and outside the Pacific Basin (e.g. the Indian Ocean Dipole and the Southern Annular Mode) that may also influence TC formation. In response to this issue, the impact of these large-scale climate drivers upon the spatial characteristics of tropical cyclogenesis is assessed for the South Pacific region (5o-35oS, 145oE-130oW) over a 67-year period (1945-2011). It is shown, that in addition to the impact of 'Pacific-centric' climate drivers, eastern Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures significantly impact the spatial characteristics of tropical cyclogenesis in the South Pacific. In particular, warming (cooling) in the eastern Indian Ocean is found to result in an eastward (westward) shift in the average location of tropical cyclogenesis in the South Pacific (up to 712km between extreme phases). One mechanism that may account for this east/west modulation of TC activity in the South Pacific is the propagation of warmer water from the Timor Sea through the Coral Sea to the Pacific, resulting in a strengthening of the Pacific Warm Pool and associated meteorological characteristics connected with tropical cyclogenesis. Understanding how other large-scale climate modes interact with Indian Ocean processes is important

  9. Long-term geochemical connections between the Samoan hotspot and the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. A.; Jackson, M. G.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Hall, P. S.; Sinton, J. M.; Kurz, M. D.; Blusztajn, J.

    2013-12-01

    northwestern Lau and North Fiji Basins, but that the Samoan component has been diluted by (mixed with) a depleted mantle component. Of interest is how the Upolu-like component mixed with the depleted mantle. One possible model is that Samoan plume material flows to the south and transits from beneath the old (100 Ma), thick Pacific lithosphere to beneath the young (<5 Ma) thin oceanic lithosphere in the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins. During transit, the southward flowing Samoan mantle will undergo adiabatic decompression melting as it upwells beneath the thin lithosphere in the northern Lau and North Fiji basins. The Samoan component is likely to melt together with ambient (depleted) mantle, thus shifting the isotopic composition of the erupted melt slightly away from Samoan compositions toward depleted MORB mantle. We suggest that this process may operate from Pandora Ridge in the west to Rochambeau Bank, ~1000 km to the east.

  10. Recent introduction of an allodapine bee into Fiji: A new model system for understanding biological invasions by pollinators.

    PubMed

    Groom, Scott V C; Tuiwawa, Marika V; Stevens, Mark I; Schwarz, Michael P

    2015-08-01

    Morphology-based studies have suggested a very depauperate bee fauna for islands in the South West Pacific, and recent genetic studies since have indicated an even smaller endemic fauna with many bee species in this region resulting from human-aided dispersal. These introduced species have the potential to both disrupt native pollinator suites as well as augment crop pollination, but for most species the timings of introduction are unknown. We examined the distribution and nesting biology of the long-tongued bee Braunsapis puangensis that was first recorded from Fiji in 2007. This bee has now become widespread in Fiji and both its local abundance and geographical range are likely to increase dramatically. The impacts of this invasion are potentially enormous for agriculture and native ecosystems, but they also provide opportunities for understanding how social insect species adapt to new environments. We outline the major issues associated with this recent invasion and argue that a long-term monitoring study is needed.

  11. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific and South East Asian Regions, 2010.

    PubMed

    Lahra, Monica M

    2012-03-31

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (GASP) has conducted continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific Region (WPR) to optimise antibiotic treatment and control of gonococcal disease since 1992. From 2007, this has been enhanced by the inclusion of data from the WHO South East Asian Region (SEAR). Over time, there has been recruitment of additional centres in both regions. This report provides an analysis of antimicrobial resistance in N. gonorrhoeae in the WHO WPR and SEAR derived from results of the 2010 GASP surveillance. In 2010 there were 9,744 N. gonorrhoeae isolates examined for their susceptibility to one or more of the antibiotics used for the treatment of gonorrhoea, incorporating External Quality Assurance controlled methods, from reporting centres in 19 countries and/or jurisdictions. A high proportion of penicillin and quinolone resistance was again detected amongst isolates tested in the 'Asian' countries of WHO WPR and SEAR. In contrast, lower levels of penicillin and quinolone resistance were reported from the Pacific Islands of Fiji and New Caledonia. The proportion of gonococci reported as having 'decreased susceptibility' to the third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic ceftriaxone varied widely, ranging from 1.3% to 55.8%. There is a continued need for revision and clarification of some of the in vitro criteria that are currently used to categorise the clinical importance of gonococci with different ceftriaxone and oral cephalosporin MIC levels, and to relate these to treatment outcome. Azithromycin resistance was very low in most countries reporting, except in Mongolia where it was 34%. The number of instances of spectinomycin resistance remained low. A high proportion of strains tested continued to exhibit high-level plasmid mediated resistance to tetracyclines. The continuing emergence and spread of antibiotic resistant gonococci in and

  12. Digital Divide within Society: An Account of Poverty, Community and E-Governance in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Mohammad Habibur; Naz, Rafia

    2006-01-01

    The importance and potential of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to develop economies has been demonstrated through various studies around the globe. For the Pacific, especially Fiji, where development is hampered by dispersed populations, small sizes and vast ocean distances, ICT can help overcome these restrictive circumstances,…

  13. Digital Divide within Society: An Account of Poverty, Community and E-Governance in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Mohammad Habibur; Naz, Rafia

    2006-01-01

    The importance and potential of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to develop economies has been demonstrated through various studies around the globe. For the Pacific, especially Fiji, where development is hampered by dispersed populations, small sizes and vast ocean distances, ICT can help overcome these restrictive circumstances,…

  14. Plastic pollution in the South Pacific subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Marcus; Maximenko, Nikolai; Thiel, Martin; Cummins, Anna; Lattin, Gwen; Wilson, Stiv; Hafner, Jan; Zellers, Ann; Rifman, Samuel

    2013-03-15

    Plastic marine pollution in the open ocean of the southern hemisphere is largely undocumented. Here, we report the result of a (4489 km) 2424 nautical mile transect through the South Pacific subtropical gyre, carried out in March-April 2011. Neuston samples were collected at 48 sites, averaging 50 nautical miles apart, using a manta trawl lined with a 333 μm mesh. The transect bisected a predicted accumulation zone associated with the convergence of surface currents, driven by local winds. The results show an increase in surface abundance of plastic pollution as we neared the center and decrease as we moved away, verifying the presence of a garbage patch. The average abundance and mass was 26,898 particles km(-2) and 70.96 g km(-2), respectively. 88.8% of the plastic pollution was found in the middle third of the samples with the highest value of 396,342 particles km(-2) occurring near the center of the predicted accumulation zone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Subseafloor sedimentary life in the South Pacific Gyre

    PubMed Central

    D'Hondt, Steven; Spivack, Arthur J.; Pockalny, Robert; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Fischer, Jan P.; Kallmeyer, Jens; Abrams, Lewis J.; Smith, David C.; Graham, Dennis; Hasiuk, Franciszek; Schrum, Heather; Stancin, Andrea M.

    2009-01-01

    The low-productivity South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is Earth's largest oceanic province. Its sediment accumulates extraordinarily slowly (0.1–1 m per million years). This sediment contains a living community that is characterized by very low biomass and very low metabolic activity. At every depth in cored SPG sediment, mean cell abundances are 3 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than at the same depths in all previously explored subseafloor communities. The net rate of respiration by the subseafloor sedimentary community at each SPG site is 1 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than the rates at previously explored sites. Because of the low respiration rates and the thinness of the sediment, interstitial waters are oxic throughout the sediment column in most of this region. Consequently, the sedimentary community of the SPG is predominantly aerobic, unlike previously explored subseafloor communities. Generation of H2 by radiolysis of water is a significant electron-donor source for this community. The per-cell respiration rates of this community are about 2 orders of magnitude higher (in oxidation/reduction equivalents) than in previously explored anaerobic subseafloor communities. Respiration rates and cell concentrations in subseafloor sediment throughout almost half of the world ocean may approach those in SPG sediment. PMID:19561304

  16. Subseafloor sedimentary life in the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Steven; Spivack, Arthur J; Pockalny, Robert; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Fischer, Jan P; Kallmeyer, Jens; Abrams, Lewis J; Smith, David C; Graham, Dennis; Hasiuk, Franciszek; Schrum, Heather; Stancin, Andrea M

    2009-07-14

    The low-productivity South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is Earth's largest oceanic province. Its sediment accumulates extraordinarily slowly (0.1-1 m per million years). This sediment contains a living community that is characterized by very low biomass and very low metabolic activity. At every depth in cored SPG sediment, mean cell abundances are 3 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than at the same depths in all previously explored subseafloor communities. The net rate of respiration by the subseafloor sedimentary community at each SPG site is 1 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than the rates at previously explored sites. Because of the low respiration rates and the thinness of the sediment, interstitial waters are oxic throughout the sediment column in most of this region. Consequently, the sedimentary community of the SPG is predominantly aerobic, unlike previously explored subseafloor communities. Generation of H(2) by radiolysis of water is a significant electron-donor source for this community. The per-cell respiration rates of this community are about 2 orders of magnitude higher (in oxidation/reduction equivalents) than in previously explored anaerobic subseafloor communities. Respiration rates and cell concentrations in subseafloor sediment throughout almost half of the world ocean may approach those in SPG sediment.

  17. A Framework for the Origin of the Diagonally Oriented South Atlantic and South Pacific Convergence Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, K.; Matthews, A. J.; Stevens, D. P.; Joshi, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a conceptual framework for the diagonal orientation of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), based on observations of tropical-extratropical interactions, Rossby wave theory, and vorticity calculations. Wave trains propagate eastward along the Southern Hemisphere subtropical jet, with initially quasi-circular vorticity centres. In the zonally sheared environment on the equatorward flank of the jet, these vorticity centres become elongated and develop a northwest-southeast tilt. Ray tracing diagnostics in a non-divergent, barotropic Rossby wave framework then explain the observed equatorward propagation of these diagonal vorticity structures toward the westerly ducts over the equatorial Pacific and Atlantic. The baroclinic component of these circulations leads to ascent and destabilisation ahead of the cyclonic vorticity anomaly in the wave. Over the high sea surface temperatures in this region, deep convection is triggered. Latent heat release forces ascent and strong upper-tropospheric divergence, with an associated anticyclonic vorticity tendency. In a vorticity budget, this cancels out the advective cyclonic vorticity tendency in the wave train over the SPCZ, and dissipates the wave within a day. The mean SPCZ is then comprised of the sum of these pulses of diagonal bands of precipitation. These mechanisms also operate in the SACZ. However, the vorticity anomalies in the wave trains are stronger, and the precipitation and negative feedback from the divergence and anticyclonic vorticity tendency are weaker, resulting in continued propagation of the wave and a more diffuse diagonal convergence zone.

  18. Meteorology of the Southern Global Plume: African and South American Fires Pollute the South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Z.; Chatfield, R. B.

    1999-01-01

    An immense global plume of CO meanders widely around the world in the Southern Hemisphere. It arises over Southern America and Africa and flows eastward. The first emissions are in tropical Brazil, and the plume circulates around the world to South America again. The plume was largely unexpected until there were aircraft studies made in NASA's Pacific Exploratory Mission - Tropics (Part A). This paper describes the meteorology of the Global Plume, as our simulation, with a synoptic model adapted to global transport, reveals it with a tracer-CO simulation. The observations and their simulation require a particular set of conditions of pollutant accumulation, cumulonimbus venting with required strengths at a narrow range of altitude. Additionally, a particular subtropical conduction region, over the Indian Ocean, Australia, and the westeRNmost South Pacific, relatively free of storms, appears to be a key part of the mechanism. These conclusions are the results of a synoptic reconstruction of the PEMT-A period, September- October, 1996.

  19. Absolute cardiovascular risk in a Fiji medical zone.

    PubMed

    Gyaneshwar, Rajat; Naidu, Swaran; Raban, Magdalena Z; Naidu, Sheetal; Linhart, Christine; Morrell, Stephen; Tukana, Isimeli; Taylor, Richard

    2016-02-09

    of the survey highlight the need for individual and community interventions to address the high levels of NCD/RFs. Evaluation of interventions is needed in order to inform NCD control policies in Fiji and other Pacific Island nations.

  20. Remote influence of Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation on the South Atlantic meridional overturning circulation variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hosmay; Dong, Shenfu; Lee, Sang-Ki; Campos, Edmo

    2016-08-01

    This study explores potential factors that may influence decadal variability of the South Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (SAMOC) by using observational data as well as surface-forced ocean model runs and a fully coupled climate model run. Here we show that SAMOC is strongly correlated with the leading mode of sea surface height (SSH) variability in the South Atlantic Ocean, which displays a meridional dipole between north and south of 20°S. A significant portion ( 45%) of the South Atlantic SSH dipole variability is remotely modulated by the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). Further analysis shows that anomalous tropical Pacific convection associated with the IPO forces robust stationary Rossby wave patterns, modulating the wind stress curl over the South Atlantic Ocean. A positive (negative) phase IPO increases (decreases) the westerlies over the South Atlantic, which increases (decreases) the strength of the subtropical gyre in the South Atlantic and thus the SAMOC.

  1. Impacts of tropical cyclones on Fiji and Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; Prakash, Bipendra; Atalifo, Terry; Waqaicelua, Alipate; Seuseu, Sunny; Ausetalia Titimaea, Mulipola

    2013-04-01

    Weather and climate hazards have significant impacts on Pacific Island Countries. Costs of hazards such as tropical cyclones can be astronomical making enormous negative economic impacts on developing countries. We highlight examples of extreme weather events which have occurred in Fiji and Samoa in the last few decades and have caused major economic and social disruption in the countries. Destructive winds and torrential rain associated with tropical cyclones can bring the most damaging weather conditions to the region causing economic and social hardship, affecting agricultural productivity, infrastructure and economic development which can persist for many years after the initial impact. Analysing historical data, we describe the impacts of tropical cyclones Bebe and Kina on Fiji. Cyclone Bebe (October 1972) affected the whole Fiji especially the Yasawa Islands, Viti Levu and Kadavu where hurricane force winds have been recorded. Nineteen deaths were reported and damage costs caused by cyclone Bebe were estimated as exceeding F20 million (F 1972). Tropical cyclone Kina passed between Fiji's two main islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, and directly over Levuka on the night of 2 January 1993 with hurricane force winds causing extensive damage. Twenty three deaths have been reported making Kina one of the deadliest hurricanes in Fiji's recent history. Severe flooding on Viti Levu, combined with high tide and heavy seas led to destruction of the Sigatoka and Ba bridges, as well as almost complete loss of crops in Sigatoka and Navua deltas. Overall, damage caused by cyclone Kina was estimated as F170 million. In Samoa, we describe devastation to the country caused by tropical cyclones Ofa (February 1990) and Val (December 1991) which were considered to be the worst cyclones to affect the Samoan islands since the 1889 Apia cyclone. In Samoa, seven people were killed due to cyclone Ofa, thousands of people were left homeless and entire villages were destroyed. Damage

  2. Paleoceanography in Pelagic Clay of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S.

    2014-12-01

    A spatially and temporally expansive record of early Cenozoic high-latitude ocean history resides in the pelagic clay of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). At the beginning of the Cenozoic, four sites drilled during IODP Expedition 329 were located between 40-62°S, which may have been the center of an ancient polar gyre. As the Pacific Plate migrated northward, these sites were subjected to major paleoceanographic changes including the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, Australian desertification, and Southern Hemisphere volcanism. The SPG sediment is homogenous brown, zeolitic, metalliferous pelagic clay. Such sediment can be challenging for paleooceanographic research due its ultrafine grain size, slow accumulation rate, post-depositional alteration, and lack of biogenic material. However, our geochemical techniques embrace the authigenic nature of SPG clay to develop a constant-Co age model and track variations in sediment origin and accumulation. By combining sedimentation patterns with backtracked site paths, we produce an unprecedented characterization of the Cenozoic paleoceanographic evolution of the SPG. We analyzed 47 major, trace, REE concentrations in 206 bulk sediment samples from 7 sites across the SPG, deposited as long ago as 100 Ma. For each sample, traditional geochemical partitioning techniques, Q-mode factor analyses, and multiple linear regressions allowed us to quantify contributions of six end-members: post-Archean average Australian shale (PAAS), Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, apatite, biogenic Si, and two distinct types of altered volcanic ash. Mass accumulation of the PAAS end-member increased 12-18% throughout the Cenozoic, with the most rapid increase occurring just after the mid-Miocene when Australia became more arid. The Paleogene/Neogene boundary also marks a change in sedimentation, likely caused by a change in eolian activity and/or a change in authigenic processes due to changing bottom water conditions. Contributions from one kind of

  3. 'Live more': Study protocol for a community-based lifestyle education program addressing non-communicable diseases in low-literacy areas of the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Kent, L M; Reierson, P; Morton, D P

    2015-12-09

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have reached epidemic proportions in Pacific Island countries. Unhealthy lifestyle is one of the major risk factors and lifestyle interventions have been shown to be efficacious for primary, secondary and early tertiary prevention. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding effective community-based lifestyle interventions in the Pacific Islands. The Complete Health Improvement Program for high-income countries was contextualised for rural communities with relatively low-literacy rates in low-income countries using the REFLECT delivery approach. This study will assess the effect of this 'Live More' program to reduce participant's NCD risk factors and improve lifestyle behaviours associated with health and wellbeing, in low-literacy communities in countries of the South Pacific. This study is a 6-month cluster-randomised controlled trial of 288 adults (equal proportions of men and women aged 18 years and over) with waist circumference of ≥92 cm for men and ≥80 cm for women in four rural villages in each of Fiji, Vanuatu and Solomon Islands. Participants will permanently reside in their village and be able to prepare their own meals. Two villages will be randomised to the 'Live More' intervention (n = 24) or to control receiving only country specific Ministry of Health literature (n = 24). Intervention participants will meet three times a week in the first month, then once a week for the next two months and once a month for the last three months. Themes covered include: NCDs and their causes; and the benefits of positive lifestyle choices, positive psychology, stress management, forgiveness and self-worth, and how these influence long-term health habits. Outcome assessments at baseline, 30-days, 3-months and 6-months include body mass index, waist circumference, blood lipids, blood pressure and blood glucose. Secondary outcomes include changes in medication and substance use, diet, physical activity, emotional

  4. Metabolic activity of subseafloor microbes in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Ito, M.; Terada, T.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is characterized as the most oligotrophic open ocean environment. The sediment is rich in oxygen but poor in energy-sources such as reduced organic matter, and hence harbors very low numbers of microbial cells in relatively shallow subseafloor sediment (D'Hondt et al., 2009; Kallmeyer et al., 2012). In such an energy-limited sedimentary habitat, a small size of microbial community persists living functions with extraordinary low oxygen-consumption rate (Røy et al., 2012). During IODP Expedition 329, a series of sediment samples were successfully recovered from 7 drill sites (U1365-1371) from the seafloor to basement in the SPG, providing an unprecedented opportunity to study metabolic activity of the aerobic subseafloor microbial communities. We initiated incubation onboard by adding stable isotope-labeled substrates to the freshly collected sediment sample, such as 13C and/or 15N-labeled bicarbonate, glucose, amino acids, acetate, and ammonium under the (micro-) aerobic condition. One of the technological challenges in this study is to harvest microbial cells from very low-biomass sediment samples for the analysis using nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). To address the technical issue, we improved existing cell separation technique for the SPG sediment samples with small inorganic zeolitic grains. By monitoring cell recovery rates through an image-based cell enumeration technique (Morono et al., 2009), we found that cell recovery rates in the SPG sediment samples are generally lower than those in other oceanographic settings (i.e., organic-rich ocean margin sediments). To gain higher cell recovery ratio, we applied multiple density gradient layers, resulting in the cell recovery ratio up to around 80-95% (Morono et al., in press). Then, using the newly developed cell separation technique, we successfully sorted enough number of microbial cells in small spots on the membrane (i.e., 103 to 105 cells per spot). Nano

  5. Meiofauna hotspot in the Atacama Trench, eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danovaro, R.; Gambi, C.; Della Croce, N.

    2002-05-01

    Meiofaunal assemblages were investigated (in terms of abundance, biomass, individual size and community structure) at bathyal and hadal depths (from 1050 to 7800 m) in the Atacama Trench in the upwelling sector of the eastern South Pacific Ocean, in relation to the distribution and availability of potential food sources (phytopigments, biochemical compounds and bacterial biomass) in this highly productive region. Meiofaunal density and biomass in the Atacama Trench were one to two orders of magnitude higher than values reported in other "oligotrophic" hadal systems. The Atacama Trench presented very high concentrations of nutritionally rich organic matter at 7800-m depth and displayed characteristics typical of eutrophic systems. Surprisingly, despite a decrease in chlorophyll- a and organic matter concentrations of about 50% from bathyal to hadal depths, meiofaunal abundance in hadal sediments was 10-fold higher than at bathyal depths. As indicated by the higher protein to carbohydrate ratio observed in trench sediments, the extraordinarily high meiofaunal density reported in the Atacama Trench was more dependent upon organic matter quality than on its quantity. The trophic richness of the system was reflected by a shift of the size structure of the benthic organisms. In contrast with typical trends of deep-sea systems, the ratio of bacterial to meiofaunal biomass decreased with increasing depth and, in the Atacama Trench, meiofaunal biomass largely dominated total benthic biomass. Nematodes at 7800-m depth accounted for more than 80% of total density and about 50% of total meiofaunal biomass. In hadal sediments a clear meiofaunal dwarfism was observed: the individual body size of nematodes and other taxa was reduced by 30-40% compared to individuals collected at bathyal depths. The peculiarity of this trophic-rich system allows rejection of previous hypotheses, which explained deep-sea dwarfism by the extremely oligotrophic conditions typical of deep-sea regions.

  6. Heterotrophic organisms dominate nitrogen fixation in the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Halm, Hannah; Lam, Phyllis; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Lavik, Gaute; Dittmar, Thorsten; LaRoche, Julie; D'Hondt, Steven; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2012-06-01

    Oceanic subtropical gyres are considered biological deserts because of the extremely low availability of nutrients and thus minimum productivities. The major source of nutrient nitrogen in these ecosystems is N(2)-fixation. The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is the largest ocean gyre in the world, but measurements of N(2)-fixation therein, or identification of microorganisms involved, are scarce. In the 2006/2007 austral summer, we investigated nitrogen and carbon assimilation at 11 stations throughout the SPG. In the ultra-oligotrophic waters of the SPG, the chlorophyll maxima reached as deep as 200 m. Surface primary production seemed limited by nitrogen, as dissolved inorganic carbon uptake was stimulated upon additions of (15)N-labeled ammonium and leucine in our incubation experiments. N(2)-fixation was detectable throughout the upper 200 m at most stations, with rates ranging from 0.001 to 0.19 nM N h(-1). N(2)-fixation in the SPG may account for the production of 8-20% of global oceanic new nitrogen. Interestingly, comparable (15)N(2)-fixation rates were measured under light and dark conditions. Meanwhile, phylogenetic analyses for the functional gene biomarker nifH and its transcripts could not detect any common photoautotrophic diazotrophs, such as, Trichodesmium, but a prevalence of γ-proteobacteria and the unicellular photoheterotrophic Group A cyanobacteria. The dominance of these likely heterotrophic diazotrophs was further verified by quantitative PCR. Hence, our combined results show that the ultra-oligotrophic SPG harbors a hitherto unknown heterotrophic diazotrophic community, clearly distinct from other oceanic gyres previously visited.

  7. Radiocarbon Signature and Cycling of Dissolved Organic Carbon in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druffel, E. R.; Griffin, S.

    2010-12-01

    The average radiocarbon (Delta14C) measurements of bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the deep ocean range from -390 per mil in the deep Sargasso Sea to -550 per mil in the deep Northeast Pacific. The data set used to estimate this range is based on only four sites in the world ocean. We participated in the P-6 Repeat Hydrography cruise in January to February 2010 along 30-32°S in the South Pacific and collected samples from four depth profiles. High-precision Delta14C measurements of bulk DOC are ongoing using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) techniques at the Keck Carbon Cycle AMS Laboratory. We will report completed Delta14C measurements from these South Pacific sites and compare them to those available from two other sites in the North Pacific and one in the Southern Ocean. It is anticipated that Delta14C values of deep South Pacific DOC are intermediate between those in the Southern Ocean (Delta14C = -500‰) and those in the North central Pacific (-525‰). These DOC Delta14C values will be used to assess the residence time and overall cycling of bulk DOC in deep waters of the Pacific.

  8. PM2.5 and aerosol black carbon in Suva, Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isley, C. F.; Nelson, P. F.; Taylor, M. P.; Mani, F. S.; Maata, M.; Atanacio, A.; Stelcer, E.; Cohen, D. D.

    2017-02-01

    Concentrations of particulate air pollution in Suva, Fiji, have been largely unknown and consequently, current strategies to reduce health risk from air pollution in Suva are not targeted effectively. This lack of air quality data is common across the Pacific Island Countries. A monitoring study, during 2014 and 2015, has characterised the fine particulate air quality in Suva, representing the most detailed study to date of fine aerosol air pollutants for the Pacific Islands; with sampling at City, Residential (Kinoya) and Background (Suva Point) sites. Meteorology for Suva, as it relates to pollutant dispersion for this period of time, has also been analysed. The study design enables the contribution of maritime air and the anthropogenic emissions to be carefully distinguished from each other and separately characterised. Back trajectory calculations show that a packet of air sampled at the Suva City site has typically travelled 724 km in the 24-h prior to sampling, mainly over open ocean waters; inferring that pollutants would also be rapidly transported away from Suva. For fine particulates, Suva City reported a mid-week PM2.5 of 8.6 ± 0.4 μg/m3, averaged over 13-months of gravimetric sampling. Continuous monitoring (Osiris laser photometer) suggests that some areas of Suva may experience levels exceeding the WHO PM2.5 guideline of 10 μg/m3, however, compared to other countries, Fiji's PM2.5 is low. Peak aerosol particulate levels, at all sites, were experienced at night-time, when atmospheric conditions were least favourable to dispersion of air pollutants. Suva's average ambient concentrations of black carbon in PM2.5, 2.2 ± 0.1 μg/m3, are, however, similar to those measured in much larger cities. With any given parcel of air spending only seven minutes, on average, over the land area of Suva Peninsula, these black carbon concentrations are indicative that significant combustion emissions occur within Suva. Many other communities in the Pacific Islands

  9. Ocean transport and variability studies of the South Pacific, Southern, and Indian Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, John A.; Cresswell, G. R.; Nilsson, C. S.; Mcdougall, T. J.; Coleman, R.; Rizos, C.; Penrose, J.; Hunter, J. R.; Lynch, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyze ocean dynamics in the western South Pacific and the adjacent Southern Ocean and the eastern Indian Ocean. Specifically, our objectives for these three regions are, for the South Pacific Ocean: (1) To estimate the volume transport of the east Australian Current (EAC) along the Australian coast and in the Tasman Front, and to estimate the time variability (on seasonal and interannual time scales) of this transport. (2) To contribute to estimating the meridional heat and freshwater fluxes (and their variability) at about 30 deg S. Good estimates of the transport in the western boundary current are essential for accurate estimates of these fluxes. (3) To determine how the EAC transport (and its extension, the Tasman Front and the East Auckland Current) closes the subtropical gyre of the South Pacific and to better determine the structure at the confluence of this current and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. (4) To examine the structure and time variability of the circulation in the western South Pacific and the adjacent Southern Ocean, particularly at the Tasman Front. For the Indian Ocean: (5) To study the seasonal interannual variations in the strength of the Leeuwin Current. (6) To monitor the Pacific-Indian Ocean throughflow and the South Equatorial and the South Java Currents between northwest Australia and Indonesia. (7) To study the processes that form the water of the permanent oceanic thermocline and, in particular, the way in which new thermocline water enters the permanent thermocline in late winter and early spring as the mixed layer restratifies. For the Southern Ocean: (8) To study the mesoscale and meridional structure of the Southern Ocean between 150 deg E and 170 deg E; in particular, to describe the Antarctic frontal system south of Tasmania and determine its interannual variability; to estimate the exchanges of heat, salt, and other properties between the Indian and Pacific Oceans; and to investigate the

  10. Nitrate in the atmospheric boundary layer of the tropical South Pacific - Implications regarding sources and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoie, Dennis L.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Merrill, John T.; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    Weekly bulk aerosol samples collected at three sites in the tropical South Pacific from 1983 to 1987 are analyzed. The mean nitrate concentrations obtained for the sites range from 0.107 to 0.117 microg/cu m. The results suggest that the region is minimally affected by the transport of soil material and pollutants from the continents. Measurements from sites in the tropical North Pacific show mean nitrate concentrations that are about three times higher than those in the South Pacific, showing that the North Pacific is significantly impacted by the transport of material from Asia and North America. The relationships between the nitrate concentrations to other constituents at American Samoa are discussed, including nonseasalt sulfate, Pb-210, and Be-7.

  11. Nitrate in the atmospheric boundary layer of the tropical South Pacific - Implications regarding sources and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoie, Dennis L.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Merrill, John T.; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    Weekly bulk aerosol samples collected at three sites in the tropical South Pacific from 1983 to 1987 are analyzed. The mean nitrate concentrations obtained for the sites range from 0.107 to 0.117 microg/cu m. The results suggest that the region is minimally affected by the transport of soil material and pollutants from the continents. Measurements from sites in the tropical North Pacific show mean nitrate concentrations that are about three times higher than those in the South Pacific, showing that the North Pacific is significantly impacted by the transport of material from Asia and North America. The relationships between the nitrate concentrations to other constituents at American Samoa are discussed, including nonseasalt sulfate, Pb-210, and Be-7.

  12. Nitrate in the atmospheric boundary layer of the tropical South Pacific - Implications regarding sources and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoie, Dennis L.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Merrill, John T.; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    1989-05-01

    Weekly bulk aerosol samples collected at three sites in the tropical South Pacific from 1983 to 1987 are analyzed. The mean nitrate concentrations obtained for the sites range from 0.107 to 0.117 microg/cu m. The results suggest that the region is minimally affected by the transport of soil material and pollutants from the continents. Measurements from sites in the tropical North Pacific show mean nitrate concentrations that are about three times higher than those in the South Pacific, showing that the North Pacific is significantly impacted by the transport of material from Asia and North America. The relationships between the nitrate concentrations to other constituents at American Samoa are discussed, including nonseasalt sulfate, Pb-210, and Be-7.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide in deep waters from the Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopwood, Mark J.; Rapp, Insa; Schlosser, Christian; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2017-03-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present ubiquitously in marine surface waters where it is a reactive intermediate in the cycling of many trace elements. Photochemical processes are considered the dominant natural H2O2 source, yet cannot explain nanomolar H2O2 concentrations below the photic zone. Here, we determined the concentration of H2O2 in full depth profiles across three ocean basins (Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans). To determine the accuracy of H2O2 measurements in the deep ocean we also re-assessed the contribution of interfering species to ‘apparent H2O2’, as analysed by the luminol based chemiluminescence technique. Within the vicinity of coastal oxygen minimum zones, accurate measurement of H2O2 was not possible due to interference from Fe(II). Offshore, in deep (>1000 m) waters H2O2 concentrations ranged from 0.25 ± 0.27 nM (Mediterranean, Balearics-Algeria) to 2.9 ± 2.2 nM (Mediterranean, Corsica-France). Our results indicate that a dark, pelagic H2O2 production mechanism must occur throughout the deep ocean. A bacterial source of H2O2 is the most likely origin and we show that this source is likely sufficient to account for all of the observed H2O2 in the deep ocean.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide in deep waters from the Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Mark J; Rapp, Insa; Schlosser, Christian; Achterberg, Eric P

    2017-03-07

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present ubiquitously in marine surface waters where it is a reactive intermediate in the cycling of many trace elements. Photochemical processes are considered the dominant natural H2O2 source, yet cannot explain nanomolar H2O2 concentrations below the photic zone. Here, we determined the concentration of H2O2 in full depth profiles across three ocean basins (Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans). To determine the accuracy of H2O2 measurements in the deep ocean we also re-assessed the contribution of interfering species to 'apparent H2O2', as analysed by the luminol based chemiluminescence technique. Within the vicinity of coastal oxygen minimum zones, accurate measurement of H2O2 was not possible due to interference from Fe(II). Offshore, in deep (>1000 m) waters H2O2 concentrations ranged from 0.25 ± 0.27 nM (Mediterranean, Balearics-Algeria) to 2.9 ± 2.2 nM (Mediterranean, Corsica-France). Our results indicate that a dark, pelagic H2O2 production mechanism must occur throughout the deep ocean. A bacterial source of H2O2 is the most likely origin and we show that this source is likely sufficient to account for all of the observed H2O2 in the deep ocean.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide in deep waters from the Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Mark J.; Rapp, Insa; Schlosser, Christian; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present ubiquitously in marine surface waters where it is a reactive intermediate in the cycling of many trace elements. Photochemical processes are considered the dominant natural H2O2 source, yet cannot explain nanomolar H2O2 concentrations below the photic zone. Here, we determined the concentration of H2O2 in full depth profiles across three ocean basins (Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans). To determine the accuracy of H2O2 measurements in the deep ocean we also re-assessed the contribution of interfering species to ‘apparent H2O2’, as analysed by the luminol based chemiluminescence technique. Within the vicinity of coastal oxygen minimum zones, accurate measurement of H2O2 was not possible due to interference from Fe(II). Offshore, in deep (>1000 m) waters H2O2 concentrations ranged from 0.25 ± 0.27 nM (Mediterranean, Balearics-Algeria) to 2.9 ± 2.2 nM (Mediterranean, Corsica-France). Our results indicate that a dark, pelagic H2O2 production mechanism must occur throughout the deep ocean. A bacterial source of H2O2 is the most likely origin and we show that this source is likely sufficient to account for all of the observed H2O2 in the deep ocean. PMID:28266529

  16. Horizontal and vertical deformation field in New Caledonia, South West Pacific, derived from more than 20 years of GNSS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, V.; Calmant, S.; Valty, P.; Gravelle, M.; Sakic, P.; Aucan, J.; Pelletier, B.

    2015-12-01

    New Caledonia is located in the South West Pacific Ocean, on the Australian Plate just before its subduction under the North Fiji Basin. Because it is on the subducting side of the plate interface, New Caledonia is considered to be stable to first order and not to undergo rapid deformation. However, moderate seismicity is recorded close to the plate interface, in the southern part of the main land and along the Loyalty ridge. In addition, the main island and Loyalty ridge are subjected to long-term vertical deformation due to the flexure of the plate entering subduction. A geodetic network was installed since the early days of GPS (~1990) and has been further developed and occasionally measured since. Due to the low number of global GNSS recording stations in the early 1990s, the positioning accuracy that can be achieved with these data is poor compared to present-day standards, and expected movements are slow (possibly less than 1 mm/yr). However, the >20 year length of the time series may allow us to determine the current deformation field in New Caledonia and Loyalty Ridge. We pay special care in using older GNSS data for characterizing ground motions, reprocessing all available data using a range of different processing strategies and products. We calculated daily positions from double-differenced ionosphere-free carrier phase data in a global network using the GAMIT software and combined and aligned the results on the ITRF2008 using the CATREF software, according to the processing strategy developed as part of the current ULR6 (www.sonel.org) reprocessing campaign for IGS. We compare the double difference results with those obtained in PPP mode using JPL GIPSY software as well as CNES GINS software and different products (MIT, JPL and GRG orbits and clocks provided in the framework of the IGS2 reprocessing campaign). We present both the results for New Caledonia and an analysis of the applicability of these different processing strategies to older GNSS

  17. Palaeotectonic implications of increased late Eocene-early Oligocene volcanism from South Pacific DSDP sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennett, J.P.; Von Der Borch, C.; Baker, P.A.; Barton, C.E.; Boersma, A.; Cauler, J.P.; Dudley, W.C.; Gardner, J.V.; Jenkins, D.G.; Lohman, W.H.; Martini, E.; Merrill, R.B.; Morin, R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Robert, C.; Srinivasan, M.S.; Stein, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Late Eocene-early Oligocene (42-35 Myr) sediments cored at two DSDP sites in the south-west Pacific contain evidence of a pronounced increase in local volcanic activity, particularly in close association with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This pulse of volcanism is coeval with that in New Zealand and resulted from the development of an Indo- Australian / Pacific Plate boundary through the region during the late Eocene. The late Eocene / earliest Oligocene was marked by widespread volcanism and tectonism throughout the Pacific and elsewhere, and by one of the most important episodes of Cenozoic climatic cooling. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. The East Pacific Rise current: Topographic enhancement of the interior flow in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, N. V.; Roemmich, D. H.; Gille, S. T.

    2017-01-01

    Observations of absolute velocity based on Argo float profiles and trajectories in the ocean interior show evidence for an equatorward current, the East Pacific Rise current, between 42°S and 30°S, along the western flank of the East Pacific Rise. The East Pacific Rise current carries predominantly intermediate water masses, including Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water, and deeper waters, from the southern edge of the subtropical gyre toward the Equator. The 2004 to 2014 mean East Pacific Rise current transport extrapolated through the 0-2600 m depth range is 8.1 ± 1.6 sverdrup (Sv) (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), consistent with a wind-driven interior transport influenced by the East Pacific Rise topography. While deep ocean mixing and geothermal heating can both create pressure gradients that support geostrophic flows in the deep ocean, this study indicates that about half of the East Pacific Rise current transport is associated with topographic steering of the deep flow over the East Pacific Rise.

  19. Connection of sea level height between Western Pacific and South Indian Ocean in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DU, Y.; Wang, T.; Zhuang, W.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Based on merged altimetry data and in site observations from tide gauges, we analyzed the fast increasing trend of sea surface height (SSH) in the recent two decades in the tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean. The results of analysis indicated a dynamic connection of SSH between the tropical western Pacific and the southeastern Indian Ocean. The low-frequency variations of SSH propagate westward in the tropical Pacific, enter the Indonesian Seas through the waveguide, and influence the southeastern India Ocean with the Kelvin-Rossby wave transformation. The thermal structure of upper ocean reveals the above adjustment mainly occur in the thermocline. However, the impacts from the Pacific are limited in the southeast Indian Ocean. In the central and west of the south Indian Ocean, local wind dominates the SSH changes in the last two decades. By lead-lag statistic analyses, we identified the cause of interdecadal from the interannual SSH variations. The interannual SSH variations is dominated by ENSO, forced by the anomalous wind along the equatorial Pacific. Whereas, the interdecadal SSH variations results from the off-equatorial wind stress curl, which is closely related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The dynamic connections between the western Pacific and the south Indian Ocean were tested in the baroclinic Rossby wave solution and the numerical experiments based on the nonlinear reduced-gravity dynamics model.

  20. The `Plate-Like' Subsidence of the East Pacific Rise - South Pacific Superswell System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, J. K.; Watts, T. B.

    2003-12-01

    The separation of small-scale features from the regional seafloor depth is an important problem in the geosciences, especially as it impacts our understanding of mid-plate topographic swells and subsidence away from mid-ocean ridges. In the south Pacific ocean, for example, the removal of these features from the bathymetry using modal techniques has revealed a large and unusually shallow region of the seafloor, which at ˜3000 km wide and up to 1 km high has been dubbed a ``Superswell''. Modal analysis, however, does not completely isolate and remove small-scale features such as oceanic islands, seamounts, oceanic plateaus and localised hot-spot swells from the regional bathymetry. This is because these features are superimposed upon the unperturbed ridge-generated regional bathymetry, accordingly a technique is required that underlines topographic constructs rather than passing through them as is the tendency of any average (mean, median or mode). We have therefore developed an algorithm that reproducibly simulates manual interpretation (MiMIC), thereby removing the superimposed features and revealing larger scale trends. Application of MiMIC to grids of bathymetric data in the region 12-26oS, 200-243oE shows that seafloor of all ages (0.5-112Ma) deepens slowly (initially ˜218 mMa-1/2) and in essence monotonically from the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Although initially deep (-2712m) with respect to a standard plate model (-2500m, 125km, 1350oC), the low subsidence rate reduces the negative depth anomaly with time until it becomes a positive anomaly west of ˜234oE ( ˜20-25Ma) that increases to a maximum of 712+/-66m at 98Ma, not 1300m at ˜65Ma as previously observed. Most significantly though, the Superswell appears to be part of a larger scale, monotonic and `plate-like' subsidence trend that extends to the EPR, not an isolated shallowing that reverses subsidence and causes uplift between 40-80Ma. The continuous nature of the EPR-Superswell subsidence trend

  1. A dissolved cobalt plume in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawco, Nicholas J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Resing, Joseph A.; Twining, Benjamin S.; Saito, Mak A.

    2016-10-01

    Cobalt is a nutrient to phytoplankton, but knowledge about its biogeochemical cycling is limited, especially in the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report sections of dissolved cobalt and labile dissolved cobalt from the US GEOTRACES GP16 transect in the South Pacific. The cobalt distribution is closely tied to the extent and intensity of the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific with highest concentrations measured at the oxycline near the Peru margin. Below 200 m, remineralization and circulation produce an inverse relationship between cobalt and dissolved oxygen that extends throughout the basin. Within the oxygen minimum zone, elevated concentrations of labile cobalt are generated by input from coastal sources and reduced scavenging at low O2. As these high cobalt waters are upwelled and advected offshore, phytoplankton export returns cobalt to low-oxygen water masses underneath. West of the Peru upwelling region, dissolved cobalt is less than 10 pM in the euphotic zone and strongly bound by organic ligands. Because the cobalt nutricline within the South Pacific gyre is deeper than in oligotrophic regions in the North and South Atlantic, cobalt involved in sustaining phytoplankton productivity in the gyre is heavily recycled and ultimately arrives from lateral transport of upwelled waters from the eastern margin. In contrast to large coastal inputs, atmospheric deposition and hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise appear to be minor sources of cobalt. Overall, these results demonstrate that oxygen biogeochemistry exerts a strong influence on cobalt cycling.

  2. Determination of rainfall and condensational heating in the South Pacific convergence zone during FGGE SOP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The role of cloud related diabatic processes in maintaining the structure of the South Pacific Convergence Zone is discussed. The method chosen to evaluate the condensational heating is a diagnostic cumulus mass flux technique which uses GOES digital IR data to characterize the cloud population. This method requires as input an estimate of time/area mean rainfall rate over the area in question. Since direct observation of rainfall in the South Pacific is not feasible, a technique using GOES IR data is being developed to estimate rainfall amounts for a 2.5 degree grid at 12h intervals.

  3. Assessment of South Pacific albacore stock ( Thunnus alalunga) by improved Schaefer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien-Hsiung; Wang, Shyh-Bin

    2006-04-01

    Based on catch and effort data of tuna longline fishery operating in the South Pacific Ocean, the South Pacific albacore stock was assessed by an improved Schaefer model. The results revealed that the intrinsic growth rate was about 1.283 74 and carrying capacities vareied in the range from 73 734 to 266 732 metric tons. The growth ability of this species is remarkable. Stock dynamics mainly depends on environmental conditions. The stock is still in good condition. However, the continuous decreasing of biomass in recent years should be noticed.

  4. Economic impacts of interregional competition in the forest products industry during the 1970's: the South and the Pacific Northwest.

    Treesearch

    Con H. Schallau; Wilbur R. Maki

    1986-01-01

    Until the 1970's, the Pacific Northwest dominated national markets for softwood lumber and plywood. During the 1970's, however, the region's share declined while production increased in the South. Meanwhile, the South's and the Pacific Northwest's shares of the Nation's employment in lumber and wood products declined. This resulted mainly...

  5. Reconstructing Export Production in the Subantarctic South Pacific during the Last Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. W.; Winckler, G.; Anderson, R. F.; Schwartz, R.; Lamy, F.; Gersonde, R.; Pahnke, K.

    2016-02-01

    Despite high concentration of major nutrients in the Southern Ocean, nutrient utilization is inefficient because the scarcity of iron limits phytoplankton growth and primary productivity. Input of eolian dust into the ocean may supply iron, leading to increased export production and nutrient utilization, and potentially affect the Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystem. Recent studies (Martínez-Garcia et al., 2009, 2011, 2014) suggest that iron fertilization in the Subantarctic South Atlantic may have contributed to reducing atmospheric CO2 by 40ppm over the last glacial cycle. While most of current observations on the Southern Ocean come from the South Atlantic, the Pacific sector covers the largest surface area of the Southern Ocean, indicating its potential to store the largest fraction of carbon. Dust fluxes to the South Atlantic are generally stronger than those to the South Pacific, but the glacial-interglacial pattern of dust deposition is similar. A recent study (Lamy et al., 2014) suggests a threefold increase of dust deposition over glacial periods than over interglacial periods in the South Pacific, and show a correlation between dust records and preliminary export production. In this study, we examine a set of cores from the Subantarctic South Pacific at higher temporal resolution to observe variability of export production in response to changing dust flux. We present proxy records for paleoproductivity from excess Ba, biogenic opal and authigenic Uranium. The results will allow us to evaluate the importance of iron fertilization in the Subantarctic Pacific Ocean over glacial/interglacial timescale and its potential effect on the global carbon cycle.

  6. South Pacific hydrologic and cyclone variability during the last 3000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, Michael R.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Tierney, Jessica E.

    2016-04-01

    Major excursions in the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and/or changes in its intensity are thought to drive tropical cyclone (TC) and precipitation variability across much of the central South Pacific. A lack of conventional sites typically used for multimillennial proxy reconstructions has limited efforts to extend observational rainfall/TC data sets and our ability to fully assess the risks posed to central Pacific islands by future changes in fresh water availability or the frequency of storm landfalls. Here we use the sedimentary record of Apu Bay, offshore the island of Tahaa, French Polynesia, to explore the relationship between SPCZ position/intensity and tropical cyclone overwash, resolved at decadal time scales, since 3200 years B.P. Changes in orbital precession and Pacific sea surface temperatures best explain evidence for a coordinated pattern of rainfall variability at Tahaa and across the Pacific over the late Holocene. Our companion record of tropical cyclone activity from Tahaa suggests major storm activity was higher between 2600-1500 years B.P., when decadal scale SPCZ variability may also have been stronger. A transition to lower storm frequency and a shift or expansion of the SPCZ toward French Polynesia around 1000 years B.P. may have prompted Polynesian migration into the central Pacific.

  7. Long-term trend of Pacific South Equatorial Current bifurcation over 1950-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Fangguo; Hu, Dunxin; Wang, Qingye; Wang, Fujun

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the long-term change of the Pacific South Equatorial Current (SEC) bifurcation latitude (SBL) over 1950-2010 with Simple Ocean Data Assimilation version 2.2.4. Results indicate that the SBL averaged within upper 200 m has migrated southward at 0.020°S yr-1, comparable in magnitude with -0.024°N yr-1 for the North Equatorial Current bifurcation latitude (NBL). The SEC transport into the Coral Sea has increased. Due to the southward SBL migration, most of the increased SEC water was transported equatorward, contributing to the Equatorial Undercurrent intensification. Experiments with a nonlinear 1.5 layer reduced gravity model indicate that the southward migration of SBL is mainly caused by positive Ekman flux divergence trend in the eastern tropical South Pacific, while that of NBL is caused by negative Ekman flux divergence trend in the western tropical North Pacific.

  8. Distance Education Regulatory Frameworks: Readiness for Openness in Southwest Pacific/South East Asia Region Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Belinda; James, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports in brief the pilot study, Distance Education Regulatory Frameworks, undertaken by the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) in 2010-2012 and the implications for openness for higher education in Southwest Pacific/South East Asia region nations. The project developed a methodological approach to…

  9. Asian-South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education Courier No. 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This issue is comprised of a series of articles dealing with adult education in Asia and the South Pacific. Included in the issue are the following articles: "Thoughts for the Advancement of Women's Project" by Sally Bruce Seddon; "Adult Education Program for Working Women in Kumi Industrial Area" by Yoon Bok-Nam; "Needs…

  10. Education and the Vestiges of Colonialism: Self-Determination, Neocolonialism and Dependency in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Outlines colonial histories and present constitutional statuses of 16 South Pacific Island countries. Discusses important legacies of colonialism in education systems, curriculum, and educational attitudes; education as an instrument of neocolonialist influence; and the complexities of international relationships (both regionally and with donor…

  11. Professional Development across the Islands of the South Pacific: A Perspective of a Blended Learning Facilitator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann-Dumienski, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    Access to information and communication technology (ICT) is becoming an increasingly important factor for education and training in the South Pacific region. While many studies have examined the attitudes and understanding of educators towards using ICT in their profession and for their professional development, studies that specifically deal with…

  12. Tuamotu Archipelago in South Pacific as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-10-21

    AS07-04-1590 (20 Oct. 1968) --- Tuamotu Archipelago in the South Pacific Ocean, looking southwest, as photographed from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 141st revolution of Earth. The photograph was taken from an altitude of 110 nautical miles, at a ground elapsed time of 224 hours and 18 minutes.

