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Sample records for filament structure molecular

  1. Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Holmes, Kenneth; Noe, Frank; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

  2. Towards a molecular description of intermediate filament structure and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, David A.D.; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Burkhard, Peter; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald . E-mail: h.herrmann@dkfz.de

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) represent one of the prominent cytoskeletal elements of metazoan cells. Their constituent proteins are coded by a multigene family, whose members are expressed in complex patterns that are controlled by developmental programs of differentiation. Hence, IF proteins found in epidermis differ significantly from those in muscle or neuronal tissues. Due to their fibrous nature, which stems from a fairly conserved central {alpha}-helical coiled-coil rod domain, IF proteins have long resisted crystallization and thus determination of their atomic structure. Since they represent the primary structural elements that determine the shape of the nucleus and the cell more generally, a major challenge is to arrive at a more rational understanding of how their nanomechanical properties effect the stability and plasticity of cells and tissues. Here, we review recent structural results of the coiled-coil dimer, assembly intermediates and growing filaments that have been obtained by a hybrid methods approach involving a rigorous combination of X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, cryo-electron tomography, computational analysis and molecular modeling.

  3. Rift Valley fever phlebovirus NSs protein core domain structure suggests molecular basis for nuclear filaments.

    PubMed

    Barski, Michal; Brennan, Benjamin; Miller, Ona K; Potter, Jane A; Vijayakrishnan, Swetha; Bhella, David; Naismith, James H; Elliott, Richard M; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich

    2017-09-15

    Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (RVFV) is a clinically and economically important pathogen increasingly likely to cause widespread epidemics. RVFV virulence depends on the interferon antagonist non-structural protein (NSs), which remains poorly characterized. We identified a stable core domain of RVFV NSs (residues 83-248), and solved its crystal structure, a novel all-helical fold organized into highly ordered fibrils. A hallmark of RVFV pathology is NSs filament formation in infected cell nuclei. Recombinant virus encoding the NSs core domain induced intranuclear filaments, suggesting it contains all essential determinants for nuclear translocation and filament formation. Mutations of key crystal fibril interface residues in viruses encoding full-length NSs completely abrogated intranuclear filament formation in infected cells. We propose the fibrillar arrangement of the NSs core domain in crystals reveals the molecular basis of assembly of this key virulence factor in cell nuclei. Our findings have important implications for fundamental understanding of RVFV virulence.

  4. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vetebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca++ binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved. PMID:18616971

  5. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Scott L; Hobbs, Kevin H; Thuma, Jeffrey B

    2008-10-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vertebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca(++) binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved.

  6. Gravitational infall onto molecular filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2013-06-01

    Two aspects of filamentary molecular cloud evolution are addressed: (1) exploring analytically the role of the environment for the evolution of filaments demonstrates that considering them in isolation (i.e., just addressing the fragmentation stability) will result in unphysical conclusions about the filament's properties. Accretion can also explain the observed decorrelation between FWHM and peak column density. (2) Free-fall accretion onto finite filaments can lead to the characteristic 'fans' of infrared-dark clouds around star-forming regions. The fans may form due to tidal forces mostly arising at the ends of the filaments, consistent with numerical models and earlier analytical studies.

  7. Radial Infall onto a Massive Molecular Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara

    2015-08-01

    The newly discovered massive molecular filament G32.02+0.05 (~70 pc long, 10^5 Msun) has been shaped and compressed by older generations of massive stars. The similarity of this filament in physical structure (density profile, temperature) to much smaller star-forming filaments, suggests that the mechanism to form such filaments is a universal process. The densest portion of the filament, apparent as an Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) appears to have been compressed on both sides by a pair of bubbles and now shows a range of massive star formation signatures throughout. We investigate the kinematics in this massive star-forming filament and find velocity coherence along the filament and global blue asymmetric line profiles. These line asymmetries are interpreted as a signature of large-scale radial collapse. Using line asymmetries observed with optically thick HCO+ (1-0) and optically thin H13CO+ (1-0) across a range of massive star forming regions in the filament, we estimate the global radial infall rate of the filament to range from a few 100 to a few 1000 Msun/Myr/pc^2. At its current infall rate the densest portions of the cloud will more than double their current mass within a Myr. The discovery of such a reservoir of infalling gas has important ramifications on the course of star formation in the cloud and on our overall understanding of star cluster formation.

  8. Radial Infall onto a Massive Molecular Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Myers, Philip C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Keto, Eric; Kirk, Helen

    The newly discovered Massive Molecular Filament (MMF) G32.02+0.05 (~ 70 pc long, 105 M⊙) has been shaped and compressed by older generations of massive stars. The similarity of this filament in physical structure (density profile, temperature) to much smaller star-forming filaments, suggests that the mechanism to form such filaments may be a universal process. The densest portion of the filament, apparent as an Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) shows a range of massive star formation signatures throughout. We investigate the kinematics in this filament and find widespread inverse P cygni asymmetric line profiles. These line asymmetries are interpreted as a signature of large-scale radial collapse. Using line asymmetries observed with optically thick HCO+ (1-0) and optically thin H13CO+ (1-0) across a range of massive star forming regions in the filament, we estimate the global radial infall rate of the filament to range from a few 100 to a few 1000 M⊙ Myr-1 pc-1. At its current infall rate the densest portions of the cloud will more than double their current mass within a Myr.

  9. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  10. Filament wound structure and method

    DOEpatents

    Dritt, William S.; Gerth, Howard L.; Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

  11. Intermediate Filaments: Structure and Assembly.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the intermediate filament (IF) supergene family are ubiquitous structural components that comprise, in a cell type-specific manner, the cytoskeleton proper in animal tissues. All IF proteins show a distinctly organized, extended α-helical conformation prone to form two-stranded coiled coils, which are the basic building blocks of these highly flexible, stress-resistant cytoskeletal filaments. IF proteins are highly charged, thus representing versatile polyampholytes with multiple functions. Taking vimentin, keratins, and the nuclear lamins as our prime examples, we present an overview of their molecular and structural parameters. These, in turn, document the ability of IF proteins to form distinct, highly diverse supramolecular assemblies and biomaterials found, for example, at the inner nuclear membrane, throughout the cytoplasm, and in highly complex extracellular appendages, such as hair and nails, of vertebrate organisms. Ultimately, our aim is to set the stage for a more rational understanding of the immediate effects that missense mutations in IF genes have on cellular functions and for their far-reaching impact on the development of the numerous IF diseases caused by them.

  12. Kiloparsec-Scale Simulations of Star Formation in Disk Galaxies III. Structure and Dynamics of Filaments and Clumps in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Van Loo, Sven

    2015-05-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of self-gravitating dense gas in a galactic disk, exploring scales ranging from 1 kpc down to ˜0.1 pc. Our primary goal is to understand how dense filaments form in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). These structures, often observed as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) in the Galactic plane, are thought to be the precursors to massive stars and star clusters, so their formation may be the rate-limiting step controlling global star formation rates in galactic systems as described by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. Our study follows on from Van Loo et al., which carried out simulations to 0.5 pc resolution and examined global aspects of the formation of dense gas clumps and the resulting star formation rate. Here, using our higher resolution, we examine the detailed structural, kinematic, and dynamical properties of dense filaments and clumps, including mass surface density (Σ) probability distribution functions, filament mass per unit length and its dispersion, lateral Σ profiles, filament fragmentation, filament velocity gradients and infall, and degree of filament and clump virialization. Where possible, these properties are compared to observations of IRDCs. By many metrics, especially too large mass fractions of high {Σ }\\gt 1 g c{{m}-2} material, too high mass per unit length dispersion due to dense clump formation, too high velocity gradients, and too high velocity dispersion for a given mass per unit length, the simulated filaments differ from observed IRDCs. We thus conclude that IRDCs do not form from global fast collapse of GMCs. Rather, we expect that IRDC formation and collapse are slowed significantly by the influence of dynamically important magnetic fields, which may thus play a crucial role in regulating galactic star formation rates.

  13. Probing the Energetics of Dynactin Filament Assembly and the Binding of Cargo Adaptor Proteins Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Electrostatics-Based Structural Modeling.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2017-01-10

    Dynactin, a large multiprotein complex, binds with the cytoplasmic dynein-1 motor and various adaptor proteins to allow recruitment and transportation of cellular cargoes toward the minus end of microtubules. The structure of the dynactin complex is built around an actin-like minifilament with a defined length, which has been visualized in a high-resolution structure of the dynactin filament determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). To understand the energetic basis of dynactin filament assembly, we used molecular dynamics simulation to probe the intersubunit interactions among the actin-like proteins, various capping proteins, and four extended regions of the dynactin shoulder. Our simulations revealed stronger intersubunit interactions at the barbed and pointed ends of the filament and involving the extended regions (compared with the interactions within the filament), which may energetically drive filament termination by the capping proteins and recruitment of the actin-like proteins by the extended regions, two key features of the dynactin filament assembly process. Next, we modeled the unknown binding configuration among dynactin, dynein tails, and a number of coiled-coil adaptor proteins (including several Bicaudal-D and related proteins and three HOOK proteins), and predicted a key set of charged residues involved in their electrostatic interactions. Our modeling is consistent with previous findings of conserved regions, functional sites, and disease mutations in the adaptor proteins and will provide a structural framework for future functional and mutational studies of these adaptor proteins. In sum, this study yielded rich structural and energetic information about dynactin and associated adaptor proteins that cannot be directly obtained from the cryo-EM structures with limited resolutions.

  14. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Tremblin, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Hill, T.; Molinari, S.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of ˜1.5 × 1021 cm-2 and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  15. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung; Teixeira, Paula S.; Zapata, Luis A.

    2013-01-20

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 {mu}m continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 Multiplication-Sign 2.'0 (0.88 Multiplication-Sign 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H{sub 2} mass between 0.3-5.7 M {sub Sun} and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n{sub H{sub 2}}{>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of Almost-Equal-To 17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud ( Almost-Equal-To 35 pc), large-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  16. Filament Winding Of Carbon/Carbon Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoy, Paul J.; Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method of winding carbon filaments for carbon/carbon composite structures less costly and labor-intensive, also produces more consistent results. Involves use of roller squeegee to ensure filaments continuously wet with resin during winding. Also involves control of spacing and resin contents of plies to obtain strong bonds between carbon filaments and carbon matrices. Lends itself to full automation and involves use of filaments and matrix-precursor resins in their simplest forms, thereby reducing costs.

  17. The evolution of giant molecular filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Dobbs, C. L.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in studying giant molecular filaments (GMFs), which are extremely elongated (>100 pc in length) giant molecular clouds (GMCs). They are often seen as inter-arm features in external spiral galaxies, but have been tentatively associated with spiral arms when viewed in the Milky Way. In this paper, we study the time evolution of GMFs in a high-resolution section of a spiral galaxy simulation, and their link with spiral arm GMCs and star formation, over a period of 11 Myr. The GMFs generally survive the inter-arm passage, although they are subject to a number of processes (e.g. star formation, stellar feedback and differential rotation) that can break the giant filamentary structure into smaller sections. The GMFs are not gravitationally bound clouds as a whole, but are, to some extent, confined by external pressure. Once they reach the spiral arms, the GMFs tend to evolve into more substructured spiral arm GMCs, suggesting that GMFs may be precursors to arm GMCs. Here, they become incorporated into the more complex and almost continuum molecular medium that makes up the gaseous spiral arm. Instead of retaining a clear filamentary shape, their shapes are distorted both by their climbing up the spiral potential and their interaction with the gas within the spiral arm. The GMFs do tend to become aligned with the spiral arms just before they enter them (when they reach the minimum of the spiral potential), which could account for the observations of GMFs in the Milky Way.

  18. Filament L1482 in the California molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. L.; Esimbek, J.; Zhou, J. J.; Lou, Y.-Q.; Wu, G.; Tang, X. D.; He, Y. X.

    2014-07-01

    compared with that in the Orion molecular cloud based on the mass-radius threshold derived from the static Bonnor-Ebert sphere. The largely uniform 12CO J = 2 - 1 line-of-sight velocities along the L1482 molecular cloud shows that it is a generally coherent filamentary structure. Since the NGC 1579 stellar cluster is at the junction of two molecular filaments, the origin of the NGC 1579 stellar cluster might be merging molecular filaments fed by converging inflows. Our analysis suggests that these molecular filaments are thermally supercritical and molecular clumps may form by gravitational fragmentation along the filament. Instead of being static, these molecular clumps are most likely in processes of dynamic evolution. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Myosin filament structure in vertebrate smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The in vivo structure of the myosin filaments in vertebrate smooth muscle is unknown. Evidence from purified smooth muscle myosin and from some studies of intact smooth muscle suggests that they may have a nonhelical, side-polar arrangement of crossbridges. However, the bipolar, helical structure characteristic of myosin filaments in striated muscle has not been disproved for smooth muscle. We have used EM to investigate this question in a functionally diverse group of smooth muscles (from the vascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and visual systems) from mammalian, amphibian, and avian species. Intact muscle under physiological conditions, rapidly frozen and then freeze substituted, shows many myosin filaments with a square backbone in transverse profile. Transverse sections of fixed, chemically skinned muscles also show square backbones and, in addition, reveal projections (crossbridges) on only two opposite sides of the square. Filaments gently isolated from skinned smooth muscles and observed by negative staining show crossbridges with a 14.5-nm repeat projecting in opposite directions on opposite sides of the filament. Such filaments subjected to low ionic strength conditions show bare filament ends and an antiparallel arrangement of myosin tails along the length of the filament. All of these observations are consistent with a side-polar structure and argue against a bipolar, helical crossbridge arrangement. We conclude that myosin filaments in all smooth muscles, regardless of function, are likely to be side-polar. Such a structure could be an important factor in the ability of smooth muscles to contract by large amounts. PMID:8698822

  20. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: Observational Analysis of Filaments in the Serpens South Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-López, M.; Arce, H. G.; Looney, L.; Mundy, L. G.; Storm, S.; Teuben, P. J.; Lee, K.; Segura-Cox, D.; Isella, A.; Tobin, J. J.; Rosolowsky, E.; Plunkett, A.; Kwon, W.; Kauffmann, J.; Ostriker, E.; Tassis, K.; Shirley, Y. L.; Pound, M.

    2014-08-01

    We present the N2H+ (J = 1 → 0) map of the Serpens South molecular cloud obtained as part of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey. The observations cover 250 arcmin2 and fully sample structures from 3000 AU to 3 pc with a velocity resolution of 0.16 km s-1, and they can be used to constrain the origin and evolution of molecular cloud filaments. The spatial distribution of the N2H+ emission is characterized by long filaments that resemble those observed in the dust continuum emission by Herschel. However, the gas filaments are typically narrower such that, in some cases, two or three quasi-parallel N2H+ filaments comprise a single observed dust continuum filament. The difference between the dust and gas filament widths casts doubt on Herschel ability to resolve the Serpens South filaments. Some molecular filaments show velocity gradients along their major axis, and two are characterized by a steep velocity gradient in the direction perpendicular to the filament axis. The observed velocity gradient along one of these filaments was previously postulated as evidence for mass infall toward the central cluster, but these kind of gradients can be interpreted as projection of large-scale turbulence.

  1. Patterns of molecular motors that guide and sort filaments.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Beat; Nédélec, François

    2012-11-21

    Molecular motors can be immobilized to transport filaments and loads that are attached to these filaments inside a nano-device. However, if motors are distributed uniformly over a flat surface, the motility is undirected, and the filaments move equally in all directions. For many applications it is important to control the direction in which the filaments move, and two strategies have been explored to achieve this: applying external forces and confining the filaments inside channels. In this article, we discuss a third strategy in which the topography of the sample remains flat, but the motors are distributed non-uniformly over the surface. Systems of filaments and patterned molecular motors were simulated using a stochastic engine that included Brownian motion and filament bending elasticity. Using an evolutionary algorithm, patterns were optimized for their capacity to precisely control the paths of the filaments. We identified patterns of motors that could either direct the filaments in a particular direction, or separate short and long filaments. These functionalities already exceed what has been achieved with confinement. The patterns are composed of one or two types of motors positioned in lines or along arcs and should be easy to manufacture. Finally, these patterns can be easily combined into larger designs, allowing one to precisely control the motion of microscopic objects inside a device.

  2. Structure of flexible filamentous plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C; Havens, Wendy M; Ghabrial, Said A; Wall, Joseph S; Stubbs, Gerald

    2008-10-01

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  3. Structure of Flexible Filamentous Plant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.; Havens, Wendy M.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2008-10-23

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  4. The intermediate-sized filaments in rat kangaroo PtK2 cells. II. Structure and composition of isolated filaments.

    PubMed

    Franke, W W; Schmid, E; Osborn, M; Weber, K

    1978-08-01

    When cultured cells of the rat kangaroo cell line PtK2 grown on plastic or glass surfaces are lysed and extracted with combinations of low and high salt buffers and the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 cytoskeletal preparations are obtained that show an enrichment of 6 to 11 nm thick filaments. The arrays of these filaments have been examined by various light and electron microscopic techniques, including ultrathin sectioning, whole mount transmission electron microscopy, negative staining, and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, 6 to 11 nm filaments isolated from these cells with similar extraction procedures and with centrifugation techniques have been examined by electron microscopy. The arrays of these isolated intermediate-sized filaments, their ultrastructure and their specific decoration by certain antibodies present in normal rabbit sera as well as by guinea pig antibodies against purified bovine prekeratin is demonstrated. When preparations enriched in these intermediate-sized filaments are examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis a corresponding enrichment of three polypeptide bands with apparent molecular weights of about 45 000, 52 000 and 58 000 (the latter component sometimes appears split into two bands) is observed, besides some residual actin and a few high molecular weight bands. The morphology of the isolated filaments, their immunological reaction with antibodies decorating prekeratin-containing structures, and the sizes of their constitutive polypeptides suggest that these filaments are closely related to prekeratin-containing filaments observed in a variety of epithelial cells.

  5. A closer look at the `characteristic' width of molecular cloud filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, G. V.; Psaradaki, I.; Skalidis, R.; Tassis, K.; Andrews, J. J.

    2017-04-01

    Filaments in Herschel molecular cloud images are found to exhibit a 'characteristic width'. This finding is in tension with spatial power spectra of the data, which show no indication of this characteristic scale. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is a result of the methodology adopted for measuring filament widths. First, we perform the previously used analysis technique on artificial scale-free data, and obtain a peaked width distribution of filament-like structures. Next, we repeat the analysis on three Herschel maps and reproduce the narrow distribution of widths found in previous studies - when considering the average width of each filament. However, the distribution of widths measured at all points along a filament spine is broader than the distribution of mean filament widths, indicating that the narrow spread (interpreted as a 'characteristic' width) results from averaging. Furthermore, the width is found to vary significantly from one end of a filament to the other. Therefore, the previously identified peak at 0.1 pc cannot be understood as representing the typical width of filaments. We find an alternative explanation by modelling the observed width distribution as a truncated power-law distribution, sampled with uncertainties. The position of the peak is connected to the lower truncation scale and is likely set by the choice of parameters used in measuring filament widths. We conclude that a 'characteristic' width of filaments is not supported by the available data.

  6. Structure and mechanical properties of liquid crystalline filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, Alexey; Nemes, Alexandru; Stannarius, Ralf; Schulz, Mario; Nadasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    The formation of stable freely suspended filaments is an interesting peculiarity of some liquid crystal phases. So far, little is known about their structure and stability. Similarly to free-standing smectic films, an internal molecular structure of the mesophase stabilizes these macroscopically well-ordered objects with length to diameter ratios of 10{sup 3} and above. In this paper, we report observations of smectic liquid crystal fibers formed by bent-shaped molecules in different mesophases. Our study, employing several experimental techniques, focuses on mechanical and structural aspects of fiber formation such as internal structure, stability, and mechanical and optical properties.

  7. Paramyosin structures in the thick filaments of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Heumann, H G

    1980-10-01

    Freeze-substituted cells of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis contain paramyosin filaments which exhibit a characteristic fine structure. Longitudinally sectioned filaments show a variety of band patterns, those occurring most frequently being cross, oblique or double oblique striations. The periodic spacings within one pattern are precise as can be demonstrated by Markham analysis and optical diffractometry. The patterns arise from structures in the interior of the filament since they persist in serially sectioned filaments and a layered structure is visible in cross-sectioned filaments. The different patterns are found to be convertible by rotating the grid around the filament axis. The observations led to the conclusion that the paramyosin core has some kind of helical arrangement. A model is proposed which consists of concentric layers of parallel paramyosin molecules which are displaced along the molecular axis in such a way that the characteristic Bear-Selby net structure results.

  8. ALMA observations of cold molecular gas filaments trailing rising radio bubbles in PKS 0745-191

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; McNamara, B. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Edge, A. C.; Combes, F.; Murray, N. W.; Parrish, I. J.; Salomé, P.; Sanders, J. S.; Baum, S. A.; Donahue, M.; Main, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; O'Dea, C. P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Tremblay, G.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Voit, G. M.

    2016-05-01

    We present ALMA observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) line emission tracing filaments of cold molecular gas in the central galaxy of the cluster PKS 0745-191. The total molecular gas mass of 4.6± 0.3× 109 M_{⊙}, assuming a Galactic XCO factor, is divided roughly equally between three filaments each extending radially 3-5 kpc from the galaxy centre. The emission peak is located in the SE filament ˜ 1 arcsec (2 kpc) from the nucleus. The velocities of the molecular clouds in the filaments are low, lying within ± 100 { km s^{-1}} of the galaxy's systemic velocity. Their full width at half-maximum (FWHM) are less than 150 { km s^{-1},} which is significantly below the stellar velocity dispersion. Although the molecular mass of each filament is comparable to a rich spiral galaxy, such low velocities show that the filaments are transient and the clouds would disperse on < 107 yr time-scales unless supported, likely by the indirect effect of magnetic fields. The velocity structure is inconsistent with a merger origin or gravitational free-fall of cooling gas in this massive central galaxy. If the molecular clouds originated in gas cooling even a few kpc from their current locations their velocities would exceed those observed. Instead, the projection of the N and SE filaments underneath X-ray cavities suggests they formed in the updraft behind bubbles buoyantly rising through the cluster atmosphere. Direct uplift of the dense gas by the radio bubbles appears to require an implausibly high coupling efficiency. The filaments are coincident with low temperature X-ray gas, bright optical line emission and dust lanes indicating that the molecular gas could have formed from lifted warmer gas that cooled in situ.

  9. Collective alignment of polar filaments by molecular motors.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebert, F.; Aranson, I. S.; Vershinin, M.; Gross, S. P.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California at Irvine

    2009-04-01

    We study the alignment of polar biofilaments, such as microtubules and actin, subject to the action of multiple molecular motors attached simultaneously to more than one filament. Focusing on a paradigm model of only two filaments interacting with multiple motors, we were able to investigate in detail the alignment dynamics. While almost no alignment occurs in the case of a single motor, the filaments become rapidly aligned due to the collective action of the motors. Our analysis shows that the alignment time is governed by the number of bound motors and the magnitude of the motors stepping fluctuations. We predict that the time scale of alignment is in the order of seconds, much faster than that reported for passive crosslink-induced bundling. In vitro experiments on the alignment of microtubules by multiple-motor covered beads are in qualitative agreement. We also discuss another mode of fast alignment of filaments, namely the cooperation between motors and passive crosslinks.

  10. Collective alignment of polar filaments by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Ziebert, F; Vershinin, M; Gross, S P; Aranson, I S

    2009-04-01

    We study the alignment of polar biofilaments, such as microtubules and actin, subject to the action of multiple molecular motors attached simultaneously to more than one filament. Focusing on a paradigm model of only two filaments interacting with multiple motors, we were able to investigate in detail the alignment dynamics. While almost no alignment occurs in the case of a single motor, the filaments become rapidly aligned due to the collective action of the motors. Our analysis shows that the alignment time is governed by the number of bound motors and the magnitude of the motors' stepping fluctuations. We predict that the time scale of alignment is in the order of seconds, much faster than that reported for passive crosslink-induced bundling. In vitro experiments on the alignment of microtubules by multiple-motor covered beads are in qualitative agreement. We also discuss another mode of fast alignment of filaments, namely the cooperation between motors and passive crosslinks.

  11. Filamentous structures in skeletal muscle: anchors for the subsarcolemmal space.

    PubMed

    Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Soenggono, Arifin; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, intermediate filaments and actin filaments provide structural support to the myofibrils and the sarcolemma. For many years, it was poorly understood from ultrastructural observations that how these filamentous structures were kept anchored. The present study was conducted to determine the architecture of filamentous anchoring structures in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils. The diaphragms (Dp) of adult wild type and mdx mice (mdx is a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy) were subjected to tension applied perpendicular to the long axis of the muscle fibers, with or without treatment with 1% Triton X-100 or 0.03% saponin. These experiments were conducted to confirm the presence and integrity of the filamentous anchoring structures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these structures provide firm transverse connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. Most of the filamentous structures appeared to be inserted into subsarcolemmal densities, forming anchoring connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. In some cases, actin filaments were found to run longitudinally in the subsarcolemmal space to connect to the sarcolemma or in some cases to connect to the intermyofibrils as elongated thin filaments. These filamentous anchoring structures were less common in the mdx Dp. Our data suggest that the transverse and longitudinal filamentous structures form an anchoring system in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils.

  12. Molecular phylogeny of metazoan intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Erber, A; Riemer, D; Bovenschulte, M; Weber, K

    1998-12-01

    We have cloned cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) proteins from a large number of invertebrate phyla using cDNA probes, the monoclonal antibody IFA, peptide sequence information, and various RT-PCR procedures. Novel IF protein sequences reported here include the urochordata and nine protostomic phyla, i.e., Annelida, Brachiopoda, Chaetognatha, Echiura, Nematomorpha, Nemertea, Platyhelminthes, Phoronida, and Sipuncula. Taken together with the wealth of data on IF proteins of vertebrates and the results on IF proteins of Cephalochordata, Mollusca, Annelida, and Nematoda, two IF prototypes emerge. The L-type, which includes 35 sequences from 11 protostomic phyla, shares with the nuclear lamins the long version of the coil 1b subdomain and, in most cases, a homology segment of some 120 residues in the carboxyterminal tail domain. The S-type, which includes all four subfamilies (types I to IV) of vertebrate IF proteins, lacks 42 residues in the coil 1b subdomain and the carboxyterminal lamin homology segment. Since IF proteins from all three phyla of the chordates have the 42-residue deletion, this deletion arose in a progenitor prior to the divergence of the chordates into the urochordate, cephalochordate, and vertebrate lineages, possibly already at the origin of the deuterostomic branch. Four phyla recently placed into the protostomia on grounds of their 18S rDNA sequences (Brachiopoda, Nemertea, Phoronida, and Platyhelminthes) show IF proteins of the L-type and fit by sequence identity criteria into the lophotrochozoic branch of the protostomia.

  13. Colliding filaments and a massive dense core in the Cygnus OB 7 molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Akisato, Ko; Ohashi, Kenjiro; Nakagomi, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Saito, Hiro

    2014-12-10

    We report the results of molecular line observations carried out toward a massive dense core in the Cyg OB 7 molecular cloud. The core has an extraordinarily large mass (∼1.1 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) and size (∼2 × 5 pc{sup 2}), but there is no massive young star forming therein. We observed this core in various molecular lines such as C{sup 18}O(J = 1-0) using the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. We find that the core has an elongated morphology consisting of several filaments and core-like structures. The filaments are massive (10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}), and they are apparently colliding with one another. Some candidates for young stellar objects are distributed around their intersection, suggesting that the collisions of the filaments may have influenced their formation. To understand the formation and evolution of such colliding filaments, we performed numerical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement technique, adopting the observed core parameters (the mass and size) as the initial conditions. The results indicate that the filaments are formed as seen in other earlier simulations for small cores in the literature, but we could not reproduce the collisions of the filaments simply by assuming a large initial mass and size. We find that collisions of the filaments occur only when there is a large velocity gradient in the initial core, in a sense compressing it. We suggest that the observed core was actually compressed by an external effect, e.g., shocks from nearby supernova remnants, including HB 21 which has been suggested to be interacting with the Cyg OB 7 molecular cloud.

  14. The structures, mass motions and footpoints of solar filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    This thesis focuses on identifying the mechanism by which solar filaments acquire mass. Some of the speculations for how a filament gets its mass are 1) injection of mass from the chromosphere into the filament structure, and 2) condensation of mass from the corona into the region of the filament channel. Mass motion at the footpoints of the filaments is studied to detect mass entering and leaving the filament body. The magnetic properties of the footpoints of the filaments are also studied. Recommendations are drawn by comparing observational properties obtained in this study with the features used in some of the previously developed models. The datasets used for this study are high-resolution image sets of centerline and Doppler wings of Halpha, obtained using the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT). The data were obtained on Oct 30, 2010. The data set contains three filaments in an active region in the northern hemisphere of the Sun. The images in each wavelength are aligned and made into movies to find the footpoints of the filaments through which the mass goes into and comes out of the filaments from and to the chromosphere, respectively. The magnetic properties of the footpoints are studied by overlaying the magnetogram images with the DOT images by using full-disk Halpha images for matching the features in the two. Of the three filaments, one of the filaments is observed to be stable throughout the duration of the observations; another filament erupts after about two hours of the beginning of observations; and the third filament is in its early stages of formation. The ends of the stable filament are clearly observed whereas the ends of the erupting filament and the forming filament are observed clearly intermittently during the duration of the observations. The animations of the region near the ends of filament 1 reveal definite injection and draining of mass via the footpoints into and out of the filament. The mass motion into and out of the filaments are observed

  15. Novel actin-like filament structure from Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C

    2012-06-15

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines.

  16. Novel Actin-like Filament Structure from Clostridium tetani*

    PubMed Central

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines. PMID:22514279

  17. Structural analysis of vimentin and keratin intermediate filaments by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Norlen, Lars . E-mail: lars.norlen@ki.se; Masich, Sergej; Goldie, Kenneth N.; Hoenger, Andreas

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments are a large and structurally diverse group of cellular filaments that are classified into five different groups. They are referred to as intermediate filaments (IFs) because they are intermediate in diameter between the two other cytoskeletal filament systems that is filamentous actin and microtubules. The basic building block of IFs is a predominantly {alpha}-helical rod with variable length globular N- and C-terminal domains. On the ultra-structural level there are two major differences between IFs and microtubules or actin filaments: IFs are non-polar, and they do not exhibit large globular domains. IF molecules associate via a coiled-coil interaction into dimers and higher oligomers. Structural investigations into the molecular building plan of IFs have been performed with a variety of biophysical and imaging methods such as negative staining and metal-shadowing electron microscopy (EM), mass determination by scanning transmission EM, X-ray crystallography on fragments of the IF stalk and low-angle X-ray scattering. The actual packing of IF dimers into a long filament varies between the different families. Typically the dimers form so called protofibrils that further assemble into a filament. Here we introduce new cryo-imaging methods for structural investigations of IFs in vitro and in vivo, i.e., cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, as well as associated techniques such as the preparation and handling of vitrified sections of cellular specimens.

  18. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5′-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  19. Filament shape versus coronal potential magnetic field structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filament shape in projection on disc depends on the structure of the coronal magnetic field. We calculate the position of polarity inversion lines (PILs) of coronal potential magnetic field at different heights above the photosphere, which compose the magnetic neutral surface, and compare with them the distribution of the filament material in Hα chromospheric images. We found that the most of the filament material is enclosed between two PILs, one at a lower height close to the chromosphere and one at a higher level, which can be considered as a height of the filament spine. Observations of the same filament on the limb by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft confirm that the height of the spine is really very close to the value obtained from the PIL and filament border matching. Such matching can be used for filament height estimations in on-disc observations. Filament barbs are housed within protruding sections of the low-level PIL. On the base of simple model, we show that the similarity of the neutral surfaces in potential and non-potential fields with the same sub-photospheric sources is the reason for the found tendency for the filament material to gather near the potential-field neutral surface.

  20. Myosin filament 3D structure in mammalian cardiac muscle☆

    PubMed Central

    AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Morris, Edward P.; Kensler, Robert W.; Squire, John M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of cardiac myopathies (e.g. familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy) are linked to mutations in cardiac muscle myosin filament proteins, including myosin and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C). To understand the myopathies it is necessary to know the normal 3D structure of these filaments. We have carried out 3D single particle analysis of electron micrograph images of negatively stained isolated myosin filaments from rabbit cardiac muscle. Single filament images were aligned and divided into segments about 2 × 430 Å long, each of which was treated as an independent ‘particle’. The resulting 40 Å resolution 3D reconstruction showed both axial and azimuthal (no radial) myosin head perturbations within the 430 Å repeat, with successive crown rotations of approximately 60°, 60° and 0°, rather than the regular 40° for an unperturbed helix. However, it is shown that the projecting density peaks appear to start at low radius from origins closer to those expected for an unperturbed helical filament, and that the azimuthal perturbation especially increases with radius. The head arrangements in rabbit cardiac myosin filaments are very similar to those in fish skeletal muscle myosin filaments, suggesting a possible general structural theme for myosin filaments in all vertebrate striated muscles (skeletal and cardiac). PMID:18472277

  1. A BRIGHT MOLECULAR CORE IN A CRAB NEBULA FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, E. D.; Baldwin, J. A.; Ferland, G. J. E-mail: baldwin@pa.msu.ed

    2010-06-10

    In a sub-arcsec near-infrared survey of the Crab Nebula using the new Spartan Infrared Camera, we have found several knots with high surface brightness in the H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m line and a very large H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m to Br{gamma} ratio. The brightest of these knots has an intensity ratio I(H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m)/I(Br{gamma}) = 18 {+-} 9, which we show sets a lower limit on the ratio of masses in the molecular and recombination (i.e., ionized) zones M{sub mol}/M{sub rec} {>=} 0.9, and a total molecular mass within this single knot M{sub mol} {>=} 5 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun}. We argue that the knot discussed here probably is able to emit so strongly in the 2.12 {mu}m line because its physical conditions are better tuned for such emission than is the case in other filaments. It is unclear whether this knot has an unusually large M{sub mol}/M{sub rec} ratio, or if many other Crab filaments also have similar amounts of molecular gas which is not emitting because the physical conditions are not so well tuned.

  2. Structure and assembly of calf hoof keratin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Z; Michon, A M; Sicre, P; Koch, M H

    1990-05-01

    Keratin filament polypeptides were purified from calf hoof stratum corneum with the aim of studying the in vitro assembly process and determining structural parameters of reconstituted filaments. Anion exchange chromatography was used to obtain the most complete fractionation and identification of the acidic and basic components in the purified polypeptide mixture to date. The reassembly products of the fractionated components were investigated by electron microscopy. Fully reconstituted filaments yield homogeneous solutions, and values of 9.8 nm for the filament diameter and 25 kDa/nm for the mass per unit length (M/L) were obtained by X-ray solution scattering. The structures formed in solution at various stages of filament assembly were not sufficiently homogeneous to be studied by this technique. X-ray diffraction patterns from native stratum corneum display strong maxima at 3.6 and 5.4 nm. Contrary to previous reports, these maxima do not appear to be due to lipids since they are also observed with delipidated rehydrated specimens. A series of weak maxima is also detected in the patterns of dry tissue. The absence of these features in the patterns of reconstituted filaments suggests that, in contrast to some electron microscopic observations, there are no prominent regularities in the structure of calf hoof keratin filaments.

  3. Myosin Va molecular motors manoeuvre liposome cargo through suspended actin filament intersections in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Andrew T.; Nelson, Shane R.; Ali, M. Yusuf; Kennedy, Guy G.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Walcott, Sam; Warshaw, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular cargo transport relies on myosin Va molecular motor ensembles to travel along the cell's three-dimensional (3D) highway of actin filaments. At actin filament intersections, the intersecting filament is a structural barrier to and an alternate track for directed cargo transport. Here we use 3D super-resolution fluorescence imaging to determine the directional outcome (that is, continues straight, turns or terminates) for an ∼10 motor ensemble transporting a 350 nm lipid-bound cargo that encounters a suspended 3D actin filament intersection in vitro. Motor–cargo complexes that interact with the intersecting filament go straight through the intersection 62% of the time, nearly twice that for turning. To explain this, we develop an in silico model, supported by optical trapping data, suggesting that the motors' diffusive movements on the vesicle surface and the extent of their engagement with the two intersecting actin tracks biases the motor–cargo complex on average to go straight through the intersection. PMID:28569841

  4. Structural design criteria for filament-wound composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Jensen, D. W.; Claus, S. J.; Pai, S. P.; Hipp, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced composite cylinders, manufactured by filament winding, provide a cost effective solution to many present structural applications; however, the compressive performance of filament-wound cylinders is lower than comparable shells fabricated from unidirectional tape. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of this reduction in thin filament-wound cylinders by relating the manufacturing procedures to the quality of the cylinder and to its compressive performance. The experiments on cylinder buckling were complemented by eigenvalue buckling analysis using a detailed geometric model in a finite element analysis. The applicability of classical buckling analyses was also investigated as a design tool.

  5. Development of epoxy matrices for filament-wound graphite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.J.; Walkup, C.M.; Kong, F.M.; Mones, E.T.

    1984-11-27

    This paper reviews our program to develop epoxy matrix systems for filament-wound graphite structures. The criteria for this matrix development program requires that the epoxide and amine components are processible and non-toxic; and the corresponding matrix itself is tough, possesses a Tg > 120/sup 0/C and does not lose its mechanical-thermal properties upon exposure to service environment conditions. We report our data on processible, hindered amine cured-epoxide matrices such as menthane or 2,5 dimethyl 2,5 hexane diamine cured bis-phenol-A-diglycidyl ether (DGEBA) epoxide systems in the presence of viscosity-lowering diluents. To produce tough, processible matrices that do not deteriorate upon exposure to service environment conditions requires a knowledge of the network structure formed and how such structure may deteriorate under molecular flow associated with the shear-band toughening mechanisms. For amine-cured DGEBA matrices we report deterioration in the mechanical response and Tg after plastic flow has occurred in such glasses. Permanent chemical changes that occur during this flow induced degradation process were monitored by stress-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ability to eliminate the aging of tough, cross-linked composite matrices upon molecular flow is discussed in terms of networks with segments of equal extensibility. 15 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Structural changes accompanying phosphorylation of tarantula muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to study the structural changes that occur in the myosin filaments of tarantula striated muscle when they are phosphorylated. Myosin filaments in muscle homogenates maintained in relaxing conditions (ATP, EGTA) are found to have nonphosphorylated regulatory light chains as shown by urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis and [32P]phosphate autoradiography. Negative staining reveals an ordered, helical arrangement of crossbridges in these filaments, in which the heads from axially neighboring myosin molecules appear to interact with each other. When the free Ca2+ concentration in a homogenate is raised to 10(-4) M, or when a Ca2+-insensitive myosin light chain kinase is added at low Ca2+ (10(-8) M), the regulatory light chains of myosin become rapidly phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is accompanied by potentiation of the actin activation of the myosin Mg- ATPase activity and by loss of order of the helical crossbridge arrangement characteristic of the relaxed filament. We suggest that in the relaxed state, when the regulatory light chains are not phosphorylated, the myosin heads are held down on the filament backbone by head-head interactions or by interactions of the heads with the filament backbone. Phosphorylation of the light chains may alter these interactions so that the crossbridges become more loosely associated with the filament backbone giving rise to the observed changes and facilitating crossbridge interaction with actin. PMID:2958483

  7. Magnetic Structure of a Filament during its Phase of Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasso, C.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2008-09-01

    We analyze and interpret spectropolarimetric observations of an active region filament located close to the solar disc center, during its phase of activity. The observations are obtained in the chromospheric He I lines at 1083.0 nm. We provide novel observational results on the magnetic field measurements in solar filaments to give constraints to the theoretical models of their support in the solar corona. Our main goal is to interpret the behavior of the atmospheric parameters retrieved from the spectropolarimetric data to give a picture of the magnetic structure of the observed filament. The analysis of the observed polarization of the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet in the filament, carried out by inverting the Stokes profiles, reveals the presence of different unresolved atmospheric components of the He lines, coexisting within the resolution element (1.2 arcsec). The different components, belonging to different magnetic field lines, show supersonic up- and downflows, sometimes within the same resolution element. The He blueshifted components belong to mostly transversal field lines in the body of the filament. These field lines are found to be curving upwards on both sides. This picture suggests the presence of dipped field lines that are moving upward, carrying with them the filament material. During this movement, we also observe filament material flowing down along field lines having the same polarity as the photospheric field (i.e. they have the opposite inclination with respect to the dipped field lines). These downflows are faster at the filament end points and can reach values close to 10 times the speed of sound. The field lines are found to be almost parallel to the filament axis in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. We use the two main theoretical models of prominence support (dip or flux rope models) to interpret the results obtained.

  8. Variation in dust properties in a dense filament of the Taurus molecular complex (L1506)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysard, N.; Abergel, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Juvela, M.; Pagani, L.; Könyves, V.; Spencer, L.; White, G.; Zavagno, A.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: We observed the L1506 filament, which is located in the Taurus molecular complex, with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. Our aim is to prove the variation in grain properties along the entire length of the filament. In particular, we want to determine above which gas density this variation arises and what changes in the grain optical properties/size distribution are required. Methods: We use the 3D radiative transfer code CRT, coupled to the dust emission and extinction code DustEM, to model the emission and extinction of the dense filament. We test a range of optical properties and size distributions for the grains: dust of the diffuse interstellar medium (interstellar PAHs and amorphous carbons and silicates) and both compact and fluffy aggregates. Results: We find that the grain opacity has to increase across the filament to fit simultaneously the near-IR extinction and Herschel emission profiles of L1506. We interpret this change to be a consequence of the coagulation of dust grains to form fluffy aggregates. Grains similar to those in the diffuse medium have to be present in the outer layers of the cloud, whereas aggregates must prevail above gas densities of a few 103 H/cm3. This corresponds to line-of-sights with visual extinction in the V band of the order of 2 to 3. The dust opacity at 250 μm is raised by a factor of 1.8 to 2.2, while the grain average size is increased by a factor of 5. These exact numbers depend naturally on the dust model chosen to fit the data. Our findings agree with the constraints given by the study of the gas molecular lines. Using a simple approach, we show that the aggregates may have time to form inside the filament within the cloud lifetime. Our model also characterises the density structure of the filament, showing that the filament width is not constant along L1506 but instead varies by a factor of the order of 4. Conclusions: We confirm the need for an increase in the far-IR dust opacity to explain the emission

  9. Myosin and Actin Filaments in Muscle: Structures and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Squire, John M; Paul, Danielle M; Morris, Edward P

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, improvements in electron microscopy and image processing have permitted significantly higher resolutions to be achieved (sometimes <1 nm) when studying isolated actin and myosin filaments. In the case of actin filaments the changing structure when troponin binds calcium ions can be followed using electron microscopy and single particle analysis to reveal what happens on each of the seven non-equivalent pseudo-repeats of the tropomyosin α-helical coiled-coil. In the case of the known family of myosin filaments not only are the myosin head arrangements under relaxing conditions being defined, but the latest analysis, also using single particle methods, is starting to reveal the way that the α-helical coiled-coil myosin rods are packed to give the filament backbones.

  10. Method for preparing metallated filament-wound structures

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, George R.

    1979-01-01

    Metallated graphite filament-wound structures are prepared by coating a continuous multi-filament carbon yarn with a metal carbide, impregnating the carbide coated yarn with a polymerizable carbon precursor, winding the resulting filament about a mandrel, partially curing the impregnation in air, subjecting the wound composite to heat and pressure to cure the carbon precursor, and thereafter heating the composite in a sizing die at a pressure loading of at least 1000 psi for graphitizing the carbonaceous material in the composite. The carbide in the composite coalesces into rod-like shapes which are disposed in an end-to-end relationship parallel with the filaments to provide resistance to erosion in abrasive laden atmospheres.

  11. Demonstration of mechanical connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nucleoplasm that stabilize nuclear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    We report here that living cells and nuclei are hard-wired such that a mechanical tug on cell surface receptors can immediately change the organization of molecular assemblies in the cytoplasm and nucleus. When integrins were pulled by micromanipulating bound microbeads or micropipettes, cytoskeletal filaments reoriented, nuclei distorted, and nucleoli redistributed along the axis of the applied tension field. These effects were specific for integrins, independent of cortical membrane distortion, and were mediated by direct linkages between the cytoskeleton and nucleus. Actin microfilaments mediated force transfer to the nucleus at low strain; however, tearing of the actin gel resulted with greater distortion. In contrast, intermediate filaments effectively mediated force transfer to the nucleus under both conditions. These filament systems also acted as molecular guy wires to mechanically stiffen the nucleus and anchor it in place, whereas microtubules acted to hold open the intermediate filament lattice and to stabilize the nucleus against lateral compression. Molecular connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nuclear scaffolds may therefore provide a discrete path for mechanical signal transfer through cells as well as a mechanism for producing integrated changes in cell and nuclear structure in response to changes in extracellular matrix adhesivity or mechanics.

  12. Demonstration of mechanical connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nucleoplasm that stabilize nuclear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    We report here that living cells and nuclei are hard-wired such that a mechanical tug on cell surface receptors can immediately change the organization of molecular assemblies in the cytoplasm and nucleus. When integrins were pulled by micromanipulating bound microbeads or micropipettes, cytoskeletal filaments reoriented, nuclei distorted, and nucleoli redistributed along the axis of the applied tension field. These effects were specific for integrins, independent of cortical membrane distortion, and were mediated by direct linkages between the cytoskeleton and nucleus. Actin microfilaments mediated force transfer to the nucleus at low strain; however, tearing of the actin gel resulted with greater distortion. In contrast, intermediate filaments effectively mediated force transfer to the nucleus under both conditions. These filament systems also acted as molecular guy wires to mechanically stiffen the nucleus and anchor it in place, whereas microtubules acted to hold open the intermediate filament lattice and to stabilize the nucleus against lateral compression. Molecular connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nuclear scaffolds may therefore provide a discrete path for mechanical signal transfer through cells as well as a mechanism for producing integrated changes in cell and nuclear structure in response to changes in extracellular matrix adhesivity or mechanics.