  13. An Assessment of Vocational and Technical Education in the South Pacific Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, David

    Technical and vocational education in the developing countries of the South Pacific region vary from the well-established to just commencing. Within the region as a whole, facilities exist to meet all the needs for semiskilled and skilled workers as well as for most middle and higher level needs; additional needs not catered to within the region…

  14. Diglossia and Its Practice in Multilingual Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Margaret Kamla

    2001-01-01

    Explores the notion of diglossia in the three main languages of Fiji--Bauab Fijian, Shudh Hindi, and English. Discussion focuses on situating the languages both historically and socially in a multilingual context. (Author/VWL)

  15. Diglossia and Its Practice in Multilingual Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Margaret Kamla

    2001-01-01

    Explores the notion of diglossia in the three main languages of Fiji--Bauab Fijian, Shudh Hindi, and English. Discussion focuses on situating the languages both historically and socially in a multilingual context. (Author/VWL)

  16. Neodymium isotopic characterization of Ross Sea Bottom Water and its advection through the southern South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Chandranath; Pahnke, Katharina; Frank, Martin; Lamy, Frank; Gersonde, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    Since the inception of the international GEOTRACES program, studies investigating the distribution of trace elements and their isotopes in the global ocean have significantly increased. In spite of this large-scale effort, the distribution of neodymium isotopes (143Nd/144Nd, εNd) and concentrations ([Nd]) in the high latitude South Pacific is still understudied, specifically north of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF). Here we report dissolved Nd isotopes and concentrations from 11 vertical water column profiles from the South Pacific between South America and New Zealand and across the Antarctic frontal system. Results confirm that Ross Sea Bottom Water (RSBW) is represented by an εNd value of ∼ - 7, and for the first time show that these Nd characteristics can be traced into the Southeast Pacific until progressive mixing with ambient Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) dilutes this signal north of the APF. That is, εNd behaves conservatively in RSBW, opening a path for studies of past RSBW behavior. Neodymium concentrations show low surface concentrations and a linear increase with depth north of the APF. South of the APF, surface [Nd] is high and increases with depth but remains almost constant below ∼1000 m. This vertical and spatial [Nd] pattern follows the southward shoaling density surfaces of the Southern Ocean and hence suggests supply of Nd to the upper ocean through upwelling of Nd-rich deep water. Low particle abundance due to reduced opal production and seasonal sea ice cover likely contributes to the maintenance of the high upper ocean [Nd] south of the APF. This suggests a dominant lateral transport component on [Nd] and a reduced vertical control on Nd concentrations in the South Pacific south of the APF.

  17. Pediatric otitis media in Fiji: Survey findings 2015.

    PubMed

    Fang, Te-Yung; Rafai, Eric; Wang, Pa-Chun; Bai, Chiy-Huey; Jiang, Peng-Long; Huang, Shu-Nuan; Chen, You-Ju; Chao, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chen-Hsu; Chang, Chia-Hsiu

    2016-06-01

    Otitis media (OM), as a common infectious disease, is a major cause of hearing impairment among the general population. OM remains a major public health threat in the Pacific islands, but the risks of OM have not been thoroughly explored in this region. The objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence, clinical features, and quality-of-life impacts of OM in Fiji. In the medical service trip entitled "Healing and Hope - Taiwan Cathay Heart and Hearing Medical Mission to Fiji" (TCHHMMF), we conducted a cross-sectional OM survey study in Suva and Sigatoka areas (Korolevu, Cuvu, and Lomawai) in the summer of 2015. The otitis media - 6 (OM-6) was used to survey the OM-related quality of life. In the 467 pediatric patients (aged 0-18 years old) screened, 13 (2.78%) have acute otitis media (AOM), 37 (7.92%) have otitis media with effusion (OME), and 19 (4.1%) have chronic otitis media (COM). Age (OR 0.53, 95% CI: 0.36-0.77) is a significant predictor of AOM, whereas male gender (OR 2.46, 95% CI: 1.13-5.37), smoke exposure (OR 2.81, 95% CI: 1.01-7.82), and concomitant chronic sinusitis (OR 6.05, 95% CI: 2.31-15.88) are significant predictors of OME. The mean OM-6 item scores are highest in caregiver concerns (3.8), physical suffering (3.7), and hearing loss (3.4) domains. OM is an important primary care disease in Fiji that remains under-served. It is critical to educate professionals, parents, and patients to detect and to improve care for OM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fiji

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ... June 12, 2001 - The green archipelago with many plant species. project:  MISR category:  ...

  19. Multi-linear regression of sea level in the south west Pacific as a first step towards local sea level projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vandhna; Meyssignac, Benoit; Melet, Angélique; Ganachaud, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Rising sea levels are a critical concern in small island nations. The problem is especially serious in the western south Pacific, where the total sea level rise over the last 60 years is up to 3 times the global average. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct sea levels at selected sites in the region (Suva, Lautoka, Noumea - Fiji and New Caledonia) as a mutiple-linear regression of atmospheric and oceanic variables. We focus on interannual-to-decadal scale variability, and lower (including the global mean sea level rise) over the 1979-2014 period. Sea levels are taken from tide gauge records and the ORAS4 reanalysis dataset, and are expressed as a sum of steric and mass changes as a preliminary step. The key development in our methodology is using leading wind stress curl as a proxy for the thermosteric component. This is based on the knowledge that wind stress curl anomalies can modulate the thermocline depth and resultant sea levels via Rossby wave propagation. The analysis is primarily based on correlation between local sea level and selected predictors, the dominant one being wind stress curl. In the first step, proxy boxes for wind stress curl are determined via regions of highest correlation. The proportion of sea level explained via linear regression is then removed, leaving a residual. This residual is then correlated with other locally acting potential predictors: halosteric sea level, the zonal and meridional wind stress components, and sea surface temperature. The statistically significant predictors are used in a multi-linear regression function to simulate the observed sea level. The method is able to reproduce between 40 to 80% of the variance in observed sea level. Based on the skill of the model, it has high potential in sea level projection and downscaling studies.

  20. Cyclone development in the South Pacific convergence zone during FGGE, 10-17 January 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the life cycles of three different South Pacific cyclones. Emphasis is given to two of the cyclones which propagate south-eastward along the western edge of the South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) and reach middle latitudes before decaying. The analysis is based on imagery from the GOES-West Satellite and on data from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (EMWF). A comparison between estimates of the mean sea level pressure in the vicinity of the cyclones taken at observation stations and from ECMWF predictions shows good agreement when the cyclone disturbances are above grid-scale. The propagation characteristics of the cyclones are discussed in detail.

  1. Location of South Georgia and potential impact on early Pacific-Atlantic through flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, A.; Curtis, M.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most significant Cenozoic reconfigurations of global ocean circulation involved the initiation of Pacific to Atlantic exchange that led to the isolation of Antarctica by the Antarctica Circumpolar Current though the separation of South America and Antarctica and the opening of the Scotia Sea and Drake Passage. Whether significant Pacific to Atlantic through-flow was possible in the early Cenozoic has remained unclear because it is not certain where continental fragments such as South Georgia, a potential barrier, were located before seafloor spreading created the Scotia Sea. Establishing where South Georgia was located is also critical to reconstructing the Scotia arc and understanding its evolution. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and apatite thermochronometry are used to constrain the pre-drift location of South Georgia. Data from Cretaceous turbidites exposed on South Georgia are consistent with a former connection to the Rocas Verdes back-arc basin giving support to models that have argued for a pre- tectonic translation location southeast of Tierra del Fuego. Following an early phase of rock uplift, thermal history models of the apatite chronometry data indicate that the South Georgia continental fragment underwent burial related heating and was therefore not a significant topographic feature until it emerged c. 10-7 Ma coeval with the cessation of spreading at the West Scotia Ridge and collision between the South Georgia continental block and the Northeast Georgia Rise.

  2. Are South Texas Streamflow Variations Influenced by Sea Surface Temperature Changes in Pacific and Atlantic Oceans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, V.; Hay, R.; Ard, R.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on several major river basins in the continental U. S. has recently become well documented. Clear relationships have been identified between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and continental U. S. streamflow. Because these relationships can be potentially used to predict streamflow variability, it would also be of great importance to evaluate whether these climate phenomena affect river basins at the sub-regional and/or local scale, objectives that are not usually addressed in previous studies. Therefore, this study is focused on the basin river system of South Texas, an area that encompasses approximately 30,000 km2 and is climatologically defined as subtropical subhumid. Streamflow data (1940-2011) from sixteen unimpaired U.S. Geological Survey gage stations were normalized into a South Texas streamflow data set and evaluated with respect to ENSO, PDO and AMO index time series. The comparison of South Texas annual streamflow with Pacific Decadal Oscillation and El Niño Southern Oscillation Indices shows that the warm phases of ENSO and PDO are generally associated with increased streamflow, whereas cold phases of ENSO and PDO result in lower streamflow volumes. In addition, cross-correlation analyses show a 7-8 month delayed streamflow response to sea surface temperature signals. Furthermore, annual streamflow variability in the South Texas river basins can be also due to sea surface temperature anomalies in the Atlantic Ocean. Higher streamflow values are shown during the cold phase of AMO, while relatively low streamflow values are illustrated during the warm phase of AMO. Thus, preliminary results show that SST anomalies in both Pacific and Atlantic Oceans influence the streamflow variability in the South Texas area. Current research is also focused on evaluating if these climate phenomena

  3. Two subpopulations of Crocosphaera watsonii have distinct distributions in the North and South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Bench, Shellie R; Frank, Ildiko; Robidart, Julie; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2016-02-01

    Crocosphaera watsonii is a unicellular nitrogen (N2)-fixing cyanobacterium with ecological importance in oligotrophic oceans. In cultivated strains there are two phenotypes of C. watsonii (large and small cells) with differences that could differentially impact biogeochemical processes. Recent work has shown the phenotypes diverged through loss or addition of type-specific genes in a fraction of their genomes, whereas the rest of the genomes were maintained at 99-100% DNA identity. Previous molecular assays for C. watsonii abundances targeted the conserved regions and therefore could not differentiate between phenotypes, so their relative distributions in natural communities were unknown. To determine phenotype distributions, this study developed and applied type-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays to samples from the North and South Pacific. Abundances of both Crocosphaera types declined sharply with depth between 45 and 75 m in both sites. In surface water small cells were 10-100 times more abundant than large cells in the N. Pacific, whereas in the S. Pacific the two phenotypes were nearly equal. Evidence for large cell aggregation was only found in N. Pacific samples. The differences in C. watsonii sub-populations in the North and South Pacific have direct implications for biogeochemistry and carbon export in oligotrophic gyres.

  4. Pronounced interannual variability in tropical South Pacific temperatures during Heinrich Stadial 1.

    PubMed

    Felis, Thomas; Merkel, Ute; Asami, Ryuji; Deschamps, Pierre; Hathorne, Ed C; Kölling, Martin; Bard, Edouard; Cabioch, Guy; Durand, Nicolas; Prange, Matthias; Schulz, Michael; Cahyarini, Sri Yudawati; Pfeiffer, Miriam

    2012-07-24

    The early last glacial termination was characterized by intense North Atlantic cooling and weak overturning circulation. This interval between ~18,000 and 14,600 years ago, known as Heinrich Stadial 1, was accompanied by a disruption of global climate and has been suggested as a key factor for the termination. However, the response of interannual climate variability in the tropical Pacific (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) to Heinrich Stadial 1 is poorly understood. Here we use Sr/Ca in a fossil Tahiti coral to reconstruct tropical South Pacific sea surface temperature around 15,000 years ago at monthly resolution. Unlike today, interannual South Pacific sea surface temperature variability at typical El Niño-Southern Oscillation periods was pronounced at Tahiti. Our results indicate that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation was active during Heinrich Stadial 1, consistent with climate model simulations of enhanced El Niño-Southern Oscillation variability at that time. Furthermore, a greater El Niño-Southern Oscillation influence in the South Pacific during Heinrich Stadial 1 is suggested, resulting from a southward expansion or shift of El Niño-Southern Oscillation sea surface temperature anomalies.

  5. Marine biodiversity in the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America: knowledge and gaps.

    PubMed

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Klein, Eduardo; Díaz, Juan M; Hernández, Cristián E; Bigatti, Gregorio; Campos, Lucia; Artigas, Felipe; Castillo, Julio; Penchaszadeh, Pablo E; Neill, Paula E; Carranza, Alvar; Retana, María V; Díaz de Astarloa, Juan M; Lewis, Mirtha; Yorio, Pablo; Piriz, María L; Rodríguez, Diego; Yoneshigue-Valentin, Yocie; Gamboa, Luiz; Martín, Alberto

    2011-01-31

    The marine areas of South America (SA) include almost 30,000 km of coastline and encompass three different oceanic domains--the Caribbean, the Pacific, and the Atlantic--ranging in latitude from 12∘N to 55∘S. The 10 countries that border these coasts have different research capabilities and taxonomic traditions that affect taxonomic knowledge. This paper analyzes the status of knowledge of marine biodiversity in five subregions along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America (SA): the Tropical East Pacific, the Humboldt Current,the Patagonian Shelf, the Brazilian Shelves, and the Tropical West Atlantic, and it provides a review of ecosystem threats and regional marine conservation strategies. South American marine biodiversity is least well known in the tropical subregions (with the exception of Costa Rica and Panama). Differences in total biodiversity were observed between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans at the same latitude. In the north of the continent, the Tropical East Pacific is richer in species than the Tropical West Atlantic, however, when standardized by coastal length, there is very little difference among them. In the south, the Humboldt Current system is much richer than the Patagonian Shelf. An analysis of endemism shows that 75% of the species are reported within only one of the SA regions, while about 22% of the species of SA are not reported elsewhere in the world. National and regional initiatives focusing on new exploration, especially to unknown areas and ecosystems, as well as collaboration among countries are fundamental to achieving the goal of completing inventories of species diversity and distribution.These inventories will allow accurate interpretation of the biogeography of its two oceanic coasts and latitudinal trends,and will also provide relevant information for science based policies.

  6. Family planning unmet need and access among iTaukei women in New Zealand and Fiji.

    PubMed

    Cammock, Radilaite; Herbison, Peter; Lovell, Sarah; Priest, Patricia

    2017-09-22

    The aim of the study was to identify unmet need and family planning access among indigenous Fijian or iTaukei women living in New Zealand and Fiji. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken between 2012-2013 in five major cities in New Zealand: Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin; and in three suburbs in Fiji. Women who did not want any (more) children but were not using any form of contraception were defined as having an unmet need. Access experiences involving cost and health provider interactions were assessed. Unmet need in New Zealand was 26% and similar to the unmet need found in Fiji (25%). Cost and concern over not being seen by a female provider were the most problematic access factors for women. There is a need for better monitoring and targeting of family planning services among minority Pacific groups, as the unmet need found in New Zealand was three times the national estimate overall and similar to the rate found in Fiji. Cost remains a problem among women trying to access family planning services. Gendered traditional roles in sexual and reproductive health maybe an area from which more understanding into cultural sensitivities and challenges may be achieved.

  7. Hydroacoustic monitoring of drifting icebergs in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, J.; Hyvernaud, O.; Reymond, D.

    2009-12-01

    The french Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique has settled in French Polynesia a 'T-Wave' seismic network since 1960. These 10 high sensitivity broad band stations transmitted in real time enable to monitor natural submarine processes such as volcanic eruptions, colliding icebergs and seismic activity in the Pacific. During the 2008-2009 summer season in Antarctic, we have tracked the giant drifting iceberg B15a in the roaring fifties. During 4 months, we have recorded and located the hydroacoustic cracks which accompany the progressive breaking-up of B15a into small bergs and growlers. The use of arrival times and azimuth of IMS hydrophones triplet and enhanced hydroacoustic velocity model reduced significantly the error ellipse of locations. The locations have been compared with well-dated visible and infrared satellite images of iceberg B15a, providing some insights into the fracturation process.

  8. A Two-year Record of Daily Rainfall Isotopes from Fiji: Implications for Reconstructing Precipitation from Speleothem δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, M.; Mattey, D.; Stephens, M.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen isotopes in speleothem provide opportunities to construct precisely dated records of palaeoclimate variability, underpinned by an understanding of both the regional climate and local controls on isotopes in rainfall and groundwater. For tropical islands, a potential means to reconstruct past rainfall variability is to exploit the generally high correlation between rainfall amount and δ18O: the 'amount effect'. The GNIP program provides δ18O data at monthly resolution for several tropical Pacific islands but there are few data for precipitation isotopes at daily resolution, for investigating the amount effect over different timescales in a tropical maritime setting. Timescales are important since meteoric water feeding a speleothem has undergone storage and mixing in the aquifer system and understanding how the isotope amount effect is preserved in aquifer recharge has fundamental implications on the interpretation of speleothem δ18O in terms of palaeo-precipitation. The islands of Fiji host speleothem caves. Seasonal precipitation is related to the movement of the South Pacific Convergence Zone, and interannual variations in rainfall are coupled to ENSO behaviour. Individual rainfall events are stratiform or convective, with proximal moisture sources. We have daily resolution isotope data for rainfall collected at the University of the South Pacific in Suva, covering every rain event in 2012 and 2013. δ18O varies between -18‰ and +3‰ with the annual weighted averages at -7.6‰ and -6.8‰ respectively, while total recorded rainfall amount is similar in both years. We shall present analysis of our data compared with GNIP, meteorological data and back trajectory analyses to demonstrate the nature of the relationship between rainfall amount and isotopic signatures over this short timescale. Comparison with GNIP data for 2012-13 will shed light on the origin of the amount effect at monthly and seasonal timescales in convective, maritime, tropical

  9. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations. PMID:25066005

  10. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-10-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. First record of the genus Wilkinsonellus (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) from Fiji with description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Arias-Penna, Diana Carolina; Zhang, Yali; Whitfield, James B

    2014-01-01

    Wilkinsonellus Mason is a relatively small Pantropical genus of braconid parasitoid wasps within the subfamily Microgastrinae. Most of the currently described species are from the Palaeotropics; however, previous records were absent from Fiji. Here, the first three Wilkinsonellus species from Fiji are described: Wilkinsonellus corpustriacolor sp. n., Wilkinsonellus fijienis sp. n. and Wilkinsonellus nescalpura sp. n. The material was collected by Malaise traps set up in a quite variety of ecosystems (wet zone, dry zone and coastal forests) throughout the archipelago. With these records, Fiji represents the easternmost known distribution of the genus in the Indo-Pacific Region. A key to all of the currently known Wilkinsonellus species is included to facilitate species identification.

  12. First record of the genus Wilkinsonellus (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) from Fiji with description of three new species

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Penna, Diana Carolina; Zhang, Yali; Whitfield, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Wilkinsonellus Mason is a relatively small Pantropical genus of braconid parasitoid wasps within the subfamily Microgastrinae. Most of the currently described species are from the Palaeotropics; however, previous records were absent from Fiji. Here, the first three Wilkinsonellus species from Fiji are described: Wilkinsonellus corpustriacolor sp. n., Wilkinsonellus fijienis sp. n. and Wilkinsonellus nescalpura sp. n. The material was collected by Malaise traps set up in a quite variety of ecosystems (wet zone, dry zone and coastal forests) throughout the archipelago. With these records, Fiji represents the easternmost known distribution of the genus in the Indo-Pacific Region. A key to all of the currently known Wilkinsonellus species is included to facilitate species identification. PMID:24715796

  13. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  14. Comparison of elemental accumulation rates between ferromanganese deposits and sediments in the South Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.; Schornick, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of accumulation of Fe and Mn, as well as Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn, Hg, U and Th have been determined for five ferromanganese deposits from four localities in the South Pacific Ocean. Manganese is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate roughly equivalent to that found to be accumulating in sediments in the same area. Iron shows a deficiency in accumulation in nodules and crusts with respect to sediments, especially near the continents, but also in the central and south-central Pacific. Copper is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate one order of magnitude less than the surrounding sediments. This is interpreted as meaning that most of the Mn is supplied as an authigenic phase to both sediments and nodules while Fe is supplied mostly by ferromanganese micro-nodules and by detrital and adsorbed components of sediments; and Cu is enriched in sediments relative to nodules and crusts most probably through biological activity. ?? 1974.

  15. Diversity of culturable filamentous Ascomycetes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean off Chile.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jeanett; Gutiérrez, Marcelo H; Palfner, Götz; Pantoja, Silvio

    2017-08-01

    Our study reports the diversity of culturable mycoplankton in the eastern South Pacific Ocean off Chile to contribute with novel knowledge on taxonomy of filamentous fungi isolated from distinct physicochemical and biological marine environments. We characterized spatial distribution of isolates, evaluated their viability and assessed the influence of organic substrate availability on fungal development. Thirty-nine Operational Taxonomic Units were identified from 99 fungal strains isolated from coastal and oceanic waters by using Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery. All Operational Taxonomic Units belonged to phylum Ascomycota and orders Eurotiales, Dothideales, Sordariales and Hypocreales, mainly Penicillium sp. (82%); 11 sequences did not match existing species in GenBank, suggesting occurrence of novel fungal taxa. Our results suggest that fungal communities in the South Pacific Ocean off Chile appear to thrive in a wide range of environmental conditions in the ocean and that substrate availability may be a factor influencing fungal viability in the ocean.

  16. Temporal Variability of Tropical Cyclogenesis: A Climatology of the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Andrew D.; Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Kiem, Anthony S.

    2015-04-01

    The total number of tropical cyclones (TCs) occurring across the South Pacific each year traditionally exhibits significant temporal variability. For example, in 1998, 24 TCs were recorded, whilst in 1988, only eight TCs were recorded. Socially, this temporal variability results in increased vulnerability for the 15 island nations of the South Pacific. Therefore understanding what causes this year to year variability is particularly important in combatting this issue. In this study, the South Pacific Basin is analysed in its entirety and across a series of zones over a 67-year period (1945-2011) using the Joint Typhoon Warning Centre (JTWC) Best-Track Dataset. Based on the Overall Mean Centre of Cyclogenesis (OMCC) (15oS, 167.5oE), the Basin was zoned by drawing axis based on the four cardinal directions from the OMCC, creating four quadrants; north-east, south-east, south-west and north-west. Trend analysis was then completed to establish if the number of TCs have changed over time over the entire Basin and within these quadrants. It is shown that, Basin-wide, the number of TCs has decreased over time, a result consistent with many studies. However, when the same analysis was completed for each of the four quadrants, two were actually shown to have increasing TC activity over the same time period, (the north-east and south-east quadrants). Interannual variability was also particularly evident across all four quadrants. The attribution of climate driver induced variability on the frequency of TCs is also explored. The various phases of Pacific and Indian Ocean climate drivers (positive, negative, neutral) are used in this study, including; El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), ENSO Modoki (EMI), Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and Indonesian SST variability (II). In comparison with the overall mean of 11.2 TCs per year, TCs that occurred during a positive IOD and negative IPO saw the two most

  17. Dynamics and energetics of the South Pacific Convergence Zone during FGGE SOP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    The major research objectives are to diagnose the physical processes responsible for the maintenance of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and to examine the role of the SPCZ in the large-scale circulation patterns of the Southern Hemisphere. To accomplish these objectives researchers used several data sources which include: a modified set of Level III-b upper air analyses, originally produced by ECMWF (Vincent, 1982); subjectively analyzed surface analyses for the South Pacific based on island station reports (Vincent, 1985); outgoing longwave radiation values supplied to us by NOAA/NESDIS; and equivalent black body temperatures and precipitation rates derived by Robertson. In the past year researchers found that wave number four plays an inportant role in the Southern Hemisphere tropics during the 15-day period when the sPCZ was a dominant feature, particularly with regard to the baroclinic conversion of potential to kinetic energy (Huang and Vincent, 1985). The convectively-active SPCZ area was found to make a significant contribution to this conversion process; thus, it appears that baroclinic effects and latent heating are important in maintaining the SPCZ. Recently efforts concentrated on two research tasks, an examination of cyclone activity within the SPCZ (Kann, 1985; Vincent, 1985; Vincent and Kann, 1985) and a study of the heat and moisture budgets in the South Pacific (Miller, et al., 1985). It was found that cyclonic disturbances occurred with regularity in the Zone from 10 to 17 January.

  18. Floating marine debris surface drift: convergence and accumulation toward the South Pacific subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elodie; Maamaatuaiahutapu, Keitapu; Taillandier, Vincent

    2009-09-01

    Whatever its origin is, a floating particle at the sea surface is advected by ocean currents. Surface currents could be derived from in situ observations or combined with satellite data. For a better resolution in time and space, we use satellite-derived sea-surface height and wind stress fields with a 1/3 degrees grid from 1993 to 2001 to determine the surface circulation of the South Pacific Ocean. Surface currents are then used to compute the Lagrangian trajectories of floating debris. Results show an accumulation of the debris in the eastern-centre region of the South Pacific subtropical gyre ([120 degrees W; 80 degrees W]-[20 degrees S; 40 degrees S]), resulting from a three-step process: in the first two years, mostly forced by Ekman drift, the debris drift towards the tropical convergence zone ( approximately 30 degrees S). Then they are advected eastward mostly forced by geostrophic currents. They finally reach the eastern-centre region of the South Pacific subtropical gyre from where they could not escape.

  19. Dynamics and energetics of the South Pacific Convergence Zone during FGGE SOP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    The major research objectives are to diagnose the physical processes responsible for the maintenance of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and to examine the role of the SPCZ in the large-scale circulation patterns of the Southern Hemisphere. To accomplish these objectives researchers used several data sources which include: a modified set of Level III-b upper air analyses, originally produced by ECMWF (Vincent, 1982); subjectively analyzed surface analyses for the South Pacific based on island station reports (Vincent, 1985); outgoing longwave radiation values supplied to us by NOAA/NESDIS; and equivalent black body temperatures and precipitation rates derived by Robertson. In the past year researchers found that wave number four plays an inportant role in the Southern Hemisphere tropics during the 15-day period when the sPCZ was a dominant feature, particularly with regard to the baroclinic conversion of potential to kinetic energy (Huang and Vincent, 1985). The convectively-active SPCZ area was found to make a significant contribution to this conversion process; thus, it appears that baroclinic effects and latent heating are important in maintaining the SPCZ. Recently efforts concentrated on two research tasks, an examination of cyclone activity within the SPCZ (Kann, 1985; Vincent, 1985; Vincent and Kann, 1985) and a study of the heat and moisture budgets in the South Pacific (Miller, et al., 1985). It was found that cyclonic disturbances occurred with regularity in the Zone from 10 to 17 January.

  20. Multi-Decadal Rainfall Variability under the South Pacific Convergence Zone from 1570-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T. M.; Shen, C.; Taylor, F. W.; Banner, J. L.; Maupin, C. R.; lin, K.; Sinclair, D. J.; Huh, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Pacific Ocean Basin undergoes natural climate variability on decadal to multi-decadal timescales. Ocean-atmosphere feedbacks drive a complex cycle in tropical and extra-tropical winds and zonal sea-surface temperatures (SST) resulting in basin-scale climate reorganizations. The Pacific Ocean zonal SST gradient responds to upwelling of cold waters near the equator transported by shallow Pacific Meridional Overturning Circulation (PMOC), which in turn responds to changes in winds. However, the frequency, timing, and magnitude of past decadal changes in the Pacific are largely unknown. To address this question, we developed a U-Th dated, 430-year stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) cave record of past precipitation in Vanuatu, a location whose climate is heavily influenced by variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The δ18O-based precipitation record shows repeating cycles that are ~25-50 years in duration and correspond to ~115 mm/month of rainfall change that can occur in as fast as 5 years - a change larger and quicker than the 1976 regime shift. The stalagmite δ18O to rainfall amount conversion is based on the "amount effect" observed at similar tropical sites. The "Little Ice Age" (LIA) section of the record exhibits no trend in precipitation, hence no change in the strength or position of the SPCZ over Vanuatu. This result suggests a disconnection between changes in the SPCZ and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), which does exhibit a southerly shift during the LIA period. Changes in PMOC via ocean-atmosphere feedbacks most likely explain the decadal shifts in SPCZ strength through alteration of the tropical Pacific zonal SST gradient and subsequent trade wind response. Periods of high paleo-rainfall in Vanuatu (strong PMOC, increased zonal SST gradient and increased trade winds) correlate with historical accounts of little to no El Niño activity implying that Pacific Basin mean state regulates interannual variability.

  1. Short-lived and discontinuous intraplate volcanism in the South Pacific: Hot spots or extensional volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Staudigel, Hubert; Pringle, Malcolm S.; Wijbrans, Jan R.

    2003-10-01

    South Pacific intraplate volcanoes have been active since the Early Cretaceous. Their HIMU-EMI-EMII mantle sources can be traced back into the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP) using plate tectonic reconstructions, implying that these distinctive components are enduring features within the Earth's mantle for, at least, the last 120 Myr. These correlations are eminent on the scale of the WPSP and the South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly (SOPITA), but the evolution of single hot spots emerges notably more complicated. Hot spots in the WPSP and SOPITA mantle regions typically display intermittent volcanic activity, longevities shorter than 40 Myr, superposition of hot spot volcanism, and motion relative to other hot spots. In this review, we use 40Ar/39Ar seamount ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures to map out Cretaceous volcanism in the WPSP and to characterize its evolution with respect to the currently active hot spots in the SOPITA region. Our plate tectonic reconstructions indicate cessation of volcanism during the Cretaceous for the Typhoon and Japanese hot spots; whereas the currently active Samoan, Society, Pitcairn and Marquesas hot spots lack long-lived counterparts in the WPSP. These hot spots may have become active during the last 20 Myr only. The other WPSP seamount trails can be only "indirectly" reconciled with hot spots in the SOPITA region. Complex age distributions in the Magellan, Anewetak, Ralik and Ratak seamount trails would necessitate the superposition of multiple volcanic trails generated by the Macdonald, Rurutu and Rarotonga hot spots during the Cretaceous; whereas HIMU-type seamounts in the Southern Wake seamount trail would require 350-500 km of hot spot motion over the last 100 Myr following its origination along the Mangaia-Rurutu "hotline" in the Cook-Austral Islands. These observations, however, violate all assumptions of the classical Wilson-Morgan hot spot hypothesis, indicating that long-lived, deep and fixed mantle

  2. Historic accounts of Mansonella parasitaemias in the South Pacific and their relevance to lymphatic filariasis elimination efforts today.

    PubMed

    Crainey, J Lee; Ribeiro da Silva, Túllio Romão; Luz, Sérgio Luiz Bessa

    2016-03-01

    There are two species of filarial parasites with sheathless microfilariae known to commonly cause parasitaemias in humans: Mansonella perstans and Mansonella ozzardi. In most contemporary accounts of the distribution of these parasites, neither is usually considered to occur anywhere in the Eastern Hemisphere. However, Sir Patrick Manson, who first described both parasite species, recorded the existence of sheathless sharp-tailed Mansonella ozzardi-like parasites occurring in the blood of natives from New Guinea in each and every version of his manual for tropical disease that he wrote before his death in 1922. Manson's reports were based on his own identifications and were made from at least two independent blood sample collections that were taken from the island. Pacific region Mansonella perstans parasitaemias were also later (in 1923) reported to occur in New Guinea and once before this (in 1905) in Fiji. Although Mansonella-parasitaemias are generally regarded as benign, they are thought to be of public health importance because they can affect the epidemiological monitoring of other filarial diseases. In this article, we reviewed the historic literature concerning Pacific-origin Mansonella-parasitaemias in an attempt to explain how, despite repeated reports of Pacific-region Mansonella-parasitaemias, by as early as the 1970s, the WHO had arrived at the present-day view that Wuchereria bancrofti is the only cause of filarial parasitaemias in Papua New Guinea. We have also evaluated the evidence supporting the contemporary existence of Pacific-area parasitaemia-causing Mansonella parasites and assessed the relevance such parasites could have for present-day lymphatic filariasis elimination efforts in the region. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Vertical and horizontal extension of the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenzalida, Rosalino; Schneider, Wolfgang; Garcés-Vargas, José; Bravo, Luis; Lange, Carina

    2009-07-01

    Recent hydrographic measurements within the eastern South Pacific (1999-2001) were combined with vertically high-resolution data from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, high-resolution profiles and bottle casts from the World Ocean Database 2001, and the World Ocean Atlas 2001 in order to evaluate the vertical and horizontal extension of the oxygen minimum zone (<20 μmol kg -1). These new calculations estimate the total area and volume of the oxygen minimum zone to be 9.82±3.60×10 6 km 2 and 2.18±0.66×10 6 km 3, respectively. The oxygen minimum zone is thickest (>600 m) off Peru between 5 and 13°S and to about 1000 km offshore. Its upper boundary is shallowest (<150 m) off Peru, shoaling towards the coast and extending well into the euphotic zone in some places. Offshore, the thickness and meridional extent of the oxygen minimum zone decrease until it finally vanishes at 140°W between 2° and 8°S. Moving southward along the coast of South America, the zonal extension of the oxygen minimum zone gradually diminishes from 3000 km (15°S) to 1200 km (20°S) and then to 25 km (30°S); only a thin band is detected at ˜37°S off Concepción, Chile. Simultaneously, the oxygen minimum zone's maximum thickness decreases from 300 m (20°S) to less than 50 m (south of 30°S). The spatial distribution of Ekman suction velocity and oxygen minimum zone thickness correlate well, especially in the core. Off Chile, the eastern South Pacific Intermediate Water mass introduces increased vertical stability into the upper water column, complicating ventilation of the oxygen minimum zone from above. In addition, oxygen-enriched Antarctic Intermediate Water clashes with the oxygen minimum zone at around 30°S, causing a pronounced sub-surface oxygen front. The new estimates of vertical and horizontal oxygen minimum zone distribution in the eastern South Pacific complement the global quantification of naturally hypoxic continental margins by Helly and Levin [2004. Global

  4. Analysis of the corporate political activity of major food industry actors in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Mialon, Melissa; Swinburn, Boyd; Wate, Jillian; Tukana, Isimeli; Sacks, Gary

    2016-05-10

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of mortality in Fiji, a middle-income country in the Pacific. Some food products processed sold and marketed by the food industry are major contributors to the NCD epidemic, and the food industry is widely identified as having strong economic and political power. However, little research has been undertaken on the attempts by the food industry to influence public health-related policies and programs in its favour. The "corporate political activity" (CPA) of the food industry includes six strategies (information and messaging; financial incentives; constituency building; legal strategies; policy substitution; opposition fragmentation and destabilisation). For this study, we aimed to gain a detailed understanding of the CPA strategies and practices of major food industry actors in Fiji, interpreted through a public health lens. We implemented a systematic approach to monitor the CPA of the food industry in Fiji for three months. It consisted of document analysis of relevant publicly available information. In parallel, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 stakeholders involved in diet- and/or public health-related issues in Fiji. Both components of the study were thematically analysed. We found evidence that the food industry adopted a diverse range of strategies in an attempt to influence public policy in Fiji, with all six CPA strategies identified. Participants identified that there is a substantial risk that the widespread CPA of the food industry could undermine efforts to address NCDs in Fiji. Despite limited public disclosure of information, such as data related to food industry donations to political parties and lobbying, we were able to identify many CPA practices used by the food industry in Fiji. Greater transparency from the food industry and the government would help strengthen efforts to increase their accountability and support NCD prevention. In other low- and middle-income countries, it

  5. Relationship Between Intraseasonal Oscillation and Subtropical Wind Maxima Over the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Dayton G.; Hurrell, James W.; Speth, P.; Sperling, T.; Funk, A.; Zube, S.

    1991-01-01

    The significance of tropical heat sources on higher latitude jet streams has been examined by numerous investigators. Hurrell and Vincent (1990) provide a summary of many of these investigations in their observational case study of the relationship between tropical heating and subtropical wind maxima in the Southern Hemisphere during SOP-1, FGGE. They showed that the divergent outflow from tropical heating associated with the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), acted on by the coriolis force, was an important factor in maintaining the subtropical jet on the poleward side of the SPCZ during the period, 6-20 January 1979. They found a similar, but weaker relationship, over the southern Indian Ocean from 3-17 February 1979, a period when the SPCZ heating was greatly reduced and the jet was essentially non-existent. Since their findings were based on a case study and involved the use of the highly-specialized FGGE data set, the natural questions which arose were: (1) Is this relationship a regular feature of the circulation over the South Pacific? and, (2) If so, can it be detected with a routine data set? Another question posed by Hurrell and Vincent in their papers was:(3) How important was the intraseasonal oscillation in causing the enhanced heating and divergent outflow in the Pacific Ocean in January and southern Indian Ocean in February? The purpose of the present paper is to address the answer to these three questions. To accomplish this, some circulation features for an entire warm season in the Southern Hemisphere were examined. The year selected was 1984-85, and the warm season consisted of the 6-month period, 1 November 1984 - 30 April 1985. This period was chosen because there were numerous cases of the westerly wind maxima over the South Pacific and the intraseasonal oscillation was well documented.

  6. ENSO related SST anomalies and relation with surface heat fluxes over south Pacific and Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Nuncio, M.; Satheesan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The role of surface heat fluxes in Southern Pacific and Atlantic Ocean SST anomalies associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is studied using observation and ocean reanalysis products. A prominent dipole structure in SST anomaly is found with a positive (negative) anomaly center over south Pacific (65S-45S, 120W-70W) and negative (positive) one over south Atlantic (50S-30S, 30W-0E) during austral summer (DJF) of El Nino (LaNina). During late austral spring-early summer (OND) of El Nino (LaNina), anomalous northerly (southerly) meridional moisture transport and a positive (negative) sea level pressure anomaly induces a suppressed (enhanced) latent heat flux from the ocean surface over south Pacific. This in turn results in a shallower than normal mixed layer depth which further helps in development of the SST anomaly. Mixed layer thins further due to anomalous shortwave radiation during summer and a well developed SST anomaly evolves. The south Atlantic pole exhibits exactly opposite characteristics at the same time. The contribution from the surface heat fluxes to mixed layer temperature change is found to be dominant over the advective processes over both the basins. Net surface heat fluxes anomaly is also found to be maximum during late austral spring-early summer period, with latent heat flux having a major contribution to it. The anomalous latent heat fluxes between atmosphere and ocean surface play important role in the growth of observed summertime SST anomaly. Sea-surface height also shows similar out-of-phase signatures over the two basins and are well correlated with the ENSO related SST anomalies. It is also observed that the magnitude of ENSO related anomalies over the southern ocean are weaker in LaNina years than in El Nino years, suggesting an intensified tropics-high latitude tele-connection during warm phases of ENSO.

  7. Secondary Hotspots in the South Pacific as a Result of Mantle Plumelets and Lithospheric Extension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Wijbrans, J.; Pringle, M.

    2003-12-01

    By far the largest number of secondary hotspots (cf. Courtillet et al., 2003) can be found in the "South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly" (SOPITA) or "Superswell" region. Its Cretaceous counterpart is preserved in a large range of seamounts and guyots found in the "West Pacific Seamount Province" (WPSP). The seamounts in these regions display very distinct and long-lived isotopic signatures (Staudigel et al., 1991; Koppers et al., 2003) that can be used to combine source region chemistry and seamount geochronology to map out mantle melting anomalies over geological time. These mappings may resolve many important questions regarding the stationary character, continuity and longevity of the melting anomalies in the South Pacific mantle - and its secondary hotspots. Of all secondary hotspots that are currently active in the SOPITA we could identify only two hotspots that appear to be long-lived and that have Cretaceous counterparts in the WPSP. Plate reconstructions show that the "HIMU-type" Southern Wake seamounts may have originated from the Mangaia-Rurutu "hotline" in the Cook-Austral Islands, whereas the "EMI-type" Magellan seamounts may have originated from the Rarotonga hotspot. All other hotspots in the SOPITA and WPSP are short-lived (or intermittently active) as evidenced by the presence of numerous seamount trail "segments" representing no more than 10-40 Myr of volcanism. Our observations violate one or more assumptions of the classical Wilson-Morgan hotspot hypothesis: (1) none of the South Pacific hotspots are continuously active, (2) most are short-lived, (3) some show evidence of hotspot motion, and (4) most of them have poor linear age progressions, if any at all. On top of this we have evidence for volcanism along "hotlines" and the "superposition" of hotspots. The simple and elegant "hotspot" model, therefore, seems insufficient to explain the age distribution and source region characteristics of intra-plate volcanoes in the South Pacific. This

  8. Radiocarbon constraints on the extent and evolution of the South Pacific glacial carbon pool

    PubMed Central

    Ronge, T. A.; Tiedemann, R.; Lamy, F.; Köhler, P.; Alloway, B. V.; De Pol-Holz, R.; Pahnke, K.; Southon, J.; Wacker, L.

    2016-01-01

    During the last deglaciation, the opposing patterns of atmospheric CO2 and radiocarbon activities (Δ14C) suggest the release of 14C-depleted CO2 from old carbon reservoirs. Although evidences point to the deep Pacific as a major reservoir of this 14C-depleted carbon, its extent and evolution still need to be constrained. Here we use sediment cores retrieved along a South Pacific transect to reconstruct the spatio-temporal evolution of Δ14C over the last 30,000 years. In ∼2,500–3,600 m water depth, we find 14C-depleted deep waters with a maximum glacial offset to atmospheric 14C (ΔΔ14C=−1,000‰). Using a box model, we test the hypothesis that these low values might have been caused by an interaction of aging and hydrothermal CO2 influx. We observe a rejuvenation of circumpolar deep waters synchronous and potentially contributing to the initial deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. These findings constrain parts of the glacial carbon pool to the deep South Pacific. PMID:27157845

  9. Multilingual Proficiency in Fiji Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shameem, Nikhat

    2002-01-01

    Determined language proficiency among multilingual Indo-Fijian primary school children who have the languages, Fiji-Hindi, Standard Hindi, Urdu, English, Fijian, and Fijian English in their speech repertoire. Identifies the variables that affect multilingual proficiency in this group and determines whether classroom practice reflects educational…

  10. Situation Report [--Fiji, Indonesia, Israel, and Philippines].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This is a series of four situation reports prepared by the International Planned Parenthood Federation for informational and consultative purposes. The countries reported on are Fiji, Indonesia, Israel, and the Philippines. Some of the latest statistical figures for each country are listed. They are area, population and growth rate, birth, death,…

  11. Multilingual Proficiency in Fiji Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shameem, Nikhat

    2002-01-01

    Determined language proficiency among multilingual Indo-Fijian primary school children who have the languages, Fiji-Hindi, Standard Hindi, Urdu, English, Fijian, and Fijian English in their speech repertoire. Identifies the variables that affect multilingual proficiency in this group and determines whether classroom practice reflects educational…

  12. Rethinking Ethnic Conflict: Somalia and Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerson, Hazel M.

    1996-01-01

    Compares and contrasts the recent years of ethnic conflict in Somali and Fiji. The widely divergent reactions of both populations dispels the belief that ethnic pluralism is both a necessary and sufficient condition for violent conflict in a society. Provides succinct portraits of both societies and their cultures. (MJP)

  13. Rethinking Ethnic Conflict: Somalia and Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerson, Hazel M.

    1996-01-01

    Compares and contrasts the recent years of ethnic conflict in Somali and Fiji. The widely divergent reactions of both populations dispels the belief that ethnic pluralism is both a necessary and sufficient condition for violent conflict in a society. Provides succinct portraits of both societies and their cultures. (MJP)

  14. Financing for universal health coverage in small island states: evidence from the Fiji Islands

    PubMed Central

    Asante, Augustine D; Irava, Wayne; Limwattananon, Supon; Hayen, Andrew; Martins, Joao; Guinness, Lorna; Ataguba, John E; Price, Jennifer; Jan, Stephen; Mills, Anne; Wiseman, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Background Universal health coverage (UHC) is critical to global poverty alleviation and equity of health systems. Many low-income and middle-income countries, including small island states in the Pacific, have committed to UHC and reforming their health financing systems to better align with UHC goals. This study provides the first comprehensive evidence on equity of the health financing system in Fiji, a small Pacific island state. The health systems of such states are poorly covered in the international literature. Methods The study employs benefit and financing incidence analyses to evaluate the distribution of health financing benefits and burden across the public and private sectors. Primary data from a cross-sectional survey of 2000 households were used to assess healthcare benefits and secondary data from the 2008–2009 Fiji Household Income and Expenditure Survey to assess health financing contributions. These were analysed by socioeconomic groups to determine the relative benefit and financing incidence across these groups. Findings The distribution of healthcare benefits in Fiji slightly favours the poor—around 61% of public spending for nursing stations and 26% of spending for government hospital inpatient care were directed to services provided to the poorest 20% of the population. The financing system is significantly progressive with wealthier groups bearing a higher share of the health financing burden. Conclusions The healthcare system in Fiji achieves a degree of vertical equity in financing, with the poor receiving a higher share of benefits from government health spending and bearing a lower share of the financing burden than wealthier groups. PMID:28589017

  15. Tectonics of South China: Key to understanding West Pacific geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsü, Kenneth J.; Li, Jiliang; Chen, Haihong; Wang, Qingchen; Sun, Shu; Şengör, A. M. C.

    1990-11-01

    South China is not a post-Caledonian platform, but a composite of orogenic belts. This late Proterozoic/Mesozoic orogen is a collage of three continental fragments. The three blocks are Yangzi, Huanan, and Dongnanya, and they are separated by the Banxi-Nanpanjiang (formerly Xianggangzhe) and Gunanhai Suture zones. Yangzi was separated from Gondwanaland during Late Precambrian when an open ocean, called Banxi, was present between the two continents. Tectonic processes at an active margin during Sinian and Early Paleozoic time led to the genesis of an accretionary wedge complex, the Banxi Melange and the Huanan Flysch Nappes, on the northern margin of Huanan, which was then the northern margin of the Gondwana Continent. Reorganization of plates during the Devonian suspended subduction at the Huanan active margin. Huanan was uplifted and unconformably overlain by transgressive deposits of Devonian and/or Carboniferous age. A remnant ocean, the Nanpanjiang Sea, still existed between Yangzi and Huanan, and deep-water sedimentation continued both at the southern margin of Yangzi and at the northwestern margin of Huanan. The latter again became an active margin during Late Paleozoic, when Permian and Triassic flysch sediments were deposited in foredeeps ahead of advancing nappes. Huanan and Yangzi collided during the Triassic, and resulted in the deformation of the passive margin of the latter to form the Yangzi Deformed Belt. Huanan was separated from a more southerly continent, Dongnanya, in the Devonian by seafloor spreading which created a Late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic ocean (Gunanhai Ocean). A continuously deposited sequence, ranging in age from Devonian to Triassic, was laid down on the southern passive margin of Huanan. On the other side of the ocean, the Dongnanya Permian strata include glacial marine deposits of Gondwanaland affinity. Dongnanya became separated from Gondwanaland during the Late Permian, when it marched northward to be reunited with Huanan

  16. Changes in the South Pacific deep water Nd isotope composition over the last 140 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröllje, Henning; Basak, Chandranath; Lamy, Frank; Gersonde, Rainer; Ullermann, Johannes; Pahnke, Katharina

    2015-04-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a central role in the global overturning circulation of the ocean through the formation of intermediate and bottom waters and the import and redistribution of deep waters from all major ocean basins that make up Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). The South Pacific is an ideal location to study the evolution of CDW over the last glacial-interglacial cycles with little direct overprint by fluctuating North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) input. Here were present a 140ky-long record of neodymium isotope ratios (143Nd/144Nd, expressed as ɛNd) analyzed on fossil fish teeth and debris from sediment core PS75/056-1 (55° 09.74 S, 114° 47.31 W, 3581 m water depth) in the open South Pacific that is bathed today by Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) with a small contribution from Pacific Deep Water. The Late Holocene and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 ɛNd values of -7.5 to -7.7 are close to the modern seawater isotopic composition near the core site [1]. Glacial ɛNd of about -6 is observed during MIS 2 and 6. The decrease in the ɛNd record during the penultimate deglaciation is more gradual compared to that during the last deglaciation and the most negative values of the last interglacial are reached during MIS 5c. The transition from MIS 5 into MIS 4 is characterized by a shift towards more negative ɛNd (-6.5) but full glacial values are not reached. The change to more positive ɛNd at the MIS 4/3 transition is followed by a long-term increase to maximum values reached during the last glacial maximum. The timing of the observed transitions is comparable to a nearby δ13C record (core E11-2) [2] and to published ɛNd records from the deep South Atlantic and Indian Oceans [3, 4]. We observe consistently more positive absolute ɛNd values in the South Pacific compared to the Atlantic. The offset is around one ɛNd unit during cold periods (MIS 2, 4, 6) and 1.5 ɛNd units during the interglacials. During MIS 3, on the other hand, there is little difference

  17. The Impact of Bilateral Aid on Educational Development: The Case of Australia and the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maglen, Leo R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes Australian financial aid for education to Fiji, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Western Samoa, Tonga, Kiribati, Tuvalu, and Nauru, and its impact on access to education, higher education options, "nationalization" of education, and educational quality. Concludes that Australian aid serves Australian interests and does not address…

  18. A Comparison of Science Laboratory Classrooms in Asia, Australia, South Pacific and USA: An International Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giddings, Geoffrey; Waldrip, Bruce G.

    This study attempted to compare the science laboratory learning environments of secondary schools across both developed and developing countries (Australia, Brunei, Cook Islands, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, United States, Vanuatu, and Western Samoa). The study used a version of the Science Laboratory Learning…

  19. Cross equator transport of 137Cs from North Pacific Ocean to South Pacific Ocean ( BEAGLE2003 cruises)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, M.; Fukasawa, M.; Hirose, K.; Hamajima, Y.; Kawano, T.; Povinec, P. P.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    The anthropogenic radionuclides such as 137Cs, 90Sr, 99Tc, 129I and some transuranics are important tracers of transport and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. 137Cs, with a half-life of 30 years, a major fission product present in a dissolved form in seawater, is a good tracer of oceanic circulation at a time scale of several decades. At WOCE P6 line along 30°S during the BEAGLE cruise in 2003, surface seawater (around 80 L) was collected a few meters below the ocean surface by a pumping system. Water column samples (from 5 to 20 L) were collected using a Rosette multisampling system and Niskin bottles. 137Cs was separated from seawater samples using ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP) and analysed for 137Cs in low-level HPGe gamma-ray spectrometers. Results allowed to draw a detailed picture of the distribution of 137Cs in the South Pacific Ocean along P6 line. A 137Cs depth section was depicted from about 160 samples. 137Cs concentrations in the subsurface layers ranged from 0.07 ± 0.04 Bq m -3 to 1.85 ± 0.145 Bq m -3, high in the Tasman Sea and very low in the eastern region where upwelling occurs. Water column inventories of 137Cs from surface to 1000 dbar depth ranged from 270 ± 104 to 1048 ± 127 Bq m -2. It was concluded that the source of higher 137Cs concentration and inventories in the Tasman Sea was 137Cs deposited in the mid latitude of the North Pacific Ocean and transported across the equator during four decades.

  20. Reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to the deep central South Pacific during the last two glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Kescher, Mario; Frank, Martin; Tapia, Raúl; Ronge, Thomas A.; Nürnberg, Dirk; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The South Pacific is a sensitive location for the variability of the global oceanic thermohaline circulation given that deep waters from the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and the Pacific Basin are exchanged. Here we reconstruct the deep water circulation of the central South Pacific for the last two glacial cycles (from 240,000 years ago to the Holocene) based on radiogenic neodymium (Nd) and lead (Pb) isotope records complemented by benthic stable carbon data obtained from two sediment cores located on the flanks of the East Pacific Rise. The records show small but consistent glacial/interglacial changes in all three isotopic systems with interglacial average values of -5.8 and 18.757 for ɛNd and 206Pb/204Pb, respectively, whereas glacial averages are -5.3 and 18.744. Comparison of this variability of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) to previously published records along the pathway of the global thermohaline circulation is consistent with reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to CDW during cold stages. The absolute values and amplitudes of the benthic δ13C variations are essentially indistinguishable from other records of the Southern Hemisphere and confirm that the low central South Pacific sedimentation rates did not result in a significant reduction of the amplitude of any of the measured proxies. In addition, the combined detrital Nd and strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope signatures imply that Australian and New Zealand dust has remained the principal contributor of lithogenic material to the central South Pacific.

  1. Physical and chemical characterization of marine atmospheric aerosols over the North and South Pacific Oceans using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Jung, J.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of marine atmospheric aerosols were characterized and compared over the North and South Pacific Ocean during two trans-Pacific cruises (from Japan to Chile and Australia to Japan) during the period of January-June 2009, which cover broad region of Pacific Ocean from 40°N to 55°S and 140°E to 70°W. The measured parameters of aerosol properties were single particle size-resolved chemical composition (D = 100 ~ 1500 nm), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, size distribution from 10 nm to 5 μm, total aerosol nitrate and sulfate concentrations, and filter-based chemical composition. Trace gas concentrations of O3 and CO were also measured to aid air parcel categorization during the cruises. Reflecting larger anthropogenic emission in the Northern Hemisphere, pronounced concentration gradient between the North and South Pacific Ocean was observed for aerosol nitrate, CO, and O3. Aerosol sulfate also showed a similar concentration drop in the equatorial region, relatively higher sulfate concentration was observed in 30°S-40°S and 55°S regions, which was associated with increased aerosol methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration but little increase in local marine chlorophyll concentration, suggesting contribution of long-range transported marine biogenic sulfur from the high primary production area over the South Pacific high latitude region. Aerosol chemical classification by single particle chemical analysis revealed that certain aerosol types, such as biomass burning, elemental carbon, and elemental/organic carbon mixed type, were mainly observed in the North Pacific region, while several specific organic aerosol types with abundant aged organic and disulfur composition were identified in the South Pacific region. Further comparison of aerosol properties, aerosol sources, and atmospheric aerosol processing in the North and South Pacific Oceans will be discussed.

  2. South Pacific influence on the termination of El Niño in 2014.

    PubMed

    Imada, Yukiko; Tatebe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kimoto, Masahide

    2016-07-28

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of climate variability affecting worldwide extreme weather events; therefore, improving ENSO prediction is an important issue. In this regard, a peculiar time evolution of ENSO in 2014 posed a challenge to the climate science community. Despite the observance of several precursors for a strong El Niño to develop during the summer and autumn, cold sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies appeared unexpectedly to the south of the equatorial cold tongue, which prevented development of an El Niño event in the late summer. Several hypotheses have been raised to explain the unmaterialized El Niño in 2014, but complete understanding of processes responsible for terminating this event has not yet been obtained. Here we show, using observations and extended seasonal prediction experiments with a climate model, that cold off-equatorial subsurface water in the South Pacific Ocean penetrated into the equatorial region along the slanted isopycnal surface via the mean advection, and it prevented the El Niño evolution in 2014. The negative subsurface temperature anomalies in the off-equatorial South Pacific Ocean were persistent throughout the last decade, and additional numerical simulations indicated that they contributed to the suppression of El Niño events during the 2000s.

  3. South Pacific influence on the termination of El Niño in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Imada, Yukiko; Tatebe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kimoto, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of climate variability affecting worldwide extreme weather events; therefore, improving ENSO prediction is an important issue. In this regard, a peculiar time evolution of ENSO in 2014 posed a challenge to the climate science community. Despite the observance of several precursors for a strong El Niño to develop during the summer and autumn, cold sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies appeared unexpectedly to the south of the equatorial cold tongue, which prevented development of an El Niño event in the late summer. Several hypotheses have been raised to explain the unmaterialized El Niño in 2014, but complete understanding of processes responsible for terminating this event has not yet been obtained. Here we show, using observations and extended seasonal prediction experiments with a climate model, that cold off-equatorial subsurface water in the South Pacific Ocean penetrated into the equatorial region along the slanted isopycnal surface via the mean advection, and it prevented the El Niño evolution in 2014. The negative subsurface temperature anomalies in the off-equatorial South Pacific Ocean were persistent throughout the last decade, and additional numerical simulations indicated that they contributed to the suppression of El Niño events during the 2000s. PMID:27464581

  4. South Pacific influence on the termination of El Niño in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Yukiko; Tatebe, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kimoto, Masahide

    2016-07-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of climate variability affecting worldwide extreme weather events; therefore, improving ENSO prediction is an important issue. In this regard, a peculiar time evolution of ENSO in 2014 posed a challenge to the climate science community. Despite the observance of several precursors for a strong El Niño to develop during the summer and autumn, cold sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies appeared unexpectedly to the south of the equatorial cold tongue, which prevented development of an El Niño event in the late summer. Several hypotheses have been raised to explain the unmaterialized El Niño in 2014, but complete understanding of processes responsible for terminating this event has not yet been obtained. Here we show, using observations and extended seasonal prediction experiments with a climate model, that cold off-equatorial subsurface water in the South Pacific Ocean penetrated into the equatorial region along the slanted isopycnal surface via the mean advection, and it prevented the El Niño evolution in 2014. The negative subsurface temperature anomalies in the off-equatorial South Pacific Ocean were persistent throughout the last decade, and additional numerical simulations indicated that they contributed to the suppression of El Niño events during the 2000s.

  5. Uppermost mantle anisotropy beneath south and northwest Pacific by ambient noise interferometry analysis of OBS records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Forsyth, D. W.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Nishida, K.; Isse, T.; Kawakatsu, H.; Shiobara, H.; Sugioka, H.; Suetsugu, D.; Ito, A.; Kanazawa, T.

    2012-12-01

    For obtaining shear-wave anisotropy at depths shallower than 50 km in the oceanic area, we apply ambient noise interferometry to two array datasets of ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) and differential pressure gauges (DPGs). The first array includes 9 OBSs deployed in south Pacific (French Polynesia region) by TIARES project. The second array includes 9 OBSs and 12 DPGs deployed in northwest Pacific by PLATE project. For each dataset, we first calculate cross correlation functions (CCFs) between every pair of stations. The calculated CCFs show the propagations of the fundamental mode of Love wave, the fundamental, first higher and second higher modes of Rayleigh waves at periods of about 2-40 s. For each array and each mode, we then measure average phase velocities by waveform fitting based on Aki (1957) (c.f. Takeo, 2011 master's thesis; 2012 in preparation). In the final step, we measure phase velocity anomalies for each CCFs. The obtained anomalies show azimuthal dependence for the fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave at periods of about 15-30 s. For the south Pacific, the peak-to-peak intensity of 2theta azimuthal variation is 2-3% and the fastest direction is N48-62E, which is consistent with the recent plate motion, N70W. Those for the northwest Pacific are 4-6% and N36-44W, which is consistent with the seafloor spreading direction, N35W. These results roughly reflect shear-wave anisotropy at depths shallower than 50 km. For more detailed discussion, we will estimate the shear-wave anisotropy using these phase-velocity anomalies.

  6. Forest plant and bird communities in the Lau Group, Fiji.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Janet; Steadman, David W

    2010-12-29

    We examined species composition of forest and bird communities in relation to environmental and human disturbance gradients on Lakeba (55.9 km²), Nayau (18.4 km²), and Aiwa Levu (1.2 km²), islands in the Lau Group of Fiji, West Polynesia. The unique avifauna of West Polynesia (Fiji, Tonga, Samoa) has been subjected to prehistoric human-caused extinctions but little was previously known about this topic in the Lau Group. We expected that the degree of human disturbance would be a strong determinant of tree species composition and habitat quality for surviving landbirds, while island area would be unrelated to bird diversity. All trees > 5 cm diameter were measured and identified in 23 forest plots of 500 m² each. We recognized four forest species assemblages differentiated by composition and structure: coastal forest, dominated by widely distributed species, and three forest types with differences related more to disturbance history (stages of secondary succession following clearing or selective logging) than to environmental gradients (elevation, slope, rockiness). Our point counts (73 locations in 1 or 2 seasons) recorded 18 of the 24 species of landbirds that exist on the three islands. The relative abundance and species richness of birds were greatest in the forested habitats least disturbed by people. These differences were due mostly to increased numbers of columbid frugivores and passerine insectivores in forests on Lakeba and Aiwa Levu. Considering only forested habitats, the relative abundance and species richness of birds were greater on the small but completely forested (and uninhabited) island of Aiwa Levu than on the much larger island of Lakeba. Forest disturbance history is more important than island area in structuring both tree and landbird communities on remote Pacific islands. Even very small islands may be suitable for conservation reserves if they are protected from human disturbance.

  7. Forest Plant and Bird Communities in the Lau Group, Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Janet; Steadman, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Background We examined species composition of forest and bird communities in relation to environmental and human disturbance gradients on Lakeba (55.9 km2), Nayau (18.4 km2), and Aiwa Levu (1.2 km2), islands in the Lau Group of Fiji, West Polynesia. The unique avifauna of West Polynesia (Fiji, Tonga, Samoa) has been subjected to prehistoric human-caused extinctions but little was previously known about this topic in the Lau Group. We expected that the degree of human disturbance would be a strong determinant of tree species composition and habitat quality for surviving landbirds, while island area would be unrelated to bird diversity. Methodology/Principal Findings All trees >5 cm diameter were measured and identified in 23 forest plots of 500 m2 each. We recognized four forest species assemblages differentiated by composition and structure: coastal forest, dominated by widely distributed species, and three forest types with differences related more to disturbance history (stages of secondary succession following clearing or selective logging) than to environmental gradients (elevation, slope, rockiness). Our point counts (73 locations in 1 or 2 seasons) recorded 18 of the 24 species of landbirds that exist on the three islands. The relative abundance and species richness of birds were greatest in the forested habitats least disturbed by people. These differences were due mostly to increased numbers of columbid frugivores and passerine insectivores in forests on Lakeba and Aiwa Levu. Considering only forested habitats, the relative abundance and species richness of birds were greater on the small but completely forested (and uninhabited) island of Aiwa Levu than on the much larger island of Lakeba. Conclusions/Significance Forest disturbance history is more important than island area in structuring both tree and landbird communities on remote Pacific islands. Even very small islands may be suitable for conservation reserves if they are protected from human

  8. Economic valuation of ecosystem services from coral reefs in the South Pacific: taking stock of recent experience.

    PubMed

    Laurans, Yann; Pascal, Nicolas; Binet, Thomas; Brander, Luke; Clua, Eric; David, Gilbert; Rojat, Dominique; Seidl, Andrew

    2013-02-15

    The economic valuation of coral reefs ecosystem services is currently seen as a promising approach to demonstrate the benefits of sustainable management of coral ecosystems to policymakers and to provide useful information for improved decisions. Most coral reefs economic studies have been conducted in the United States, Southeast Asia and the Caribbean, and only a few have covered the South Pacific region. In this region, coral reefs are essential assets for small island developing states as well as for developed countries. Accordingly, a series of ecosystem services valuations has been carried out recently in the South Pacific, to try and supply decision-makers with new information. Applying ecosystem services valuation to the specific ecological, social, economic and cultural contexts of the South Pacific is however not straightforward. This paper analyses how extant valuations address the various management challenges of coral reef regions in general and more specifically for the South Pacific. Bearing in mind that economic valuation has to match policy-making contexts, we emphasize a series of specific considerations when conducting and applying ecosystem services valuation in South Pacific ecological and social contexts. Finally, the paper examines the decision-making situations in which extant valuations took place. We conclude that, although ecosystem valuations have been effectively used as a means to raise awareness with respect to coral reef conservation, methodologies will have to be further developed, with multidisciplinary inputs, if they are to provide valuable inputs in local and technical decision-making.

  9. The South ``West'' Pacific Convergence Zone: Large-scale feedback on atmospheric subsidence to the east

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widlansky, M. J.; Webster, P. J.; Hoyos, C.

    2010-12-01

    Three semi-permanent convective cloud bands exist in the Southern Hemisphere extending southeastward from the equator, through the tropics, and into the subtropics. The most prominent of these features occurs in the South Pacific during summer and is referred to as the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Similar cloud bands, with less intensity, exist in the South Indian and Atlantic basins. To the east of each convective zone is a large-scale region of atmospheric subsidence. We attempt to explain the physical mechanisms that promote the diagonal orientation of the SPCZ and also teleconnections that may exist with stratocumulus cloud cover in the southeastern Pacific. It is argued that slowly varying sea surface temperature patterns produce upper tropospheric wind fields that vary substantially in longitude (∂U/∂x). Regions where 200 hPa zonal winds decrease with longitude (i.e., negative zonal stretching deformation, or ∂U/∂x<0) reduce the group speed of the eastward propagating synoptic (3-6 day period) Rossby waves and locally increase the wave energy density. Such a region of wave accumulation occurs in the vicinity of the SPCZ (see Figure), thus providing a hypothesis for the diagonal orientation and a physical basis for earlier observations that the zone traps eastward propagating synoptic disturbances. Controlled numerical experiments and composites of observed life cycles of synoptic waves confirm that disturbances slow in the SPCZ. From the hypothesis comes a more general theory accounting for the SPCZ’s spatial orientation and the lack of disturbances to the east. December-February climatology of 200 hPa zonal winds (shading) and negative zonal stretching deformation (red contours). Large black box located at 20°S-35°S, 165°W-135°W encloses the diagonal region of the SPCZ. 240 W m-2 OLR contour outlined by blue lines.

  10. Nitrogen isotope ratios of nitrate and N* anomalies in the subtropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Chisato; Makabe, Akiko; Shiozaki, Takuhei; Toyoda, Sakae; Yoshida, Osamu; Furuya, Ken; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen isotopic ratios of nitrate (δ15N-NO3-) were analyzed above 1000 m water depth along 17°S in the subtropical South Pacific during the revisit WOCE P21 cruise in 2009. The δ15N-NO3- and N* values were as high as 17‰ and as low as -18 μmol N L-1, respectively, at depths around 250 m east of 115°W, but were as low as 5‰ and as high as +1 μmol N L-1, respectively, in subsurface waters west of 170°W. The relationships among NO3- concentrations, N* values, δ15N-NO3- values, and oxygen and nitrite concentrations suggest that a few samples east of 90°W were from suboxic and nitrite-accumulated conditions and were possibly affected by in situ water column denitrification. Most of the high-δ15N-NO3- and negative-N* waters were probably generated by mixing between Subantarctic Mode Water from the Southern Ocean and Oxygen Deficit Zone Water from the eastern tropical South Pacific, with remineralization of organic matter occurring during transportation. Moreover, the relationship between δ15N-NO3- and N* values, as well as Trichodesmium abundances and size-specific nitrogen fixation rates at the surface, suggest that the low-δ15N-NO3- and positive-N* subsurface waters between 160°E and 170°W were generated by the input of remineralized particles created by in situ nitrogen fixation, mainly by Trichodesmium spp. Therefore, the δ15N values of sediments in this region are expected to reveal past changes in nitrogen fixation or denitrification rates in the subtropical South Pacific. The copyright line for this article was changed on 5 JUN 2015 after original online publication.

  11. View of a South Pacific storm photographed from Skylab space station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-12-02

    SL4-136-3388 (2 Dec. 1973) --- This excellent view of a South Pacific storm was photographed from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit by one of the Skylab 4 crewmen. The camera used was a hand-held 70mm Hasselblad, with SO-368 medium-speed Ektachrome film. This photograph of a low pressure area and associated frontal activity was taken for studying the development of such storm systems. The low sun angle enhances the relief, giving much of the picture a three-dimensional appearance. The good definition of the clouds with the cumulonimbus (thunderstorm clouds) penetrating the cirrus cloud layer makes this an interesting photograph to study. This storm, located east of New Zealand at 170 degrees west longitude and 50 degrees south latitude, is not and never became a typhoon. However, in some ways it may look similar. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Accounting for health in climate change policies: a case study of Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Georgina; Bowen, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Background Climate change is expected to affect the health of most populations in the coming decades, having the greatest impact on the poorest and most disadvantaged people in the world. The Pacific islands, including Fiji, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Objective The three major health impacts of climate change in Fiji explored in this study were dengue fever, diarrhoeal disease, and malnutrition, as they each pose a significant threat to human health. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent the Fiji National Climate Change Policy, and a selection of relevant sectoral policies, account for these human health effects of climate change. Design The study employed a three-pronged policy analysis to evaluate: 1) the content of the Fijian National Climate Change Policy and to what extent health was incorporated within this; 2) the context within which the policy was developed; 3) the relevant processes; and 4) the actors involved. A selection of relevant sectoral policies were also analysed to assess the extent to which these included climate change and health considerations. Results The policy analysis showed that these three health impacts of climate change were only considered to a minor extent, and often indirectly, in both the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and the corresponding National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, as well as the Public Health Act. Furthermore, supporting documents in relevant sectors including water and agriculture made no mention of climate change and health impacts. Conclusions The projected health impacts of climate change should be considered as part of reviewing the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, and the Public Health Act. In the interest of public health, this should include strategies for combating dengue fever, malnutrition, and water-borne disease. Related sectoral policies in water and agriculture should also be revised to

  13. Accounting for health in climate change policies: a case study of Fiji.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Georgina; Bowen, Kathryn

    2014-12-01

    Background Climate change is expected to affect the health of most populations in the coming decades, having the greatest impact on the poorest and most disadvantaged people in the world. The Pacific islands, including Fiji, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Objective The three major health impacts of climate change in Fiji explored in this study were dengue fever, diarrhoeal disease, and malnutrition, as they each pose a significant threat to human health. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent the Fiji National Climate Change Policy, and a selection of relevant sectoral policies, account for these human health effects of climate change. Design The study employed a three-pronged policy analysis to evaluate: 1) the content of the Fijian National Climate Change Policy and to what extent health was incorporated within this; 2) the context within which the policy was developed; 3) the relevant processes; and 4) the actors involved. A selection of relevant sectoral policies were also analysed to assess the extent to which these included climate change and health considerations. Results The policy analysis showed that these three health impacts of climate change were only considered to a minor extent, and often indirectly, in both the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and the corresponding National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, as well as the Public Health Act. Furthermore, supporting documents in relevant sectors including water and agriculture made no mention of climate change and health impacts. Conclusions The projected health impacts of climate change should be considered as part of reviewing the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, and the Public Health Act. In the interest of public health, this should include strategies for combating dengue fever, malnutrition, and water-borne disease. Related sectoral policies in water and agriculture should also be revised to

  14. Accounting for health in climate change policies: a case study of Fiji.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Georgina; Bowen, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect the health of most populations in the coming decades, having the greatest impact on the poorest and most disadvantaged people in the world. The Pacific islands, including Fiji, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. The three major health impacts of climate change in Fiji explored in this study were dengue fever, diarrhoeal disease, and malnutrition, as they each pose a significant threat to human health. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent the Fiji National Climate Change Policy, and a selection of relevant sectoral policies, account for these human health effects of climate change. The study employed a three-pronged policy analysis to evaluate: 1) the content of the Fijian National Climate Change Policy and to what extent health was incorporated within this; 2) the context within which the policy was developed; 3) the relevant processes; and 4) the actors involved. A selection of relevant sectoral policies were also analysed to assess the extent to which these included climate change and health considerations. The policy analysis showed that these three health impacts of climate change were only considered to a minor extent, and often indirectly, in both the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and the corresponding National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, as well as the Public Health Act. Furthermore, supporting documents in relevant sectors including water and agriculture made no mention of climate change and health impacts. The projected health impacts of climate change should be considered as part of reviewing the Fiji National Climate Change Policy and National Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, and the Public Health Act. In the interest of public health, this should include strategies for combating dengue fever, malnutrition, and water-borne disease. Related sectoral policies in water and agriculture should also be revised to consider climate change and its impact on human

  15. Interdecadal change in the lagged relationship between the Pacific-South American pattern and ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ruiqiang; Li, Jianping; Tseng, Yu-heng; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Zhao, Sen; Lee, June-Yi

    2016-11-01

    A significant interdecadal change in the lagged relationship between the austral summer Pacific-South American (PSA) pattern and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the following austral summer (the PSA serving as a precursor signature to ENSO events) has been detected by analysis of a 91-year historical record. Strong correlations between the PSA and ENSO occurred during the periods 1956-1975 and 1990-2004 [referred to as the high correlation (HC) periods], but the correlations were weak for the periods 1928-1956 and 1975-1990 [referred to as the low correlation (LC) periods]. Both the processes of surface air-sea coupling in the extratropical/tropical Pacific, and subsurface ocean temperature evolution along the equator associated with the PSA, were found to be stronger during the HC periods than during the LC periods, thereby resulting in a stronger influence of the PSA on the subsequent ENSO during the HC periods. Changes in the PSA-ENSO relationship can be attributed mainly to interdecadal changes in the intensity of the austral summer PSA. The latter was found to have contributions from both the modulation of the Pacific decadal oscillation and long-term variations in the Southern Annular Mode.

  16. Fiji - an Open Source platform for biological image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schindelin, Johannes; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Frise, Erwin; Kaynig, Verena; Longair, Mark; Pietzsch, Tobias; Preibisch, Stephan; Rueden, Curtis; Saalfeld, Stephan; Schmid, Benjamin; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; White, Daniel James; Hartenstein, Volker; Eliceiri, Kevin; Tomancak, Pavel; Cardona, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Fiji is a distribution of the popular Open Source software ImageJ focused on biological image analysis. Fiji uses modern software engineering practices to combine powerful software libraries with a broad range of scripting languages to enable rapid prototyping of image processing algorithms. Fiji facilitates the transformation of novel algorithms into ImageJ plugins that can be shared with end users through an integrated update system. We propose Fiji as a platform for productive collaboration between computer science and biology research communities. PMID:22743772

  17. Improving maternal and child health systems in Fiji through a perinatal mortality audit.

    PubMed

    Raman, Shanti; Iljadica, Alexandra; Gyaneshwar, Rajat; Taito, Rigamoto; Fong, James

    2015-05-01

    To develop a standardized process of perinatal mortality audit (PMA) and improve the capacity of health workers to identify and correct factors underlying preventable deaths in Fiji. In a pilot study, clinicians and healthcare managers in obstetrics and pediatrics were trained to investigate stillbirths and neonatal deaths according to current guidelines. A pre-existing PMA datasheet was refined for use in Fiji and trialed in three divisional hospitals in 2011-12. Key informant interviews identified factors influencing PMA uptake. Overall, 141 stillbirths and neonatal deaths were analyzed (57 from hospital A and 84 from hospital B; forms from hospital C excluded because incomplete/illegible). Between-site variations in mortality were recorded on the basis of the level of tertiary care available; 28 (49%) stillbirths were recorded in hospital A compared with 53 (63%) in hospital B. Substantial health system factors contributing to preventable deaths were identified, and included inadequate staffing, problems with medical equipment, and lack of clinical skills. Leadership, teamwork, communication, and having a standardized process were associated with uptake of PMA. The use of PMAs by health workers in Fiji and other Pacific island countries could potentially rectify gaps in maternal and neonatal service delivery. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-lived but Discontinuous Hotspot Volcanism of the South Pacific Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Wijbrans, J.; Pringle, M.

    2001-12-01

    Hotspots of the South Pacific have been operating since the Early Cretaceous. We present evidence that their heterogeneous geochemical character and, hence, their respective HIMU-EMI-EMII mantle sources, can be traced back into the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP) using plate tectonic reconstructions. This implies that the HIMU, EMI and EMII mantle components are enduring features within the Earth's mantle, at least, for the last 140 Myr. These correlations are eminent on the scale of the WPSP and the South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly (SOPITA) although the evolution of individual hotspots emerges notably more complicated. Hotspots in the WPSP and SOPITA mantle regions typically display intermittent volcanic activity, longevities shorter than 70 Myr, superposition of hotspot volcanism, and indirectly the motion of their mantle plumes through time. In our plate tectonic reconstructions, we use 40Ar/39Ar seamount ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures to map out Cretaceous hotspot volcanism in the WPSP and to characterize its evolution with respect to the currently active hotspots in the SOPITA region. EM-type Magellan, Anewetak, Ralik and Ratak seamount trails can be traced back to the magmatic activity of the Macdonald, Rurutu and Rarotonga hotspots during the Cretaceous; the HIMU-type seamounts within the Southern Wake seamount trail (97-120 Ma) most likely originated from the Mangaia-Rurutu "hot-line" in the Cook-Austral Islands. The Typhoon and Japanese guyots terminated their volcanism during the Early Cretaceous and have no presently active hot spot. However, the currently active Samoan, Society, Pitcairn and Marquesas hotspots may be traced back only to about 30-70 Myr and lack long-lived counterparts in the WPSP. These hotspots may have become active over the last 30-70 Myr only. All in all hotspot volcanism in the South Pacific seems to be controlled by a "superplume" type of mantle convection giving rise to multiple weak mantle plumes, each

  19. Seasonal prediction of the South Pacific Convergence Zone in the austral wet season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A. N.; Brown, J. R.; Cottrill, A.; Shelton, K. L.; Nakaegawa, T.; Kuleshov, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The position and orientation of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), modulated by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), determine many of the potentially predictable interannual variations in rainfall in the South Pacific region. In this study, the predictability of the SPCZ in austral summer is assessed using two coupled (ocean-atmosphere) global circulation model (CGCM)-based seasonal prediction systems: the Japan Meteorological Agency's Meteorological Research Institute Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model (JMA/MRI-CGCM) and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's Predictive Ocean-Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA-M24). Forecasts of austral summer rainfall, initialized in November are assessed over the period 1980-2010. The climatology of CGCM precipitation in the SPCZ region compares favorably to rainfall analyses over subsets of years characterizing different phases of ENSO. While the CGCMs display biases in the mean SPCZ latitudes, they reproduce interannual variability in austral summer SPCZ position indices for forecasts out to 4 months, with temporal correlations greater than 0.6. The summer latitude of the western branch of the SPCZ is predictable with correlations of the order of 0.6 for forecasts initialized as early as September, while the correlation for the eastern branch only exceeds 0.6 for forecasts initialized in November. Encouragingly, the models are able to simulate the large displacement of the SPCZ during zonal SPCZ years 1982-1983, 1991-1992, and 1997-1998.

  20. Diagnosing inflow-moisture-precipitation relationships along the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintner, B. R.; Neelin, J.

    2009-12-01

    The tropical South Pacific is characterized by an area of large-scale atmospheric subsidence to the east and strong low-level convergence and deep convection, i.e., the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), to the west. The spatial transition between these subsiding and convecting regimes manifests strong variability on multiple timescales and presents challenges for simulation, both of which underscore the need for understanding the interplay of dynamics and thermodynamics controlling the SPCZ margins. Here, the effect of one potential source of margin variability, the low-level trades, is examined. Composite analysis reveals high-frequency relationships among reanalysis inflow wind variability and observed column water vapor and precipitation along the SPCZ, with strengthening of the trades along the eastern tropical SPCZ margin associated with a reduction of column water vapor and precipitation. A simple analytic prototype for idealized convective margins situated in regions of substantial low-level inflow from a relatively dry oceanic region into the convection zone is used to interpret the observed inflow-moisture-precipitation relationships. Building on insights from this prototype, diagnostics of relevance for model evaluation and intercomparison and bias mitigation in the vicinity of the SPCZ or similar areas in other ocean basins are also discussed.

  1. Latent heat and cyclone activity in the South Pacific, 10-18 January 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. L.; Vincent, D. G.; Kann, D. M.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines the heat budget of the tropical South Pacific for the period of January 10-18, 1979 and compares precipitation estimates obtained from the budget equation with those derived from GOES-IR satellite imagery, using data that were part of the total FGGE package. In addition, the relationship between latent heat release and the baroclinic energy conversion is examined for the life cycles of two cyclones which propagated along the South Pacific Convection Zone in that period. It is shown that latent heat plays an important role in the baroclinic energy conversion between potential and kinetic energy through diabatically-induced vertical circulations. For a cyclone where latent heat stays at a high level both spacially and with regard to intensity, there appears to be ample fuel for its intensification. On the other hand, for a filling cyclone, the latent heat impact decreased and the baroclinic conversion fell off rapidly, due to the lack of both potential energy generation and diabatically-induced thermally-direct circulations.

  2. Characteristics of the 29th September 2009 South Pacific tsunami as observed at Niuatoputapu Island, Tonga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Kate; Power, William; Nishimura, Yuichi; 'Atelea Kautoke, Richard; Vaiomo'unga, Rennie; Pongi, 'Aleki; Fifita, Makameone

    2011-07-01

    Niuatoputapu Island, Tonga, lies at the northern end of the Tongan trench, approximately 190 km east of the epicentre of the earthquake that produced the 29th September, 2009, South Pacific tsunami. The tsunami inundated 46% of the land area of Niuatoputapu, maximum inundation of 1100 m occurred along the southeastern coastline of the island while inundation distances in the villages were typically 200-500 m. Flow direction indicators show that the strongest flow of the tsunami came from a northeast to east direction; the tsunami refracted around the northern and southern points of the island and inundated the west coast from variable directions. Maximum runup of 4.7 m above mean sea level was recorded at the village of Falehau in the northwest of Niuatoputapu. The flow height of the tsunami reached a maximum of 16.9 m above mean sea level at Toma, on the southeast coast of Niuatoputapu. Flow heights were typically between 8 and 15 m along the eastern, uninhabited coastline of Niuatoputapu and decreased by about half, to between 4 and 7 m above mean sea level along the western, inhabited coastline. With no prior knowledge or education to prompt self-evacuation, its remote location hampering recovery efforts, and high tsunami flow heights, Niuatoputapu suffered severe tsunami impacts in the social, economic and physical realms. We discuss aspects of the tsunami impacts and the implications of the event on our understanding of South Pacific tsunami hazard and how tsunami hazards can be managed on small, remote islands.

  3. Stratigraphic potential of Bolboforma significantly increased by new finds in the North Atlantic and South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Karowe, A. I.

    1986-01-01

    Until now, the genus Bolboforma, a problematic group of calcareous microfossils, has been recorded only in Oligocene to Pliocene marine sedimentary rocks, chiefly in the eastern North Atlantic region. We add to this eastern North Atlantic record six new sites and eleven undescribed species from the continental slopes of Ireland and Morocco. More significantly, we record, for the first time, abundant assemblages of Bolboforma on the western side of the North Atlantic and in the western South Pacific. Seven boreholes on the continental shelf and slope of New Jersey and Virginia contain ten species, three of which are new. Two species are present in two outcrops in eastern Mississippi and four are present in a borehole in the coastal plain of Virginia. On the Lord Howe Rise, west of New Zealand, a DSDP corehole has yielded a rich assemblage including four undescribed species. In addition to expanding the geographic distribution of Bolboforma, our work extends the known stratigraphic range downward into the upper Eocene on both sides of the North Atlantic and in the western South Pacific. Our findings firmly support the inference of a planktonic life style for Bolboforma, which implies a significant potential for biostratigraphic, paleobiogeographic, and paleoenvironmental studies, on both a local and global scale. We recommend a concerted effort to further document the nature and distribution of Bolboforma.

  4. Gliders Measure Western Boundary Current Transport from the South Pacific to the Equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. E.; Kessler, W. S.; Sherman, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2007, the Consortium on the Ocean's Role in Climate (CORC) has used repeated glider transects across the southern Solomon Sea to measure the previously nearly unsampled mass and heat transport from the South Pacific to the equatorial zone. Mean transport is dominated by the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent (NGCUC). This low-latitude western boundary current is a major element of the shallow meridional overturning circulation, returning water from the subtropical South Pacific to the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) where it upwells. We find the mean NGCUC to be a jet less than 100 km wide, centered near 300 m depth, with equatorward velocities reaching 35 cm/s and salinity anomalies on isopycnals up to 0.05. Weaker poleward flow is found near the surface in the eastern basin. Equatorward transport above 700 m is typically 20 Sv, but nearly vanished during two La Niñas and reached 25 Sv during an El Niño. Within these events the seasonal cycle cannot yet be defined. Transport variability is strongest outside the boundary current and appears to consist of two independently moving layers with a boundary near 250 m. ENSO variability is predominantly in the upper layer. The relation of Solomon Sea mass and heat transport with ENSO indicators will be discussed The ability to initiate and maintain measurements that support such quantitative analyses with a small effort in a remote site far from research institutions demonstrates that gliders can be a productive part of the global ocean observing system.

  5. High penetration of ultraviolet radiation in the south east Pacific waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedetti, Marc; Sempéré, Richard; Vasilkov, Alexander; Charrière, Bruno; Nérini, David; Miller, William L.; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Raimbault, Patrick

    2007-06-01

    We investigated the penetration of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in the surface waters of the south east Pacific (08-35°S, 142-73°W) from October to December 2004 during the BIOSOPE cruise. In the hyper-oligotrophic waters of the South Pacific Gyre (near Easter Island), diffuse attenuation coefficients for downward irradiance, Kd(λ), at 305 nm (UV-B), 325, 340 and 380 nm (UV-A) were 0.083, 0.055, 0.039 and 0.021 m-1, respectively. The corresponding 10% irradiance depths, Z10%(λ), were 28, 42, 59 and 110 m, respectively. These UVR penetrations are the highest ever reported for oceanic waters and are equal to those measured in the clearest fresh waters. UV-extended inherent optical property (IOP) and radiative transfer (RT) models allowed reliable estimations of Kd(λ) with the Case 1 water assumption when two values of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption spectral slope coefficient (S) were used, i.e. 0.017 nm-1 at 325, 340 and 380 nm, and 0.023 nm-1 at 305 nm.

  6. Spherical Cap Harmonic Modelling of 400 Years of Secular Variation in the South-west Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, M.; Alfheid, M.; Ingham, E. M.; Turner, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Historical magnetic data recorded in ship's logs on voyages of exploration and trade in the south-west Pacific have been used as a basis for constructing a model of secular variation in the region using spherical cap harmonic (SCH) analysis. The spherical cap used is centred on colatitude 115° and longitude 160° and has a radius of 50°, thus covering New Zealand, Australia and parts of Antarctica. Gaps in the observational data have been filled by an iterative procedure started by using IGRF field values to obtain SCH models for 2000, 1950 and 1900 and assuming that the spherical cap coefficients have a linear variation in time over the 400 year time period of the model, as is observed to a first approximation for Gauss coefficients calculated from a global spherical harmonic analysis. The resulting field models have generally smooth spatial and temporal variations in declination, inclination and intensity which show some differences from the variations calculated using the global spherical harmonic model gufm1. The technique clearly shows promise for producing more refined models of secular variation in the south-west Pacific when the historical data are supplemented by archeomagnetic and paleomagnetic data.

  7. Relations of South American summer rainfall interannual variations with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayano, Mary T.; Andreoli, Rita V.

    2007-03-01

    The anomaly patterns of rainfall in South America for El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) extreme conditions stratified according to the high, low, and normal Pacific (inter-) Decadal Oscillation (PDO) phases (HPDO, LPDO and NPDO) are examined for the three bi-months of the season from November to April. El Niño (EN) and La Niña (LN) composites as well as the linear (EN - LN) and nonlinear (EN + LN) components of the precipitation anomaly patterns relative to ENSO show substantial differences among the three PDO phases. The differences in the strength of ENSO teleconnections for the South American rainfall might be related to the PDO, which creates a background for these teleconnections acting constructively (destructively) when ENSO and PDO are in the same (opposite) phase. An interesting aspect is the occurrence of robust structures of the nonlinear component, which are due to the same sign rainfall anomalies for EN and LN composites. This is particularly conspicuous for the HPDO over eastern Brazil in the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) region during Nov/Dec and Jan/Feb, for the HPDO over northern/northwestern South America during Mar/Apr, and for the NPDO over northeastern Brazil during Mar/Apr. The results presented here might have relevant implications for climate monitoring purposes.

  8. Circulation, eddies, oxygen and nutrient changes in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeschel, R.; Stramma, L.; Weller, R. A.; Fischer, T.

    2014-09-01

    A large, subsurface oxygen deficiency zone is located in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean (ETSP). The large-scale circulation in the eastern equatorial Pacific and off Peru in November/December 2012 shows the influence of the equatorial current system, the eastern boundary currents, and the northern reaches of the subtropical gyre. In November 2012 the Equatorial Undercurrent is centered at 250 m depth, deeper than in earlier observations. In December 2012 the equatorial water is transported southeastward near the shelf in the Peru-Chile Undercurrent with a mean transport of 1.6 Sv. In the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) the flow is overlaid with strong eddy activity on the poleward side of the OMZ. Floats with parking depth at 400 m show fast westward flow in the mid-depth equatorial channel and sluggish flow in the OMZ. Floats with oxygen sensors clearly show the passage of eddies with oxygen anomalies. The long-term float observations in the upper ocean lead to a net community production estimate at about 18° S of up to 16.7 mmol C m-3 yr1 extrapolated to an annual rate and 7.7 mmol C m-3 yr-1 for the time period below the mixed layer. Oxygen differences between repeated ship sections are influenced by the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation, by the phase of El Niño, by seasonal changes, and by eddies and hence have to be interpreted with care. At and south of the equator the decrease in oxygen in the upper ocean since 1976 is related to an increase in nitrate, phosphate, and in part in silicate.

  9. Circulation, eddies, oxygen, and nutrient changes in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeschel, R.; Stramma, L.; Weller, R. A.; Fischer, T.

    2015-06-01

    A large subsurface oxygen deficiency zone is located in the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean (ETSP). The large-scale circulation in the eastern equatorial Pacific and off the coast of Peru in November/December 2012 shows the influence of the equatorial current system, the eastern boundary currents, and the northern reaches of the subtropical gyre. In November 2012 the equatorial undercurrent (EUC) is centered at 250 m depth, deeper than in earlier observations. In December 2012, the equatorial water is transported southeastward near the shelf in the Peru-Chile undercurrent (PCUC) with a mean transport of 1.4 Sv. In the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), the flow is overlaid with strong eddy activity on the poleward side of the OMZ. Floats with parking depth at 400 m show fast westward flow in the mid-depth equatorial channel and sluggish flow in the OMZ. Floats with oxygen sensors clearly show the passage of eddies with oxygen anomalies. The long-term float observations in the upper ocean lead to a net community production estimate at about 18° S of up to 16.7 mmol C m-3 yr-1 extrapolated to an annual rate and 7.7 mmol C m-3 yr-1 for the time period below the mixed layer. Oxygen differences between repeated ship sections are influenced by the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), by the phase of El Niño, by seasonal changes, and by eddies, and hence have to be interpreted with care. At and south of the Equator the decrease in oxygen in the upper ocean since 1976 is related to an increase in nitrate, phosphate, and in part silicate.

  10. Analogous nutrient limitations in unicellular diazotrophs and Prochlorococcus in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Moisander, Pia H; Zhang, Ruifeng; Boyle, Edward A; Hewson, Ian; Montoya, Joseph P; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2012-04-01

    Growth limitation of phytoplankton and unicellular nitrogen (N(2)) fixers (diazotrophs) were investigated in the oligotrophic Western South Pacific Ocean. Based on change in abundances of nifH or 23S rRNA gene copies during nutrient-enrichment experiments, the factors limiting net growth of the unicellular diazotrophs UCYN-A (Group A), Crocosphaera watsonii, γ-Proteobacterium 24774A11, and the non-diazotrophic picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, varied within the region. At the westernmost stations, numbers were enhanced by organic carbon added as simple sugars, a combination of iron and an organic chelator, or iron added with phosphate. At stations nearest the equator, the nutrient-limiting growth was not apparent. Maximum net growth rates for UCYN-A, C. watsonii and γ-24774A11 were 0.19, 0.61 and 0.52 d(-1), respectively, which are the first known empirical growth rates reported for the uncultivated UCYN-A and the γ-24774A11. The addition of N enhanced total phytoplankton biomass up to 5-fold, and the non-N(2)-fixing Synechococcus was among the groups that responded favorably to N addition. Nitrogen was the major nutrient-limiting phytoplankton biomass in the Western South Pacific Ocean, while availability of organic carbon or iron and organic chelator appear to limit abundances of unicellular diazotrophs. Lack of phytoplankton response to nutrient additions in the Pacific warm pool waters suggests diazotroph growth in this area is controlled by different factors than in the higher latitudes, which may partially explain previously observed variability in community composition in the region.

  11. Analogous nutrient limitations in unicellular diazotrophs and Prochlorococcus in the South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Moisander, Pia H; Zhang, Ruifeng; Boyle, Edward A; Hewson, Ian; Montoya, Joseph P; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Growth limitation of phytoplankton and unicellular nitrogen (N2) fixers (diazotrophs) were investigated in the oligotrophic Western South Pacific Ocean. Based on change in abundances of nifH or 23S rRNA gene copies during nutrient-enrichment experiments, the factors limiting net growth of the unicellular diazotrophs UCYN-A (Group A), Crocosphaera watsonii, γ-Proteobacterium 24774A11, and the non-diazotrophic picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, varied within the region. At the westernmost stations, numbers were enhanced by organic carbon added as simple sugars, a combination of iron and an organic chelator, or iron added with phosphate. At stations nearest the equator, the nutrient-limiting growth was not apparent. Maximum net growth rates for UCYN-A, C. watsonii and γ-24774A11 were 0.19, 0.61 and 0.52 d−1, respectively, which are the first known empirical growth rates reported for the uncultivated UCYN-A and the γ-24774A11. The addition of N enhanced total phytoplankton biomass up to 5-fold, and the non-N2-fixing Synechococcus was among the groups that responded favorably to N addition. Nitrogen was the major nutrient-limiting phytoplankton biomass in the Western South Pacific Ocean, while availability of organic carbon or iron and organic chelator appear to limit abundances of unicellular diazotrophs. Lack of phytoplankton response to nutrient additions in the Pacific warm pool waters suggests diazotroph growth in this area is controlled by different factors than in the higher latitudes, which may partially explain previously observed variability in community composition in the region. PMID:22094348

  12. Interdecadal modulation of ENSO-related spring rainfall over South China by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaofei; Mao, Jiangyu

    2016-11-01

    The interdecadal modulation of the relationship between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the South China spring rainfall (SCSR) by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is investigated using long-term observational datasets. When ENSO and PDO are in-phase [i.e., El Niño events during warm PDO (EN_WPDO) and La Niña events during cold PDO (LN_CPDO)], the positive correlations between ENSO and SCSR are enhanced significantly, with above-normal (below-normal) SCSR generally following EN_WPDO (LN_CPDO) events. In contrast, the ENSO-SCSR relationship becomes ambiguous when ENSO and PDO are out-of-phase [i.e., El Niño events during cold PDO (EN_CPDO) and La Niña events during warm PDO (LN_WPDO)]. The PDO modulates the ENSO-SCSR relationship through the impact of variations in the lower-tropospheric subtropical anticyclone over the western North Pacific (WNP) and upper-tropospheric westerly jets over East Asia and the midlatitude North Pacific. An EN_WPDO (LN_CPDO) event induces an enhanced subtropical anticyclone (cyclone) over the WNP and intensified (weakened) subtropical westerly jet around the southern Tibetan Plateau due to modification by the PDO-forced anomalous circulation. Thus, South China falls just under the influence of the anomalous lower-tropospheric southwesterlies (northeasterlies) and upper-tropospheric divergent (convergent) environment, leading to above-normal (below-normal) SCSR. In contrast, the SCSR anomalies exhibit no wet or dry preference following EN_CPDO (LN_CPDO) events, because ENSO-induced and PDO-forced circulation anomalies tend to cancel each other out. These modulating effects by the PDO on the ENSO-SCSR relationship and related physical processes are also examined with coupled model simulations.

  13. A cluster of Zika virus infection in a Chinese tour group returning from Fiji and Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jimin; Fu, Tao; Mao, Haiyan; Wang, Zhen; Pan, Junhang; Rutherford, Shannon; Ren, Jiangping; Dong, Xuanjun; Chen, Yin; Zhu, Zhihong; Qi, Xiaohua; Gong, Zhenyu; Liu, Qiyong; Yu, Hongjie; Zhu, Liebo; Chen, Wenxian; Chen, Zhiping; Zhang, Yanjun; Chen, Enfu

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is currently causing extensive outbreaks in a number of countries in South and Central America and the Caribbean and has been associated with foetal abnormalities. We report an outbreak of Zika virus infection in a Chinese tour-group returning from a nine day holiday in Fiji and Samoa. The index case was a 38-year old male who developed symptoms while travelling back from Fiji to Hong Kong on the 14th February, 2016. A field investigation was initiated to define the epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of Zika virus infection in this tour group and revealed two further symptomatic infections and one asymptomatic infection among the 33 travellers; an overall infection attack rate of 12% in these travellers. Active surveillance led to detection of Zika virus RNA in the serum of one case four days prior to onset of symptoms and detection of Zika virus in saliva from one asymptomatic infection.