  13. Cluster-formation in the Rosette molecular cloud at the junctions of filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Hennemann, M.; Motte, F.; Didelon, P.; Federrath, C.; Bontemps, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Arzoumanian, D.; Minier, V.; André, Ph.; Hill, T.; Zavagno, A.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Attard, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Elia, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Griffin, M.; Kirk, J.; Klessen, R.; Könyves, V.; Martin, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Russeil, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Sousbie, T.; Testi, L.; Tremblin, P.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. Instead, gravitational collapse of filaments and/or merging of filamentary structures can lead to building up dense high-mass star-forming clumps. However, the overall density structure of the cloud has a large influence on this process, and requires a better understanding. Methods: The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC 2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. Results: The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peaked PDF we interprete as caused by shock compression, while the PDFs of the center and other cloud parts are more complex, partly with a power-law tail. A deviation of the log-normal PDF form occurs at AV ≈ 9m for the center, and around 4m for the other regions. Only the part of the cloud farthest from the Rosette nebula shows a log-normal PDF. Conclusions: The deviations of the PDF from the log-normal shape typically associated with low- and high-mass star-forming regions at AV ≈ 3-4m and 8-10m, respectively, are found here within the very same cloud. This shows that there is no fundamental difference in the density structure of low- and high-mass star

  14. Structural Dynamics of Filament-Wound Booster Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    Report summarizes program of measurements and calculations of vibrations in filament-wound composite models of Space Shuttle solid-rocket boosters. Vibrational behavior predicted by finite-element computer model of structural dynamics correlates well with data from tests on full- and quarter-scale models. Computer model developed with NASTRAN general-purpose structural-analysis computer code.

  15. Structural Dynamics of Filament-Wound Booster Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    Report summarizes program of measurements and calculations of vibrations in filament-wound composite models of Space Shuttle solid-rocket boosters. Vibrational behavior predicted by finite-element computer model of structural dynamics correlates well with data from tests on full- and quarter-scale models. Computer model developed with NASTRAN general-purpose structural-analysis computer code.

  16. Complete Structure of an Epithelial Keratin Dimer: Implications for Intermediate Filament Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bray, David J.; Walsh, Tiffany R.; Noro, Massimo G.; Notman, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that hierarchically arrange into filaments, starting with the dimer sub-unit. They are integral to the structural support of cells, in skin, hair and nails. In skin, keratin is thought to play a critical role in conferring the barrier properties and elasticity of skin. In general, the keratin dimer is broadly described by a tri-domain structure: a head, a central rod and a tail. As yet, no atomistic-scale picture of the entire dimer structure exists; this information is pivotal for establishing molecular-level connections between structure and function in intermediate filament proteins. The roles of the head and tail domains in facilitating keratin filament assembly and function remain as open questions. To address these, we report results of molecular dynamics simulations of the entire epithelial human K1/K10 keratin dimer. Our findings comprise: (1) the first three-dimensional structural models of the complete dimer unit, comprising of the head, rod and tail domains; (2) new insights into the chirality of the rod-domain twist gained from analysis of the full domain structure; (3) evidence for tri-subdomain partitioning in the head and tail domains; and, (4) identification of the residue characteristics that mediate non-covalent contact between the chains in the dimer. Our findings are immediately applicable to other epithelial keratins, such as K8/K18 and K5/K14, and to intermediate filament proteins in general. PMID:26181054

  17. Structure of the Intermediate Filament-Binding Region of Desmoplakin

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyunook; Weiss, Thomas M.; Bang, Injin; Weis, William I.; Choi, Hee -Jung; Kursula, Petri

    2016-01-25

    Here, desmoplakin (DP) is a cytoskeletal linker protein that connects the desmosomal cadherin/plakoglobin/plakophilin complex to intermediate filaments (IFs). The C-terminal region of DP (DPCT) mediates IF binding, and contains three plakin repeat domains (PRDs), termed PRD-A, PRD-B and PRD-C. Previous crystal structures of PRDs B and C revealed that each is formed by 4.5 copies of a plakin repeat (PR) and has a conserved positively charged groove on its surface. Although PRDs A and B are linked by just four amino acids, B and C are separated by a 154 residue flexible linker, which has hindered crystallographic analysis of the full DPCT. Here we present the crystal structure of a DPCT fragment spanning PRDs A and B, and elucidate the overall architecture of DPCT by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. The structure of PRD-A is similar to that of PRD-B, and the two domains are arranged in a quasi-linear arrangement, and separated by a 4 amino acid linker. Analysis of the B-C linker region using secondary structure prediction and the crystal structure of a homologous linker from the cytolinker periplakin suggests that the N-terminal ~100 amino acids of the linker form two PR-like motifs. SAXS analysis of DPCT indicates an elongated but non-linear shape with Rg = 51.5 Å and Dmax = 178 Å. These data provide the first structural insights into an IF binding protein containing multiple PRDs and provide a foundation for studying the molecular basis of DP-IF interactions.

  18. Structure of the Intermediate Filament-Binding Region of Desmoplakin

    DOE PAGES

    Kang, Hyunook; Weiss, Thomas M.; Bang, Injin; ...

    2016-01-25

    Here, desmoplakin (DP) is a cytoskeletal linker protein that connects the desmosomal cadherin/plakoglobin/plakophilin complex to intermediate filaments (IFs). The C-terminal region of DP (DPCT) mediates IF binding, and contains three plakin repeat domains (PRDs), termed PRD-A, PRD-B and PRD-C. Previous crystal structures of PRDs B and C revealed that each is formed by 4.5 copies of a plakin repeat (PR) and has a conserved positively charged groove on its surface. Although PRDs A and B are linked by just four amino acids, B and C are separated by a 154 residue flexible linker, which has hindered crystallographic analysis of themore » full DPCT. Here we present the crystal structure of a DPCT fragment spanning PRDs A and B, and elucidate the overall architecture of DPCT by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. The structure of PRD-A is similar to that of PRD-B, and the two domains are arranged in a quasi-linear arrangement, and separated by a 4 amino acid linker. Analysis of the B-C linker region using secondary structure prediction and the crystal structure of a homologous linker from the cytolinker periplakin suggests that the N-terminal ~100 amino acids of the linker form two PR-like motifs. SAXS analysis of DPCT indicates an elongated but non-linear shape with Rg = 51.5 Å and Dmax = 178 Å. These data provide the first structural insights into an IF binding protein containing multiple PRDs and provide a foundation for studying the molecular basis of DP-IF interactions.« less

  19. Automatic Segmentation and Quantification of Filamentous Structures in Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Loss, Leandro A.; Bebis, George; Chang, Hang; Auer, Manfred; Sarkar, Purbasha; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography is a promising technology for imaging ultrastructures at nanoscale resolutions. However, image and quantitative analyses are often hindered by high levels of noise, staining heterogeneity, and material damage either as a result of the electron beam or sample preparation. We have developed and built a framework that allows for automatic segmentation and quantification of filamentous objects in 3D electron tomography. Our approach consists of three steps: (i) local enhancement of filaments by Hessian filtering; (ii) detection and completion (e.g., gap filling) of filamentous structures through tensor voting; and (iii) delineation of the filamentous networks. Our approach allows for quantification of filamentous networks in terms of their compositional and morphological features. We first validate our approach using a set of specifically designed synthetic data. We then apply our segmentation framework to tomograms of plant cell walls that have undergone different chemical treatments for polysaccharide extraction. The subsequent compositional and morphological analyses of the plant cell walls reveal their organizational characteristics and the effects of the different chemical protocols on specific polysaccharides. PMID:28090597

  20. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells. PMID:23587993

  1. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M D

    2013-06-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

  2. Particle accelerations and current structures of Weibel and Filamentation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, C. M.; Huynh, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Particle accelerations of the Wibel instability (WI) and the Filamentation instability(FI) are studied by using PIC simuations, comparing them side-by-side. Although two instabilities are almost identical in the linear growth phase, significant differences are found in the nonlinear phase in their particle accelerations and current structures. The FI shows enhanced electron acceleration, whereas particle acceleration is almost absent in the WI. The different particle accelerations between the FI and the WI seem to be associated with their different current structures; a hollow electron current structure for the FI and a center filled current structure for that of the WI. Different electron distributions seem to bring in different current filament structures, eventually leading to different magnetic characteristics.

  3. On filament structure and propagation within a commercial plasma globe

    SciTech Connect

    Burin, M. J.; Simmons, G. G.; Ceja, H. G.; Zweben, S. J.; Nagy, A.; Brunkhorst, C.

    2015-05-15

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed yet not well understood. Here, we investigate the discharge properties of a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. We find that increasing voltage magnitude increases the number of filaments while leaving their individual structure basically unchanged, a result typical of dielectric barrier discharges. The frequency of the voltage also affects filament population but more significantly changes filament structure, with more diffuse filaments seen at lower frequencies. Voltage polarity is observed to be important, especially at lower frequencies, where for negative-gradient voltages the discharge is more diffuse, not filamentary. At late stages of the discharge circular structures appear and expand on the glass boundaries. We find no trend of discharge speed with respect to voltage variables, though this may be due to manufacturer sample-to-sample variation. Each voltage cycle the discharge expands outward at ∼10–15 km/s, a speed significantly higher than the estimated electron drift yet considerably lower than that observed for most streamers. We discuss the physics of these observations and their relation to similar discharges that can be found within nature and industry.

  4. Filamented ion tail structures at Titan: A hybrid simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyerabend, Moritz; Simon, Sven; Motschmann, Uwe; Liuzzo, Lucas

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the processes that lead to the detection of split signatures in ion density during several crossings of the Cassini spacecraft through Titan's mid-range plasma tail (T9, T63, and T75). During each of these flybys, the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer detected Titan's ionospheric ion population twice; i.e., the spacecraft passed through two spatially separated regions where cold ions were detected, with the regions also being dominated by ions of different masses in the case of T9. Whether this filamented tail structure is an omnipresent feature of Titan's plasma interaction or a result of non-stationary upstream conditions during specific flybys is still unclear. To explain these features, we apply the hybrid simulation code AIKEF (kinetic ions and fluid electrons). Our model includes chemical reactions as well as a realistic photoionization model for a sophisticated description of the ionospheric composition of Titan. Our simulations show that the filamentation of Titan's tail is indeed a common feature of the moon's plasma interaction. Light ionospheric species escape along draped magnetic field lines to form a parabolically shaped filament structure, which is mainly seen in planes that contain the upstream magnetospheric magnetic field and the upstream flow direction. In addition, transport of ions of all species from the ramside towards downstream produces a cone structure behind Titan, with a region of decreased density inside and filaments of 1-2 RT (RT=2575 km) thickness and enhanced density at the surface of the cone. Spacecraft trajectories that penetrate these structures allow for the detection of split signatures in the tail. The orientation of the upstream magnetic field and plasma flow as well as local time effects (i.e., Titan's orbital position) influence the location of the filaments in the tail and can also cause asymmetries in their sizes and densities. The detection of the split signatures along a spacecraft trajectory may

  5. Assembly and exchange of intermediate filament proteins of neurons: neurofilaments are dynamic structures

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have explored the dynamics of intermediate filament assembly and subunit exchange using fluorescently labeled neurofilament proteins and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Neurofilaments (NFs) are assembled from three highly phosphorylated proteins with molecular masses of 180 (NF-H), 130 (NF-M), and 66 kD (NF-L) of which NF-L forms the structural core. The core component, NF-L, was stoichiometrically labeled at cysteine 321 with fluorescein, coumarin, or biotin-maleimide to produce assembly-competent fluorescent or biotinylated derivatives, respectively. Using coumarin-labeled NF-L as fluorescence donor and fluorescein-labeled NF-L as the fluorescence acceptor, assembly of NF filaments was induced by rapidly raising the NaCl concentration to 170 mM, and the kinetics was followed by the decrease in the donor fluorescence. Assembly of NF-L subunits into filaments does not require nucleotide binding or hydrolysis but is strongly dependent on ionic strength, pH, and temperature. The critical concentration of NF-L, that concentration that remains unassembled at equilibrium with fully formed filaments, is 38 micrograms/ml or 0.6 microM. Under physiological salt conditions NF-L filaments also undergo extensive subunit exchange. Kinetic analysis and evaluation of several possible mechanisms indicate that subunit exchange is preceded by dissociation of subunits from the filament and generation of a kinetically active pool of soluble subunits. Given the concentration of NF-L found in nerve cells and the possibility of regulating this pool, these results provide the first information that intermediate filaments are dynamic structures and that NF-L within the NF complex is in dynamic equilibrium with a small but kinetically active pool of unassembled NF-L units. PMID:2925792

  6. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filaments under Extreme Conditions and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao

    Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation as well as participate in signal transduction. However, it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure, as well as the biochemical properties of these protein molecules contribute to their biomechanical functions. In this research we investigate the material function of intermediate filaments under various extreme mechanical conditions as well as disease states. We use a full atomistic model and study its response to mechanical stresses. Learning from the mechanical response obtained from atomistic simulations, we build mesoscopic models following the finer-trains-coarser principles. By using this multiple-scale model, we present a detailed analysis of the mechanical properties and associated deformation mechanisms of intermediate filament network. We reveal the mechanism of a transition from alpha-helices to beta-sheets with subsequent intermolecular sliding under mechanical force, which has been inferred previously from experimental results. This nanoscale mechanism results in a characteristic nonlinear force-extension curve, which leads to a delocalization of mechanical energy and prevents catastrophic fracture. This explains how intermediate filament can withstand extreme mechanical deformation of > 1 00% strain despite the presence of structural defects. We combine computational and experimental techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a premature aging disease. We find that the mutated lamin tail .domain is more compact and stable than the normal one. This altered structure and stability may enhance the association of intermediate filaments with the nuclear membrane, providing a molecular mechanism of the disease. We study the nuclear membrane association

  7. In vivo formation steps of the hard alpha-keratin intermediate filament along a hair follicle: evidence for structural polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rafik, Mériem Er; Briki, Fatma; Burghammer, Manfred; Doucet, Jean

    2006-04-01

    Several aspects of the intermediate filaments' molecular architecture remain mysterious despite decades of study. The growth process and the final architecture may depend on the physical, chemical, and biochemical environment. Aiming at clarifying this issue, we have revisited the structure of the human hair follicle by means of X-ray microdiffraction. We conclude that the histology-based growth zones along the follicle are correlated to the fine architecture of the filaments deduced from X-ray microdiffraction. Our analysis reveals the existence of two major polymorph intermediate filament architectures. Just above the bulb, the filaments are characterized by a diameter of 100 Angstroms and a low-density core. The following zone upwards is characterized by the lateral aggregation of the filaments into a compact network of filaments, by a contraction of their diameter (to 75 Angstroms) and by the setting up of a long-range longitudinal ordering. In the upper zone, the small structural change associated with the tissue hardening likely concerns the terminal domains. The architecture of the intermediate filament in the upper zones could be specific to hard alpha-keratin whilst the other architecture found in the lower zone could be representative for intermediate filaments in a different environment.

  8. Flexible filamentous virus structure from fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Gerald; Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah; McCullough, Ian; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Ghabrial, Said

    2008-10-24

    Fiber diffraction data have been obtained from Narcissus mosaic virus, a potexvirus from the family Flexiviridae, and soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a potyvirus from the family Potyviridae. Analysis of the data in conjunction with cryo-electron microscopy data allowed us to determine the symmetry of the viruses and to make reconstructions of SMV at 19 {angstrom} resolution and of another potexvirus, papaya mosaic virus, at 18 {angstrom} resolution. These data include the first well-ordered data ever obtained for the potyviruses and the best-ordered data from the potexviruses, and offer the promise of eventual high resolution structure determinations.

  9. An Early Cretaceous heterodontosaurid dinosaur with filamentous integumentary structures.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Ting; You, Hai-Lu; Xu, Xing; Dong, Zhi-Ming

    2009-03-19

    Ornithischia is one of the two major groups of dinosaurs, with heterodontosauridae as one of its major clades. Heterodontosauridae is characterized by small, gracile bodies and a problematic phylogenetic position. Recent phylogenetic work indicates that it represents the most basal group of all well-known ornithischians. Previous heterodontosaurid records are mainly from the Early Jurassic period (205-190 million years ago) of Africa. Here we report a new heterodontosaurid, Tianyulong confuciusi gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous period (144-99 million years ago) of western Liaoning Province, China. Tianyulong extends the geographical distribution of heterodontosaurids to Asia and confirms the clade's previously questionable temporal range extension into the Early Cretaceous period. More surprisingly, Tianyulong bears long, singular and unbranched filamentous integumentary (outer skin) structures. This represents the first confirmed report, to our knowledge, of filamentous integumentary structures in an ornithischian dinosaur.

  10. A Molecular Perspective of Inter-filament Bonding in Fused Deposition Modeling 3-D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duranty, Edward; Spradlin, Brandon; Dadmun, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Fused deposition 3D printing is an important tool for low-cost and rapid prototyping of objects with complex geometries. 3D printed materials are composed of many filaments deposited on a heated substrate, requiring the bonding of neighboring filaments during the deposition process. Filament deposition often creates voids between filaments, which requires necking between them to create a robust sample. Therefore the amount of interfacial contact and interdiffusion between filaments become important parameters that control the macroscopic physical properties of the printed prototype. Our research focuses on quantifying the interfacial adhesion between ABS filaments and its impact on structural properties. The time evolution of the temperature profile near the heated substrate demonstrates that the deposited filaments are repeatedly heated above the Tg of ABS allowing interpenetration of the polymer chains between adjacent filaments. Results of DMA experiments on samples of different geometries have been correlated to microphotography that monitors the degree of necking between filaments and the thermal history. Results indicate that interfacial contact area between filaments and increased thermal energy are crucial to their mechanical properties.

  11. Skip residues modulate the structural properties of the myosin rod and guide thick filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Keenan C.; Buvoli, Massimo; Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Buvoli, Ada; Zheng, Yuqing; Heinze, Nathan T.; Cui, Qiang; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Rayment, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The rod of sarcomeric myosins directs thick filament assembly and is characterized by the insertion of four skip residues that introduce discontinuities in the coiled-coil heptad repeats. We report here that the regions surrounding the first three skip residues share high structural similarity despite their low sequence homology. Near each of these skip residues, the coiled-coil transitions to a nonclose-packed structure inducing local relaxation of the superhelical pitch. Moreover, molecular dynamics suggest that these distorted regions can assume different conformationally stable states. In contrast, the last skip residue region constitutes a true molecular hinge, providing C-terminal rod flexibility. Assembly of myosin with mutated skip residues in cardiomyocytes shows that the functional importance of each skip residue is associated with rod position and reveals the unique role of the molecular hinge in promoting myosin antiparallel packing. By defining the biophysical properties of the rod, the structures and molecular dynamic calculations presented here provide insight into thick filament formation, and highlight the structural differences occurring between the coiled-coils of myosin and the stereotypical tropomyosin. In addition to extending our knowledge into the conformational and biological properties of coiled-coil discontinuities, the molecular characterization of the four myosin skip residues also provides a guide to modeling the effects of rod mutations causing cardiac and skeletal myopathies. PMID:26150528

  12. Skip residues modulate the structural properties of the myosin rod and guide thick filament assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Keenan C.; Buvoli, Massimo; Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; ...

    2015-07-06

    The rod of sarcomeric myosins directs thick filament assembly and is characterized by the insertion of four skip residues that introduce discontinuities in the coiled-coil heptad repeats. We report in this paper that the regions surrounding the first three skip residues share high structural similarity despite their low sequence homology. Near each of these skip residues, the coiled-coil transitions to a nonclose-packed structure inducing local relaxation of the superhelical pitch. Moreover, molecular dynamics suggest that these distorted regions can assume different conformationally stable states. In contrast, the last skip residue region constitutes a true molecular hinge, providing C-terminal rod flexibility.more » Assembly of myosin with mutated skip residues in cardiomyocytes shows that the functional importance of each skip residue is associated with rod position and reveals the unique role of the molecular hinge in promoting myosin antiparallel packing. By defining the biophysical properties of the rod, the structures and molecular dynamic calculations presented here provide insight into thick filament formation, and highlight the structural differences occurring between the coiled-coils of myosin and the stereotypical tropomyosin. Finally, in addition to extending our knowledge into the conformational and biological properties of coiled-coil discontinuities, the molecular characterization of the four myosin skip residues also provides a guide to modeling the effects of rod mutations causing cardiac and skeletal myopathies.« less

  13. Skip residues modulate the structural properties of the myosin rod and guide thick filament assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Keenan C.; Buvoli, Massimo; Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Buvoli, Ada; Zheng, Yuqing; Heinze, Nathan T.; Cui, Qiang; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Rayment, Ivan

    2015-07-06

    The rod of sarcomeric myosins directs thick filament assembly and is characterized by the insertion of four skip residues that introduce discontinuities in the coiled-coil heptad repeats. We report in this paper that the regions surrounding the first three skip residues share high structural similarity despite their low sequence homology. Near each of these skip residues, the coiled-coil transitions to a nonclose-packed structure inducing local relaxation of the superhelical pitch. Moreover, molecular dynamics suggest that these distorted regions can assume different conformationally stable states. In contrast, the last skip residue region constitutes a true molecular hinge, providing C-terminal rod flexibility. Assembly of myosin with mutated skip residues in cardiomyocytes shows that the functional importance of each skip residue is associated with rod position and reveals the unique role of the molecular hinge in promoting myosin antiparallel packing. By defining the biophysical properties of the rod, the structures and molecular dynamic calculations presented here provide insight into thick filament formation, and highlight the structural differences occurring between the coiled-coils of myosin and the stereotypical tropomyosin. Finally, in addition to extending our knowledge into the conformational and biological properties of coiled-coil discontinuities, the molecular characterization of the four myosin skip residues also provides a guide to modeling the effects of rod mutations causing cardiac and skeletal myopathies.

  14. Skip residues modulate the structural properties of the myosin rod and guide thick filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Keenan C; Buvoli, Massimo; Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Buvoli, Ada; Zheng, Yuqing; Heinze, Nathan T; Cui, Qiang; Leinwand, Leslie A; Rayment, Ivan

    2015-07-21

    The rod of sarcomeric myosins directs thick filament assembly and is characterized by the insertion of four skip residues that introduce discontinuities in the coiled-coil heptad repeats. We report here that the regions surrounding the first three skip residues share high structural similarity despite their low sequence homology. Near each of these skip residues, the coiled-coil transitions to a nonclose-packed structure inducing local relaxation of the superhelical pitch. Moreover, molecular dynamics suggest that these distorted regions can assume different conformationally stable states. In contrast, the last skip residue region constitutes a true molecular hinge, providing C-terminal rod flexibility. Assembly of myosin with mutated skip residues in cardiomyocytes shows that the functional importance of each skip residue is associated with rod position and reveals the unique role of the molecular hinge in promoting myosin antiparallel packing. By defining the biophysical properties of the rod, the structures and molecular dynamic calculations presented here provide insight into thick filament formation, and highlight the structural differences occurring between the coiled-coils of myosin and the stereotypical tropomyosin. In addition to extending our knowledge into the conformational and biological properties of coiled-coil discontinuities, the molecular characterization of the four myosin skip residues also provides a guide to modeling the effects of rod mutations causing cardiac and skeletal myopathies.

  15. Elasticity of a semiflexible filament with a discontinuous tension due to a cross-link or a molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the stretching elasticity of a wormlike chain with a tension discontinuity resulting from a Hookean spring connecting its backbone to a fixed point. The elasticity of isolated semiflexible filaments has been the subject in a significant body of literature, primarily because of its relevance to the mechanics of biological matter. In real systems, however, these filaments are usually part of supramolecular structures involving cross-linkers or molecular motors, which cause tension discontinuities. Our model is intended as a minimal structural element incorporating such a discontinuity. We obtain analytical results in the weakly bending limit of the filament, concerning its force-extension relation and the response of the two parts in which the filament is divided by the spring. For a small tension discontinuity, the linear response of the filament extension to this discontinuity strongly depends on the external tension. For large external tension f , the spring force contributes a subdominant correction ˜1 /f3 /2 to the well-known ˜1 /√{f } -dependence of the end-to-end extension.

  16. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Hartig, Kyle C.; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-03-08

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is important for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament- uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emission exhibitsmore » a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. Lastly, the results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity.« less

  17. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Kyle C; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-03-08

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity.

  18. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hartig, Kyle C.; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity. PMID:28272450

  19. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, Kyle C.; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-03-01

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity.

  20. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  1. Molecular architecture of the Spire–actin nucleus and its implication for actin filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sitar, Tomasz; Gallinger, Julia; Ducka, Anna M.; Ikonen, Teemu P.; Wohlhoefler, Michael; Schmoller, Kurt M.; Bausch, Andreas R.; Joel, Peteranne; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Noegel, Angelika A.; Schleicher, Michael; Huber, Robert; Holak, Tad A.

    2011-01-01

    The Spire protein is a multifunctional regulator of actin assembly. We studied the structures and properties of Spire–actin complexes by X-ray scattering, X-ray crystallography, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and actin polymerization assays. We show that Spire–actin complexes in solution assume a unique, longitudinal-like shape, in which Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 domains (WH2), in an extended configuration, line up actins along the long axis of the core of the Spire–actin particle. In the complex, the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain is positioned at the side of the first N-terminal Spire–actin module. In addition, we find that preformed, isolated Spire–actin complexes are very efficient nucleators of polymerization and afterward dissociate from the growing filament. However, under certain conditions, all Spire constructs—even a single WH2 repeat—sequester actin and disrupt existing filaments. This molecular and structural mechanism of actin polymerization by Spire should apply to other actin-binding proteins that contain WH2 domains in tandem. PMID:22106272

  2. Testing for Helical Magnetic Fields in the Orion Molecular Cloud Integral-Shaped Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Lauren; Clemens, Dan P.

    2014-06-01

    The Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC) is one of the closest and most well-studied regions of ongoing star formation. Within the OMC, the Integral-Shaped Filament (ISF) is a long, filamentary structure of gas and dust that stretches over 7 pc and is itself comprised of many smaller filaments. Radial density profiles of the ISF indicate that these filamentary structures may be supported by helical magnetic fields (Johnstone & Bally 1999). To test for the presence of helical fields, we have collected deep near-infrared (NIR) H-band (1.6 μm) and K-band (2.2 μm) linear polarimetry of background starlight for a grid of six 10x10 arcmin fields of view fully spanning the ISF. NIR polarizations from scattered light and young stellar objects, which do not trace the magnetic field, are identified by examining the ratio of percent polarization in H-band to K-band. The data were collected using the Mimir NIR instrument on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope located outside of Flagstaff, AZ. This work is partially supported by NSF grant AST 09-07790.

  3. Structural basis of thymosin-β4/profilin exchange leading to actin filament polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bo; Leyrat, Cedric; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Robinson, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Thymosin-β4 (Tβ4) and profilin are the two major sequestering proteins that maintain the pool of monomeric actin (G-actin) within cells of higher eukaryotes. Tβ4 prevents G-actin from joining a filament, whereas profilin:actin only supports barbed-end elongation. Here, we report two Tβ4:actin structures. The first structure shows that Tβ4 has two helices that bind at the barbed and pointed faces of G-actin, preventing the incorporation of the bound G-actin into a filament. The second structure displays a more open nucleotide binding cleft on G-actin, which is typical of profilin:actin structures, with a concomitant disruption of the Tβ4 C-terminal helix interaction. These structures, combined with biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulations, show that the exchange of bound actin between Tβ4 and profilin involves both steric and allosteric components. The sensitivity of profilin to the conformational state of actin indicates a similar allosteric mechanism for the dissociation of profilin during filament elongation. PMID:25313062

  4. Structural basis of thymosin-β4/profilin exchange leading to actin filament polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bo; Leyrat, Cedric; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2014-10-28

    Thymosin-β4 (Tβ4) and profilin are the two major sequestering proteins that maintain the pool of monomeric actin (G-actin) within cells of higher eukaryotes. Tβ4 prevents G-actin from joining a filament, whereas profilin:actin only supports barbed-end elongation. Here, we report two Tβ4:actin structures. The first structure shows that Tβ4 has two helices that bind at the barbed and pointed faces of G-actin, preventing the incorporation of the bound G-actin into a filament. The second structure displays a more open nucleotide binding cleft on G-actin, which is typical of profilin:actin structures, with a concomitant disruption of the Tβ4 C-terminal helix interaction. These structures, combined with biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulations, show that the exchange of bound actin between Tβ4 and profilin involves both steric and allosteric components. The sensitivity of profilin to the conformational state of actin indicates a similar allosteric mechanism for the dissociation of profilin during filament elongation.

  5. Giant molecular filaments in the Milky Way. II. The fourth Galactic quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu-Vicente, J.; Ragan, S.; Kainulainen, J.; Henning, Th.; Beuther, H.; Johnston, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Filamentary structures are common morphological features of the cold, molecular interstellar medium (ISM). Recent studies have discovered massive, hundred-parsec-scale filaments that may be connected to the large-scale, Galactic spiral arm structure. Addressing the nature of these giant molecular filaments (GMFs) requires a census of their occurrence and properties. Aims: We perform a systematic search of GMFs in the fourth Galactic quadrant and determine their basic physical properties. Methods: We identify GMFs based on their dust extinction signatures in the near- and mid-infrared and the velocity structure probed by 13CO line emission. We use the 13CO line emission and ATLASGAL dust emission data to estimate the total and dense gas masses of the GMFs. We combine our sample with an earlier sample from literature and study the Galactic environment of the GMFs. Results: We identify nine GMFs in the fourth Galactic quadrant: six in the Centaurus spiral arm and three in inter-arm regions. Combining this sample with an earlier study using the same identification criteria in the first Galactic quadrant results in 16 GMFs, nine of which are located within spiral arms. The GMFs have sizes of 80-160 pc and 13CO-derived masses between 5-90 × 104M⊙. Their dense gas mass fractions are between 1.5-37%, which is higher in the GMFs connected to spiral arms. We also compare the different GMF-identification methods and find that emission and extinction-based techniques overlap only partially, thereby highlighting the need to use both to achieve a complete census. Table A.2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A131

  6. Filament and core formation in nearby molecular clouds: results from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Fernández-López, Manuel; Lee, Katherine I.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Looney, Leslie; Chen, Che-Yu; Classy Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Stars rarely form in isolation, so it is critical to understand how the parsec-scale molecular cloud environment shapes the formation of individual dense cores at the sub-0.1 pc scale. To address the pathway to core formation in a clustered environment, I co-developed the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey, which spectrally imaged dense gas tracer lines across 800 square arcminutes of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular clouds with 7'' angular resolution. There are four key results from initial papers. First, I created a new non-binary dendrogram code that shows correlation between the hierarchical complexity of dense, N2H+ (J=1-0) structures and the amount of star formation activity in a cluster. This may imply that feedback from young protostars changes the structure of dense gas within a cluster and increases the amount of high column density material. Second, we discovered strong radial velocity gradients within filaments that are an order of magnitude larger than detected axial gradients. We see similar radial gradients in filaments formed in numerical simulations of converging, turbulent flows; this suggests that the observed filaments are accreting material from an environment that is flattened at larger scales, and that they are more likely to fragment locally into cores than to support the flow of gas along the filament length. Third, we constructed two size-linewidth relations using the dendrogram-identified gas structures and our high resolution maps of the gas centroid velocity and line-of-sight velocity dispersion. The two relations show distinct behavior, and we developed a theoretical framework based on isotropic turbulence to show that they support the clustered regions being flattened (sheet-like) at parsec scales, with depths on the order 0.1-0.2 pc into the sky. Finally, we found that many filaments seen with Herschel show substructure in our high resolution maps, which implies that measuring the widths of filaments may be more complex than

  7. Molecular tools for functional genomics in filamentous fungi: recent advances and new strategies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dewei; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yunchuan; Sun, Chang; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2013-12-01

    Advances in genetic transformation techniques have made important contributions to molecular genetics. Various molecular tools and strategies have been developed for functional genomic analysis of filamentous fungi since the first DNA transformation was successfully achieved in Neurospora crassa in 1973. Increasing amounts of genomic data regarding filamentous fungi are continuously reported and large-scale functional studies have become common in a wide range of fungal species. In this review, various molecular tools used in filamentous fungi are compared and discussed, including methods for genetic transformation (e.g., protoplast transformation, electroporation, and microinjection), the construction of random mutant libraries (e.g., restriction enzyme mediated integration, transposon arrayed gene knockout, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation), and the analysis of gene function (e.g., RNA interference and transcription activator-like effector nucleases). We also focused on practical strategies that could enhance the efficiency of genetic manipulation in filamentous fungi, such as choosing a proper screening system and marker genes, assembling target-cassettes or vectors effectively, and transforming into strains that are deficient in the nonhomologous end joining pathway. In summary, we present an up-to-date review on the different molecular tools and latest strategies that have been successfully used in functional genomics in filamentous fungi.

  8. Filamentary structures in dense plasma focus: Current filaments or vortex filaments?

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José; Castillo, Fermin; Veloso, Felipe; Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-07-15

    Recent observations of an azimuthally distributed array of sub-millimeter size sources of fusion protons and correlation between extreme ultraviolet (XUV) images of filaments with neutron yield in PF-1000 plasma focus have re-kindled interest in their significance. These filaments have been described variously in literature as current filaments and vortex filaments, with very little experimental evidence in support of either nomenclature. This paper provides, for the first time, experimental observations of filaments on a table-top plasma focus device using three techniques: framing photography of visible self-luminosity from the plasma, schlieren photography, and interferometry. Quantitative evaluation of density profile of filaments from interferometry reveals that their radius closely agrees with the collision-less ion skin depth. This is a signature of relaxed state of a Hall fluid, which has significant mass flow with equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy, supporting the “vortex filament” description. This interpretation is consistent with empirical evidence of an efficient energy concentration mechanism inferred from nuclear reaction yields.

  9. Negative Stains Containing Trehalose: Application to Tubular and Filamentous Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. Robin; Gerber, Max; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Wernicke, Wolfgang; Markl, Jürgen

    1996-02-01

    Several examples are presented that show the successful application of uranyl acetate and ammonium molybdate negative staining in the presence of trehalose for TEM studies of filamentous and tubular structures. The principal benefit to be gained from the inclusion of trehalose stems from the considerably reduced flattening of the large tubular structures and the greater orientational freedom of single molecules due to an increased depth of the negative stain in the presence of trehalose. Trehalose is likely to provide considerable protection to protein molecules and their assemblies during the drying of negatively stained specimens. Some reduction in the excessive density imparted by uranyl acetate around large assemblies is also achieved. Nevertheless, in the presence of 1% (w/v) trehalose, it is desirable to increase the concentration of negative stain to 5% (w/v) for ammonium molybdate and to 4% for uranyl acetate to produce satisfactory image contrast. In general, the ammonium molybdate-trehalose negative stain is more satisfactory than the uranyl acetate-trehalose combination, because of the greater electron beam sensitivity of the uranyl negative stain. Reassembled taxol-stabilized pig brain microtubules, together with collagen fibrils, sperm tails, helical filaments, and reassociated hemocyanin (KLH2), all from the giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata, have been studied by negative staining in the presence of trehalose. In all cases satisfactory TEM imaging conditions were readily obtained on the specimens, as long as regions of excessively deep stain were avoided.

  10. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gayarre, Javier; Sanchez, David; Sanchez-Gomez, Francisco J.; Terron, Maria C.; Llorca, Oscar; Perez-Sala, Dolores . E-mail: dperezsala@cib.csic.es

    2006-11-03

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-PGJ{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}) and PGA{sub 1} in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA{sub 1} and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ{sub 2} at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles.

  11. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure.

    PubMed

    Gayarre, Javier; Sánchez, David; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Terrón, María C; Llorca, Oscar; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2006-11-03

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and PGA(1) in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA(1) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ(2) or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles.

  12. Molecular Studies of Filamentous and Biofilm-Forming Hyperthermophilic Communities in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, R. E.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Bradley, A. S.; Dibbell, A. K.; Fredricks, H. F.; Hinrichs, K.; Jahnke, L. L.; Shock, E.; Amend, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    The Aquificales, the most deeply-branching order of Bacteria in the phylogenetic tree of life, comprises eight recognized thermophilic genera, including Aquifex, Hydrogenobacter, and Thermocrinis. The common metabolism for these Bacteria, when grown in culture, is the oxidation of hydrogen with molecular oxygen (Knallgas reaction). Aquificales have been identified by molecular techniques (16S rRNA gene surveys, fluorescent in situ hybridization) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), sea vent chimneys and fluids, and many other terrestrial and marine locations. In situ, Aquificales can reside as biofilms on vent sinters but they also commonly form filamentous communities, otherwise known as pink streamers, which attach to solid substrates. Initial 16S rRNA gene surveys conducted on streamer communities from Octopus Spring YNP indicated that these were low diversity ecosystems dominated by a few phylotypes including Thermocrinis sp., Thermotoga sp. and one other bacterial clade (Reysenbach et al 1994). Archaea were notable for their absence. In one of the first geobiological studies of pink streamers and vent biofilms in Yellowstone National Park, Jahnke and coworkers (2001) used classical lipidological techniques to compare Aquificales cultures with environmental samples to show that YNP pink filaments were more phylogenetically diverse and physiologically more complex than the early genomic studies indicated. The presence of archaeol, the range and structures of other lipids and a wide dispersion in the carbon isotopic signatures of biomass and individual lipids (-15 to -27%) showed that Archaea were present in pink filament communities and that there was, at least, one additional bacterial group besides the dominant Aquificales component. New molecular studies that comprise analyses of 16S rRNA genes and total lipid extracts by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry and chemical degradation with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry now show that Crenarchaea

  13. An Analytical Model for Molecular Propagation in Nanocommunication via Filaments Using Relay-Enabled Nodes.

    PubMed

    Darchinimaragheh, Kamaloddin; Alfa, Attahiru S

    2015-12-01

    Molecular communication is a nanoscale communication method in which information is encoded in molecules. Molecular communication using microtubules in free space is one of the realistic scenarios proposed for this type of nanocommunication. Based on this technique, molecular communication via filaments using nano-relays is proposed in this paper to improve the performance of the system in terms of delay and bit error probability. An analytical model using jump diffusion processes is proposed for molecular propagation in this scenario. It is shown that the proposed mathematical model is capable of tracking molecular propagation in molecular communication via filaments using nano-relays. Also, the model is used to investigate effects of different parameters on delay and bit error probability.

  14. DYNAMICS OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR EMISSION FEATURES FROM NANOSECOND, FEMTOSECOND LASER AND FILAMENT PRODUCED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-08

    In this presentation, the persistence of atomic, and molecular emission features and its relation to fundamental properties (temperature and density) of ablation plumes generated using various irradiation methods (ns, fs, filaments) will be discussed in detail along with its implications for remote sensing applications.

  15. From Aβ Filament to Fibril: Molecular Mechanism of Surface-Activated Secondary Nucleation from All-Atom MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Schwierz, Nadine; Frost, Christina V; Geissler, Phillip L; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-02-02

    Secondary nucleation pathways in which existing amyloid fibrils catalyze the formation of new aggregates and neurotoxic oligomers are of immediate importance for the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we apply extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water to study surface-activated secondary nucleation pathways at the extended lateral β-sheet surface of a preformed Aβ9-40 filament. Calculation of free-energy profiles allows us to determine binding free energies and conformational intermediates for nucleation complexes consisting of 1-4 Aβ peptides. In addition, we combine the free-energy profiles with position-dependent diffusion profiles to extract complementary kinetic information and macroscopic growth rates. Single monomers bind to the β-sheet surface in a disordered, hydrophobically collapsed conformation, whereas dimers and larger oligomers can retain a cross-β conformation resembling a more ordered fibril structure. The association processes during secondary nucleation follow a dock/lock mechanism consisting of a fast initial encounter phase (docking) and a slow structural rearrangement phase (locking). The major driving forces for surface-activated secondary nucleation are the release of a large number of hydration water molecules and the formation of hydrophobic interface contacts, the latter being in contrast to the elongation process at filament tips, which is dominated by the formation of stable and highly specific interface hydrogen bonds. The calculated binding free energies and the association rates for the attachment of Aβ monomers and oligomers to the extended lateral β-sheet surface of the filament seed are higher compared to those for elongation at the filament tips, indicating that secondary nucleation pathways can become important once a critical concentration of filaments has formed.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of a myosin subfragment-1 docking with an actin filament.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tadashi

    2013-09-01

    Myosins are typical molecular motor proteins, which convert the chemical energy of ATP into mechanical work. The fundamental mechanism of this energy conversion is still unknown. To explain the experimental results observed in molecular motors, Masuda has proposed a theory called the "Driven by Detachment (DbD)" mechanism for the working principle of myosins. Based on this theory, the energy used during the power stroke of the myosins originates from the attractive force between a detached myosin head and an actin filament, and does not directly arise from the energy of ATP. According to this theory, every step in the myosin working process may be reproduced by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, except for the ATP hydrolysis step. Therefore, MD simulations were conducted to reproduce the docking process of a myosin subfragment-1 (S1) against an actin filament. A myosin S1 directed toward the barbed end of an actin filament was placed at three different positions by shifting it away from the filament axis. After 30 ns of MD simulations, in three cases out of ten trials on average, the myosin made a close contact with two actin monomers by changing the positions and the orientation of both the myosin and the actin as predicted in previous studies. Once the docking was achieved, the distance between the myosin and the actin showed smaller fluctuations, indicating that the docking is stable over time. If the docking was not achieved, the myosin moved randomly around the initial position or moved away from the actin filament. MD simulations thus successfully reproduced the docking of a myosin S1 with an actin filament. By extending the similar MD simulations to the other steps of the myosin working process, the validity of the DbD theory may be computationally demonstrated.

  17. Filamentous Structure of Hard β-Keratins in the Epidermal Appendages of Birds and Reptiles.

    PubMed

    Fraser, R D Bruce; Parry, David A D

    The structures of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, such as feathers, claws and scales, have been modelled using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy data, combined with sequence analyses. In most cases, a family of closely related molecules makes up the bulk of the appendage, and each of these molecules contains a central β-rich 34-residue segment, which has been identified as the principal component of the framework of the 3.4 nm diameter filaments. The N- and C-terminal segments form the matrix component of the filament/matrix complex. The 34-residue β-rich central domains occur in pairs, related by either a parallel dyad or a perpendicular dyad axis, and form a β-sandwich stabilized by apolar interactions. They are also twisted in a right-handed manner. In feather, the filaments are packed into small sheets and it is possible to determine their likely orientation within the sheets from the low-angle X-ray diffraction data. The physical properties of the various epidermal appendages can be related to the amino acid sequence and composition of defined molecular segments characteristic of the chains concerned.

  18. Molecular Gas Along a Bright Hα Filament in 2A 0335+096 Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantyghem, A. N.; McNamara, B. R.; Russell, H. R.; Hogan, M. T.; Edge, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Fabian, A. C.; Combes, F.; Salomé, P.; Baum, S. A.; Donahue, M.; Main, R. A.; Murray, N. W.; O'Connell, R. W.; O'Dea, C. P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Parrish, I. J.; Sanders, J. S.; Tremblay, G.; Voit, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present ALMA CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the 2A 0335+096 galaxy cluster (z = 0.0346). The total molecular gas mass of 1.13 ± 0.15 × 109 M ⊙ is divided into two components: a nuclear region and a 7 kpc long dusty filament. The central molecular gas component accounts for 3.2 ± 0.4 × 108 M ⊙ of the total supply of cold gas. Instead of forming a rotationally supported ring or disk, it is composed of two distinct, blueshifted clumps south of the nucleus and a series of low-significance redshifted clumps extending toward a nearby companion galaxy. The velocity of the redshifted clouds increases with radius to a value consistent with the companion galaxy, suggesting that an interaction between these galaxies <20 Myr ago disrupted a pre-existing molecular gas reservoir within the BCG. Most of the molecular gas, 7.8 ± 0.9 × 108 M ⊙, is located in the filament. The CO emission is co-spatial with a 104 K emission-line nebula and soft X-rays from 0.5 keV gas, indicating that the molecular gas has cooled out of the intracluster medium over a period of 25-100 Myr. The filament trails an X-ray cavity, suggesting that the gas has cooled from low-entropy gas that has been lifted out of the cluster core and become thermally unstable. We are unable to distinguish between inflow and outflow along the filament with the present data. Cloud velocities along the filament are consistent with gravitational free-fall near the plane of the sky, although their increasing blueshifts with radius are consistent with outflow.

  19. Plasticity in PYD assembly revealed by cryo-EM structure of the PYD filament of AIM2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Alvin; Li, Yang; Yin, Qian; Ruan, Jianbin; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an essential cytosolic double-stranded DNA receptor that assembles with the adaptor, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1 to form the AIM2 inflammasome, which leads to proteolytic maturation of cytokines and pyroptotic cell death. AIM2 contains an N-terminal Pyrin domain (PYD) that interacts with ASC through PYD/PYD interactions and nucleates ASCPYD filament formation. To elucidate the molecular basis of AIM2-induced ASCPYD polymerization, we generated AIM2PYD filaments fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and determined its cryo-electron microscopic (cryo-EM) structure. The map showed distinct definition of helices, allowing fitting of the crystal structure. Surprisingly, the GFP-AIM2PYD filament is a 1-start helix with helical parameters distinct from those of the 3-start ASCPYD filament. However, despite the apparent symmetry difference, helical net and detailed interface analyses reveal minimal changes in subunit packing. GFP-AIM2PYD nucleated ASCPYD filament formation in comparable efficiency as untagged AIM2PYD, suggesting assembly plasticity in both AIM2PYD and ASCPYD. The DNA-binding domain of AIM2 is able to form AIM2/DNA filaments, within which the AIM2PYD is brought into proximity to template ASCPYD filament assembly. Because ASC is able to interact with many PYD-containing receptors for the formation of inflammasomes, the observed structural plasticity may be critically important for this versatility in the PYD/PYD interactions. PMID:26583071

  20. Plasticity in PYD assembly revealed by cryo-EM structure of the PYD filament of AIM2.

    PubMed

    Lu, Alvin; Li, Yang; Yin, Qian; Ruan, Jianbin; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward; Wu, Hao

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an essential cytosolic double-stranded DNA receptor that assembles with the adaptor, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1 to form the AIM2 inflammasome, which leads to proteolytic maturation of cytokines and pyroptotic cell death. AIM2 contains an N-terminal Pyrin domain (PYD) that interacts with ASC through PYD/PYD interactions and nucleates ASC(PYD) filament formation. To elucidate the molecular basis of AIM2-induced ASC(PYD) polymerization, we generated AIM2(PYD) filaments fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and determined its cryo-electron microscopic (cryo-EM) structure. The map showed distinct definition of helices, allowing fitting of the crystal structure. Surprisingly, the GFP-AIM2(PYD) filament is a 1-start helix with helical parameters distinct from those of the 3-start ASC(PYD) filament. However, despite the apparent symmetry difference, helical net and detailed interface analyses reveal minimal changes in subunit packing. GFP-AIM2(PYD) nucleated ASC(PYD) filament formation in comparable efficiency as untagged AIM2(PYD), suggesting assembly plasticity in both AIM2(PYD) and ASC(PYD). The DNA-binding domain of AIM2 is able to form AIM2/DNA filaments, within which the AIM2(PYD) is brought into proximity to template ASC(PYD) filament assembly. Because ASC is able to interact with many PYD-containing receptors for the formation of inflammasomes, the observed structural plasticity may be critically important for this versatility in the PYD/PYD interactions.

  1. Near-atomic structure of jasplakinolide-stabilized malaria parasite F-actin reveals the structural basis of filament instability.

    PubMed

    Pospich, Sabrina; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; von der Ecken, Julian; Vahokoski, Juha; Kursula, Inari; Raunser, Stefan

    2017-09-18

    During their life cycle, apicomplexan parasites, such as the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, use actomyosin-driven gliding motility to move and invade host cells. For this process, actin filament length and stability are temporally and spatially controlled. In contrast to canonical actin, P. falciparum actin 1 (PfAct1) does not readily polymerize into long, stable filaments. The structural basis of filament instability, which plays a pivotal role in host cell invasion, and thus infectivity, is poorly understood, largely because high-resolution structures of PfAct1 filaments were missing. Here, we report the near-atomic structure of jasplakinolide (JAS)-stabilized PfAct1 filaments determined by electron cryomicroscopy. The general filament architecture is similar to that of mammalian F-actin. The high resolution of the structure allowed us to identify small but important differences at inter- and intrastrand contact sites, explaining the inherent instability of apicomplexan actin filaments. JAS binds at regular intervals inside the filament to three adjacent actin subunits, reinforcing filament stability by hydrophobic interactions. Our study reveals the high-resolution structure of a small molecule bound to F-actin, highlighting the potential of electron cryomicroscopy for structure-based drug design. Furthermore, our work serves as a strong foundation for understanding the structural design and evolution of actin filaments and their function in motility and host cell invasion of apicomplexan parasites.

  2. A molecular model of phosphorylation-based activation and potentiation of tarantula muscle thick filaments

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Reicy; Alamo, Lorenzo; Lundberg, Ulf; Guerrero, José R.; Pinto, Antonio; Sulbarán, Guidenn; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). To elucidate the structural mechanism of activation, we have studied RLC phosphorylation in tarantula thick filaments, whose high resolution structure is known. In the relaxed state, tarantula RLCs are ~50% non- and 50% mono-phosphorylated, while on activation mono-phosphorylation increases and some RLCs become bi-phosphorylated. Mass spectrometry shows that relaxed-state mono-phosphorylation occurs on Ser35 while Ca2+-activated phosphorylation is on Ser45, both located near the RLC N-terminus. The sequences around these serines suggest they are the targets for protein kinase C (PKC) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) respectively. The atomic model of the tarantula filament shows that the two myosin heads (“free” and “blocked”) are in different environments, with only the free head serines readily accessible to kinases. Thus PKC Ser35 mono-phosphorylation in relaxed filaments would occur only on the free heads. Structural considerations suggest these heads are less strongly bound to the filament backbone, and may oscillate occasionally between attached and detached states (“swaying” heads). These heads would be available for immediate actin interaction upon Ca2+-activation of the thin filaments. Once MLCK becomes activated, it phosphorylates free heads on Ser45. These heads become fully mobile, exposing blocked-head Ser45 to MLCK. This would release the blocked-heads, allowing their interaction with actin. On this model, twitch force would be produced by rapid interaction of swaying free heads with activated thin filaments, while prolonged exposure to Ca2+ on tetanus would recruit new, MLCK-activated heads, resulting in force potentiation. PMID:21959262

  3. A molecular model of phosphorylation-based activation and potentiation of tarantula muscle thick filaments.

    PubMed

    Brito, Reicy; Alamo, Lorenzo; Lundberg, Ulf; Guerrero, José R; Pinto, Antonio; Sulbarán, Guidenn; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2011-11-18

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). To elucidate the structural mechanism of activation, we have studied RLC phosphorylation in tarantula thick filaments, whose high-resolution structure is known. In the relaxed state, tarantula RLCs are ~50% non-phosphorylated and 50% mono-phosphorylated, while on activation, mono-phosphorylation increases, and some RLCs become bi-phosphorylated. Mass spectrometry shows that relaxed-state mono-phosphorylation occurs on Ser35, while Ca(2+)-activated phosphorylation is on Ser45, both located near the RLC N-terminus. The sequences around these serines suggest that they are the targets for protein kinase C and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), respectively. The atomic model of the tarantula filament shows that the two myosin heads ("free" and "blocked") are in different environments, with only the free head serines readily accessible to kinases. Thus, protein kinase C Ser35 mono-phosphorylation in relaxed filaments would occur only on the free heads. Structural considerations suggest that these heads are less strongly bound to the filament backbone and may oscillate occasionally between attached and detached states ("swaying" heads). These heads would be available for immediate actin interaction upon Ca(2)(+) activation of the thin filaments. Once MLCK becomes activated, it phosphorylates free heads on Ser45. These heads become fully mobile, exposing blocked head Ser45 to MLCK. This would release the blocked heads, allowing their interaction with actin. On this model, twitch force would be produced by rapid interaction of swaying free heads with activated thin filaments, while prolonged exposure to Ca(2+) on tetanus would recruit new MLCK-activated heads, resulting in force potentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Myopathy-inducing mutation H40Y in ACTA1 hampers actin filament structure and function

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Chun; Fan, Jun; Messer, Andrew E.; ...

    2016-04-22

    In humans, more than 200 missense mutations have been identified in the ACTA1 gene. The exact molecular mechanisms by which, these particular mutations become toxic and lead to muscle weakness and myopathies remain obscure. To address this, here, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation, and we used a broad range of biophysical assays to determine how the lethal and myopathy-related H40Y amino acid substitution in actin affects the structure, stability, and function of this protein. Interestingly, our results showed that H40Y severely disrupts the DNase I-binding-loop structure and actin filaments. In addition, we observed that normal and mutant actin monomersmore » are likely to form distinctive homopolymers, with mutant filaments being very stiff, and not supporting proper myosin binding. Lastly, these phenomena underlie the toxicity of H40Y and may be considered as important triggering factors for the contractile dysfunction, muscle weakness and disease phenotype seen in patients.« less

  5. The connection between prestellar cores and filaments in the Aquila molecular cloud complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    One of the main scientific goals of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr)is to elucidate the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation and evolution of prestellar cores inmolecular clouds. In the ~ 11 deg2 field of Aquila imaged with Herschel/SPIRE-PACS between 70 and 500microns, we have recently identified a complete sample of 651 starless cores, 446 of them aregravitationally-bound candidate prestellar cores that will likely form stars in the future (Könyves et al. 2010and 2015, submitted - see http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr/archives).Our Herschel observations also provide an unprecedented census of filaments in the Aquila cloud andsuggest an intimate connection between these filaments and the formation process of prestellar cores.About 10%-20% of the gas mass is in the form of filaments below Av ~ 7, while as much as ~ 50%-75%of the dense gas mass above Av ~ 7-10 is in the form of filamentary structures.Furthermore, about 90% of the Herschel-identified prestellar cores are located above a background columndensity corresponding to Av ~ 7, and ~ 75% of them lie within the densest filamentary structures withsupercritical masses per unit length > 16 M⊙/pc. In accordance with this, a strong correlation is foundbetween the spatial distribution of prestellar cores and the densest filaments.Comparing the statistics of cores and filaments with the number of young stellar objects identified bySpitzer in the same complex, we also infer a typical timescale ~ 1 Myr for the formation and evolutionof both prestellar cores and filaments.In summary, our Herschel findings in the Aquila cloud support a filamentary paradigm for the early stagesof star formation, where the cores result primarily from the gravitational fragmentation of marginallysupercritical filaments (cf. André et al. 2014, PPVI).

  6. CCFold: rapid and accurate prediction of coiled-coil structures and application to modeling intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Guzenko, Dmytro; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2017-09-04

    Accurate molecular structure of the protein dimer representing the elementary building block of intermediate filaments (IFs) is essential towards the understanding of the filament assembly, rationalizing their mechanical properties and explaining the effect of disease-related IF mutations. The dimer contains a ~300-residue long α-helical coiled coil which cannot be assessed by either direct experimental structure determination or modelling using standard approaches. At the same time, coiled coils are well-represented in structural databases. Here we present CCFold, a generally applicable threading-based algorithm which produces coiled-coil models from protein sequence only. The algorithm is based on a statistical analysis of experimentally determined structures and can handle any hydrophobic repeat patterns in addition to the most common heptads. We demonstrate that CCFold outperforms general-purpose computational folding in terms of accuracy, while being faster by orders of magnitude. By combining the CCFold algorithm and Rosetta folding we generate representative dimer models for all IF protein classes. The source code is freely available at https://github.com/biocryst/IF ; a web server to run the program is at http://pharm.kuleuven.be/Biocrystallography/cc. sergei.strelkov@kuleuven.be. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. An Ammonia Spectral Map of the L1495-B218 Filaments in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. I. Physical Properties of Filaments and Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young Min; Shirley, Yancy L.; Goldsmith, Paul; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Kirk, Jason M.; Schmalzl, Markus; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Friesen, Rachel; Langston, Glen; Masters, Joe; Garwood, Robert W.

    2015-06-01

    We present deep NH3 observations of the L1495-B218 filaments in the Taurus molecular cloud covering over a 3° angular range using the K-band focal plane array on the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. The L1495-B218 filaments form an interconnected, nearby, large complex extending over 8 pc. We observed NH3 (1, 1) and (2, 2) with a spectral resolution of 0.038 km s-1 and a spatial resolution of 31″. Most of the ammonia peaks coincide with intensity peaks in dust continuum maps at 350 and 500 μm. We deduced physical properties by fitting a model to the observed spectra. We find gas kinetic temperatures of 8-15 K, velocity dispersions of 0.05-0.25 km s-1, and NH3 column densities of 5 × 1012 to 1 × 1014 cm-2. The CSAR algorithm, which is a hybrid of seeded-watershed and binary dendrogram algorithms, identifies a total of 55 NH3 structures, including 39 leaves and 16 branches. The masses of the NH3 sources range from 0.05 to 9.5 {{M}⊙ }. The masses of NH3 leaves are mostly smaller than their corresponding virial mass estimated from their internal and gravitational energies, which suggests that these leaves are gravitationally unbound structures. Nine out of 39 NH3 leaves are gravitationally bound, and seven out of nine gravitationally bound NH3 leaves are associated with star formation. We also found that 12 out of 30 gravitationally unbound leaves are pressure confined. Our data suggest that a dense core may form as a pressure-confined structure, evolve to a gravitationally bound core, and undergo collapse to form a protostar.

  8. Structural complexity of filaments formed from the actin and tubulin folds

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shimin; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT From yeast to man, an evolutionary distance of 1.3 billion years, the F-actin filament structure has been conserved largely in line with the 94% sequence identity. The situation is entirely different in bacteria. In comparison to eukaryotic actins, the bacterial actin-like proteins (ALPs) show medium to low levels of sequence identity. This is extreme in the case of the ParM family of proteins, which often display less than 20% identity. ParMs are plasmid segregation proteins that form the polymerizing motors that propel pairs of plasmids to the extremities of a cell prior to cell division, ensuring faithful inheritance of the plasmid. Recently, exotic ParM filament structures have been elucidated that show ParM filament geometries are not limited to the standard polar pair of strands typified by actin. Four-stranded non-polar ParM filaments existing as open or closed nanotubules are found in Clostridium tetani and Bacillus thuringiensis, respectively. These diverse architectures indicate that the actin fold is capable of forming a large variety of filament morphologies, and that the conception of the “actin” filament has been heavily influenced by its conservation in eukaryotes. Here, we review the history of the structure determination of the eukaryotic actin filament to give a sense of context for the discovery of the new ParM filament structures. We describe the novel ParM geometries and predict that even more complex actin-like filaments may exist in bacteria. Finally, we compare the architectures of filaments arising from the actin and tubulin folds and conclude that the basic units possess similar properties that can each form a range of structures. Thus, the use of the actin fold in microfilaments and the tubulin fold for microtubules likely arose from a wider range of filament possibilities, but became entrenched as those architectures in early eukaryotes. PMID:28042378

  9. Ultrasonic analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, W.D.

    1985-07-16

    Composite structures are often desirable for their strength and weight characteristics. Since composites are not as well characterized mechanically as metallic or ceramic structures, much work has been performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to obtain that characterization and to develop methods of determining the mechanical properties of a composite nondestructively. Most of the work to date has been performed on nonenclosed structures. One notable exception has been the holographic evaluation of spherical Kevlar-epoxy composite pressure vessels. Several promising nondestructive evaluation techniques have been used to locate flaws and predict the integrity of the composite. Several of these include thermography, Moire interferometry, ultrasonic stress wave factor, ultrasonic C-scan image enhancement, radiography, and nuclear magnetic resonance. As a first step in this transfer and development of NDE techniques, known defects were placed within spherical Kevlar-epoxy, filament-wound test specimens to determine the extent to which they could be detected. These defects included Teflon shim-simulated delaminations, macrosphere-simulated voids, dry-band sets, variable tension, Kevlar 29 fiber instead of the higher strength Kevlar 40 fiber, and an alternate high-void-content winding pattern. Ultrasonic waveform analysis was performed in both the time and frequency domains to determine the detectability and locatability of structural flaws within the composite. Preparation has been made at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and at the University of Delaware, to examine the specimens using various NDE techniques. This work is a compilation of interim project reports in partial fulfillment of the contracts between Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, the University of Delaware, and Y-12 Plant.

  10. Ultrasonic analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosey, W. D.

    1985-07-01

    Composite structures are often desirable for their strength and weight characteristics. Since composites are not as well characterized mechanically as metallic or ceramic structures, much work has been performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to obtain that characterization and to develop methods of determining the mechanical properties of a composite nondestructively. Most of the work to date has been performed on nonenclosed structures. One notable exception has been the holographic evaluation of spherical Kevlar-epoxy composite pressure vessels. Several promising nondestructive evaluation techniques have been used to locate flaws and predict the integrity of the composite. Several of these include thermography, Moire interferometry, ultrasonic stress wave factor, ultrasonic C-scan image enhancement, radiography, and nuclear magnetic resonance. As a first step in this transfer and development of NDE techniques, known defects were placed within spherical Kevlar-epoxy, filament-wound test specimens to determine the extent to which they could be detected. These defects included Teflon shim-simulated delaminations, macrosphere-simulated voids, dry-band sets, variable tension, Kevlar 29 fiber instead of the higher strength Kevlar 40 fiber, and an alternate high-void-content winding pattern. Ultrasonic waveform analysis was performed in both the time and frequency domains to determine the detectability and locatability of structural flaws within the composite. Preparation has been made at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and at the University of Delaware, to examine the specimens using various NDE techniques. This work is a compilation of interim project reports in partial fulfillment of the contracts between Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, the University of Delaware, and Y-12 Plant.

  11. Structures of actin-like ParM filaments show architecture of plasmid-segregating spindles.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Murshudov, Garib N; Sachse, Carsten; Löwe, Jan

    2015-07-02

    Active segregation of Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 involves formation of a bipolar spindle made of left-handed double-helical actin-like ParM filaments. ParR links the filaments with centromeric parC plasmid DNA, while facilitating the addition of subunits to ParM filaments. Growing ParMRC spindles push sister plasmids to the cell poles. Here, using modern electron cryomicroscopy methods, we investigate the structures and arrangements of ParM filaments in vitro and in cells, revealing at near-atomic resolution how subunits and filaments come together to produce the simplest known mitotic machinery. To understand the mechanism of dynamic instability, we determine structures of ParM filaments in different nucleotide states. The structure of filaments bound to the ATP analogue AMPPNP is determined at 4.3 Å resolution and refined. The ParM filament structure shows strong longitudinal interfaces and weaker lateral interactions. Also using electron cryomicroscopy, we reconstruct ParM doublets forming antiparallel spindles. Finally, with whole-cell electron cryotomography, we show that doublets are abundant in bacterial cells containing low-copy-number plasmids with the ParMRC locus, leading to an asynchronous model of R1 plasmid segregation.

  12. Molecular mechanics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in native thick filaments.

    PubMed

    Previs, M J; Beck Previs, S; Gulick, J; Robbins, J; Warshaw, D M

    2012-09-07

    The heart's pumping capacity results from highly regulated interactions of actomyosin molecular motors. Mutations in the gene for a potential regulator of these motors, cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, cMyBP-C's ability to modulate cardiac contractility is not well understood. Using single-particle fluorescence imaging techniques, transgenic protein expression, proteomics, and modeling, we found that cMyBP-C slowed actomyosin motion generation in native cardiac thick filaments. This mechanical effect was localized to where cMyBP-C resides within the thick filament (i.e., the C-zones) and was modulated by phosphorylation and site-specific proteolytic degradation. These results provide molecular insight into why cMyBP-C should be considered a member of a tripartite complex with actin and myosin that allows fine tuning of cardiac muscle contraction.

  13. Regulation of structure and function of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a valuable system to study structure and function of striated muscle. The body wall muscle of C. elegans is obliquely striated muscle with highly organized sarcomeric assembly of actin, myosin, and other accessary proteins. Genetic and molecular biological studies in C. elegans have identified a number of genes encoding structural and regulatory components for the muscle contractile apparatuses, and many of them have counterparts in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles or striated muscles in other invertebrates. Applicability of genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry has made C. elegans an excellent system to study mechanisms of muscle contractility and assembly and maintenance of myofibrils. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms of structure and function of actin filaments in the C. elegans body wall muscle. Sarcomeric actin filaments in C. elegans muscle are associated with the troponin-tropomyosin system that regulates the actin-myosin interaction. Proteins that bind to the side and ends of actin filaments support ordered assembly of thin filaments. Furthermore, regulators of actin dynamics play important roles in initial assembly, growth, and maintenance of sarcomeres. The knowledge acquired in C. elegans can serve as bases to understand the basic mechanisms of muscle structure and function. PMID:25125169

  14. Structural transition of actin filament in a cell-sized water droplet with a phospholipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, M.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2006-03-01

    Actin filament, F-actin, is a semiflexible polymer with a negative charge, and is one of the main constituents of cell membranes. To clarify the effect of cross talk between a phospholipid membrane and actin filaments in cells, we conducted microscopic observations on the structural changes in actin filaments in a cell-sized (several tens of micrometers in diameter) water droplet coated with a phospholipid membrane such as phosphatidylserine (PS; negatively charged head group) or phosphatidylethanolamine (PE; neutral head group) as a simple model of a living cell membrane. With PS, actin filaments are distributed uniformly in the water phase without adsorption onto the membrane surface between 2 and 6mM Mg2+, while between 6 and 12mM Mg2+, actin filaments are adsorbed onto the inner membrane surface. With PE, the actin filaments are uniformly adsorbed onto the inner membrane surface between 2 and 12mM Mg2+. With both PS and PE membranes, at Mg2+ concentrations higher than 12mM, thick bundles are formed in the bulk water droplet accompanied by the dissolution of actin filaments from the membrane surface. The attraction between actin filaments and membrane is attributable to an increase in the translational entropy of counterions accompanied by the adsorption of actin filaments onto the membrane surface. These results suggest that a microscopic water droplet coated with phospholipid can serve as an easy-to-handle model of cell membranes.

  15. The structural basis of the filament-matrix texture in the avian/reptilian group of hard β-keratins.

    PubMed

    Fraser, R D Bruce; Parry, David A D

    2011-02-01

    Avian hard keratin has a filament-matrix texture in which the filaments contain a helical array of twisted β-sheets and the matrix has unusually high concentrations of cysteine, glycine, and tyrosine. X-ray diffraction studies have established that similar filaments exist in the hard keratins of crocodiles, turtles, tuataras, lizards and snakes. Here, the relationship between amino acid sequence and the filament-matrix texture is explored in a wide variety of avian and reptilian hard keratins. Universally, the molecules contain three distinct domains: a central domain rich in β-favoring residues associated with the filament framework, and N- and C-terminal domains associated with the matrix and with crosslinking via disulfide bonds. A variety of structural probes were employed to identify the β-framework of the filaments and a common pattern 34 residues in length was found in all cases. In addition, detailed analyses of the sequences in the two "matrix" domains revealed profound differences between the Archosaurs (birds, crocodiles and turtles), where the N-terminal domains were very similar, and the Squamates (snakes and lizards) where the N-terminal domains varied widely in length and composition, in some cases exhibiting a subdomain structure, and segments of highly homologous sequence. The C-terminal domains in both branches varied widely in composition but almost all exhibit a subdomain structure characterized by a terminal sequence rich in cysteine and arginine residues. A revised model for the molecular organization in avian and reptilian hard keratins is presented and similarities and differences in the matrix domains are noted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Shocks, Superbubbles, and Filaments: Investigations into Large Scale Gas Motions in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, Andrew Richard

    2013-12-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMCs), out of which stars form, are complex, dynamic systems, which both influence and are shaped by the process of star formation. In this dissertation, I examine three different facets of the dynamical motions within GMCs. Collapse modes in different dimensional objects. Molecular clouds contain lower dimensional substructures, such as filaments and sheets. The collapse properties of finite filaments and sheets differ from those of spherical objects as well as infinite sheets and filaments. I examine the importance of local collapse modes of small central perturbations, relative to global collapse modes, in different dimensional objects to elucidate whether strong perturbations are required for molecular clouds to fragment to form stars. I also calculate the dependence of the global collapse timescale upon the aspect ratio of sheets and filaments. I find that lower dimensional objects are more readily fragmented, and that for a constant density, lower dimensional objects and clouds with larger aspect ratios collapse more slowly. An edge-driven collapse mode also exists in sheets and filaments and is most important in elongated filaments. The failure to consider the geometry of a gas cloud is shown to lead to an overestimation of the star formation rate by up to an order of magnitude. Molecular tracers of turbulent energy dissipation. Molecular clouds contain supersonic turbulence that simulations predict will decay rapidly via shocks. I use shock models to predict which species emit the majority of the turbulent energy dissipated in shocks and find that carbon monoxide, CO, is primarily responsible for radiating away this energy. By combining these shock models with estimates for the turbulent energy dissipation rate of molecular clouds, I predict the expected shock spectra of CO from molecular clouds. I compare the results of these shock models to predictions for the emission from the unshocked gas in GMCs and show that mid

  17. Morphological And Molecular Analyses of an Anatomical Novelty: The Pelvic Fin Filaments of the South American Lungfish.

    PubMed

    Lima, Sergio Q; Costa, Carinne M; Amemiya, Chris T; Schneider, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The pelvic fins of male South American lungfish, Lepidosiren paradoxa, are adorned with a distinctive array of filaments, which grow and become highly vascularized during the breeding season. The resemblance between these pelvic fin filaments (PFFs) and external gills of other vertebrates suggested that this gill-like structure was used for physiological gas exchange. It has been proposed that the unique pelvic fin of male L. paradoxa is used for release of oxygen from its blood into the environment in order to aerate its nesting brood, or, conversely, as an auxiliary respiratory organ by absorbing oxygen from the environment into its bloodstream. Here, we employed histology, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) to assess whether the morphology and molecular profile of PFFs are compatible with a role in gas exchange. First, we closely examined its external morphology and showed that PFFs develop from short papillae during the rainy season, but remain covered by a thick nonvascularized epithelium. Histological examination confirmed that capillaries within the filaments are separated from the exterior by a basement membrane and a stratified epithelium composed of four to five cell layers. In addition, SEM analysis revealed significant differences between the fin filament epithelium and typical gill epithelium. Finally, our qPCR results showed that five genes commonly expressed in gills were downregulated in PFFs relative to their expression in regular pectoral fin epidermis. Collectively, our results do not directly support a role for PFFs, commonly referred to as "limb gills", in oxygen release or uptake. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Alma Observations of Massive Molecular Gas Filaments Encasing Radio Bubbles in the Phoenix Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; McDonald, M.; McNamara, B. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Bayliss, M. B.; Benson, B. A.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Edge, A. C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Marrone, D. P.; Reichardt, C. L.; Vieira, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    We report new ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) line emission from the 2.1+/- 0.3× {10}10 {M}ȯ molecular gas reservoir in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster. The cold molecular gas is fueling a vigorous starburst at a rate of 500{--}800 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 and powerful black hole activity in the forms of both intense quasar radiation and radio jets. The radio jets have inflated huge bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot, X-ray atmospheres surrounding the host galaxy. The ALMA observations show that extended filaments of molecular gas, each 10{--}20 {kpc} long with a mass of several billion solar masses, are located along the peripheries of the radio bubbles. The smooth velocity gradients and narrow line widths along each filament reveal massive, ordered molecular gas flows around each bubble, which are inconsistent with gravitational free-fall. The molecular clouds have been lifted directly by the radio bubbles, or formed via thermal instabilities induced in low-entropy gas lifted in the updraft of the bubbles. These new data provide compelling evidence for close coupling between the radio bubbles and the cold gas, which is essential to explain the self-regulation of feedback. The very feedback mechanism that heats hot atmospheres and suppresses star formation may also paradoxically stimulate production of the cold gas required to sustain feedback in massive galaxies.

  19. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Assembles into Structured Filamentous Virion Particles Independently of Host Cytoskeleton and Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Fyza Y.; Utley, Thomas J.; Craven, Ryan E.; Rogers, Meredith C.; Lapierre, Lynne A.; Goldenring, James R.; Crowe, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that assembles into viral filaments at the cell surface. Virus assembly often depends on the ability of a virus to use host proteins to accomplish viral tasks. Since the fusion protein cytoplasmic tail (FCT) is critical for viral filamentous assembly, we hypothesized that host proteins important for viral assembly may be recruited by the FCT. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that filamin A interacted with FCT, and mammalian cell experiments showed it localized to viral filaments but did not affect viral replication. Furthermore, we found that a number of actin-associated proteins also were excluded from viral filaments. Actin or tubulin cytoskeletal rearrangement was not necessary for F trafficking to the cell surface or for viral assembly into filaments, but was necessary for optimal viral replication and may be important for anchoring viral filaments. These findings suggest that RSV assembly into filaments occurs independently of actin polymerization and that viral proteins are the principal drivers for the mechanical tasks involved with formation of complex, structured RSV filaments at the host cell plasma membrane. PMID:22808269

  20. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  1. Discovery of a pre-existing molecular filament associated with supernova remnant G127.1+0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

    2014-08-20

    We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s{sup –1} consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

  2. The missing link: Tracing molecular gas in the outer filament of Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Oonk, J. B. Raymond; Santoro, Francesco; Tadhunter, Clive

    2016-08-01

    We report the detection, using observations of the CO(2-1) line performed with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX), of molecular gas in the region of the outer filament of Centaurus A, a complex region known to show various signatures of an interaction between the radio jet, an H i cloud, and ionised gas filaments. We detect CO(2-1) at all observed locations, which were selected to represent regions with very different physical conditions. The H2 masses of the detections range between 0.2 × 106 and 1.1 × 106M⊙, for conservative choices of the CO to H2 conversion factor. Surprisingly, the stronger detections are not coincident with the H i cloud, but instead are in the region of the ionised filaments. We also find variations in the widths of the CO(2-1) lines throughout the region, with broader lines in the region of the ionised gas, i.e. where the jet-cloud interaction is strongest, and with narrow profiles in the H i cloud. This may indicate that the molecular gas in the region of the ionised gas has the momentum of the jet-cloud interaction encoded in it, in the same way as the ionised gas does. These molecular clouds may therefore be the result of very efficient cooling of the down-stream gas photo- or shock-ionised by the interaction. On the other hand, the molecular clouds with narrower profiles, which are closer to or inside the H i cloud, could be pre-existing cold H2 cores which manage to survive the effects of the passing jet.

  3. THE FORMATION AND MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OF ACTIVE-REGION FILAMENTS OBSERVED BY NVST, SDO, AND HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Xiang, Y. Y.; Kong, D. F.; Yang, L. H.; Pan, G. M.

    2015-08-15

    To better understand the properties of solar active-region filaments, we present a detailed study on the formation and magnetic structures of two active-region filaments in active region NOAA 11884 during a period of four days. It is found that the shearing motion of the opposite magnetic polarities and the rotation of the small sunspots with negative polarity play an important role in the formation of two active-region filaments. During the formation of these two active-region filaments, one foot of the filaments was rooted in a small sunspot with negative polarity. The small sunspot rotated not only around another small sunspot with negative polarity, but also around the center of its umbra. By analyzing the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation using the vector magnetic fields in the photosphere, twisted structures were found in the two active-region filaments prior to their eruptions. These results imply that the magnetic fields were dragged by the shearing motion between opposite magnetic polarities and became more horizontal. The sunspot rotation twisted the horizontal magnetic fields and finally formed the twisted active-region filaments.

  4. Thin Filament Structure and the Steric Blocking Model.

    PubMed

    Lehman, William

    2016-03-15

    By interacting with the troponin-tropomyosin complex on myofibrillar thin filaments, Ca2+ and myosin govern the regulatory switching processes influencing contractile activity of mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles. A possible explanation of the roles played by Ca2+ and myosin emerged in the early 1970s when a compelling "steric model" began to gain traction as a likely mechanism accounting for muscle regulation. In its most simple form, the model holds that, under the control of Ca2+ binding to troponin and myosin binding to actin, tropomyosin strands running along thin filaments either block myosin-binding sites on actin when muscles are relaxed or move away from them when muscles are activated. Evidence for the steric model was initially based on interpretation of subtle changes observed in X-ray fiber diffraction patterns of intact skeletal muscle preparations. Over the past 25 years, electron microscopy coupled with three-dimensional reconstruction directly resolved thin filament organization under many experimental conditions and at increasingly higher resolution. At low-Ca2+, tropomyosin was shown to occupy a "blocked-state" position on the filament, and switched-on in a two-step process, involving first a movement of tropomyosin away from the majority of the myosin-binding site as Ca2+ binds to troponin and then a further movement to fully expose the site when small numbers of myosin heads bind to actin. In this contribution, basic information on Ca2+-regulation of muscle contraction is provided. A description is then given relating the voyage of discovery taken to arrive at the present understanding of the steric regulatory model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. The ALP-Enigma protein ALP-1 functions in actin filament organization to promote muscle structural integrity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Han, Hsiao-Fen; Beckerle, Mary C

    2009-05-01

    Mutations that affect the Z-disk-associated ALP-Enigma proteins have been linked to human muscular and cardiac diseases. Despite their clear physiological significance for human health, the mechanism of action of ALP-Enigma proteins is largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the ALP-Enigma protein family is encoded by a single gene, alp-1; thus C. elegans provides an excellent model to study ALP-Enigma function. Here we present a molecular and genetic analysis of ALP-Enigma function in C. elegans. We show that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin colocalize at dense bodies where actin filaments are anchored and that the proper localization of ALP-1 at dense bodies is dependent on alpha-actinin. Our analysis of alp-1 mutants demonstrates that ALP-1 functions to maintain actin filament organization and participates in muscle stabilization during contraction. Reducing alpha-actinin activity enhances the actin filament phenotype of the alp-1 mutants, suggesting that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin function in the same cellular process. Like alpha-actinin, alp-1 also interacts genetically with a connectin/titin family member, ketn-1, to provide mechanical stability for supporting body wall muscle contraction. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin function together to stabilize actin filaments and promote muscle structural integrity.

  6. Molecular transformation, gene cloning, and gene expression systems for filamentous fungi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Scott E.; Duick, John W.; Redman, Regina S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter discusses the molecular transformation, gene cloning, and gene expression systems for filamentous fungi. Molecular transformation involves the movement of discrete amounts of DNA into cells, the expression of genes on the transported DNA, and the sustainable replication of the transforming DNA. The ability to transform fungi is dependent on the stable replication and expression of genes located on the transforming DNA. Three phenomena observed in bacteria, that is, competence, plasmids, and restriction enzymes to facilitate cloning, were responsible for the development of molecular transformation in fungi. Initial transformation success with filamentous fungi, involving the complementation of auxotrophic mutants by exposure to sheared genomic DNA or RNA from wt isolates, occurred with low transformation efficiencies. In addition, it was difficult to retrieve complementing DNA fragments and isolate genes of interest. This prompted the development of transformation vectors and methods to increase efficiencies. The physiological studies performed with fungi indicated that the cell wall could be removed to generate protoplasts. It was evident that protoplasts could be transformed with significantly greater efficiencies than walled cells.

  7. Structural architecture of the CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 signalosome: nucleation-induced filamentous assembly.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Qi; Yang, Chenghua; Zheng, Chao; Fontán, Lorena; David, Liron; Yu, Xiong; Bracken, Clay; Rosen, Monica; Melnick, Ari; Egelman, Edward H; Wu, Hao

    2013-09-26

    The CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 (CBM) signalosome mediates antigen receptor-induced NF-κB signaling to regulate multiple lymphocyte functions. While CARMA1 and Bcl10 contain caspase recruitment domains (CARDs), MALT1 is a paracaspase with structural similarity to caspases. Here we show that the reconstituted CBM signalosome is a helical filamentous assembly in which substoichiometric CARMA1 nucleates Bcl10 filaments. Bcl10 filament formation is a highly cooperative process whose threshold is sensitized by oligomerized CARMA1 upon receptor activation. In cells, both cotransfected CARMA1/Bcl10 complex and the endogenous CBM signalosome are filamentous morphologically. Combining crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron microscopy, we reveal the structure of the Bcl10 CARD filament and the mode of interaction between CARMA1 and Bcl10. Structure-guided mutagenesis confirmed the observed interfaces in Bcl10 filament assembly and MALT1 activation in vitro and NF-κB activation in cells. These data support a paradigm of nucleation-induced signal transduction with threshold response due to cooperativity and signal amplification by polymerization.

  8. Structural Architecture of the CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 Signalosome: Nucleation-Induced Filamentous Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qi; Yang, Chenghua; Zheng, Chao; Fontán, Lorena; David, Liron; Yu, Xiong; Bracken, Clay; Rosen, Monica; Melnick, Ari; Egelman, Edward H.; Wu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 (CBM) signalosome mediates antigen receptor-induced NF-κB signaling to regulate multiple lymphocyte functions. While CARMA1 and Bcl10 contain caspase recruitment domains (CARDs), MALT1 is a paracaspase with structural similarity to caspases. Here we show that the reconstituted CBM signalosome is a helical filamentous assembly in which substoichiometric CARMA1 nucleates Bcl10 filaments. Bcl10 filament formation is a highly cooperative process whose threshold is sensitized by oligomerized CARMA1 upon receptor activation. In cells, both cotransfected CARMA1/Bcl10 complex and the endogenous CBM signalosome are filamentous morphologically. Combining crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron microscopy, we reveal the structure of the Bcl10 CARD filament and the mode of interaction between CARMA1 and Bcl10. Structure-guided mutagenesis confirmed the observed interfaces in Bcl10 filament assembly and MALT1 activation in vitro and NF-κB activation in cells. These data support a paradigm of nucleation-induced signal transduction with threshold response due to cooperativity and signal amplification by polymerization. PMID:24074955

  9. The identification of filaments on far-infrared and submillimiter images: Morphology, physical conditions and relation with star formation of filamentary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Schisano, E.; Carey, S.; Paladini, R.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Molinari, S.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Busquet, G.; Billot, N.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Glover, S. C. O.; Vázquez-Semadeni, E.

    2014-08-10

    Observations of molecular clouds reveal a complex structure, with gas and dust often arranged in filamentary, rather than spherical geometries. The association of pre- and proto-stellar cores with the filaments suggests a direct link with the process of star formation. Any study of the properties of such filaments requires representative samples from different environments for an unbiased detection method. We developed such an approach using the Hessian matrix of a surface-brightness distribution to identify filaments and determine their physical and morphological properties. After testing the method on simulated, but realistic, filaments, we apply the algorithms to column-density maps computed from Herschel observations of the Galactic plane obtained by the Hi-GAL project. We identified ∼500 filaments, in the longitude range of l = 216.°5 to l = 225.°5, with lengths from ∼1 pc up to ∼30 pc and widths between 0.1 pc and 2.5 pc. Average column densities are between 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} and 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. Filaments include the majority of dense material with N{sub H{sub 2}} > 6 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}. We find that the pre- and proto-stellar compact sources already identified in the same region are mostly associated with filaments. However, surface densities in excess of the expected critical values for high-mass star formation are only found on the filaments, indicating that these structures are necessary to channel material into the clumps. Furthermore, we analyze the gravitational stability of filaments and discuss their relationship with star formation.

  10. Alma observations of massive molecular gas filaments encasing radio bubbles in the Phoenix cluster

    DOE PAGES

    Russell, H. R.; McDonald, M.; McNamara, B. R.; ...

    2017-02-14

    We report new ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) line emission from themore » $$2.1\\pm0.3\\times10^{10}\\rm\\thinspace M_{\\odot}$$ molecular gas reservoir in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster. The cold molecular gas is fuelling a vigorous starburst at a rate of $$500-800\\rm\\thinspace M_{\\odot}\\rm\\; yr^{-1}$$ and powerful black hole activity in the form of both intense quasar radiation and radio jets. The radio jets have inflated huge bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot, X-ray atmospheres surrounding the host galaxy. The ALMA observations show that extended filaments of molecular gas, each $$10-20\\rm\\; kpc$$ long with a mass of several billion solar masses, are located along the peripheries of the radio bubbles. The smooth velocity gradients and narrow line widths along each filament reveal massive, ordered molecular gas flows around each bubble, which are inconsistent with gravitational free-fall. The molecular clouds have been lifted directly by the radio bubbles, or formed via thermal instabilities induced in low entropy gas lifted in the updraft of the bubbles. These new data provide compelling evidence for close coupling between the radio bubbles and the cold gas, which is essential to explain the self-regulation of feedback. As a result, the very feedback mechanism that heats hot atmospheres and suppresses star formation may also paradoxically stimulate production of the cold gas required to sustain feedback in massive galaxies.« less

  11. Multiple crystal structures of actin dimers and their implications for interactions in the actin filament

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Michael R.; Kudryashov, D. S.; Pashkov, Inna; Adisetiyo, Helty; Reisler, Emil; Yeates, Todd O.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of actin in its monomeric form is known at high resolution, while the structure of filamentous F-actin is only understood at considerably lower resolution. Knowing pre­cisely how the monomers of actin fit together would lead to a deeper understanding of the dynamic behavior of the actin filament. Here, a series of crystal structures of actin dimers are reported which were prepared by cross-linking in either the longitudinal or the lateral direction in the filament state. Laterally cross-linked dimers, comprised of monomers belonging to different protofilaments, are found to adopt configurations in crystals that are not related to the native structure of filamentous actin. In contrast, multiple structures of longitudinal dimers consistently reveal the same interface between monomers within a single protofilament. The re­appearance of the same longitudinal interface in multiple crystal structures adds weight to arguments that the interface visualized is similar to that in actin filaments. Highly conserved atomic interactions involving residues 199–205 and 287–291 are highlighted. PMID:18391412

  12. X-ray structures associated with disappearing H-alpha filaments in active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the relationship between active region disappearing H-alpha filaments and the associated coronal X-ray structures observed both before the disappearance event and afterwards. The events chosen for the study were selected from a list of active region X-ray transients observed in the images from the X-ray telescope on Skylab and from a list compiled by Webb (1976) of sudden disappearances of filaments during the Skylab period. Results indicate no distinction between the disappearing and the remaining active region filaments in terms of their pre-event associated X-ray emission features. However, X-ray brightenings were associated in a nearly one-to-one correspondence with disappearing portions of the filaments.

  13. Mini-chromosome maintenance complexes form a filament to remodel DNA structure and topology

    PubMed Central

    Slaymaker, Ian M.; Fu, Yang; Toso, Daniel B.; Ranatunga, Nimna; Brewster, Aaron; Forsburg, Susan L.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins is associated with genomic instability and cancer. MCM complexes are recruited to replication origins for genome duplication. Paradoxically, MCM proteins are in excess than the number of origins and are associated with chromatin regions away from the origins during G1 and S phases. Here, we report an unusually wide left-handed filament structure for an archaeal MCM, as determined by X-ray and electron microscopy. The crystal structure reveals that an α-helix bundle formed between two neighboring subunits plays a critical role in filament formation. The filament has a remarkably strong electro-positive surface spiraling along the inner filament channel for DNA binding. We show that this MCM filament binding to DNA causes dramatic DNA topology change. This newly identified function of MCM to change DNA topology may imply a wider functional role for MCM in DNA metabolisms beyond helicase function. Finally, using yeast genetics, we show that the inter-subunit interactions, important for MCM filament formation, play a role for cell growth and survival. PMID:23361460

  14. Sarcomere-length dependence of myosin filament structure in skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    PubMed

    Reconditi, Massimo; Brunello, Elisabetta; Fusi, Luca; Linari, Marco; Martinez, Manuel Fernandez; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Irving, Malcolm; Piazzesi, Gabriella

    2014-03-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were recorded at beamline ID02 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility from small bundles of skeletal muscle fibres from Rana esculenta at sarcomere lengths between 2.1 and 3.5 μm at 4°C. The intensities of the X-ray reflections from resting fibres associated with the quasi-helical order of the myosin heads and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) decreased in the sarcomere length range 2.6-3.0 μm but were constant outside it, suggesting that an OFF conformation of the thick filament is maintained by an interaction between MyBP-C and the thin filaments. During active isometric contraction the intensity of the M3 reflection from the regular repeat of the myosin heads along the filaments decreased in proportion to the overlap between thick and thin filaments, with no change in its interference fine structure. Thus, myosin heads in the regions of the thick filaments that do not overlap with thin filaments are highly disordered during isometric contraction, in contrast to their quasi-helical order at rest. Heads in the overlap region that belong to two-headed myosin molecules that are fully detached from actin are also highly disordered, in contrast to the detached partners of actin-attached heads. These results provide strong support for the concept of a regulatory structural transition in the thick filament involving changes in both the organisation of the myosin heads on its surface and the axial periodicity of the myosin tails in its backbone, mediated by an interaction between MyBP-C and the thin filaments.

  15. Cryo-electron microscopy structure of human peroxiredoxin-3 filament reveals the assembly of a putative chaperone.

    PubMed

    Radjainia, Mazdak; Venugopal, Hariprasad; Desfosses, Ambroise; Phillips, Amy J; Yewdall, N Amy; Hampton, Mark B; Gerrard, Juliet A; Mitra, Alok K

    2015-05-05

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a ubiquitous class of thiol-dependent peroxidases that play an important role in the protection and response of cells to oxidative stress. The catalytic unit of typical 2-Cys Prxs are homodimers, which can self-associate to form complex assemblies that are hypothesized to have signaling and chaperone activity. Mitochondrial Prx3 forms dodecameric toroids, which can further stack to form filaments, the so-called high-molecular-weight (HMW) form that has putative holdase activity. We used single-particle analysis and helical processing of electron cryomicroscopy images of human Prx3 filaments induced by low pH to generate a ∼7-Å resolution 3D structure of the HMW form, the first such structure for a 2-Cys Prx. The pseudo-atomic model reveals interactions that promote the stacking of the toroids and shows that unlike previously reported data, the structure can accommodate a partially folded C terminus. The HMW filament lumen displays hydrophobic patches, which we hypothesize bestow holdase activity.

  16. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms behind cellulase production in Trichoderma reesei, the hyper-cellulolytic filamentous fungus.

    PubMed

    Shida, Yosuke; Furukawa, Takanori; Ogasawara, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is a potent cellulase producer and the best-studied cellulolytic fungus. A lot of investigations not only on glycoside hydrolases produced by T. reesei, but also on the machinery controlling gene expression of these enzyme have made this fungus a model organism for cellulolytic fungi. We have investigated the T. reesei strain including mutants developed in Japan in detail to understand the molecular mechanisms that control the cellulase gene expression, the biochemical and morphological aspects that could favor this phenotype, and have attempted to generate novel strains that may be appropriate for industrial use. Subsequently, we developed recombinant strains by combination of these insights and the heterologous-efficient saccharifing enzymes. Resulting enzyme preparations were highly effective for saccharification of various biomass. In this review, we present some of the salient findings from the recent biochemical, morphological, and molecular analyses of this remarkable cellulase hyper-producing fungus.