  14. More extreme swings of the South Pacific convergence zone due to greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenju; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Borlace, Simon; Collins, Matthew; Cowan, Tim; McPhaden, Michael J; Timmermann, Axel; Power, Scott; Brown, Josephine; Menkes, Christophe; Ngari, Arona; Vincent, Emmanuel M; Widlansky, Matthew J

    2012-08-16

    The South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) is the Southern Hemisphere's most expansive and persistent rain band, extending from the equatorial western Pacific Ocean southeastward towards French Polynesia. Owing to its strong rainfall gradient, a small displacement in the position of the SPCZ causes drastic changes to hydroclimatic conditions and the frequency of extreme weather events--such as droughts, floods and tropical cyclones--experienced by vulnerable island countries in the region. The SPCZ position varies from its climatological mean location with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), moving a few degrees northward during moderate El Niño events and southward during La Niña events. During strong El Niño events, however, the SPCZ undergoes an extreme swing--by up to ten degrees of latitude toward the Equator--and collapses to a more zonally oriented structure with commensurately severe weather impacts. Understanding changes in the characteristics of the SPCZ in a changing climate is therefore of broad scientific and socioeconomic interest. Here we present climate modelling evidence for a near doubling in the occurrences of zonal SPCZ events between the periods 1891-1990 and 1991-2090 in response to greenhouse warming, even in the absence of a consensus on how ENSO will change. We estimate the increase in zonal SPCZ events from an aggregation of the climate models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phases 3 and 5 (CMIP3 and CMIP5) multi-model database that are able to simulate such events. The change is caused by a projected enhanced equatorial warming in the Pacific and may lead to more frequent occurrences of extreme events across the Pacific island nations most affected by zonal SPCZ events.

  15. Process evaluation of a walking programme delivered through the workplace in the South Pacific island Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Siefken, Katja; Schofield, Grant; Schulenkorf, Nico

    2015-06-01

    The South Pacific region is experiencing significant rates of chronic diseases. Well-evaluated health promotion programmes are needed as a central piece of a strategic solution. Just as important as the evaluation itself is how that evaluation outcome can be communicated for future programme use by local programme planners. The objective of this study is to evaluate a physical activity (PA) programme that was designed for Pacific women in urban Vanuatu, and subsequently to develop new techniques to display data that support the understanding and communication of programme success and challenges. Data collection methods included quantitative Likert scale questions and qualitative open-ended questions. A new analysis technique visualises open-ended process evaluation data. We present themes using word sizes proportional to the frequency of the themes identified through thematic analysis. The Likert scale technique revealed little meaningful information; almost all participants rated most elements of the programme highly. This may be related to Pacific people being frequently inclined to assent with external ideas. Open-ended questions provided more significant insights. For example, we found a stronger change in eating habits (68.9%) than in exercise behaviour (28.2%). We present an evaluation of the first pedometer-based PA intervention in the Pacific and respond to the paucity of process evaluations that have been carried out in the context of low- and middle-income countries. Moreover, the new thematic data visualisation (TDV) approach may aid in understanding complex and cluttered data in a constructive and coordinated way; we present a new approach in health promotion research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Connection between the Eastern Subtropical Mode Water in the South Pacific Ocean and the ENSO cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Water subducted in the subtropics is intimately linked to the circulation in the Tropics through the interior mass communication and/or the western boundary, and could potentially affect climate variability on interannual and decadal time scales (Gu and Philander, 1997). The interior mass communication rate between the subtropical and equatorial ocean can be quantified in different ways. For example, Huang and Wang (2001) proposed a method of using the Sverdrup function to quantify the communication rate. Their method is used here to compute the meridional transport function below the Ekman layer in order to investigate the direct communication from the eastern STMW to the equatorial Pacific, and study the connection between the eastern STMW and the ENSO cycle. The western subtropical mode water, however, is less likely to directly participate in the subtropical-tropical exchange because they are mainly formed and confined to the recirculation region of the western subtropical gyre (Ladd and Thompson, 2000). The variability of the Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) formation in the South Pacific Ocean from 1980 to 2004 is investigated in this study, using a high-resolution numerical model and a 3D Lagrangian trajectory model. Variations of subduction rate in the mode waters are closely linked to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle. The eastern STMW could potentially affect the ENSO cycle through the interior communication window that was identified from the virtual streamfunction. Its location and width closely related to the ENSO cycle. The deep westward penetration of the western edge of the window at the equatorial Pacific is evident during the 1998 La Niña event.; Zonal location of the interior communication window for eastern STMW, when the subducted water parcels reach the equatorial Pacific at 10oS. Solid gray (black) line represents the western (eastern) edge of the window.

  17. The clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infections in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few data describing the microbiology and genetic typing of Staphylococcus aureus that cause infections in developing countries. Methods In this study we observed S. aureus infections in Pacific Island nation of Fiji in both the community and hospital setting with an emphasis on clonal complex (CC) genotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility. Results S. aureus was commonly found in impetigo lesions of school children and was recovered from 57% of impetigo lesions frequently in conjunction with group A streptococcal infection. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) comprised 7% (20/299) of isolates and were all non-multi-resistant and all genotyped as CC1. In contrast, there was a diverse selection of 17 CCs among the 105 genotyped methicillin-susceptible S.aureus (MSSA) strains. Isolates of the rare, phylogenetically divergent and non-pigmented CC75 lineage (also called S.argenteus) were found in Fiji. From hospitalized patients the available 36 MRSA isolates from a 9-month period were represented by five CCs. The most common CCs were CC1 and CC239. CC1 is likely to be a community-acquired strain, reflecting what was found in the school children, whereas the CC239 is the very successful multi-drug resistant MRSA nosocomial lineage. Of 17 MSSA isolates, 59% carried genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin. The S. aureus bacteraemia incidence rate of 50 per 100,000 population is among the highest reported in the literature and likely reflects the high overall burden of staphylococcal infections in this population. Conclusions S. aureus is an important cause of disease in Fiji and there is considerable genotypic diversity in community skin infections in Fijian schoolchildren. Community acquired- (CA)- MRSA is present at a relatively low prevalence (6.7%) and was solely to CC1 (CA-MRSA). The globally successful CC239 is also a significant pathogen in Fiji. PMID:24655406

  18. Patterns of diversification and ancestral range reconstruction in the southeast Asian-Pacific angiosperm lineage Cyrtandra (Gesneriaceae).

    PubMed

    Clark, John R; Wagner, Warren L; Roalson, Eric H

    2009-12-01

    The genus Cyrtandra is the largest in the Gesneriaceae family and is one of the most widely dispersed plant genera in southeast Asia and the Pacific. Species of Cyrtandra are morphologically diverse but characters are often homoplastic causing considerable difficulty in defining monophyletic classification units. In this study, we used molecular phylogenetic analysis of 88 taxa representing approximately 70 species to construct a well-resolved evolutionary hypothesis for Cyrtandra. Diversification rates analysis and ancestral range analysis were also conducted to infer timing of major lineage divergences and geographic origin of these lineages, principally among Pacific species. Using these data, we compared existing classification schemes to better understand the applicability of current taxonomy. Divergence time estimates support a diversification of the Pacific clade at approximately 20 MYBP. Although the origin of the Pacific lineage remains unresolved, ancestral range reconstruction analysis supports Fiji as the most likely "first-step" into the Pacific with subsequent dispersals to Hawai'i, and other archipelagos. A greater Fiji-Samoa region, corresponding with Takhtajan's Fijian Region, is implicated as a major Pacific region interface and possibly a center of origin for expansion of Cyrtandra throughout the Pacific. Among South Pacific taxa sampled, several supported clades in our evolutionary hypothesis are characterized by distinct morphological traits possibly warranting sectional rankings. Relationships among Hawaiian taxa are less resolved and the distributions of species within this clade do not consistently correspond to existing sectional rankings. More detailed, population-level research is needed to clarify these relationships. We argue that future sectional classifications should correspond with monophyletic lineages and that species-level relationships should be more closely studied within these lineages.

  19. Circulation, eddies and oxygen changes in the Oxygen Minimum Zone of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeschel, Rena; Stramma, Lothar; Weller, Robert; Fischer, Tim

    2016-04-01

    A large, subsurface oxygen deficiency zone is located in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) revealing a decrease in oxygen over the past decades. Oxygen time series from historical measurements augmented with float data reveal a significant negative trend between 50 to 300 m depth since 1976, averaged in the region of the westward flowing South Equatorial Current and the South Equatorial Intermediate Current between 2-5°S, 84-87°W. This long-term trend, which is related to increasing nutrients might be modified by climate signals such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. To understand the ongoing changes in the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) it is necessary to understand the circulation in the ETSP and its variability, which is still not well described. In the frame of the research initiative 'Climate-Biogeochemistry Interactions in the Tropical Ocean' hydrographic data from an open ocean and a near shelf cruise leg in November and December 2012 and from floats are used to investigate the large-scale circulation in subsurface layers of the ETSP showing the influence of the equatorial current system, the eastern boundary, and the northern reaches of the subtropical gyre. On the poleward side of the OMZ the mean flow is overlaid with strong eddy activity. Coherent/isolated mesoscale eddies can exist over periods of several months propagating westwards after formation in the coastal regions. Float data as well as data from the Stratus mooring (~86°W, 20°S) are used to describe the passage of eddies by anomalies in oxygen and hydrographic data.

  20. Education and the New Technologies. Report of the WCOTP Asian and South Pacific Regional Conference (10th, Seoul, South Korea, August 7-13, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Confederation of Organizations of the Teaching Profession, Morges (Switzerland).

    This report on the 1985 Asian and South Pacific Regional Conference of the World Confederation of Organizations of the Teaching Profession (WCOTP) presents the full text of three addresses presented during the opening ceremony, as well as four major presentations by invited speakers and three addresses from the closing ceremony. A day of…

  1. Decadal variations of the South Tropical Countercurrent and Eddy Kinetic Energy in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieck, Jan Klaus; Böning, Claus W.; Greatbatch, Richard J.

    2017-04-01

    A series of eddying global ocean-sea ice models is used to assess the low-frequency variability of Eddy Kinetic Energy in the world ocean. The models with horizontal resolutions ranging from 1/4°-1/12° are driven by the atmospheric CORE.v2 forcing for a period of 1958-2009. A region located between 25°-33°S and 153°-175°W stands out globally, having a high variance of EKE, relative to the mean EKE, at decadal timescales. This region is characterized by the shallow, eastward South Tropical Countercurrent (STCC). The STCC, restricted to the upper 200m, forms a vertically sheared current system with the westward South Equatorial Current (SEC) below. While there are only minor changes to the SEC on decadal timescales, velocities of the STCC vary with a magnitude of >50% of the mean. The induced variations in vertical shear (du/dz) are at a maximum during the 1970s, followed by a minimum from the mid 1980s to mid 1990s and a subsequent increase. Decadal EKE changes are driven by these variations in du/dz and an associated strengthening of the reversal of the meridional gradient of potential vorticity with depth. Increased du/dz between the STCC and SEC is related, through the thermal wind balance, to sub-surface temperature anomalies, with a maximum >1°C at 300m depth. Sensitivity studies reveal this decadal variations to be driven by changes in the wind stress τ. A combination of local and remote anomalies of curl(τ) drives sub-surface temperature changes that either emerge locally or propagate in to the STCC region from the east and south. These temperature anomalies steepen (flatten) the isopycnals and increase (decrease) du/dz.

  2. Distribution and bacterial availability of dissolved neutral sugars in the South East Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempéré, R.; Tedetti, M.; Panagiotopoulos, C.; Charrière, B.; van Wambeke, F.

    2008-02-01

    The distribution and bacterial availability of dissolved neutral sugars were studied in the South East Pacific from October to December 2004 during the BIOSOPE cruise. Four contrasted sites were investigated: Marquesas Islands (MAR), the hyper-oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre (GYR), the eastern part of the Gyre (EGY), and the coastal waters associated to upwelling of Chile (UPW). Total (free and combined) dissolved neutral sugar (TDNS) concentrations were higher in UPW (149-329 nM) and MAR (111-540 nM), than in GYR (79-390 nM) and EGY (58-492 nM). Nevertheless, their contribution to dissolved organic carbon (TDNS-C/DOC%) was generally low for all sites varying from 0.5% to 4% indicating that our South East Pacific surface waters were relatively poor in neutral sugars. Free dissolved neutral sugar (FDNS; e.g. sugars analyzed without hydrolysis) concentrations were very low within the detection of our method (5-10 nM) accounting <5% of the TDNS. In general, the predominant sugars within the TDNS pool were glucose, xylose, arabinose, and galactose while in the FDNS pool only glucose was present. TDNS stock to bacterial production ratios (integrated values from the surface to the deep chlorophyll maximum) were relatively high in GYR with respect to the low primary production, whereas the opposite trend was observed in the highly productive area of UPW. Intermediate situations were observed for MAR and EGY. Bioavailability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exposed to natural solar radiation was also experimentally studied and compared to dark treatments. Our results showed no or little detectable effect of sunlight on DOM bacterial assimilation in UPW and in GYR while a significant stimulation was found in MAR and EGY. The overall results clearly suggest the semi-labile character of DOM in GYR compared to the labile of UPW and are consistent with dissolved organic carbon accumulation and the elevated C/N ratios reported by Raimbault et al. (2007).

  3. Distribution and bacterial availability of dissolved neutral sugars in the South East Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempéré, R.; Tedetti, M.; Panagiotopoulos, C.; Charrière, B.; van Wambeke, F.

    2008-08-01

    The distribution and bacterial availability of dissolved neutral sugars were studied in the South East Pacific from October to December 2004 during the BIOSOPE cruise. Four contrasting stations were investigated: Marquesas Islands (MAR), the hyper-oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre (GYR), the eastern part of the Gyre (EGY), and the coastal waters associated to the upwelling area off Chile (UPW). Total (free and combined) dissolved neutral sugar (TDNS) concentrations were in the same order of magnitude at MAR (387±293 nM), GYR (206±107 nM), EGY (269±175 nM), and UPW (231±73 nM), with the highest and lowest concentrations found at MAR (30 m, 890 nM) and EGY (250 m, 58 nM), respectively. Their contribution to dissolved organic carbon (TDNS-C×DOC-1%) was generally low for all sites varying from 0.4% to 6.7% indicating that South East Pacific surface waters were relatively poor in neutral sugars. Free dissolved neutral sugar (FDNS; e.g. sugars analyzed without hydrolysis) concentrations were very low within the detection limit of our method (5 10 nM) accounting for <5% of the TDNS. In general, the predominant sugars within the TDNS pool were glucose, xylose, arabinose, and galactose, while in the FDNS pool only glucose was present. TDNS stock to bacterial production ratios (integrated values from the surface to the deep chlorophyll maximum) were high at GYR with respect to the low primary production, whereas the opposite trend was observed in the highly productive area of UPW. Intermediate situations were observed for MAR and EGY. Bioavailability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exposed to natural solar radiation was also experimentally studied and compared to dark treatments. Our results showed no or little detectable effect of sunlight on DOM bacterial assimilation in surface waters of UPW and GYR, while a significant stimulation was found in MAR and EGY. The overall results clearly suggest that DOM is less labile at GYR compared to UPW, which is consistent with

  4. Language Education Needs for Multilingualism in Fiji Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shameem, Nikhat

    2007-01-01

    This paper looks at current practice in teaching multilingual Indo-Fijian children in eight Fiji primary schools. Indo-Fijians speak Fiji Hindi (FH) as their mother tongue, learn Shudh Hindi (SH) or Urdu, and English for formal and literacy purposes and use English and Fijian for interethnic communication. The current education policy states that…

  5. Language Education Needs for Multilingualism in Fiji Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shameem, Nikhat

    2007-01-01

    This paper looks at current practice in teaching multilingual Indo-Fijian children in eight Fiji primary schools. Indo-Fijians speak Fiji Hindi (FH) as their mother tongue, learn Shudh Hindi (SH) or Urdu, and English for formal and literacy purposes and use English and Fijian for interethnic communication. The current education policy states that…

  6. Solomon Islands: Summary Report. Educational Experience Survey: Education, Language and Literacy Experience. Asia-South Pacific Education Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Sylvia

    2007-01-01

    The Education Watch initiative is being implemented in the Solomon Islands by the Coalition on Education Solomon Islands (COESI) in partnership with Asian South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education (ASPBAE). COESI aims to generate a reliable body of information that will: (1) Accurately explain how much the national government has done and can do to…

  7. Neothalassius, a new genus of Parathalassiinae (Diptera: Dolichopodidae s.lat.) from the Pacific coast of South America.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Scott E; Cumming, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-15

    A new genus, Neothalassius gen. nov., and two new species, Neothalassius triton sp. nov. and Neothalassius villosus sp. nov., are described from rocky shorelines along the Pacific seacoast of South America. The phylogenetic placement of Neothalassius within the subfamily Parathalassiinae is discussed.

  8. Deglacial shift in subsurface watermass source in the subtropcal South Pacific North of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiraldi, B.; Sikes, E. L.; Elmore, A. C.; Cook, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial-interglacial changes in global temperature are linked with shifts in atmospheric winds and oceanic fronts. Climatic shifts associated with last glacial conditions include a northward shift of the southern hemisphere westerlies, a southward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ), and a northward shift of the subtropical front (STF) from their modern day locations. These shifts would compress the transition zone in the subtropical south Pacific affecting the source of surface waters. Here we present a δ18Oseawater and δ13C reconstruction from surface dwelling Globogerina bulloides from Bay of Plenty core 87JPC from North of New Zealand to illustrate changes in subtropical South Pacific surface water mass structure over the past 30 ka. Age control is based on tephra stratigraphy benthic foraminiferal δ18O and 14C dates. Sea level reconstruction and surface temperature (SST) reconstructions based on Mg/Ca were used to remove the temperature effect and the ice volume effect was removed from δ18O yielding an estimate of δ18Oseawater of surface-mixed layer water in the Bay of Plenty for the deglaciation. Early in the last glacial period (27-24 ka), reconstructed δ18Oseawater averaged -0.2‰ increasing at 24-21 ka to reach 0.5‰ for 1.2 kyr at the height of the LGM (21-19ka). At 19ka there is a rapid depletion of δ18Oseawater to -0.2‰ after which values average 0.2‰ into the Holocene. More depleted δ18Oseawater values during the LGM suggest surface waters were sourced at high latitudes and were fresher relative to modern. The enrichment through the height of the LGM suggests gradual shift in source waters to more saline and/or lower latitudes. Glacial δ13C holds steady at ~-0.5‰ with a late glacial enrichment maximum of -0.3‰ at 21-20 ka. A subsequent depletion of 0.6‰ at 19.8 ka marks a step change after which δ13C is level through the deglaciation at an average value of -0.8‰ and through the Holocene at -1.0‰. The δ13C

  9. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Resing, Joseph A; Sedwick, Peter N; German, Christopher R; Jenkins, William J; Moffett, James W; Sohst, Bettina M; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-09

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  10. Characterization of the variability of the South Pacific Convergence Zone using satellite and reanalysis wind products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Autumn; Lee, Tong; Jo, Young-Heon; Yan, Xiao-hai

    2016-04-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the largest rain band worldwide during austral summer, is important to atmospheric circulation (including cyclone genesis) and ocean circulation. Previous studies of the SPCZ have focused on parameters such as outgoing longwave radiation or precipitation. However, wind convergence is fundamental causing the variations of these parameters. In this study, the SPCZ variability is examined using ocean surface wind products derived from NASA's QuickSCAT (1999-2009) and ESA's ASCAT (2007 onward) satellite scatterometers and ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis (1981 onward). From these products, indices were developed to characterize the SPCZ strength, area, and centroid location. Excellent agreement is found in terms of the temporal variations of the indices derived from the satellites and reanalysis wind products, despite some small differences in the time-mean SPCZ strength. The SPCZ strength, area, and centroid latitude have a dominant seasonal cycle. In contrast, the SPCZ centroid longitude is dominated by intraseasonal variability due to the influence by the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The SPCZ indices are all correlated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. Interannual and intraseasonal variations of SPCZ strength during strong El Niño are approximately twice as large as the respective seasonal variations. SPCZ strength depends more on the intensity of El Niño rather than the central- vs. eastern-Pacific type. The longer ERA-Interim product is also used to examine decadal variations of the SPCZ indices. The change from positive to negative Pacific Decadal Oscillation phase around 1999 resulted in a westward shift of the SPCZ centroid longitude, much smaller interannual swing in centroid latitude, and a decrease in SPCZ area. This study improves the understanding of the variations of the SPCZ on multiple time scales and reveals the variations of SPCZ strength not reported previously. The diagnostics analyses can be

  11. Deep water exchanges between the South China Sea and the Pacific since the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Sui; Jian, Zhimin

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean circulation is widely considered as one of the important factors for increasing CO2 concentration and decreasing radiocarbon activity (Δ14C) of the atmosphere during the last deglaciation. The AMS 14C ages of benthic and planktonic foraminifers from 18 samples of Core MD05-2904 (water depth of 2066 m) in the northern South China Sea (SCS) and 15 samples of Core MD05-2896 (water depth of 1657 m) in the southern SCS were analyzed in this study for reconstructing the intrabasin deep oceanic processes and hence exploring the deep water exchanges between the SCS and the Pacific since the last glacial period. The results show that during the Holocene the average apparent ventilation age of deep water was younger in the southern SCS (~1350 years) than in the northern SCS (~1850 years) due to relatively strong vertical mixing and advection, consistent with modern observations. However, during the last glacial period and deglaciation the deep water was older in the southern SCS (~2050 years and ~1800 to 1200 years, respectively) than in the northern SCS (~1600 years and ~670 years, respectively), indicating reduced deep mixing and advection. Moreover, the northern SCS deep water was significantly younger during the last deglaciation than during the Holocene and the last glacial period, implying the existence of northern sourced newly formed and relatively young North Pacific deep water. Our records do not support the intrusion of anomalously 14C-depleted deep water to the middepth of the low-latitude western Pacific and the SCS during the "Mystery Interval" (17.5-14.5 kyr B.P.).

  12. Family planning education: working with target groups in the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Winn, M

    1992-07-01

    Family planning education programs are commonly designed by expert educators who are far removed, in location and experience, from their target audiences. Educators operate on the premise that their job is simply to develop strategies to successfully transfer their knowledge to the target audience. Judgements are often colored by a determination not to offend local sensibilities, which can lead educators to uncritically adopt the local wisdom about what is and is not culturally acceptable. A proper exploration of sexuality is absent from most family planning programs. Usual features of expert-designed family planning programs are an admonishment about people having too many children (the stick), a clear rationale for having fewer children (the carrot), the provision of detailed contraceptive information (the means), and the encouragement of individuals to exercise some personal control over their fertility (the ends). This standard model, although widely used throughout the Pacific, was not adopted by the Family Planning Federation of Australia in its regional family planning education work. The Federation, in conjunction with the independent Family Planning Association in the South Pacific, has taken a more participatory, learner-focused approach that values the contribution of the audience in all phases of the program. There is a huge need to target men, particularly young, unmarried men. The Federation found that not only did Pacific men want to view and discuss the women's documentary video Taboo Talk about family planning issues, they wanted their own men's version. The Federation soon discovered that attempts to meet the requests can easily flounder on the issue of language. The Federation has worked with the target audience to develop a lexicon of acceptable words for reproductive health education.

  13. Student Expectations of Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of the Fiji National University (FNU)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Shana Nigar

    2012-01-01

    Education is a human right and Fiji's tertiary education board recently declared that all tertiary institutions in Fiji must abide by the framework in order to meet student-customers' needs. The Fiji National University's (FNU's) destiny to be Fiji's leading higher education provider could be a reality if students and staff's expectations are…

  14. Student Expectations of Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of the Fiji National University (FNU)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Shana Nigar

    2012-01-01

    Education is a human right and Fiji's tertiary education board recently declared that all tertiary institutions in Fiji must abide by the framework in order to meet student-customers' needs. The Fiji National University's (FNU's) destiny to be Fiji's leading higher education provider could be a reality if students and staff's expectations are…

  15. The problem of the Culex pipiens complex in the South Pacific (including Australia)*

    PubMed Central

    Dobrotworsky, N. V.

    1967-01-01

    There are three representatives of the Culex pipiens complex in the South Pacific. C. p. fatigans is the most common and most widely distributed subspecies; it is closely associated with man. The males can be readily distinguished by the structure of the phallosome of the terminalia. C. p. molestus is spread over the southern part of Australia and in Tasmania; it also is a domestic mosquito. Throughout its extensive range in Australia, it exhibits all the biological traits that distinguish it from C. p. pipiens. C. p. australicus is widely distributed over the mainland of Australia and in Tasmania. It is superficially similar to C. p. fatigans but can be distinguished from C. p. pallens by the structure of the phallosome. It is primarily a rural non-man-biting mosquito. C. p. australicus is probably a relatively ancient member of the Australian fauna that may have evolved in the southern temperate zone. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 2 PMID:5300062

  16. A Record-High Ocean Bottom Pressure in the South Pacific Observed by GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boening, Carmen; Lee, Tong; Zlotnicki, Victor

    2011-01-01

    In late 2009 to early 2010, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite pair observed a record increase in ocean bottom pressure (OBP) over a large mid-latitude region of the South East Pacific. Its magnitude is substantially larger than other oceanic events in the Southern Hemisphere found in the entire GRACE data records (2003-2010) on multi-month time scales. The OBP data help to understand the nature of a similar signal in sea surface height (SSH) anomaly observed by altimetry: the SSH increase is mainly due to mass convergence. Analysis of the barotropic vorticity equation using scatterometer data, atmospheric reanalysis product, and GRACE and altimeter an atmospheric reanalysis product observations suggests that the observed OBP/SSH signal was primarily caused by wind stress curl associated with a strong and persistent anticyclone in late 2009 in combination with effects of planetary vorticity gradient, bottom topography, and friction

  17. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  18. Litter and seabirds found across a longitudinal gradient in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Urbina, Diego; Thiel, Martin; Luna-Jorquera, Guillermo

    2015-07-15

    Abundances and composition of marine litter and seabirds were estimated in the central South Pacific (SP) Ocean between the Chilean continental coast and the Easter Island Ecoregion. Litter was dominated by plastics throughout the study area, but the proportion of plastics was higher at sea and on the oceanic islands than in coastal waters and on continental beaches. Litter densities were higher close to the center of the SP subtropical gyre compared to the continental coast. The seabird assemblage was diverse (28 species), and several endemic species were recorded. Seabird abundances were higher in the coastal waters and around Juan Fernández Islands off the continental coast than in the Oceanic and Polynesian sectors. Endangered species breeding on Salas & Gómez Island were observed in the Polynesian sector, which suggests a high potential for negative interactions between seabirds and floating litter, both occurring in high densities in this sector. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  20. A Record-High Ocean Bottom Pressure in the South Pacific Observed by GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boening, Carmen; Lee, Tong; Zlotnicki, Victor

    2011-01-01

    In late 2009 to early 2010, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite pair observed a record increase in ocean bottom pressure (OBP) over a large mid-latitude region of the South East Pacific. Its magnitude is substantially larger than other oceanic events in the Southern Hemisphere found in the entire GRACE data records (2003-2010) on multi-month time scales. The OBP data help to understand the nature of a similar signal in sea surface height (SSH) anomaly observed by altimetry: the SSH increase is mainly due to mass convergence. Analysis of the barotropic vorticity equation using scatterometer data, atmospheric reanalysis product, and GRACE and altimeter an atmospheric reanalysis product observations suggests that the observed OBP/SSH signal was primarily caused by wind stress curl associated with a strong and persistent anticyclone in late 2009 in combination with effects of planetary vorticity gradient, bottom topography, and friction

  1. A diagnosis of two cyclones in the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, D. G.; Kann, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of three cyclones which originated in the South Pacific Convergence Zone, two of which propagated into middle latitudes, are traced. The analysis is based on IR imagery from GOES-W, island meteorological station data, and estimates of heat and moisture budget residuals. A European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting Level III-b analysis was used to model the cyclones. The northward-propagating storms exhibited strong vertical shear of the horizontal wind, implicating baroclinic effects in the development of the storms. The processes which enhanced storm intensification are discussed. Attention is given to the spatial and temporal behavior of dynamic atmospheric components which were significant to baroclinicity and latent heat release, which the analysis demonstrates were coupled processes.

  2. A structural outline of the Yenkahe volcanic resurgent dome (Tanna Island, Vanuatu Arc, South Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, O.; Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Bachèlery, P.; Garaébiti, E.

    2013-12-01

    A structural study has been conducted on the resurgent Yenkahe dome (5 km long by 3 km wide) located in the heart of the Siwi caldera of Tanna Island (Vanuatu arc, south Pacific). This spectacular resurgent dome hosts a small caldera and a very active strombolian cinder cone - the Yasur volcano - in the west and exhibits an intriguing graben in its central part. Detailed mapping and structural observations make it possible to unravel the volcano-tectonic history of the dome. It is shown that, following the early formation of a resurgent dome in the west, a complex collapse (caldera plus graben) occurred and this was associated with the recent uplift of the eastern part of the present dome. Eastward migration of the underlying magma related to regional tectonics is proposed to explain this evolution.

  3. Is seasonal net community production in the South Pacific Subtropical Gyre anomalously low?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Michael L.; Jönsson, Bror

    2016-09-01

    The region of the South Pacific Subtropical Gyre (SPSG) at 20°-30°S, 140°-110°W is the oceanic area with the lowest chlorophyll concentration and the deepest nutricline, O2 saturation horizon, and euphotic zone. We analyze the limited available data from this region to determine if rates of net community production (NCP) are systematically lower than elsewhere. We present limited mixed layer O2/Ar data constraining mixed layer NCP, examine hydrographic data from the CLIVAR repeat hydrography P18 line to assess seasonal dissolved inorganic carbon drawdown, and review results from the literature. While it is not possible to formalize uncertainties, the evidence suggests that euphotic zone NCP is around the lower end (~1 mol m-2 yr-1) of rates observed elsewhere. However, NCP is shifted to unusually deep depths, a change enabled by the very low extinction coefficients of these waters.

  4. A diagnosis of two cyclones in the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, D. G.; Kann, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of three cyclones which originated in the South Pacific Convergence Zone, two of which propagated into middle latitudes, are traced. The analysis is based on IR imagery from GOES-W, island meteorological station data, and estimates of heat and moisture budget residuals. A European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting Level III-b analysis was used to model the cyclones. The northward-propagating storms exhibited strong vertical shear of the horizontal wind, implicating baroclinic effects in the development of the storms. The processes which enhanced storm intensification are discussed. Attention is given to the spatial and temporal behavior of dynamic atmospheric components which were significant to baroclinicity and latent heat release, which the analysis demonstrates were coupled processes.

  5. Doctor William Gunn (1804-1890): From the South Pacific Islands to Chatham Royal Dockyard.

    PubMed

    Biddle, Richard

    2016-11-24

    Doctor William Gunn had a long and varied career in the Royal Navy. After spending time on anti-slavery patrols along the west coast of Africa, he was posted to the south Pacific. At Pitcairn Island, he treated the inhabitants during an influenza epidemic, proving himself to be a determined and dedicated practitioner. Subsequently, he was appointed head of the medical department at Chatham Royal Dockyard (1859-1865), an appointment that coincided with the final stages of the Royal Navy's transition from sail and wood to steam and iron. The impact of these changes on the health of dockworkers was quickly felt at Chatham, and Gunn found himself in charge during the building of the first iron warship in a royal dockyard. His story thus offers a window through which to observe a practitioner confronting the health issues and medical uncertainties thrown up by technological change in the Victorian era.

  6. Interdecadal variation in the extent of South Pacific tropical waters during the Younger Dryas event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrège, Thierry; Gagan, Michael K.; Beck, J. Warren; Burr, George S.; Cabioch, Guy; Le Cornec, Florence

    2004-04-01

    During the Younger Dryas event, about 12,000 years ago, the Northern Hemisphere cooled by between 2 and 10°C (refs 1, 2) whereas East Antarctica experienced warming. But the spatial signature of the event in the southern mid-latitudes and tropics is less well known, as records are sparse and inconclusive. Here we present high-resolution analyses of skeletal Sr/Ca and 18O/16O ratios for a giant fossil Diploastrea heliopora coral that was preserved in growth position on the raised reef terraces of Espiritu Santo Island, Vanuatu, in the southwestern tropical Pacific Ocean. Our data indicate that sea surface temperatures in Vanuatu were on average 4.5 +/- 1.3°C cooler during the Younger Dryas event than today, with a significant interdecadal modulation. The amplified annual cycle of sea surface temperatures, relative to today, indicates that cooling was caused by the compression of tropical waters towards the Equator. The positive correlation in our record between the oxygen isotope ratios of sea water and sea surface temperatures suggests that the South Pacific convergence zone, which brings 18O-depleted precipitation to the area today, was not active during the Younger Dryas period.

  7. Historical Sea Level in the South Pacific from Rescued Archives, Geodetic Measurements, and Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucan, J.; Merrifield, M. A.; Pouvreau, N.

    2017-08-01

    Automatic sea-level measurements in Nouméa, South Pacific, started in 1957 for the International Geophysical year. Data from this location exist in paper record for the 1957-1967 period, and in two distinct electronic records for the 1967-2005 and 2005-2015 period. In this study, we digitize the early record, and established a link between the two electronic records to create a unique, nearly 60 year-long instrumental sea-level record. This work creates one of the longest instrumental sea-level records in the Pacific Islands. These data are critical for the study of regional and interannual variations of sea level. This new data set is then used to infer rates of vertical movements by comparing it to (1) the entire satellite altimetric record (1993-2013) and (2) a global sea-level reconstruction (1957-2010). These inferred rates show an uplift of 1.3-1.4 mm/year, opposite to the currently accepted values of subsidence found in the geological and geodetic literature, and underlie the importance of systematic geodetic measurements at, over very near tide gauges.

  8. A new deep-water goatfish of the genus Upeneus (Mullidae) from Vanuatu, South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Uiblein, Franz; Causse, Romain

    2013-01-01

    A new goatfish, Upeneus vanuatu (Mullidae), is described based on five specimens collected off two islands of Vanuatu (South Pacific), at depths of 191-321 m, and compared with five closely related species: Upeneus davidaroni (Red Sea), U. mascareinsis (Western Indian Ocean), U. stenopsis (northern Australia, Philippines, 127-275 m), and the more shallow-occurring Indo-West Pacific species U. subvittatus (26-120 m) and U. vittatus (

  9. Cladogenesis as the result of long-distance rafting events in South Pacific topshells (Gastropoda, Trochidae).

    PubMed

    Donald, Kirsten M; Kennedy, Martyn; Spencer, Hamish G

    2005-08-01

    We used DNA sequences of lecithotrophic monodontine topshells, belonging to the genera Diloma, Melagraphia, and Austrocochlea, to ascertain how this group became established over a large area of the South Pacific Ocean. The phylogeny of the topshells was estimated using portions of two mitochondrial genes (16S and cytochrome oxidase 1) and one nuclear gene (actin). A range of divergence rates was used to estimate the approximate timing of cladogenetic events within their phylogenetic tree. These estimates allow us to unambiguously reject vicariant explanations for several major divergence events and to infer several dispersal events across wide stretches of ocean. The first were two initial dispersal events from Australia (1) to an area between Samoa and Japan and (2) to New Zealand. Subsequently, at least one, and possibly two, recent eastward dispersals took place from New Zealand to Chile and the Juan Fernandez Islands, and one further dispersal occurred from somewhere in the tropical Pacific to Samoa. Moreover, owing to the short-lived nature of the topshell larvae, transoceanic larval dispersal is unlikely. The apparent paradox of a short larval phase and broad geographic range suggests that dispersal most probably occurred by rafting of adults on a suitable platform such as macroalgae; indeed, naturally buoyant bull kelp is the natural habitat of the most geographically widespread species in this group. Our molecular phylogenies imply that, despite of being an unlikely event, adult rafting in ocean currents has occurred on several occasions throughout the evolutionary history of topshells, resulting in their wide present-day distribution.

  10. Status or subjugation? women, migration and development in the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Connell, J

    1984-01-01

    Similar to the situation elsewhere in the world, migration may enhance a women's position in societies in the regions of the South Pacific by prividing them greater autonomy and competence in new skills whether they are themselves immigrants or remain in villages as heads of households when male relatives leave. Or, it can cause them to lose independence and social standing and be extremely subjugated to men especially when they are 'passive' migrants to towns, or through over-dependence or remittances, poor health and welfare when the maintenace of necessary rural economic activities proves excessively demanding or urban incomes are poor. It is apparent from the Highlands of Papua New Guinea that rather different situations may result in seemingly similar areas. The emergence of cash cropping, wage labor, migration and greater individualism within the nuclear family, as a result of the breakdown of traditional family structures, all emphasize isolation of men and women, and produce conflict, diversity and tension. While women may indeed acquire some elevation in status and prestige from their participation in a greater range of economic, social and political affairs, men too gain in prestige, offsetting women's gains. Pressures on women's time may inhibit their fuller participation in community activities, contributing to their marginalization, and give rise to new economic inequalities despite some gains. Ironically, the type of economic change tends to cause women to be locked into domestic and reproductive roles. Although women have apparently made strides in small South Pacific states, little of this social change is translated into long-term economic changes that would ultimately have a positive impact on the status of women. The lack of absence of proper data concerning women in migration and accompanying phenomena such as changing roles, power structures as well as the changing distribution of resources, virtually ensures the exclusion of women from policy

  11. Precipitation Changes Throughout the South Pacific Convergence Zone During the Last 2000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, A. E.; Nelson, D. B.; Sachs, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is the southern hemisphere's most prominent precipitation feature extending 3000km southeastwards from Papua New Guinea to French Polynesia. Seasonal and interannual variability in SPCZ rainfall is well characterized by satellite data, however an understanding of this feature prior to the instrumental record is lacking. Rainfall in the western tropical Pacific is difficult to reconstruct due to a dearth of archives that are both high-resolution and continuous. Here we present molecular fossil hydroclimate reconstructions from the last 2000 years. The hydrogen isotopic composition of the algal lipid biomarker dinosterol was measured in 10 freshwater lake sediment cores from 7 lakes on 4 islands in Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, and Wallis and Futuna. Coretop δ2Hdinosterol values were well correlated with satellite-derived rainfall rates, providing a transfer function for deriving precipitation rates from sedimentary δ2Hdinosterol values. The Vanuatu and Wallis records indicate that the south-western portion of the SPCZ was driest during the transition from the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) to the Little Ice Age (LIA) (1200-1400 CE) with rainfall rates as low as 2mm/day compare to more typical values of 4mm/day. Conversely, the central SPCZ (Solomon Islands) experienced the driest conditions ( 5mm/day) during the MWP (600-1200 CE) and has maintained high ( 9mm/day) rainfall rates since the LIA. The tropical water cycle influences global climate and these quantitative precipitation records are important for understanding SPCZ natural variability.

  12. Shallow genetic and morphological divergence among seaperches in the South Pacific (family Scorpaenidae; genus Helicolenus).

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Struthers, C D; Paulin, C D; McVeagh, S M; Daley, R K

    2009-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among populations of seaperch, Helicolenus spp., in the south-west Pacific were examined with mtDNA markers. Parts of the cytochrome b gene [459 base pair (bp)] and the control region (448 bp) were sequenced in 58 specimens from the south-west Pacific and four specimens of Helicolenus lengerichi from Chile. Only one clade was recognized in New Zealand coastal waters, despite a wide range of colour morphs. This clade also occurred in the mid Tasman Sea on the Norfolk Ridge and around Tasmania and Victoria. A second sympatric clade was identified around Tasmania and Victoria and to the west of New Zealand. A third allopatric clade was identified to the north of New Zealand and in deep water on the Chatham Rise and a fourth clade on the Foundation Seamounts and the Louisville Ridge. Helicolenus lengerichi from Chile formed a fifth clade. Assuming a molecular clock, the clades were estimated to have diverged c. 0.7-2.6 million years ago. Only two clades, around Tasmania and Victoria, were separated using morphology, colour (in live) and dorsal-fin soft ray counts and were confirmed as Helicolenus percoides and Helicolenus barathri. Two characters, orbit diameter and colour variation, previously used to identify two species in New Zealand waters were unreliable characters for species discrimination. Principle component analyses of 11 morphological measures from 67 individuals did not delineate the clades. A canonical discriminant analysis was able to separate four of the five clades, but mean discriminate probabilities were low (77.6%), except for the five Chilean specimens of H. lengerichi (100%).

  13. Assessment of seasonal prediction of South Pacific Convergence Zone using APCC multi-model ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ok-Yeon

    2017-07-01

    We have quantified and examined the South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) characteristics for the purpose of its seasonal prediction, by defining two orientation indices, strength and area. The multi-model ensemble (MME) tends to simulate the ENSO-associated shift of SPCZ orientation, especially for the 1-month forecast lead. The migration of the SPCZ orientation indices associated with ENSO phases is clear in the observation and the MME. The variation of the SPCZ strength and area associated with ENSO phases is not as clear as in the SPCZ orientation. In spite of marginal changes in the SPCZ strength and area related to ENSO phases, the SPCZ strength becomes a bit stronger during El Niño and weaker during La Niña, which is represented in individual models and MME. The performance of the MME in simulating the variability of the SPCZ orientation, strength and area is also examined. We found that the MME reasonably predicts the observed interannual variability of the western portion of the SPCZ, with systematic and marginal shift southward. Compared to the western part of the SPCZ, the MME seems to have a limitation in predicting the variability of the eastern part. In comparison to the SPCZ orientation, the MME is not capable of predicting the strength and area of the SPCZ. The interannual variability of the SPCZ strength in the MME is systematically weaker compared to that in the analysis. By comparison with SPCZ orientation and strength, the SPCZ area is not resolved in the MME. The SPCZ is a main source of precipitation in the South Pacific, and the SPCZ predictability also influences high impact weather prediction such as tropical cyclones. Therefore, skillful predictions of seasonal variability of the SPCZ could benefit users who utilize the seasonal forecasting information for their decision making in many applicable sectors.

  14. Upper mantle structure of the Tonga-Lau-Fiji region from Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S. Shawn; Zha, Yang; Shen, Weisen; Wiens, Douglas A.; Conder, James A.; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the upper mantle seismic structure in the Tonga-Lau-Fiji region by jointly fitting the phase velocities of Rayleigh waves from ambient-noise and two-plane-wave tomography. The results suggest a wide low-velocity zone beneath the Lau Basin, with a minimum SV-velocity of about 3.7 ± 0.1 km/s, indicating upwelling hot asthenosphere with extensive partial melting. The variations of velocity anomalies along the Central and Eastern Lau Spreading Centers suggest varying mantle porosity filled with melt. In the north where the spreading centers are distant from the Tonga slab, the inferred melting commences at about 70 km depth, and forms an inclined zone in the mantle, dipping to the west away from the arc. This pattern suggests a passive decompression melting process supplied by the Australian plate mantle from the west. In the south, as the supply from the Australian mantle is impeded by the Lau Ridge lithosphere, flux melting controlled by water from the nearby slab dominates in the back-arc. This source change results in the rapid transition in geochemistry and axial morphology along the spreading centers. The remnant Lau Ridge and the Fiji Plateau are characterized by a 60-80 km thick lithosphere underlain by a low-velocity asthenosphere. Our results suggest the removal of the lithosphere of the northeastern Fiji Plateau-Lau Ridge beneath the active Taveuni Volcano. Azimuthal anisotropy shows that the mantle flow direction rotates from trench-perpendicular beneath Fiji to spreading-perpendicular beneath the Lau Basin, which provides evidence for the southward flow of the mantle wedge and the Samoan plume.

  15. Fiji's largest marine reserve benefits reef sharks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, J. S.; Fullwood, L. A. F.

    2013-03-01

    To provide more information about whether sharks benefit from no-take marine reserves, we quantified the relative abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside and outside of Namena, Fiji's largest reserve (60.6 km2). Using stereo baited remote underwater video systems (stereo-BRUVs), we found that the abundance and biomass of sharks was approximately two and four times greater in shallow and deep locations, respectively, within the Namena reserve compared to adjacent fished areas. The greater abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside Namena is likely a result of greater prey availability rather than protection from fishing. This study demonstrates that marine reserves can benefit sharks.

  16. Reconstructing the South Pacific upper water column structure during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, R. I.; Nuernberg, D.; Frank, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current system (ACCs) is the most important current system in the Southern Ocean, characterized by strong zonal variations in specific surface water properties, variations used to classify regions whose edges are defined by fronts. The past changes in the strength and latitudinal position of the ACC frontal system are supposed to play a major role on the global oceanic circulation and thus the Earth's climate through their impact on atmospheric CO2 contents by changes in water stratification conditions, Therefore the study of variability in the surface characteristics of the ACCs provides crucial information to understand and to reconstruct the global climate evolution. The dynamics of the upper-ocean vertical structure, primarily defined by vertical changes in salinity and temperature from the mixed layer down to the seasonal and permanent thermocline, can be tracked using the differences in stable oxygen isotopes (Δδ18O) and Mg/Ca-based temperatures (ΔT) recorded in the test of planktic foraminifera. Only Mg/Ca thermometry coupled with δ18O can guarantee a common source of signal, averaging the same environmental conditions (season and spatial habitat), where, the combined measurements of Mg/Ca and δ18O allow to extract the δ18O record of past upper ocean water, and accordingly salinity variations In this study we present paired measurements of Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotopes of shallow-living and deeper-living planktic foraminifera preserved in core top and downcore samples from the South Pacific (36° to 45° S) retrieved during the SOPATRA cruise (South Pacific Paleoceanographic Transect) Chile-New Zealand. The total Mg/Ca values preserved in the foraminiferal calcite from 31 core top samples ranged from ~2 to 1.3 mmol/mol, allowing estimate SSTs between 16° and 12° C. Additionally, to evaluate the reliability of the Mg/Ca signal paleothermometry for long term reconstruction we determined the effect of calcite saturation

  17. Geocemical provinces of magmatism in the south-eastern part of the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushchevskaya, Nadezhda; Belyatsky, Boris; Teterin, Dmitry

    2010-05-01

    Comparison of geochemical signatures of island magmatism in the south-eastern part of the Pacific Ocean and tholeiites of the Bransfield and Powell rift zones revealed the similar character of the enrichment which reflects the melting of a close mantle source. But alkaline magmatism of the islands in the west of Antarctic and Marie Byrd Land differs from the enriched basalts of the northern province (Bransfield, Powell, BTJ) by showing more radiogenic Sr values and non-radiogenic Nd. The tectonic development of the South Ocean is characterized by its formation under stationary conditions of Antarctic continent. As a result of this, for the volcanic islands distributed at the western part of the Antarctic we observe no long mountain ridges typical for their development under conditions of the moving plate. Intraplate magmatism evolution was coincided with the extinction of the old subduction zones, formation of the new rift zones and separation of South America from Antarctic [Udintsev, Schenke, 2007; Teterin, 2008]. Such complicated geodynamics caused the possibility of formation of rupture cracks reaching the underlying metasomatizated mantle and decompression melting with further island formation. In Oligocene due to migration of asthenospheric flow from the west to east in the result of destruction of previously united continental blocks there was formed the Scotia Sea, South Sandwich island arc as well as Drake Passage. This caused the mechanical weakening of South Atlantic lithosphere and the starting at the end of Oligocene - beginning Miocene of the new plate border formation - American-Antarctic ridge, which propagated in the eastern direction till the Bouvet triple junction [Dubinin et al., 1999]. The close geochemical signatures of mantle source for islands basalts including the Bouvet Island and the enriched tholeiites of the western extremity of the SW Indian Ridge proves the development of a specific geochemical province enveloping the southeastern

  18. Staphylococcus aureus 'Down Under': contemporary epidemiology of S. aureus in Australia, New Zealand, and the South West Pacific.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D A; Coombs, G W; Nimmo, G R

    2014-07-01

    The clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus disease has changed considerably over the past two decades, particularly with the emergence and spread of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) clones. Indeed, some of the first global descriptions of CA-MRSA were from remote indigenous communities in Western Australia, and from Pacific Peoples in New Zealand. The epidemiology of S. aureus infections in the South West Pacific has several unique features, largely because of the relative geographical isolation and unique indigenous communities residing in this region. In particular, a number of distinct CA-MRSA clones circulate in Australia and New Zealand, such as sequence type (ST) 93 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (Queensland clone) and clonal complex 75 S. aureus (Staphylococcus argenteus) in Australia, and ST30 MRSA (Southwest Pacific clone) in New Zealand. In addition, there is a disproportionate burden of S. aureus disease in indigenous paediatric populations, particularly in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia, and in Pacific Peoples and Maori in New Zealand. In this review, we provide a contemporary overview of the clinical and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus disease in the South West Pacific region, with a particular focus on features distinct to this region.