  17. Self-Oligomerizing Structure of the Flagellar Cap Protein FliD and Its Implication in Filament Assembly.

    PubMed

    Song, Wan Seok; Cho, So Yeon; Hong, Ho Jeong; Park, Sun Cheol; Yoon, Sung-Il

    2017-03-24

    FliD is a self-oligomerizing structural protein that caps the growing end of the bacterial flagellar filament. FliD also plays a key role in the flagellar system by continuously adding a new flagellin protein to the tip of the filament. To structurally characterize FliD oligomerization and to provide a FliD-mediated flagellin polymerization mechanism, we have determined the crystal structures of FliD proteins from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ecFliD and stFliD, respectively). ecFliD consists of three domains (D1, D2, and D3) and forms a hexamer plate of the D2 and D3 domains that resembles a six-pointed star with legs consisting of the D1 domain. In contrast, the D2 and D3 domains of stFliD assemble into a pentamer as a five-pointed star plate. Despite their distinct oligomeric states, ecFliD and stFliD engage a common molecular surface for oligomerization. FliD also features interdomain and intersubunit flexibility, suggesting that FliD reorganizes its domains and adjacent subunits depending on the FliD binding partner. The similarity of the FliD shape to flagellin and the structural dynamics of FliD led us to propose a FliD-catalyzed filament elongation mechanism. In this model, FliD occupies a position in place of a nascent flagellin until the flagellin reaches the growing end of the filament, and then, FliD moves aside to repeat the positional replacement.

  18. Structural basis for heteromeric assembly and perinuclear organization of keratin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Kim, Min-Sung; Chung, Byung Min; Leahy, Daniel J; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    There is as yet no high-resolution data regarding the structure and organization of keratin intermediate filaments, which are obligate heteropolymers providing vital mechanical support in epithelia. We report the crystal structure of interacting 2B regions from the central coiled-coil domains of keratins 5 and 14 (K5 and K14), expressed in progenitor keratinocytes of epidermis. The interface of the K5–K14 coiled-coil heterodimer has asymmetric salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts, and its surface exhibits a notable charge polarization. A trans-dimer homotypic disulfide bond involving Cys367 in K14's stutter region occurs in the crystal and in skin keratinocytes, where it is concentrated in a keratin filament cage enveloping the nucleus. We show that K14-Cys367 impacts nuclear shape in cultured keratinocytes and that mouse epidermal keratinocytes lacking K14 show aberrations in nuclear structure, highlighting a new function for keratin filaments. PMID:22705788

  19. Myosin filament sliding through the Z-disc relates striated muscle fibre structure to function.

    PubMed

    Rode, Christian; Siebert, Tobias; Tomalka, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-03-16

    Striated muscle contraction requires intricate interactions of microstructures. The classic textbook assumption that myosin filaments are compressed at the meshed Z-disc during striated muscle fibre contraction conflicts with experimental evidence. For example, myosin filaments are too stiff to be compressed sufficiently by the muscular force, and, unlike compressed springs, the muscle fibres do not restore their resting length after contractions to short lengths. Further, the dependence of a fibre's maximum contraction velocity on sarcomere length is unexplained to date. In this paper, we present a structurally consistent model of sarcomere contraction that reconciles these findings with the well-accepted sliding filament and crossbridge theories. The few required model parameters are taken from the literature or obtained from reasoning based on structural arguments. In our model, the transition from hexagonal to tetragonal actin filament arrangement near the Z-disc together with a thoughtful titin arrangement enables myosin filament sliding through the Z-disc. This sliding leads to swivelled crossbridges in the adjacent half-sarcomere that dampen contraction. With no fitting of parameters required, the model predicts straightforwardly the fibre's entire force-length behaviour and the dependence of the maximum contraction velocity on sarcomere length. Our model enables a structurally and functionally consistent view of the contractile machinery of the striated fibre with possible implications for muscle diseases and evolution. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Dark Ribbons Propagating and Sweeping Across Extreme Ultraviolet Structures After Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Junmin; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong

    2015-05-01

    With observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we first report that dark ribbons (DRs) moved apart from the filament channel and swept across EUV structures after filament eruptions on 2013 June 23 and 2012 February 10 and 24, respectively. In the first event, the DR with a length of 168 Mm appeared at 100 Mm to the northwest of the filament channel, where the filament erupted 15 hr previously. The DR moved toward the northwest with the different sections having different velocities, ranging from 0.3 to 1.6 km s-1. When the DR’s middle part swept across a strong EUV structure, the motion of this part was blocked, appearing to deflect the DR. With the DR propagation, the connection of the surrounding EUV structures gradually changed. After one day passed, the DR eventually disappeared. In the other two events, the dynamic evolution of the DRs was similar to that in the first event. Based on the observations, we speculate that the reconnection during the filament eruption changes the configuration of the surrounding magnetic fields systematically. During the reconnection process, magnetic fields are deflecting and the former arbitrarily distributed magnetic fields are rearranged along specific directions. The deflection of magnetic fields results in an instantaneous void region where the magnetic strength is smaller and the plasma density is lower. Consequently, the void region is observed as a DR and propagates outward with the reconnection developing.

  1. DARK RIBBONS PROPAGATING AND SWEEPING ACROSS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET STRUCTURES AFTER FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Junmin; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn

    2015-05-20

    With observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we first report that dark ribbons (DRs) moved apart from the filament channel and swept across EUV structures after filament eruptions on 2013 June 23 and 2012 February 10 and 24, respectively. In the first event, the DR with a length of 168 Mm appeared at 100 Mm to the northwest of the filament channel, where the filament erupted 15 hr previously. The DR moved toward the northwest with the different sections having different velocities, ranging from 0.3 to 1.6 km s{sup −1}. When the DR’s middle part swept across a strong EUV structure, the motion of this part was blocked, appearing to deflect the DR. With the DR propagation, the connection of the surrounding EUV structures gradually changed. After one day passed, the DR eventually disappeared. In the other two events, the dynamic evolution of the DRs was similar to that in the first event. Based on the observations, we speculate that the reconnection during the filament eruption changes the configuration of the surrounding magnetic fields systematically. During the reconnection process, magnetic fields are deflecting and the former arbitrarily distributed magnetic fields are rearranged along specific directions. The deflection of magnetic fields results in an instantaneous void region where the magnetic strength is smaller and the plasma density is lower. Consequently, the void region is observed as a DR and propagates outward with the reconnection developing.

  2. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  3. Carbon doping in molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs from a heated graphite filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, R. J.; Nottenberg, R. N.; Schubert, E. F.; Walker, J. F.; Ryan, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon doping of GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been obtained for the first time by use of a heated graphite filament. Controlled carbon acceptor concentrations over the range of 10 to the 17th-10 to the 20th/cu cm were achieved by resistively heating a graphite filament with a direct current power supply. Capacitance-voltage, p/n junction and secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements indicate that there is negligible diffusion of carbon during growth and with postgrowth rapid thermal annealing. Carbon was used for p-type doping in the base of Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Current gains greater than 100 and near-ideal emitter heterojunctions were obtained in transistors with a carbon base doping of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. These preliminary results indicate that carbon doping from a solid graphite source may be an attractive substitute for beryllium, which is known to have a relatively high diffusion coefficient in GaAs.

  4. Carbon doping in molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs from a heated graphite filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, R. J.; Nottenberg, R. N.; Schubert, E. F.; Walker, J. F.; Ryan, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon doping of GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been obtained for the first time by use of a heated graphite filament. Controlled carbon acceptor concentrations over the range of 10 to the 17th-10 to the 20th/cu cm were achieved by resistively heating a graphite filament with a direct current power supply. Capacitance-voltage, p/n junction and secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements indicate that there is negligible diffusion of carbon during growth and with postgrowth rapid thermal annealing. Carbon was used for p-type doping in the base of Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Current gains greater than 100 and near-ideal emitter heterojunctions were obtained in transistors with a carbon base doping of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. These preliminary results indicate that carbon doping from a solid graphite source may be an attractive substitute for beryllium, which is known to have a relatively high diffusion coefficient in GaAs.

  5. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  6. Structure of a longitudinal actin dimer assembled by tandem w domains: implications for actin filament nucleation.

    PubMed

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-10-15

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  7. FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2016-08-01

    FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

  8. Viscoelasticity of the sarcomere matrix of skeletal muscles. The titin-myosin composite filament is a dual-stage molecular spring.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K; McCarter, R; Wright, J; Beverly, J; Ramirez-Mitchell, R

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical roles of sarcomere-associated cytoskeletal lattices were investigated by studying the resting tension-sarcomere length curves of mechanically skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers over a wide range of sarcomere strain. Correlative immunoelectron microscopy of the elastic titin filaments of the endosarcomeric lattice revealed biphasic extensibility behaviors and provided a structural interpretation of the multiphasic tension-length curves. We propose that the reversible change of contour length of the extensible segment of titin between the Z line and the end of thick filaments underlies the exponential rise of resting tension. At and beyond an elastic limit near 3.8 microns, a portion of the anchored titin segment that adheres to thick filaments is released from the distal ends of thick filament. This increase in extensible length of titin results in a net length increase in the unstrained extensible segment, thereby lowering the stiffness of the fiber, lengthening the slack sarcomere length, and shifting the yield point in postyield sarcomeres. Thus, the titin-myosin composite filament behaves as a dual-stage molecular spring, consisting of an elastic connector segment for normal response and a longer latent segment that is recruited at and beyond the elastic limit of the sarcomere. Exosarcomeric intermediate filaments contribute to resting tension only above 4.5 microns. We conclude that the interlinked endo- and exosarcomeric lattices are both viscoelastic force-bearing elements. These distinct cytoskeletal lattices appear to operate over two ranges of sarcomere strains and collectively enable myofibrils to respond viscoelastically over a broad range of sarcomere and fiber lengths. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8494977

  9. The biology of desmin filaments: how do mutations affect their structure, assembly, and organisation?

    PubMed

    Bär, Harald; Strelkov, Sergei V; Sjöberg, Gunnar; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2004-11-01

    Desmin, the major intermediate filament (IF) protein of muscle, is evolutionarily highly conserved from shark to man. Recently, an increasing number of mutations of the desmin gene has been described to be associated with human diseases such as certain skeletal and cardiac myopathies. These diseases are histologically characterised by intracellular aggregates containing desmin and various associated proteins. Although there is progress regarding our knowledge on the cellular function of desmin within the cytoskeleton, the impact of each distinct mutation is currently not understood at all. In order to get insight into how such mutations affect filament assembly and their integration into the cytoskeleton we need to establish IF structure at atomic detail. Recent progress in determining the dimer structure of the desmin-related IF-protein vimentin allows us to assess how such mutations may affect desmin filament architecture.

  10. Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A large scale 13CO map (containing 33,000 spectra) of the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of Orion is presented which contains the Orion Nebula, NGC1977, and the LI641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. This morphology may result from the effects of star formation in the region or embedded magnetic fields in the cloud. We suggest a simple picture for the evolution of the Orion-A cloud and the formation of the major filament. A rotating proto-cloud (counter rotating with respect to the galaxy) contians a b-field aligned with the galaxtic plane. The northern protion of this cloud collapsed first, perhaps triggered by the pressure of the Ori I OB association. The magnetic field combined with the anisotropic pressure produced by the OB-association breaks the symmetry of the pancake instability, a filament rather than a disc is produced. The growth of instabilities in the filament formed sub-condensations which are recent sites of star formation.

  11. Molecular mimicry in virus infection: crossreaction of measles virus phosphoprotein or of herpes simplex virus protein with human intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Fujinami, R S; Oldstone, M B; Wroblewska, Z; Frankel, M E; Koprowski, H

    1983-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrate that the phosphoprotein of measles virus and a protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 crossreact with an intermediate filament protein of human cells. This intermediate filament protein, probably vimentin, has a molecular weight of 52,000, whereas the molecular weights of the measles viral phosphoprotein and the herpes virus protein are 70,000 and 146,000, respectively. Crossreactivity was shown by immunofluorescent staining of infected and uninfected cells and by immunoblotting. The monoclonal antibody against measles virus phosphoprotein did not react with herpes simplex virus protein and vice versa, indicating that these monoclonal antibodies recognize different antigenic determinants on the intermediate filament molecule. The significance of these results in explaining the appearance of autoantibodies during virus infections in humans is discussed. Images PMID:6300911

  12. Myosin light chain phosphorylation enhances contraction of heart muscle via structural changes in both thick and thin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Contraction of heart muscle is triggered by calcium binding to the actin-containing thin filaments but modulated by structural changes in the myosin-containing thick filaments. We used phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (cRLC) by the cardiac isoform of its specific kinase to elucidate mechanisms of thick filament-mediated contractile regulation in demembranated trabeculae from the rat right ventricle. cRLC phosphorylation enhanced active force and its calcium sensitivity and altered thick filament structure as reported by bifunctional rhodamine probes on the cRLC: the myosin head domains became more perpendicular to the filament axis. The effects of cRLC phosphorylation on thick filament structure and its calcium sensitivity were mimicked by increasing sarcomere length or by deleting the N terminus of the cRLC. Changes in thick filament structure were highly cooperative with respect to either calcium concentration or extent of cRLC phosphorylation. Probes on unphosphorylated myosin heads reported similar structural changes when neighboring heads were phosphorylated, directly demonstrating signaling between myosin heads. Moreover probes on troponin showed that calcium sensitization by cRLC phosphorylation is mediated by the thin filament, revealing a signaling pathway between thick and thin filaments that is still present when active force is blocked by Blebbistatin. These results show that coordinated and cooperative structural changes in the thick and thin filaments are fundamental to the physiological regulation of contractility in the heart. This integrated dual-filament concept of contractile regulation may aid understanding of functional effects of mutations in the protein components of both filaments associated with heart disease. PMID:27162358

  13. Structure meets function: actin filaments and myosin motors in the axon.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Don B; Gallo, Gianluca

    2014-04-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the organization and roles of actin filaments, and associated myosin motor proteins, in regulating the structure and function of the axon shaft. 'Patches' of actin filaments have emerged as a major type of actin filament organization in axons. In the distal axon, patches function as precursors to the formation of filopodia and branches. At the axon initial segment, patches locally capture membranous organelles and contribute to polarized trafficking. The trapping function of patches at the initial segment can be ascribed to interactions with myosin motors, and likely also applies to patches in the more distal axon. Finally, submembranous rings of actin filaments were recently described in axons, which form an actin-spectrin cytoskeleton, likely contributing to the maintenance of axon integrity. Continued investigation into the roles of axonal actin filaments and myosins will shed light on fundamental aspects of the development, adult function and the repair of axons in the nervous system. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. CORTICAL CYTOPLASMIC FILAMENTS OF CLEAVING EGGS: A STRUCTURAL ELEMENT CORRESPONDING TO THE CONTRACTILE RING

    PubMed Central

    Szollosi, Daniel

    1970-01-01

    A sheath consisting of filaments 50–70 A in diameter has been demonstrated in association with the expanded, leading margins of the cleavage furrow in unilaterally and symmetrically cleaving eggs of a jellyfish and a polychaete worm, respectively. The observations suggest that the filament system might provide a structural basis for the existence of the contractile gel that, according to a hypothesis by Marsland and Landau, accomplishes cleavage. The filamentous sheath is present only in the furrow region and is arranged in an arcuate manner in unilaterally cleaving eggs and circumferentially in symmetrical cleavage. The filaments appear to be of finite length, and a number of them must overlap to span the length of the furrow. Contraction may be accomplished if the filaments slide relative to each other. However, contraction per se was experimentally not demonstrated in the studied systems. The disappearance of microvilli and the merocrine type secretion of mucoid droplets at the interdigitating or "spinning" membrane region of unilateral cleavage suggest that the unfolding of a pleated membrane and the insertion of intracytoplasmic membranes might contribute, at least in part, to the necessary extra cell membrane. PMID:4390970

  15. Structure, sarcomeric organization, and thin filament binding of cardiac myosin-binding protein-C.

    PubMed

    Craig, Roger; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Mun, Ji Young; Torre, Iratxe; Luther, Pradeep K

    2014-03-01

    Myosin-binding protein-C (MyBP-C) is an accessory protein of the myosin filaments of vertebrate striated muscle. In the heart, it plays a key role in modulating contractility in response to β-adrenergic stimulation. Mutations in the cardiac isoform (cMyBP-C) are a leading cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Understanding cMyBP-C function and its role in disease requires knowledge of the structure of the molecule, its organization in the sarcomere, and its interactions with other sarcomeric proteins. Here we review the main structural features of this modular, elongated molecule and the properties of some of its key domains. We describe observations suggesting that the bulk of the molecule extends perpendicular to the thick filament, enabling it to reach neighboring thin filaments in the sarcomere. We review structural and functional evidence for interaction of its N-terminal domains with actin and how this may modulate thin filament activation. We also discuss the effects that phosphorylation of cMyBP-C has on some of these structural features and how this might relate to cMyBP-C function in the beating heart.

  16. GTPase Activity, Structure, and Mechanical Properties of Filaments Assembled from Bacterial Cytoskeleton Protein MreB

    PubMed Central

    Esue, Osigwe; Wirtz, Denis; Tseng, Yiider

    2006-01-01

    MreB, a major component of the recently discovered bacterial cytoskeleton, displays a structure homologous to its eukaryotic counterpart actin. Here, we study the assembly and mechanical properties of Thermotoga maritima MreB in the presence of different nucleotides in vitro. We found that GTP, not ADP or GDP, can mediate MreB assembly into filamentous structures as effectively as ATP. Upon MreB assembly, both GTP and ATP release the gamma phosphate at similar rates. Therefore, MreB is an equally effective ATPase and GTPase. Electron microscopy and quantitative rheology suggest that the morphologies and micromechanical properties of filamentous ATP-MreB and GTP-MreB are similar. In contrast, mammalian actin assembly is favored in the presence of ATP over GTP. These results indicate that, despite high structural homology of their monomers, T. maritima MreB and actin filaments display different assembly, morphology, micromechanics, and nucleotide-binding specificity. Furthermore, the biophysical properties of T. maritima MreB filaments, including high rigidity and propensity to form bundles, suggest a mechanism by which MreB helical structure may be involved in imposing a cylindrical architecture on rod-shaped bacterial cells. PMID:16428401

  17. Structural basis for the prion-like MAVS filaments in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; He, Xiaojing; Zheng, Hui; Huang, Lily J; Hou, Fajian; Yu, Zhiheng; de la Cruz, Michael Jason; Borkowski, Brian; Zhang, Xuewu; Chen, Zhijian J; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein is required for innate immune responses against RNA viruses. In virus-infected cells MAVS forms prion-like aggregates to activate antiviral signaling cascades, but the underlying structural mechanism is unknown. Here we report cryo-electron microscopic structures of the helical filaments formed by both the N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) of MAVS and a truncated MAVS lacking part of the proline-rich region and the C-terminal transmembrane domain. Both structures are left-handed three-stranded helical filaments, revealing specific interfaces between individual CARD subunits that are dictated by electrostatic interactions between neighboring strands and hydrophobic interactions within each strand. Point mutations at multiple locations of these two interfaces impaired filament formation and antiviral signaling. Super-resolution imaging of virus-infected cells revealed rod-shaped MAVS clusters on mitochondria. These results elucidate the structural mechanism of MAVS polymerization, and explain how an α-helical domain uses distinct chemical interactions to form self-perpetuating filaments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01489.001 PMID:24569476

  18. Structural basis for the prion-like MAVS filaments in antiviral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; He, Xiaojing; Zheng, Hui; Huang, Lily J; Hou, Fajian; Yu, Zhiheng; de la Cruz, Michael Jason; Borkowski, Brian; Zhang, Xuewu; Chen, Zhijian J; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein is required for innate immune responses against RNA viruses. In virus-infected cells MAVS forms prion-like aggregates to activate antiviral signaling cascades, but the underlying structural mechanism is unknown. Here we report cryo-electron microscopic structures of the helical filaments formed by both the N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) of MAVS and a truncated MAVS lacking part of the proline-rich region and the C-terminal transmembrane domain. Both structures are left-handed three-stranded helical filaments, revealing specific interfaces between individual CARD subunits that are dictated by electrostatic interactions between neighboring strands and hydrophobic interactions within each strand. Point mutations at multiple locations of these two interfaces impaired filament formation and antiviral signaling. Super-resolution imaging of virus-infected cells revealed rod-shaped MAVS clusters on mitochondria. These results elucidate the structural mechanism of MAVS polymerization, and explain how an α-helical domain uses distinct chemical interactions to form self-perpetuating filaments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01489.001.

  19. Specific Transformation of Assembly with Actin Filaments and Molecular Motors in a Cell-Sized Self-Emerged Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kingo; Negishi, Makiko; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Hayashi, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Eukaryotes, by the same combination of cytoskeleton and molecular motor, for example actin filament and myosin, can generate a variety of movements. For this diversity, the organization of biological machineries caused by the confinement and/or crowding effects of internal living cells, may play very important roles.

  20. Structure of the coat protein in fd filamentous bacteriophage particles determined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zeri, Ana Carolina; Mesleh, Michael F.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    The atomic resolution structure of fd coat protein determined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy of magnetically aligned filamentous bacteriophage particles differs from that previously determined by x-ray fiber diffraction. Most notably, the 50-residue protein is not a single curved helix, but rather is a nearly ideal straight helix between residues 7 and 38, where there is a distinct kink, and then a straight helix with a different orientation between residues 39 and 49. Residues 1–5 have been shown to be mobile and unstructured, and proline 6 terminates the helix. The structure of the coat protein in virus particles, in combination with the structure of the membrane-bound form of the same protein in bilayers, also recently determined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, provides insight into the viral assembly process. In addition to their roles in molecular biology and biotechnology, the filamentous bacteriophages continue to serve as model systems for the development of experimental methods for determining the structures of proteins in biological supramolecular assemblies. New NMR results include the complete sequential assignment of the two-dimensional polarization inversion spin-exchange at the magic angle spectrum of a uniformly 15N-labeled 50-residue protein in a 1.6 × 107 Da particle in solution, and the calculation of the three-dimensional structure of the protein from orientational restraints with an accuracy equivalent to an rms deviation of ≈1Å. PMID:12750469

  1. Solid-state NMR studies of the dynamics and structure of mouse keratin intermediate filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.W.; Torchia, D.A.; Steinert, P.M.

    1988-07-26

    The molecular dynamics and structural organization of mouse epidermal keratin intermediate filaments (IF) have been studied via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on IF labeled both in vivo and in vitro with isotopically enriched amino acids. As a probe of the organization of the peripheral glycine-rich end domains of the IF, carbon-13 NMR experiments have been performed on subfilamentous forms (prekeratin) and on IF reassembled in vitro that had been labeled with either (1-/sup 13/C)glycine or (2-/sup 13/C)glycine, as more than 90% of the glycines of the keratins are located in the end domains. Measurements of carbon relaxation times, nuclear Overhauser enhancements, and signal intensities show that the motions of the peptide backbone in the end domains are effectively isotropic. These results indicate that the end domains of IF are remarkably flexible and have little or no structural order. To probe the structural organization of the coiled-coil rod domains of the IF, separate samples of native keratin IF, raised in primary tissue culture, were labeled with L-(1-/sup 13/C)leucine, L-(/sup 2/H/sub 10/)leucine, or L-(2,3,3-/sup 2/H/sub 3/)leucine, as greater than 90% of the leucyl residues of the keratin IF types studied are located in the coiled coils which form the central core of IF. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on IF labeled with deuteriated leucines indeed reveal a marked degree of peptide backbone rigidity within the coiled coils, confirming the initial conclusions of the carbon-13 data. These data, demonstrating relative peptide backbone rigidity yet side-chain flexibility, are interpreted to mean that the coiled coils of these keratin IF are not tightly packed together but rather form a somewhat looser structure which permits a significant degree of side-chain mobility.

  2. Specific Glucoside Transporters Influence Septal Structure and Function in the Filamentous, Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; López-Igual, Rocío; Frías, José E; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Wolk, C Peter; Flores, Enrique

    2017-04-01

    When deprived of combined nitrogen, some filamentous cyanobacteria contain two cell types: vegetative cells that fix CO2 through oxygenic photosynthesis and heterocysts that are specialized in N2 fixation. In the diazotrophic filament, the vegetative cells provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon (mainly in the form of sucrose) and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with combined nitrogen. Septal junctions traverse peptidoglycan through structures known as nanopores and appear to mediate intercellular molecular transfer that can be traced with fluorescent markers, including the sucrose analog esculin (a coumarin glucoside) that is incorporated into the cells. Uptake of esculin by the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was inhibited by the α-glucosides sucrose and maltose. Analysis of Anabaena mutants identified components of three glucoside transporters that move esculin into the cells: GlsC (Alr4781) and GlsP (All0261) are an ATP-binding subunit and a permease subunit of two different ABC transporters, respectively, and HepP (All1711) is a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein that was shown previously to be involved in formation of the heterocyst envelope. Transfer of fluorescent markers (especially calcein) between vegetative cells of Anabaena was impaired by mutation of glucoside transporter genes. GlsP and HepP interact in bacterial two-hybrid assays with the septal junction-related protein SepJ, and GlsC was found to be necessary for the formation of a normal number of septal peptidoglycan nanopores and for normal subcellular localization of SepJ. Therefore, beyond their possible role in nutrient uptake in Anabaena, glucoside transporters influence the structure and function of septal junctions.IMPORTANCE Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria have the ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and to assimilate atmospheric CO2 and N2 These organisms grow as filaments that fix these gases specifically in vegetative

  3. Specific Glucoside Transporters Influence Septal Structure and Function in the Filamentous, Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; López-Igual, Rocío; Frías, José E.; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J.; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Wolk, C. Peter

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT When deprived of combined nitrogen, some filamentous cyanobacteria contain two cell types: vegetative cells that fix CO2 through oxygenic photosynthesis and heterocysts that are specialized in N2 fixation. In the diazotrophic filament, the vegetative cells provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon (mainly in the form of sucrose) and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with combined nitrogen. Septal junctions traverse peptidoglycan through structures known as nanopores and appear to mediate intercellular molecular transfer that can be traced with fluorescent markers, including the sucrose analog esculin (a coumarin glucoside) that is incorporated into the cells. Uptake of esculin by the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was inhibited by the α-glucosides sucrose and maltose. Analysis of Anabaena mutants identified components of three glucoside transporters that move esculin into the cells: GlsC (Alr4781) and GlsP (All0261) are an ATP-binding subunit and a permease subunit of two different ABC transporters, respectively, and HepP (All1711) is a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein that was shown previously to be involved in formation of the heterocyst envelope. Transfer of fluorescent markers (especially calcein) between vegetative cells of Anabaena was impaired by mutation of glucoside transporter genes. GlsP and HepP interact in bacterial two-hybrid assays with the septal junction-related protein SepJ, and GlsC was found to be necessary for the formation of a normal number of septal peptidoglycan nanopores and for normal subcellular localization of SepJ. Therefore, beyond their possible role in nutrient uptake in Anabaena, glucoside transporters influence the structure and function of septal junctions. IMPORTANCE Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria have the ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and to assimilate atmospheric CO2 and N2. These organisms grow as filaments that fix these gases specifically in

  4. Nanoscopic structural rearrangements of the Cu-filament in conductive-bridge memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celano, U.; Giammaria, G.; Goux, L.; Belmonte, A.; Jurczak, M.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-07-01

    The electrochemical reactions triggering resistive switching in conductive-bridge resistive random access memory (CBRAM) are spatially confined in few tens of nm3. The formation and dissolution of nanoscopic Cu-filaments rely on the displacement of ions in such confined volume, and it is driven by the electric field induced ion migration and nanoscaled redox reactions. The stochastic nature of these fundamental processes leads to a large variability of the device performance. In this work, a combination of two- and three-dimensional scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques are used to study the conductive filament (CF) formation, rupture and its nanoscopic structural rearrangements. The high spatial confinement of our approach enables to locally induce RS in a confined area and image it in 3D. A conical shape of the CF is consistently observed, indicating that the ion migration is the rate limiting step in the filament formation when using high quality dielectrics as switching layers. The sub-10 nm electrical contact size of the AFM tip is used to study the filament's dissolution and detect the hopping conduction of Cu during the CF rupture. We consistently observe a tunnel gap formation associated with the tip-induced filament reset. Finally, aiming to match the fundamental understanding with the integrated device operations, we apply scalpel SPM to failed memory cells and directly observe the appearance of filament multiplicity as a major source of failures and variability in CBRAM.The electrochemical reactions triggering resistive switching in conductive-bridge resistive random access memory (CBRAM) are spatially confined in few tens of nm3. The formation and dissolution of nanoscopic Cu-filaments rely on the displacement of ions in such confined volume, and it is driven by the electric field induced ion migration and nanoscaled redox reactions. The stochastic nature of these fundamental processes leads to a large variability of the device performance. In this

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Cell Fusion and Heterokaryon Formation in Filamentous Fungi.

    PubMed

    Daskalov, Asen; Heller, Jens; Herzog, Stephanie; Fleißner, André; Glass, N Louise

    2017-03-01

    For the majority of fungal species, the somatic body of an individual is a network of interconnected cells sharing a common cytoplasm and organelles. This syncytial organization contributes to an efficient distribution of resources, energy, and biochemical signals. Cell fusion is a fundamental process for fungal development, colony establishment, and habitat exploitation and can occur between hyphal cells of an individual colony or between colonies of genetically distinct individuals. One outcome of cell fusion is the establishment of a stable heterokaryon, culminating in benefits for each individual via shared resources or being of critical importance for the sexual or parasexual cycle of many fungal species. However, a second outcome of cell fusion between genetically distinct strains is formation of unstable heterokaryons and the induction of a programmed cell death reaction in the heterokaryotic cells. This reaction of nonself rejection, which is termed heterokaryon (or vegetative) incompatibility, is widespread in the fungal kingdom and acts as a defense mechanism against genome exploitation and mycoparasitism. Here, we review the currently identified molecular players involved in the process of somatic cell fusion and its regulation in filamentous fungi. Thereafter, we summarize the knowledge of the molecular determinants and mechanism of heterokaryon incompatibility and place this phenomenon in the broader context of biotropic interactions and immunity.

  6. Probing the flexibility of tropomyosin and its binding to filamentous actin using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Barua, Bipasha; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2013-10-15

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is a coiled-coil protein that binds to filamentous actin (F-actin) and regulates its interactions with actin-binding proteins like myosin by moving between three positions on F-actin (the blocked, closed, and open positions). To elucidate the molecular details of Tm flexibility in relation to its binding to F-actin, we conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations for both Tm alone and Tm-F-actin complex in the presence of explicit solvent (total simulation time >400 ns). Based on the simulations, we systematically analyzed the local flexibility of the Tm coiled coil using multiple parameters. We found a good correlation between the regions with high local flexibility and a number of destabilizing regions in Tm, including six clusters of core alanines. Despite the stabilization by F-actin binding, the distribution of local flexibility in Tm is largely unchanged in the absence and presence of F-actin. Our simulations showed variable fluctuations of individual Tm periods from the closed position toward the open position. In addition, we performed Tm-F-actin binding calculations based on the simulation trajectories, which support the importance of Tm flexibility to Tm-F-actin binding. We identified key residues of Tm involved in its dynamic interactions with F-actin, many of which have been found in recent mutational studies to be functionally important, and the rest of which will make promising targets for future mutational experiments.

  7. Multilamellar Structures and Filament Bundles Are Found on the Cell Surface during Bunyavirus Egress

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Sánchez, Laura; Risco, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Inside cells, viruses build specialized compartments for replication and morphogenesis. We observed that virus release associates with specific structures found on the surface of mammalian cells. Cultured adherent cells were infected with a bunyavirus and processed for oriented sectioning and transmission electron microscopy. Imaging of cell basal regions showed sophisticated multilamellar structures (MLS) and extracellular filament bundles with attached viruses. Correlative light and electron microscopy confirmed that both MLS and filaments proliferated during the maximum egress of new viruses. MLS dimensions and structure were reminiscent of those reported for the nanostructures on gecko fingertips, which are responsible for the extraordinary attachment capacity of these lizards. As infected cells with MLS were more resistant to detachment than control cells, we propose an adhesive function for these structures, which would compensate for the loss of adherence during release of new virus progeny. PMID:23799021

  8. Formation of dense structures induced by filament collisions. Correlation of density, kinematics, and magnetic field in the Pipe nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Alves, F. O.; Franco, G. A. P.; Onishi, T.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The Pipe nebula is a molecular cloud that lacks star formation feedback and has a relatively simple morphology and velocity structure. This makes it an ideal target for testing cloud evolution through collisions. Aims: We aim at drawing a comprehensive picture of this relatively simple cloud to better understand the formation and evolution of molecular clouds on large scales. Methods: We use archival data to compare the optical polarization properties, the visual extinction, and the 13CO velocities and linewidths of the entire cloud in order to identify trends among the observables. Results: The Pipe nebula can be roughly divided into two filaments with different orientations and gas velocity ranges: E-W at 2-4 km s-1 and N-S at 6-7 km s-1. The two filaments overlap at the bowl, where the gas shows a velocity gradient spanning from 2 to 7 km s-1. Compared to the rest of the Pipe nebula, the bowl gas appears to be denser and exhibits larger linewidths. In addition, the polarization data at the bowl shows lower angular dispersion and higher polarization degree. Cores in the bowl tend to cluster in space and to follow the 13CO velocity gradient. In the stem, cores tend to cluster in regions with properties similar to those of the bowl. Conclusions: The velocity pattern points to a collision between the filaments in the bowl region. The magnetic field seems to be compressed and strengthened in the shocked region. The proportional increase in density and magnetic field strength by a factor similar to the Alfvénic Mach number suggests a continuous shock at low Alfvénic Mach number under the flux-freezing condition. Shocked regions seem to enhance the formation and clustering of dense cores. A movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  9. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF QUIESCENT FILAMENT CHANNELS OBSERVED BY HINODE/XRT AND STEREO/EUVI

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yingna; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan; Golub, Leon

    2010-09-20

    We present a study of the structure and dynamics of quiescent filament channels observed by Hinode/XRT and STEREO/EUVI at the solar minimum 23/24 from 2006 November to 2008 December. For 12 channels identified on the solar disk (Group I channels), we find that the morphology of the structure on the two sides of the channel is asymmetric in both X-rays and EUV: the eastern side has curved features while the western side has straight features. We interpret the results in terms of a magnetic flux rope model. The asymmetry in the morphology is due to the variation in axial flux of the flux rope along the channel, which causes the field lines from one polarity to turn into the flux rope (curved feature), while the field lines from the other polarity are connected to very distant sources (straight). For most of the 68 channels identified by cavities at the east and west limbs (Group II channels), the asymmetry cannot be clearly identified, which is likely due to the fact that the axial flux may be relatively constant along such channels. Corresponding cavities are identified only for 5 of the 12 Group I channels, while Group II channels are identified for all of the 68 cavity pairs. The studied filament channels are often observed as dark channels in X-rays and EUV. Sheared loops within Group I channels are often seen in X-rays, but are rarely seen in Group II channels as shown in the X-ray Telescope daily synoptic observations. A survey of the dynamics of studied filament channels shows that filament eruptions occur at an average rate of 1.4 filament eruptions per channel per solar rotation.

  10. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  11. High-resolution structure of the presynaptic RAD51 filament on single-stranded DNA by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Short, Judith M.; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shaoxia; Soni, Neelesh; Madhusudhan, Mallur S.; Shivji, Mahmud K.K.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous DNA recombination (HR) by the RAD51 recombinase enables error-free DNA break repair. To execute HR, RAD51 first forms a presynaptic filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA, which catalyses pairing with homologous double-stranded (ds) DNA. Here, we report a structure for the presynaptic human RAD51 filament at 3.5–5.0Å resolution using electron cryo-microscopy. RAD51 encases ssDNA in a helical filament of 103Å pitch, comprising 6.4 protomers per turn, with a rise of 16.1Å and a twist of 56.2°. Inter-protomer distance correlates with rotation of an α-helical region in the core catalytic domain that is juxtaposed to ssDNA, suggesting how the RAD51–DNA interaction modulates protomer spacing and filament pitch. We map Fanconi anaemia-like disease-associated RAD51 mutations, clarifying potential phenotypes. We predict binding sites on the presynaptic filament for two modules present in each BRC repeat of the BRCA2 tumour suppressor, a critical HR mediator. Structural modelling suggests that changes in filament pitch mask or expose one binding site with filament-inhibitory potential, rationalizing the paradoxical ability of the BRC repeats to either stabilize or inhibit filament formation at different steps during HR. Collectively, our findings provide fresh insight into the structural mechanism of HR and its dysregulation in human disease. PMID:27596592

  12. Structure of the Acidianus Filamentous Virus 3 and Comparative Genomics of Related Archaeal Lipothrixviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Gisle; Aramayo, Ricardo; Basta, Tamara; Häring, Monika; Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Chen, Lanming; Rachel, Reinhard; Boisset, Nicolas; Garrett, Roger A.; Prangishvili, David

    2008-01-01

    Four novel filamentous viruses with double-stranded DNA genomes, namely, Acidianus filamentous virus 3 (AFV3), AFV6, AFV7, and AFV8, have been characterized from the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus, and they are assigned to the Betalipothrixvirus genus of the family Lipothrixviridae. The structures of the approximately 2-μm-long virions are similar, and one of them, AFV3, was studied in detail. It consists of a cylindrical envelope containing globular subunits arranged in a helical formation that is unique for any known double-stranded DNA virus. The envelope is 3.1 nm thick and encases an inner core with two parallel rows of protein subunits arranged like a zipper. Each end of the virion is tapered and carries three short filaments. Two major structural proteins were identified as being common to all betalipothrixviruses. The viral genomes were sequenced and analyzed, and they reveal a high level of conservation in both gene content and gene order over large regions, with this similarity extending partly to the earlier described betalipothrixvirus Sulfolobus islandicus filamentous virus. A few predicted gene products of each virus, in addition to the structural proteins, could be assigned specific functions, including a putative helicase involved in Holliday junction branch migration, a nuclease, a protein phosphatase, transcriptional regulators, and glycosyltransferases. The AFV7 genome appears to have undergone intergenomic recombination with a large section of an AFV2-like viral genome, apparently resulting in phenotypic changes, as revealed by the presence of AFV2-like termini in the AFV7 virions. Shared features of the genomes include (i) large inverted terminal repeats exhibiting conserved, regularly spaced direct repeats; (ii) a highly conserved operon encoding the two major structural proteins; (iii) multiple overlapping open reading frames, which may be indicative of gene recoding; (iv) putative 12-bp genetic elements; and (v) partial gene

  13. Density filament and helical field line structures in three dimensional Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritaka, Toseo; Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Yamaura, Yuta; Ishikawa, Taishi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Collisionless shocks mediated by Weibel instability are attracting attention for their relevance to experimental demonstrations of astrophysical shocks in high-intensity laser facilities. The three dimensional structure of Weibel-mediated shocks is investigated through a fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulation. The structures obtained are characterized by the following features: (i) helical magnetic field lines elongated in the direction upstream of the shock region, (ii) high and low density filaments inside the helical field lines. These structures originate from the interaction between counter-streaming plasma flow and magnetic vortexes caused by Weibel instability, and potentially affect the shock formation mechanism.

  14. The role of disulfide bond formation in the structural transition observed in the intermediate filaments of developing hair.

    PubMed

    Bruce Fraser, R D; Parry, David A D

    2012-10-01

    Hair keratin is a composite structure in which intermediate filaments (IF) are embedded in a protein matrix. During the early stages of development in the hair follicle the redox potential is such that the cysteine residues in the IF are maintained in a reduced form. However, at a late stage of development the redox potential changes to produce an oxidizing environment and the IF undergo a structural transition involving both molecular slippage and radial compaction. In our earlier study the changes in the molecular parameters were estimated from knowledge of the sites of artificially induced crosslinks, and it was noted that the changes in these parameters realigned many of the cysteine residues to positions more favorable to disulfide bond formation. As the energy involved in the formation of disulfide bonds is much greater than that of hydrogen bonds or van der Waals interactions the structural transition is likely to be dominated by the requirement that the bonded cysteine residues occur at closely equivalent axial positions. This criterion was used in the present study to obtain more precise values for the molecular parameters in the oxidized fiber than has hitherto been possible. A comparison of the sequences of hair keratins and epidermal keratins suggests that the slippage observed in trichocyte IF during keratinization does not occur in epidermal IF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds.

  16. Nucleoprotein filament formation is the structural basis for bacterial protein H-NS gene silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ci Ji; Lee, Sin Yi; Kenney, Linda J.; Yan, Jie

    2012-07-01

    H-NS is an abundant nucleoid-associated protein in bacteria that globally silences genes, including horizontally-acquired genes related to pathogenesis. Although it has been shown that H-NS has multiple modes of DNA-binding, which mode is employed in gene silencing is still unclear. Here, we report that in H-NS mutants that are unable to silence genes, are unable to form a rigid H-NS nucleoprotein filament. These results indicate that the H-NS nucleoprotein filament is crucial for its gene silencing function, and serves as the fundamental structural basis for gene silencing by H-NS and likely other H-NS-like bacterial proteins.

  17. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three- dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells. PMID:6682423

  18. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Niederman, R; Amrein, P C; Hartwig, J

    1983-05-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three-dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells.

  19. Freely Suspended Smectic Filaments and the Structure of the B7 Phase of MHOBOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, N.; Link, D. R.; Maclennan, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    Our recent discovery of the spontaneous formation of chiral domains in fluid smectic phases of achiral bow-shaped molecules opens up a wide variety of possibilities for new liquid crystal phases and phenomena. The basic, spontaneously chiral layer structure of the highest temperature fluid smectic phases, the B2 and B7, are shown. One of the most intriguing aspects of this structure is the plethora of possible phases coming from different stacking sequences of the polar ordering and tilt directions. The four possibilities of next-nearest neighbor alternation are shown. In the original material studied, NOBOW, the ground states found are antiferroelectric, either the racemic SmC(sub S)P(sub A) or the chiral SmC(sub A)P(sub A). We are currently studying MHOBOW, synthesized by D. Walba which, by virtue of its methyl hexyloxy tail has a tendency to form anticlinic layer interfaces, in the hope of finding a phase with a ferroelectric ground state, either SmC(sub A)P(sub S) or SmC(sub S)P(sub A), which can be obtained in NOBOW only by applying a field. Preliminary observations of MHO-BOW have made its study, from the point of view of understanding novel LC structures, extremely high priority. The following truly remarkable characteristics have been revealed: (i) The smectic phase grows out of the isotropic in the form of helical ribbons. The resulting planar aligned textures of focal conics with layers normal to glass plates exhibit bizarre modulations, including stripes and checker-boards. These have also been seen in other materials suggesting that this is a new phase (tentatively called B7), which is a fluid smectic with some kind of in-layer structure. (ii) It is virtually impossible to make freely suspended films of MHOBOW. Rather it makes the freely suspended filaments which preliminary x-ray scattering experiments reveal to have the nested cylinder layer structure indicated; (iii) The powder x-ray diffraction exhibits four resolution-limited smectic layering peaks

  20. Special issue on filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxin; Milchberg, Howard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2014-05-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on filamentation, to appear in the spring of 2015, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will attempt to give an overview of the present status of this field in order to create synergies and foster future developments. The issue is open to papers on the following issues: Theoretical advances on filamentation. Self-focusing and collapse. Filamentation in various media. Pulse self-compression and ultrafast processes in filaments. Molecular alignment and rotation. Filamentation tailoring. Interaction between filaments. Filament weather and pollution control. Filament induced condensation and precipitation. Terahertz science with filaments. Lasing in filaments. Filament induced molecular excitation and reaction. Electric discharge and plasma. Cross-disciplinary applications. Novel concepts related to these topics are particularly welcome. Please submit your article by 1 October 2014 (expected web publication: spring 2015) using our website http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue. The issue will be edited by Ruxin Li, Howard Milchberg and André Mysyrowicz.

  1. Fabrication of low cost composite tooling for filament winding large structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Timothy S.; Fortin, Christopher J.

    A TQM/concurrent engineering approach has been used to create a low cost filament-winding mandrel for large launch-vehicle structure fabrication. The process involves the fabrication of a low cost/low temperature master model, followed by the building of the mandrel and its backup structure within the master. Mandrels fabricated by these means are able to maintain full vacuum integrity and dimensional stability throughout high-temperature cure cycles; the reduced thermal mass of the mandrel results in part-cure cycles that are shorter than those associated with conventional mandrel materials.

  2. Crystal structure of the coat protein of the flexible filamentous papaya mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoqing; Wang, Tao; Bohon, Jen; Gagné, Marie-Ève Laliberté; Bolduc, Marilène; Leclerc, Denis; Li, Huilin

    2012-09-14

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a filamentous plant virus that belongs to the Alphaflexiviridae family. Flexible filamentous viruses have defied more than two decades of effort in fiber diffraction, and no high-resolution structure is available for any member of the Alphaflexiviridae family. Here, we report our structural characterization of PapMV by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction. We found that PapMV is 135Å in diameter with a helical symmetry of ~10 subunits per turn. Crystal structure of the C-terminal truncated PapMV coat protein (CP) reveals a novel all-helix fold with seven α-helices. Thus, the PapMVCP structure is different from the four-helix-bundle fold of tobacco mosaic virus in which helix bundling dominates the subunit interface in tobacco mosaic virus and conveys rigidity to the rod virus. PapMV CP was crystallized as an asymmetrical dimer in which one protein lassoes the other by the N-terminal peptide. Mutation of residues critical to the inter-subunit lasso interaction abolishes CP polymerization. The crystal structure suggests that PapMV may polymerize via the consecutive N-terminal loop lassoing mechanism. The structure of PapMV will be useful for rational design and engineering of the PapMV nanoparticles into innovative vaccines.