  19. Concentrations, isotopic compositions, and sources of lead in the surface waters of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, R.; Zurbrick, C. M.; Flegal, A. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured in surface and subsurface waters across the Eastern Tropical South Pacific as part of the 2013 US GEOTRACES Zonal Transect from Peru to Tahiti. Surface waters were collected throughout the transect, and subsurface waters were collected to a depth of 1,000 m at 36 vertical profile stations. Aliquots of some of those samples, as well as samples from greater depths, were used in intercalibrations with Ed Boyle's group, which focused on lead fluxes from hydrothermal vents and at the benthic boundary layer. In contrast, our group focused on aeolian lead fluxes to surface waters from natural and industrial sources. Preliminary data indicate that lead concentrations in those South Pacific surface waters are low compared to the more contaminated North Pacific. Moreover, complementary lead isotopic compositions indicate distinguishing between natural and industrial lead fluxes in the South Pacific will be more difficult now that the use of gasoline with lead alkyls from Australia have been eliminated.

  20. Applications of SEASAT altimeter data in seismotectonic studies of the South-Central Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, R.V.; Okal, E.A.

    1983-02-28

    Individual tracks of SEASAT altimeter data can be used effectively to identify significant bathymetric features in remote and unsurveyed ocean areas. It is especially important, for studies of oceanic seismicity, to identify correlation (or lack of correlation) between seismicity and bathymetric features. However, in many seismically active regions, bathymetric data are sparse or nonexistent. A typical example is the south-central Pacific, an area studied by Okal et al. (1980), who identified several sites of active intraplate seismicity. The purpose of the present paper is to demonstrate how SEASAT data can be used to aid in bathymetric and seismotectonic interpretation of this remote ocean area. We present two illustrations: (1) SEASAT observations of Macdonald seamount, a volcanically active seamount representing the youngest member in the Austral Island chain, and (2) SEASAT observation of a previously undiscovered fracture zone located at approximately 21.4 /sup 0/S and trending east-west between 232 /sup 0/E and 236 /sup 0/E. This fracture zone is located approximately 70 km to the south of a small region of active seismicity (96 events of magnitude greater than 2.7 from 1976 to 1980). On the basis of the demonstrated ability to observe active seamounts such as Macdonald and small fracture zones, we conclude that the observed seismicity in the region near 21 /sup 0/S, 233 /sup 0/E is due to intraplate stresses but is not associated with large-scale volcanism or with an active or fossil fracture zone.

  1. Tales from the South (and West) Pacific in the Common Era: A Climate Proxy Perspective (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Partin, J. W.; Maupin, C. R.; Hereid, K. A.; Gorman, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    The southwest Pacific is a major source of tropical climate variability through heat and moisture exchanges associated with the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) and the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). These variations are especially significant at the annual, interannual (El Niño-Southern Oscillation, ENSO), and multi-decadal timescales. Gridded SST data products are available in the pre-satellite era in this region for the past ~130 years, although data density is a significant issue for the older half of these records. Time series of salinity (SSS) and rainfall from this region are exceedingly rare. Thus, climate proxy records must be used to reconstruct SST, SSS, and rainfall variations in the Common Era (CE) in the tropical Pacific. The analytical laboratory for paleoclimate studies at UT has focused its research efforts into producing climate proxy time series from southwest tropical Pacific using modern and fossil corals, and speleothems. Our most recent results are summarized in this presentation, although much of this work is still in progress. Coral climate records have been generated from Sabine Bank, Vanuatu (16°S, 166°E) and Misima Island, Papua New Guinea (10.6°S, 152.8°E). The Vanuatu coral record of monthly resolved Sr/Ca variations extends back to the late 18th century. All strong ENSO warm phase events of the 20th century observed in the instrumental record are also observed in the coral record. We note that several ENSO warm phase events in the 19th century portion of the coral record are comparable in size to that recorded in response to the 1982/1983 and 1997/1998 events. The Misima coral record of monthly resolved δ18O and Sr/Ca variations spans the interval ~1414-1645 CE — the heart of the Little Ice Age. Amplitude modulation of interannual variability is observed in this LIA record, much like what is observed during the relatively quiescent period of 1920-1950 in the 20th century instrumental and proxy records of ENSO. However

  2. Reviewing the circulation and mixing of Antarctic Intermediate Water in the South Pacific using evidence from geochemical tracers and Argo float trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, Helen C.; Sutton, Phil J.; Williams, Michael J. M.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2013-03-01

    Evidence from physical and geochemical tracers measured during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) shows that there are four sub-types of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the South Pacific. The main formation region of AAIW is the southeast Pacific, where fresh, cold, high oxygen, low nutrient, intermediate waters are created. This AAIW is transported north and mixes with Equatorial Pacific Intermediate Waters (EqPIW), themselves a combination of AAIW and nutrient rich, old North Pacific deep waters. 'Tasman' AAIW found in the Coral and Tasman Seas is more saline and warmer than the main subtropical gyre, and appears to have formed from mixing of AAIW with thermocline waters in the Tasman Gyre. Tasman AAIW leaks out of the Tasman basin to the north of New Zealand and along Chatham Rise, and also in the South Tasman Sea via the Tasman Leakage. Another source of relatively fresh, high oxygen, low nutrient, young AAIW comes directly from the Southern Ocean, flowing into the southwest and central South Pacific Basin, west of the East Pacific Rise. This 'Southern Ocean' (SO) AAIW is most likely a mixture of AAIW formed locally at the Subantarctic Front (SAF), and AAIW formed along the SAF in the southeast Pacific or Indian oceans and transported by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Interpreting physical and geochemical tracers, combined with velocity estimates from Argo floats, and previous research, has allowed us to refine the detailed circulation pattern of AAIW in the South Pacific, especially in the topographically complex southwest Pacific.

  3. Oceanographic Data Report for South West Pacific Cruises in the SEAMAP Series. Part 2. Winter Survey Data 1985 to 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    WSRL-TM-15f AR-OO586 AD-A236 018 DTIC 4N 13913 4 OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA REPORT FOR SOUTH WEST PACIFIC CRUISES IN THE SEAMAP SERIES. PART 2. WINTER SURVEY...WEST PACIFIC CRUISES IN THE SEAMAP SERIES. PART 2. WINTER SURVEY DATA 1985 TO 1987 L.J. Hamilton and J.A. Boyle SUMMARY(U) Six oceanographic surveys...oceanographic parameters known as project SEAMAP . This report presents winier survey data for bathymetry, sea surface temperature, wind speed, sea

  4. Persistent decadal-scale rainfall variability in the tropical South Pacific Convergence Zone through the past six centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Shen, C.-C.; Quinn, T. M.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Banner, J. L.; Thirumalai, K.; Sinclair, D. J.

    2013-10-01

    Observations and reconstructions of decadal-scale climate variability are necessary to place predictions of future global climate change into temporal context (Goddard et al., 2012). This is especially true for decadal-scale climate variability that originates in the Pacific Ocean (Deser et al., 2004; Dong and Lu, 2013). We focus here on the western tropical Pacific (Solomon Islands; ~ 9.5° S, ~ 160° E), a region directly influenced by: the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), the Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC), and the Hadley Circulation. We calibrate δ18O variations in a fast growing stalagmite to local rainfall amount and produce a 600 yr record of rainfall variability from the zonally oriented, tropical portion of the SPCZ. We present evidence for large (~ 1.5 m), persistent and decade(s)-long shifts in total annual rainfall amount in the Solomon Islands since 1416 ± 5 CE. The timing of the decadal changes in rainfall inferred from the 20th century portion of the stalagmite δ18O record coincide with previously identified decadal shifts in Pacific ocean-atmosphere behavior (Clement et al., 2011; Deser et al., 2004). The 600 yr Solomons stalagmite δ18O record indicates that decadal oscillations in rainfall are a robust characteristic of SPCZ-related climate variability, which has important implications to water resource management in this region.

  5. Japanese submersible explores the North Fiji Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipboard Scientific Party; Auzende, J.-M.; Urabe, T.; Tanahashi, M.; Ruellan, E.

    1992-03-01

    Since 1987, Japanese and French geologists, geophysicists, and biologists have been studying the North Fiji Basin Ridge within the framework of a joint project named STARMER (Science and Technology Agency of Japan—IFREMER of France). This ridge was first geologically, geophysically, and geochemically surveyed during the 1985 SEAPSO 3 cruise of the R/V Jean Charcot [Auzende et al., 1988]. At that time, water sampling and morphotectonic analysis indicated that the North Fiji Basin Ridge was technically and hydrothermally active. Within the STARMER project, four surface ship cruises have been conducted {Kaiyo 87-88-89 and Yokosuka 90).One significant result of these surveys is the complete mapping of the entire ridge between 14°S and 22°S (Figure 1), an area approximately 900 km long and more than 50 km wide (Sea Beam and Furuno multibeam swath-mapping systems were used). During the Kaiyo 87 cruise, the presence of active hydrothermalism (sulfide deposits, chimneys expelling shimmering water, and associated living animal colonies) was discovered through water sampling and video deep towing.

  6. Polychaeta Orbiniidae from Antarctica, the Southern Ocean, the Abyssal Pacific Ocean, and off South America.

    PubMed

    Blake, James A

    2017-01-12

    The orbiniid polychaetes chiefly from Antarctic and subantarctic seas and off South America are described based on collections of the National Museum of Natural History and new material from surveys conducted by the United States Antarctic Program and other federal and privately funded sources as well as participation in international programs. A total of 44 species of Orbiniidae distributed in 10 genera are reported from the Pacific Ocean and waters off South America and Antarctica. Twenty-one species are new to science; one species is renamed. Berkeleyia heroae n. sp., B. abyssala n. sp., B. weddellia n. sp.; B. hadala n. sp., Leitoscoloplos simplex n. sp., L. plataensis n. sp., L. nasus n. sp., L. eltaninae n. sp., L. phyllobranchus n. sp., L. rankini n. sp., Scoloplos bathytatus n. sp., S. suroestense n. sp., Leodamas hyphalos n. sp., L. maciolekae n. sp., L. perissobranchiatus n. sp., Califia bilamellata n. sp., Orbinia orensanzi n. sp., Naineris antarctica n. sp., N. argentiniensis n. sp., Orbiniella spinosa n. sp., and O. landrumae n. sp. are new to science. A new name, Naineris furcillata, replaces N. chilensis Carrasco, 1977, a junior homonym of N. dendtritica chilensis Hartmann‑Schröder, 1965, which is raised to full species status. Leodamas cochleatus (Ehlers, 1900) is removed from synonymy and redescribed. A neotype is established for Leodamas verax Kinberg, 1966, the type species. A general overview of Leodamas species is provided. The Leitoscoloplos kerguelensis (McIntosh, 1885) complex is reviewed and partially revised. Definitions of the genera of the Orbiniidae are updated to conform to recently described taxa. Several new synonymies are proposed following a reexamination of previously described type specimens. The morphological characters used to identify and classify orbiniids are reviewed. The biogeographic and bathymetric distributions of the South American and Southern Ocean orbiniid fauna are reviewed.

  7. The bladed Bangiales (Rhodophyta) of the South Eastern Pacific: Molecular species delimitation reveals extensive diversity.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Marie-Laure; Contreras-Porcia, Loretto; Ramírez, María Eliana; Macaya, Erasmo C; Contador, Cristian Bulboa; Woods, Helen; Wyatt, Christopher; Brodie, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    A molecular taxonomic study of the bladed Bangiales of the South Eastern Pacific (coast of Chile) was undertaken based on sequence data of the mitochondrial COI and chloroplast rbcL for 193 specimens collected from Arica (18°S) in the north to South Patagonia (53°S) in the south. The results revealed for the first time that four genera, Porphyra, Pyropia, Fuscifolium and Wildemania were present in the region. Species delimitation was determined based on a combination of a General Mixed Yule Coalescence model (GMYC) and Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) coupled with detection of monophyly in tree reconstruction. The overall incongruence between the species delimitation methods within each gene was 29%. The GMYC method led to over-splitting groups, whereas the ABGD method had a tendency to lump groups. Taking a conservative approach to the number of putative species, at least 18 were recognized and, with the exception of the recently described Pyropia orbicularis, all were new to the Chilean flora. Porphyra and Pyropia were the most diverse genera with eight 'species' each, whereas only a 'single' species each was found for Fuscifolium and Wildemania. There was also evidence of recently diverging groups: Wildemania sp. was distinct but very closely related to W. amplissima from the Northern Hemisphere and raises questions in relation to such disjunct distributions. Pyropia orbicularis was very closely related to two other species, making species delimitation very difficult but provides evidence of an incipient speciation. The difference between the 'species' discovered and those previously reported for the region is discussed in relation to the difficulty of distinguishing species based on morphological identification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transition from slab stagnation to penetration beneath the northwestern Pacific and South America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Y.; Obayashi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Subducting slabs tend to once deflect horizontally in the transition zone as stagnant slabs and then to penetrate into the lower mantle across the 660-km discontinuity. Here we present the detailed tomographic images of transition from stagnant-slab mode to penetrating-slab mode, based on the global ISC travel time data to which regional network data and long-term array observation data including ocean bottom data are added. The targets are the subducted slabs beneath South America and the northwestern Pacific. In South America the transition occurs across the northeastward extension of the sharp bend of the Peru-Chili trench. The slab to the south of this extension is stagnant above the 660, and to the north it plunges into the lower mantle across the 660. The transition is sharp as if the originally flat slab in the northern part was rotated into the present configuration by hinge faulting along the extension. We suspect that this hinge faulting either triggered the northward propagation of or truncated the southward propagation of the plunging motion of the slab into the lower mantle. Along the Kurile arc, the slab is flattened above the 660 in the southwest, penetrating in the northeast, with a transitional feature in between. In southern Kurile the flattened part has a deepest bottom near the junction with the dipping part. Such an along-arc change of slab configuration is indicative of a process of transition from stagnant-slab mode to penetrating-slab mode: the flattened part and dipping part of the slab begin to sink into the lower mantle at their junction so that the horizontal part is progressively dragged to and is eventually united to the dipping part as a penetrating slab. Along the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc, the slab is flattened above the 660 in the north (Izu-Bonin) and is penetrating the 660 in the south (Mariana) leaving the horizontal part in the transition zone. In the Izu-Bonin the flattened part has a deepest bottom near the junction with

  9. Decadal changes in the South Pacific western boundary current system revealed in observations and ocean state estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. L.; Rintoul, S. R.; Ridgway, K. R.; Oke, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Observations and ocean state estimates are used to investigate the nature and mechanism of decadal variability in the East Australian Current (EAC) system and South Pacific subtropical gyre. A 62 year record on the Tasmanian continental shelf shows decadal variations of temperature and salinity, as well as a long-term trend, which has been related to wind-driven variations in the poleward extension of the EAC. Repeat expendable bathythermograph lines spanning the last 15 years suggest that low-frequency variations in the transport of the EAC extension and Tasman Front are anticorrelated, but the time series are too short to draw firm conclusions. Here we use two ocean state estimates spanning the past 50 years to diagnose the physical mechanisms and spatial structure of the decadal variability of the South Pacific subtropical gyre. The observations and state estimates paint a consistent picture of the decadal variability of the gyre and EAC system. Strengthening of the basin-wide wind stress curl drives a southward expansion of the subtropical gyre. As the gyre shifts south, the EAC extension pathway is favored at the expense of the Tasman Front, resulting in the observed anticorrelation of the these two major currents. The results suggest that the subtropical gyre and western boundary current respond to decadal variability in basin-scale wind stress curl, consistent with Island Rule dynamics; that strong decadal variability of the South Pacific gyre complicates efforts to infer trends from short-term records; and that wind stress curl changes over the South Pacific basin drive changes in the EAC system that are likely to have implications for marine ecosystems and regional climate.

  10. Asia and the Pacific: Issues of Educational Policy, Curriculum, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donald C., Ed.; And Others

    The Pacific region is growing in worldwide importance in terms of politics, economics, and culture. The emergence of this area of the world provides an opportunity for new directions in social studies education. This book addresses the Pacific Rim issues from the viewpoints of educators from 9 Pacific nations: Australia, Canada, Fiji, Japan,…

  11. Ocean response to typhoon Nuri (2008) in western Pacific and South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingru; Oey, Lie-Yauw; Chang, Roger; Xu, Fanghua; Huang, Shih-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Typhoon Nuri formed on 18 August 2008 in the western North Pacific east of the Philippines and traversed northwestward over the Kuroshio in the Luzon Strait where it intensified to a category 3 typhoon. The storm weakened as it passed over South China Sea (SCS) and made landfall in Hong Kong as a category 1 typhoon on 22 August. Despite the storm's modest strength, the change in typhoon Nuri's intensity was unique in that it strongly depended on the upper ocean. This study examines the ocean response to typhoon Nuri using the Princeton Ocean Model. An ocean state accounting for the sea-surface temperature (SST) and mesoscale eddy field prior to Nuri was constructed by assimilating satellite SST and altimetry data 12 days before the storm. The simulation then continued without further data assimilation, so that the ocean response to the strong wind can be used to understand processes. It is found that the SST cooling was biased to the right of the storm's track due to inertial currents that rotated in the same sense as the wind vector, as has previously been found in the literature. However, despite the comparable wind speeds while the storm was in western Pacific and SCS, the SST cooling was much more intense in SCS. The reason was because in SCS, the surface layer was thinner, the vorticity field of the Kuroshio was cyclonic, and moreover a combination of larger Coriolis frequency as the storm moved northward and the typhoon's slower translational speed produced a stronger resonance between wind and current, resulting in strong shears and entrainment of cool subsurface waters in the upper ocean.

  12. A magneto- and chemostratigraphically calibrated dinoflagellate cyst zonation of the early Palaeogene South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Peter K.; Sluijs, Appy; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2013-09-01

    Investigation of the early Palaeogene palaeoecological and palaeoclimatological evolution of the Polar Regions is hindered by the absence of calcite microfossils in sedimentary archives, which are conventionally the main dating tool. To overcome this problem, we have generated large datasets of organic dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblages from Southern Ocean shelf sediments over the past decade, and we here calibrate these to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) using magnetostratigraphy and stable isotope stratigraphy. This now for the first time allows a high-resolution Southern Pacific Ocean dinocyst zonation for the late Palaeocene to late Eocene (58-36 million years ago; Ma). We compile published dinocyst chronologies from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1171D on the South Tasman Rise, Hole 1172A/D on the East Tasman Plateau and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hole U1356A on the Wilkes Land margin. Correlation to dinocyst zonations from New Zealand lead to revisions of the magnetostratigraphic age model at Holes 1171D and 1172A/D. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope records reveal the stratigraphic location of the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (~ 56 Ma) and the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (~ 40 Ma), respectively. The resulting zonation consists of thirteen dinocyst zones, calibrated to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) of Vandenberghe et al. (2012), which can likely be applied to the entire Southern Ocean. Finally, we apply the revised stratigraphy to all published TEX86 data, a biomarker-based proxy for sea surface temperature (SST), from ODP Site 1172 to assess long-term climate evolution. This shows that Southwest Pacific SST trends mimic the global compilation of benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotopes even better than previously appreciated.

  13. Investigating ENSO Variability in the mid-Holocene using a Fossil Coral from the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vara, M. A.; Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Partin, J. W.; Gorman, M. K.; Maupin, C. R.; Edwards, R.; Cheng, H.; Inoue, M.; Nakedau, D.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate mid-Holocene variability in the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using geochemical variations in a well-preserved fossil Porites lutea coral collected in 2005 at Araki Island, Vanuatu (15.62°S 166.95°E). Vanuatu is a good location to reconstruct ENSO variability because it is located on the edge of the West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) and below the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). As a result of the location, Vanuatu is salty, dry, and cool during an El Niño event and is fresh, warm, and wet during a La Niña event. The coral core is ~1.64 m in length and has been dated to 7,230 ± 440 y B.P. using U/Th techniques. X-radiography images show that the coral exhibits clear density banding and has an average extension rate of 1.5 cm per year. The coral was sampled for geochemical analysis every 0.125 cm, which is approximately one sample per month. This record will be about 60 years in length once all sampling and analyses have been completed. Our initial results are a monthly resolved, 30-year coral δ18O record, which has a mean δ18O value of -4.75 ‰ and an annual-cycle amplitude that averages 0.35 ‰. The fossil coral δ18O record contains patterns of isotopic variation that match patterns recognized as El Niño and La Niña events in modern coral δ18O records from this region. We will continue to explore the nature of interannual variability in our record as it is lengthened and additional data (Sr/Ca) are generated.

  14. Blue whale population structure along the eastern South Pacific Ocean: evidence of more than one population.

    PubMed

    Torres-Florez, J P; Hucke-Gaete, R; LeDuc, R; Lang, A; Taylor, B; Pimper, L E; Bedriñana-Romano, L; Rosenbaum, H C; Figueroa, C C

    2014-12-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were among the most intensively exploited species of whales in the world. As a consequence of this intense exploitation, blue whale sightings off the coast of Chile were uncommon by the end of the 20th century. In 2004, a feeding and nursing ground was reported in southern Chile (SCh). With the aim to investigate the genetic identity and relationship of these Chilean blue whales to those in other Southern Hemisphere areas, 60 biopsy samples were collected from blue whales in SCh between 2003 and 2009. These samples were genotyped at seven microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region was sequenced, allowing us to identify 52 individuals. To investigate the genetic identity of this suspected remnant population, we compared these 52 individuals to blue whales from Antarctica (ANT, n = 96), Northern Chile (NCh, n = 19) and the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP, n = 31). No significant differentiation in haplotype frequencies (mtDNA) or among genotypes (nDNA) was found between SCh, NCh and ETP, while significant differences were found between those three areas and Antarctica for both the mitochondrial and microsatellite analyses. Our results suggest at least two breeding population units or subspecies exist, which is also supported by other lines of evidence such as morphometrics and acoustics. The lack of differences detected between SCh/NCh/ETP areas supports the hypothesis that eastern South Pacific blue whales are using the ETP area as a possible breeding area. Considering the small population sizes previously reported for the SCh area, additional conservation measures and monitoring of this population should be developed and prioritized.

  15. Distal transport of hydrothermal iron in the deep Eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Jenkins, W. J.; Lee, J.; Kayser, R. A.; Boyle, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    While dust deposition and transport from continental margin sediments are usually thought to be the main inputs of iron to the surface ocean dissolved Fe (dFe) pool, Fe input to the deep ocean has been attributed mostly to remineralization of sinking biogenic particles. Hydrothermal vents are known to emit large amounts of Fe to the deep ocean, but most of this Fe precipitates near the ridge crest, so it is not clear that vents supply a significant amount of dFe to the deep ocean. Several recent studies have seen dFe maxima in the deep ocean near ridge crests and attributed this dFe to hydrothermal activity (Boyle & Jenkins, 2008; Klunder et al. 2011; Wu et al. 2011; Klunder et al. 2012; Noble et al. 2012). Hydrothermally-derived Fe is believed to be maintained in the dissolved phase by a combination of binding by organic ligands (Bennett et al. 2008; Sander & Koschinsky, 2012) and a nanoparticle/colloidal contribution to the dFe class (Yucel et al. 2011). Modeling efforts using the distribution of excess He-3 in deep waters arising from hydrothermal activity have predicted that deep ocean dFe may be much higher than currently believed, especially in the southern hemisphere (Tagliabue et al. 2010). In this presentation, we show the first deep ocean dFe data from two stations in the Eastern South Pacific Ocean (Station 7 at 26.3degS, 104degW and Station 4 at 23.5degS, 88.8degW). He-3 and dissolved manganese (dMn) distributions at these stations imply that hydrothermal activity is a significant source of dFe to the deep ocean in this region. Maximum deep dFe concentrations at 2250m reach 1.5 nmol/kg at Station 7 and are still 0.86 nmol/kg at Station 4, thousands of kilometers from presumed East Pacific Rise hydrothermal sources. Excess He-3 and dFe are correlated in the plume maximum by comparison of the measured dFe with nearby WOCE He-3 stations spatially interpolated on isopycnals. We observe a slope of 1.1-2.0 x 10^6 mol Fe/mol He-3, similar to but somewhat

  16. The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory's 25th Anniversary Expedition to the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. R.; Wiltshire, J. C.; Malahoff, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) was established by NOAA at the University of Hawaii 25 years ago as part of its National Undersea Research Program. HURL's mission is to study deep water marine processes in the Pacific Ocean through a competitive proposal and review process. The dual Pisces IV and Pisces V 2000-meter manned submersibles, an RCV-150 1000-meter ROV, and multibeam equipped support ship R/V Ka'imikai-o-Kanaloa ( KoK) were largely acquired from the petroleum industry then adapted and upgraded to carry out cutting edge scientific expeditions. These studies range from active submarine volcanoes, delicate precious coral gardens, endangered marine mammal and fisheries management, to engineering surveys and deployment of observatory systems. HURL successfully completed a major 5-month expedition to the South Pacific during March-August 2005, working in the waters of New Zealand, Tonga, American Samoa, and the U.S. Line Islands covering a distance of nearly 14,500 nautical miles. This mission was significant in both the scientific merit and scope of operations, consisting of 8 different cruise legs at 21 study sites, with 12 chief and co-chief scientists, 58 total science team participants, and completing 61 out of 56 scheduled Pisces science dives, 17 ROV dives, 5 multibeam survey areas, 6 CTD rosette deployments, and 7 instrument mooring recoveries. The $3.5 million expedition was funded by an international partnership with New Zealand agencies (GNS & NIWA) and the University of Kiel in Germany along with the NOAA Office of Exploration and National Undersea Research Program. While most of the individual cruise legs focused on active submarine volcanoes of the Tonga-Kermadec Islands Arc and the Samoan hot spot chain with their hydrothermal systems and associated biological communities, others concentrated on marine protected areas including those of American Samoa and the remote atolls of the Line Islands of the Central Pacific. These studies

  17. The joint impact of ocean circulation and plate tectonics on the glacial South Pacific carbon pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronge, T.; Tiedemann, R.; Lamy, F.; Köhler, P.; Alloway, B.; De Pol-Holz, R.; Pahnke, K.; Southon, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the whereabouts of CO2 during glacials and its pathways during deglacial transitions is one of the main priorities in paleoclimate research. The opposing patterns of atmospheric CO2 and Δ14C suggest that the bulk of CO2 was released from an old and therefore 14C-depleted carbon reservoir. As the modern deep ocean, below ~2000 m, stores up to 60-times more carbon than the entire atmosphere, it is considered to be a major driver of the atmospheric CO2 pattern, storing CO2 during glacials, releasing it during deglacial transitions. We use a South Pacific transect of sediment cores, covering the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), the Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) and the Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW), to reconstruct the spatio-temporal evolution of oceanic Δ14C over the last 30,000 years. During the last glacial, we find significantly 14C-depleted waters between 2000 and 4300 m water depth, indicating a strong stratification and the storage of carbon in these water masses. However, two sediment cores from 2500 m and 3600 m water depth reveal an extreme glacial atmosphere-to-deep-water Δ14C offset of up to -1000‰ and ventilation ages (deep-water to atmosphere 14C-age difference) of ~8000 years. Such old water masses are expected to be anoxic, yet there is no evidence of anoxia in the glacial S-Pacific. Recent studies showed an increase of Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) volcanism during glacials due to the low stand of global sea level. For this reason, we hypothesize that the admixture of 14C-dead carbon via tectonic activity along MORs might have contributed to these extremely low radiocarbon values. With a simple 1-box model, we calculated if the admixture of hydrothermal CO2 has the potential to lower the deep Pacific Δ14C signal. We show that if the oceanic turnover time is at least 2700 years, an increased hydrothermal flux of 1.2 μmol kg-1 yr-1 has the potential to reproduce the extreme radiocarbon values observed in our records.

  18. Coupled dynamics of the South China Sea, the Sulu Sea, and the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, E. Joseph; Hurlburt, Harley E.

    1996-05-01

    The complex geometry, the seasonally reversing monsoon winds, and the connectivity with the Pacific Ocean all contribute to the coupled dynamics of the circulation in the South China Sea (SCS), the Sulu Sea, and the region around the Philippine Islands. The 1/2°, 1.5-layer global reduced gravity thermodynamic Navy layered ocean model (NLOM) is used to separate these components and to investigate the role of each one. When forced by the Hellerman and Rosenstein [1983] (HR) monthly wind stress climatology, the basic features of the model solution compare well with observations, and with higher-resolution NLOM versions. The dynamics of the flow from the Pacific Ocean into the SCS via the Luzon Strait are emphasized. The effects of Ekman suction/pumping due to wind curl are examined by forming monthly spatial averages of the winds over the SCS/Sulu Sea basins. This maintains a monthly varying stress but with a region of zero curl. Forcing the model with these modified winds leaves the mean Luzon Strait transport unchanged, and the variability actually increases slightly. These results suggest that it is the pressure head created by the pileup of water from the monsoonal wind stress that controls the variability of the Luzon Strait transport. The forcing for wind stress pileup effects could be either internal or external to the SCS/Sulu Sea basin. The effects of internal forcing are studied by applying monthly winds within this basin but annual HR winds outside the region. With this forcing the mean Luzon Strait transport is essentially unchanged, but the variability is only 44% of the standard case value. The external forcing is defined as zero stress in the SCS/Sulu Sea basins and HR monthly winds outside. Again, the mean Luzon Strait transport is unchanged, and here the variability is 60% of the standard case. The mean Luzon Strait transport is largely a function of the model geometry. When the Sulu archipelago is opened, a net cyclonic flow develops around the

  19. Evaluating the Influence of Solar Radiation, Coral Extension Rate and Anthropogenic CO2 on Skeletal δ13C in a Network of Fiji and Tonga Porites Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassie, E. P.; Lemley, G. M.; Linsley, B. K.; Howe, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    While stable oxygen isotope signatures in coral reefs have proven to be reliable recorders of temperature and salinity, it is difficult to interpret their skeletal 13C/12C signatures. Various studies have suggested that coral skeletal δ13C is primarily controlled by complex physiological mechanisms. However, it has also been proposed that δ13C variations in coral skeletons are related to more apparent factors such as solar radiation, skeletal extension rate, and the anthropogenic addition of 13C-depleted CO2 into the atmosphere and surface ocean ("Suess Effect"). We will present time-series variations of δ13C in six coral cores from Fiji and Tonga (South Pacific Ocean). On seasonal timescales, increases in solar radiation are correlated to increases in skeletal δ13C and visa-versa. Annually averaged data shows a correlation between increased coral δ13C and reduced coral extension rate, while a decrease in δ13C is associated with an increased extension rate. In the most recent portion of four of the coral δ13C records (from around 1900 to the core top), the value progressively decreases - a trend that is not present in either the skeletal extension rate or solar radiation data. We conclude that this decreasing δ13C trend is a consequence of the Suess Effect, as reported in other coral δ13C records. However, two of the six corals do not show this decreasing trend, which may be a result of their residence in especially shallow water (sub-tidal environments). The onset of the Suess effect in the four corals may help constrain the timing of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon by the western South Pacific Ocean. Although all factors controlling δ13C variation in corals are not completely understood, this study works towards an understanding of their relative contribution to δ13C variation.

  20. Modelling the impact of climate change on South Pacific albacore tuna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehodey, Patrick; Senina, Inna; Nicol, Simon; Hampton, John

    2015-03-01

    The potential impact of climate change under the IPCC AR4-A2 scenario (close to the AR5-RCP8.5 scenario) on south Pacific albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) is simulated with the Spatial Ecosystem And Population Dynamics Model (SEAPODYM) and environmental forcing variables provided by the Earth Climate model IPSL-CM4. Parameters controlling the habitat and dynamics of the population were optimized by fitting the model, using maximum likelihood, to a complete fishing data set for the historical fishing period since 1950. Albacore undertake clear seasonal migrations between feeding and spawning grounds, as evidenced by seasonal catch and size composition changes. This seasonality was well predicted by the SEAPODYM albacore simulations. The total biomass estimate of south Pacific albacore was predicted to have decreased from ~1.8 million tonnes (Mt) at the beginning of industrial fisheries in 1950 to 1.25 Mt in 2006, in good agreement with an independent estimate from stock assessment analysis. A simulation without fishing indicated an equivalent contribution of environmental variability and fishing to the historical decrease of the stock biomass. The parameterized SEAPODYM model was used to project the dynamics of the population until the end of the 21st century with an average fishing effort based on recent years. Under this fishing and climate change scenario, the population was predicted to decrease and to stabilize after 2035 just below 0.8 Mt, i.e., 55% below the initial biomass of 1960. After 2080 however, the trend was reversed when a new spawning ground emerged in the north Tasman Sea. A test simulation highlighted the sensitivity of the model results to projected dissolved oxygen concentration for which there is large uncertainty in the tropical region. A second test simulation showed that genetic selection favouring albacore with preferences for higher optimal ambient spawning temperature would maintain a reduced level of spawning in current tropical spawning

  1. On the decade-long deep-ocean warming in the subtropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Denis; Lee, Sang-Ki; Landerer, Felix; Lumpkin, Rick

    2017-04-01

    The persistent energy imbalance at the top of the atmosphere, inferred from satellite measurements, indicates that the Earth climate system continues to accumulate excess heat. As only sparse and irregular measurements of ocean heat below 2000-m depth exist, one of the most challenging questions in global climate change studies is whether the excess heat has already penetrated into the deep-ocean. The deep-ocean warming can initiate and advance in the regions where the air-sea interactions and ocean internal dynamics favor transfer of heat from the surface to the deeper waters. It is important to identify such regions, preferably using as many independent observing systems as possible, and to understand the associated dynamics. Combination of the present-day satellite and in situ observing systems has a potential to provide a more complete view on the horizontal and vertical distribution of heat in the ocean. While the uncertainties associated with the observing systems are decreasing, the combined use of satellite altimetry, GRACE, and Argo measurements may theoretically become an ideal method to indirectly infer deep-ocean temperature changes below 2000-m depth. The difference between the total sea level (observed by altimetry) and the mass-related sea level (observed by GRACE) gives the steric (due to changes in seawater density) sea level variability, which is mostly a function of the full-depth heat content. The deep-ocean (below 2000-m) contribution can be inferred indirectly, as the difference between the satellite-based (altimetry minus GRACE) and Argo-based steric sea level. Carrying out a comprehensive analysis of satellite and in situ measurements, and atmospheric re-analyses, here we report on deep-ocean warming signatures observed in the subtropical South Pacific during the past decade of 2005-2014. We show that the local accumulation of heat accounted for up to a quarter of the global ocean heat increase, with directly and indirectly inferred deep

  2. Seasonal oceanography from physics to micronekton in the south-west Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menkes, C. E.; Allain, V.; Rodier, M.; Gallois, F.; Lebourges-Dhaussy, A.; Hunt, B. P. V.; Smeti, H.; Pagano, M.; Josse, E.; Daroux, A.; Lehodey, P.; Senina, I.; Kestenare, E.; Lorrain, A.; Nicol, S.

    2015-03-01

    Tuna catches represent a major economic and food source in the Pacific Ocean, yet are highly variable. This variability in tuna catches remains poorly explained. The relationships between the distributions of tuna and their forage (micronekton) have been mostly derived from model estimates. Observations of micronekton and other mid-trophic level organisms, and their link to regional oceanography, however are scarce and constitute an important gap in our knowledge and understanding of the dynamics of pelagic ecosystems. To fill this gap, we conducted two multidisciplinary cruises (Nectalis1 and Nectalis2) in the New Caledonian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) at the southeastern edge the Coral Sea, in 2011 to characterize the oceanography of the region during the cool (August) and the hot (December) seasons. The physical and biological environments were described by hydrology, nutrients and phytoplankton size structure and biomass. Zooplankton biomass was estimated from net sampling and acoustics and micronecton was estimated from net sampling, the SEAPODYM ecosystem model, a dedicated echosounder and non-dedicated acoustics. Results demonstrated that New Caledonia is located in an oligotrophic area characterized by low nutrient and low primary production which is dominated by a high percentage of picoplankton cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus (>90%). The area exhibits a large-scale north-south temperature and salinity gradient. The northern area is influenced by the equatorial Warm Pool and the South Pacific Convergence Zone and is characterized by higher temperature, lower salinity, lower primary production and micronekton biomass. The southern area is influenced by the Tasman Sea and is characterized by cooler temperature, higher salinity, higher primary production and micronekton biomass. The dynamic oceanography and the complex topography create a myriad of mesoscale features including eddies, inducing patchy structures in the ecosystem. During the cool season, a

  3. Biogeochemical characteristics of a long-lived anticyclonic eddy in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, M.; Bravo, L.; Ramos, M.; Pizarro, O.; Karstensen, J.; Gallegos, M.; Correa-Ramirez, M.; Silva, N.; Farias, L.; Karp-Boss, L.

    2015-09-01

    Eastern boundary upwelling systems are characterized by high productivity that often leads to subsurface hypoxia on the shelf. Mesoscale eddies are important, frequent, and persistent features of circulation in these regions, transporting physical, chemical and biological properties from shelves to the open ocean. In austral fall of 2011, during the Tara Oceans expedition, a subsurface layer (200-400 m) in which the concentration of oxygen was very low (< 2 μmol kg-1 of O2) was observed in the eastern South Pacific, ~ 900 km offshore (30° S, 81° W). Satellite altimetry combined with CTD observations associated the local oxygen anomaly with an intrathermocline, anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy with a diameter of about 150 km. The eddy contained Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) that at this latitude is normally restricted near the coast. Undersaturation (44 %) of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrite accumulation (> 0.5 μM) gave evidence for denitrification in this water mass. Based on satellite altimetry, we tracked the eddy back to its region of formation on the coast of central Chile (36.1° S, 74.6° W). We estimate that the eddy formed in April 2010. Field studies conducted on the Chilean shelf in June 2010 provided approximate information on initial O2 and N2O concentrations of "source water" in the region at the time of eddy formation. Concentrations of both O2 and N2O in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the offshore eddy were lower than its surroundings or "source water" on the shelf, suggesting that these chemical species were consumed as the eddy moved offshore. Estimates of apparent oxygen utilization rates at the OMZ of the eddy ranged from 0.29 to 44 nmol L-1 d-1 and the rate of N2O consumption was 3.92 nmol L-1 d-1. Our results show that mesoscale eddies in the ESP not only transport physical properties of the ESSW from the coast to the ocean interior, but also export and transform biogeochemical properties, creating suboxic environments in the oligotrophic

  4. Title: Biogenic Magnetite Prevails in Oxic Pelagic Red Clay Core in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, T.; Yamazaki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have been observed in wide variety of environments, including soils, freshwater lakes, and marine sediments, since Blakemore (1975) first described in 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) of aquatic environments, produce intracellular crystals of magnetic minerals, specifically magnetite or greigite. It is considered that the magnetite/greigite crystals facilitate the bacteria's search for optimal conditions within the sharp chemical gradients of the OATZ. Petermann and Bleil (1993) reported living magnetotactic bacteria in pelagic and hemipelagic sediments near OATZ in the eastern South Atlantic at water depths to about 3,000 m, but they couldn't find actively swimming magnetotactic bacteria in sediments of deeper water depths. The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is far from continents and the lowest productivity region on Earth. IODP site U1365 (water depth ~5,700 m) cored pelagic red clay of 75.5 m thick above ~100 Ma basement (except for the chart layer from ~42 to 63.5 m) in the western edge of the SPG. The core mainly consists of iron rich clay. The color is dark reddish and/or dark brown throughout the core. We conducted a paleomagnetic and environmental rock magnetic study of the pelagic clay core. The magnetostratigraphy revealed the top 5 m sediments cover the last 5 My, and sedimentation rate decreases downward from 1.7 to 0.6 m/m.y. Geochemical measurements of pore water indicate that dissolved oxygen was present throughout the core (>50 μM). Thus oxygen penetrates through the entire sediment column to the sediment/basalt interface, and there is no OATZ. Magnetic mineral assemblage of this core is dominated by biogenic magnetite despite no OATZ. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams of all specimens have a narrow central ridge along the Hc axis with very small vertical spread. This indicates very weak magnetostatic interaction (Roberts et al., 2000), and is the

  5. Diel variability of heterotrophic bacterial production and UV doses in the South East Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wambeke, F.; Tedetti, M.; Duhamel, S.; Sempéré, R.

    2008-01-01

    Diel variability of heterotrophic bacterial production (BP) was investigated in the South East Pacific from October to December 2004 during the BIOSOPE cruise. Three sites differing by their trophic status were studied: Marquesas Islands (MAR; 08° S, 141° W), the centre of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) (GYR; 26° S, 114° W) and the eastern part of the SPG (EGY; 32° S, 91° W). At the three sites, diel variability of BP ranged from 17 to 40% and from 13 to 22% for volumetric surface (5 m) and integrated (to Ze and Zm) data, respectively. The main feature we observed was at 5 m, an abrupt increase (×2 to ×4) in leucine activity during the afternoon-sunset period (12:00-18:00 at the site MAR and 15:00-21:00 at the site GYR) and lowest activities recorded between 10:00 and 14:00. To assess the potential influence of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR: 280-400 nm) on this BP diel variability, we determined, from in situ optical measurements, the mean tri-hourly ultraviolet B (UVB, 305 nm) and ultraviolet A (UVA, 380 nm) doses (irradiances integrated over time) within the mixed layer (Hm(UVB) and Hm(UVA), respectively). The wavelengths 305 nm and 380 nm were used as biologically effective wavelengths for the induction of DNA damages (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers: CPDs) and photoenzymatic repairs (PERs), respectively. In the SPG, daily Hm(UVB) and Hm(UVA) were 0.6 and 14 kJ m-2 nm-1, respectively. The latter were probably the highest daily doses ever measured in the marine environment. The Hm(UVB)/Hm(UVA) ratio (Q) increased by 58, 117 and 46% from 06:00-09:00 to 12:00-15:00, and decreased by 36, 26 and 16% from 12:00-15:00 to 15:00-18:00 at the sites MAR, GYR and EGY, respectively. The relationship between Q and BP suggested a significant influence of UVR on the diel variability of BP (BP decreased when Q increased) at the site GYR from the surface waters to Zm, likely in relation with its hyper-oligotrophic status. Therefore, possible alternance of CPD and PER

  6. Review of solutions for 3D hydrodynamic modeling applied to aquaculture in South Pacific atoll lagoons.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, S; Ouillon, S; Brinkman, R; Falter, J; Douillet, P; Wolk, F; Smith, R; Garen, P; Martinez, E; Laurent, V; Lo, C; Remoissenet, G; Scourzic, B; Gilbert, A; Deleersnijder, E; Steinberg, C; Choukroun, S; Buestel, D

    2006-10-01

    A workshop organized in French Polynesia in November 2004 allowed reviewing the current methods to model the three-dimensional hydrodynamic circulation in semi-enclosed atoll lagoons for aquaculture applications. Mollusk (e.g. pearl oyster, clam) aquaculture is a major source of income for South Pacific countries such as French Polynesia or Cook Islands. This aquaculture now requires a better understanding of circulation patterns to improve the spatial use of the lagoons, especially to define the best area to set larvae collectors. The pelagic larval duration of the relevant species (<20 days) and the size of the semi-closed lagoons (few hundreds of km2) drive the specifications of the model in terms of the spatial and temporal scale. It is considered that, in contrast with fish, mollusk larvae movements are limited and that their cycle occurs completely in the lagoon, without an oceanic stage. Atolls where aquaculture is productive are generally well-bounded, or semi-closed, without significant large and deep openings to the ocean. Nevertheless part of the lagoon circulation is driven by oceanic water inputs through the rim, ocean swells, tides and winds. Therefore, boundary conditions of the lagoon system are defined by the spatial structure of a very shallow rim (exposition and number of hoas), the deep ocean swell climate, tides and wind regimes. To obtain a realistic 3D numerical model of lagoon circulation with adequate forcing, it is thus necessary to connect in an interdisciplinary way a variety of methods (models, remote sensing and in situ data collection) to accurately represent the different components of the lagoon system and its specific boundary conditions. We review here the current methods and tools used to address these different components for a hypothetical atoll of the Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia), representative of the semi-closed lagoons of the South Pacific Ocean. We hope this paper will serve as a guide for similar studies

  7. A novel clade of Prochlorococcus found in high nutrient low chlorophyll waters in the South and Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    West, Nyree J; Lebaron, Philippe; Strutton, Pete G; Suzuki, Marcelino T

    2011-01-01

    A novel high-light (HL)-adapted Prochlorococcus clade was discovered in high nutrient and low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters in the South Pacific Ocean by phylogenetic analyses of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 16S–23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. This clade, named HNLC fell within the HL-adapted Prochlorococcus clade with sequences above 99% similarity to one another, and was divided into two subclades, HNLC1 and HNLC2. The distribution of the whole HNLC clade in a northwest to southeast transect in the South Pacific (HNLC-to-gyre) and two 8°N to 8°S transects in the Equatorial Pacific was determined by quantitative PCR using specific primers targeting ITS regions. HNLC was the dominant HL Prochlorococcus clade (2–9% of bacterial 16S rRNA genes) at the three westernmost stations in the South Pacific but decreased to less than 0.1% at the other stations being replaced by the eMIT9312 ecotype in the hyperoligotrophic gyre. The highest contributions of HNLC Prochlorococcus in both Equatorial Pacific transects along the latitudinal lines of 170°W and 155°W were observed at the southernmost stations, reaching 16 and 6% of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, respectively, whereas eMIT9312 dominated near the Equator. Spearman Rank Order correlation analysis indicated that although both the HNLC clade and eMIT9312 were correlated with temperature, they showed different correlations with regard to nutrients. HNLC only showed significant correlations to ammonium uptake and regeneration rates, whereas eMIT9312 was negatively correlated with inorganic nutrients. PMID:21124492

  8. Epidemiological and molecular features of dengue virus type-1 in New Caledonia, South Pacific, 2001–2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of dengue in the South Pacific has been characterized by transmission of a single dominant serotype for 3–5 years, with subsequent replacement by another serotype. From 2001 to 2008 only DENV-1 was reported in the Pacific. In 2008, DENV-4 emerged and quickly displaced DENV-1 in the Pacific, except in New Caledonia (NC) where DENV-1 and DENV-4 co-circulated in 2008–2009. During 2012–2013, another DENV-1 outbreak occurred in NC, the third DENV-1 outbreak in a decade. Given that dengue is a serotype-specific immunizing infection, the recurrent outbreaks of a single serotype within a 10-year period was unexpected. Findings This study aimed to inform this phenomenon by examining the phylogenetic characteristics of the DENV-1 viruses in NC and other Pacific islands between 2001 and 2013. As a result, we have demonstrated that NC experienced introductions of viruses from both the Pacific (genotype IV) and South-east Asia (genotype I). Moreover, whereas genotype IV and I were co-circulating at the beginning of 2012, we observed that from the second half of 2012, i.e. during the major DENV-1 outbreak, all analyzed viruses were genotype I suggesting that a genotype switch occurred. Conclusions Repeated outbreaks of the same dengue serotype, as observed in NC, is uncommon in the Pacific islands. Why the earlier DENV-1 outbreaks did not induce sufficient herd immunity is unclear, and likely multifactorial, but the robust vector control program may have played a role by limiting transmission and thus maintaining a large susceptible pool in the population. PMID:24684835

  9. A comparative study of Taiwan's short-term medical missions to the South Pacific and Central America

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Taiwan has been dispatching an increasing number of short-term medical missions (STMMs) to its allied nations to provide humanitarian health care; however, overall evaluations to help policy makers strengthen the impact of such missions are lacking. Our primary objective is to identify useful strategies by comparing STMMs to the South Pacific and Central America. Methods The data for the evaluation come from two main sources: the official reports of 46 missions to 11 countries in Central America and 25 missions to 8 countries in the South Pacific, and questionnaires completed by health professionals who had participated in the above missions. In Central America, STMMs were staffed by volunteer health professionals from multiple institutions. In the South Pacific, STMMs were staffed by volunteer health professionals from single institutions. Results In comparison to STMMs to Central America, STMMs to the South Pacific accomplished more educational training for local health providers, including providing heath-care knowledge and skills (p<0.05), and training in equipment administration (p<0.001) and drug administration (p<0.005). In addition, language constraints were more common among missions to Central America (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the performance of clinical service between the two regions. Conclusions Health-care services provided by personnel from multiple institutions are as efficient as those from single institutions. Proficiency in the native language and provision of education for local health-care workers are essential for conducting a successful STMM. Our data provide implications for integrating evidence into the deployment of STMMs. PMID:23270459

  10. Creating a Joint Approach to New Zealand Defence Force Contemporary Amphibious Operations in the South West Pacific

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-06

    command and control, and operational planning. Discussion: The South West Pacific largely comes under the security umbrella of both Australia and...economic structures . New Zealand’s security picture takes into account the roles of both Australia and the United States (US). The US focus in the...and resources to enhance what we do. In researching this, what I found was that as an organisation , the New Zealand Defence Force is already well into

  11. Photosynthetic picoeukaryote community structure in the South East Pacific Ocean encompassing the most oligotrophic waters on Earth.

    PubMed

    Lepère, Cécile; Vaulot, Daniel; Scanlan, David J

    2009-12-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs), comprising organisms < 3 mum in size, are important primary producers in marine food webs and include representatives from all known algal lineages. Little is known, however, regarding the composition and distribution of PPE communities, particularly at large spatial scales, or in relation to the underlying biotic and abiotic factors that influence this structure. Here, we analysed PPE community structure along a transect in the South East Pacific Ocean (BIOSOPE cruise) that encompassed a large trophic gradient, including hyper-oligotrophic waters in the South Pacific Gyre (SPG), considered to be some of the 'clearest' natural waters on Earth. Using dot blot hybridizations with 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes, we established that the PPE community was dominated by members of the classes Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyceae throughout the transect. Moreover, clone library construction followed by phylogenetic analysis of sequenced clones revealed several novel 16S rRNA gene lineages, including new clades of prymnesiophytes (designated Prym 16S-III) and prasinophytes (Pras 16S-VIII). Pras 16S-VIII was found at all five stations at which clone libraries were constructed, representing a range of trophic conditions, including the South Pacific Gyre, suggesting members of this clade have a broad distribution in this part of the South East Pacific at least. In contrast, Prym 16S-III sequences were largely restricted to oligotrophic stations of the SPG. Subsequent multivariate statistical analyses showed that, within the measured factors, chemical and biological factors seem to influence PPE community structure more than physical parameters. However, more than 50% of the variation in distribution of PPE classes remained unexplained.

  12. Teaching physics with the Peace Corps in Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellisen, Raleigh

    1998-10-01

    The author was a Peace Corps volunteer teacher for two years at a high school in Fiji. The educational system and physics curriculum are described. Some of the author's experiences teaching in a different country conclude the article.

  13. Dissolved organic carbon in the South China Sea and its exchange with the Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Dai, Minhan; Chen, Junhui; Meng, Feifei; Li, Xiaolin; Liu, Zhiyu; Du, Chuanjun; Gan, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Based on a large and high quality dataset of total organic carbon (TOC, an approximation of dissolved organic carbon) collected from three cruises in spring, fall and winter in 2009-2011, we examined the distribution of TOC and its seasonality in the oligotrophic regime of the Northern South China Sea (NSCS) as well as its exchanges with the West Philippine Sea (WPS) in the Northwest Pacific Ocean through the Luzon Strait, the only deep channel linking the South China Sea (SCS) and the Pacific Ocean. Surface TOC concentration in the slope and basin areas of the NSCS varied from 65 to 75 μmol L-1 with relatively high values in the northeast part (southwest of Taiwan Island) in spring, and in the eastern parts of the NSCS during fall and winter. The TOC inventory in the upper 100 m of the water column ranged from 6.0-7.5 mol m-2 with a similar distribution pattern as the surface TOC concentration. There were two most significant differences in the TOC profiles between the SCS and the WPS. One was in the upper 200 m, where more TOC was accumulated in the WPS; the other was in the intermediate layer at ~1000-1500 m, where the gradient of TOC concentration was still persistent below 1000 m in the SCS, a feature which did not exist in the WPS. At this intermediate layer, there also appeared an excess of TOC in the SCS as compared with that in the WPS. The TOC concentration below 2000 m in the SCS was identical to that in the Northwestern Pacific, both of which were ~40 μmol L-1 without significant difference among stations and seasons, suggesting that this deep water TOC was homogeneously distributed in the deep SCS basin owing to the fast replenishment of the deep water from the WPS. We adopted an isopycnal mixing model to derive the water proportion contributed respectively from the SCS and Kuroshio along individual isopycnal plane and examined the impact of the Kuroshio intrusion on the TOC in the NSCS. The upper 100 m TOC inventory in the NSCS was overall

  14. Decade-long deep-ocean warming detected in the subtropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Denis L.; Lee, Sang-Ki; Landerer, Felix W.; Lumpkin, Rick

    2017-01-01

    The persistent energy imbalance at the top of the atmosphere, inferred from satellite measurements, indicates that the Earth's climate system continues to accumulate excess heat. As only sparse and irregular measurements of ocean heat below 2000 m depth exist, one of the most challenging questions in global climate change studies is whether the excess heat has already penetrated into the deep ocean. Here we perform a comprehensive analysis of satellite and in situ measurements to report that a significant deep-ocean warming occurred in the subtropical South Pacific Ocean over the past decade (2005-2014). The local accumulation of heat accounted for up to a quarter of the global ocean heat increase, with directly and indirectly inferred deep ocean (below 2000 m) contribution of 2.4 ± 1.4 and 6.1-10.1 ± 4.4%, respectively. We further demonstrate that this heat accumulation is consistent with a decade-long intensification of the subtropical convergence, possibly linked to the persistent La Niña-like state.

  15. Nitrous oxide production in the eastern tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qixing; Altabet, Mark; Arevalo-Martinez, Damian; Bange, Hermann; Ma, Xiao; Marandino, Christa; Sun, Mingshuang; Grundle, Damian

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important climate active trace gas that contributes to both atmospheric warming and ozone destruction, and the ocean is an important source of N2O to the atmosphere. Dissolved oxygen concentrations play an important role in regulating N2O production in the ocean, such that under low oxygen conditions major shifts in the predominant production pathways (i.e. nitrification vs. denitrification) can occur and the magnitude of production may increase substantially. To this end, major oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are responsible for a disproportionately high amount of marine N2O production. During the October 2015 ASTRA-OMZ cruise to the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP), one of the three major oceanic OMZs, we measured a suite of N2O parameters which included N2O concentrations, N2O production, and natural abundance N2O isotope (i.e. del 15N and del 18O) and isotopomer (i.e. 15N site-preference) signatures. Based on the results from these measurements, our presentation will demonstrate how N2O production and the different production pathways change along the oxygen concentration gradients from the oxygenated surface waters through the oxygen minimum layer. Our data could better constrain the importance of the ETSP-OMZ as source of marine N2O. Results from this work will provide insights into how N2O cycling responds to ocean deoxygenation as a result of climate change.

  16. Environmental rock-magnetism of Cenozoic red clay in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, Takaya; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu

    2016-04-01

    Nonfossiliferous red clay can be used for elucidating long-range environmental changes, although such studies were limited so far because of the difficulty in precise age estimation and extremely low sedimentation rates. We conducted an environmental rock-magnetic study of Cenozoic red clay at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1365 in the South Pacific Gyre. Magnetostratigraphy could be established only above ˜6 m below the seafloor (mbsf) (˜5 Ma). Below ˜6 mbsf, the ages of the cores were transferred from the published ages of nearby Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 596, which is based mainly on a constant Cobalt flux model, by intercore correlation using magnetic susceptibility and rare earth element content variation patterns. Rock-magnetic analyses including first-order reversal curve diagrams, the ratio of anhysteretic remanent magnetization susceptibility to saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), and IRM component analyses revealed that magnetic minerals consist mainly of biogenic magnetite and terrigenous maghemite, and that the proportion of the terrigenous component increased since ˜23 Ma. We consider that the increase reflects a growth of eolian dust flux associated with a northward shift of Australia and the site to an arid region of the middle latitudes. The increase of the terrigenous component accelerated after ˜5 Ma, which may be associated with a further growth of the Antarctic glaciation at that time. This is coeval with the onset of the preservation of magnetostratigraphy, suggesting that the primary remanent magnetization is carried by the terrigenous component.

  17. Gradients in Strong and Weak Organic Copper-Binding Ligands in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruacho, A.; Bundy, R.; Barbeau, K.; Parker, C.; Roshan, S.; Wu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic copper-binding ligands were examined on the U.S. GEOTRACES zonal transect in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific from Peru to Tahiti. All samples were measured using competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-ACSV), and a subset were analyzed using multiple competition strengths of the added ligand salicylaldoxime (1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 μM). Titration data was processed using newly available multiple analytical window data processing techniques, which unify the multiple window dataset as a whole. Multiple competition strengths of the added ligand enabled the detection of an additional weaker class of copper-binding ligand, compared to the two stronger ligand classes which have been measured previously in the open ocean. The strongest ligand class (L1) ranged in concentration from 1-10 nmol L-1 and had a conditional stability constant (logK) ranging from approximately 15.0-16.0. The weaker ligand classes (L2, and L3) were present in much higher concentrations even in surface waters, with concentrations ranging from 5-50 nmol L-1 and conditional stability constants ranging from 8.6-12.5. The elevated ligand concentrations, both in surface and deep waters, lead to extremely low concentrations of Cu2+ throughout the transect, possibly influencing important biogeochemical processes such as inducible iron acquisition by diatoms, and ammonium oxidation in the oxygen minimum zone.

  18. Copper Speciation Results From The U.S. GEOTRACES Eastern Tropical South Pacific Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruacho, A.; Bundy, R.; Barbeau, K.; Parker, C.; Bruland, K. W.; Roshan, S.; Wu, J.

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved organic copper-binding ligands were examined on the U.S. GEOTRACES zonal transect in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific from Peru to Tahiti. All samples were measured using competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-ACSV), the bulk in duplicate titrations at a single analytical window (5 µM) using the added ligand salicylaldoxime (SA). A subset of samples were also analyzed using multiple competition strengths (1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 µM added SA), along with equilibration tests at each analytical window. Titration data was processed using newly available software for single and multiple analytical window data. Equilibration tests conducted at the various analytical windows showed no significant differences in ligand concentration and binding strength between overnight vs. 15-30 minute equilibration times. Samples analyzed at a single window reveal excess strong ligands in the coastal region over the oxygen minimum zone with a conditional stability constant (logK) around 14. Multiple competition strengths of the added ligand enabled the detection of up to three classes of copper-binding ligands, with conditional stability constants ranging from 8.6-16.0, and high concentrations of weaker ligands throughout the water column. The presence of strong copper-binding ligands across the transect led to low free copper concentrations, which can be limiting to some phytoplankton. Analysis is ongoing and this presentation will summarize the status of this unique data set.

  19. Dolomitization of atolls by sea water convection flow: test of a hypothesis at Niue, South Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Aharon, P.; Socki, R.A.; Chan, L.

    1987-03-01

    The core of the former atoll on Niue Island, South Pacific, is extensively dolomitized. A detailed stable isotope study reveals that the dolomites are uniformly enriched in /sup 18/O and /sup 13/C(delta /sup 18/O = 2.8 per thousand +/- 0.5; delta /sup 13/C = 2.0 per thousand +/- 0.3) relative to their carbonate precursor. The Sr isotope ratios are equally constant with depth yielding /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values between 0.70912 and 0.70916. The observed isotopic compositions point to sea water as the dominant dolomitizing fluid. The Sr age of the dolomites is younger than the biostratigraphic age (Mid to Late Miocene) placing the dolomitization event at Plio-Pleistocene time. A model of sea water convection is proposed for atoll dolomitization on the basis of a thermal gradient between the atoll and the ambient ocean water. Sea water is drawn through the atoll margin and transferred upward by convective flow delivering Mg to the sites of dolomite precipitation. Transported with the sea water are volcano-derived metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn) as evidenced by the chemical gradient in the dolomite unit. It is suggested that the thermal convection model can find general application in atolls and other carbonate platforms containing dolomite where thermal instability exists. 70 references.

  20. Dinitrogen Fixation Within and Adjacent to Oxygen Deficient Waters of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widner, B.; Mulholland, M. R.; Bernhardt, P. W.; Chang, B. X.; Jayakumar, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recent work suggests that planktonic diazotrophs are geographically more widely distributed than previously thought including relatively warm (14-23oC) aphotic oxygenated pelagic waters and in aphotic waters within oxygen deficient zones. Because the volume of aphotic water in the ocean is large and may increase in the future, if dinitrogen (N2) fixation is widely occurring at sub-euphotic depths, this could result in a dramatic upward revision of global nitrogen (N) inputs via this process. N2 fixation rates were measured during a cruise in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific using stable isotope tracer techniques that account for slow gas dissolution. Results are compared with light, nutrient, and oxygen gradients (and necessarily temperature gradients). In addition, rates of N2 fixation made in vertical profiles within and above oxygen deficient waters are compared with those measured in vertical profiles adjacent to oxygen deficient waters. Results suggest that while rates of N2 fixation were measurable in deeper anoxic waters, volumetric N2 fixation rates were higher in surface waters.

  1. Nitrous oxide production by nitrification and denitrification in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qixing; Babbin, Andrew R.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    The Eastern Tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (ETSP-OMZ) is a site of intense nitrous oxide (N2O) flux to the atmosphere. This flux results from production of N2O by nitrification and denitrification, but the contribution of the two processes is unknown. The rates of these pathways and their distributions were measured directly using 15N tracers. The highest N2O production rates occurred at the depth of peak N2O concentrations at the oxic-anoxic interface above the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) because slightly oxygenated waters allowed (1) N2O production from both nitrification and denitrification and (2) higher nitrous oxide production yields from nitrification. Within the ODZ proper (i.e., anoxia), the only source of N2O was denitrification (i.e., nitrite and nitrate reduction), the rates of which were reflected in the abundance of nirS genes (encoding nitrite reductase). Overall, denitrification was the dominant pathway contributing the N2O production in the ETSP-OMZ.

  2. Measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO2 at the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, J.; Song, D.; Lee, J. S.; Rhee, T. S.; Park, K.; Lee, G.

    2014-12-01

    We measured peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO2 in remote marine boundary area during the SHIPPO (Shipborne Pole to Pole Observation). The measurements were made on the R/V Araon from Christ church, New Zealand to Gwangyang, South Korea along the western Pacific Ocean from March 30th to April 25th, 2014. Both PAN and NO2 were analyzed every 2 minute by a fast chromatograph with luminol-based chemiluminescence detection. In order to improve their detection limits, random noise from PMT has been successfully reduced by ensembled chromatograms with every 30 samples. Additionally, we replaced Nylon membrane surface with reflective aluminum surface and applied the new Luminol solution, which enhanced the signals significantly with detection limits of 6 pptv and 40 ppbv for PAN and NO2, respectively. Average concentrations of PAN and NO2 were 8 pptv for PAN and 80 pptv for NO2 during the experiment. The back trajectory analysis showed that the directly influenced air masses from anthropogenic activities were rare except the latitudes higher than 20°N. Relatively good correlations between PAN and NO2 were consistently observed, while PAN and O3 were not clearly correlated except in the air masses recently originated from land masses.

  3. Behavioral changes associated with economic development in the South Pacific: health transition in Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Dancause, Kelsey Needham; Dehuff, Christa; Soloway, Laura E; Vilar, Miguel; Chan, Chim; Wilson, Michelle; Tarivonda, Len; Regenvanu, Ralph; Kaneko, Akira; Garruto, Ralph M; Lum, J Koji

    2011-01-01

    Health patterns are changing in developing countries; as diet and activity patterns change with economic development, chronic disease prevalence increases, which is a characteristic of health transition. The islands of Vanuatu (South Pacific) have varying rates of economic development and provide a natural experimental model of health transition. To characterize behavioral changes associated with modernization. We surveyed 425 children and 559 adults on three islands varying in degree of economic development. We assessed diet (24-h dietary recall), physical activity (mode of transport, work activities, and recreation), substance use, and other behavioral patterns. Spending patterns and access to Western foods followed modernization gradients in our sample, whereas occupational patterns and ownership of technological goods were poor markers of modernization. With increasing economic development, participants consumed more animal proteins and simple carbohydrates. Physical activity levels were high; most participants were active in gardening, and sports were popular, especially in urban areas. However, urban participants spent more time in sedentary recreation. Men's use of alcohol and tobacco increased with economic development, but we observed marked differences in substance use patterns between two rural islands-one with and one without tourism. Economic development in Vanuatu is accompanied by nutrition transition and increased sedentary recreation, although physical activity levels remain high. Differences in substance use patterns between rural islands with and without tourism indicate a need for more research in rural areas. These findings might inform research in other communities in the early stages of health transition. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Disparities in glacial advection of Southern Ocean Intermediate Water to the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, R.; Nürnberg, D.; Ronge, T.; Tiedemann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Intermediate Waters formed in the Southern Ocean are critical for ventilating the thermocline in the Southern Hemisphere Gyres and transporting climatic signals from high to low latitudes on glacial-interglacial time-scales. Despite the importance of the Southern Ocean Intermediate Waters (SOIWs), information on past changes in SOIWs formation is fragmentary, and its impact on the South Pacific Gyre (SPG)'s thermocline largely unknown. Here, we present a 200 kyr record of paired Mg/Ca ratios and stable oxygen isotope from surface and deep dwelling planktonic foraminifera, from the SPG. On average, the Globigerina bulloides Mg/Ca-derived sea surface temperatures show similar conditions during the LGM and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 (9.4 °C versus 9.8 °C). In contrast, the subsurface temperatures derived from the Mg/Ca values of Globorotalia inflata and Globorotalia truncatulinoides suggest that LGM is ∼3 to ∼2 °C colder than MIS 6. Furthermore, at subsurface depths the reconstructed δ18Osw-ivc record (proxy for relative local salinity changes) suggests opposite glacial conditions, with slightly saltier-than-Holocene waters during MIS 6, and fresher-than-Holocene waters during LGM. Contrasting glacial scenarios, plausibly due to changes in the presence of SOIWs at the study site, suggest variable formation and/or advection of SOIWs to the SPG during different glacial stages. The variability in SOIWs is probably driven by the changes in the intensity of the Southern Westerly Winds.

  5. Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov., isolated from deep subseafloor sediment of South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghu; Fan, Xiaoyang; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, motile bacterium with a subpolar or lateral flagellum, designated strain XH089(T), was isolated from deep-sea sediment sample collected from the South Pacific Gyre (41°51' S 153°06' W) during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XH089(T) belonged to the genus Achromobacter and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Achromobacter ruhlandii ATCC 15749(T) (96.95%), Achromobacter denitrificans DSM 30026(T) (96.70%) and Achromobacter marplatensis B2(T) (96.66%). The DNA G+C content of strain XH089(T) was 66.5 mol%. The major fatty acids were C16: 0 and C17: 0 cyclo. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. On the basis of data from the polyphasic analysis, strain XH089(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Achromobacter, for which the name Achromobacter sediminum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XH089(T) ( = DSM 27279(T) = JCM 19223(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  6. Following the N2O consumption at the Oxygen Minimum Zone in the eastern South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, M.; Farías, L.

    2012-03-01

    Oxygen deficient zones (OMZs), such as those found in the eastern South Pacific (ESP), are the most important N2O sources in the world ocean relative to their volume. N2O production is related to low O2 concentrations and high primary productivity. However, when O2 is sufficiently low, canonical denitrification takes place and N2O consumption can be expected. N2O distribution in the ESP was analyzed over a wide latitudinal range (from 5° to 30° S and 71°-76° to ~84° W) based on ~890 N2O measurements. The intense consumption of N2O appears to be related to secondary NO2- accumulation, the best indicator of very low O2 levels. Using relationships that depend on threshold levels of O2 (<8 μM) and nitrite (>0.75 μM), we reproduced the apparent N2O production (ΔN2O) with high reliability (r2=0.73 p=0.01). Our results contribute to quantify the ratio of N2O production/consumption that is being cycling in O2 deficient water of N2O and may improve the prediction of N2O behavior under future scenarios of the OMZ expansion.

  7. Arcobacter pacificus sp. nov., isolated from seawater of the South Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zenghu; Yu, Cong; Wang, Xiaolei; Yu, Shaolan; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-11-09

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, slightly curved, non-spore-forming strain, designated SW028T, was isolated from surface seawater (26°29' S, 137°56' W) of the South Pacific Gyre during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SW028T belonged to the genus Arcobacter and it showed the highest sequence similarity with Arcobacter molluscorum LMG 25693T (95.50%). The dominant fatty acids of strain SW028T were C18:1ω7c, C16:1ω7c and C16:0. The only respiratory quinone detected was menaquinone-6. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unidentified phospholipid. The DNA G+C content was 27.1 mol%. The phylogenetic position of the novel strain was further confirmed by analysis of the housekeeping genes rpoB, gyrB and atpA. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, strain SW028T represents a novel species of the genus Arcobacter, for which the name Arcobacter pacificus is proposed. The type strain is SW028T (= DSM 25018T = JCM 17857T = LMG 26638T = CGMCC NO.1.11011).

  8. Impact of the Madden-Jullian oscillation on Rainfall over the South Pacific Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariyar, Sunil Kumar; Keenlyside, Noel; Bhatt, Bhuwan Chandra; Koseki, Shunya; Spengler, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Impacts of Madden-Jullian oscillation (MJO) on southern summertime rainfall over the south Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) is investigated. For this, the real-time multivariate daily MJO series 1 (RMM1) and 2 (RMM2) are used to measure the intensity and different phases of the MJO. For rainfall, daily 3B42 TRMM rainfall data are used and composite analysis is done in all eight different phases of the MJO. By analyzing the daily rainfall for the period 1998-2014, it is found that the MJO significantly modulates the distribution of rainfall over the SPCZ region. Multiple regression analysis (daily rainfall regressed with RMM1 and RMM2) shows noticeable impact of the MJO on rainfall over the SPCZ with explained variance of up to 14%. The phase composite analysis shows considerable changes in rainfall over the SPCZ region during the MJO life cycle with episodes of enhanced and supressed convection. When the MJO is in phase 2,3, and 4 negative rainfall anomalies (up to 6 mm day-1) are observed along the SPCZ. While during phase 6,7,and 8, SPCZ experiences positive rainfall anomaly (up to 8 mm day-1). Spectral analysis of daily rainfall data over the SPCZ (160E-180E,5S-15S) shows the maximum spectral peak within the range of intraseasonal periods of 30-90 days. This indicates that the intraseasonal variation in rainfall over the SPCZ is typically associated with the MJO.

  9. High abundances of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lami, Raphaël; Cottrell, Matthew T; Ras, Joséphine; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Claustre, Hervé; Kirchman, David L; Lebaron, Philippe

    2007-07-01

    Little is known about the abundance, distribution, and ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, particularly in oligotrophic environments, which represent 60% of the ocean. We investigated the abundance of AAP bacteria across the South Pacific Ocean, including the center of the gyre, the most oligotrophic water body of the world ocean. AAP bacteria, Prochlorococcus, and total prokaryotic abundances, as well as bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and divinyl-chlorophyll a concentrations, were measured at several depths in the photic zone along a gradient of oligotrophic conditions. The abundances of AAP bacteria and Prochlorococcus were high, together accounting for up to 58% of the total prokaryotic community. The abundance of AAP bacteria alone was up to 1.94 x 10(5) cells ml(-1) and as high as 24% of the overall community. These measurements were consistent with the high BChl a concentrations (up to 3.32 x 10(-3) microg liter(-1)) found at all stations. However, the BChl a content per AAP bacterial cell was low, suggesting that AAP bacteria are mostly heterotrophic organisms. Interestingly, the biovolume and therefore biomass of AAP bacteria was on average twofold higher than that of other prokaryotic cells. This study demonstrates that AAP bacteria can be abundant in various oligotrophic conditions, including the most oligotrophic regime of the world ocean, and can account for a large part of the bacterioplanktonic carbon stock.

  10. Geodynamic implications for zonal and meridional isotopic patterns across the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Allison A.; Jackson, Matthew G.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Kurz, Mark D.; Gill, Jim; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Jenner, Frances; Brens, Raul; Arculus, Richard

    2017-03-01

    We present new Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-He isotopic data for 65 volcanic samples from the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins. This includes 47 lavas obtained from 40 dredge sites spanning an east-west transect across the Lau and North Fiji basins, 10 ocean island basalt (OIB)-type lavas collected from seven Fijian islands, and eight OIB lavas sampled on Rotuma. For the first time, we are able to map clear north-south and east-west geochemical gradients in 87Sr/86Sr across the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins: lavas with the most geochemically enriched radiogenic isotopic signatures are located in the northeast Lau Basin, while signatures of geochemical enrichment are diminished to the south and west away from the Samoan hot spot. Based on these geochemical patterns and plate reconstructions of the region, these observations are best explained by the addition of Samoa, Rurutu, and Rarotonga hot spot material over the past 4 Ma. We suggest that underplated Samoan material has been advected into the Lau Basin over the past ˜4 Ma. As the slab migrated west (and toward the Samoan plume) via rollback over time, younger and hotter (and therefore less viscous) underplated Samoan plume material was entrained. Thus, entrainment efficiency of underplated plume material was enhanced, and Samoan plume signatures in the Lau Basin became stronger as the trench approached the Samoan hot spot. The addition of subducted volcanoes from the Cook-Austral Volcanic Lineament first from the Rarotonga hot spot, then followed by the Rurutu hot spot, contributes to the extreme geochemical signatures observed in the northeast Lau Basin.

  11. The Asia Pacific Academic Consortium for Global Public Health and medicine: stabilizing south-south academic collaboration.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Walter K

    2011-09-01

    Developmental strategies over the last 4 decades have generally tended to transfer knowledge and technology along north-south axes as trickle-down theories in development, especially in health knowledge transfers, prevailed. Limited efforts in development assistance for health (DAH) were made to promote south-south cooperation for basic health needs. Globalization with increased educational networks and development health assistance has enhanced the potential for more effective south-south partnerships for health. The stages of development in a consortium and key catalysts in the metamorphosis to a south-south partnership are identified: leadership, resources, expertise, visibility participation, and dynamism of a critical mass of young professionals.

  12. Relationships between sea surface temperature anomalies in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and South Texas precipitation and streamflow variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, Dorina; Valeriu, Murgulet; Hay, Richard R.; Tissot, Philippe; Mestas-Nuñez, Alberto M.

    2017-07-01

    While many studies have described linkages between large-scale climate phenomena and precipitation and streamflow, fewer studies explicitly address the climatic modulations at sub-regional scales. This study quantifies statistically the temporal variability in precipitation and streamflow at a regional scale in the semi-arid area of South Texas associated with three climate indices: El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). Results show that ENSO and PDO strongly modulate rainfall during the cold season and, to various extents, streamflow during the cold and warm seasons. In addition, this study shows that in South Texas streamflow is consistently below normal (i.e. means) while precipitation slightly increases during AMO-warm. To different extents, the Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies show stronger influences on the climate of South Texas when coupled. Droughts are more correlated with La Niña events but these events play a secondary role during PDO-cold. Although the PDO-cold phase is the dominant driver of droughts in this area, our analyses also show that the coupled effect of the PDO-cold/AMO-warm phases significantly increases the intensity of drought conditions to a degree similar to the PDO-cold/La Niña coupled effect. Given its stronger response to climate anomalies, streamflow offers a more effective tool for predicting climate variability impacts on South Texas water resources when compared to precipitation.

  13. Magmatic evolution of the Easter microplate-Crough Seamount region (South East Pacific)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hekinian, R.; Stoffers, P.; Akermand, D.; Binard, N.; Francheteau, Jean; Devey, C.; Garbe-Schonberg, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Easter microplate-Crough Seamount region located between 25?? S-116?? W and 25?? S-122?? W consists of a chain of seamounts forming isolated volcanoes and elongated (100-200 km in length) en echelon volcanic ridges oriented obliquely NE (N 065??), to the present day general spreading direction (N 100??) of the Pacific-Nazca plates. The extension of this seamount chain into the southwestern edge of the Easter microplate near 26??30??? S-115?? W was surveyed and sampled. The southern boundary including the Orongo fracture zone and other shallow ridges ( 0.25) MORBs which are similar in composition to other more recent basalts from the Southwest and East Rifts spreading axes of the Easter microplate. Incompatible element ratios normalized to chondrite values [(Ce/Yb)N = 1-2.5}, {(La/Sm)N = 0.4-1.2} and {(Zr/Y)N = 0.7-2.5} of the basalts are also similar to present day volcanism found in the Easter microplate. The volcanics from the Easter microplate-Crough region are unrelated to other known South Pacific intraplate magmatism (i.e. Society, Pitcairn, and Salas y Gomez Islands). Instead their range in incompatible element ratios is comparable to the submarine basalts from the recently investigated Ahu and Umu volcanic field (Easter hotspot) (Scientific Party SO80, 1993) and centered at about 80 km west of Easter Island. The oblique ridges and their associated seamounts are likely to represent ancient leaky transform faults created during the initial stage of the Easter microplate formation (??? 5 Ma). It appears that volcanic activity on seamounts overlying the oblique volcanic ridges has continued during their westward drift from the microplate as shown by the presence of relatively fresh lava observed on one of these structures, namely the first Oblique Volcanic Ridge near 25?? S-118?? W at about 160 km west of the Easter microplate West Rift. Based on a reconstruction of the Easter microplate, it is suggested that the Crough seamount (< 800 m depth) was formed

  14. Microbial Cells and Aerobic Respiration from Seafloor to Basement in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, S.; Inagaki, F.; Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.; Morono, Y.; Pockalny, R. A.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The seafloor is broadly divided into two regions (Emerson et al., 1985): one where sedimentary microbial respiration is high and oxygen (O2) penetrates only millimeters to centimeters into the sediment (Revsbech et al., 1980), and another where sedimentary respiration is low and O2 penetrates much deeper (Murray& Grundmanis, 1980; D'Hondt et al., 2011; Røy et al, 2012; Orcutt et al., 2013). Active anaerobic microbial communities persist for hundreds of meters or more in subseafloor sediment of the high-respiration region. In the low-respiration region, the existence of microbial communities is previously unknown throughout most of the sedimentary sequence (Morita & Zobell, 1955; D'Hondt et al., 2009; Røy et al., 2012). Here we show that microbial cells and aerobic respiration persist through the entire sediment sequence (to depths of at least 75 m below seafloor) throughout the vast expanse of the oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre. This sediment and underlying basalt may be continuously exposed to O2 for its entire history (up to 120 myrs at our sites). Redfield stoichiometry of dissolved O2 and nitrate indicates that net sedimentary O2 reduction is coupled to oxidation of marine organic matter. Oxygen and aerobic communities may occur throughout the entire sediment sequence in 15-44% of the Pacific and 9-37% of the global ocean. This result has major implications for the nature and distribution of subseafloor life. It may ultimately affect the chemical evolution of Earth's mantle and subduction-related volcanic systems. References D'Hondt, S., et al., 2009. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 11651-11656, doi:10.1073/pnas.0811793106. D'Hondt, S., et al., 2011. Proc. IODP 329, doi:10.2204/ iodp.proc.329.2011. Emerson, S., et al., 1985. Deep-Sea Research 32, 1-21. Morita, R.Y. & Zobell, C.E., 1955. Deep-Sea Research 3, 66-73.Murray, J.W. & Grundmanis, V., 1980. Science 209, 1527-1530. Orcutt, B.N., et al., 2013. Nature Communications 4, 2539, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3539

  15. Investigating ENSO Variability in the mid-Holocene using a Fossil Coral from the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vara, M. A.; Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Partin, J. W.; Gorman, M. K.; Maupin, C. R.; Edwards, R.; Cheng, H.; Inoue, M.; Nakedau, D.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate mid-Holocene variability in the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) system using geochemical variations in a well-preserved fossil Porites lutea coral collected in 2005 at Araki Island, Vanuatu (15.62°S 166.95°E). Surface-ocean conditions (temperature and salinity) at Vanuatu respond to ENSO-related changes in the West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) and the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The coral core is ~1.64 m in length and has been U-Th dated to 7,230 × 440 y B.P. Skeletal extension rate averages 1.5 cm per year based on analysis of X-radiographic images, which document the presence of well-defined density bands. The coral was sampled for geochemical analysis every 0.125 cm, which is approximately one sample per month. The full coral record will be approximately 90 continuous years in length once all sampling and analyses have been completed. Thus far, we have generated monthly resolved, 50-year coral δ18O and Sr/Ca records. The coral δ18O record has a mean δ18O value of -4.75 ‰ and an annual-cycle amplitude that averages 0.35 ‰. The fossil coral δ18O record contains patterns of isotopic variation that match patterns recognized as El Niño and La Niña events in modern coral δ18O records from this region. The fossil coral Sr/Ca record yields temperature estimates at ~7.2 ka that are similar to modern values. Future work will focus in three areas: 1) extending the length of the fossil coral record to more fully explore the nature of interannual variability recorded in the present fossil coral sample; 2) generating an additional fossil coral record using another coral collected from the same reef terrace to assess reproducibility of the records; and 3) extend the assessment of past ENSO variability using paleorecords generated from fossil corals of similar age from a different location in Vanuatu.

  16. Community seroprevalence survey for yaws and trachoma in the Western Division of Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Cocks, Naomi; Rainima-Qaniuci, Merelesita; Yalen, Chelsea; Macleod, Colin; Nakolinivalu, Apisalome; Migchelsen, Stephanie; Roberts, Chrissy h.; Butcher, Robert; Kama, Mike; Mabey, David; Marks, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Both yaws and trachoma are endemic in several countries in the Pacific. In co-endemic countries there may be potential synergies between both control programmes. Methods We undertook a cluster randomised trachoma and yaws seroprevalence survey of children in the Western Division of Fiji. Children were examined for skin lesions consistent with active yaws. A dried blood spot was collected which was tested using the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test and an ELISA to detect antibodies against Pgp3. Results A total of 607 children from 305 households across 23 villages were recruited into the survey. On skin examination, no child had clinical evidence of yaws, and the TPPA assay was negative in all children (0%, 95% CI 0.0–0.6). The seroprevalence of Pgp3 antibodies was 20.9% (95% CI 17.8–24.6%). Discussion In this study there was neither clinical nor serological evidence that transmission of yaws was ongoing. The Pgp3 seroprevalence pattern was consistent with either low level transmission of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis or exposure to C. trachomatis in the birth canal which is consistent with a survey conducted in the same region in 2013. These data suggest neither yaws nor ocular chlamydia infection are a significant public health problem in the Western Division of Fiji. PMID:27852877

  17. Variation in acquisition of Fiji disease virus by Perkinsiella saccharicida (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Ridley, Andrew W; Dhileepan, K; Walter, Gimme H; Johnson, Karyn N; Croft, Barry J

    2008-02-01

    Fiji leaf gall, caused the Fiji disease virus (genus Fijivirus, family Reoviridae, FDV), is a serious disease of sugarcane, Saccharum officinarum L., in Australia and several other Asia-Pacific countries. In Australia FDV is transmitted only by the planthopper Perkinsiella saccharicida Kirkaldy (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), in a propagative manner. Successful transmission of FDV by single planthoppers confined to individual virus free plants is highly variable, even under controlled conditions. The research reported here addresses two possible sources of this variation: (1) gender, wing form, and life stage of the planthopper; and (2) genotype of the source plant. The acquisition of FDV by macropterous males, macropterous females, brachypterous females, and nymphs of P. saccharicida from infected plants was investigated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to diagnose FDV infection in the vector. The proportion of individuals infected with FDV was not statistically related to life stage, gender, or adult wing form of the vector. The acquisition of FDV by P. saccharicida from four cultivars of sugarcane was compared to assess the influence of plant genotype on acquisition. Those planthopper populations reared on diseased 'NCo310' plants had twice as many infected planthoppers as those reared on 'Q110', 'WD1', and 'WD2'. Therefore, variation in FDV acquisition in this system is not the result of variation in the gender, wing form and life stage of the P. saccharicida vectors. The cultivar used as the source plant to rear vector populations does affect the proportion of infected planthoppers in a population.

  18. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Managing the Papuana uninodis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Taro Beetle in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Brown, P; Daigneault, A

    2014-10-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) plays a prominent role in the economies and cultures of Pacific Island countries such as Fiji. Unfortunately, taro is highly susceptible to invasion from taro beetles, which burrow into the corms and weaken the plants, rendering them unmarkable and prone to rot. Papuana uninodis Prell, an invasive alien species that is native to the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, was first reported on Viti Levu (Fiji's largest island) in 1984. Since that time, taro production on Viti Levu has fallen substantially. In this paper, we employ data from surveys of households and communities to document the impacts of P. uninodis on Viti Levu. We then identify three management approaches-chemical controls, cultural controls, and switching from taro to another staple crop-and conduct a cost-benefit analysis of each. We find strong arguments for pursuing chemical control, which derives a net present value of monetised benefits of about FJ$139,500 per hectare over 50 yr, or >FJ$21 for each FJ$1 spent. Still, any of the three management options is more efficient than no management, even without any attempt to quantify the benefits to biodiversity or forest protection, underscoring the value of actively managing this invasive alien species.

  19. A Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic reconstruction of the Southwest Pacific region: Tectonics controlled by subduction and slab rollback processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, W. P.; Lister, G. S.; Toy, V. G.

    2006-06-01

    A Cenozoic tectonic reconstruction is presented for the Southwest Pacific region located east of Australia. The reconstruction is constrained by large geological and geophysical datasets and recalculated rotation parameters for Pacific-Australia and Lord Howe Rise-Pacific relative plate motion. The reconstruction is based on a conceptual tectonic model in which the large-scale structures of the region are manifestations of slab rollback and backarc extension processes. The current paradigm proclaims that the southwestern Pacific plate boundary was a west-dipping subduction boundary only since the Middle Eocene. The new reconstruction provides kinematic evidence that this configuration was already established in the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleogene. From ˜ 82 to ˜ 52 Ma, subduction was primarily accomplished by east and northeast-directed rollback of the Pacific slab, accommodating opening of the New Caledonia, South Loyalty, Coral Sea and Pocklington backarc basins and partly accommodating spreading in the Tasman Sea. The total amount of east-directed rollback of the Pacific slab that took place from ˜ 82 Ma to ˜ 52 Ma is estimated to be at least 1200 km. A large percentage of this rollback accommodated opening of the South Loyalty Basin, a north-south trending backarc basin. It is estimated from kinematic and geological constraints that the east-west width of the basin was at least ˜ 750 km. The South Loyalty and Pocklington backarc basins were subducted in the Eocene to earliest Miocene along the newly formed New Caledonia and Pocklington subduction zones. This culminated in southwestward and southward obduction of ophiolites in New Caledonia, Northland and New Guinea in the latest Eocene to earliest Miocene. It is suggested that the formation of these new subduction zones was triggered by a change in Pacific-Australia relative motion at ˜ 50 Ma. Two additional phases of eastward rollback of the Pacific slab followed, one during opening of the South Fiji

  20. U-series disequilibria in volcanic rocks from the Futuna spreading centre (North Fiji Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Faouder, A.; Hemond, C.; Benoit, M.; Lagabrielle, Y.; Guivel, C.; Pelletier, B.; Bollinger, C.

    2005-05-01

    The North Fiji basin is the largest active back arc basin of the SW Pacific. It is 12 m.y. old and characterised by a regional upper mantle thermal anomaly (Garel, 2001). The 200Km long Futuna spreading centre (Pelletier et al., 2001) is located west of Futuna and Alofi islands at the border between Lau and North Fijian Basins. This ridge is composed of an axial valley spotted with numerous seamounts. It starts from the north of the Fiji platform (15° 40'S) and ends in the north Fiji transform zone, northwest of the Futuna and Alofi islands (13° 35'S). New U series measurements were performed by TIMS on fresh dredged glassy samples. As the topography of this spreading centre exhibits a peculiar structure, the geochemical signature is also unusual. U and Th concentrations range between 0,0930%, six have a 230Th excess within 25 ± 5% and three have 230Th excess of about 15%. These 230Th excesses are typical of MORB or OIB source melting and not a back arc volcanic processes. It is also symptomatic of a melting in presence of garnet. In the equiline diagram, samples fall on a linear correlation indicating a mixing between two end-members with different Th/Usources ratios. The trend observed in this diagram requires the involvement of an enriched component, likely an EMII component, as defined by the trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions (Benoit et al., in prep). This trend falls within the OIB field and plots close to Samoan samples analysed by Newman et al. (1984). This trend demonstrates the influence of a melt may be even more enriched than the samples of Savai'i volcano. This EMII melt mixes, within the upper mantle, with the Indian ocean like component as it was already established that

  1. Low Prevalence of Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis Infection and Active Trachoma in the Western Division of Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Umesh; Natutusau, Kinisimere; Pavluck, Alexandre L.; Willis, Rebecca; Alexander, Neal; Mabey, David C. W.; Cikamatana, Luisa; Kama, Mike; Rafai, Eric; Roberts, Chrissy H.; Solomon, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness and is caused by ocular infection with the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct). While the majority of the global disease burden is found in sub-Saharan Africa, the Western Pacific Region has been identified as trachoma endemic. Population surveys carried out throughout Fiji have shown an abundance of both clinically active trachoma and trachomatous trichiasis in all divisions. This finding is at odds with the clinical experience of local healthcare workers who do not consider trachoma to be highly prevalent. We aimed to determine whether conjunctival infection with Ct could be detected in one administrative division of Fiji. Methods A population-based survey of 2306 individuals was conducted using the Global Trachoma Mapping Project methodology. Population prevalence of active trachoma in children and trichiasis in adults was estimated using the World Health Organization simplified grading system. Conjunctival swabs were collected from 1009 children aged 1–9 years. DNA from swabs was tested for the presence of the Ct plasmid and human endogenous control. Results The prevalence of active trachoma in 1–9 year olds was 3.4%. The age-adjusted prevalence was 2.8% (95% CI: 1.4–4.3%). The unadjusted prevalence of ocular Ct infection in 1–9 year-olds was 1.9% (19/1009), and the age-adjusted infection prevalence was 2.3% (95% CI: 0.4–2.5%). The median DNA load was 41 Ct plasmid copies per swab (min 20, first quartile 32, mean 6665, third quartile 161, max 86354). There was no association between current infection and follicular trachoma. No cases of trachomatous trichiasis were identified. Discussion The Western Division of Fiji has a low prevalence of clinical trachoma. Ocular Ct infections were observed, but they were predominantly low load infections and were not correlated with clinical signs. Our study data suggest that trachoma does not meet the WHO definition of a public health problem in

  2. Low Prevalence of Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis Infection and Active Trachoma in the Western Division of Fiji.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Colin K; Butcher, Robert; Mudaliar, Umesh; Natutusau, Kinisimere; Pavluck, Alexandre L; Willis, Rebecca; Alexander, Neal; Mabey, David C W; Cikamatana, Luisa; Kama, Mike; Rafai, Eric; Roberts, Chrissy H; Solomon, Anthony W

    2016-07-01

    Trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness and is caused by ocular infection with the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct). While the majority of the global disease burden is found in sub-Saharan Africa, the Western Pacific Region has been identified as trachoma endemic. Population surveys carried out throughout Fiji have shown an abundance of both clinically active trachoma and trachomatous trichiasis in all divisions. This finding is at odds with the clinical experience of local healthcare workers who do not consider trachoma to be highly prevalent. We aimed to determine whether conjunctival infection with Ct could be detected in one administrative division of Fiji. A population-based survey of 2306 individuals was conducted using the Global Trachoma Mapping Project methodology. Population prevalence of active trachoma in children and trichiasis in adults was estimated using the World Health Organization simplified grading system. Conjunctival swabs were collected from 1009 children aged 1-9 years. DNA from swabs was tested for the presence of the Ct plasmid and human endogenous control. The prevalence of active trachoma in 1-9 year olds was 3.4%. The age-adjusted prevalence was 2.8% (95% CI: 1.4-4.3%). The unadjusted prevalence of ocular Ct infection in 1-9 year-olds was 1.9% (19/1009), and the age-adjusted infection prevalence was 2.3% (95% CI: 0.4-2.5%). The median DNA load was 41 Ct plasmid copies per swab (min 20, first quartile 32, mean 6665, third quartile 161, max 86354). There was no association between current infection and follicular trachoma. No cases of trachomatous trichiasis were identified. The Western Division of Fiji has a low prevalence of clinical trachoma. Ocular Ct infections were observed, but they were predominantly low load infections and were not correlated with clinical signs. Our study data suggest that trachoma does not meet the WHO definition of a public health problem in this Division of Fiji, but the inconsistency with

  3. A Sea-Surface Radiation Data Set for Climate Applications in the Tropical Western Pacific and South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Yan, Michael M.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The sea-surface shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes have been retrieved from the radiances measured by Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5. The surface radiation data set covers the domain 40S-40N and 90E-170W. The temporal resolution is 1 day, and the spatial resolution is 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg latitude-longitude. The retrieved surface radiation have been validated with the radiometric measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measuring (ARM) site on Manus island in the equatorial western Pacific for a period of 15 months. It has also been validated with the measurements at the radiation site on Dungsha island in the South China Sea during the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) Intensive Observing Period (May and June 1998). The data set is used to study the effect of El Nino and East Asian Summer monsoon on the heating of the ocean in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. Interannual variations of clouds associated with El Nino and the East Asian Summer monsoon have a large impact on the radiative heating of the ocean. It has been found that the magnitude of the interannual variation of the seasonal mean surface radiative heating exceeds 40 W/sq m over large areas. Together with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) shortwave fluxes at top of the atmosphere and the radiative transfer calculations of clear-sky fluxes, this surface radiation data set is also used to study the impact of clouds on the solar heating of the atmosphere. It is found that clouds enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approx. 20 W/sq m in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. This result is important for evaluating the accuracy of solar flux calculations in clear and cloudy atmospheres.

  4. Genetic divergence between Atlantic and Indo-Pacific stocks of bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) and admixture around South Africa.

    PubMed

    Chow, S; Okamoto, H; Miyabe, N; Hiramatsu, K; Barut, N

    2000-02-01

    Two mitochondrial DNA segments of the bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of these segments were used for the genetic stock study. The variation in a segment flanking the ATPase and COIII genes was low; only two genotypes (alpha and beta) were detected by RsaI digestion. Yet a large difference in the genotype distribution was observed between ocean basin samples. The alpha type predominated in four Atlantic samples, where 178 of 244 individuals were the alpha type. In contrast, only one of 195 individuals collected in the Indo-Pacific was the alpha type? The frequency of the alpha type varied considerably from 0 to 80% among seven samples collected off the Cape of Good Hope. The variation found in the other segment, containing the D-loop region, was much higher; two endonucleases (DpnII and RsaI) detected five genotypes each and 15 composite genotypes. A highly significant difference in genotype frequencies was observed between the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific samples, but no heterogeneity was observed among the four Atlantic or among four Indo-Pacific samples. These results clearly indicate that not only gene flow, but also fish migration, between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans are severely restricted, and that fishes from these distinct stocks are intermingling around South Africa. The simple and diagnostic genetic marker found in this study can be used to estimate mixing ratios between Atlantic and Indian stocks around South Africa.

  5. Supply chain and marketing of sea grapes, Caulerpa racemosa (Forsskål) J. Agardh (Chlorophyta: Caulerpaceae) in Fiji, Samoa and Tonga.

    PubMed

    Morris, C; Bala, S; South, G R; Lako, J; Lober, M; Simos, T

    2014-01-01

    This report describes for the first time the supply chain of Caulerpa racemosa in three Pacific Island countries. The harvesting and marketing of C. racemosa are important subsistence activities for villagers in Fiji and Samoa, less so in Tonga. At least 150 harvesters are involved in Fiji, some 100 in Samoa and only a handful in Tonga. The annual combined crop is of some 123 t valued at around US$266,492. In Fiji, it is projected that supply does not meet local demand and there is a potential export market that is currently operating at a pilot project level. In Samoa, the supply is considered adequate for the current market. In Tonga, harvesting is carried out by a few families and supplies a niche market in that country. The possibilities of field cultivation of Caulerpa have been explored but, at present, with only limited success in Samoa. The supply chain is simple in all three countries, and only in Fiji are middlemen involved in the distribution process. The limitations for marketing include the fact that only a few sites supply most of the crop in all the three countries, that all sites need to be conserved through sustainable harvesting methods, the short shelf life of the crop and a lack of information on the carrying capacity of harvest sites. Caulerpa remains a crop that fulfils a niche market but has the potential to be scaled up for additional livelihood development in the future.