  3. Dynamical Timescale of Pre-collapse Evolution Inferred from Chemical Distribution in the Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (TMC-1) Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yunhee; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bourke, Tyler L.; Evans, Neal J., II

    2017-04-01

    We present observations and analyses of the low-mass star-forming region, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (TMC-1). CS (J = 2-1)/N2H+ (J = 1-0) and C17O (J = 2-1)/C18O (J = 2-1) were observed with the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory and the Seoul Radio Astronomy Observatory, respectively. In addition, Spitzer infrared data and 1.2 mm continuum data observed with Max-Planck Millimetre Bolometer are used. We also perform chemical modeling to investigate the relative molecular distributions of the TMC-1 filament. Based on Spitzer observations, there is no young stellar object along the TMC-1 filament, while five Class II and one Class I young stellar objects are identified outside the filament. The comparison between column densities calculated from dust continuum and C17O 2-1 line emission shows that CO is depleted much more significantly in the ammonia peak than in the cyanopolyyne peak, while the column densities calculated from the dust continuum are similar at the two peaks. N2H+ is not depleted much in either peak. According to our chemical calculation, the differential chemical distribution in the two peaks can be explained by different timescales required to reach the same density, i.e., by different dynamical processes.

  4. Structural basis of the relaxed state of a Ca2+-regulated myosin filament and its evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Woodhead, John L; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger

    2013-05-21

    Myosin filaments of muscle are regulated either by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains or Ca(2+) binding to the essential light chains, contributing to on-off switching or modulation of contraction. Phosphorylation-regulated filaments in the relaxed state are characterized by an asymmetric interaction between the two myosin heads, inhibiting their actin binding or ATPase activity. Here, we have tested whether a similar interaction switches off activity in myosin filaments regulated by Ca(2+) binding. Cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle image reconstruction of Ca(2+)-regulated (scallop) filaments reveals a helical array of myosin head-pair motifs above the filament surface. Docking of atomic models of scallop myosin head domains into the motifs reveals that the heads interact in a similar way to those in phosphorylation-regulated filaments. The results imply that the two major evolutionary branches of myosin regulation--involving phosphorylation or Ca(2+) binding--share a common structural mechanism for switching off thick-filament activity in relaxed muscle. We suggest that the Ca(2+)-binding mechanism evolved from the more ancient phosphorylation-based system to enable rapid response of myosin-regulated muscles to activation. Although the motifs are similar in both systems, the scallop structure is more tilted and higher above the filament backbone, leading to different intermolecular interactions. The reconstruction reveals how the myosin tail emerges from the motif, connecting the heads to the filament backbone, and shows that the backbone is built from supramolecular assemblies of myosin tails. The reconstruction provides a native structural context for understanding past biochemical and biophysical studies of this model Ca(2+)-regulated myosin.

  5. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, Wellington C.; Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.; Spies, Maria

    2016-07-22

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. In conclusion, our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament.

  6. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament. PMID:27447485

  7. Streptococcus salivarius Fimbriae Are Composed of a Glycoprotein Containing a Repeated Motif Assembled into a Filamentous Nondissociable Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Céline; Vadeboncoeur, Christian; Chandad, Fatiha; Frenette, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius, a gram-positive bacterium found in the human oral cavity, expresses flexible peritrichous fimbriae. In this paper, we report purification and partial characterization of S. salivarius fimbriae. Fimbriae were extracted by shearing the cell surface of hyperfimbriated mutant A37 (a spontaneous mutant of S. salivarius ATCC 25975) with glass beads. Preliminary experiments showed that S. salivarius fimbriae did not dissociate when they were incubated at 100°C in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. This characteristic was used to separate them from other cell surface components by successive gel filtration chromatography procedures. Fimbriae with molecular masses ranging from 20 × 106 to 40 × 106 Da were purified. Examination of purified fimbriae by electron microscopy revealed the presence of filamentous structures up to 1 μm long and 3 to 4 nm in diameter. Biochemical studies of purified fimbriae and an amino acid sequence analysis of a fimbrial internal peptide revealed that S. salivarius fimbriae were composed of a glycoprotein assembled into a filamentous structure resistant to dissociation. The internal amino acid sequence was composed of a repeated motif of two amino acids alternating with two modified residues: A/X/T-E-Q-M/φ, where X represents a modified amino acid residue and φ represents a blank cycle. Immunolocalization experiments also revealed that the fimbriae were associated with a wheat germ agglutinin-reactive carbohydrate. Immunolabeling experiments with antifimbria polyclonal antibodies showed that antigenically related fimbria-like structures were expressed in two other human oral streptococcal species, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus constellatus. PMID:11292790

  8. Filament wound composite thermal isolator structures for cryogenic dewars and instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    Studies showing high tensile strength, low thermal conductivity, and adequate fatigue strength capabiliies in conjunction with low resin outgassing properties of S-90 fiber glass with SCI REZ 080 and 081 epoxy resins has resulted in use of filament wound tension straps, struts, and conical shells as thermal isolators in several high-performance cryogenic applications. These thermal isolator structures and their use in the following cryogenic systems are discussed in this paper: hydrogen and oxygen dewars for space shuttle, helium tank for the infra-red astronomy satellite, spacecraft refrigerators, and infrared telescope. Mechanical and thermo-physical properties of the composite laminates are presented.

  9. Collaborative protein filaments.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Debnath; Löwe, Jan

    2015-09-14

    It is now well established that prokaryotic cells assemble diverse proteins into dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that perform essential cellular functions. Although most of the filaments assemble on their own to form higher order structures, growing evidence suggests that there are a number of prokaryotic proteins that polymerise only in the presence of a matrix such as DNA, lipid membrane or even another filament. Matrix-assisted filament systems are frequently nucleotide dependent and cytomotive but rarely considered as part of the bacterial cytoskeleton. Here, we categorise this family of filament-forming systems as collaborative filaments and introduce a simple nomenclature. Collaborative filaments are frequent in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes and are involved in vital cellular processes including chromosome segregation, DNA repair and maintenance, gene silencing and cytokinesis to mention a few. In this review, we highlight common principles underlying collaborative filaments and correlate these with known functions.

  10. Searching for filaments and large-scale structure around DAFT/FADA clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Márquez, I.; Acebrón, A.; Adami, C.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Capelato, H.; Martinet, N.; Sarron, F.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Clusters of galaxies are located at the intersection of cosmic filaments and are still accreting galaxies and groups along these preferential directions. However, because of their relatively low contrast on the sky, filaments are difficult to detect (unless a large amount of spectroscopic data are available), and unambiguous detections have been limited until now to relatively low redshifts (z< ~ 0.3). Aims: This project is aimed at searching for extensions and filaments around clusters, traced by galaxies selected to be at the cluster redshift based on the red sequence. In the 0.4 filaments. Methods: We have searched for extensions and filaments around the thirty clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey for which we had deep wide field photometric data. For each cluster, based on a colour-magnitude diagram, we selected galaxies that were likely to belong to the red sequence, and hence to be at the cluster redshift, and built density maps. By computing the background for each of these maps and drawing 3σ contours, we estimated the elongations of the structures detected in this way. Whenever possible, we identified the other structures detected on the density maps with clusters listed in NED. Results: We find clear elongations in twelve clusters out of thirty, with sizes that can reach up to 7.6 Mpc. Eleven other clusters have neighbouring structures, but the zones linking them are not detected in the density maps at a 3σ level. Three clusters show no extended structure and no neighbours, and four clusters are of too low contrast to be clearly visible on our density maps. Conclusions: The simple method we have applied appears to work well to show the existence of filaments and/or extensions around a number of clusters in the redshift range 0.4

  11. Changes in Bacterial and Eukaryotic Community Structure after Mass Lysis of Filamentous Cyanobacteria Associated with Viruses†

    PubMed Central

    van Hannen, Erik J.; Zwart, Gabriel; van Agterveld, Miranda P.; Gons, Herman J.; Ebert, Jeannine; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1999-01-01

    During an experiment in two laboratory-scale enclosures filled with lake water (130 liters each) we noticed the almost-complete lysis of the cyanobacterial population. Based on electron microscopic observations of viral particles inside cyanobacterial filaments and counts of virus-like particles, we concluded that a viral lysis of the filamentous cyanobacteria had taken place. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S ribosomal DNA fragments qualitatively monitored the removal of the cyanobacterial species from the community and the appearance of newly emerging bacterial species. The majority of these bacteria were related to the Cytophagales and actinomycetes, bacterial divisions known to contain species capable of degrading complex organic molecules. A few days after the cyanobacteria started to lyse, a rotifer species became dominant in the DGGE profile of the eukaryotic community. Since rotifers play an important role in the carbon transfer between the microbial loop and higher trophic levels, these observations confirm the role of viruses in channeling carbon through food webs. Multidimensional scaling analysis of the DGGE profiles showed large changes in the structures of both the bacterial and eukaryotic communities at the time of lysis. These changes were remarkably similar in the two enclosures, indicating that such community structure changes are not random but occur according to a fixed pattern. Our findings strongly support the idea that viruses can structure microbial communities. PMID:9925618

  12. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons.

  13. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  14. Structural changes in myosin motors and filaments during relaxation of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, E; Fusi, L; Reconditi, M; Linari, M; Bianco, P; Panine, P; Narayanan, T; Piazzesi, G; Lombardi, V; Irving, M

    2009-01-01

    Structural changes in myosin motors and filaments during relaxation from short tetanic contractions of intact single fibres of frog tibialis anterior muscles at sarcomere length 2.14 μm, 4°C were investigated by X-ray diffraction. Force declined at a steady rate for several hundred milliseconds after the last stimulus, while sarcomere lengths remained almost constant. During this isometric phase of relaxation the intensities of the equatorial and meridional M3 X-ray reflections associated with the radial and axial distributions of myosin motors also recovered at a steady rate towards their resting values, consistent with progressive net detachment of myosin motors from actin filaments. Stiffness measurements confirmed that the fraction of motors attached to actin declined at a constant rate, but also revealed a progressive increase in force per motor. The interference fine structure of the M3 reflection suggested that actin-attached myosin motors are displaced towards the start of their working stroke during isometric relaxation. There was negligible recovery of the intensities of the meridional and layer-line reflections associated with the quasi-helical distribution of myosin motors in resting muscle during isometric relaxation, and the 1.5% increase in the axial periodicity of the myosin filament associated with muscle activation was not reversed. When force had decreased to roughly half its tetanus plateau value, the isometric phase of relaxation abruptly ended, and the ensuing chaotic relaxation had an exponential half-time of ca 60 ms. Recovery of the equatorial X-ray intensities was largely complete during chaotic relaxation, but the other X-ray signals recovered more slowly than force. PMID:19651765

  15. Structural data suggest that the active and inactive forms of the RecA filament are not simply interconvertible.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1992-09-05

    We have used electron microscopy to examine the two major conformational states of the helical filament formed by the RecA protein of Escherichia coli. The compressed filament, formed in the absence of a nucleotide cofactor either as a self-polymer or on a single-stranded DNA molecule, is characterized in solution by about 6.1 subunits per turn of a 76 A pitch helix, and appears to be inactive with respect to all RecA activity. The active state of the filament, formed with ATP or an ATP analog on either a single or double-stranded DNA substrate, has about 6.2 subunits per turn of a 94 A pitch helix. Measurements of the contour length of RecA-covered single-stranded DNA circles in ice, formed in the absence of nucleotide cofactor, indicate that each RecA subunit binds five bases, in contrast to the three bases or base-pairs per subunit in the active state. The different stoichiometries of DNA binding suggests that the two polymeric forms are not interconvertible, as has been suggested on biochemical grounds. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the inactive state shows the same general features as the 83 A pitch filament present in the RecA crystal. This structural similarity and the fact that the crystal does not contain ATP or DNA suggests that the crystal structure is more similar to the compressed filament than the active, extended filament.

  16. The primary structure of component 8c-1, a subunit protein of intermediate filaments in wool keratin. Relationships with proteins from other intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, L M; Crewther, W G; Inglis, A S

    1986-01-01

    Component 8c-1, one of four highly homologous component-8 subunit proteins present in the microfibrils of wool, was isolated as its S-carboxymethyl derivative and its amino acid sequence was determined. Large peptides were isolated after cleaving the protein chemically or enzymically and the sequence of each was determined with an automatic Sequenator. The peptides were ordered by sequence overlaps and, in some instances, by homology with known sequences from other component-8 subunits. The C-terminal residues were identified by three procedures. Full details of the various procedures used have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50133 (4 pp.) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1986) 233, 5. The result showed that the protein comprises 412 residues and has an Mr, including the N-terminal acetyl group, of 48,300. The sequence of residues 98-200 of component 8c-1 was found to correspond to the partial or complete sequences of four homologous type I helical segments previously isolated from helical fragments recovered from chymotryptic digests of microfibrillar proteins of wool [Crewther & Dowling (1971) Appl. Polym. Symp. 18, 1-20; Crewther, Gough, Inglis & McKern (1978) Text. Res. J. 48, 160-162; Gough, Inglis & Crewther (1978) Biochem. J. 173, 385]. Considered in relation to amino acid sequences of other intermediate-filament proteins, the sequence is in accord with the view that keratin filament proteins are of two types [Hanukoglu & Fuchs (1983) Cell (Cambridge, Mass.) 33, 915-924]. Filament proteins from non-keratinous tissues, such as desmin, vimentin, neurofilament proteins and the glial fibrillary acidic protein, which form monocomponent filaments, constitute a third type. It is suggested that as a whole the proteins from intermediate filaments be classed as filamentins, the three types at present identified forming

  17. Purification and structural characterization of a filamentous, mucin-like proteophosphoglycan secreted by Leishmania parasites.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T; Stierhof, Y D; Craik, D; Simpson, R; Handman, E; Bacic, A

    1996-08-30

    Parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania secrete a filamentous macromolecule that forms networks and appears to be associated with cell aggregation. We report here the purification of this parasite antigen from Leishmania major culture supernatant and its compositional (75.6% carbohydrate, 20% phosphate, 4.4% amino acids, w/w), structural, and ultrastructural characterization as a highly unusual proteophosphoglycan (PPG). Mild acid hydrolysis, which cleaves preferentially hexose 1-phosphate bonds, releases the PPG glycans. Their structures are Galbeta1-4Man, Manalpha1-2Man, Galbeta1-3Galbeta1-4Man, PO4-6(Galbeta1-3)0-2Galbeta1-4Man, and PO4-6(Arabeta1-2Galbeta1-3)Galbeta1-4Man. These glycans are also components of the parasite glycolipid lipophosphoglycan, but their relative abundance and structural organization in PPG are different. Some of them represent novel forms of protein glycosylation. 31P NMR on native PPG demonstrates that phosphate is exclusively in phosphodiester bonds and that the basic structure R-Manalpha1-PO4-6-Gal-R connects the glycans. A phosphodiester linkage to phosphoserine (most likely R-Manalpha1-PO4-Ser) anchors the PPG oligosaccharides to the polypeptide. PPG has a unique amino acid composition; glycosylated phosphoserine (>43 mol %), serine, alanine, and proline account for more than 87 mol % and appear to be clustered in large proteinase-resistant domains. Electron microscopy of purified PPG reveals cable-like, flexible, long (to 6 microm), and unbranched filaments. The overall structure of PPG shows many similarities to mammalian mucins. Potential functions of this novel mucin-like molecule for the parasites are discussed.

  18. Fine control of terahertz radiation from filamentation by molecular lensing in air.

    PubMed

    Durand, M; Liu, Y; Houard, A; Mysyrowicz, A

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate a method to control remotely the terahertz (THz) source in air based on the bifilamentation of femtosecond laser pulses. By fine tuning the time delay between the two pulses, a significant modulation of the THz intensity from bifilamentation is observed. The phenomenon is attributed to the molecule quantum lensing effect around the air molecule revival time, which changes the separation between the two neighboring plasma producing filaments.

  19. Structural investigation of endoglucanase 2 from the filamentous fungus Penicillium verruculosum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakhrusheva, A. V.; Nemashkalov, V. A.; Kravchenko, O. V.; Tishchenko, S. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Korotkova, O. G.; Gusakov, A. V.; Sinitsyn, A. P.

    2017-03-01

    Enzyme additives capable of degrading non-starch polysaccharides of cereal cell walls, which are major ingredients used in animal feed, can improve the efficiency of livestock production. Non-starch polysaccharides have antinutritional properties that interfere with efficient digestion and assimilation of nutrients by animals. Therefore, the improvement of the properties and characteristics of enzyme additive is an important issue. The three-dimensional structure of one of the key industrial enzymes involved in the degradation of non-starch polysaccharides — endoglucanase 2 from the filamentous fungus Penicillium verruculosum — was determined (PDB ID: 5I6S). The catalytic site of this enzyme was established. Based on the enzyme structure, it was suggested that the pH optimum of the enzyme activity can be shifted from acidic to neutral or alkaline pH values.

  20. Crenactin from Pyrobaculum calidifontis is closely related to actin in structure and forms steep helical filaments

    PubMed Central

    Izoré, Thierry; Duman, Ramona; Kureisaite-Ciziene, Danguole; Löwe, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Polymerising proteins of the actin family are nearly ubiquitous. Crenactins, restricted to Crenarchaea, are more closely related to actin than bacterial MreB. Crenactins occur in gene clusters hinting at an unknown, but conserved function. We solved the crystal structure of crenactin at 3.2 Å resolution. The protein crystallises as a continuous right-handed helix with 8 subunits per complete turn, spanning 419 Å. The structure of crenactin shows several loops that are longer than in actin, but overall, crenactin is closely related to eukaryotic actin, with an RMSD of 1.6 Å. Crenactin filaments imaged by electron microscopy showed polymers with very similar helical parameters. PMID:24486010

  1. Giant axonal neuropathy alters the structure of keratin intermediate filaments in human hair.

    PubMed

    Soomro, Asfia; Alsop, Richard J; Negishi, Atsuko; Kreplak, Laurent; Fudge, Douglas; Kuczmarski, Edward R; Goldman, Robert D; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2017-04-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) follows an autosomal recessive genetic inheritance and impedes the peripheral and central nervous system due to axonal swellings that are packed with neurofilaments. The patients display a number of phenotypes, including hypotonia, muscle weakness, decreased reflexes, ataxia, seizures, intellectual disability, pale skin and often curled hair. We used X-ray diffraction and tensile testing to determine potential changes to the structure of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) in the hair of patients with GAN. A statistically significant decrease in the 47 and the 27 Å diffraction signals were observed. Tensile tests determined that the hair was slightly stiffer, stronger and more extensible in GAN patients. These results suggest that the structure of keratin IFs in hair is altered in GAN, and the findings are compatible with an increased positional disorder of the keratin tetramers within the hair fibres. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-05

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the η(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the FeCH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions.

  3. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-12-15

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling.

  4. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12548.001 PMID:26670543

  5. Refining the structure of the Halobacterium salinarum flagellar filament using the iterative helical real space reconstruction method: insights into polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Shlomo; Galkin, Vitold E; Egelman, Edward H

    2005-02-25

    The eubacterial flagellar filament is an external, self-assembling, helical polymer approximately 220 A in diameter constructed from a highly conserved monomer, flagellin, which polymerizes externally at the distal end. The archaeal filament is only approximately 100 A in diameter, assembles at the proximal end and is constructed from different, glycosylated flagellins. Although the phenomenology of swimming is similar to that of eubacteria, the symmetry of the archebacterial filament is entirely different. Here, we extend our previous study on the flagellar coiled filament structure of strain R1M1 of Halobacterium salinarum. We use strain M175 of H.salinarum, which forms poly-flagellar bundles at high yield which, under conditions of relatively low ionic-strength (0.8 M versus 5 M) and low pH ( approximately 2.5 versus approximately 6.8), form straight filaments. We demonstrated previously that a single-particle approach to helical reconstruction has many advantages over conventional Fourier-Bessel methods when dealing with variable helical symmetry and heterogeneity. We show here that when this method is applied to the ordered helical structure of the archebacterial uncoiled flagellar filament, significant extensions in resolution can be obtained readily when compared to applying traditional helical techniques. The filament population can be separated into classes of different morphologies, which may represent polymorphic states. Using cryo-negatively stained images, a resolution of approximately 10-15 A has been achieved. Single alpha-helices can be fit into the reconstruction, supporting the proposed similarity of the structure to that of type IV bacterial pili.

  6. Effect of shampoo, conditioner and permanent waving on the molecular structure of human hair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuchen; Alsop, Richard J.; Soomro, Asfia; Yang, Fei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The hair is a filamentous biomaterial consisting of the cuticle, the cortex and the medulla, all held together by the cell membrane complex. The cortex mostly consists of helical keratin proteins that spiral together to form coiled-coil dimers, intermediate filaments, micro-fibrils and macro-fibrils. We used X-ray diffraction to study hair structure on the molecular level, at length scales between ∼3–90 Å, in hopes of developing a diagnostic method for diseases affecting hair structure allowing for fast and noninvasive screening. However, such an approach can only be successful if common hair treatments do not affect molecular hair structure. We found that a single use of shampoo and conditioner has no effect on packing of keratin molecules, structure of the intermediate filaments or internal lipid composition of the membrane complex. Permanent waving treatments are known to break and reform disulfide linkages in the hair. Single application of a perming product was found to deeply penetrate the hair and reduce the number of keratin coiled-coils and change the structure of the intermediate filaments. Signals related to the coiled-coil structure of the α-keratin molecules at 5 and 9.5 Å were found to be decreased while a signal associated with the organization of the intermediate filaments at 47 Å was significantly elevated in permed hair. Both these observations are related to breaking of the bonds between two coiled-coil keratin dimers. PMID:26557428

  7. Effect of shampoo, conditioner and permanent waving on the molecular structure of human hair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Alsop, Richard J; Soomro, Asfia; Yang, Fei-Chi; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-01-01

    The hair is a filamentous biomaterial consisting of the cuticle, the cortex and the medulla, all held together by the cell membrane complex. The cortex mostly consists of helical keratin proteins that spiral together to form coiled-coil dimers, intermediate filaments, micro-fibrils and macro-fibrils. We used X-ray diffraction to study hair structure on the molecular level, at length scales between ∼3-90 Å, in hopes of developing a diagnostic method for diseases affecting hair structure allowing for fast and noninvasive screening. However, such an approach can only be successful if common hair treatments do not affect molecular hair structure. We found that a single use of shampoo and conditioner has no effect on packing of keratin molecules, structure of the intermediate filaments or internal lipid composition of the membrane complex. Permanent waving treatments are known to break and reform disulfide linkages in the hair. Single application of a perming product was found to deeply penetrate the hair and reduce the number of keratin coiled-coils and change the structure of the intermediate filaments. Signals related to the coiled-coil structure of the α-keratin molecules at 5 and 9.5 Å were found to be decreased while a signal associated with the organization of the intermediate filaments at 47 Å was significantly elevated in permed hair. Both these observations are related to breaking of the bonds between two coiled-coil keratin dimers.

  8. Structural Dynamics of the Vimentin Coiled-coil Contact Regions Involved in Filament Assembly as Revealed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange.

    PubMed

    Premchandar, Aiswarya; Mücke, Norbert; Poznański, Jarosław; Wedig, Tatjana; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Herrmann, Harald; Dadlez, Michał

    2016-11-25

    Intermediate filaments (IF) are major constituents of the cytoskeleton of metazoan cells. They are not only responsible for the mechanical properties but also for various physiological activities in different cells and tissues. The building blocks of IFs are extended coiled-coil-forming proteins exhibiting a characteristic central α-helical domain ("rod"). The fundamental principles of the filament assembly mechanism and the network formation have been widely elucidated for the cytoplasmic IF protein vimentin. Also, a comprehensive structural model for the tetrameric complex of vimentin has been obtained by X-ray crystallography in combination with various biochemical and biophysical techniques. To extend these static data and to investigate the dynamic properties of the full-length proteins in solution during the various assembly steps, we analyzed the patterns of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in vimentin and in four variants carrying point mutations in the IF consensus motifs present at either end of the α-helical rod that cause an assembly arrest at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. The results yielded unique insights into the structural properties of subdomains within the full-length vimentin, in particular in regions of contact in α-helical and linker segments that stabilize different oligomeric forms such as tetramers, ULFs, and mature filaments. Moreover, hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis of the point-mutated variants directly demonstrated the active role of the IF consensus motifs in the oligomerization mechanism of tetramers during ULF formation. Ultimately, using molecular dynamics simulation procedures, we provide a structural model for the subdomain-mediated tetramer/tetramer interaction via "cross-coiling" as the first step of the assembly process.

  9. Filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, A. M.

    The major aspects of filament winding are discussed, emphasizing basic reinforcement and matrix materials, winding procedures, process controls, and cured composite properties. Fiberglass (E-glass and S-glass strengths are 500,000 and 665,000 psi respectively) and polyester resins are the principal reinforcement constituent materials. Graphite and aramid reinforcements are being used more frequently, primarily for the more critical pressure vessels. Matrix systems are most commonly based on epoxy as it has superior mechanical properties, fatigue behavior, and heat resistance as compard with polyesters. A fiberglass overwrap of PVC pipe is an anticipated development in on-site winding and combination winding, and the compression molding of filament wound lay-ups will be investigated. The fabrication of weight-sensitive structural components may be achieved by using such moldings.

  10. Nanogap structures for molecular nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Motto, Paolo; Dimonte, Alice; Rattalino, Ismael; Demarchi, Danilo; Piccinini, Gianluca; Civera, Pierluigi

    2012-02-09

    This study is focused on the realization of nanodevices for nano and molecular electronics, based on molecular interactions in a metal-molecule-metal (M-M-M) structure. In an M-M-M system, the electronic function is a property of the structure and can be characterized through I/V measurements. The contact between the metals and the molecule was obtained by gold nanogaps (with a dimension of less than 10 nm), produced with the electromigration technique. The nanogap fabrication was controlled by a custom hardware and the related software system. The studies were carried out through experiments and simulations of organic molecules, in particular oligothiophenes.

  11. Nanogap structures for molecular nanoelectronics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study is focused on the realization of nanodevices for nano and molecular electronics, based on molecular interactions in a metal-molecule-metal (M-M-M) structure. In an M-M-M system, the electronic function is a property of the structure and can be characterized through I/V measurements. The contact between the metals and the molecule was obtained by gold nanogaps (with a dimension of less than 10 nm), produced with the electromigration technique. The nanogap fabrication was controlled by a custom hardware and the related software system. The studies were carried out through experiments and simulations of organic molecules, in particular oligothiophenes. PMID:22321736

  12. Visualizing the Nonhomogeneous Structure of RAD51 Filaments Using Nanofluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Fornander, Louise H; Frykholm, Karolin; Fritzsche, Joachim; Araya, Joshua; Nevin, Philip; Werner, Erik; Çakır, Ali; Persson, Fredrik; Garcin, Edwige B; Beuning, Penny J; Mehlig, Bernhard; Modesti, Mauro; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-08-23

    RAD51 is the key component of the homologous recombination pathway in eukaryotic cells and performs its task by forming filaments on DNA. In this study we investigate the physical properties of RAD51 filaments formed on DNA using nanofluidic channels and fluorescence microscopy. Contrary to the bacterial ortholog RecA, RAD51 forms inhomogeneous filaments on long DNA in vitro, consisting of several protein patches. We demonstrate that a permanent "kink" in the filament is formed where two patches meet if the stretch of naked DNA between the patches is short. The kinks are readily seen in the present microscopy approach but would be hard to identify using conventional single DNA molecule techniques where the DNA is more stretched. We also demonstrate that protein patches separated by longer stretches of bare DNA roll up on each other and this is visualized as transiently overlapping filaments. RAD51 filaments can be formed at several different conditions, varying the cation (Mg(2+) or Ca(2+)), the DNA substrate (single-stranded or double-stranded), and the RAD51 concentration during filament nucleation, and we compare the properties of the different filaments formed. The results provide important information regarding the physical properties of RAD51 filaments but also demonstrate that nanofluidic channels are perfectly suited to study protein-DNA complexes.

  13. Lessons from a tarantula: new insights into muscle thick filament and myosin interacting-heads motif structure and function.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Koubassova, Natalia; Pinto, Antonio; Gillilan, Richard; Tsaturyan, Andrey; Padrón, Raúl

    2017-09-04

    The tarantula skeletal muscle X-ray diffraction pattern suggested that the myosin heads were helically arranged on the thick filaments. Electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained relaxed tarantula thick filaments revealed four helices of heads allowing a helical 3D reconstruction. Due to its low resolution (5.0 nm), the unambiguous interpretation of densities of both heads was not possible. A resolution increase up to 2.5 nm, achieved by cryo-EM of frozen-hydrated relaxed thick filaments and an iterative helical real space reconstruction, allowed the resolving of both heads. The two heads, "free" and "blocked", formed an asymmetric structure named the "interacting-heads motif" (IHM) which explained relaxation by self-inhibition of both heads ATPases. This finding made tarantula an exemplar system for thick filament structure and function studies. Heads were shown to be released and disordered by Ca(2+)-activation through myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation, leading to EM, small angle X-ray diffraction and scattering, and spectroscopic and biochemical studies of the IHM structure and function. The results from these studies have consequent implications for understanding and explaining myosin super-relaxed state and thick filament activation and regulation. A cooperative phosphorylation mechanism for activation in tarantula skeletal muscle, involving swaying constitutively Ser35 mono-phosphorylated free heads, explains super-relaxation, force potentiation and post-tetanic potentiation through Ser45 mono-phosphorylated blocked heads. Based on this mechanism, we propose a swaying-swinging, tilting crossbridge-sliding filament for tarantula muscle contraction.

  14. The structure and poloidal dynamics of blob filaments in TJ-K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, S.; Fuchert, G.; Ramisch, M.; Hirth, T.

    2016-04-01

    Relatively dense, field-aligned, filament-like structures (blobs) have been observed to propagate radially and poloidally through the scrape-off layer (SOL) in magnetically confined fusion plasmas, and contribute significantly to SOL transport. A detailed understanding of blob structure and dynamics, and their dependence on magnetic field geometry, is important in magnetic confinement physics for the prediction of heat loads on reactor wall facing components, as well as for understanding plasma confinement and neutral particle recycling. Experimentally deduced centre of mass poloidal blob velocity components, obtained using the conditional averaging technique, have been compared to an analytical blob model which has been simplified to express blob velocity in terms of the magnetic field curvature vector. Background flows are not incorporated into the analytical model, and must be added in to obtain good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the 3D structure of blobs in TJ-K has been investigated using the conditional average of density fluctuations in two toroidally separated poloidal planes. Blobs are observed to be aligned to a flux tube near to the last closed flux surface, in the blob birth region. However at positions further along the blob trajectory, the structures do not deform according to the magnetic shear, rather they remain rigid, and retain their original form.

  15. Structure and dynamics of the Pf1 filamentous bacteriophage coat protein in micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Schiksnis, R.A.; Bogusky, M.J.; Tsang, P.; Opella, S.J.

    1987-03-10

    The major coat protein of filamentous bacteriophage adopts its membrane-bound conformation in detergent micelles. High-resolution /sup 1/H and /sup 15/N NMR experiments are used to characterize the structure and dynamics of residues 30-40 in the hydrophobic midsection of Pf1 coat protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles. Uniform and specific-site /sup 15/N labels enable the immobile backbone sites to be identified by their /sup 1/H//sup 15/N heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect and allow the assignment of /sup 1/H and /sup 15/N resonances. About one-third of the amide N-H protons in the protein undergo very slow exchange with solvent deuterons, which is indicative of sites in highly structured environments. The combination of results from /sup 1/H//sup 15/N heteronuclear correlation, /sup 1/H homonuclear correlation, and /sup 1/H homonuclear Overhauser effect experiments assigns the resonances to specific residues and demonstrates that residues 30-40 of the coat protein have a helical secondary structure.

  16. Using Data Mining and Computational Approaches to Study Intermediate Filament Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Parry, David A D

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research aimed at determining the structure and function of the family of intermediate filament proteins has made significant advances over the past 20 years. Much of this has either contributed to or relied on the amino acid sequence databases that are now available online, and the data mining approaches that have been developed to analyze these sequences. As the quality of sequence data is generally high, it follows that it is the design of the computational and graphical methodologies that are of especial importance to researchers who aspire to gain a greater understanding of those sequence features that specify both function and structural hierarchy. However, these techniques are necessarily subject to limitations and it is important that these be recognized. In addition, no single method is likely to be successful in solving a particular problem, and a coordinated approach using a suite of methods is generally required. A final step in the process involves the interpretation of the results obtained and the construction of a working model or hypothesis that suggests further experimentation. While such methods allow meaningful progress to be made it is still important that the data are interpreted correctly and conservatively. New data mining methods are continually being developed, and it can be expected that even greater understanding of the relationship between structure and function will be gleaned from sequence data in the coming years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An acidic protein aligns magnetosomes along a filamentous structure in magnetotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, André; Gruska, Manuela; Faivre, Damien; Linaroudis, Alexandros; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2006-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are widespread aquatic microorganisms that use unique intracellular organelles to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field. These organelles, called magnetosomes, consist of membrane-enclosed magnetite crystals that are thought to help to direct bacterial swimming towards growth-favouring microoxic zones at the bottom of natural waters. Questions in the study of magnetosome formation include understanding the factors governing the size and redox-controlled synthesis of the nano-sized magnetosomes and their assembly into a regular chain in order to achieve the maximum possible magnetic moment, against the physical tendency of magnetosome agglomeration. A deeper understanding of these mechanisms is expected from studying the genes present in the identified chromosomal `magnetosome island', for which the connection with magnetosome synthesis has become evident. Here we use gene deletion in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense to show that magnetosome alignment is coupled to the presence of the mamJ gene product. MamJ is an acidic protein associated with a novel filamentous structure, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron tomography. We suggest a mechanism in which MamJ interacts with the magnetosome surface as well as with a cytoskeleton-like structure. According to our hypothesis, magnetosome architecture represents one of the highest structural levels achieved in prokaryotic cells.

  18. Structural properties of highly conductive ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films grown by hot-filament CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, M.; Lin, I.-N.; Manoharan, D.; Moeinian, A.; Brühne, K.; Fecht, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we show the correlation of the electrical conductivity of ultra-nanocrystalline (UNCD) diamond films grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) with their structural properties. The substrate temperature, the methane to hydrogen ratio and the pressure are the main factor influencing the growth of conductive UNCD films, which extends from electrical resistive diamond films (<10-4 S/cm) to highly conductive diamond films with a specific conductivity of 300 S/cm. High-resolution-transmission-electron-microscopy (HRTEM) and electron-energy-loss-spectroscopy (EELS) have been done on the highly conductive diamond films, to show the origin of the high electrical conductivity. The HRTEM results show random oriented diamond grains and a large amount of nano-graphite between the diamond crystals. EELS investigations are confirming these results. Raman measurements are correlated with the specific conductivity, which shows structural changes of sp2 carbons bonds as function of conductivity. Hall experiments complete the results, which lead to a model of an electron mobility based conductivity, which is influenced by the structural properties of the grain boundary regions in the ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films.

  19. On the Structure and Evolution of a Polar Crown Prominence/Filament System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Schmit, D. J.; Tiwari, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Polar crown prominences, that partially circle the Sun's poles between 60° and 70° latitude, are made of chromospheric plasma. We aim to diagnose the 3D dynamics of a polar crown prominence using high-cadence EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA at 304, 171, and 193 Å and the Ahead spacecraft of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A)/EUVI at 195 Å. Using time series across specific structures, we compare flows across the disk in 195 Å with the prominence dynamics seen on the limb. The densest prominence material forms vertical columns that are separated by many tens of Mm and connected by dynamic bridges of plasma that are clearly visible in 304/171 Å two-colour images. We also observe intermittent but repetitious flows with velocity 15 km s-1 in the prominence that appear to be associated with EUV bright points on the solar disk. The boundary between the prominence and the overlying cavity appears as a sharp edge. We discuss the structure of the coronal cavity seen both above and around the prominence. SDO/HMI and GONG magnetograms are used to infer the underlying magnetic topology. The evolution and structure of the prominence with respect to the magnetic field seems to agree with the filament-linkage model.

  20. The structure of the coronal soft X-ray source associated with the dark filament disappearance of 1991 September 28 using the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, Alan; Uchida, Yutaka; Tsuneta, Saku; Strong, Keith T.; Acton, Loren W.; Hiei, Eijiro; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Watanabe, Takashi; Shibata, Kazunari

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the coronal soft X-ray source associated with the dark filament disappearance on September 28, 1991, observed with the Soft X-ray Telescope, is examined as a possible example of the 'eruption-reconnection' model of filament disappearance. The results suggest, however, that this model may not fit. There is a strong possibility that much of the dark filament mass remains in the heated unwinding axial field.

  1. Measuring Filament Orientation: A New Quantitative, Local Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C.-E.; Dawson, J. R.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Novak, G.; Fissel, L. M.

    2017-09-01

    The relative orientation between filamentary structures in molecular clouds and the ambient magnetic field provides insight into filament formation and stability. To calculate the relative orientation, a measurement of filament orientation is first required. We propose a new method to calculate the orientation of the one-pixel-wide filament skeleton that is output by filament identification algorithms such as filfinder. We derive the local filament orientation from the direction of the intensity gradient in the skeleton image using the Sobel filter and a few simple post-processing steps. We call this the “Sobel-gradient method.” The resulting filament orientation map can be compared quantitatively on a local scale with the magnetic field orientation map to then find the relative orientation of the filament with respect to the magnetic field at each point along the filament. It can also be used for constructing radial profiles for filament width fitting. The proposed method facilitates automation in analyses of filament skeletons, which is imperative in this era of “big data.”

  2. Filament formation as a scale-free process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    I will discuss the formation of filaments in molecular clouds, and its potential similarity with filament formation in the cosmic web. First, I will recall the formation mechanism of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and their likely state of global, hierarchical gravitational collapse, which amplifies any anisotropies of the initial configuration. I will then briefly recall the density and structure produced by this mechanism, emphasizing the fact that filaments are flow features, funneling material from the cloud to the star-forming cores, rather than static objects. I will conclude with a comparison of the physical processes operating in GMC filament formation to that operating on the formation of extragalactic filaments, to conclude with the question of the extent to which the two processes are comparable.

  3. Shared antigenicity between the polar filaments of myxosporeans and other Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Ringuette, Maurice J; Koehler, Anne; Desser, Sherwin S

    2011-02-01

    Nematocysts containing coiled polar filaments are a distinguishing feature of members of the phylum Cnidaria. As a first step to characterizing the molecular structure of polar filaments, a polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against a cyanogen bromide-resistant protein extract of mature cysts containing spores of Myxobolus pendula. The antiserum reacted only with proteins associated with extruded polar filaments. Western blot and whole-mount immunohistochemical analyses indicated a conservation of polar filament epitopes between M. pendula and 2 related cnidarians, i.e., the anthozoan, Nematostella vectensis, and the hydrozoan, Hydra vulgaris. This conservation of polar filament epitopes lends further support to a shared affinity between Myxozoa and cnidarians.

  4. Effect of filament twist on the structure and properties of Ag-sheathed Bi2223 tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kurihara, C.; Machida, T.; Inada, R.; Oota, A.

    2009-10-01

    Ag-sheathed Bi2223 tapes show good performances and are ready for many prototype applications. However, drastic reduction of AC loss is strongly required for practical AC power applications. To reduce the AC loss under AC external magnetic field, the introduction of filament twisting with high resistive barrier is effective, but the filament twisting tends to decrease the Jc value. This decrease in Jc is a problem to balance low AC loss with high Ic value. In this study, the effect of filament twisting on the microstructure and Jc property was investigated to overcome the Jc reduction. The Bi2223 tapes sheathed with Ag-Cu alloy were fabricated with a standard PIT method. Although the formation of Bi2223 phase was not affected by filament twisting from the XRD analysis and SEM observation, the Jc values of the twisted tapes decreased about 30% compared to that of non-twisted tape. In the case of the same twist pitch, the sample rolled under large pass reduction ratio showed relatively high Jc value. This high Jc would be caused by the high aspect ratio of the filament of those tapes, in which the grain alignment along the filament interface would be well. On the other hand, a reason for the Jc reduction of twist tapes is proposed to be the misorientation at grain boundaries of Bi2223 grains in the transference region near the edges of the tape, where the filaments move up and down in the thickness direction.

  5. Global Simulations of Differentially Rotating Magnetized Disks: Formation of Low-beta Filaments and Structured Coronae.

    PubMed

    Machida; Hayashi; Matsumoto

    2000-03-20

    We present the results of three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the Parker-shearing instability in a differentially rotating torus initially threaded by toroidal magnetic fields. An equilibrium model of a magnetized torus is adopted as an initial condition. When beta0=Pgas&solm0;Pmag approximately 1 at the initial state, magnetic flux buoyantly escapes from the disk and creates looplike structures similar to those in the solar corona. Inside the torus, the growth of nonaxisymmetric magnetorotational (or Balbus & Hawley) instability generates magnetic turbulence. Magnetic field lines are tangled on a small scale, but on a large scale they show low azimuthal wavenumber spiral structure. After several rotation periods, the system oscillates around a state with beta approximately 5. We found that magnetic pressure-dominated (beta<1) filaments are created in the torus. The volume filling factor of the region in which beta

  6. Crystal structures of two tetrameric β-carbonic anhydrases from the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Lehneck, Ronny; Neumann, Piotr; Vullo, Daniela; Elleuche, Skander; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ficner, Ralf; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2014-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are metalloenzymes catalyzing the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate (hydrogen carbonate) and protons. CAs have been identified in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes and can be classified into five groups (α, β, γ, δ, ζ) that are unrelated in sequence and structure. The fungal β-class has only recently attracted attention. In the present study, we investigated the structure and function of the plant-like β-CA proteins CAS1 and CAS2 from the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. We demonstrated that both proteins can substitute for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae β-CA Nce103 and exhibit an in vitro CO2 hydration activity (kcat /Km of CAS1: 1.30 × 10(6) m(-1) ·s(-1) ; CAS2: 1.21 × 10(6 ) m(-1) ·s(-1) ). To further investigate the structural properties of CAS1 and CAS2, we determined their crystal structures to a resolution of 2.7 Å and 1.8 Å, respectively. The oligomeric state of both proteins is tetrameric. With the exception of the active site composition, no further major differences have been found. In both enzymes, the Zn(2) (+) -ion is tetrahedrally coordinated; in CAS1 by Cys45, His101 and Cys104 and a water molecule and in CAS2 by the side chains of four residues (Cys56, His112, Cys115 and Asp58). Both CAs are only weakly inhibited by anions, making them good candidates for industrial applications. CAS1 and CAS2 bind by x-ray crystallography (View interaction) Structural data have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank database under accession numbers 4O1J for CAS1 and 4O1K for CAS2. © 2014 FEBS.

  7. Structure and assembly of P-pili: A protruding hinge region used for assembly of a bacterial adhesion filament

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiang-Qi; Bullitt, Esther

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution structures of macromolecular complexes offer unparalleled insight into the workings of biological systems and hence the interplay of these systems in health and disease. We have adopted a multifaceted approach to understanding the pathogenically important structure of P-pili, the class I adhesion pili from pyelonephritic Escherichia coli. Our approach combines electron cryomicroscopy, site-directed mutagenesis, homology modeling, and energy calculations, resulting in a high-resolution model of PapA, the major structural element of these pili. Fitting of the modeled PapA subunit into the electron cryomicroscopy data provides a detailed view of these pilins within the supramolecular architecture of the pilus filament. A structural hinge in the N-terminal region of the subunit is located at the site of a newly resolved electron density that protrudes from the P-pilus surface. The structural flexibility provided by this hinge is necessary for assembly of P-pili, illustrating one solution to construction of large macromolecular complexes from small repeating units. These data support our hypothesis that domain-swapped pilin subunits transit the outer cell membrane vertically and rotate about the hinge for final positioning into the pilus filament. Our data confirm and supply a structural basis for much previous genetic, biochemical, and structural data. This model of the P-pilus filament provides an insight into the mechanism of assembly of a macromolecular complex essential for initiation of kidney infection by these bacteria. PMID:16782819

  8. The structural basis for the intrinsic disorder of the actin filament: the "lateral slipping" model

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) helical reconstructions computed from electron micrographs of negatively stained dispersed F-actin filaments invariably revealed two uninterrupted columns of mass forming the "backbone" of the double-helical filament. The contact between neighboring subunits along the thus defined two long-pitch helical strands was spatially conserved and of high mass density, while the intersubunit contact between them was of lower mass density and varied among reconstructions. In contrast, phalloidinstabilized F-actin filaments displayed higher and spatially more conserved mass density between the two long-pitch helical strands, suggesting that this bicyclic hepta-peptide toxin strengthens the intersubunit contact between the two strands. Consistent with this distinct intersubunit bonding pattern, the two long-pitch helical strands of unstabilized filaments were sometimes observed separated from each other over a distance of two to six subunits, suggesting that the intrastrand intersubunit contact is also physically stronger than the interstrand contact. The resolution of the filament reconstructions, extending to 2.5 nm axially and radially, enabled us to reproducibly "cut out" the F- actin subunit which measured 5.5 nm axially by 6.0 nm tangentially by 3.2 nm radially. The subunit is distinctly polar with a massive "base" pointing towards the "barbed" end of the filament, and a slender "tip" defining its "pointed" end (i.e., relative to the "arrowhead" pattern revealed after stoichiometric decoration of the filaments with myosin subfragment 1). Concavities running approximately parallel to the filament axis both on the inner and outer face of the subunit define a distinct cleft separating the subunit into two domains of similar size: an inner domain confined to radii less than or equal to 2.5-nm forms the uninterrupted backbone of the two long-pitch helical strands, and an outer domain placed at radii of 2-5-nm protrudes radially and thus predominantly

  9. Featuring dark coronal structures: physical signatures of filaments and coronal holes for automated recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Judith; Cid, Consuelo; Saiz, Elena; Cerrato, Yolanda; Guerrero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Filaments may be mistaken for coronal holes when observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images; however, a closer and more careful look reveals that their photometric properties are different. The combination of EUV images with photospheric magnetograms shows some characteristic differences between filaments and coronal holes. We have performed analyses with 7 different SDO/AIA wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 211, 193, 304, 335 Å) and SDO/HMI magnetograms obtained in September 2011 and March 2012 to study coronal holes and filaments from the photometric, magnetic, and also geometric point of view, since projection effects play an important role on the aforementioned traits.