  6. Differences in Late Quaternary primary productivity between the western tropical Pacific and the South China Sea: Evidence from coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiang; Liu, Chuanlian; Beaufort, Luc; Barbarin, Nicolas; Jian, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    Changes in Late Quaternary oceanic primary productivity in the western tropical Pacific were reconstructed using coccolith counts from the improved SYRACO system in piston core MD01-2386 retrieved from the Halmahera Sea near northwest New Guinea. The calculated primary productivity exhibits cycles on obliquity and precession timescales over the last 192 ka. There are marked differences between primary productivity records from the western tropical Pacific and the South China Sea (SCS), with the former being dominated by precession, and the latter showing all three Milankovitch cycles (eccentricity, obliquity and precession). Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analyses reveal two significant EOF modes in the western tropical Pacific and SCS records. EOF-1 accounts for 38% of the total variance and exhibits obvious precessional cycles corresponding to Northern Hemisphere summer insolation, while EOF-2 accounts for 22% of the total variance and exhibits strong 41-kyr periodicity, suggesting different biological responses to hydroclimate changes in the two regions. A more complex hydroclimate regime influenced by the East Asian monsoon and the large contrast in regional topography and circulation during glacial cycles are considered to be the primary drivers of the stronger temporal variability in productivity in the SCS compared to the relatively stable western tropical Pacific.

  7. Persistent decadal-scale rainfall variability in the tropical South Pacific Convergence Zone through the past six centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Shen, C.-C.; Quinn, T. M.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Banner, J. L.; Thirumalai, K.; Sinclair, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    Modern Pacific decadal variability (PDV) has global impacts; hence records of PDV from the pre-instrumental period are needed to better inform models that are used to project future climate variability. We focus here on reconstructing rainfall in the western tropical Pacific (Solomon Islands; ~ 9.5° S, ~160° E), a region directly influenced by PDV, using cave deposits (stalagmite). A relationship is developed between δ18O variations in the stalagmite and local rainfall amount to produce a 600 yr record of rainfall variability from the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). We present evidence for large (~1.5 m), abrupt, and periodic changes in total annual rainfall amount on decadal to multidecadal timescales since 1423 ± 5 CE (Common Era) in the Solomon Islands. The timing of the decadal changes in rainfall inferred from the 20th century portion of the stalagmite δ18O record coincides with previously identified decadal shifts in PDV-related Pacific ocean-atmosphere behavior (Clement et al., 2011; Deser et al., 2004). The Solomons record of PDV is not associated with variations in external forcings, but rather results from internal climate variability. The 600 yr Solomon Islands stalagmite δ18O record indicates that decadal oscillations in rainfall are a persistent characteristic of SPCZ-related climate variability.

  8. Low rates of nitrogen fixation in eastern tropical South Pacific surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Angela N.; Casciotti, Karen L.; Berelson, William M.; Prokopenko, Maria G.; Capone, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    An extensive region of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) Ocean has surface waters that are nitrate-poor yet phosphate-rich. It has been proposed that this distribution of surface nutrients provides a geochemical niche favorable for N2 fixation, the primary source of nitrogen to the ocean. Here, we present results from two cruises to the ETSP where rates of N2 fixation and its contribution to export production were determined with a suite of geochemical and biological measurements. N2 fixation was only detectable using nitrogen isotopic mass balances at two of six stations, and rates ranged from 0 to 23 µmol N m−2 d−1 based on sediment trap fluxes. Whereas the fractional importance of N2 fixation did not change, the N2-fixation rates at these two stations were several-fold higher when scaled to other productivity metrics. Regardless of the choice of productivity metric these N2-fixation rates are low compared with other oligotrophic locations, and the nitrogen isotope budgets indicate that N2 fixation supports no more than 20% of export production regionally. Although euphotic zone-integrated short-term N2-fixation rates were higher, up to 100 µmol N m−2 d−1, and detected N2 fixation at all six stations, studies of nitrogenase gene abundance and expression from the same cruises align with the geochemical data and together indicate that N2 fixation is a minor source of new nitrogen to surface waters of the ETSP. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that, despite a relative abundance of phosphate, iron may limit N2 fixation in the ETSP. PMID:26976587

  9. Behavioral risk factors for obesity during health transition in Vanuatu, South Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Dancause, Kelsey Needham; Vilar, Miguel; Wilson, Michelle; Soloway, Laura E; DeHuff, Christa; Chan, Chim; Tarivonda, Len; Regenvanu, Ralph; Kaneko, Akira; Lum, J Koji; Garruto, Ralph M

    2012-01-01

    The South Pacific archipelago of Vanuatu, like many developing countries, is currently experiencing a shift in disease burdens from infectious to chronic diseases with economic development. A rapid increase in obesity prevalence represents one component of this “health transition.” We sought to identify behaviors associated with measures of obesity in Vanuatu. We surveyed 534 adults from three islands varying in level of economic development. We measured height; weight; waist and hip circumferences; triceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfolds; and percent body fat (%BF) by bioelectrical impedance. We assessed diet through 24-hour dietary recall and physical activity patterns using a survey. We calculated prevalence of obesity and central obesity based on multiple indicators (body mass index, %BF, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio), and analyzed differences among islands and associations with behavioral patterns. Obesity prevalence was lowest among rural and highest among suburban participants. Prevalence of central obesity was particularly high among women (up to 73.9%), even in rural areas (ranging from 14.7% to 41.2% depending on the measure used). Heavier reliance on animal protein and incorporation of Western foods in the diet – specifically, tinned fish and instant noodles – was significantly associated with increased obesity risk. Even in rural areas where diets and lifestyles remain largely traditional, modest incorporation of Western foods in the diet can contribute to increased risk of obesity. Early prevention efforts are thus particularly important during health transition. Where public health resources are limited, education about dietary change could be the best target for prevention. PMID:23505203

  10. A proposed time transfer experiment between the USA and the South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luck, John; Dunkley, John; Armstrong, Tim; Gifford, Guy A.; Landis, Paul; Rasmussen, Scott; Wheeler, Paul J.; Bartholomew, Thomas R.; Stein, Samuel R.

    1992-01-01

    Described here are the concept, architecture and preliminary details of an experiment directed towards providing continuous Ultra High Precision (UHP) time transfer between Washington, DC; Salisbury, SA Australia; Orroral Valley, ACT Australia; and Lower Hutt, New Zealand. A proposed method of distributing UTC(USNO) at a high level of precision to passive users over a broad area of the South Pacific is described. The concept is based on active two-way satellite time transfer from the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) to the proposed USNO Master Clock West (MCW) in Wahiwa, HI at the 1 nanosecond level using active satellite two-way time transfer augmented by Precise Positioning Service (PPS) of the Global Positioning System (GPS). MCW would act as an intermediate transfer/reference station, again linked to Salisbury at the 1 nanosecond level using active satellite two-way time transfer augmented by PPS GPS. From this point, time would be distributed within the region by two methods. The first is an existing TV line sync system using an Australian communications satellite (AUSSAT K1) which is useful to the 20 nanosecond level. The second approach is RF ranging and multilateration between Salisbury, Orroral Observatory, Lower Hutt and the AUSSAT B1 and B2 to be launched in 1992. Orroral Observatory will provide precise laser ranging to the AUSSAT B1/B2 retro reflectors which will reduce ephemeris related time transfer errors to below 1 nanosecond. The corrected position will be transmitted by both the time transfer modem and the existing TV line sync dissemination process. Multilateration has the advantage of being an all weather approach and when used with the laser ranging technique will provide a precise measurement of the propagation path delays. This will result in time transfer performance levels on the order of 10 nanoseconds to passive users in both Australia and New Zealand.

  11. Low rates of nitrogen fixation in eastern tropical South Pacific surface waters.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Angela N; Casciotti, Karen L; Berelson, William M; Prokopenko, Maria G; Capone, Douglas G

    2016-04-19

    An extensive region of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) Ocean has surface waters that are nitrate-poor yet phosphate-rich. It has been proposed that this distribution of surface nutrients provides a geochemical niche favorable for N2fixation, the primary source of nitrogen to the ocean. Here, we present results from two cruises to the ETSP where rates of N2fixation and its contribution to export production were determined with a suite of geochemical and biological measurements. N2fixation was only detectable using nitrogen isotopic mass balances at two of six stations, and rates ranged from 0 to 23 µmol N m(-2)d(-1)based on sediment trap fluxes. Whereas the fractional importance of N2fixation did not change, the N2-fixation rates at these two stations were several-fold higher when scaled to other productivity metrics. Regardless of the choice of productivity metric these N2-fixation rates are low compared with other oligotrophic locations, and the nitrogen isotope budgets indicate that N2fixation supports no more than 20% of export production regionally. Although euphotic zone-integrated short-term N2-fixation rates were higher, up to 100 µmol N m(-2)d(-1), and detected N2fixation at all six stations, studies of nitrogenase gene abundance and expression from the same cruises align with the geochemical data and together indicate that N2fixation is a minor source of new nitrogen to surface waters of the ETSP. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that, despite a relative abundance of phosphate, iron may limit N2fixation in the ETSP.

  12. Beach development on an uplifted coral atoll: Niue, south west Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsters, Teuvirihei Helene; Kennedy, David M.

    2014-10-01

    Niue is an uplifted coral atoll in the south western Pacific characterised by erosional terraces on its coastal margin. Beaches are found around the island located in pockets at the rear of erosional shore platforms. The beaches in Niue are < 100 m long, < 25 m wide and generally less than 0.5 m thick. The beaches sit on top of an abrasion ramp that dips seaward at a similar angle to the beach. The morphology, stability and sedimentology of these beaches are investigated through laser surveying, aerial photo analysis and petrographic techniques. Surveying was undertaken in 2008 and 2010 with data compared to previous work conducted in the 1990s in order to assess the controls on sediment deposition on uplifted coral atolls. There is a high potential for sediment transport on the island. The beaches are entirely removed during tropical cyclone events and even under calm conditions sediment is mobile. The restriction of beaches to pockets along the rocky coast suggests that these areas temporally interrupt sediment transport allowing beaches to form. All the beaches are composed of a typical chlorozoan assemblage of carbonate grains dominated by coral (20-50%), coralline algae (18%) and foraminifera (up to 81%). These sediments are produced on the platforms in the immediate vicinity of the beaches with little longshore transport between embayments being evident. The close relationship between source and depositional zones, combined with the high transport potential across the platforms indicates that the beaches are highly vulnerable to any change in either energy conditions or sediment supply.

  13. Revisiting nitrification in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific: A focus on controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Warner, Mark J.; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2016-03-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonium (NH4+) to nitrite (NO2-) and to nitrate (NO3-), is a component of the nitrogen (N) cycle internal to the fixed N pool. In oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hotspots for oceanic fixed N loss, nitrification plays a key role because it directly supplies substrates for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox), and may compete for substrates with these same processes. However, the control of oxygen and substrate concentrations on nitrification are not well understood. We performed onboard incubations with 15N-labeled substrates to measure rates of NH4+ and NO2- oxidation in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP). The spatial and depth distributions of NH4+ and NO2- oxidation rates were primarily controlled by NH4+ and NO2- availability, oxygen concentration, and light. In the euphotic zone, nitrification was partially photoinhibited. In the anoxic layer, NH4+ oxidation was negligible or below detection, but high rates of NO2- oxidation were observed. NH4+ oxidation displayed extremely high affinity for both NH4+ and oxygen. The positive linear correlations between NH4+ oxidation rates and in situ NH4+ concentrations and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene abundances in the upper oxycline indicate that the natural assemblage of ammonia oxidizers responds to in situNH4+ concentrations or supply by adjusting their population size, which determines the NH4+ oxidation potential. The depth distribution of archaeal and bacterial amoA gene abundances and N2O concentration, along with independently reported simultaneous direct N2O production rate measurements, suggests that AOA were predominantly responsible for NH4+ oxidation, which was a major source of N2O production at oxygen concentrations > 5 µM.

  14. Nitrous oxide cycling in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific Oxygen Deficient Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, K. L.; Forbes, M. S.; Vedamati, J.; Peters, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    Marine sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas that also contributes to stratospheric ozone depletion, account for up to 25% of global emissions. Much of this N2O is produced in upwelling regions near the ocean's oxygen deficient zones (ODZs), areas known for intense N2O cycling. The Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) ODZ is one such area, and the balance of the processes regulating the production and emission of N2O in the ETSP is uncertain. Here we examined the concentration, isotopic and isotopomeric measurements of dissolved N2O, in concert with nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) isotopic ratios from seven stations on the NBP1305 cruise to the ETSP to understand the mechanisms that drive N2O production and consumption throughout the water column. Keeling plot analysis identified N2O produced with a low site preference (5-9‰) and moderate d15Nbulk (6-8‰) in the surface and oxycline layers. In the deep layer, N2O was produced with a higher site preference (18-20‰) but similar d15Nbulk (6-7‰). In the ODZ significant enrichment was apparent in δ15Nbulk (14-22‰), δ18O (68-100‰) and site preference (SP = 39-60‰), implying active N2O consumption in this layer. Further scrutiny of the ODZ N2O isotope data identifies a deviation from the relative increases in d18O and SP expected for bacterial denitrification. At high levels of N2O consumption, SP increases more than expected for the increase in d18O. Examination of these signals in conjunction with parallel analysis of nitrate and nitrite d15N and d18O measurements are used to evaluate potential N2O sources in this region.

  15. Phosphorus burial in ultra-oligotrophic sediments of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhammer, Tobias; Ahrens, Janis; Marshall, Joseph; Ferdelman, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Marine phosphorus (P) biogeochemistry has a certain affection towards continental margins and shallow oceans. There, ocean currents re-cycle the major share of the standing P stock, and the formation of phosphate mineral phases and their burial is most intense. The seabed below the open ocean has received considerably less attention, but in fact is a major player in global P cycling alone for its sheer extent. Processes controlling P sequestration and regeneration in these environments remain to be explored, and P budgets of these oceanic provinces are yet poorly constrained. Here, we present data from the seafloor beneath the nutrient-depleted South Pacific Gyre (SPG), characterized by ultra low primary production, inferior sedimentation rates, and barely detectable microbial activity and biomass. We have investigated P phases and binding forms in surface-near samples from sediment cores retrieved by IODP Expedition 329, covering a productivity transect from the ultra-oligotrophic center of the SPG to the mesotrophic waters east of New Zealand, employing different sequential extraction protocols for sedimentary phosphate and bulk elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. In these samples, we find sedimentary P contents that are unexpectedly large and in an order of magnitude as values known from upwelling sediments. Furthermore, the highest P contents are located beneath the center of the gyre, and the depth trends of P speciation are highly variable across the productivity transect. In our contribution, we will discuss (1) the balance of P burial vs. regeneration in the SPG seabed, (2) the contribution of biogenic P to the overall P pool and the formation of stable burial phases, (3) the potential of zeolitic phases to efficiently retain P and represent an alternative burial pathway for P in these ultra-oligotrophic sediments.

  16. Metagenomic and Phylogenetic Analysis of Deep-Sea Ferromanganese Nodules from the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, B.; Horn, G.; Edwards, K. J.; Nelson, W.; Heidelberg, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ferromanganese/polymetallic nodules form at the sediment-water interface in deep-sea environments (4,000-6,000 m). They are primarily composed of manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and other metals including copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), and rare trace metals, but composition can vary from nodule to nodule and area to area. Globally, it is estimated that ferromanganese nodules contain more than 2 × 10E14 kg of Mn and Fe. There is much debate as to how these nodules form and the extent to which the process is controlled/mediated by microorganisms, specifically bacteria and archaea. Ferromanganese nodules from 3 different sites (4 different nodules; 59 subsamples) were aseptically collected on the site survey expedition to the South Pacific Gyre (KNOX-02RR, Dec. 2006 - Jan. 2007). Microbial community structure was determined using high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing. Subsequently, samples were subjected to multiple displacement amplification (MDA) and shotgun metagenomics was performed using both the GS FLX Titanium XL+ chemistry. Metagenomic sequences were assembled and analyzed. Preliminary results have revealed a high abundance of sequences related to 'marine group-1' Thaumarchaea, to date, a group that contains only autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing organisms. Furthermore, there appears to be limited correlation between community composition and the layer of the nodule from which DNA was extracted. The community composition of the nodule from area with the lowest sedimentation and organic carbon burial rates was significantly different from the other nodules, with a community dominated by heterotrophic organisms. Metagenomic results support the community structure and produced several scaffolds (longest ~12 kbp) that have begun to reveal the genomic potential in the microbial community. Further, the data has been used to identify two previously unsequenced Microviridae viral genomes. And further metagenomic analysis is currently ongoing. Community

  17. Multiple metabolisms constrain the anaerobic nitrite budget in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbin, Andrew R.; Peters, Brian D.; Mordy, Calvin W.; Widner, Brittany; Casciotti, Karen L.; Ward, Bess B.

    2017-02-01

    The Eastern Tropical South Pacific is one of the three major oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) in the global ocean and is responsible for approximately one third of marine water column nitrogen loss. It is the best studied of the ODZs and, like the others, features a broad nitrite maximum across the low oxygen layer. How the microbial processes that produce and consume nitrite in anoxic waters interact to sustain this feature is unknown. Here we used 15N-tracer experiments to disentangle five of the biologically mediated processes that control the nitrite pool, including a high-resolution profile of nitrogen loss rates. Nitrate reduction to nitrite likely depended on organic matter fluxes, but the organic matter did not drive detectable rates of denitrification to N2. However, multiple lines of evidence show that denitrification is important in shaping the biogeochemistry of this ODZ. Significant rates of anaerobic nitrite oxidation at the ODZ boundaries were also measured. Iodate was a potential oxidant that could support part of this nitrite consumption pathway. We additionally observed N2 production from labeled cyanate and postulate that anammox bacteria have the ability to harness cyanate as another form of reduced nitrogen rather than relying solely on ammonification of complex organic matter. The balance of the five anaerobic rates measured—anammox, denitrification, nitrate reduction, nitrite oxidation, and dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonium—is sufficient to reproduce broadly the observed nitrite and nitrate profiles in a simple one-dimensional model but requires an additional source of reduced nitrogen to the deeper ODZ to avoid ammonium overconsumption.

  18. Behavioral risk factors for obesity during health transition in Vanuatu, South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Dancause, Kelsey Needham; Vilar, Miguel; Wilson, Michelle; Soloway, Laura E; DeHuff, Christa; Chan, Chim; Tarivonda, Len; Regenvanu, Ralph; Kaneko, Akira; Lum, J Koji; Garruto, Ralph M

    2013-01-01

    The South Pacific archipelago of Vanuatu, like many developing countries, is currently experiencing a shift in disease burdens from infectious to chronic diseases with economic development. A rapid increase in obesity prevalence represents one component of this "health transition." To identify behaviors associated with measures of obesity in Vanuatu. Five hundred and thirty four adults from three islands varying in level of economic development were surveyed. Height, weight, waist, and hip circumferences; triceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfolds; and percent body fat (%BF) by bioelectrical impedance were measured. Diet through 24-h dietary recall and physical activity patterns using a survey were assessed. We analyzed prevalence of obesity and central obesity based on multiple indicators (body mass index, %BF, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio), and analyzed differences among islands and associations with behavioral patterns. Obesity prevalence was lowest among rural and highest among suburban participants. Prevalence of central obesity was particularly high among women (up to 73.9%), even in rural areas (ranging from 14.7 to 41.2% depending on the measure used). Heavier reliance on animal protein and incorporation of Western foods in the diet-specifically, tinned fish and instant noodles-was significantly associated with increased obesity risk. Even in rural areas where diets and lifestyles remain largely traditional, modest incorporation of Western foods in the diet can contribute to increased risk of obesity. Early prevention efforts are thus particularly important during health transition. Where public health resources are limited, education about dietary change could be the best target for prevention. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  19. Biological N2O Fixation in the Eastern South Pacific Ocean and Marine Cyanobacterial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Farías, Laura; Faúndez, Juan; Fernández, Camila; Cornejo, Marcela; Sanhueza, Sandra; Carrasco, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the global radiative balance and atmospheric ozone chemistry, its sources and sinks within the Earth’s system are still poorly understood. In the ocean, N2O is produced by microbiological processes such as nitrification and partial denitrification, which account for about a third of global emissions. Conversely, complete denitrification (the dissimilative reduction of N2O to N2) under suboxic/anoxic conditions is the only known pathway accountable for N2O consumption in the ocean. In this work, it is demonstrated that the biological assimilation of N2O could be a significant pathway capable of directly transforming this gas into particulate organic nitrogen (PON). N2O is shown to be biologically fixed within the subtropical and tropical waters of the eastern South Pacific Ocean, under a wide range of oceanographic conditions and at rates ranging from 2 pmol N L−1 d− to 14.8 nmol N L−1 d−1 (mean ± SE of 0.522±1.06 nmol N L−1 d−1, n = 93). Additional assays revealed that cultured cyanobacterial strains of Trichodesmium (H-9 and IMS 101), and Crocosphaera (W-8501) have the capacity to directly fix N2O under laboratory conditions; suggesting that marine photoautotrophic diazotrophs could be using N2O as a substrate. This metabolic capacity however was absent in Synechococcus (RCC 1029). The findings presented here indicate that assimilative N2O fixation takes place under extreme environmental conditions (i.e., light, nutrient, oxygen) where both autotrophic (including cyanobacteria) and heterotrophic microbes appear to be involved. This process could provide a globally significant sink for atmospheric N2O which in turn affects the oceanic N2O inventory and may also represent a yet unexplored global oceanic source of fixed N. PMID:23717516

  20. Gammaproteobacterial diazotrophs and nifH gene expression in surface waters of the South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Moisander, Pia H; Serros, Tracy; Paerl, Ryan W; Beinart, Roxanne A; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the cyanobacterial N2-fixers (diazotrophs), there is a high nifH gene diversity of non-cyanobacterial groups present in marine environments, yet quantitative information about these groups is scarce. N2 fixation potential (nifH gene expression), diversity and distributions of the uncultivated diazotroph phylotype γ-24774A11, a putative gammaproteobacterium, were investigated in the western South Pacific Ocean. γ-24774A11 gene copies correlated positively with diazotrophic cyanobacteria, temperature, dissolved organic carbon and ambient O2 saturation, and negatively with depth, chlorophyll a and nutrients, suggesting that carbon supply, access to light or inhibitory effects of DIN may control γ-24774A11 abundances. Maximum nifH gene-copy abundance was 2 × 104 l−1, two orders of magnitude less than that for diazotrophic cyanobacteria, while the median γ-24774A11 abundance, 8 × 102 l−1, was greater than that for the UCYN-A cyanobacteria, suggesting a more homogeneous distribution in surface waters. The abundance of nifH transcripts by γ-24774A11 was greater during the night than during the day, and the transcripts generally ranged from 0–7%, but were up to 26% of all nifH transcripts at each station. The ubiquitous presence and low variability of γ-24774A11 abundances across tropical and subtropical oceans, combined with the consistent nifH expression reported in this study, suggest that γ-24774A11 could be one of the most important heterotrophic (or photoheterotrophic) diazotrophs and may need to be considered in future N budget estimates and models. PMID:24722632

  1. Aphotic N2 Fixation in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Sophie; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Turk-Kubo, Kendra A.; Moutin, Thierry; Hamersley, Robert M.; Grosso, Olivier; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Capone, Douglas G.

    2013-01-01

    We examined rates of N2 fixation from the surface to 2000 m depth in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) during El Niño (2010) and La Niña (2011). Replicated vertical profiles performed under oxygen-free conditions show that N2 fixation takes place both in euphotic and aphotic waters, with rates reaching 155 to 509 µmol N m−2 d−1 in 2010 and 24±14 to 118±87 µmol N m−2 d−1 in 2011. In the aphotic layers, volumetric N2 fixation rates were relatively low (<1.00 nmol N L−1 d−1), but when integrated over the whole aphotic layer, they accounted for 87–90% of total rates (euphotic+aphotic) for the two cruises. Phylogenetic studies performed in microcosms experiments confirm the presence of diazotrophs in the deep waters of the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), which were comprised of non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs affiliated with nifH clusters 1K (predominantly comprised of α-proteobacteria), 1G (predominantly comprised of γ-proteobacteria), and 3 (sulfate reducing genera of the δ-proteobacteria and Clostridium spp., Vibrio spp.). Organic and inorganic nutrient addition bioassays revealed that amino acids significantly stimulated N2 fixation in the core of the OMZ at all stations tested and as did simple carbohydrates at stations located nearest the coast of Peru/Chile. The episodic supply of these substrates from upper layers are hypothesized to explain the observed variability of N2 fixation in the ETSP. PMID:24349048

  2. Predicting cetacean and seabird habitats across a productivity gradient in the South Pacific gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannocci, Laura; Catalogna, Maxime; Dorémus, Ghislain; Laran, Sophie; Lehodey, Patrick; Massart, Wendy; Monestiez, Pascal; Van Canneyt, Olivier; Watremez, Pierre; Ridoux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Oligotrophic regions are expected to host low densities of top predators. Nevertheless, top predators with contrasting energetic costs might respond differently to the productivity of their habitats. Predators with high energetic demands might be constrained to select the most productive habitats to meet their high energetic requirements, whereas less active predators would be able to satisfy their needs by exploiting either high or low productivity habitats. Although situated in the core of the South Pacific oligotrophic gyre, French Polynesia is characterized by a fairly marked productivity gradient from the extremely oligotrophic Australs area to the more productive Marquesas area. The aim of this study was to investigate cetacean and seabird habitats in French Polynesia in light of their general energetic constraints. We collected cetacean and seabird sightings from an aerial survey across French Polynesian waters during the austral summer 2011. We classified cetaceans and seabirds into energetic guilds according to the literature. For each guild, we built generalized additive models along with static covariates and oceanographic covariates at the seasonal and climatological resolutions. We provided regional habitat predictions for Delphininae, Globicephalinae, sperm and beaked whales, tropicbirds, grey terns, noddies, white terns, boobies, petrels and shearwaters, sooty terns and frigatebirds. Explained deviances ranged from 5% to 30% for cetaceans and from 14% to 29% for seabirds. Cetaceans clearly responded to the productivity gradient, with the highest predicted densities around the productive waters of the Marquesas. However, Delphininae and Globicephalinae, characterized by higher energetic demands, depended more strongly on productivity, showing a ratio of 1-26 and 1-31 between their lowest and highest density areas respectively, compared to the less active sperm and beaked whales (showing only a ratio of 1-3.5 in predicted densities). In contrast

  3. Following the N2O consumption in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, M.; Farías, L.

    2012-08-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), such as those found in the eastern South Pacific (ESP), are the most important N2O sources in the global ocean relative to their volume. N2O production is related to low O2 concentrations and high primary productivity. However, when O2 is sufficiently low, canonical denitrification takes place and N2O consumption can be expected. N2O distribution in the ESP was analyzed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range (from 5° to 30° S and from 71-76° to ~ 84° W) based on ~ 890 N2O measurements. Intense N2O consumption, driving undersaturations as low as 40%, was always associated with secondary NO2- accumulation (SNM), a good indicator of suboxic/anoxic O2 levels. First, we explore relationships between ΔN2O and O2 based on existing data of denitrifying bacteria cultures and field observations. Given the uncertainties in the O2 measurements, a second relationship between ΔN2O and NO2- (> 0.75 μM) was established for suboxic waters (O2 < 8 μM). We reproduced the apparent N2O production (ΔN2O) along the OMZ in ESP with high reliability (r2 = 0.73 p = 0.01). Our results will contribute to the quantification of the N2O that is recycled in O2 deficient waters, and improve the prediction of N2O behavior under future scenarios of OMZ expansion and intensification.

  4. Dust, Volcanic Ash, and the Evolution of the South Pacific Gyre through the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S.; Higgins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust and volcanic ash play a critical role in past global climate by affecting cloud cover and ocean nutrients as well as responding to changes in tectonics, aridity, and wind. Because the eolian fluxes in the Southern Hemisphere are so low, subtle changes in the absolute flux of dust and volcanic ash may have a disproportionally large impact on climate. Our multi-site record of eolian dust and volcanic ash accumulation in pelagic clay of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG), gathered during IODP Expedition 329, shows that eolian fluxes varied by an order of magnitude over the Cenozoic and correlate with changes of tectonic processes and global climate. We analyzed the concentrations of 37 elements in 138 bulk pelagic clay samples from 6 sites drilled throughout the SPG. Using multivariate statistical modeling of the geochemical dataset (e.g. Q-mode factor analysis and multiple linear regression) and a cobalt-based age model, we quantified the mass accumulation rate (MAR) of 6 end-members that comprise the SPG pelagic clay: dust, rhyolite, altered basalt, Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, excess Si, and apatite. Our record shows that Australian dust MAR begins at the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum ~50 Ma as global temperatures began to cool and Australia began to tectonically separate from Antarctica. The mid-Miocene has noticeably higher MAR of dust and ash at multiple sites. While a simultaneous increase in production is possible (i.e., more aridity and volcanic activity), the synchronicity may be more indicative of stronger winds in the Southern Hemisphere and increased material in the atmosphere during this time. Heavier Mg isotopes occur at Site U1366 in samples that are composed primarily of hydrothermal deposition, excess Si, and volcanic ash. The Mg isotopic enrichment suggests that these components have undergone alterations to form authigenic aluminosilicates.

  5. Dust, volcanic ash, and the evolution of the South Pacific Gyre through the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, Ann G.; Murray, Richard W.; Sauvage, Justine; Spivack, Arthur J.; Harris, Robert N.; D'Hondt, Steven

    2015-08-01

    We examine the 0-100 Ma paleoceanographic record retained in pelagic clay from the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) by analyzing 47 major, trace, and rare earth elements in bulk sediment in 206 samples from seven sites drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329. We use multivariate statistical analyses (Q-mode factor analysis and multiple linear regression) of the geochemical data to construct a model of bulk pelagic clay composition and mass accumulation rates (MAR) of six end-members, (post-Archean average Australian shale, rhyolite, basalt, Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, apatite, and excess Si). Integrating the results with Co-based age models at Sites U1365, U1366, U1369, and U1370, we link changes in MAR of these components to global oceanographic, terrestrial, and climatic transformations through the Cenozoic. Our results track the spatial extent (thousands of kilometers) of dust deposition in the SPG during the aridification of Australia. Dispersed ash is a significant component of the pelagic clay, often comprising >50% by mass, and records episodes of Southern Hemisphere volcanism. Because both are transported by wind, the correlation of dust and ash MAR depends on the site's latitude and suggests meridional shifts in the position of atmospheric circulation cells. The hydrothermal MARs provide evidence for rapid deposition from the Osbourn Trough spreading ridge before it went extinct. Excess Si MARs show that the abrupt increase in siliceous productivity observed at Site U1371 also extended at least as far north as Sites U1369 and U1370, suggesting large-scale reorganizations of oceanic Si distributions ~10-8 Ma in the southern SPG.

  6. Biochemical characteristics and bacterial community structure of the sea surface microlayer in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obernosterer, I.; Catala, P.; Lami, R.; Caparros, J.; Ras, J.; Bricaud, A.; Dupuy, C.; van Wambeke, F.; Lebaron, P.

    2007-08-01

    The chemical and biological characteristics of the surface microlayer were determined during a transect across the South Pacific Ocean in October-December 2004. Concentrations of particulate organic carbon (1.3 to 7.6-fold) and nitrogen (1.4 to 7), and POC:PON ratios were consistently higher in the surface microlayer as compared to subsurface waters (5 m). The large variability in particulate organic matter enrichment was negatively correlated to wind speed. No enhanced concentrations of dissolved organic carbon were detectable in the surface microlayer as compared to 5 m, but chromophoric dissolved organic matter was markedly enriched (by 2 to 4-fold) at all sites. Based on pigment analysis and cell counts, no consistent enrichment of any of the major components of the autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial community was detectable. CE-SSCP fingerprints and CARD FISH revealed that the bacterial communities present in the surface microlayer had close similarity (>76%) to those in subsurface waters. By contrast, bacterial heterotrophic production (3H-leucine incorporation) was consistently lower in the surface microlayer than in subsurface waters. By applying CARD-FISH and microautoradiography, we observed that Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria dominated leucine uptake in the surface microlayer, while in subsurface waters Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria were the major groups accounting for leucine incorporation. Our results demonstrate that the microbial community in the surface microlayer closely resembles that of the surface waters of the open ocean. However, even short time periods in the surface microlayer result in differences in bacterial groups accounting for leucine incorporation, probably as a response to the differences in the physical and chemical nature of the two layers.

  7. Biochemical characteristics and bacterial community structure of the sea surface microlayer in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obernosterer, I.; Catala, P.; Lami, R.; Caparros, J.; Ras, J.; Bricaud, A.; Dupuy, C.; van Wambeke, F.; Lebaron, P.

    2008-05-01

    The chemical and biological characteristics of the surface microlayer were determined during a transect across the South Pacific Ocean in October-December 2004. Concentrations of particulate organic carbon (1.3 to 7.6-fold) and nitrogen (1.4 to 7-fold), and POC:PON ratios were consistently higher in the surface microlayer as compared to surface waters (5 m). The large variability in particulate organic matter enrichment was negatively correlated to wind speed. No enhanced concentrations of dissolved organic carbon were detectable in the surface microlayer as compared to 5 m, but chromophoric dissolved organic matter was markedly enriched (by 2 to 4-fold) at all sites. Based on pigment analysis and cell counts, no consistent enrichment of any of the major components of the autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial community was detectable. CE-SSCP fingerprints and CARD FISH revealed that the bacterial communities present in the surface microlayer had close similarity (>76%) to those in surface waters. By contrast, bacterial heterotrophic production (3H-leucine incorporation) was consistently lower in the surface microlayer than in surface waters. By applying CARD-FISH and microautoradiography, we observed that Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria dominated leucine uptake in the surface microlayer, while in surface waters Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria were the major groups accounting for leucine incorporation. Our results demonstrate that the microbial community in the surface microlayer closely resembles that of the surface waters of the open ocean. Even a short residence in the surface microlayer influences leucine incorporation by different bacterial groups, probably as a response to the differences in the physical and chemical nature of the two layers.

  8. Cyclone effects on coral reef habitats in New Caledonia (South Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, N.; Chabanet, P.; Le Pape, O.

    2010-06-01

    The impacts of the unusually strong Cyclone Erica (March 2003) on coral reef habitats at a site located on the northwest coast of New Caledonia (South Pacific) were assessed using a 6-year data set (2002-2007). We examined the interannual variations of key variables describing reef habitats (live hard and soft corals, dead corals in place, coral debris, algae and relative proportion of mechanically vulnerable and resistant live hard corals). The cyclone-induced disturbances of habitats differed according to three reef types: patch reefs, barrier reefs far from passes (more than 3 km from the nearest pass) and barrier reefs near passes (less than 3 km from the nearest pass). Short-term mechanical damage was detected on the three-dimensional structure of reef habitats with a notable shift from a community dominated by mechanically vulnerable corals to one dominated by resistant corals on barrier reefs far from passes. The history of habitats and their pre-disturbance characteristics, in link with local hydrodynamics, was found to influence their short-term susceptibility to extreme events such as cyclones. However, the most significant effects appeared in the midterm (within 2 years after the cyclone) as the cover of live hard corals significantly decreased by approximately 45% between 2002 and 2004 on all reef types. The short- and midterm disturbances of coral reef habitats are discussed with regard to published temporal variations in reef fish assemblages, underlining the delayed effects of this cyclonic event on fish as well as benthic habitats. Coral reef habitats and live corals had shown significant patterns of recovery 4 years after the cyclone, followed by similar recovery in fish community, suggesting good resilience in a face of this major natural disturbance in an area under moderate anthropogenic pressure.

  9. N2 fixation in eddies of the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscher, Carolin R.; Bourbonnais, Annie; Dekaezemacker, Julien; Charoenpong, Chawalit N.; Altabet, Mark A.; Bange, Hermann W.; Czeschel, Rena; Hoffmann, Chris; Schmitz, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Mesoscale eddies play a major role in controlling ocean biogeochemistry. By impacting nutrient availability and water column ventilation, they are of critical importance for oceanic primary production. In the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean off Peru, where a large and persistent oxygen-deficient zone is present, mesoscale processes have been reported to occur frequently. However, investigations into their biological activity are mostly based on model simulations, and direct measurements of carbon and dinitrogen (N2) fixation are scarce.We examined an open-ocean cyclonic eddy and two anticyclonic mode water eddies: a coastal one and an open-ocean one in the waters off Peru along a section at 16° S in austral summer 2012. Molecular data and bioassay incubations point towards a difference between the active diazotrophic communities present in the cyclonic eddy and the anticyclonic mode water eddies.In the cyclonic eddy, highest rates of N2 fixation were measured in surface waters but no N2 fixation signal was detected at intermediate water depths. In contrast, both anticyclonic mode water eddies showed pronounced maxima in N2 fixation below the euphotic zone as evidenced by rate measurements and geochemical data. N2 fixation and carbon (C) fixation were higher in the young coastal mode water eddy compared to the older offshore mode water eddy. A co-occurrence between N2 fixation and biogenic N2, an indicator for N loss, indicated a link between N loss and N2 fixation in the mode water eddies, which was not observed for the cyclonic eddy. The comparison of two consecutive surveys of the coastal mode water eddy in November 2012 and December 2012 also revealed a reduction in N2 and C fixation at intermediate depths along with a reduction in chlorophyll by half, mirroring an aging effect in this eddy. Our data indicate an important role for anticyclonic mode water eddies in stimulating N2 fixation and thus supplying N offshore.

  10. N2 fixation in eddies of the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löscher, C. R.; Bourbonnais, A.; Dekaezemacker, J.; Charoenpong, C. N.; Altabet, M. A.; Bange, H. W.; Czeschel, R.; Hoffmann, C.; Schmitz, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mesoscale eddies play a major role in controlling ocean biogeochemistry. By impacting nutrient availability and water column ventilation, they are of critical importance for oceanic primary production. In the eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean off Peru, where a large and persistent oxygen deficient zone is present, mesoscale processes have been reported to occur frequently. However, investigations on their biological activity are mostly based on model simulations, and direct measurements of carbon and dinitrogen (N2) fixation are scarce. We examined an open ocean cyclonic eddy and two anticyclonic mode water eddies: a coastal one and an open ocean one in the waters off Peru along a section at 16° S in austral summer 2012. Molecular data and bioassay incubations point towards a difference between the active diazotrophic communities present in the cyclonic eddy and the anticyclonic mode water eddies. In the cyclonic eddy, highest rates of N2 fixation were measured in surface waters but no N2 fixation signal was detected at intermediate water depths. In contrast, both anticyclonic mode water eddies showed pronounced maxima in N2 fixation below the euphotic zone as evidenced by rate measurements and geochemical data. N2 fixation and carbon (C) fixation were higher in the young coastal mode water eddy compared to the older offshore mode water eddy. A co-occurrence between N2 fixation and biogenic N2, an indicator for N loss, indicated a link between N loss and N2 fixation in the mode water eddies, which was not observed for the cyclonic eddy. The comparison of two consecutive surveys of the coastal mode water eddy in November and December 2012 revealed also a reduction of N2 and C fixation at intermediate depths along with a reduction in chlorophyll by half, mirroring an aging effect in this eddy. Our data indicate an important role for anticyclonic mode water eddies in stimulating N2 fixation and thus supplying N offshore.

  11. Drift of Floating Debris in the South Pacific Ocean: Application to the Seaweeds Drift in French Polynesia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elodie, M.; Keitapu, M.; Claude, P.

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this study is to determine trajectories of floating debris in the South Pacific Ocean and in particular to study seaweed drift in French Polynesia. Surface currents are considered to be the sum of the geostrophic and the Ekman components determined from altimetric data of Topex-Poseidon and from wind provided by ERS scatterometer. Data are available on a one degree grid every five days from January 1993 to January 2001. As expected, large variabilities of currents are due to the El Ni¤o event of 1997-1998. Trajectories of floating debris in the South Pacific Ocean are determined by solving the lagrangian equations that give the position of the floating debris every 5 days. First calculations are carried out at the scale of the South Pacific Ocean from 1993 to 2001. Results show that debris follow the main surface currents such as the South Pacific Current, the Perou Current or the South Equatorial Current and the East Australian Current. Whatever the starting point of the debris, the debris after a long period of drift accumulate in the center of the Subtropical gyre at about 110 W and 27 S. One application of our drifting model is the determination of trajectories of seaweeds that are detached from the reefs. The objective is to understand how two brown seaweed, Turbinaria ornata, came to populate the Tuamotu archipelago during the last two decades. This seaweed is found on high volcanic islands (Gambier, Society, Austral and Marquesas islands) while it is absent from the low carbonate islands (Tuamotu atolls). Several simulations have been performed over periods of 3 months supposed to be the seaweed life period in open ocean. The 3 month periods are chosen according to the seasonal variation (dry and wet season) and according to the El Ni¤o and La Ni¤a events. Our results show that at any season seaweeds departing from Marquesas islands can reach the Tuamotu atolls. Seaweeds reach the southernmost part of the Tuamotu atolls if they depart

  12. Assessment of equity in healthcare financing in Fiji and Timor-Leste: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Asante, Augustine D; Price, Jennifer; Hayen, Andrew; Irava, Wayne; Martins, Joao; Guinness, Lorna; Ataguba, John E; Limwattananon, Supon; Mills, Anne; Jan, Stephen; Wiseman, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Equitable health financing remains a key health policy objective worldwide. In low and middle-income countries (LMICs), there is evidence that many people are unable to access the health services they need due to financial and other barriers. There are growing calls for fairer health financing systems that will protect people from catastrophic and impoverishing health payments in times of illness. This study aims to assess equity in healthcare financing in Fiji and Timor-Leste in order to support government efforts to improve access to healthcare and move towards universal health coverage in the two countries. Methods and analysis The study employs two standard measures of equity in health financing increasingly being applied in LMICs—benefit incidence analysis (BIA) and financing incidence analysis (FIA). In Fiji, we will use a combination of secondary and primary data including a Household Income and Expenditure Survey, National Health Accounts, and data from a cross-sectional household survey on healthcare utilisation. In Timor-Leste, the World Bank recently completed a health equity and financial protection analysis that incorporates BIA and FIA, and found that the distribution of benefits from healthcare financing is pro-rich. Building on this work, we will explore the factors that influence the pro-rich distribution. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of University of New South Wales, Australia (Approval number: HC13269); the Fiji National Health Research Committee (Approval # 201371); and the Timor-Leste Ministry of Health (Ref MS/UNSW/VI/218). Results Study outcomes will be disseminated through stakeholder meetings, targeted multidisciplinary seminars, peer-reviewed journal publications, policy briefs and the use of other web-based technologies including social media. A user-friendly toolkit on how to analyse healthcare financing equity will be developed for use by policymakers and

  13. Should the Asia-Pacific Region Constitute a Rapid Reaction Force?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    American States as well as numerous Pacific island states such as Fiji, Papua New Guinea, and the mini-states of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia.4...Indonesia - including Aceh, the Moluccas, and Irian Jaya; The Philippines - including separatist Muslims in Mindanao and on the island of Jolo, and...Communists in Luzon; the Spratly Islands ; Taiwan; Korea; India and Pakistan – the region of Kashmir; Sri Lanka; Burma; Fiji; the Solomon Islands ; and the

  14. Shear wave speed structure beneath the South Pacific superswell using broadband data from ocean floor and islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isse, Takehi; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Shiobara, Hajime; Sugioka, Hiroko; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Kanazawa, Toshihiko; Fukao, Yoshio

    2006-08-01

    We determined three-dimensional shear wave speed structure beneath the South Pacific superswell down to a depth of 200 km by analyzing Rayleigh wave records from broadband ocean bottom seismograph stations and island stations in the Pacific Ocean. The ocean bottom stations were deployed from 2003 to 2005 on the seafloor in the French Polynesian region, which enabled us to study the upper mantle structure beneath the Superswell with unprecedentedly high resolution. We measured the dispersions of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 140 seconds by the two-station method. We found pronounced slow anomalies near the hot spots and in the Lau Basin. The slow anomalies beneath the hot spots have deeper-rooted than those associated with the Lau basin. The slow anomalies near the Society, Macdonald, Marquesas, and Pitcairn hot spots continue down to at least 200 km depth.

  15. Anisotropy beneath the Southern Pacific - real or apparent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasse, Philipp; Thomas, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Anisotropy of the lowermost mantle beneath the South- to Central Pacific is investigated using US-Array receivers and events located near the Tonga-Fiji subduction zones. Differential splitting in three different distance ranges (65° -85° , 90° -110° and >110°) of S-ScS, SKS-S, SKS-Sdiff phases is used. By utilizing differential splitting technique, it was possible to correct for upper mantle, as well as source- and receiver side anisotropy and effectively quantify shear wave splitting originating in the lowermost mantle. Delay times of horizontal (SH) and vertical polarized (SV) shear waves show that predominantly the SH wave is delayed relative to the SV wave. Motivated by the discrepancy in previous Pacific studies investigating the lowermost mantle beneath the Pacific the possibility of isotropic structure producing the observed splitting is tested. Synthetic seismograms are computed, based on various isotropic models and the resulting synthetics are analysed in the same way as the real data. While simple layered models do not produce splitting and therefore apparent anisotropy, models in which the lowermost mantle is represented as a negative gradient in P- and S-wave velocity, produce clear apparent anisotropy. Thus, this study presents a possible alternative way of explaining the structure of the D" region.

  16. Fiji Hindustani. Working Papers in Linguistics, Vol. 7, No. 3, May-June 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    More than 250,000 of Fiji's citizens are descendants of Indian indentured laborers of diverse origins. There are still distinct social groups based on language, religion, and place of origin. However, nearly all Fiji Indians speak one language called Fiji Hindustani. Other languages, such as Gujarati, Panjabi, Tamil, and Telugu, are still spoken,…

  17. Fiji Hindustani. Working Papers in Linguistics, Vol. 7, No. 3, May-June 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    More than 250,000 of Fiji's citizens are descendants of Indian indentured laborers of diverse origins. There are still distinct social groups based on language, religion, and place of origin. However, nearly all Fiji Indians speak one language called Fiji Hindustani. Other languages, such as Gujarati, Panjabi, Tamil, and Telugu, are still spoken,…

  18. Ozone in the Pacific Troposphere from Ozonesonde Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Harris, J. M.; Voemel, H.; Koshy, K.; Simon, P.; Bendura, R.; Thompson, A. M.; Logan, J. A.; Hasebe, F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ozone vertical profile measurements obtained from ozonesondes flown at Fiji, Samoa, Tahiti and the Galapagos are used to characterize ozone in the troposphere over the tropical Pacific. There is a significant seasonal variation at each of these sites. At sites in both the eastern and western Pacific, ozone is highest at almost all levels in the troposphere during the September-November season and lowest during, March-May. There is a relative maximum at all of the sites in the mid-troposphere during all seasons of the year (the largest amounts are usually found near the tropopause). This maximum is particularly pronounced during, the September-November season. On average, throughout the troposphere at all seasons, the Galapagos has larger ozone amounts than the western Pacific sites. A trajectory climatology is used to identify the major flow regimes that are associated with the characteristic ozone behavior at various altitudes and seasons. The enhanced ozone seen in the mid-troposphere during September-November is associated with flow from the continents. In the western Pacific this flow is usually from southern Africa (although 10-day trajectories do not always reach the continent), but also may come from Australia and Indonesia. In the Galapagos the ozone peak in the mid-troposphere is seen in flow from the South American continent and particularly from northern Brazil. The time of year and flow characteristics associated with the ozone mixing ratio peaks seen in both the western and eastern Pacific suggest that these enhanced ozone values result from biomass burning. In the upper troposphere low ozone amounts are seen with flow that originates in the convective western Pacific.

  19. Rainfall Variability under the South Pacific Convergence Zone as Reconstructed from a Speleothem Record (1670-2005) from Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T. M.; Shen, C.; Maupin, C. R.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Sinclair, D. J.; Banner, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The tropical Pacific exhibits known climate changes on interannual timescales during El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events causing global socio-economic impacts. On decadal timescales, climate changes associated with oscillations in the tropical Pacific have been postulated, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). However, the instrumental record is too short and too sparse to allow reliable and convincing evaluation of such decadal-scale oscillations. A fast-growing speleothem (~1-3 mm/year) collected from the island of Espirito Santo, Vanuatu (15.5°S, 167°E), which is located under the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) yields a record of rainfall variability spanning ~1670 - 2005 Common Era (CE), as dated by U-Th disequilibrium techniques. Close agreement between speleothem stable oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) and the amount of rainfall from nearby Pekoa Airport demonstrates the ability of the speleothem to record hydrologic changes above-ground. While the speleothem grows fast enough to capture the annual cycle, mixing of rain and groundwaters in the overlying bedrock dampens this δ18O signal. However, interannual changes in speleothem δ18O, or reconstructed rainfall, of ~0.6 ‰ appear to capture events associated with ENSO and subsequent reorganizations of the SPCZ. The speleothem sample offers the opportunity to record local expressions of ENSO-related changes in rainfall for the last several hundred years. The speleothem record complements previously published coral records from Vanuatu of oceanic changes to provide a broader picture of pre-instrumental ENSO variability in the region. The speleothem δ18O record also exhibits concentrations of variance on the decadal scale, which correlate with variations associated with the PDO. The amplitude of this decadal signal is large (~1.5 ‰), which serves to highlight the sensitivity of SPCZ rainfall to decadal-scale changes in the tropical Pacific ocean-atmosphere system.

  20. ENSO regimes and the late 1970's climate shift: The role of synoptic weather and South Pacific ocean spiciness

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kane, Terence J.; Matear, Richard J.; Chamberlain, Matthew A.; Oke, Peter R.

    2014-08-15

    South Pacific subtropical density compensated temperature and salinity (spiciness) anomalies are known to be associated with decadal equatorial variability, however, the mechanisms by which such disturbances are generated, advect and the degree to which they modulate the equatorial thermocline remains controversial. During the late 1970's a climate regime transition preceded a period of strong and sustained El Nino events. Using an ocean general circulation model forced by the constituent mechanical and thermodynamic components of the reanalysed atmosphere we show that the late 1970's transition coincided with the arrival of a large-scale, subsurface cold and fresh water anomaly in the central tropical Pacific. An ocean reanalysis for the period 1990–2007 that assimilates subsurface Argo, XBT and CTD data, reveals that disturbances occur due to the subduction of negative surface salinity anomalies from near 30° S, 100° W which are advected along the σ=25–26 kgm{sup −3} isopycnal surfaces. These anomalies take, on average, seven years to reach the central equatorial Pacific where they may substantially perturb the thermocline before the remnants ultimately ventilate in the region of the western Pacific warm pool. Positive (warm–salty) disturbances, known to occur due to late winter diapycnal mixing and isopycnal outcropping, arise due to both subduction of subtropical mode waters and subsurface injection. On reaching the equatorial band (10° S–0° S) these disturbances tend to deepen the thermocline reducing the model's ENSO. In contrast the emergence of negative (cold–fresh) disturbances at the equator are associated with a shoaling of the thermocline and El Nino events. Process studies are used to show that the generation and advection of anomalous density compensated thermocline disturbances critically depend on stochastic forcing of the intrinsic ocean by weather. We further show that in the absence of the inter-annual component of the atmosphere

  1. Three-year atmospheric monitoring of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in polar regions and the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Baek, Song-Yee; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-05-15

    XAD-2 resin based passive air samplers (PAS) were deployed for three one-year periods at the Korean polar and South Pacific research stations at Ny-Ålesund (2005-2009), King George Island (2005-2007), and Chuuk (2006-2009) to investigate long-range transport, local sources, and temporal trends of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The highest hexachlocyclohexane (HCH) concentration (35.2-78.9 pg·m(-3)) over the entire sampling period was detected at Ny-Ålesund, in the Arctic. α-HCH was the dominant OCP (31.1-67.1 pg·m(-3)), contributing about 50% of the total OCP load. Additionally, a high and consistent α/γ-HCH ratio was observed at Ny-Ålesund. HCHs might reach Arctic sites more easily than other OCPs from surrounding countries through long-range atmospheric transport (LRAT). Interestingly, high levels of the current-use OCP endosulfan-particularly endosulfan-I--were detected at almost all sampling sites, including in Antarctica, ranging 12.2-88.5, 17.7-130, and ND-59.7 pg·m(-3) at King George Island, Ny-Ålesund, and Chuuk, respectively. Specific OCP and PCB patterns, such as low trans/cis-chlordane ratios and a prevalence of lighter PCB congeners, were observed in all three regions (excepting one site at Ny-Ålesund and one site in the South Pacific affected by local sources) during all sampling periods. This indicates that these Polar and remote South Pacific sites are mainly influenced by LRAT. Over the entire sampling period, a decreasing trend of HCHs (α- and γ-HCH) and an increasing trend of endosulfan-I were observed at the Ny-Ålesund sites.

  2. Inter-annual precipitation variabiity inferred from late Holocene speleothem records from Fiji: implications for SPCZ localisation and ENSO behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattey, D.; Stephens, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Brett, M.

    2015-12-01

    The modern tropical Fiji climate is characterised by seasonal rainfall controlled by the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Interannual rainfall is strongly modulated on decadal timescales by ENSO with higher rainfall associated with La Nina events. Voli Voli cave near Sigatoga (Viti Levu) is a stream passage that has been monitored since 2009. A U-Th dated laminated speleothem spans a 1500 year interval across the transition from the Medieval Warm Period into the Little Ice Age marked by a fabric change from finely laminated calcite with thin clay layers, to white well-laminated calcite. The older record is characterised by rising δ13C values followed by a rapid decrease in δ13C around 1200 AD. Evidence from cave monitoring shows that cave air CO2 levels are strongly seasonal as a result of greater ventilation by winter trade winds and high resolution δ13C record shows regularly spaced peaks correlated with paired laminae and cycles in P and S which provide annual markers driven by rainfall and seasonal ventilation. δ18O values remain relatively unchanged throughout the record but micromilling at sub-annual resolution reveals systematic cycles in δ18O that span groups of paired laminae with an inferred periodicity of 3-7 years i.e. a similar frequency to modern ENSO. The presence of these sub-decadal cycles in δ18O may be a result of a combination of factors. The amplitude of 2-3‰ would be equivalent to an amount-effect related change in annual precipitation of around 50% but an additional smoothing process, perhaps a result of aquifer storage, is required to attenuate interannual variance in precipitation. The Voli Voli record provides evidence of an underlying climatic change to more frequent La Niña conditions from 1200 AD and may be associated with increased conflict, shifts in settlements and changes in subsistence strategies on the island. Coeval speleothem isotope records from tropical Pacific Islands provide a provide a

  3. Beyond barcodes: complex DNA taxonomy of a South Pacific Island radiation

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael T; Balke, Michael; Pons, Joan; Vogler, Alfried P

    2005-01-01

    DNA barcodes can provide rapid species identification and aid species inventories in taxonomically unstudied groups. However, the approach may fail in recently diverged groups with complex gene histories, such as those typically found on oceanic islands. We produced a DNA-based inventory of taxonomically little known diving beetles (genus Copelatus) in the Fiji archipelago, where they are a dominant component of the aquatic invertebrate fauna. Sampling from 25 localities on five islands and analysis of sequences from one nuclear (328 bp histone 3) and three mitochondrial (492 bp rrnL, 786 bp cox1, 333 bp cob) gene regions revealed high haplotype diversity, mainly originated since the Pleistocene, and subdivided into three major phylogenetic lineages and 22 statistical parsimony networks. A traditional taxonomic study delineated 25 morphologically defined species that were largely incongruent with the DNA-based groups. Haplotype diversity and their spatial arrangement demonstrated a continuum of relatedness in Fijian Copelatus, with evidence for introgression at various hierarchical levels. The study illustrates the difficulties for formal classification in evolutionarily complex lineages, and the potentially misleading conclusions obtained from either DNA barcodes or morphological traits alone. However, the sequence profile of Fijian Copelatus provides an evolutionary framework for the group and a DNA-based reference system for the integration of ecological and other biodiversity data, independent of the Linnaean naming system. PMID:16618684

  4. Sharing morphospaces: early ontogenetic shape changes in two clingfish larvae (Pisces: Gobiesocidae) from the south-east Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Durán, V; Jahnsen-Guzmán, N; Landaeta, M F

    2017-09-18

    Larval body shape changes and developmental timing were examined in two clingfish species from the south-east Pacific Ocean, Gobiesox marmoratus and Sicyases sanguineus. Ontogenetic allometry showed no interspecific variation and <7 mm standard length (LS ) larvae of both species occupied similar morphospace, but larger G. marmoratus showed increased body depth while larvae of S. sanguineus developed a flattened head and maintained a hydrodynamic body. Estimated developmental timing suggests that larval body shape changes were faster in G. marmoratus than in S. sanguineus prior to settlement. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. Egg capsules of the dusky catshark Bythaelurus canescens (Carcharhiniformes, Scyliorhinidae) from the south-eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Concha, F; Bustamante, C; Oddone, M C; Hernández, S; Lamilla, J

    2010-09-01

    The external morphology of the egg capsule of Bythaelurus canescens and its fixation to the substratum are described. Bythaelurus canescens egg capsules are typically vase-shaped, dorso-ventrally flattened, pale yellow in colour when fresh and covered by 12-15 longitudinal ridges. The anterior border of the capsule is straight, whereas the posterior border is semicircular. Two horns bearing long, coiled tendrils arise from the anterior and posterior ends of the capsule. The presence of longitudinal ridges and long coiled tendrils at both anterior and posterior ends of the capsule readily distinguish these egg capsules from those of other chondrichthyans occurring in the south-east Pacific Ocean.

  6. Techniques for the Analysis of Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT) Data with Applications to the South-Western Pacific Ocean.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    listed and described. 2. T-S CURVES FOR THE SOUTH-WESTERN PACIFIC OCEAN For the analysis of XBT data from the Tasman Sea , the area from 150S to 45’S...one-atmosphere expressed in g.cm-3 . Andrews(ref.12) has proposed that the density structure in the Tasman Sea may be approximated by a relationship...Hamon, B.V. for the Tasman Sea ". Unpublished preliminary report, CSIRO Division of Fisheries and Oceanography (1979) 8 Hopper, M.J. "Harwell

  7. On the South Pacific subtropical overturning cell in October/November 1999 and comparison with a climatology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioualalen, M.; Lukas, R.; Gouriou, Y.; Eldin, G.

    2003-12-01

    Two sections, 165° E and 180° , and along the equator in between, were sampled during WESPALIS 1 cruise in Oct./Nov. 1999. The high salinity tongue of the South Pacific subtropical overturning cell (STC) is described. In particular the pathways of the circulation are exhibited. Then a comparison with a 10-year climatology is performed and the deviations from the climatology are described in terms of heat content exchange between the upper ocean surface layers. It is shown that the heat exchange between the STC and the equatorial mixed layer is more intense during Warm events of ENSO.

  8. The role of diabatic heating in maintaining the upper-tropospheric baroclinic zone in the South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Vincent, Dayton G.; Kann, Deirdre M.

    1989-01-01

    The four-dimensional structure of the region in the South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) during January 10-18, 1979 is studied using a modified set of ECMWF FGGE level III-b analyses. The effects of kinematic and thermodynamic processes on maintaining the upper baroclinic region corresponding with the subtropical jet are analyzed. The role of adiabatic and diabatic processes in the maintenance of baroclinicity in the area of the SPCZ is examined using the frontogenetical function. It is observed that the processes affecting the evolution of baroclinicity in the SPCZ region differ from those in the middle latitude; possible reasons for these differences are proposed.

  9. Biogeochemical characteristics of a long-lived anticyclonic eddy in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo D'Ottone, Marcela; Bravo, Luis; Ramos, Marcel; Pizarro, Oscar; Karstensen, Johannes; Gallegos, Mauricio; Correa-Ramirez, Marco; Silva, Nelson; Farias, Laura; Karp-Boss, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Mesoscale eddies are important, frequent, and persistent features of the circulation in the eastern South Pacific (ESP) Ocean, transporting physical, chemical and biological properties from the productive shelves to the open ocean. Some of these eddies exhibit subsurface hypoxic or suboxic conditions and may serve as important hotspots for nitrogen loss, but little is known about oxygen consumption rates and nitrogen transformation processes associated with these eddies. In the austral fall of 2011, during the Tara Oceans expedition, an intrathermocline, anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy with a suboxic (< 2 µmol kg-1 of O2), subsurface layer (200-400 m) was detected ˜ 900 km off the Chilean shore (30° S, 81° W). The core of the eddy's suboxic layer had a temperature-salinity signature characteristic of Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) that at this latitude is normally restricted to an area near the coast. Measurements of nitrogen species within the eddy revealed undersaturation (below 44 %) of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrite accumulation (> 0.5 µM), suggesting that active denitrification occurred in this water mass. Using satellite altimetry, we were able to track the eddy back to its region of formation on the coast of central Chile (36.1° S, 74.6° W). Field studies conducted in Chilean shelf waters close to the time of eddy formation provided estimates of initial O2 and N2O concentrations of the ESSW source water in the eddy. By the time of its offshore sighting, concentrations of both O2 and N2O in the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the eddy were lower than concentrations in surrounding water and "source water" on the shelf, indicating that these chemical species were consumed as the eddy moved offshore. Estimates of apparent oxygen utilization rates at the OMZ of the eddy ranged from 0.29 to 44 nmol L-1 d-1 and the rate of N2O consumption was 3.92 nmol L-1 d-1. These results show that mesoscale eddies affect open-ocean biogeochemistry in the ESP

  10. Volatiles in Submarine HIMU Basalts from the Austral Islands, South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. R.; Hanyu, T.; Shimizu, K.; Dosso, L.

    2014-12-01

    Submarine basalts have been collected from the slopes of Rurutu and Tubuai in the Austral Islands, South Pacific with the manned submersible Shinkai 6500. Previous work on the bulk radiogenic isotope and trace element chemistry of these samples suggests that the basalts were generated from a HIMU reservoir derived from an ancient subducted slab that was entrained and mixed with the depleted asthenospheric mantle. Olivines and glasses from the submarine basalts show lower 3He/4He than MORB, similar to subaerial basalts from these islands. Sixteen glass chips from the same submarine samples have now undergone in-situ analysis for major elements (including S and Cl) by EPMA, trace elements by LA-ICP-MS, H2O and CO2 by FTIR, and bulk volatile analysis (S, Cl, F) by ion chromatography combined with pyrohydrolysis. H2O ranges from 0.62-2.44 wt%, while CO2 is below detection (<20 ppm). S measured by EPMA ranges from 612-1889 ppm and by bulk analysis from 582-1301 ppm and, with the exception of one sample, concentrations agree well. Cl measured by EPMA ranges from 151-538 ppm, and by bulk analysis from 188-980 ppm. The higher values suggest that the bulk samples may be contaminated by seawater; otherwise Cl correlates strongly with incompatible elements. F measured in the bulk samples ranges from 221-1243 ppm. S correlates positively with FeO and Cu, but not with incompatible elements, suggesting sulfide saturation. While the highest H2O contents may reflect late-stage hydration and are oversaturated at the depth of collection, the low H2O contents (11 samples with 0.62-0.96 wt%) are undersaturated, and there is a positive correlation between the H2O contents of all chips and their incompatible element concentrations. This suggests that H2O/Ce and Cl/Ce filtered for shallow level processes may reflect source compositions, providing constraints on volatiles in the sources of Rurutu and Tubuai, and indications about the efficiency of subduction-related volatile-loss in the

  11. Geologic Signatures of the September 2009 South Pacific Tsunami (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, B. M.; Buckley, M. L.; Etienne, S.; Strotz, L. C.; Chague-Goff, C.; Wilson, K.; Goff, J. R.; Dudley, W. C.; Sale, F.

    2009-12-01

    The September 29th 2009 tsunami caused widespread destruction along the shorelines of Samoa in the South Pacific. Preliminary measurements indicate maximum runup values of around 12 m (average ~3-6 m) and shore-normal inundation distances of up to ~ 400m. Geological field reconnaissance studies were conducted within three weeks of the event in order to document the erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment by the tsunami. Types of data collected included: a) general morphology and characteristics of the coast, b) tsunami water level measurements (inundation, flow depth and direction, and wave height, c) surficial and subsurface sediment samples, d) topographic mapping, and e) boulder size and location measurements. Where available for transport, mud, sand, and gravel size material was moved by the tsunami and formed distinct sedimentary deposits. Four main sedimentary deposits were identified: 1) Gravel deposits that typically occurred as either isolated coral boulders derived from the adjacent reef system and deposited on the lower beach face, or, fields of basalt boulders derived from coastal engineering structures and deposited inland on the coastal plain. In both cases the boulders were found either on the surface or partially buried by sand. Patchy accumulations of staghorn corals (Acropora sp?) occurred along some shorelines, presumably where there was a nearby reef source. 2) Sand deposits that ranged from very thin patches (< 1 cm) to broad sand sheets up to 10’s of cm thick. Localized thick sand accumulations were common in the lee of structures, such as low walls, and in topographic depressions. The thicker sand deposits had multiple laminations with varying degrees of particle segregation. In some localities clusters of the green alga Halimeda were incorporated in sand deposits. The sand appeared to be derived from the reef flats, beaches, and in some cases erosion of the land surface (i.e. from sandy soil). 3) Organic debris of over 10 cm

  12. Radiolyis and life in deep subseafloor sediment of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Smith, D. C.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 revealed the occurrence of a fundamentally different subsurface world below the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) compared to previously drilled sites. The organic-poor sediment that underlies this vast ultra-oligotrophic region harbors microbial communities characterized by cell abundances three to four orders of magnitude lower than has been found at similar depths outside the gyre. The sediment column is oxic and rich in major nutrients from the seafloor to beneath the sediment-basement interface. Statistical analysis of the dissolved O2 profiles for the six sites within the SPG (U1365 through U1370) demonstrates that measurable organic-fuelled O2 reduction is limited to the upper meters of SPG sediment. At greater depths, maximum mean organic-fueled respiration rates range from 10-5 to 10-3 fmol O2 cell-1 day-1, representing a tremendously low cellular metabolism. Hydrogen is continuously produced in this sedimentary environment by radioactive splitting of water, a process known as water radiolysis. However, measured dissolved hydrogen abundances are below detection in most samples at all six sites. This combination of continuous production and low concentration suggests that radiolytic hydrogen may be a biological electron donor in the organic-poor sediment of the SPG. Gibbs energy of reaction calculations for the knallgas reaction (H2 + ½ O2 = H2O) and other hydrogen-consuming reactions show that where hydrogen concentration is above detection in SPG sediment, hydrogen oxidation is energetically favorable for microbial life (in-situ ΔGreaction averaging -210, -190, and -12 kJ/mol H2 throughout the sequence for oxygen, nitrate and sulfate reduction, respectively). By applying the water radiolysis model of Blair et al. (2007) to our preliminary data from Site U1366, we presently estimate that on average 10-5 fmol radiolytic H2 cell-1 day-1 is available throughout the site's sediment column. By measuring the radioactive

  13. NEON Collaborative Data Collection Campaign at Pacific South West Site in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Musinsky, J.; Petroy, S. B.; Wasser, L. A.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Serbin, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale observatory that will collect biological, chemical and geophysical data over the continental United States in order to study biodiversity, landcover change, climate change and invasive species. In June 2013, a large-scale data collection took place over NEON's Pacific South West (PSW) site 17 in CA, USA. Data were collected in the San Joaquin Experimental Range and the Sierra National Forest. NEON's AOP (Airborne Observation Platform) acquired high spatial resolution hyperspectral data (~1m pixels), waveform lidar, discrete lidar, and RGB imagery over all three sites. A field team simultaneously collected atmospheric and vegetation inventory data, including tree locations, height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), species, and spectral data. The NEON collect was centered within a collaboration of multiple research entities, including NASA, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), University of Massachusetts (Boston; UMB, and Lowell; UML), Boston University (BU), and the University of Wisconsin, Madison (UWM). NASA's AVIRIS and MASTER sensors were flown over a wider area encompassing the NEON sites, with AVIRIS acquiring hyperspectral data (224 bands) at approximately 30m spatial resolution, and MASTER acquiring multispectral thermal data (50 bands) at approximately 50m spatial resolution. These data will be downscaled to approximate theoretical HyspIRI data (60m spatial resolution) as part of a large collection of preparatory research. Concurrently, a variety of university teams were active in the field: RIT collected ground-based lidar, leaf area index (LAI), herbaceous biomass measurements, wide-angle photographs, and spectral measurements. Data were collected over 20 80x80m sites, centered on existing 20x20m NEON sites. This data set will be used to inform synthetic scene design and to study the impact of sub-pixel structural variation on pixel-level spectral response; The BU, UMB, and UML

  14. Sources and accumulation of plutonium in a large Western Pacific marginal sea: The South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junwen; Dai, Minhan; Xu, Yi; Zheng, Jian

    2018-01-01

    In order to examine the sources of plutonium (Pu) and elaborate its scavenging and accumulation processes, (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios and (239+240)Pu activities in the water column of the South China Sea (SCS) were determined and compared with our previously reported data for the sediments. Consistently high (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios that ranged from 0.184-0.250 (average=0.228±0.015), indicative of non-global fallout Pu sources were observed both in the surface water and at depth during 2012-2014. The spatial distribution of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in the SCS showed a decreasing trend away from the Luzon Strait, which was very consistent with the introduction pathway of the Kuroshio Current. The Kuroshio had an even heavier Pu isotopic ratio ranging from 0.250-0.263 (average=0.255±0.006), traceable to the non-global fallout Pu signature from the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG). Using a simple two end-member mixing model, we further revealed that this PPG source contributed 41±17% of the Pu in the SCS water column. The (239+240)Pu activities in the SCS surface seawater varied from 1.59 to 2.94mBqm(-3), with an average of 2.34±0.38mBqm(-3). Such an activity level was ~40% higher than that in the Kuroshio. The distribution of (239+240)Pu in the surface seawater further showed a general trend of increase from the Kuroshio to the SCS basin, suggesting significant accumulation of Pu within the SCS. The (239+240)Pu inventory of the water column in the SCS basin at the SEATS station with a total depth of ~3840m was estimated to be ~29Bqm(-2), which was substantially higher than the sediment core estimates made for the SCS basin (3.75Bqm(-2)) but much lower than the sediment core estimates made for the shelf of the northern SCS (365.6Bqm(-2)). Such differences were determined by the lower scavenging efficiency of Pu in the SCS basin compared to the northern SCS shelf. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cenozoic sedimentation rates and provenance variations in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Pelagic clays are traditionally difficult to date due to the scarcity of biogenic deposition and the prevalence of homogenous, altered, very fine-grain sediment. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 recovered completely oxic, brown, pelagic zeolitic metalliferous clay from the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). Despite post-depositional alteration, the sediment retains enough of its original chemical signature to track downcore changes in provenance. Of particular interest is the cosmogenic portion of the sediment (e.g., Co), which we use to determine sedimentation rates and explore the paleoceanographic implications of changing sedimentation in the SPG throughout the Cenozoic. Under the assumption that the flux of extraterrestrial cosmogenic dust is spatially and temporally constant (or can at least be constrained), the concentration of cosmic dust in the sediment is inversely proportional to the sedimentation rate. Previous studies have used this premise to successfully date pelagic clays and Fe-Mn crusts, using Co as a proxy for cosmic dust deposition. The SPG has the slowest marine sedimentation rates in the world (as low as 0.1 m/Myr) and subsequently has the highest concentration of cosmic dust in the seafloor, making it an ideal region to apply this techniques. Building upon Zhou and Kyte (1992, Paleocean., 7, 441-465) at the single location of DSDP Site 596, we are dating SPG pelagic clays and identifying provenance variations throughout the SPG using a combined analytical and statistical approach. We analyze bulk sediment from Exp. 329 for a wide suite of major, trace, and rare earth elements by ICP-ES/MS. We apply multivariate statistical methods to quantify the contributions through time from various sources, aiming to distinguish a cosmogenic component. From the cosmogenic abundances, we produce a high-resolution record of instantaneous sedimentation rates of SPG pelagic clays during the Cenozoic. Our preliminary constant cosmogenic Co models show

  16. Geochemically tracking provenance changes in marine sediment from the South Pacific Gyre throughout the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The South Pacific Gyre (SPG), characterized by extremely slow sedimentation rates, is the world's largest oceanic desert. The little eolian dust from continents in the Southern Hemisphere must traverse great distances to reach the SPG, and the ultra-oligotrophic waters minimize the biogenic flux of sediment to the seafloor. However sparse, the pelagic sediment that is ultimately found on the seafloor retains a chemical record that can be used to trace its origin. Using cores from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329, we trace downcore fluctuations in major, trace, and rare earth element (REE) composition and flux to yield clues to the geological, chemical, and biological evolution of the SPG throughout the Cenozoic. The shipboard scientific party generally described the completely oxic, brown pelagic clays recovered during Exp. 329 as zeolitic metalliferous clay. The homogenous, very fine-grained nature of these sediments speaks to the challenges we face in resolving eolian detrital material ("dust"), fine-grained ash (commonly altered), and authigenic aluminosilicates from one another. Based on ICP-ES and ICP-MS analyses followed by multivariate statistical treatments, we are developing chemical records from a number of sites located throughout the SPG. Building on earlier work at DSDP Site 596 (Zhou and Kyte, 1992, Paleocean., 7, 441-465), and based on backtrack paths from 100 Ma forward, we are working to construct a regionally and temporally continuous paleoclimatological history of the SPG. Preliminary La-Th-Sc concentrations from Sites U1367, U1368, and U1369 show a distinct authigenic influence, but several refractory elements retain their original provenance signature. Sediment ages are constrained using a constant-Co model, based on the geochemically similar work that Zhou and Kyte (1992) performed in the SPG. REE concentrations normalized to post-archean average shale (PAAS) reveal a negative Ce anomaly that becomes more pronounced closer to

  17. Influence of mesoscale eddies on the distribution of nitrous oxide in the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, D. L.; Kock, A.; Löscher, C. R.; Schmitz, R. A.; Stramma, L.; Bange, H. W.

    2015-06-01

    Recent observations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) demonstrated the key role of meso- and submesoscale processes (e.g. eddies) in shaping its hydrographic and biogeochemical properties. Off Peru, elevated primary production from coastal upwelling in combination with sluggish ventilation of subsurface waters fuels a prominent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Given that nitrous oxide (N2O) production/consumption processes on the water column are sensitive to oxygen (O2) concentrations, the ETSP is a region of particular interest to investigate its source-sink dynamics. To date, no detailed surveys linking mesoscale processes and N2O distributions as well as their relevance to nitrogen (N) cycling are available. In this study, we present the first measurements of N2O across three mesoscale eddies (two mode water or anticyclonic and one cyclonic) which were identified, tracked and sampled during two surveys carried out in the ETSP in November-December 2012. A "two peak" structure was observed for N2O, wherein the two maxima coincide with the upper and lower boundaries of the OMZ, indicating active nitrification and partial denitrification. This was further supported by the abundances of the key gene for nitrification amoA and the gene marker for N2O production during denitrification, nirS. Conversely, we found strong N2O depletion in the core of the OMZ (O2 < 5 μmol L-1) to be consistent with nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and low levels of nitrate (NO3-), thus suggesting active denitrification. N2O depletion within the OMZ's core was substantially higher in the center of mode water eddies, supporting the view that eddy activity enhances N-loss processes off Peru, in particular near the shelf break where nutrient-rich, productive waters from upwelling are trapped before being transported offshore. Analysis of eddies during their propagation towards the open ocean showed that, in general, "aging" of mesoscale eddies tends to decrease N2O concentrations through the

  18. Influence of mesoscale eddies on the distribution of nitrous oxide in the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, Damian L.; Kock, Annette; Löscher, Carolin R.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Stramma, Lothar; Bange, Hermann W.

    2016-02-01

    Recent observations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) have shown the key role of meso- and submesoscale processes (e.g. eddies) in shaping its hydrographic and biogeochemical properties. Off Peru, elevated primary production from coastal upwelling in combination with sluggish ventilation of subsurface waters fuels a prominent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Given that nitrous oxide (N2O) production-consumption processes in the water column are sensitive to oxygen (O2) concentrations, the ETSP is a region of particular interest to investigate its source-sink dynamics. To date, no detailed surveys linking mesoscale processes and N2O distributions as well as their relevance to nitrogen (N) cycling are available. In this study, we present the first measurements of N2O across three mesoscale eddies (two mode water or anticyclonic and one cyclonic) which were identified, tracked, and sampled during two surveys carried out in the ETSP in November-December 2012. A two-peak structure was observed for N2O, wherein the two maxima coincide with the upper and lower boundaries of the OMZ, indicating active nitrification and partial denitrification. This was further supported by the abundances of the key gene for nitrification, ammonium monooxygenase (amoA), and the gene marker for N2O production during denitrification, nitrite reductase (nirS). Conversely, we found strong N2O depletion in the core of the OMZ (O2 < 5 µmol L-1) to be consistent with nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and low levels of nitrate (NO3-), thus suggesting active denitrification. N2O depletion within the OMZ's core was substantially higher in the centre of mode water eddies, supporting the view that eddy activity enhances N-loss processes off Peru, in particular near the shelf break where nutrient-rich, productive waters from upwelling are trapped before being transported offshore. Analysis of eddies during their propagation towards the open ocean showed that, in general, "ageing" of mesoscale eddies

  19. Persistence in rainfall occurrence over Tropical south-east Asia and equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahale, S. D.; Panchawagh, N.; Singh, S. V.; Ranatunge, E. R.; Brikshavana, M.

    1994-03-01

    Daily rainfall observations during the principal rainy seasons over a large part of Tropical Asia and the equatorial Pacific are analysed for persistence by fitting Markov chains of various order. Daily rainfall data of 98 stations from India, Sri Lanka and Thailand falling in the monsoonal regime and 9 stations in the non-monsoonal regime of the equatorial Pacific are examined. The appropriate order of Markov chain is determined by analyzing wet and dry spell length characteristics and by applying the Schwarz Baysian Criterion to the arbitrary sequences of 5-day length. Markov chains of order greater than 1 are found to characterize the persistence in rainfall over India and to some extent over wet zones of Sri Lanka and central equatorial Pacific. Simple Markov chains are suggested for Thailand, the dry zone of Sri Lanka and the stations of central equatorial Pacific lying some what away from the equator.

  20. Labour circulation and the village economy in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Sofer, M

    1992-12-01

    The author examines circular labor migration in Fiji. "This paper is organized into five sections. The first section provides a brief discussion of two major perspectives of labour circulation in developing countries. The second section presents the state of the Fijian village in the context of the current pattern of uneven development in Fiji. The practice of labour circulation by Fijian villagers is dealt with in the third section. In the last two sections, issues concerning the maintenance of the polarized pattern and the preservation of the village mode of production are discussed."

  1. Iron-binding Ligands in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific: Results from U.S. GEOTRACES Cruise GP16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, K. N.; Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Sherrell, R. M.; Sohst, B. M.; Sedwick, P.; John, S.

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution depth profiles, consisting of 25-49 samples each, were collected as part of the U.S. GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (GEOTRACES cruise GP16). The organic complexation of dissolved iron in these samples, including the concentrations and conditional stability constants of iron-binding ligands, was measured by competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry using the added competitive ligand salicylaldoxime. In addition to the conventional depth profile samples for dissolved (<0.2 µm) iron-binding ligands, samples were collected for size-fractionated ligand analyses using cross flow filtration. These samples were obtained from in and around the mid-depth near-field to distal hydrothermal plume emanating from the East Pacific Rise, and allowed for iron-binding ligand analyses in the dissolved (<0.45 µm), colloidal (10 kDa to 0.45 µm) and soluble (<10 kDa) size fractions. Results from this work will be presented in the context of the few previous studies of iron-binding ligands in the South Pacific, and compared with results from the North U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic Transect (GEOTRACES cruise GA03).

  2. Factors affecting evidence-use in food policy-making processes in health and agriculture in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Waqa, Gade; Bell, Colin; Snowdon, Wendy; Moodie, Marj

    2017-01-09

    There is limited research on the use of evidence to inform policy-making in the Pacific. This study aims to identify and describe factors that facilitate or limit the use of evidence in food-related policy-making in the Health and Agriculture Ministries in Fiji. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with selected policy-makers in two government ministries that were instrumental in the development of food-related policies in Fiji designed to prevent Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). Snowball sampling was used to recruit, as key informants, senior policy-makers in management positions such as national advisors and directors who were based at either the national headquarters or equivalent. Interviewees were asked about their experiences in developing food-related or other policies, barriers or facilitators encountered in the policy development and implementation process and the use of evidence. Each interview lasted approximately 45-60 minutes, and was conducted in English. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed, thematically coded and analyzed using N-Vivo 8.0 software. Thirty-one policy-makers from the Ministry of Health and Medical Services (MoHMS n = 18) and the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA n = 13) in Fiji participated in the study. Whilst evidence is sometimes used in food-related policy-making in both the Health and Agriculture Ministries (including formal evidence such as published research and informal evidence such as personal experiences and opinions), it is not yet embedded as an essential part of the process. Participants indicated that a lack of resources, poor technical support in terms of training, the absence of clear strategies for improving competent use of evidence, procedures regarding engagement with other stakeholders across sectors, varying support from senior managers and limited consultation across sectors were barriers to evidence use. The willingness of organizations to create a culture of using evidence was

  3. The opening of the South China Sea: Driven by Pacific subduction, or by India-Eurasia collision?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The opening of the South China Sea (SCS) between ca. 30 Ma and ca. 16 Ma is widely believed to have been caused by the extrusion of the Indochina Block, and is therefore a consequence of India's indentation into the Eurasian continent (e.g., Briais et al., 1993). The main evidence used for such a connection is the roughly consistent ages between the activation of the Red River Fault and the beginning of the SCS opening. However, such a model would predict a maximum opening of the SCS proximal to the Red River Fault, an eastward propagation of the SCS, and compressional deformation in front (south) of the extruding Indochina Block. None of these predictions has been borne out by geophysical and geological data around the SCS. The model also could not explain the continental rifting along the margins of the SCS that started from ca. 60 Ma. An alternative model is that the opening of the SCS was caused by slab-pull of a paleo-SCS (Holloway, 1982; Taylor and Hayes, 1983). Here I argue that the latter model is more consistent with the kinematics around the opening of the SCS, as well as the overall evolution of the Western Pacific margin. The East Asian segment of the Pacific Margin was an Andean-type active margin between ca. 280 Ma and 90 Ma, involving flat-subduction of an oceanic plateau and slab foundering/roll-back. This Andean-type active margin appears to have terminated at around 90 Ma, and the subduction zone jumped ocean-ward, leaving a proto-SCS basin along the continental margin. The ocean-ward subduction of this old oceanic crust started sometime in the early Cenozoic, and the slab-pull effect caused the rifting of the continental margin from ca. 60 Ma, which eventually led to the opening of the South China Sea from ca. 30 Ma. The continental rifting leading to the opening of the SCS was part of the transition of an Andean-type plate margin to the Western Pacific-type from around 90 Ma along the entire Western Pacific, due to the overall ocean-ward retreat

  4. Predictable variability in the neutral sugar composition of DOM in the North Atlantic and South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, S. J.; Carlson, C. A.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Nelson, N. B.; Siegel, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Variability in the percent contribution of dissolved combined neutral sugars (DCNS) to total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (i.e. DCNS yields) and the relative composition of individual neutral sugars (i.e. mol percent DCNS) provides useful information pertaining to the processing and diagenetic state of ambient DOM pools. Here, we assess variability in the relative contributions of individual neutral sugars within spatially and temporally robust datasets from U.S. CLIVAR Repeat Hydrography program transects in the North Atlantic (A20 cruise) and South Pacific Ocean (P16S cruise) and the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series site, respectively. Novel trends in DCNS concentrations, composition, and the diagenetic state of DOM will be presented for the South Pacific Ocean. Additionally, systematic variability in the relative contributions of glucose, mannose + xylose, and galactose between basins will be discussed in relation to processes of DCNS production and degradation. A conceptual framework for the application of this ratio in the open ocean will also be discussed.

  5. Response to UVB radiation and oxidative stress of marine bacteria isolated from South Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Matallana-Surget, S; Villette, C; Intertaglia, L; Joux, F; Bourrain, M; Lebaron, P

    2012-12-05

    Marine bacterial strains isolated from South Pacific and Mediterranean Sea were studied for their resistance to UVB radiation, their repair capacity under photoreactivating light, as well as their oxidative stress response using concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), as an oxidizer. A total of 30 marine bacteria were isolated from the hyper-oligotrophic waters of the South Pacific Gyre to the eutrophic waters of the Chilean coast during the BIOSOPE cruise (2004), and 10 strains from surface Mediterranean coastal waters. One third of bacteria presented a high resistance to UVB and almost all isolates presented an efficient post-irradiation recovery. Only few strains showed cell survival to high concentration of H(2)O(2). No correlation between the sampling sites and the bacterial UVB resistance was observed. Two marine bacteria, Erythrobacter flavus and Ruegeria mobilis, were of particular interest, presenting a good response to the three parameters (UVB and H(2)O(2) resistance/efficient repair). Unexpectedly, two resistant strains were again identified as Ruegeria species underlining that this geographically widespread genus, resist to UVB regardless the environment from which the isolates originate.

  6. Yams (Dioscorea spp.) from the South Pacific Islands contain many novel badnaviruses: implications for international movement of yam germplasm.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Lawrence; Lebas, B S M; Seal, S E

    2008-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) samples (n = 690) from seven South Pacific Islands were screened for badnavirus infection by ELISA using two antisera to African badnaviruses. Positive readings were obtained for 26.4-34.6% of samples representing both known (D. bulbifera, D. nummularia and D. pentaphylla) and unreported host species (D. alata, D. esculenta, D. rotundata and D. trifida) in this region. Total DNAs were extracted from 25 ELISA-positive plants and 4 ELISA-negative controls and subjected to PCR amplification with badnavirus-specific primers targeting the reverse transcriptase (RT)-RNaseH genes. All 29 samples yielded the expected size PCR-product for badnaviruses, which were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the resulting 45 partial (500-527 bp) RT-RNaseH sequences revealed 11 new sequence groups with <79% nucleotide identity to each other or any EMBL sequence. Three sequences (two groups) were highly divergent to the other nine new South Pacific yam badnavirus groups (47.9-57.2% identity) and probably represent either new Caulimoviridae genera or endogenous pararetrovirus sequences. Some sequence groups appeared specific to particular Dioscorea host species. Four 99.9% identical RT-RNaseH sequences possessing nine amino acid deletions from D. esculenta from three islands represent a putative integrated sequence group. The distribution of sequence groups across the islands indicates that badnaviruses have spread extensively between islands and continents through infected germplasm.

  7. Changes in the D region associated with three recent solar eclipses in the South Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Abhikesh; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Singh, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    We estimate D region changes due to 22 July 2009 total solar eclipse (SE), 13-14 November 2012 total SE, and 9-10 May 2013 annular SE, using VLF navigational transmitters signal observations at Suva, Fiji. The North West Cape (NWC) signal (19.8 kHz) showed an amplitude and phase decrease of 0.70 dB and 23° during November SE and 2.0 dB and 90° during May SE. The modeling using Long Wave Propagation Capability code for NWC-Suva path during November and May SEs showed an increase in average D region reflection height (H') and sharpness factor (β) by 0.6 and 0.5 km and 0.012 and 0.015 km-1, respectively. The July total SE for JJI-Suva path showed an increase in H' of 1.5 km and a decrease in β of 0.055 km-1. The decrease in the electron density calculated using SE time H' and β is maximum for July total SE and minimum for May annular SE. The effective recombination coefficient estimated from the decay and recovery of signal phase associated with May annular SE was higher (27%) than normal daytime value 5.0 × 10-7 cm-3 s-1 and varied between 1.47 × 10-6 and 1.15 × 10-7 cm-3 s-1 in the altitude 70 to 80 km. Morlet wavelet analysis of signals amplitude shows strong wave-like signatures (WLS) associated with three SEs with period ranging 24-66 min, but the intensity and duration of WLS show no clear dependence on SE magnitude and type. Apart from the cooling spot, the eclipse shadow can also generate WLS associated with atmospheric gravity waves.

  8. Relationship of the South Asian Monsoon and Regional Drought with Distinct Equatorial Pacific SST Patterns on Interannual and Decadal Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, M.; Ummenhofer, C.; Anchukaitis, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Asian monsoon system influences the lives of over 60% of the planet's population, with widespread socioeconomic effects resulting from weakening or failure of monsoon rains. Spatially broad and temporally extended drought episodes have been known to dramatically influence human history, including the Strange Parallels Drought in the mid-18th century. Here, we explore the dynamics of sustained monsoon failure using the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas - a high-resolution network of hydro-climatically sensitive tree-ring records - and a 1300-year pre-industrial control run of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Spatial drought patterns in the instrumental and model-based Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) during years with extremely weakened South Asian monsoon are similar to those reconstructed during the Strange Parallels Drought in the MADA. We further explore how the large-scale Indo-Pacific climate during weakened South Asian monsoon differs between interannual and decadal timescales. The Strange Parallels Drought pattern is observed during March-April-May primarily over Southeast Asia, with decreased precipitation and reduced moisture fluxes, while anomalies in June-July-August are confined to the Indian subcontinent during both individual and decadal events. Individual years with anomalous drying exhibit canonical El Niño conditions over the eastern equatorial Pacific and associated shifts in the Walker circulation, while decadal events appear to be related to anomalous warming around the dateline in the equatorial Pacific, typical of El Niño Modoki events. The results suggest different dynamical processes influence drought at different time scales through distinct remote ocean influences.

  9. Detecting the progression of ocean acidification from the saturation state of CaCO3 in the subtropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Ken-ichi

    2015-04-01

    Progression of ocean acidification in the subtropical South Pacific was investigated by using high-quality data from trans-Pacific zonal section at 17°S (World Ocean Circulation Experiment section P21) collected in 1994 and 2009. During this 15 year period, the CaCO3 saturation state of seawater with respect to calcite (Ωcal) and aragonite (Ωarg) in the upper water column (<400 dbar) decreased at rates of 0.037 a-1 and 0.025 a-1, respectively, east of 145°W longitude; these rates are among the fastest in the world's oceans. In contrast, at longitudes 170°E-145°W, Ωcal and Ωarg decreased relatively slowly, at 0.008 a-1 and 0.005 a-1, respectively. The Ωarg saturation horizon occurred at a depth of about 1200 dbar at the westernmost end of the section and shoaled eastward to about 20 dbar. From 1994 to 2009, it migrated upward at a rate of 5.2 dbar a-1 west of 145°W. Decomposition of the temporal changes of Ω (ΔΩ) showed that the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean accounted for more than half of ΔΩ. The more rapid rate of decline of Ω in the eastern section was attributable to a relatively large contribution of organic matter remineralization, whereas the slower rate in the central section was attributed to a decrease of anthropogenic CO2 uptake caused by rising water temperatures. An important finding of this study was that acidification of the upper water column was enhanced by processes related to the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern subtropical South Pacific Ocean.

  10. Prediction of the fate of radioactive material in the South Pacific Ocean using a global high-resolution ocean model.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Douglas R; England, Matthew H

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the release of radioactive contaminants from Moruroa Atoll in a global high-resolution off-line model. The spread of tracer is studied in a series of simulations with varying release depths and time-scales, and into ocean velocity fields corresponding to long-term annual mean, seasonal, and interannually varying scenarios. In the instantaneous surface release scenarios we find that the incorporation of a seasonal cycle greatly influences tracer advection, with maximum concentrations still found within the French Polynesia region after 10 years. In contrast, the maximum trace is located in the southeast Pacific when long-term annual mean fields are used. This emphasizes the importance of the seasonal cycle in models of pollution dispersion on large scales. We further find that during an El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event reduced currents in the region of Moruroa Atoll result in increased concentrations of radioactive material in French Polynesia, as direct flushing from the source is reduced. In terms of the sensitivity to tracer release time-rates, we find that a gradual input results in maximum concentrations in the near vicinity of French Polynesia. This contrasts the instantaneous-release scenarios, which see maximum concentrations and tracer spread across much of the South Pacific Ocean. For example, in as little as seven years radioactive contamination can reach the east coast of Australia diluted by only a factor of 1,000 of the initial concentration. A comparison of results is made with previous studies. Overall, we find much higher concentrations of radionuclides in the South Pacific than has previously been predicted using coarser-resolution models.

  11. Response of the South Pacific Convergence Zone to imposed circulation and moisture perturbations in an intermediate level complexity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niznik, M. J.; Lintner, B. R.

    2014-12-01

    Previous research has identified a connection between the strength of low-level trade wind inflow from the relatively dry southeastern Pacific basin and the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). This circulation-precipitation relationship has been noted in composite analysis applied to reanalysis data as well as to output from current generation climate models, although the causality is ambiguous. Additionally, given that prior studies exhibit deep vertical structures associated with changes to low-level inflow east of the SPCZ, the relationship between low-level inflow variability and the propagation of upper level mid-latitude synoptic disturbances into the SPCZ remains unclear. Thus, forcing models with prescribed circulation and moisture anomalies may be instructive for untangling the dynamic and thermodynamic contributions to such interactions, as well as their potential causality. To that end, we use the Quasi-equilibrium Tropical Circulation Model 2 (QTCM2), an intermediate complexity model with a separate boundary layer of fixed height imposed at the base of the free troposphere, to explore the response of the SPCZ, and more broadly convection across the South Pacific, to perturbed low- and upper-level circulation and moisture fields east of its climatological position. Preliminary results suggest a strong precipitation response to strengthened low-level trade wind inflow, hypothesized to be the result of increased convergence in the climatological SPCZ, with an associated decrease in Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) precipitation. Conversely, there is a limited precipitation response to weakened low-level trade wind inflow despite a notable (2-3 g kg-1) increase in specific humidity, suggesting the climatological low-level inflow is already associated with the necessary moisture threshold for deep convection. Ultimately, these results suggest dynamics play a stronger role than thermodynamics in the interaction as modeled by QTCM2.

  12. Anthropogenic Influence on the Changes of the Subtropical Gyre Circulation in the South Pacific in the 20th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, F.; Pizarro, O.; Montecinos, A.

    2016-12-01

    The subtropical ocean gyre in the South Pacific is a large scale wind-driven ocean circulation, including the Peru-Chile Current, the westward South Equatorial Current, the East Australian Current, and the eastward South Pacific Current. Large scale ocean circulations play an essential role in the climate of the Earth over long and short term time scales.In the recent years a spin-up of this circulation has been recognized analyzing observations of sea level, temperature and salinity profiles, sea surface temperature and wind. Until now it is not clear whether this spin-up is decadal variability or whether it is a long-term trend introduced by anthropogenic forcing. This study aims to analyze whether and how anthropogenic forcing influences the position and the strength of the gyre in the 20th century. To determine that, yearly means of different variables of an ensemble of CMIP5 models are analyzed. The experiments 'historical' and 'historicalNat' are examined. The 'historical' experiment simulates the climate of the 20th century and the 'historicalNat' experiment covers the same time period, but only includes natural forcings. Comparing the outcomes of these two experiments is supposed to give information about the anthropogenic influence on the subtropical gyre of the South Pacific.The main variable we analyze is sea level change. This is directly related to the gyre circulation. The center of the gyre is characterized by a high pressure zone (high sea level) and the temporal and spatial variability of the sea level height field gives information about changes in the gyre circulation. The CMIP5 databank includes steric and dynamic sea level changes. Steric sea level, that is the contribution of temperature and salinity of the water, describes the major contribution to regional sea level change with respect to the global mean. Density changes contract or expand the water, which also changes the sea surface height. This does not only occur at the surface, but at

  13. Open and Flexible TVET in Commonwealth Pacific Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the current state of open and flexible technical-vocational education and training (TVET) in nine Pacific Commonwealth countries: Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) has commissioned the Open Polytechnic to complete this report to…

  14. Seismotectonics and present-day relative plate motions in the New Hebrides — North Fiji Basin region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louat, R.; Pelletier, B.

    1989-10-01

    Relative motions between the Pacific plate (P), Indo-Australian plate (IA), New Hebrides (NH) arc microplate and the North Fiji Basin (NFB) microplate are estimated using shallow seismicity, 276 focal mechanism solutions, bathymetry, magnetism and the RM-2 plate model of Minster and Jordan (1978). Within the NFB, we define the western NFB (WNFB), eastern NFB (ENFB) and southern NFB (SNFB) microplates. A 8 cm/y spreading in a N72°E direction occurs along the N-S trending spreading ridge of NFB (WNFB-ENFB boundary). Along the ENFB-IA boundary located at 176°E, a 3 cm/y extension in a N108°E direction is proposed. The WNFB-P boundary which includes the Hazel Holme Extensional Zone (HHEZ), is complex and a general N25° E extension (2 cm/y) is inferred. The Fiji fracture zone (FFZ) is composed of two segments: Along the eastern zone (P-IA boundary) trending N80° E, a left-lateral strike-slip motion occurs (9.6 cm/y) accommodated by minor N109°E extension (pull-apart); while along the western zone (ENFB-P boundary) a N84°E trending left-lateral strike-slip motion (7 cm/y) is inferred. The WNFB-SNFB boundary corresponds to a N70° E broad fracture zone along which an E-W left-lateral strike-slip motion is proposed. The SNFB microplate moves rapidly eastwards (10.5 cm/y at 172°E) and is almost attached to the IA plate. Within the NFB, an improved model is discussed