  10. Micromolding in Capillaries for the Generation of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Filaments and Microstructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-05

    to define the shape and size of the imprinted polymers . This article describes the processes leading to the fabrication of free-standing MIP ...recognition and interactions play central roles in these applications. Molecular imprinting , a technique for the synthesis of polymeric materials with analyte...generate molecularly imprinted polymer ( MIP ) microstructures on devices should open new possibilities towards the development of miniaturized systems for

  11. Primary edge localized mode filament structure in the National Spherical Torus Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda, R. J.; Maingi, R.; NSTX Team

    2009-05-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) are routinely seen in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. These unstable modes give rise to plasma filaments that burst radially outward during the nonlinear phase of the instability, moving across flux surfaces into the scrape-off layer. Fast-frame visible imaging is used in NSTX to study the evolution and characteristics of the post-ELM filaments. These edge filaments, which are well aligned with the local magnetic field, are seen to evolve from a perturbation of the edge that within 40-50 μs develops into the relatively high density/temperature primary filaments. The distribution of primary filaments in toroidal angle is seen to agree with a random model with moderate average toroidal mode numbers. At the same time, gas puff imaging shows that the perturbation of the edge leading to the burst of the ELM into the scrape-off layer is characterized by a broadband increase in fluctuations at much smaller poloidal wavelengths (λpol˜2-12 cm). These two measurements suggest that early development of turbulence may play a role in the development of primary ELM filamentation.

  12. Structure of the filamentous phage pIV multimer by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Opalka, Natacha; Beckmann, Roland; Boisset, Nicolas; Simon, Martha N; Russel, Marjorie; Darst, Seth A

    2003-01-17

    The homo-multimeric pIV protein constitutes a channel required for the assembly and export of filamentous phage across the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. We present a 22 A-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction of detergent-solubilized pIV by cryo-electron microscopy associated with image analysis. The structure reveals a barrel-like complex, 13.5 nm in diameter and 24 nm in length, with D14 point-group symmetry, consisting of a dimer of unit multimers. Side views of each unit multimer exhibit three cylindrical domains named the N-ring, the M-ring and the C-ring. Gold labeling of pIV engineered to contain a single cysteine residue near the N or C terminus unambiguously identified the N-terminal region as the N-ring, and the C-terminal region was inferred to make up the C-ring. A large pore, ranging in inner diameter from 6.0 nm to 8.8 nm, runs through the middle of the multimer, but a central domain, the pore gate, blocks it. Moreover, the pore diameter at the N-ring is smaller than the phage particle. We therefore propose that the pIV multimer undergoes a large conformational change during phage transport, with reorganization of the central domain to open the pore, and widening at the N-ring in order to accommodate the 6.5 nm diameter phage particle.

  13. THE RAPID FORMATION OF A FILAMENT CAUSED BY MAGNETIC RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO SETS OF DARK THREADLIKE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Yu, Shunping; Xu, Zhe E-mail: yjy@ynao.ac.cn

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of the high spatiotemporal resolution observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present rare observations of the rapid formation of a filament caused by magnetic reconnection between two sets of dark threadlike structures. The two sets of dark threadlike structures belong to distinct flux systems with their adjacent ends anchored in an opposite-polarity magnetic field region, where the calculated photospheric velocity field shows that converging flows dominate there. Due to the converging flows, opposite-polarity magnetic flux converged and then canceled, leading to the formation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) brightening that spread in opposite directions along the spine of the dark threadlike structures. Meanwhile, very weak remote brightening in the other terminals of the dark threadlike structures, as well as EUV loops, which rooted in the opposite-polarity magnetic field region, appeared. In addition, all of the AIA Fe line observations reveal that a flux rope was formed and underwent a rolling motion during the fadeaway of the EUV brightening. Soon after, as the EUV brightening disappeared, a filament that is very likely composed of two sets of intertwined dark threadlike structures was formed. Via differential emission measure (EM) analysis, it is found that both the EM and temperature of the plasma around the flux-canceling site increased during the brightening, implying that there, magnetic reconnection may occur to heat the plasma. These observations provide evidence that the filament is formed by magnetic reconnection associated with flux convergence and cancellation, and the magnetic structure of the filament is most likely a flux rope.

  14. Isolation and characterization of Candida albicans morphological mutants derepressed for the formation of filamentous hypha-type structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, C.; Pomes, R.; Nombela, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Several Candida albicans morphological mutants were obtained by a procedure based on a combined treatment with nitrous acid plus UV irradiation and a double-enrichment step to increase the proportion of mutants growing as long filamentous structures. Altered cell morphogenesis in these mutants correlated with an altered colonial phenotype. Two of these mutants, C. albicans NEL102 and NEL103, were selected and characterized. Mutant blastoconidia initiated budding but eventually gave rise to filamentous hypha-type formations. These filaments were long and septate, and they branched very regularly at positions near septa. Calcofluor white (which is known to bind chitin-rich areas) stained septa, branching zones, and filament tips very intensely, as observed under the fluorescence microscope. Wild-type hybrids were obtained by fusing protoplasts of strain NEL102 with B14, another morphological mutant previously described as being permanently pseudomycelial, indicating that genetic determinants responsible for the two altered phenotypes are different. The mutants characterized in this work seemed to sequentially express the morphogenic characteristics of C. albicans, from blastoconidia to hyphae, in the absence of any inducer. Further characterization of these strains could be relevant to gain understanding of the genetic control of dimorphism in this species.

  15. Filament turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Joern

    2010-03-01

    How much information do you need to distinguish between different mechanisms for spatiotemporal chaos in three-dimensions? In this talk, I will show that the observation of the dynamics on the surface of a medium can be sufficient. Studying mechanisms for filament turbulence in the context of reaction-diffusion media, we found numerically that two major classes of instabilities leave a very different signature on what can be observed on the surface of a three-dimensional medium. These results are of direct relevance in the context of ventricular fibrillation - a turbulent electrical wave activity that destroys the coherent contraction of the ventricular muscle and its main pumping function leading to sudden cardiac death. While it has been proposed that the three-dimensional structure of the heart plays an important role in this type of filament turbulence, only the surface of the heart is currently accessible to experimental observation preventing the study of the full dynamics. Our results suggest that such observations might be sufficient.

  16. Reviewing Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Lopez, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    The star formation process involves a wide range of spatial scales, densities and temperatures. Herschel observations of the cold and low density molecular gas extending tens of parsecs, that constitutes the bulk of the molecular clouds of the Milky Way, have shown a network of dense structures in the shape of filaments. These filaments supposedly condense into higher density clumps to form individual stars or stellar clusters. The study of the kinematics of the filaments through single-dish observations suggests the presence of gas flows along the filaments, oscillatory motions due to gravity infall, and the existence of substructure inside filaments that may be threaded by twisted fibers. A few molecular clouds have been mapped with interferometric resolutions bringing more insight into the filament structure. Compression due to large-scale supersonic flows is the preferred mechanism to explain filament formation although the exact nature of the filaments, their origin and evolution are still not well understood. Determining the turbulence drivers behind the origin of the filaments, the relative importance of turbulence, gravity and magnetic fields on regulating the filament structure and evolution, and providing detailed insight on the substructure inside the filaments are among the current open questions in this research area.

  17. The Molecular Architecture for the Intermediate Filaments of Hard α -Keratin Based on the Superlattice Data Obtained from a Study of Mammals Using Synchrotron Fibre Diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    James, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    High- and low-angle X-ray diffraction studies of hard α -keratin have been studied, and various models have been proposed over the last 70 years. Most of these studies have been confined to one or two forms of alpha keratin. This high- and low-angle synchrotron fibre diffraction study extends the study to cover all available data for all known forms of hard α -keratin including hairs, fingernails, hooves, horn, and quills from mammals, marsupials, and a monotreme, and it confirms that the model proposed is universally acceptable for all mammals. A complete Bragg analysis of the meridional diffraction patterns, includingmore » multiple-time exposures to verify any weak reflections, verified the existence of a superlattice consisting of two infinite lattices and three finite lattices. An analysis of the equatorial patterns establishes the radii of the oligomeric levels of dimers, tetramers, and intermediate filaments (IFs) together with the centre to centre distance for the IFs, thus confirming the proposed helices within helices molecular architecture for hard α -keratin. The results verify that the structure proposed by Feughelman and James meets the criteria for a valid α -keratin structure.« less

  18. The Molecular Architecture for the Intermediate Filaments of Hard α-Keratin Based on the Superlattice Data Obtained from a Study of Mammals Using Synchrotron Fibre Diffraction.

    PubMed

    James, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    High- and low-angle X-ray diffraction studies of hard α-keratin have been studied, and various models have been proposed over the last 70 years. Most of these studies have been confined to one or two forms of alpha keratin. This high- and low-angle synchrotron fibre diffraction study extends the study to cover all available data for all known forms of hard α-keratin including hairs, fingernails, hooves, horn, and quills from mammals, marsupials, and a monotreme, and it confirms that the model proposed is universally acceptable for all mammals. A complete Bragg analysis of the meridional diffraction patterns, including multiple-time exposures to verify any weak reflections, verified the existence of a superlattice consisting of two infinite lattices and three finite lattices. An analysis of the equatorial patterns establishes the radii of the oligomeric levels of dimers, tetramers, and intermediate filaments (IFs) together with the centre to centre distance for the IFs, thus confirming the proposed helices within helices molecular architecture for hard α-keratin. The results verify that the structure proposed by Feughelman and James meets the criteria for a valid α-keratin structure.

  19. The Molecular Architecture for the Intermediate Filaments of Hard α-Keratin Based on the Superlattice Data Obtained from a Study of Mammals Using Synchrotron Fibre Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    James, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    High- and low-angle X-ray diffraction studies of hard α-keratin have been studied, and various models have been proposed over the last 70 years. Most of these studies have been confined to one or two forms of alpha keratin. This high- and low-angle synchrotron fibre diffraction study extends the study to cover all available data for all known forms of hard α-keratin including hairs, fingernails, hooves, horn, and quills from mammals, marsupials, and a monotreme, and it confirms that the model proposed is universally acceptable for all mammals. A complete Bragg analysis of the meridional diffraction patterns, including multiple-time exposures to verify any weak reflections, verified the existence of a superlattice consisting of two infinite lattices and three finite lattices. An analysis of the equatorial patterns establishes the radii of the oligomeric levels of dimers, tetramers, and intermediate filaments (IFs) together with the centre to centre distance for the IFs, thus confirming the proposed helices within helices molecular architecture for hard α-keratin. The results verify that the structure proposed by Feughelman and James meets the criteria for a valid α-keratin structure. PMID:22028970

  20. The Molecular Architecture for the Intermediate Filaments of Hard [alpha]-Keratin Based on the Superlattice Data Obtained from a Study ofMammals Using Synchrotron Fibre Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    James, Veronica

    2014-09-24

    High- and low-angle X-ray diffraction studies of hard {alpha}-keratin have been studied, and various models have been proposed over the last 70 years. Most of these studies have been confined to one or two forms of alpha keratin. This high- and low-angle synchrotron fibre diffraction study extends the study to cover all available data for all known forms of hard {alpha}-keratin including hairs, fingernails, hooves, horn, and quills from mammals, marsupials, and a monotreme, and it confirms that the model proposed is universally acceptable for all mammals. A complete Bragg analysis of the meridional diffraction patterns, including multiple-time exposures to verify any weak reflections, verified the existence of a superlattice consisting of two infinite lattices and three finite lattices. An analysis of the equatorial patterns establishes the radii of the oligomeric levels of dimers, tetramers, and intermediate filaments (IFs) together with the centre to centre distance for the IFs, thus confirming the proposed helices within helices molecular architecture for hard {alpha}-keratin. The results verify that the structure proposed by Feughelman and James meets the criteria for a valid {alpha}-keratin structure.

  1. A new RHQT Nb3Al superconducting wire with a Ta/Cu/Ta three-layer filament-barrier structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Takao; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nimori, Shigeki; Banno, Nobuya; Iijima, Yasuo; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Nakamoto, Tatsushi

    2012-06-01

    To suppress the low-magnetic-field instability (flux jumps in low magnetic fields) of a rapid-heating, quenching and transformation (RHQT) processed Nb3Al superconductor, we had previously modified the cross-sectional design of an RHQT Nb3Al by adopting a Ta filament-barrier structure. Unlike Nb barriers, Ta barriers are not superconducting in magnetic fields at 4.2 K so that they electromagnetically decouple filaments. However, small flux jumps still occurred at 1.8 K, which is a typical operating temperature for the magnets used in high-energy particle accelerators. Furthermore, poor bonding at the Ta/Ta interface between neighboring Ta-coated jelly-roll (JR) filaments frequently caused precursor wires to break during drawing. To overcome these problems, we fabricated a new RHQT Nb3Al wire with a Ta/Cu/Ta three-layer filament-barrier structure for which an internal stabilization technique (Cu rods encased in Ta are dispersed in the wire cross section) was extended. Removing the Ta/Ta interface in the interfilamentary barrier (JR filament/Ta/Cu/Ta/JR filament) allowed precursor wires to be drawn without breaking. Furthermore, the Cu filament barrier electromagnetically decoupled filaments to suppress flux jumps at 1.8 K. The ductile Cu layer also improved the bending strain tolerance of RHQT Nb3Al.

  2. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Liu, Lucie X.; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  3. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Thomas; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-02-07

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  4. USING CORONAL CELLS TO INFER THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE AND CHIRALITY OF FILAMENT CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Martin, S. F.; Panasenco, O.

    2013-08-01

    Coronal cells are visible at temperatures of {approx}1.2 MK in Fe XII coronal images obtained from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft. We show that near a filament channel, the plumelike tails of these cells bend horizontally in opposite directions on the two sides of the channel like fibrils in the chromosphere. Because the cells are rooted in magnetic flux concentrations of majority polarity, these observations can be used with photospheric magnetograms to infer the direction of the horizontal field in filament channels and the chirality of the associated magnetic field. This method is similar to the procedure for inferring the direction of the magnetic field and the chirality of the fibril pattern in filament channels from H{alpha} observations. However, the coronal cell observations are easier to use and provide clear inferences of the horizontal field direction for heights up to {approx}50 Mm into the corona.

  5. Analytical Core Mass Function (CMF) from Filaments: Under Which Circumstances Can Filament Fragmentation Reproduce the CMF?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles

    2017-10-01

    Observations suggest that star formation in filamentary molecular clouds occurs in a two-step process, with the formation of filaments preceding that of prestellar cores and stars. Here, we apply the gravoturbulent fragmentation theory of Hennebelle & Chabrier to a filamentary environment, taking into account magnetic support. We discuss the induced geometrical effect on the cores, with a transition from 3D geometry at small scales to 1D at large ones. The model predicts the fragmentation behavior of a filament for a given mass per unit length (MpL) and level of magnetization. This core mass function (CMF) for individual filaments is then convolved with the distribution of filaments to obtain the final system CMF. The model yields two major results. (i) The filamentary geometry naturally induces a hierarchical fragmentation process, first into groups of cores, separated by a length equal to a few filament Jeans lengths, i.e., a few times the filament width. These groups then fragment into individual cores. (ii) Non-magnetized filaments with high MpL are found to fragment excessively, at odds with observations. This is resolved by taking into account the magnetic field (treated simply as additional pressure support). The present theory suggests two complementary modes of star formation: although small (spherical or filamentary) structures will collapse directly into prestellar cores, according to the standard Hennebelle–Chabrier theory, the large (filamentary) ones, the dominant population according to observations, will follow the aforedescribed two-step process.

  6. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT AS EXTRAPOLATED FROM PHOTOSPHERIC AND CHROMOSPHERIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yelles Chaouche, L.; Kuckein, C.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2012-03-20

    The three-dimensional structure of an active region filament is studied using nonlinear force-free field extrapolations based on simultaneous observations at a photospheric and a chromospheric height. To that end, we used the Si I 10827 A line and the He I 10830 A triplet obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife). The two extrapolations have been carried out independently from each other and their respective spatial domains overlap in a considerable height range. This opens up new possibilities for diagnostics in addition to the usual ones obtained through a single extrapolation from, typically, a photospheric layer. Among those possibilities, this method allows the determination of an average formation height of the He I 10830 A signal of Almost-Equal-To 2 Mm above the surface of the Sun. It allows, as well, a cross-check of the obtained three-dimensional magnetic structures to verify a possible deviation from the force-free condition, especially at the photosphere. The extrapolations yield a filament formed by a twisted flux rope whose axis is located at about 1.4 Mm above the solar surface. The twisted field lines make slightly more than one turn along the filament within our field of view, which results in 0.055 turns Mm{sup -1}. The convex part of the field lines (as seen from the solar surface) constitutes dips where the plasma can naturally be supported. The obtained three-dimensional magnetic structure of the filament depends on the choice of the observed horizontal magnetic field as determined from the 180 Degree-Sign solution of the azimuth. We derive a method to check for the correctness of the selected 180 Degree-Sign ambiguity solution.

  7. Isolation and preliminary characterization of 10-nm filaments from baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells.

    PubMed Central

    Starger, J M; Goldman, R D

    1977-01-01

    A procedure for isolating 10-nm filaments as juxtanuclear caps from normal and colchicine-treated BHK-21 cells is described. These aggregates of 10-nm filaments retain their birefringence and their structural integrity. The major proteins comprising the filament preparations can be resolved as two bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, corresponding to approximate molecular weights of 54,000 and 55,000. Images PMID:329284

  8. Morphological, molecular, and mycotoxigenic identification of dominant filamentous fungi from moldy civil cheese.

    PubMed

    Cakmakci, Songul; Cetin, Bulent; Gurses, Mustafa; Dagdemir, Elif; Hayaloglu, Ali Adnan

    2012-11-01

    Moldy Civil is a mold-ripened variety of cheese produced mainly in eastern Turkey. This cheese is produced with Civil cheese and whey curd cheese (Lor). Civil cheese has had a geographical presence since 2009 and is manufactured with skim milk. In the production of Moldy Civil cheese, Civil cheese or a mixture of Civil and Lor cheese is pressed into goat skins or plastic bags and ripened for 3 months or longer. During the ripening period, natural contaminating molds grow on the surface of and inside the cheese. In this study, 186 mold strains were isolated from 41 samples of Moldy Civil cheese, and 165 of these strains were identified as Penicillium roqueforti. Identification and mycotoxicologic analyses were conducted using morphotypic and molecular methods. PCR amplicons of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS4 region were subjected to sequence analysis. This research is the first using molecular methods on Moldy Civil cheese. Mycotoxicologic analyses were conducted using thin-layer chromatography, and random amplified polymorphic DNA genotypes were determined using the ari1 primer. Of 165 isolates, only 28 produced no penicillic acid, P. roqueforti toxin, or roquefortine.

  9. The Link between Turbulence, Magnetic Fields, Filaments, and Star Formation in the Central Molecular Zone Cloud G0.253+0.016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, C.; Rathborne, J. M.; Longmore, S. N.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Bally, J.; Contreras, Y.; Crocker, R. M.; Garay, G.; Jackson, J. M.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Star formation is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. However, the turbulence and magnetic fields in molecular clouds near the Galactic center may differ substantially compared to spiral-arm clouds. Here we determine the physical parameters of the central molecular zone (CMZ) cloud G0.253+0.016, its turbulence, magnetic field, and filamentary structure. Using column density maps based on dust-continuum emission observations with ALMA+Herschel, we identify filaments and show that at least one dense core is located along them. We measure the filament width {W}{fil}=0.17+/- 0.08 {pc} and the sonic scale {λ }{sonic}=0.15+/- 0.11 {pc} of the turbulence, and find {W}{fil}≈ {λ }{sonic}. A strong velocity gradient is seen in the HNCO intensity-weighted velocity maps obtained with ALMA+Mopra. The gradient is likely caused by large-scale shearing of G0.253+0.016, producing a wide double-peaked velocity probability distribution function (PDF). After subtracting the gradient to isolate the turbulent motions, we find a nearly Gaussian velocity PDF typical for turbulence. We measure the total and turbulent velocity dispersion, 8.8+/- 0.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and 3.9+/- 0.1 {km} {{{s}}}-1, respectively. Using magnetohydrodynamical turbulence simulations, we find that G0.253+0.016's turbulent magnetic field {B}{turb}=130+/- 50 μ {{G}} is only ≲ 1/10 of the ordered field component. Combining these measurements, we reconstruct the dominant turbulence driving mode in G0.253+0.016 and find a driving parameter of b=0.22+/- 0.12, indicating solenoidal (divergence-free) driving. We compare this to spiral-arm clouds, which typically have a significant compressive (curl-free) driving component (b\\gt 0.4). Motivated by previous reports of strong shearing motions in the CMZ, we speculate that shear causes the solenoidal driving in G0.253+0.016 and show that this reduces the star-formation rate by a factor of 6.9 compared to typical nearby

  10. Purification of native myosin filaments from muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, C; Padrón, R; Horowitz, R; Zhao, F Q; Craig, R

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the structure and function of native thick (myosin-containing) filaments of muscle has been hampered in the past by the difficulty of obtaining a pure preparation. We have developed a simple method for purifying native myosin filaments from muscle filament suspensions. The method involves severing thin (actin-containing) filaments into short segments using a Ca(2+)-insensitive fragment of gelsolin, followed by differential centrifugation to purify the thick filaments. By gel electrophoresis, the purified thick filaments show myosin heavy and light chains together with nonmyosin thick filament components. Contamination with actin is below 3.5%. Electron microscopy demonstrates intact thick filaments, with helical cross-bridge order preserved, and essentially complete removal of thin filaments. The method has been developed for striated muscles but can also be used in a modified form to remove contaminating thin filaments from native smooth muscle myofibrils. Such preparations should be useful for thick filament structural and biochemical studies. PMID:11606293

  11. RUI: Structure and Behavior of RF-Driven Plasma Filaments in High-Pressure Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Burin, Michael J.

    2014-11-18

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed, yet not well understood. We investigate filament properties in a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. Results from the 3-year grant period and their physics are discussed.

  12. Forces measured with micro-fabricated cantilevers during actomyosin interactions produced by filaments containing different myosin isoforms and loop 1 structures.

    PubMed

    Kalganov, Albert; Shalabi, Nabil; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kachmar, Linda Hussein; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Rassier, Dilson E

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that the actin-activated ATP kinetics and the mechanical work produced by muscle myosin molecules are regulated by two surface loops, located near the ATP binding pocket (loop 1), and in a region that interfaces with actin (loop 2). These loops regulate force and velocity of contraction, and have been investigated mostly in single molecules. There is a lack of information of the work produced by myosin molecules ordered in filaments and working cooperatively, which is the actual muscle environment. We use micro-fabricated cantilevers to measure forces produced by myosin filaments isolated from mollusk muscles, skeletal muscles, and smooth muscles containing variations in the structure of loop 1 (tonic and phasic myosins). We complemented the experiments with in-vitro assays to measure the velocity of actin motility. Smooth muscle myosin filaments produced more force than skeletal and mollusk myosin filaments when normalized per filament overlap. Skeletal muscle myosin propelled actin filaments in a higher sliding velocity than smooth muscle myosin. The values for force and velocity were consistent with previous studies using myosin molecules, and suggest a close correlation with the myosin isoform and structure of surface loop 1. The technique using micro-fabricated cantilevers to measure force of filaments allows for the investigation of the relation between myosin structure and contractility, allowing experiments to be conducted with an array of different myosin isoforms. Using the technique we observed that the work produced by myosin molecules is regulated by amino-acid sequences aligned in specific loops.

  13. Photosynthesis irradiance parameters and community structure associated with coastal filaments and adjacent waters in the northern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, Rory K.; Lohrenz, Steven E.; Rathbun, Catherine E.; Michelle Wood, A.; Arnone, Robert A.; Jones, Burton H.; Kindle, John C.; Weidemann, Alan D.

    Comparisons were made among size-fractionated photosynthesis-irradiance ( P- E) parameters, chlorophyll a size distributions, and accessory pigment composition of natural phytoplankton assemblages in filaments, coastal upwelling waters, and an oligotrophic region of the northern Arabian Sea during the Fall Intermonsoon in 1995. Differences between P- E parameters, PBmax and αB, were observed between filaments and adjacent waters and were associated with differences in phytoplankton community structure. In a southern filament and coastal upwelled waters, the majority of the estimated biomass (chlorophyll a) was present in the larger (2-20 and 20-200 μm) size fractions; dominant accessory pigments were 19'-butanoyloxyfucoxanthin and peridinin. In higher salinity waters, high percentages of chlorophyll a and lutein/zeaxanthin were observed in the smallest size-fraction (<2 μm). Whole water values of PBmax ranged from 1.77 to 2.31 (g C g chl a-1 h -1) when the majority of the biomass was in the largest fractions. Higher values (more than 4.48 g C g chl a-1 h -1) were determined in whole water samples for communities comprised primarily of small cells. A size dependence was also observed in the value of αB, 0.017 or greater (g C g chl a-1 h -1)/(μmol quanta m -2 s -1) for whole water samples at stations dominated by small cells and 0.013 when derived from stations dominated by large cells. The observed pattern of larger phytoplankton associated with upwelling and filament waters was consistent with previous investigations and was, for the most part, comparable to findings in the California Current system. Our results show that differences in taxonomic composition and photosynthetic characteristics were indeed present between filament waters and other distinct regions; these results suggest that taxonomic variations may be associated with size-related variations in P- E parameters. Our findings provide a unique data set describing filament biology in the northern

  14. How is kinematic structure connected to the core scale from filament scale?; Mopra mapping observations with multi-lines of dense cores in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao; Tachihara, Kengo; Saigo, Kazuya; van Kempen, Tim; Cortes, Paulo; Hill, Tracey; Knee, Lewis; Kurono, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Satoko; Aya, Higuchi; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2014-06-01

    Recently, high sensitivity mappings of nearby molecular clouds in far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths with Hershel and AzTEC/ASTE show ubiquitous existence of the filamentary structures with 0.1-pc uniform width. It is important to investigate dense core formation from large scale structure via fragmentation. We have conducted MOPRA multi-line mapping observations covered on 0.02 - 0.2 pc scales of 8 dense cores in a filamentary cloud of nearby Lupus I at 140 pc. A class 0/I protostellar core IRAS 15398-3359 is included as a sample, which has an adjacent prestellar core with the separation of 0.13pc in the west. The maps of N2H+, HNC, HC3N show well associated with each core. The velocity field of C18O shows 1.4 km/s/pc from north to south over the region containing two dense cores, which is consistent with past observation of NANTEN. In contrast to C18O results, the velocity field of HC3N shows different structures, which suggest counter rotation of two dense cores; 1.2 km/s/pc from north-west to south-east around a protostellar core and 0.8 km/s/pc from east to west around a presteller core. The filament will be fragmentized and collapsed to dense cores when the line density is over 2Cs/G (where Cs is sound speed and G is gravitational constant). If that velocity gradient was caused by such situation, it should be red-blue-red-blue across two dense cores but the observed kinematics is not consistent with this scenario, which requires that the filament structure would be extremely curved with a skew angle. Although we cannot reject the collapsing interruption, those results suggest the spin-up rotating picture separated from large-scale structure.

  15. Atomic structure of the vimentin central α-helical domain and its implications for intermediate filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Chernyatina, Anastasia A; Nicolet, Stefan; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2012-08-21

    Together with actin filaments and microtubules, intermediate filaments (IFs) are the basic cytoskeletal components of metazoan cells. Over 80 human diseases have been linked to mutations in various IF proteins to date. However, the filament structure is far from being resolved at the atomic level, which hampers rational understanding of IF pathologies. The elementary building block of all IF proteins is a dimer consisting of an α-helical coiled-coil (CC) "rod" domain flanked by the flexible head and tail domains. Here we present three crystal structures of overlapping human vimentin fragments that comprise the first half of its rod domain. Given the previously solved fragments, a nearly complete atomic structure of the vimentin rod has become available. It consists of three α-helical segments (coils 1A, 1B, and 2) interconnected by linkers (L1 and L12). Most of the CC structure has a left-handed twist with heptad repeats, but both coil 1B and coil 2 also exhibit untwisted, parallel stretches with hendecad repeats. In the crystal structure, linker L1 was found to be α-helical without being involved in the CC formation. The available data allow us to construct an atomic model of the antiparallel tetramer representing the second level of vimentin assembly. Although the presence of the nonhelical head domains is essential for proper tetramer stabilization, the precise alignment of the dimers forming the tetramer appears to depend on the complementarity of their surface charge distribution patterns, while the structural plasticity of linker L1 and coil 1A plays a role in the subsequent IF assembly process.

  16. Titin strain contributes to the Frank-Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P.; Kumar, Mohit; Greaser, Marion L.; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2016-04-29

    We determined that the Frank–Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT muscles displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank–Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA.

  17. Titin strain contributes to the Frank–Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P.; Kumar, Mohit; Greaser, Marion L.; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2016-02-08

    The Frank–Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT muscles displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Overall, our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank–Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA.

  18. Titin strain contributes to the Frank–Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The Frank–Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT musclesmore » displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Overall, our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank–Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA.« less

  19. Titin strain contributes to the Frank-Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P; Kumar, Mohit; Greaser, Marion L; Irving, Thomas C; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2016-02-23

    The Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT muscles displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Overall, our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank-Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA.

  20. Titin strain contributes to the Frank–Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P.; Kumar, Mohit; Greaser, Marion L.; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2016-01-01

    The Frank–Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT muscles displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Overall, our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank–Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA. PMID:26858417

  1. Molecular and functional characterization of a Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor in the filamentous fungus Tuber borchii

    PubMed Central

    Menotta, Michele; Amicucci, Antonella; Basili, Giorgio; Polidori, Emanuela; Stocchi, Vilberto; Rivero, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Background Small GTPases of the Rho family function as tightly regulated molecular switches that govern important cellular functions in eukaryotes. Several families of regulatory proteins control their activation cycle and subcellular localization. Members of the guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) family sequester Rho GTPases from the plasma membrane and keep them in an inactive form. Results We report on the characterization the RhoGDI homolog of Tuber borchii Vittad., an ascomycetous ectomycorrhizal fungus. The Tbgdi gene is present in two copies in the T. borchii genome. The predicted amino acid sequence shows high similarity to other known RhoGDIs. Real time PCR analyses revealed an increased expression of Tbgdi during the phase preparative to the symbiosis instauration, in particular after stimulation with root exudates extracts, that correlates with expression of Tbcdc42. In a translocation assay TbRhoGDI was able to solubilize TbCdc42 from membranes. Surprisingly, TbRhoGDI appeared not to interact with S. cerevisiae Cdc42, precluding the use of yeast as a surrogate model for functional studies. To study the role of TbRhoGDI we performed complementation experiments using a RhoGDI null strain of Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism where the roles of Rho signaling pathways are well established. For comparison, complementation with mammalian RhoGDI1 and LyGDI was also studied in the null strain. Although interacting with Rac1 isoforms, TbRhoGDI was not able to revert the defects of the D. discoideum RhoGDI null strain, but displayed an additional negative effect on the cAMP-stimulated actin polymerization response. Conclusion T. borchii expresses a functional RhoGDI homolog that appears as an important modulator of cytoskeleton reorganization during polarized apical growth that antecedes symbiosis instauration. The specificity of TbRhoGDI actions was underscored by its inability to elicit a growth defect in S. cerevisiae or to compensate the

  2. Use of a fusion protein between GFP and an actin-binding domain to visualize transient filamentous-actin structures.

    PubMed

    Pang, K M; Lee, E; Knecht, D A

    1998-03-26

    Many important processes in eukaryotic cells involve changes in the quantity, location and the organization of actin filaments [1] [2] [3]. We have been able to visualize these changes in live cells using a fusion protein (GFP-ABD) comprising the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria and the 25 kDa highly conserved actin-binding domain (ABD) from the amino terminus of the actin cross-linking protein ABP-120 [4]. In live cells of the soil amoeba Dictyostelium that were expressing GFP-ABD, the three-dimensional architecture of the actin cortex was clearly visualized. The pattern of GFP-ABD fluorescence in these cells coincided with that of rhodamine-phalloidin, indicating that GFP-ABD specifically binds filamentous (F) actin. On the ventral surface of non-polarized vegetative cells, a broad ring of F actin periodically assembled and contracted, whereas in polarized cells there were transient punctate F-actin structures; cells cycled between the polarized and non-polarized morphologies. During the formation of pseudopods, an increase in fluorescence intensity coincided with the initial outward deformation of the membrane. This is consistent with the models of pseudopod extension that predict an increase in the local density of actin filaments. In conclusion, GFP-ABD specifically binds F actin and allows the visualization of F-actin dynamics and cellular behavior simultaneously.

  3. Structure of myosin filaments from relaxed Lethocerus flight muscle by cryo-EM at 6 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongjun; Taylor, Dianne W.; Reedy, Michael K.; Edwards, Robert J.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a cryo–electron microscopy three-dimensional image reconstruction of relaxed myosin II–containing thick filaments from the flight muscle of the giant water bug Lethocerus indicus. The relaxed thick filament structure is a key element of muscle physiology because it facilitates the reextension process following contraction. Conversely, the myosin heads must disrupt their relaxed arrangement to drive contraction. Previous models predicted that Lethocerus myosin was unique in having an intermolecular head-head interaction, as opposed to the intramolecular head-head interaction observed in all other species. In contrast to the predicted model, we find an intramolecular head-head interaction, which is similar to that of other thick filaments but oriented in a distinctly different way. The arrangement of myosin’s long α-helical coiled-coil rod domain has been hypothesized as either curved layers or helical subfilaments. Our reconstruction is the first report having sufficient resolution to track the rod α helices in their native environment at resolutions ~5.5 Å, and it shows that the layer arrangement is correct for Lethocerus. Threading separate paths through the forest of myosin coiled coils are four nonmyosin peptides. We suggest that the unusual position of the heads and the rod arrangement separated by nonmyosin peptides are adaptations for mechanical signal transduction whereby applied tension disrupts the myosin heads as a component of stretch activation. PMID:27704041

  4. Structural CNT Composites. Part I; Developing a Carbon Nanotube Filament Winder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Wincheski, Russell A.; Antczak, Andrew; Campero, Jamie C.; Luong, Hoa H.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based materials promise advances in the production of high strength and multifunctional components for aerospace and other applications. Specifically, in tension dominated applications, the latest CNT based filaments are yielding composite properties comparable to or exceeding composites from more established fibers such as Kevlar and carbon fiber. However, for the properties of these materials to be fully realized at the component level, suitable manufacturing processes have to be developed. These materials handle differently from conventional fibers, with different wetting characteristics and behavior under load. The limited availability of bulk forms also requires that the equipment be scaled down accordingly to tailor the process development approach to material availability. Here, the development of hardware and software for filament winding of carbon nanotube based tapes and yarns is described. This hardware features precision guidance of the CNT material and control of the winding tension over a wide range in an open architecture that allows for effective process control and troubleshooting during winding. Use of the filament winder to develop CNT based Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) shall also be discussed.

  5. Contractile properties of thin (actin) filament-reconstituted muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, S; Funatsu, T; Fujita, H

    1998-01-01

    Selective removal and reconstitution of the components of muscle fibers (fibrils) is a useful means of examining the molecular mechanism underlying the formation of the contractile apparatus. In addition, this approach is powerful for examining the structure-function relationship of a specific component of the contractile system. In previous studies, we have achieved the partial structural and functional reconstitution of thin filaments in the skeletal contractile apparatus and full reconstitution in the cardiac contractile apparatus. First, all thin filaments other than short fragments at the Z line were removed by treatment with plasma gelsolin, an actin filament-severing protein. Under these conditions, no active tension could be generated. By incorporating exogenous actin into these thin filament-free fibers, actin filaments were reconstituted by polymerization on the short actin fragments remaining at the Z line, and active tension, which was insensitive to Ca2+, was restored. The active tension after the reconstitution of thin filaments reached as high as 30% of the original level in skeletal muscle, while it reached 140% in cardiac muscle. The augmentation of tension in cardiac muscle is mainly attributable to the elongation of reconstituted filaments, longer than the average length of thin filaments in an intact muscle. These results indicate that a muscle contractile apparatus with a high order structure and function can be constructed by the self-assembly of constituent proteins. Recently, we applied this reconstitution system to the study of the mechanism of spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in thin (actin) filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers. As a result, we found that SPOC occurs even in regulatory protein-free actin filament-reconstituted fibers (Fujita & Ishiwata, manuscript submitted), although the SPOC conditions were slightly different from the standard SPOC conditions. This result strongly suggests that spontaneous oscillation

  6. From electron microscopy to molecular cell biology, molecular genetics and structural biology: intracellular transport and kinesin superfamily proteins, KIFs: genes, structure, dynamics and functions.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    Cells transport and sort various proteins and lipids following synthesis as distinct types of membranous organelles and protein complexes to the correct destination at appropriate velocities. This intracellular transport is fundamental for cell morphogenesis, survival and functioning not only in highly polarized neurons but also in all types of cells in general. By developing quick-freeze electron microscopy (EM), new filamentous structures associated with cytoskeletons are uncovered. The characterization of chemical structures and functions of these new filamentous structures led us to discover kinesin superfamily molecular motors, KIFs. In this review, I discuss the identification of these new structures and characterization of their functions using molecular cell biology and molecular genetics. KIFs not only play significant roles by transporting various cargoes along microtubule rails, but also play unexpected fundamental roles on various important physiological processes such as learning and memory, brain wiring, development of central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, activity-dependent neuronal survival, development of early embryo, left-right determination of our body and tumourigenesis. Furthermore, by combining single-molecule biophysics with structural biology such as cryo-electrom microscopy and X-ray crystallography, atomic structures of KIF1A motor protein of almost all states during ATP hydrolysis have been determined and a common mechanism of motility has been proposed. Thus, this type of studies could be a good example of really integrative multidisciplinary life science in the twenty-first century.

  7. Insights into the mechanism of Rad51 recombinase from the structure and properties of a filament interface mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhong; Villanueva, Nicolas; Rould, Mark A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2010-09-03

    Rad51 protein promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes. Recombination activities are activated by Rad51 filament assembly on ssDNA. Previous studies of yeast Rad51 showed that His352 occupies an important position at the filament interface, where it could relay signals between subunits and active sites. To investigate, we characterized yeast Rad51 H352A and H352Y mutants, and solved the structure of H352Y. H352A forms catalytically competent but salt-labile complexes on ssDNA. In contrast, H352Y forms salt-resistant complexes on ssDNA, but is defective in nucleotide exchange, RPA displacement and strand exchange with full-length DNA substrates. The 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of H352Y reveals a right-handed helical filament in a high-pitch (130 {angstrom}) conformation with P61 symmetry. The catalytic core and dimer interface regions of H352Y closely resemble those of DNA-bound Escherichia coli RecA protein. The H352Y mutation stabilizes Phe187 from the adjacent subunit in a position that interferes with the {gamma}-phosphate-binding site of the Walker A motif/P-loop, potentially explaining the limited catalysis observed. Comparison of Rad51 H352Y, RecA-DNA and related structures reveals that the presence of bound DNA correlates with the isomerization of a conserved cis peptide near Walker B to the trans configuration, which appears to prime the catalytic glutamate residue for ATP hydrolysis.

  8. Chaperonin filaments : their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaoi, T.; Kagawa, K. H.; Trent, J. D.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo. This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} combined with ATP, ADP, ATP{gamma}S, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance.

  9. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  10. Structure and Mutational Analyses of Escherichia coli ZapD Reveal Charged Residues Involved in FtsZ Filament Bundling

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Elyse J.; Wroblewski, Charles; Seidel, Laura; Berezuk, Alison M.; Brewer, Dyanne; Kimber, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial cell division is an essential and highly coordinated process. It requires the polymerization of the tubulin homologue FtsZ to form a dynamic ring (Z-ring) at midcell. Z-ring formation relies on a group of FtsZ-associated proteins (Zap) for stability throughout the process of division. In Escherichia coli, there are currently five Zap proteins (ZapA through ZapE), of which four (ZapA, ZapB, ZapC, and ZapD) are small soluble proteins that act to bind and bundle FtsZ filaments. In particular, ZapD forms a functional dimer and interacts with the C-terminal tail of FtsZ, but little is known about its structure and mechanism of action. Here, we present the crystal structure of Escherichia coli ZapD and show it forms a symmetrical dimer with centrally located α-helices flanked by β-sheet domains. Based on the structure of ZapD and its chemical cross-linking to FtsZ, we targeted nine charged ZapD residues for modification by site-directed mutagenesis. Using in vitro FtsZ sedimentation assays, we show that residues R56, R221, and R225 are important for bundling FtsZ filaments, while transmission electron microscopy revealed that altering these residues results in different FtsZ bundle morphology compared to those of filaments bundled with wild-type ZapD. ZapD residue R116 also showed altered FtsZ bundle morphology but levels of FtsZ bundling similar to that of wild-type ZapD. Together, these results reveal that ZapD residues R116, R221, and R225 likely participate in forming a positively charged binding pocket that is critical for bundling FtsZ filaments. IMPORTANCE Z-ring assembly underpins the formation of the essential cell division complex known as the divisome and is required for recruitment of downstream cell division proteins. ZapD is one of several proteins in E. coli that associates with the Z-ring to promote FtsZ bundling and aids in the overall fitness of the division process. In the present study, we describe the dimeric structure of E. coli

  11. Structures of actin-bound Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domains of Spire and the implication for filament nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Ducka, Anna M.; Joel, Peteranne; Popowicz, Grzegorz M.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Schleicher, Michael; Noegel, Angelika A.; Huber, Robert; Holak, Tad A.; Sitar, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Three classes of proteins are known to nucleate new filaments: the Arp2/3 complex, formins, and the third group of proteins that contain ca. 25 amino acid long actin-binding Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 domains, called the WH2 repeats. Crystal structures of the complexes between the actin-binding WH2 repeats of the Spire protein and actin were determined for the Spire single WH2 domain D, the double (SpirCD), triple (SpirBCD), quadruple (SpirABCD) domains, and an artificial Spire WH2 construct comprising three identical D repeats (SpirDDD). SpirCD represents the minimal functional core of Spire that can nucleate actin filaments. Packing in the crystals of the actin complexes with SpirCD, SpirBCD, SpirABCD, and SpirDDD shows the presence of two types of assemblies, “side-to-side” and “straight-longitudinal,” which can serve as actin filament nuclei. The principal feature of these structures is their loose, open conformations, in which the sides of actins that normally constitute the inner interface core of a filament are flipped inside out. These Spire structures are distant from those seen in the filamentous nuclei of Arp2/3, formins, and in the F-actin filament. PMID:20538977

  12. G359.97-0.038: A HARD X-RAY FILAMENT ASSOCIATED WITH A SUPERNOVA SHELL-MOLECULAR CLOUD INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nynka, Melania; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin M.; Morris, Mark M.; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, Miller; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Stephen E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2015-02-20

    We present the first high-energy X-ray (>10 keV) observations of the non-thermal filament G359.97-0.038 using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). This filament is one of approximately 20 X-ray filaments of unknown origin located in the central 20 pc region in the Galactic Center near Sgr A*. Its NuSTAR and Chandra broadband spectrum is characterized by a single power law with Γ = 1.3 ± 0.3 that extends from 2 to 50 keV, with an unabsorbed luminosity of 1.3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} (d/8 kpc){sup 2} in the 2-8 keV band. Despite possessing a cometary X-ray morphology that is typical of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in high-resolution Chandra imaging, our spatially resolved Chandra spectral analysis found no significant spectral softening along the filament as would be expected from particle synchrotron cooling. Coincident radio emission is detected using the Very Large Array at 5.5 and 8.3 GHz. We examine and subsequently discard a PWN or magnetic flux tube as the origin of G359.97-0.038. We use broadband spectral characteristics and a morphological analysis to show that G359.97-0.038 is likely an interaction site between the shell of Sgr A East and an adjacent molecular cloud. This is supported by CS molecular line spectroscopy and the presence of an OH maser.

  13. Filamentous Structures Induced by a Phytoreovirus Mediate Viral Release from Salivary Glands in Its Insect Vector.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qianzhuo; Liao, Zhenfeng; Li, Jiajia; Liu, Yuyan; Wu, Wei; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Qian; Jia, Dongsheng; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-06-15

    Numerous viral pathogens are persistently transmitted by insect vectors and cause agricultural or health problems. These viruses circulate in the vector body, enter the salivary gland, and then are released into the apical plasmalemma-lined cavities, where saliva is stored. The cavity plasmalemma of vector salivary glands thus represents the last membrane barrier for viral transmission. Here, we report a novel mechanism used by a persistent virus to overcome this essential barrier. We observed that the infection by rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV), a species of the genus Phytoreovirus in the family Reoviridae, induced the formation of virus-associated filaments constructed by viral nonstructural protein Pns11 within the salivary glands of its leafhopper vector, Recilia dorsalis Such filaments attached to actin-based apical plasmalemma and induced an exocytosis-like process for viral release into vector salivary gland cavities, through a direct interaction of Pns11 of RGDV and actin of R. dorsalis Failure of virus-induced filaments assembly by RNA interference with synthesized double-stranded RNA targeting the Pns11 gene inhibited the dissemination of RGDV into salivary cavities, preventing viral transmission by R. dorsalis For the first time, we show that a virus can exploit virus-induced inclusion as a vehicle to pass through the apical plasmalemma into vector salivary gland cavities, thus overcoming the last membrane barrier for viral transmission by insect vectors.IMPORTANCE Understanding how persistent viruses overcome multiple tissue and membrane barriers within the insect vectors until final transmission is the key for viral disease control. The apical plasmalemma of the cavities where saliva is stored in the salivary glands is the last barrier for viral transmission by insect vectors; however, the mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we show that a virus has evolved to exploit virus-induced filaments to perform an exocytosis-like process that enables viral

  14. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies.

  15. Spatial structure of scrape-off-layer filaments near the midplane and X-point regions of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J L; Zweben, S J; Umansky, M V; Cziegler, I; Grulke, O; LaBombard, B; Stotler, D P

    2008-05-22

    Movies of edge turbulence at both the outboard midplane and the region outboard of the typical lower X-point location in C-Mod have been obtained using Gas-Puff-Imaging together with fast-framing cameras. Intermittent turbulent structures, typically referred to as blobs or filaments, are observed in both locations. Near the midplane the filaments are roughly circular in cross-section, while in the X-point region they are highly elongated. Filament velocities in this region are {approx}3x faster than the radial velocities at the midplane, in a direction roughly normal to the local flux surfaces. The observations are consistent with the picture that the filaments arise in outboard region and, as a consequence of the rapid parallel diffusion of the potential perturbations, map along field lines. A simulation using the 3D BOUT turbulence code has been made, with the result that reproduces many of the spatial features observed in the experiment.

  16. Geometric Frustration Selects Morphology in Chiral Filament Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Douglas; Bruss, Isaac; Barone, Justin; Grason, Gregory

    Assemblies of twisted filaments appear in a range of biological contexts, from extracellular filament bundles to amyloid fibrils. Owing to numerous distinctions in molecular structures and interactions underlying these diverse assemblies, a framework to predict and classify the basic mechanisms of structure formation in twisted filament assemblies is still lacking. In this study, we model how the size and shape of self-assembled fibers are controlled by competition between the elastic costs of inter-filament frustration, bending deformation of filaments and bundle surface energy. Exploiting a geometric mapping between inter-filament packing in twisted bundles and packing on positively-curved 2D surfaces, we show that the anisotropy of the bundle cross-section is determined by a single parameter describing the competition between elastic and bending costs. We compare the continuum model's predictions for stability of cylindrical and tape-like twisted morphologies to numerical simulations of cohesive filament bundles and observations of micron-scale amyloid fibers assembled from hydrolyzed protein fragments. Nsf (CAREER) DMR-0955760.

  17. Structural Analysis of Human Cofilin 2/Filamentous Actin Assemblies: Atomic-Resolution Insights from Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yehl, Jenna; Kudryashova, Elena; Reisler, Emil; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Cellular actin dynamics is an essential element of numerous cellular processes, such as cell motility, cell division and endocytosis. Actin’s involvement in these processes is mediated by many actin-binding proteins, among which the cofilin family plays unique and essential role in accelerating actin treadmilling in filamentous actin (F-actin) in a nucleotide-state dependent manner. Cofilin preferentially interacts with older filaments by recognizing time-dependent changes in F-actin structure associated with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the nucleotide cleft of actin. The structure of cofilin on F-actin and the details of the intermolecular interface remain poorly understood at atomic resolution. Here we report atomic-level characterization by magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of the muscle isoform of human cofilin 2 (CFL2) bound to F-actin. We demonstrate that resonance assignments for the majority of atoms are readily accomplished and we derive the intermolecular interface between CFL2 and F-actin. The MAS NMR approach reported here establishes the foundation for atomic-resolution characterization of a broad range of actin-associated proteins bound to F-actin. PMID:28303963

  18. Analysis on the Filament Structure Evolution in Reset Transition of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM Device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Li, Yang; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi; Liu, Ming

    2016-12-01

    The resistive switching (RS) process of resistive random access memory (RRAM) is dynamically correlated with the evolution process of conductive path or conductive filament (CF) during its breakdown (rupture) and recovery (reformation). In this study, a statistical evaluation method is developed to analyze the filament structure evolution process in the reset operation of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM device. This method is based on a specific functional relationship between the Weibull slopes of reset parameters' distributions and the CF resistance (R on). The CF of the Cu/HfO2/Pt device is demonstrated to be ruptured abruptly, and the CF structure of the device has completely degraded in the reset point. Since no intermediate states are generated in the abrupt reset process, it is quite favorable for the reliable and stable one-bit operation in RRAM device. Finally, on the basis of the cell-based analytical thermal dissolution model, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is implemented to further verify the experimental results. This work provides inspiration for RRAM reliability and performance design to put RRAM into practical application.

  19. Analysis on the Filament Structure Evolution in Reset Transition of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Li, Yang; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi; Liu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The resistive switching (RS) process of resistive random access memory (RRAM) is dynamically correlated with the evolution process of conductive path or conductive filament (CF) during its breakdown (rupture) and recovery (reformation). In this study, a statistical evaluation method is developed to analyze the filament structure evolution process in the reset operation of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM device. This method is based on a specific functional relationship between the Weibull slopes of reset parameters' distributions and the CF resistance ( R on). The CF of the Cu/HfO2/Pt device is demonstrated to be ruptured abruptly, and the CF structure of the device has completely degraded in the reset point. Since no intermediate states are generated in the abrupt reset process, it is quite favorable for the reliable and stable one-bit operation in RRAM device. Finally, on the basis of the cell-based analytical thermal dissolution model, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is implemented to further verify the experimental results. This work provides inspiration for RRAM reliability and performance design to put RRAM into practical application.

  20. The organization of the wall filaments and characterization of the matrix structures of Toxoplasma gondii cyst form.

    PubMed

    Lemgruber, Leandro; Lupetti, Pietro; Martins-Duarte, Erica S; De Souza, Wanderley; Vommaro, Rossiane C

    2011-12-01

    The encystation process is a key step in Toxoplasma gondii life cycle, allowing the parasite to escape from the host immune system and the transmission among the hosts. A detailed characterization of the formation and structure of the cyst stage is essential for a better knowledge of toxoplasmosis. Here we isolated cysts from mice brains and analysed the cyst wall structure and cyst matrix organization using different electron microscopy techniques. Images obtained showed that the cyst wall presented a filamentous aspect, with circular openings on its surface. The filaments were organized in two layers: a compact one, facing the exterior of the whole cyst and a more loosen one, facing the matrix. Within the cyst wall, we observed tubules and a large number of vesicles. The cyst matrix presented vesicles of different sizes and tubules, which were organized in a network connecting the bradyzoites to each other and to the cyst wall. Large vesicles, with a granular material in their lumen of glycidic nature were observed. Similar vesicles were also found associated with the posterior pole of the bradyzoites and in proximity to the cyst wall. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Structural studies of influenza virus RNPs by electron microscopy indicate molecular contortions within NP supra-structures.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, John R; Torian, Udana; McCraw, Dustin M; Harris, Audray K

    2017-03-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes of influenza viruses are composed of multiple copies of the viral nucleoprotein (NP) that can form filamentous supra-structures. RNPs package distinct viral genomic RNA segments of different lengths into pleomorphic influenza virions. RNPs also function in viral RNA transcription and replication. Different RNP segments have varying lengths, but all must be incorporated into virions during assembly and then released during viral entry for productive infection cycles. RNP structures serve varied functions in the viral replication cycle, therefore understanding their molecular organization and flexibility is essential to understanding these functions. Here, we show using electron tomography and image analyses that isolated RNP filaments are not rigid helical structures, but instead display variations in lengths, curvatures, and even tolerated kinks and local unwinding. Additionally, we observed NP rings within RNP preparations, which were commonly composed of 5, 6, or 7 NP molecules and were of similar widths to filaments, suggesting plasticity in NP-NP interactions mediate RNP structural polymorphism. To demonstrate that NP alone could generate rings of variable oligomeric state, we performed 2D single particle image analysis on recombinant NP and found that rings of 4 and 5 protomers dominated, but rings of all compositions up to 7 were directly observed with variable frequency. This structural flexibility may be needed as RNPs carry out the interactions and conformational changes required for RNP assembly and genome packaging as well as virus uncoating.

  2. TubZ filament assembly dynamics requires the flexible C-terminal tail

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Pérez, Maria E.; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Martín-González, Alejandro; Juan-Rodríguez, David; Llorca, Oscar; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Oliva, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    Cytomotive filaments are essential for the spatial organization in cells, showing a dynamic behavior based on nucleotide hydrolysis. TubZ is a tubulin-like protein that functions in extrachromosomal DNA movement within bacteria. TubZ filaments grow in a helical fashion following treadmilling or dynamic instability, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have unraveled the molecular basis for filament assembly and dynamics combining electron and atomic force microscopy and biochemical analyses. Our findings suggest that GTP caps retain the filament helical structure and hydrolysis triggers filament stiffening upon disassembly. We show that the TubZ C-terminal tail is an unstructured domain that fulfills multiple functions contributing to the filament helical arrangement, the polymer remodeling into tubulin-like rings and the full disassembly process. This C-terminal tail displays the binding site for partner proteins and we report how it modulates the interaction of the regulator protein TubY. PMID:28230082

  3. TubZ filament assembly dynamics requires the flexible C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pérez, Maria E; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Martín-González, Alejandro; Juan-Rodríguez, David; Llorca, Oscar; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Oliva, Maria A

    2017-02-23

    Cytomotive filaments are essential for the spatial organization in cells, showing a dynamic behavior based on nucleotide hydrolysis. TubZ is a tubulin-like protein that functions in extrachromosomal DNA movement within bacteria. TubZ filaments grow in a helical fashion following treadmilling or dynamic instability, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have unraveled the molecular basis for filament assembly and dynamics combining electron and atomic force microscopy and biochemical analyses. Our findings suggest that GTP caps retain the filament helical structure and hydrolysis triggers filament stiffening upon disassembly. We show that the TubZ C-terminal tail is an unstructured domain that fulfills multiple functions contributing to the filament helical arrangement, the polymer remodeling into tubulin-like rings and the full disassembly process. This C-terminal tail displays the binding site for partner proteins and we report how it modulates the interaction of the regulator protein TubY.

  4. Structure of Importin-α from a Filamentous Fungus in Complex with a Classical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Natalia E; Takeda, Agnes A S; Dreyer, Thiago R; Freitas, Fernanda Z; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2015-01-01

    Neurospora crassa is a filamentous fungus that has been extensively studied as a model organism for eukaryotic biology, providing fundamental insights into cellular processes such as cell signaling, growth and differentiation. To advance in the study of this multicellular organism, an understanding of the specific mechanisms for protein transport into the cell nucleus is essential. Importin-α (Imp-α) is the receptor for cargo proteins that contain specific nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that play a key role in the classical nuclear import pathway. Structures of Imp-α from different organisms (yeast, rice, mouse, and human) have been determined, revealing that this receptor possesses a conserved structural scaffold. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Impα mechanism of action may vary significantly for different organisms or for different isoforms from the same organism. Therefore, structural, functional, and biophysical characterization of different Impα proteins is necessary to understand the selectivity of nuclear transport. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of an Impα from a filamentous fungus which is also the highest resolution Impα structure already solved to date (1.75 Å). In addition, we performed calorimetric analysis to determine the affinity and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction between Imp-α and the classical SV40 NLS peptide. The comparison of these data with previous studies on Impα proteins led us to demonstrate that N. crassa Imp-α possess specific features that are distinct from mammalian Imp-α but exhibit important similarities to rice Imp-α, particularly at the minor NLS binding site.

  5. Reorganization of actin filaments by ADF/cofilin is involved in formation of microtubule structures during Xenopus oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We examined the reorganization of actin filaments and microtubules during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Surrounding the germinal vesicle (GV) in immature oocytes, the cytoplasmic actin filaments reorganized to accumulate beneath the vegetal side of the GV, where the microtubule-organizing center and transient microtubule array (MTOC-TMA) assembled, just before GV breakdown (GVBD). Immediately after GVBD, both Xenopus ADF/cofilin (XAC) and its phosphatase Slingshot (XSSH) accumulated into the nuclei and intranuclear actin filaments disassembled from the vegetal side with the shrinkage of the GV. As the MTOC-TMA developed well, cytoplasmic actin filaments were retained at the MTOC-TMA base region. Suppression of XAC dephosphorylation by anti-XSSH antibody injection inhibited both actin filament reorganization and proper formation and localization of both the MTOC-TMA and meiotic spindles. Stabilization of actin filaments by phalloidin also inhibited formation of the MTOC-TMA and disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments without affecting nuclear shrinkage. Nocodazole also caused the MTOC-TMA and the cytoplasmic actin filaments at its base region to disappear, which further impeded disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments from the vegetal side. XAC appears to reorganize cytoplasmic actin filaments required for precise assembly of the MTOC and, together with the MTOC-TMA, regulate the intranuclear actin filament disassembly essential for meiotic spindle formation. PMID:26424802

  6. Structural analysis of RecA protein-DNA complexes by fluorescence-detected linear dichroism: absence of structural change of filament for pairing of complementary DNA strands.

    PubMed

    Morimatsu, Katsumi; Takahashi, Masayuki

    2006-11-15

    We have developed a simple measuring system for fluorescence-detected linear dichroism and applied it to the structural analysis of the RecA-DNA complex filaments, which are intermediates of the homologous recombination reaction. Taking advantage of the selectivity of fluorescence signals, we distinguished the linear dichroism signals of ethidium bromide and tryptophan residues in the RecA-DNA-ethidium bromide complex, whereas the conventional (absorption-detected) linear dichroism measurement provides only the sum of the signals because signals overlap each other and that of DNA. We further observed that the tryptophan residue at position 290 of RecA in the RecA-DNA-adenosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) complex was oriented parallel to the long axis of the filament, in good agreement with the previous site-specific linear dichroism analysis, and that this orientation was not significantly modified by the pairing of the complementary DNA strand. These results suggest that the pairing reaction occurs without a large structural change of the RecA filament.

  7. Characterization of HI Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubar, Emily; Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2017-01-01

    We characterized the properties of dramatic interstellar HI filaments to learn more about the dynamics and structure of such features. Using Gauss fitting software, we searched the Effelsburg-Bonn HI Survey data for indications of a simple twisting (toroidal) motion across these filaments. Instead, we found that the structure was more complicated than expected. Apparent angular widths of several filaments were measured using the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI), Bonn, and Leident/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) surveys. Based on filament widths and other parameters, we conclude that magnetism is the dominant force opposing internal motion and maintaining the structure of these filaments. The apparent width as a function of beam width closely follows a relationship reported in 1993 for HI features in general. They tend to subtend an angle two times the beam width, suggesting that the features remain unresolved.The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968), and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana, and the Universities Space Research Association. The Arecibo Observatory REU is funded under grant AST-1559849 to Universidad Metropolitana.

  8. Structural Analysis of Helios Filament-Wound Tanks Subjected to Internal Pressure and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L

    2005-01-01

    A finite-element stress analysis is performed on Helios filament-wound hydrogen tanks to examine the stress field and effect of end dome geometry on the stress field. Each tank is composed of a central circular cylindrical section with either geodesic or hemispherical end domes, which have metallic polar bosses. The tanks are subjected to combined and separate internal pressure and temperature loading conditions, and the stress contributions of each loading component are examined. The tank-wall-polar-boss interfacial meridional tensile stress in the hemispherical dome is found to be approximately 27 percent lower than that in the geodesic dome. The effects of both material anisotropy and the aluminum lining on the intensities of tensile meridional stress at the tank-wall-polar-boss bonding interface are examined.

  9. Nonvolatile conductive filaments resistive switching behaviors in Ag/GaO x /Nb:SrTiO3/Ag structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. G.; Zhi, Y. S.; Wang, P. C.; Sun, Z. B.; Li, L. H.; An, Y. H.; Guo, D. Y.; Tang, W. H.; Xiao, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    Ag/GaO x /NSTO/Ag structures were fabricated, and the electrical properties measurement results show that the device behaviors a unipolar resistance switching characteristic with bi-stable resistance ratio of three orders. In the positive voltage region, the dominant conducting mechanism of high resistance state obeys Poole-Frenkel emission rules, while in the negative region, that obeys space-charge-limited current mechanism. Both the I- V curves of ON and OFF states and temperature-dependent variation resistances indicate that the unipolar resistance switching behavior can be explained by the formation/rupture of conductive filaments, which composed of oxygen vacancies. The stable switching results demonstrated that the structure can be applied in resistance random access memory devices.

  10. Filament Breakaway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-18

    A dark, elongated filament rose up and broke to the lower left and out from the sun seen by NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory, Apr.9-10, 2017. Filaments are cooler clouds of plasma tethered above the sun surface by magnetic forces. They are notoriously unstable and tend not to last more than a few days before they collapse into the sun or break away into space. A video, taken in extreme ultraviolet light, covers about nine hours of activity. Videos are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21592

  11. Structural changes of the regulatory proteins bound to the thin filaments in skeletal muscle contraction by X-ray fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Yasunobu Takezawa, Yasunori; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Ueno, Yutaka; Minakata, Shiho; Tanaka, Hidehiro; Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    2008-04-25

    In order to clarify the structural changes related to the regulation mechanism in skeletal muscle contraction, the intensity changes of thin filament-based reflections were investigated by X-ray fiber diffraction. The time course and extent of intensity changes of the first to third order troponin (TN)-associated meridional reflections with a basic repeat of 38.4 nm were different for each of these reflections. The intensity of the first and second thin filament layer lines changed in a reciprocal manner both during initial activation and during the force generation process. The axial spacings of the TN-meridional reflections decreased by {approx}0.1% upon activation relative to the relaxing state and increased by {approx}0.24% in the force generation state, in line with that of the 2.7-nm reflection. Ca{sup 2+}-binding to TN triggered the shortening and a change in the helical symmetry of the thin filaments. Modeling of the structural changes using the intensities of the thin filament-based reflections suggested that the conformation of the globular core domain of TN altered upon activation, undergoing additional conformational changes at the tension plateau. The tail domain of TN moved together with tropomyosin during contraction. The results indicate that the structural changes of regulatory proteins bound to the actin filaments occur in two steps, the first in response to the Ca{sup 2+}-binding and the second induced by actomyosin interaction.

  12. Structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Li, Wei; Zhao, Song-Feng

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory (so called MO-ADK theory) for 22 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model.

  13. Regulation of actin filament length in erythrocytes and striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V M

    1996-02-01

    Actin filaments polymerize in vitro to lengths which display an exponential distribution, yet in many highly differentiated cells they can be precisely maintained at uniform lengths in elaborate supramolecular structures. Recent results obtained using two classic model systems, the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton and the striated muscle sarcomere, reveal surprising similarities and instructive differences in the molecules and mechanisms responsible for determining and maintaining actin filament lengths in these two systems. Tropomodulin caps the slow-growing, pointed filament ends in muscle and in erythrocytes. CapZ caps the fast-growing, barbed filament ends in striated muscle, whereas a newly discovered barbed end capping protein, adducin, may cap the barbed filament ends in erythrocytes. The mechanisms responsible for specifying the characteristic filament lengths in these systems are more elusive and may include strict control of the relative amounts of actin filament capping proteins and side-binding proteins, molecular templates (e.g. tropomyosin and nebulin) and/or verniers (e.g. tropomyosin).

  14. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  15. Three-dimensional structure of the M-region (bare zone) of vertebrate striated muscle myosin filaments by single-particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Khayat, Hind A; Kensler, Robert W; Morris, Edward P; Squire, John M

    2010-11-12

    The rods of anti-parallel myosin molecules overlap at the centre of bipolar myosin filaments to produce an M-region (bare zone) that is free of myosin heads. Beyond the M-region edges, myosin molecules aggregate in a parallel fashion to yield the bridge regions of the myosin filaments. Adjacent myosin filaments in striated muscle A-bands are cross-linked by the M-band. Vertebrate striated muscle myosin filaments have a 3-fold rotational symmetry around their long axes. In addition, at the centre of the M-region, there are three 2-fold axes perpendicular to the filament long axis, giving the whole filament dihedral 32-point group symmetry. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure obtained by a single-particle analysis of the M-region of myosin filaments from goldfish skeletal muscle under relaxing conditions and as viewed in negative stain. This is the first single-particle reconstruction of isolated M-regions. The resulting three-dimensional reconstruction reveals details to about 55 Å resolution of the density distribution in the five main nonmyosin densities in the M-band (M6', M4', M1, M4 and M6) and in the myosin head crowns (P1, P2 and P3) at the M-region edges. The outermost crowns in the reconstruction were identified specifically by their close similarity to the corresponding crown levels in our previously published bridge region reconstructions. The packing of myosin molecules into the M-region structure is discussed, and some unidentified densities are highlighted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The 7-stranded structure of relaxed scallop muscle myosin filaments: support for a common head configuration in myosin-regulated muscles.

    PubMed

    Al-Khayat, Hind A; Morris, Edward P; Squire, John M

    2009-05-01

    Isolated relaxed myosin filaments from the myosin-regulated scallop striated adductor muscle have been reconstructed using electron microscopy and single particle analysis of negatively stained filaments. Three-dimensional reconstruction using 7-fold rotational symmetry but without imposed helical symmetry confirmed that the myosin head array is a 7-stranded, right-handed long-pitch 24/1 helix (or left-handed short-pitch 10/1 helix) with the whole structure having an axial repeat of 1440A. Reconstruction using the full helical symmetry revealed details of the myosin head density distribution within the head crowns in the relaxed scallop myosin filament. The resulting density distribution can best be explained by an arrangement in which the two heads from the same myosin molecule interact together within each crown in a compact parallel fashion along the filament axis. The configuration is consistent with the published configuration of the two heads within vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules observed in two-dimensional crystals of smooth muscle myosin and in the structure of tarantula myosin filaments. All these three muscle types are myosin-regulated, providing further support for a general motif of intramolecular interacting-heads structure in the relaxed state of myosin-regulated muscles as was proposed earlier by Woodhead et al. [Woodhead, J.L., Zhao, F.-Q., Craig, R., Egelman, E.H., Alamo, L., Padron, R.. 2005. Atomic model of a myosin filament in the relaxed state. Nature 436, 1195-1199]. However, the orientation of the Wendt structure is different from that found by Woodhead in that the outer head projects outwards and the inner head lies closer to the filament backbone, as in earlier work done on the insect flight muscle myosin filaments [AL-Khayat, H.A., Hudson, L., Reedy, M.K., Irving, T.C., Squire, J.M., 2003. Myosin head configuration in relaxed insect flight muscle: X-ray modelled resting crossbridges in a pre-powerstroke state are poised for

  17. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-10-01

    The chemical structure of penicillin was determined between 1942 and 1945 under conditions of secrecy established by the U.S. and U.K. governments. The evidence was not published in the open literature but as a monograph. This complex volume does not present a structure proof that can be readily comprehended by a student. In this article, a basic structural proof for the penicillin molecule is provided, emphasizing the chemical work. The stereochemistry of penicillin is also described, and various rearrangements are considered on the basis of the accepted β-lactam structure.

  18. Self-assembly of Artificial Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Christopher; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Actin Filaments are long, double-helical biopolymers that make up the cytoskeleton along with microtubules and intermediate filaments. In order to further understand the self-assembly process of these biopolymers, a model to recreate actin filament geometry was developed. A monomer in the shape of a bent rod with vertical and lateral binding sites was designed to assemble into single or double helices. With Molecular Dynamics simulations, a variety of phases were observed to form by varying the strength of the binding sites. Ignoring lateral binding sites, we have found a narrow range of binding strengths that lead to long single helices via various growth pathways. When lateral binding strength is introduced, double helices begin to form. These double helices self-assemble into substantially more stable structures than their single helix counterparts. We have found double helices to form long filaments at about half the vertical binding strength of single helices. Surprisingly, we have found that triple helices occasionally form, indicating the importance of structural regulation in the self-assembly of biopolymers.

  19. Complex Flare Dynamics Initiated by a Filament-Filament Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunming; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong; McAteer, James

    2015-04-01

    We report on a filament eruption that led to a relatively rare filament-filament interaction event. The filaments were located at different heights above the same segment of a circular polarity inversion line (PIL) around a condensed leading sunspot. The onset of the eruption of the lower of the two filaments was accompanied by a simultaneous descent of the upper filament resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction led to the subsequent merger of the filaments into a single magnetically complex structure that erupted to create a large solar flare and an array of complex dynamical activity. A hard X-ray coronal source and an associated enhancement of hot plasma are observed at the interface between the two interacting filaments. These phenomena are related to the production of a small C flare and the subsequent development of a much stronger M flare. Magnetic loop shrinkage and descending dark voids were observed at different locations as part of the large flare energy release giving us a unique insight into these dynamic flare phenomena.

  20. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  1. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  2. Strain sensing behavior of textile structures made of stainless steel continuous filament yarns under uni-axial tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Tao, XiaoMing; Cai, Jiayang; Yu, TongXi

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the sensing behavior of various textile structures made of stainless steel continuous filament yarns for their potential measurement applications for large strain under high temperature. Four knitting structures are designed and tested. It is observed that the resistance change of the fabrics depends on the structure, the shift of the loop decreasing and the change of the contact resistance between yarns increasing are help to the repeat and sensitivity of the relative resistance change respectively. The relative resistance change also depends on the loading condition, such as strain rate, the maximum cycle strain and temperature. In our four knitting structures, single warp-knit has better repetition in strain sensing than the other three structures, this is because the loops in single warp-knit possess a stabilized behavior, and the plastic deformation is the smallest. The mechanisms of this strain sensing behavior have been investigated including the relationships between electrical resistance of yarn and yarn tensile strain, between yarn length transfer in the strain fabric and the fabric tensile strain, as well as contact resistance of the looped yarns. The major contributor has been deduced to be the change of contact resistance between looped yarns during the deformation.

  3. X-ray and cryo-EM structures of monomeric and filamentous actin-like protein MamK reveal changes associated with polymerization

    PubMed Central

    He, Shaoda; Savva, Christos G.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce iron-rich magnetic nanoparticles that are enclosed by membrane invaginations to form magnetosomes so they are able to sense and act upon Earth’s magnetic field. In Magnetospirillum and other magnetotactic bacteria, to combine their magnetic moments, magnetosomes align along filaments formed by a bacterial actin homolog, MamK. Here, we present the crystal structure of a nonpolymerizing mutant of MamK from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 at 1.8-Å resolution, revealing its close similarity to actin and MreB. The crystals contain AMPPNP-bound monomeric MamK in two different conformations. To investigate conformational changes associated with polymerization, we used unmodified MamK protein and cryo-EM with helical 3D reconstruction in RELION to obtain a density map and a fully refined atomic model of MamK in filamentous form at 3.6-Å resolution. The filament is parallel (polar) double-helical, with a rise of 52.2 Å and a twist of 23.8°. As shown previously and unusually for actin-like filaments, the MamK subunits from each of the two strands are juxtaposed, creating an additional twofold axis along the filament. Compared with monomeric MamK, ADP-bound MamK in the filament undergoes a conformational change, rotating domains I and II against each other to further close the interdomain cleft between subdomains IB and IIB. The domain movement causes several loops to close around the nucleotide-binding pocket. Glu-143, a key residue for catalysis coordinating the magnesium ion, moves closer, presumably switching nucleotide hydrolysis upon polymerization—one of the hallmarks of cytomotive filaments of the actin type. PMID:27821762

  4. X-ray and cryo-EM structures of monomeric and filamentous actin-like protein MamK reveal changes associated with polymerization.

    PubMed

    Löwe, Jan; He, Shaoda; Scheres, Sjors H W; Savva, Christos G

    2016-11-22

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce iron-rich magnetic nanoparticles that are enclosed by membrane invaginations to form magnetosomes so they are able to sense and act upon Earth's magnetic field. In Magnetospirillum and other magnetotactic bacteria, to combine their magnetic moments, magnetosomes align along filaments formed by a bacterial actin homolog, MamK. Here, we present the crystal structure of a nonpolymerizing mutant of MamK from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 at 1.8-Å resolution, revealing its close similarity to actin and MreB. The crystals contain AMPPNP-bound monomeric MamK in two different conformations. To investigate conformational changes associated with polymerization, we used unmodified MamK protein and cryo-EM with helical 3D reconstruction in RELION to obtain a density map and a fully refined atomic model of MamK in filamentous form at 3.6-Å resolution. The filament is parallel (polar) double-helical, with a rise of 52.2 Å and a twist of 23.8°. As shown previously and unusually for actin-like filaments, the MamK subunits from each of the two strands are juxtaposed, creating an additional twofold axis along the filament. Compared with monomeric MamK, ADP-bound MamK in the filament undergoes a conformational change, rotating domains I and II against each other to further close the interdomain cleft between subdomains IB and IIB. The domain movement causes several loops to close around the nucleotide-binding pocket. Glu-143, a key residue for catalysis coordinating the magnesium ion, moves closer, presumably switching nucleotide hydrolysis upon polymerization-one of the hallmarks of cytomotive filaments of the actin type.

  5. Filaments in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  6. Structured Molecular Gas Reveals Galactic Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 13CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  7. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  8. CO-dark gas and molecular filaments in Milky Way-type galaxies - II. The temperature distribution of the gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the temperature distribution of CO-dark molecular hydrogen (H2) in a series of disc galaxies simulated using the AREPO moving-mesh code. In conditions similar to those in the Milky Way, we find that H2 has a flat temperature distribution ranging from 10 to 100 K. At T < 30 K, the gas is almost fully molecular and has a high CO content, whereas at T > 30 K, the H2 fraction spans a broader range and the CO content is small, allowing us to classify gas in these two regimes as CO-bright and CO-dark, respectively. The mean sound speed in the CO-dark H2 is cs, dark = 0.64 km s-1, significantly lower than the value in the cold atomic gas (cs, CNM = 1.15 km s-1), implying that the CO-dark molecular phase is more susceptible to turbulent compression and gravitational collapse than its atomic counterpart. We further show that the temperature of the CO-dark H2 is highly sensitive to the strength of the interstellar radiation field, but that conditions in the CO-bright H2 remain largely unchanged. Finally, we examine the usefulness of the [C II] and [O I] fine-structure lines as tracers of the CO-dark gas. We show that in Milky Way-like conditions, diffuse [C II] emission from this gas should be detectable. However, it is a problematic tracer of this gas, as there is only a weak correlation between the brightness of the emission and the H2 surface density. The situation is even worse for the [O I] line, which shows no correlation with the H2 surface density.

  9. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Thushara

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom-made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  10. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, G. S. Thushara

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom--made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  11. Predicting Solar Filament Eruptions with HEK Filament Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, A.; Reeves, K.; Schanche, N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013) has shown a positive correlation (80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME's). If certain filament properties, such as length, chirality, and tilt, indicate a tendency towards filament eruptions, one may be able to further predict an oncoming CME. Towards this end, we present a novel algorithm based on spatiotemporal analysis that systematically correlates filament eruptions documented in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) with HEK filaments that have been grouped together using a tracking algorithm developed at Georgia State University (e.g. Kempton et al. 2014). We also find filament tracks that are not correlated with eruptions to form a null data set in a similar fashion. Finally, we compare the metadata from erupting and non-erupting filament tracks to discover which filament properties may present signs of an eruption onset. Through statistical methods such as the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and Random Forest Classifier, we find that a filament that is increasing in length or changing in tilt with respect to the equator may be a useful gauge to predict a filament eruption. However, the average values of length and tilt for both datasets follow similar distributions, leading us to conclude that these parameters do not indicate an eruption event. This work is supported by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1263241, and NSF DIBBS grant number ACI-1443061.

  12. Self-Assembled DNA Structures for Molecular Force Measurement: A Magnetically Actuated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, M.; Lauback, S.; Miller, C.; Peace, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding molecular forces is important to comprehend many of the underlying properties of molecular machines and biological processes. The relevant forces in these cases often lie in the picoNewton range, and thus experiments on individual biomolecules must integrate techniques capable of measuring such forces. A mechanical system to measure molecular forces associated with interacting DNA strands is being developed by using self-assembled DNA nanostructures and super-paramagnetic beads. The DNA nanostructure consists of single-stranded DNA molecules which can be folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides, i.e., staples, via programmed molecular self-assembly. These nanostructures can be polymerized into micron-scale filaments. By functionalizing the filament ends with bispecific conjugate staples, the structure can be attached to a surface as well as labeled with magnetic beads in order to apply a force on the system. External magnetic fields provide the means to maneuver and manipulate the magnetically labeled DNA structures. Preliminary findings associated with the DNA constructs and their manipulation lay the groundwork to establish real-time control of DNA nanodevices with micromanipulation.

  13. Magnetic Field Structure in Molecular Clouds by Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Su, B. H.; Eswaraiah, C.; Pandey, A. K.; Wang, C. W.; Lai, S. P.; Tamura, M.; Sato, S.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a program to delineate magnetic field structure inside molecular clouds by optical and infrared polarization observations. An ordered magnetic field inside a dense cloud may efficiently align the spinning dust grains to cause a detectable level of optical and near-infrared polarization of otherwise unpolarized background starlight due to dichroic extinction. The near-infrared polarization data were taken by SIRPOL mounted on IRSF in SAAO. Here we present the SIRPOL results in RCW 57, for which the magnetic field is oriented along the cloud filaments, and in Carina Nebula, for which no intrinsic polarization is detected in the turbulent environment. We further describe TRIPOL, a compact and efficient polarimer to acquire polarized images simultaneously at g', r', and i' bands, which is recently developed at Nagoya University for adaption to small-aperture telescopes. We show how optical observations probe the translucent outer parts of a cloud, and when combining with infrared observations probing the dense parts, and with millimeter and submillimeter observations to sutdy the central embedded protostar, if there is one, would yield the magnetic field structure on different length scales in the star-formation process.

  14. Statistical analysis of the strength of ultra-oriented ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene film filaments in the framework of the Weibull model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, Yu. M.; Marikhin, V. A.; Myasnikova, L. P.; Moskalyuk, O. A.; Radovanova, E. I.

    2016-10-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of the tensile strength σ of ultra-oriented ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) film filaments has been performed in the framework of the Weibull model using the results obtained from a large number (50) of measurements. The UHMWPE film filaments have been produced by means of high-temperature multistage zone drawing of xerogels prepared from 1.5% UHMWPE solutions in decalin. The Weibull modulus has been determined for this type of materials. It has been shown that, for the ultimate draw ratio λ = 120, the average tensile strength is equal to 4.7 GPa, which is significantly higher than the tensile strength σ = 3.5 GPa for commercial gel-spun UHMWPE fibers manufactured by the DSM Company (The Netherlands) and the Honeywell International Incorporation (United States). It has been demonstrated that, for 20% of the specimens thus prepared, the tensile strength reaches record-high values σ = 5.2-5.9 GPa.

  15. Structures in Molecular Clouds: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D

    2006-04-20

    We attempt to predict the observed morphology, column density and velocity gradient of Pillar II of the Eagle Nebula, using Rayleigh Taylor (RT) models in which growth is seeded by an initial perturbation in density or in shape of the illuminated surface, and cometary models in which structure is arises from a initially spherical cloud with a dense core. Attempting to mitigate suppression of RT growth by recombination, we use a large cylindrical model volume containing the illuminating source and the self-consistently evolving ablated outflow and the photon flux field, and use initial clouds with finite lateral extent. An RT model shows no growth, while a cometary model appears to be more successful at reproducing observations.

  16. Site-specific cation release drives actin filament severing by vertebrate cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyeran; Bradley, Michael J.; Cao, Wenxiang; Zhou, Kaifeng; Grintsevich, Elena E.; Michelot, Alphée; Sindelar, Charles V.; Hochstrasser, Mark; De La Cruz, Enrique M.

    2014-01-01

    Actin polymerization powers the directed motility of eukaryotic cells. Sustained motility requires rapid filament turnover and subunit recycling. The essential regulatory protein cofilin accelerates network remodeling by severing actin filaments and increasing the concentration of ends available for elongation and subunit exchange. Although cofilin effects on actin filament assembly dynamics have been extensively studied, the molecular mechanism of cofilin-induced filament severing is not understood. Here we demonstrate that actin filament severing by vertebrate cofilin is driven by the linked dissociation of a single cation that controls filament structure and mechanical properties. Vertebrate cofilin only weakly severs Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin filaments lacking this “stiffness cation” unless a stiffness cation-binding site is engineered into the actin molecule. Moreover, vertebrate cofilin rescues the viability of a S. cerevisiae cofilin deletion mutant only when the stiffness cation site is simultaneously introduced into actin, demonstrating that filament severing is the essential function of cofilin in cells. This work reveals that site-specific interactions with cations serve a key regulatory function in actin filament fragmentation and dynamics. PMID:25468977

  17. Redox-driven conductance switching via filament formation and dissolution in carbon/molecule/TiO2/Ag molecular electronic junctions.

    PubMed

    Ssenyange, Solomon; Yan, Haijun; McCreery, Richard L

    2006-12-05

    Carbon/molecule/TiO2/Au molecular electronic junctions show robust conductance switching, in which a metastable high conductance state may be induced by a voltage pulse which results in redox reactions in the molecular and TiO2 layers. When Ag is substituted for Au as the "top contact", dramatically different current/voltage curves and switching behavior result. When the carbon substrate is biased negative, an apparent breakdown occurs, leading to a high conductance state which is stable for at least several hours. Upon scanning to positive bias, the conductance returns to a low state, and the cycle may be repeated hundreds of times. Similar effects are observed when Cu is substituted for Au and for three different molecular layers as well as "control" junctions of the type carbon/TiO2/Ag/Au. The polarity of the "switching" is reversed when the Ag layer is between the carbon and molecular layers, and the conductance change is suppressed at low temperature. Pulse experiments show very erratic transitions between high and low conductivity states, particularly near the switching threshold. The results are consistent with a switching mechanism based on Ag or Cu oxidation, transport of their ions through the TiO2, and reduction at the carbon to form a metal filament.

  18. The Molecular Structure of Monofluorobenzaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozada, Issiah Byen; Sun, Wenhao; van Wijngaarden, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The pure rotational spectra of 2- and 3-fluorobenzaldehyde have been investigated using a chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer in the range of 8-18 GHz and a Balle-Flygare FTMW spectrometer in the range of 4-26 GHz. As in a previous study of monofluorobenzaldehydes, only transitions due to a single planar conformer were observed for 2-fluorobenzaldehyde (O-trans) whereas two planar conformers (O-trans and O-cis) of 3-fluorobenzaldehydes were confirmed. Transitions due to the seven unique ^{13}C isotopologues of each of the three molecules have been observed for the first time. Their rotational constants were used to derive the effective ground state (r_{0}) and substitution (r_{s}) structures. The results compare favourably with the equilibrium (r_{e}) geometries which were determined following geometry optimization at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. José L. Alonso and Rosa M. Villamañán, J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 2, 1989, 85(2), 137-149

  19. Solid friction between soft filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-02

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  20. Solid friction between soft filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  1. On the emergence of molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matyus, Edit; Reiher, Markus; Hutter, Juerg; Mueller-Herold, Ulrich

    2011-05-15

    The structure of (a{sup {+-}},a{sup {+-}},b{sup {+-}})-type Coulombic systems is characterized by the effective ground-state density of the a-type particles, computed via nonrelativistic quantum mechanics without introduction of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A structural transition is observed when varying the relative mass of the a- and b-type particles, e.g., between atomic H{sup -} and molecular H{sub 2}{sup +}. The particle-density profile indicates a molecular-type behavior for the positronium ion, Ps{sup -}.

  2. Characterization of a filamentous virus from Bermuda grass and its molecular, serological and biological comparison with Spartina mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, A; Koohi Habibi, M; Izadpanah, K; Mosahebi, G H; Rubies-Autonell, C; Ratti, C

    2010-10-01

    Bermuda grass with mosaic symptoms have been found in many parts of Iran. No serological correlation was observed between two isolates of this filamentous virus and any of the members of the family Potyviridae that were tested. Aphid transmission was demonstrated at low efficiency for isolates of this virus, whereas no transmission through seed was observed. A DNA fragment corresponding to the 3' end of the viral genome of these two isolates from Iran and one isolate from Italy was amplified and sequenced. A BLAST search showed that these isolates are more closely related to Spartina mottle virus (SpMV) than to any other virus in the family Potyviridae. Specific serological assays confirmed the phylogenetic analysis. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis suggested that these isolates could be considered as divergent strains of SpMV in the proposed genus Sparmovirus.

  3. Reversible S-glutathionylation of Cys 374 regulates actin filament formation by inducing structural changes in the actin molecule.

    PubMed

    Dalle-Donne, I; Giustarini, D; Rossi, R; Colombo, R; Milzani, A

    2003-01-01

    S-glutathionylation, the reversible formation of mixed disulphides of cysteinyl residues in target proteins with glutathione, occurs under conditions of oxidative stress; this could be a posttranslational mechanism through which protein function is regulated by the cellular redox status. A novel physiological relevance of actin polymerization regulated by glutathionylation of Cys(374) has been recently suggested. In the present study we showed that glutathionylated actin (GS-actin) has a decreased capacity to polymerize compared to native actin, filament elongation being the polymerization step actually inhibited. Actin polymerizability recovers completely after dethiolation, indicating that S-glutathionylation does not induce any protein denaturation and is therefore a reversible oxidative modification. The increased exposure of hydrophobic regions of protein surface observed upon S-glutathionylation indicates changes in actin conformation. Structural alterations are confirmed by the increased rate of ATP exchange as well as by the decreased susceptibility to proteolysis of the subtilisin cleavage site between Met(47) and Gly(48), in the DNase-I-binding loop of the actin subdomain 2. Structural changes in the surface loop 39-51 induced by S-glutathionylation could influence actin polymerization in view of the involvement of the N-terminal portion of this loop in intermonomer interactions, as predicted by the atomic models of F-actin.

  4. RESOLVED SHOCK STRUCTURE OF THE BALMER-DOMINATED FILAMENTS IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT: COSMIC-RAY PRECURSOR?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Park, Sangwook; Raymond, John C.; Korreck, Kelly; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Winkler, P. F.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the results from H{alpha} imaging observations of the eastern limb of Tycho's supernova remnant (SN1572) using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We resolve the detailed structure of the fast, collisionless shock wave into a delicate structure of nearly edge-on filaments. We find a gradual increase of H{alpha} intensity just ahead of the shock front, which we interpret as emission from the thin ({approx}1'') shock precursor. We find that a significant amount of the H{alpha} emission comes from the precursor and that this could affect the amount of temperature equilibration derived from the observed flux ratio of the broad and narrow H{alpha} components. The observed H{alpha} emission profiles are fit using simple precursor models, and we discuss the relevant parameters. We suggest that the precursor is likely due to cosmic rays and discuss the efficiency of cosmic-ray acceleration at this position.

  5. THE FORMATION AND ERUPTION OF A SMALL CIRCULAR FILAMENT DRIVEN BY ROTATING MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Xu, Zhe E-mail: yjy@ynao.ac.cn

    2015-04-20

    We present the first observation of the formation and eruption of a small circular filament driven by a rotating network magnetic field (RNF) in the quiet Sun. In the negative footpoint region of an inverse J-shaped dextral filament, the RNF was formed by the convergence to supergranular junctions of several magnetic flux patches of the same polarity, and it then rotated counterclockwise (CCW) for approximately 11 hr and showed up as a CCW rotating EUV cyclone, during which time the filament gradually evolved into a circular filament that surrounded the cyclone. When the calculated convergence and vortex flows appeared around the RNF during its formation and rotation phases, the injected magnetic helicity calculation also showed negative helicity accumulation during the RNF rotation that was consistent with the dextral chirality of the filament. Finally, the RNF rotation stopped and the cyclone disappeared, and, probably due to an emerging bipole and its forced cancellation with the RNF, the closure filament underwent an eruption along its axis in the (clockwise) direction opposite to the rotation directions of the RNF and cyclone. These observations suggest that the RNFs might play an important role in the formation of nearby small-scale circular filaments as they transport and inject magnetic energy and helicity, and the formation of the EUV cyclones may be a further manifestation of the helicity injected into the corona by the rotation of the RNFs in the photosphere. In addition, the new emerging bipole observed before the filament eruption might be responsible for destabilizing the system and triggering the magnetic reconnection which proves useful for the filament eruption.

  6. The Formation and Eruption of a Small Circular Filament Driven by Rotating Magnetic Structures in the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Xu, Zhe

    2015-04-01

    We present the first observation of the formation and eruption of a small circular filament driven by a rotating network magnetic field (RNF) in the quiet Sun. In the negative footpoint region of an inverse J-shaped dextral filament, the RNF was formed by the convergence to supergranular junctions of several magnetic flux patches of the same polarity, and it then rotated counterclockwise (CCW) for approximately 11 hr and showed up as a CCW rotating EUV cyclone, during which time the filament gradually evolved into a circular filament that surrounded the cyclone. When the calculated convergence and vortex flows appeared around the RNF during its formation and rotation phases, the injected magnetic helicity calculation also showed negative helicity accumulation during the RNF rotation that was consistent with the dextral chirality of the filament. Finally, the RNF rotation stopped and the cyclone disappeared, and, probably due to an emerging bipole and its forced cancellation with the RNF, the closure filament underwent an eruption along its axis in the (clockwise) direction opposite to the rotation directions of the RNF and cyclone. These observations suggest that the RNFs might play an important role in the formation of nearby small-scale circular filaments as they transport and inject magnetic energy and helicity, and the formation of the EUV cyclones may be a further manifestation of the helicity injected into the corona by the rotation of the RNFs in the photosphere. In addition, the new emerging bipole observed before the filament eruption might be responsible for destabilizing the system and triggering the magnetic reconnection which proves useful for the filament eruption.

  7. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    SciTech Connect

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  8. Surface manipulation of protein filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreplak, Laurent; Staple, Douglas; Loparic, Marko; Kreuzer, Hans-Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Within mammalian tissues, cells move by actively remodeling a dense network of collagen fibrils. In order to study this situation, we analyze the force response of two types of filamentous protein structures, desmin intermediate filaments 12 nm in diameter and collagen fibrils 80 nm in diameter. Both types of filaments were adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface and locally moved with an AFM tip at constant velocity against surface friction in the interfacial plane. In the case of collagen fibrils, that have an extensibility below 30% extension, we observed that microns long fibrils could be moved by the tip and deformed into shapes that could not be explain by the linear elastic theory for a stiff rod. In the case of desmin filaments that can be stretched up to 3.5 times there length, we observed local stretching of the filaments and discreet steps in the torsional force measured with the cantilever. In order to describe both types of filaments' behaviors, we described the protein filaments as a chain of beads of mass m linked together by a mass-less polymer linker. By solving the Newtonian equations of motions for the coupled beads in the presence of a point load and a viscous drag due to the surface-filament interactions we were able to reproduced our experimental data and extract information on friction.

  9. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  10. In-depth characterization and computational 3D reconstruction of flagellar filament protein layer structure based on in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Kozma, Daniel; Nemeth, Andrea; Jankovics, Hajnalka; Kurunczi, Sandor; Horvath, Robert; Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Fried, Miklos; Petrik, Peter

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we have reconstructed the statistical 3D structure of hundreds of nanometers thick surface immobilized flagellar filament protein layers in their native environment, in buffer solution. The protein deposition onto the surface activated Ta 2O 5 film was performed in a flow cell, and the immobilization process was followed by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. A multilayer optical model was developed, in that the protein layer was described by five effective medium sublayers. Applying this method, an in-depth analysis of the protein layer formation was performed. Based on the kinetics in the distribution of the surface mass density, the statistical properties of the filamentous film could be determined computationally as a function of the measurement time. It was also demonstrated that the 3D structure of the protein layer can be reconstructed based on the calculated in-depth mass density profile. The computational investigation revealed that the filaments can be classified into two individual groups in approximately equal ratio according to their orientation. In the first group the filaments are close to laying position, whereas in the second group they are in a standing position, resulting in a significantly denser sublayer close to the substrate than at a larger distance.

  11. Molecular docking to ensembles of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Knegtel, R M; Kuntz, I D; Oshiro, C M

    1997-02-21

    Until recently, applications of molecular docking assumed that the macromolecular receptor exists in a single, rigid conformation. However, structural studies involving different ligands bound to the same target biomolecule frequently reveal modest but significant conformational changes in the target. In this paper, two related methods for molecular docking are described that utilize information on conformational variability from ensembles of experimental receptor structures. One method combines the information into an "energy-weighted average" of the interaction energy between a ligand and each receptor structure. The other method performs the averaging on a structural level, producing a "geometry-weighted average" of the inter-molecular force field score used in DOCK 3.5. Both methods have been applied in docking small molecules to ensembles of crystal and solution structures, and we show that experimentally determined binding orientations and computed energies of known ligands can be reproduced accurately. The use of composite grids, when conformationally different protein structures are available, yields an improvement in computational speed for database searches in proportion to the number of structures.

  12. Ionic Wave Propagation along Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tuszyński, J. A.; Portet, S.; Dixon, J. M.; Luxford, C.; Cantiello, H. F.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the conditions enabling actin filaments to act as electrical transmission lines for ion flows along their lengths. We propose a model in which each actin monomer is an electric element with a capacitive, inductive, and resistive property due to the molecular structure of the actin filament and viscosity of the solution. Based on Kirchhoff's laws taken in the continuum limit, a nonlinear partial differential equation is derived for the propagation of ionic waves. We solve this equation in two different regimes. In the first, the maximum propagation velocity wave is found in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. In the general case, we analyze the equation in terms of Fisher-Kolmogoroff modes with both localized and extended wave characteristics. We propose a new signaling mechanism in the cell, especially in neurons. PMID:15041636

  13. Conformational basis for asymmetric seeding barrier in filaments of three- and four-repeat tau.

    PubMed

    Siddiqua, Ayisha; Luo, Yin; Meyer, Virginia; Swanson, Michael A; Yu, Xiang; Wei, Guanghong; Zheng, Jie; Eaton, Gareth R; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth; Eaton, Sandra S; Margittai, Martin

    2012-06-20

    Tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease is intimately linked to the deposition of proteinacious filaments, which akin to infectious prions, have been proposed to spread via seeded conversion. Here we use double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy in combination with extensive computational analysis to show that filaments of three- (3R) and four-repeat (4R) tau are conformationally distinct. Distance measurements between spin labels in the third repeat, reveal tau amyloid filaments as ensembles of known β-strand-turn-β-strand U-turn motifs. Whereas filaments seeded with 3R tau are structurally homogeneous, filaments seeded with 4R tau are heterogeneous, composed of at least three distinct conformers. These findings establish a molecular basis for the seeding barrier between different tau isoforms and offer a new powerful approach for investigating the composition and dynamics of amyloid fibril ensembles.

  14. The velocity characteristics of dusty filaments in the JCMT GBS clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Salji, C.; Richer, J. S.

    2013-07-01

    Large scale, high resolution spectral and continuum imaging maps have revealed, to an unprecedented extent, the characteristics of filamentary structure in star-forming molecular clouds, and their close association with star-forming cores. The filaments are associated with the formation of dense molecular cores where star formation occurs, and recent models highlight the important relationship between filaments and star-forming clusters. Velocity-coherent filaments have been proposed as the parent structures of star forming cores in Taurus. In Serpens, accretion flows along filaments have been proposed as the continuous source of mass for the star forming cluster. An evolutionary scenario for filaments based on velocity dispersion and column density measurements has recently been proposed, which we test with large scale molecular line and dust continuum maps. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey with SCUBA-2 and HARP provides dust continuum observations at 850 and 450 micron, and 12CO/13CO/C18O J=3-2 spectral line mapping of several nearby molecular clouds, covering large angular scales at high resolution. Velocities and linewidths of optically thin species, such as C18O which traces the warm, dense gas associated with star formation, are critical for an estimate of the virial stability of filamentary structures. The data and analyses that we present provide robust statistics over a large range of starless and protostellar evolutionary states. We present the velocity characteristics of dusty filaments in Orion, probing the physics at the boundary of filamentary structure and star formation. Using C18O, we investigate the internal structure of filaments, based on fragmentation and velocity coherence in the molecular line data. Through velocity dispersion measurements, we determine whether the filamentary structures are bound, and compare results between clouds of different star formation characteristics.

  15. Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziatdinov, Maxim; Maksov, Artem; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in high resolution scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have allowed researchers to perform measurements of materials structural parameters and functional properties in real space with a picometre precision. In many technologically relevant atomic and/or molecular systems, however, the information of interest is distributed spatially in a non-uniform manner and may have a complex multi-dimensional nature. One of the critical issues, therefore, lies in being able to accurately identify (`read out') all the individual building blocks in different atomic/molecular architectures, as well as more complex patterns that these blocks may form, on a scale of hundreds and thousands of individual atomic/molecular units. Here we employ machine vision to read and recognize complex molecular assemblies on surfaces. Specifically, we combine Markov random field model and convolutional neural networks to classify structural and rotational states of all individual building blocks in molecular assembly on the metallic surface visualized in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We show how the obtained full decoding of the system allows us to directly construct a pair density function—a centerpiece in analysis of disorder-property relationship paradigm—as well as to analyze spatial correlations between multiple order parameters at the nanoscale, and elucidate reaction pathway involving molecular conformation changes. The method represents a significant shift in our way of analyzing atomic and/or molecular resolved microscopic images and can be applied to variety of other microscopic measurements of structural, electronic, and magnetic orders in different condensed matter systems.

  16. Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision

    DOE PAGES

    Ziatdinov, Maxim; Maksov, Artem; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-08-10

    Recent advances in high resolution scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have allowed researchers to perform measurements of materials structural parameters and functional properties in real space with a picometre precision. In many technologically relevant atomic and/or molecular systems, however, the information of interest is distributed spatially in a non-uniform manner and may have a complex multi-dimensional nature. One of the critical issues, therefore, lies in being able to accurately identify (‘read out’) all the individual building blocks in different atomic/molecular architectures, as well as more complex patterns that these blocks may form, on a scale of hundreds andmore » thousands of individual atomic/molecular units. Here we employ machine vision to read and recognize complex molecular assemblies on surfaces. Specifically, we combine Markov random field model and convolutional neural networks to classify structural and rotational states of all individual building blocks in molecular assembly on the metallic surface visualized in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We show how the obtained full decoding of the system allows us to directly construct a pair density function—a centerpiece in analysis of disorder-property relationship paradigm—as well as to analyze spatial correlations between multiple order parameters at the nanoscale, and elucidate reaction pathway involving molecular conformation changes. Here, the method represents a significant shift in our way of analyzing atomic and/or molecular resolved microscopic images and can be applied to variety of other microscopic measurements of structural, electronic, and magnetic orders in different condensed matter systems.« less

  17. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  18. Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferk, Vesna; Vrtacnik, Margareta; Blejec, Andrej; Gril, Alenka

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the meanings attached by students to the different kinds of molecular structure representations used in chemistry teaching. The students (n = 124) were from primary (aged 13-14 years) and secondary (aged 17-18 years) schools and a university (aged 21-25 years). A computerised "Chemical…

  19. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  20. Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferk, Vesna; Vrtacnik, Margareta; Blejec, Andrej; Gril, Alenka

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the meanings attached by students to the different kinds of molecular structure representations used in chemistry teaching. The students (n = 124) were from primary (aged 13-14 years) and secondary (aged 17-18 years) schools and a university (aged 21-25 years). A computerised "Chemical…

  1. How We Teach Molecular Structure to Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Michael O.

    2002-01-01

    Currently molecular structure is taught in general chemistry using three theories, this being based more on historical development rather than logical pedagogy. Electronegativity is taught with a confusing mixture of definitions that do not correspond to modern practice. Valence bond theory and VSEPR are used together in a way that often confuses…

  2. The bacterial actin MamK: in vitro assembly behavior and filament architecture.

    PubMed

    Ozyamak, Ertan; Kollman, Justin; Agard, David A; Komeili, Arash

    2013-02-08

    It is now recognized that actin-like proteins are widespread in bacteria and, in contrast to eukaryotic actins, are highly diverse in sequence and function. The bacterial actin, MamK, represents a clade, primarily found in magnetotactic bacteria, that is involved in the proper organization of subcellular organelles, termed magnetosomes. We have previously shown that MamK from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 (AMB-1) forms dynamic filaments in vivo. To gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie MamK dynamics and function, we have now studied the in vitro properties of MamK. We demonstrate that MamK is an ATPase that, in the presence of ATP, assembles rapidly into filaments that disassemble once ATP is depleted. The mutation of a conserved active site residue (E143A) abolishes ATPase activity of MamK but not its ability to form filaments. Filament disassembly depends on both ATPase activity and potassium levels, the latter of which results in the organization of MamK filaments into bundles. These data are consistent with observations indicating that accessory factors are required to promote filament disassembly and for spatial organization of filaments in vivo. We also used cryo-electron microscopy to obtain a high resolution structure of MamK filaments. MamK adopts a two-stranded helical filament architecture, but unlike eukaryotic actin and other actin-like filaments, subunits in MamK strands are unstaggered giving rise to a unique filament architecture. Beyond extending our knowledge of the properties and function of MamK in magnetotactic bacteria, this study emphasizes the functional and structural diversity of bacterial actins in general.

  3. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. S.; Cong, H.; Dame, T. M.; Thaddeus, P.

    1980-01-01

    Two large-scale 2.6 mm CO surveys of the galactic plane, one in the first quadrant (l = 12 to 60 deg, b = -1 to +1 deg), the other in the second (l = 105 to 139 deg, b = -3 to +3 deg), have provided evidence that, contrary to previous findings, molecular clouds constitute a highly specific tracer of spiral structure. Molecular counterparts of five of the classical 21-cm spiral arms have been identified: the Perseus arm, the local arm (including Lindblad's local expanding ring), the Sagittarius arm, the Scutum arm, and the 4-kpc arm. The region between the local arm and the Perseus arm is apparently devoid of molecular clouds, and the interarm regions of the inner Galaxy appear largely so. CO spiral structure implies that the mean lifetime of molecular clouds cannot be greater than 100 million years, the time required for interstellar matter to cross a spiral arm. Conservation of mass then sets a limit on the fraction of the interstellar medium in the form of molecular clouds: it cannot exceed one-half at any distance from the galactic center in the range 4-12 kpc.

  4. Chemical and biological structure and transport of a cool filament associated with a jet-eddy system of northern California in July 1986 (OPTOMA21)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Burton H.; Mooers, Christopher N. K.; Rienecker, Michele M.; Stanton, Tim; Washburn, Libe

    1991-01-01

    The distributions of nutrient, pigment, bio-optical, and physical variables were mapped in a jet-eddy system off Point Reyes and Point Arena, California, from July 7 to 19, 1986, in order to describe the 3D variability of the filament and its relation to the nutrient and phytoplankton distributions offshore, to examine the interaction between the filament and coastal water, and to estimate the transport of nutrients and phytoplankton by the jet system. Several cool filaments were distinguishable at distances of more than 35-50 km from the coast in satellite imagery during this period. The juxtaposition of these features as well as the presence of an offshore anticyclone and a cyclone south of the filament anchored to the coast at Point Arena led to complex patterns in all variables, aided by the apparent alongshore variability in the source of upwelled water. This structure has implications for the fluxes of organic material in the region and is probably significant in organizing the interactions among different trophic levels within the system.

  5. ALMA view of the Galactic Center 50km/s molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Kenta; Tsuboi, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Miyawaki, Ryosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    We have observed the Galactic Center 50km/s molecular cloud (50MC) with ALMA to search for filamentary structures. In the CS J=2-1 emission line channel maps, we succeeded in identifying 27 molecular cloud filaments using the DisPerSE algorithm. This is the first attempt of filament-finding in the Galactic Center Region. These molecular cloud filaments strongly suggest that the molecular cloud filaments are also ubiquitous in the molecular clouds of the Galactic Center Region.

  6. Immobilization of functional light antenna structures derived from the filamentous green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arati; Muthuswamy, Jit; Labelle, Jeffrey T; Pizziconi, Vincent B

    2008-08-05

    The integration of highly efficient, natural photosynthetic light antenna structures into engineered systems while their biophotonic capabilities are maintained has been an elusive goal in the design of biohybrid photonic devices. In this study, we report a novel technique to covalently immobilize nanoscaled bacterial light antenna structures known as chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus on both conductive and nonconductive glass while their energy transducing functionality was maintained. Chlorosomes without their reaction centers (RCs) were covalently immobilized on 3-aminoproyltriethoxysilane (APTES) treated surfaces using a glutaraldehyde linker. AFM techniques verified that the chlorosomes maintained their native ellipsoidal ultrastructure upon immobilization. Results from absorbance and fluorescence spectral analysis (where the Stokes shift to 808/810 nm was observed upon 470 nm blue light excitation) in conjunction with confocal microscopy confirm that the functional integrity of immobilized chlorosomes was also preserved. In addition, experiments with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggested that the presence of chlorosomes in the electrical double layer of the electrode enhanced the electron transfer capacity of the electrochemical cell. Further, chronoamperometric studies suggested that the reduced form of the Bchl- c pigments found within the chlorosome modulate the conduction properties of the electrochemical cell, where the oxidized form of Bchl- c pigments impeded any current transduction at a bias of 0.4 V within the electrochemical cell. The results therefore demonstrate that the intact chlorosomes can be successfully immobilized while their biophotonic transduction capabilities are preserved through the immobilization process. These findings indicate that it is feasible to design biophotonic devices incorporating fully functional light antenna structures, which may offer significant performance enhancements to current silicon

  7. How We Teach Molecular Structure to Freshmen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Michael O.

    2002-06-01

    Currently molecular structure is taught in general chemistry using three theories, this being based more on historical development rather than logical pedagogy. Electronegativity is taught with a confusing mixture of definitions that do not correspond to modern practice. Explaining bond type with electronegativity is also done poorly. Teaching of valence bond theory and molecular orbital theory should be left to upper-level classes where it will be used. Currently, valence bond theory and VSEPR are used together in a way that often confuses the students about the difference between the different theories.

  8. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  9. Unwinding Motion of a Twisted Active Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Liu, J. H.; Kong, D. F.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  10. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  11. Structural effects in molecular metal halides.

    PubMed

    Hargittai, Magdolna

    2009-03-17

    Metal halides are a relatively large class of inorganic compounds that participate in many industrial processes, from halogen metallurgy to the production of semiconductors. Because most metal halides are ionic crystals at ambient conditions, the term "molecular metal halides" usually refers to vapor-phase species. These gas-phase molecules have a special place in basic research because they exhibit the widest range of chemical bonding from the purely ionic to mostly covalent bonding through to weakly interacting systems. Although our focus is basic research, knowledge of the structural and thermodynamic properties of gas-phase metal halides is also important in industrial processes. In this Account, we review our most recent work on metal halide molecular structures. Our studies are based on electron diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, and increasingly, we have augmented our experimental work with quantum chemical computations. Using both experimental and computational techniques has enabled us to determine intriguing structural effects with better accuracy than using either technique alone. We loosely group our discussion based on structural effects including "floppiness", relativistic effects, vibronic interactions, and finally, undiscovered molecules with computational thermodynamic stability. Floppiness, or serious "nonrigidity", is a typical characteristic of metal halides and makes their study challenging for both experimentalists and theoreticians. Relativistic effects are mostly responsible for the unique structure of gold and mercury halides. These molecules have shorter-than-expected bonds and often have unusual geometrical configurations. The gold monohalide and mercury dihalide dimers and the molecular-type crystal structure of HgCl(2) are examples. We also examined spin-orbit coupling and the possible effect of the 4f electrons on the structure of lanthanide trihalides. Unexpectedly, we found that the geometry of their dimers depends on the f

  12. On the fine structure of sunspot penumbrae. III. The vertical extension of penumbral filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrero, J. M.; Solanki, S. K.; Lagg, A.; Socas-Navarro, H.; Lites, B.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we study the fine structure of the penumbra as inferred from the uncombed model (flux tube embedded in a magnetic surrounding) when applied to penumbral spectropolarimetric data from the neutral iron lines at 6300 Å. The inversion infers very similar radial dependences in the physical quantities (LOS velocity, magnetic field strength etc.) as those obtained from the inversion of the Fe I 1.56 μm lines. In addition, the large Stokes V area asymmetry exhibited by the visible lines helps to constrain the size of the penumbral flux tubes. As we demonstrate here, the uncombed model is able to reproduce the area asymmetry with striking accuracy, returning flux tubes as thick as 100-300 kilometers in the vertical direction, in good agreement with previous investigations.

  13. Determination of the persistence length of actin filaments on microcontact printed myosin patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajne, Joanna; Hanson, Kristi L.; van Zalinge, Harm; Nicolau, Dan V.; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2015-03-01

    Protein molecular motors, which convert chemical energy into kinetic energy, are prime candidates for use in nanodevice in which active transport is required. To be able to design these devices it is essential that the properties of the cytoskeletal filaments propelled by the molecular motors are well established. Here we used micro-contact printed BSA to limit the amount of HMM that can adsorb creating a tightly confined pathway for the filaments to travel. Both the image and statistical analysis of the movement of the filaments through these structures have been used to new insights into the motility behaviour of actomyosin on topographically homogenous, but motor-heterogeneous planar systems. It will be shown that it is possible to determine the persistence length of the filaments and that it is related to the amount of locally adsorbed HMM. This provides a basis that can be used to optimize the design of future nanodevices incorporating the actomyosin system for the active transport.

  14. Structural features of sugars that trigger or support conidial germination in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Hayer, Kimran; Stratford, Malcolm; Archer, David B

    2013-11-01

    The asexual spores (conidia) of Aspergillus niger germinate to produce hyphae under appropriate conditions. Germination is initiated by conidial swelling and mobilization of internal carbon and energy stores, followed by polarization and emergence of a hyphal germ tube. The effects of different pyranose sugars, all analogues of d-glucose, on the germination of A. niger conidia were explored, and we define germination as the transition from a dormant conidium into a germling. Within germination, we distinguish two distinct stages, the initial swelling of the conidium and subsequent polarized growth. The stage of conidial swelling requires a germination trigger, which we define as a compound that is sensed by the conidium and which leads to catabolism of d-trehalose and isotropic growth. Sugars that triggered germination and outgrowth included d-glucose, d-mannose, and d-xylose. Sugars that triggered germination but did not support subsequent outgrowth included d-tagatose, d-lyxose, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Nontriggering sugars included d-galactose, l-glucose, and d-arabinose. Certain nontriggering sugars, including d-galactose, supported outgrowth if added in the presence of a complementary triggering sugar. This division of functions indicates that sugars are involved in two separate events in germination, triggering and subsequent outgrowth, and the structural features of sugars that support each, both, or none of these events are discussed. We also present data on the uptake of sugars during the germination process and discuss possible mechanisms of triggering in the absence of apparent sugar uptake during the initial swelling of conidia.

  15. Structural Features of Sugars That Trigger or Support Conidial Germination in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Kimran; Stratford, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The asexual spores (conidia) of Aspergillus niger germinate to produce hyphae under appropriate conditions. Germination is initiated by conidial swelling and mobilization of internal carbon and energy stores, followed by polarization and emergence of a hyphal germ tube. The effects of different pyranose sugars, all analogues of d-glucose, on the germination of A. niger conidia were explored, and we define germination as the transition from a dormant conidium into a germling. Within germination, we distinguish two distinct stages, the initial swelling of the conidium and subsequent polarized growth. The stage of conidial swelling requires a germination trigger, which we define as a compound that is sensed by the conidium and which leads to catabolism of d-trehalose and isotropic growth. Sugars that triggered germination and outgrowth included d-glucose, d-mannose, and d-xylose. Sugars that triggered germination but did not support subsequent outgrowth included d-tagatose, d-lyxose, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Nontriggering sugars included d-galactose, l-glucose, and d-arabinose. Certain nontriggering sugars, including d-galactose, supported outgrowth if added in the presence of a complementary triggering sugar. This division of functions indicates that sugars are involved in two separate events in germination, triggering and subsequent outgrowth, and the structural features of sugars that support each, both, or none of these events are discussed. We also present data on the uptake of sugars during the germination process and discuss possible mechanisms of triggering in the absence of apparent sugar uptake during the initial swelling of conidia. PMID:23995938

  16. Chaperonin filaments: their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, T; Kagawa, H K; Trent, J D

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo (J. D. Trent et al., 1997, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 5383-5388). This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg2+ combined with ATP, ADP, ATPgammaS, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  17. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  18. Bacillus subtilis Bactofilins Are Essential for Flagellar Hook- and Filament Assembly and Dynamically Localize into Structures of Less than 100 nm Diameter underneath the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    El Andari, Jihad; Altegoer, Florian; Bange, Gert; Graumann, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widely conserved protein family implicated in cell shape maintenance and in bacterial motility. We show that the bactofilins BacE and BacF from Bacillus subtilis are essential for motility. The proteins are required for the establishment of flagellar hook- and filament structures, but apparently not for the formation of basal bodies. Functional YFP fusions to BacE and to BacF localize as discrete assemblies at the B. subtilis cell membrane, and have a diameter of 60 to 70 nm. BacF assemblies are relatively static, and partially colocalize with flagellar basal bodies, while BacE assemblies are fewer per cell than those of BacF and are highly mobile. Tracking of BacE foci showed that the assemblies arrest at a single point for a few hundred milliseconds, showing that a putative interaction with flagellar structures would be transient and fast. When overexpressed or expressed in a heterologous cell system, bactofilins can form filamentous structures, and also form multimers as purified proteins. Our data reveal a propensity for bactofilins to form filaments, however, in B. subtilis cells, bactofilins assemble into defined size assemblies that show a dynamic localization pattern and play a role in flagellar assembly. PMID:26517549

  19. 8B structure in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, K. R.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.

    2015-04-01

    The structure of the light exotic nucleus 8B is investigated in the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model. The decay of 8B is responsible for almost the entire high- energy solar-neutrino flux, making structure calculations of 8B important for determining the solar core temperature. 8B is a proton halo candidate thought to exhibit clustering. FMD uses a wave-packet basis and is well-suited for modelling clustering and halos. For a multiconfiguration treatment we construct the many-body Hilbert space from antisymmetrised angular-momentum projected 8-particle states. First results show formation of a proton halo.

  20. PARTIAL SLINGSHOT RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yunchun; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Zheng, Ruisheng; Yang, Bo; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan

    2013-02-10

    We present a rare observation of an interaction between two filaments around AR 11358 and AR 11361 on 2011 December 3 that is strongly suggestive of the occurrence of slingshot reconnection. A small elbow-shaped active-region filament (F12) underwent a failed eruption that brought it into contact with a nearby larger, thicker filament (F34). Accompanied by the appearance of complicated internal structures below the erupting F12, its two legs separated away from each other and then connected into F34. This process led the filaments to change their connectivity to form two newly linked filaments, and one of them showed a clear inverse {gamma}-shape. However, the alteration in the filament connectivity was imperfect since F34 is discernible after the eruption. These observations can be interpreted as a partial slingshot reconnection between two filaments that had unequal axial magnetic flux.

  1. Filamentous Fungi.

    PubMed

    Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V; Kendall, Brian A; Griffin, Allen T; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous mycoses are often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment are essential for good clinical outcomes in immunocompromised patients. The host immune response plays an essential role in determining the course of exposure to potential fungal pathogens. Depending on the effectiveness of immune response and the burden of organism exposure, fungi can either be cleared or infection can occur and progress to a potentially fatal invasive disease. Nonspecific cellular immunity (i.e., neutrophils, natural killer [NK] cells, and macrophages) combined with T-cell responses are the main immunologic mechanisms of protection. The most common potential mold pathogens include certain hyaline hyphomycetes, endemic fungi, the Mucorales, and some dematiaceous fungi. Laboratory diagnostics aimed at detecting and differentiating these organisms are crucial to helping clinicians make informed decisions about treatment. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the medically important fungal pathogens, as well as to discuss the patient characteristics, antifungal-therapy considerations, and laboratory tests used in current clinical practice for the immunocompromised host.

  2. Polar patterns of driven filaments.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Volker; Weber, Christoph; Semmrich, Christine; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R

    2010-09-02

    The emergence of collective motion exhibited by systems ranging from flocks of animals to self-propelled microorganisms to the cytoskeleton is a ubiquitous and fascinating self-organization phenomenon. Similarities between these systems, such as the inherent polarity of the constituents, a density-dependent transition to ordered phases or the existence of very large density fluctuations, suggest universal principles underlying pattern formation. This idea is followed by theoretical models at all levels of description: micro- or mesoscopic models directly map local forces and interactions using only a few, preferably simple, interaction rules, and more macroscopic approaches in the hydrodynamic limit rely on the systems' generic symmetries. All these models characteristically have a broad parameter space with a manifold of possible patterns, most of which have not yet been experimentally verified. The complexity of interactions and the limited parameter control of existing experimental systems are major obstacles to our understanding of the underlying ordering principles. Here we demonstrate the emergence of collective motion in a high-density motility assay that consists of highly concentrated actin filaments propelled by immobilized molecular motors in a planar geometry. Above a critical density, the filaments self-organize to form coherently moving structures with persistent density modulations, such as clusters, swirls and interconnected bands. These polar nematic structures are long lived and can span length scales orders of magnitudes larger than their constituents. Our experimental approach, which offers control of all relevant system parameters, complemented by agent-based simulations, allows backtracking of the assembly and disassembly pathways to the underlying local interactions. We identify weak and local alignment interactions to be essential for the observed formation of patterns and their dynamics. The presented minimal polar-pattern-forming system

  3. Colocalization properties of elementary Ca(2+) release signals with structures specific to the contractile filaments and the tubular system of intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Tihomir; Zapiec, Bolek; Förderer, Moritz; Fink, Rainer H A; Vogel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Ca(2+) regulates several important intracellular processes. We combined second harmonic generation (SHG) and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) to simultaneously record the SHG signal of the myosin filaments and localized elementary Ca(2+) release signals (LCSs). We found LCSs associated with Y-shaped structures of the myosin filament pattern (YMs), so called verniers, in intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers under hypertonic treatment. Ion channels crucial for the Ca(2+) regulation are located in the tubular system, a system that is important for Ca(2+) regulation and excitation-contraction coupling. We investigated the tubular system of intact, living mouse skeletal muscle fibers using 2PFM and the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 dissolved in the external solution or the membrane dye di-8-ANEPPS. We simultaneously measured the SHG signal from the myosin filaments of the skeletal muscle fibers. We found that at least a subset of the YMs observed in SHG images are closely juxtaposed with Y-shaped structures of the transverse tubules (YTs). The distances of corresponding YMs and YTs yield values between 1.3 μm and 4.1 μm including pixel uncertainty with a mean distance of 2.52±0.10 μm (S.E.M., n=41). Additionally, we observed that some of the linear-shaped areas in the tubular system are colocalized with linear-shaped areas in the SHG images. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion. VI. The Internal Structures and a Candidate of Transiting Core in NGC 2024 Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiyuan; Li, Di

    2016-06-01

    We present a multiwavelength observational study of the NGC 2024 filament using infrared to submillimeter continuum and the {{NH}}3 (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions centered on FIR-3, the most massive core therein. FIR-3 is found to have no significant infrared point sources in the Spitzer/IRAC bands. But the {{NH}}3 kinetic temperature map shows a peak value at the core center with {T}{{k}}=25 K, which is significantly higher than the surrounding level ({T}{{k}}\\quad = 15-19 K). Such internal heating signature without an infrared source suggests an ongoing core collapse possibly at a transition stage from first hydrostatic core (FHSC) to protostar. The eight dense cores in the filament have dust temperatures between 17.5 and 22 K. They are much cooler than the hot ridge ({T}{{d}}˜ 55 K) around the central heating star IRS-2b. Comparison with a dust heating model suggests that the filament should have a distance of 3-5 pc from IRS-2b. This value is much larger than the spatial extent of the hot ridge, suggesting that the filament is spatially separated from the hot region along the line of sight.

  5. Molecular Structure of a Functional Drosophila Centromere

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; Wahlstrom, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Summary Centromeres play a critical role in chromosome inheritance but are among the most difficult genomic components to analyze in multicellular eukaryotes. Here, we present a highly detailed molecular structure of a functional centromere in a multicellular organism. The centromere of the Drosophila minichromosome Dp1187 is contained within a 420 kb region of centric heterochromatin. We have used a new approach to characterize the detailed structure of this centromere and found that it is primarily composed of satellites and single, complete transposable elements. In the rest of the Drosophila genome, these satellites and transposable elements are neither unique to the centromeres nor present at all centromeres. We discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of heterochromatin structure and on the determinants of centromere identity and function. PMID:9428523

  6. Torsion and curvature of FtsZ filaments.

    PubMed

    González de Prado Salas, Pablo; Hörger, Ines; Martín-García, Fernando; Mendieta, Jesús; Alonso, Álvaro; Encinar, Mario; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Vélez, Marisela; Tarazona, Pedro

    2014-03-28

    FtsZ filaments participate in bacterial cell division, but it is still not clear how their dynamic polymerization and shape exert force on the underlying membrane. We present a theoretical description of individual filaments that incorporates information from molecular dynamic simulations. The structure of the crystallized Methanococcus jannaschii FtsZ dimer was used to model a FtsZ pentamer that showed a curvature and a twist. The estimated bending and torsion angles between monomers and their fluctuations were included in the theoretical description. The MD data also permitted positioning the curvature with respect to the protein coordinates and allowed us to explore the effect of the relative orientation of the preferred curvature with respect to the surface plane. We find that maximum tension is attained when filaments are firmly attached and oriented with their curvature perpendicular to the surface and that the twist serves as a valve to release or to tighten the tension exerted by the curved filaments on the membrane. The theoretical model also shows that the presence of torsion can explain the shape distribution of short filaments observed by Atomic Force Microscopy in previously published experiments. New experiments with FtsZ covalently attached to lipid membranes show that the filament on-plane curvature depends on lipid head charge, confirming the predicted monomer orientation effects. This new model underlines the fact that the combination of the three elements, filament curvature, twist and the strength and orientation of its surface attachment, can modulate the force exerted on the membrane during cell division.

  7. The multicellular nature of filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Antonia; Stavans, Joel; Flores, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    Cyanobacteria carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, play a key role in the cycling of carbon and nitrogen in the biosphere, and have had a large impact on the evolution of life and the Earth itself. Many cyanobacterial strains exhibit a multicellular lifestyle, growing as filaments that can be hundreds of cells long and endowed with intercellular communication. Furthermore, under depletion of combined nitrogen, filament growth requires the activity of two interdependent cell types: vegetative cells that fix CO2 and heterocysts that fix N2. Intercellular molecular transfer is essential for signaling involved in the regulation of heterocyst differentiation and for reciprocal nutrition of heterocysts and vegetative cells. Here we review various aspects of multicellularity in cyanobacterial filaments and their differentiation, including filament architecture with emphasis on the structures used for intercellular communication; we survey theoretical models that have been put forward to understand heterocyst patterning and discuss the factors that need to be considered for these models to reflect the biological entity; and finally, since cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria has the peculiarity of producing linked instead of independent cells, we review distinct aspects of cell division in these organisms.

  8. Filamentous fungal diversity and community structure associated with the solid state fermentation of Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi; Wu, Qun; Xu, Yan

    2014-06-02

    Maotai-flavor liquor is produced by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process under solid state conditions, including Daqu (starter) making, stacking fermentation and alcohol fermentation stages. Filamentous fungi produce many enzymes to degrade the starch material into fermentable sugar during liquor fermentation. This study investigated the filamentous fungal community associated with liquor making process. Eight and seven different fungal species were identified by using culture-dependent and -independent method (PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) analyses, respectively. The traditional enumeration method showed that Daqu provided 7 fungal species for stacking fermentation. The total population of filamentous fungi increased from 3.4 × 10(3)cfu/g to 1.28 × 10(4)cfu/g in the first 3 days of stacking fermentation, and then decreased till the end. In alcohol fermentation in pits, the population continuously decreased and few fungal species survived (lower than 1 × 10(3)cfu/g) after 10 days. Therefore, stacking fermentation is an essential stage for the growth of filamentous fungi. Paecilomyces variotii, Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus terreus were detected by both methods, and P. variotii and A. oryzae were the predominant species. Meanwhile, P. variotii possessed the highest glucoamylase (3252 ± 526 U/g) and A. oryzae exhibited the highest α-amylase (1491 ± 324 U/g) activity among the cultivable fungal species. Furthermore, the variation of starch and reducing sugar content was consistent with the growth of P. variotii and A. oryzae in Zaopei (fermented grains) during stacking fermentation, which implied that the two filamentous fungi played an important role in producing amylase for hydrolyzing the starch. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  10. A novel protocol for molecularly imprinted polymer filaments online coupled to GC-MS for the determination of androgenic steroids in urine.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qisheng; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke

    2013-12-01

    An online system that can perform dynamic microextraction, on-coating derivatization and desorption, and subsequent GC-MS analysis with a large-volume injection was developed. A derivatization cell as the conjunction of the online system was developed for the online extraction and derivatization. To evaluate the feasibility of the online system, methyltestosterone molecularly imprinted polymer filaments (MIPFs) were prepared for the selective online extraction of five androgenic steroids, namely, methyltestosterone, testosterone, epitestosterone, nandrolone, and metandienone. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of testosterone and epitestosterone were 0.09 and 0.12 μg/L, respectively, which were under the minimum required performance limits between 2 and 10 μg/L from the World Anti-Doping Agency. The detection limits of the other three androgenic steroids were varied from 0.04 to 0.18 μg/L. Finally, the MIPFs-GC-MS method was applied for the determination of androgenic steroids in urine, and satisfactory recovery (78.0-96.9%) and reproducibility (3.2-8.9%) were obtained. The proposed online coupling system offers an attractive alternative for hyphenation to GC instruments and could also be extended to other adsorptive materials.

  11. Observations of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.; Xu, A. A.

    An active region filament was well observed on September 4, 2002 with THEMIS at the Teide observatory and SOHO/MDI. The full Stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα and FeI 6302 Å lines. Using the data, we have studied the fine structure of the filament and obtained the parameters at the barb endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Our results indicate: (a) the Doppler velocities are quiet different at barb endpoints; (b) the longitudinal magnetic fields at the barb endpoints are very weak; (c) there is a strong magnetic field structure under the filament spine.

  12. Muscle myosin filaments: cores, crowns and couplings.

    PubMed

    Squire, John M

    2009-09-01

    Myosin filaments in muscle, carrying the ATPase myosin heads that interact with actin filaments to produce force and movement, come in multiple varieties depending on species and functional need, but most are based on a common structural theme. The now successful journeys to solve the ultrastructures of many of these myosin filaments, at least at modest resolution, have not been without their false starts and erroneous sidetracks, but the picture now emerging is of both diversity in the rotational symmetries of different filaments and a degree of commonality in the way the myosin heads are organised in resting muscle. Some of the remaining differences may be associated with how the muscle is regulated. Several proteins in cardiac muscle myosin filaments can carry mutations associated with heart disease, so the elucidation of myosin filament structure to understand the effects of these mutations has a clear and topical clinical relevance.

  13. Structural Dynamics of Troponin I during Ca2+-Activation of Cardiac Thin Filaments: A Multi-Site Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Chalovich, Joseph M.; Marriott, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    A multi-site, steady-state Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach was used to quantify Ca2+-induced changes in proximity between donor loci on human cardiac troponin I (cTnI), and acceptor loci on human cardiac tropomyosin (cTm) and F-actin within functional thin filaments. A fluorescent donor probe was introduced to unique and key cysteine residues on the C- and N-termini of cTnI. A FRET acceptor probe was introduced to one of three sites located on the inner or outer domain of F-actin, namely Cys-374 and the phalloidin-binding site on F-actin, and Cys-190 of cTm. Unlike earlier FRET analyses of protein dynamics within the thin filament, this study considered the effects of non-random distribution of dipoles for the donor and acceptor probes. The major conclusion drawn from this study is that Ca2+ and myosin S1-binding to the thin filament results in movement of the C-terminal domain of cTnI from the outer domain of F-actin towards the inner domain, which is associated with the myosin-binding. A hinge-linkage model is used to best-describe the finding of a Ca2+-induced movement of the C-terminus of cTnI with a stationary N-terminus. This dynamic model of the activation of the thin filament is discussed in the context of other structural and biochemical studies on normal and mutant cTnI found in hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. PMID:23227172

  14. Self-Organization of Treadmilling Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovinski, K.; Kruse, K.

    2007-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is an active network of polar filaments. The activity can lead to the polymerization of filaments at one end and depolymerization at the other. This phenomenon is called treadmilling and is essential for many cellular processes, in particular, the crawling of cells on a substrate. We develop a microscopic theoretical framework for describing systems of treadmilling filaments. We show that such systems can self-organize into structures observed in cell fragments, in particular, asters and moving spots.

  15. A 1000 AU Scale Molecular Outflow Driven by a Candidate First Hydrostatic Core in a Filament Supported by MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Ray; Kitamura, Y.; Shinnaga, H.

    2017-06-01

    To shed light on the physical properties of a first hydrostatic core, first core, in low-mass protostar formation process, we conducted interferometric observations towards an exceptionally young ``proto"star GF9-2 using the CARMA and SMA. The observations have been carried out in the CO J=3-2 line and in the continuum emission at the wavelengths of 3.3 mm, 1.1 mm and 850 micron with a spatial resolution of 400 AU. Our spectroscopic imaging of the CO line revealed that the continuum source is driving a 1000 AU scale molecular outflow, including a pair of lobes where a collimated ``higher" velocity ( 10 km/s with respect to the velocity of the cloud) red lobe exists inside a poorly collimated ``lower" velocity ( 5 km/s) red lobe. These lobes are found to be one of the youngest (dynamical time scales of 500 - 3000 yrs) and the least powerful (momentum rates of 10^{-7}-10^{-6} Msun kms/yr) ones so far detected. All the continuum images detected a single point-like source with an effective beam-deconvolve radius of 250 AU at the center of the 3.5 Sun molecular cloud core. Analyzing the spectral energy distribution of the continuum emission, we estimated a ``circum"stellar mass of the gas and dust to be M_csm 8x10^{-3} Msun within 400 AU in radius, a ``stellar surface" temperature of T* 150 K with an assumption of a ``stellar radius" of 5 AU and a bolometric luminosity of 0.06 Lsun. In addition, a ``stellar" mass of M* < 0.07 +/- 0.02 Msun was estimated using the previously obtained upper limit of the ``stellar" age of tau_* < (2.7 +/- 0.5) x 10^3 yrs and the mass accretion rate of dM/dt_acc = 2.5 x 10^{-5} Msun yr^{-1}. All the observational facts assessed so far reinforces an assertion that the continuum source represents a first core candidate.

  16. [Molecular structure and fractal analysis of oligosaccharide].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-long; Wang, Lu-man; He, Dong-qi; Zhang, Tian-lan; Gou, Bao-di; Li, Qing

    2014-10-18

    To propose a calculation method of oligosaccharides' fractal dimension, and to provide a new approach to studying the drug molecular design and activity. By using the principle of energy optimization and computer simulation technology, the steady structures of oligosaccharides were found, and an effective way of oligosaccharides fractal dimension's calculation was further established by applying the theory of box dimension to the chemical compounds. By using the proposed method, 22 oligosaccharides' fractal dimensions were calculated, with the mean 1.518 8 ± 0.107 2; in addition, the fractal dimensions of the two activity multivalent oligosaccharides which were confirmed by experiments, An-2 and Gu-4, were about 1.478 8 and 1.516 0 respectively, while C-type lectin-like receptor Dectin-1's fractal dimension was about 1.541 2. The experimental and computational results were expected to help to find a class of glycoside drugs whose target receptor was Dectin-1. Fractal dimension, differing from other known macro parameters, is a useful tool to characterize the compound molecules' microscopic structure and function, which may play an important role in the molecular design and biological activity study. In the process of oligosaccharides drug screening, the fractal dimension of receptor and designed oligosaccharides or glycoclusters can be calculated respectively. The oligosaccharides with fractal dimension close to that of target receptor should then take priority compared with others, to get the drug molecules with latent activity.

  17. A Network of Three Types of Filaments Organizes Synaptic Vesicles for Storage, Mobilization, and Docking

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission between neurons requires precise management of synaptic vesicles. While individual molecular components of the presynaptic terminal are well known, exactly how the molecules are organized into a molecular machine serving the storage and mobilization of synaptic vesicles to the active zone remains unclear. Here we report three filament types associated with synaptic vesicles in glutamatergic synapses revealed by electron microscope tomography in unstimulated, dissociated rat hippocampal neurons. One filament type, likely corresponding to the SNAREpin complex, extends from the active zone membrane and surrounds docked vesicles. A second filament type contacts all vesicles throughout the active zone and pairs vesicles together. On the third filament type, vesicles attach to side branches extending from the long filament core and form vesicle clusters that are distributed throughout the vesicle cloud and along the active zone membrane. Detailed analysis of presynaptic structure reveals how each of the three filament types interacts with synaptic vesicles, providing a means to traffic reserved and recycled vesicles from the cloud of vesicles into the docking position at the active zone. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The formation and release of synaptic vesicles has been extensively investigated. Explanations of the release of synaptic vesicles generally begin with the movement of vesicles from the cloud into the synaptic active zone. However, the presynaptic terminal is filled with filamentous material that would appear to limit vesicular diffusion. Here, we provide a systematic description of three filament types connecting synaptic vesicles. A picture emerges illustrating how the cooperative attachment and release of these three filament types facilitate the movement of vesicles to the active zone to become docked in preparation for release. PMID:26985032

  18. A Network of Three Types of Filaments Organizes Synaptic Vesicles for Storage, Mobilization, and Docking.

    PubMed

    Cole, Andy A; Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S

    2016-03-16

    Synaptic transmission between neurons requires precise management of synaptic vesicles. While individual molecular components of the presynaptic terminal are well known, exactly how the molecules are organized into a molecular machine serving the storage and mobilization of synaptic vesicles to the active zone remains unclear. Here we report three filament types associated with synaptic vesicles in glutamatergic synapses revealed by electron microscope tomography in unstimulated, dissociated rat hippocampal neurons. One filament type, likely corresponding to the SNAREpin complex, extends from the active zone membrane and surrounds docked vesicles. A second filament type contacts all vesicles throughout the active zone and pairs vesicles together. On the third filament type, vesicles attach to side branches extending from the long filament core and form vesicle clusters that are distributed throughout the vesicle cloud and along the active zone membrane. Detailed analysis of presynaptic structure reveals how each of the three filament types interacts with synaptic vesicles, providing a means to traffic reserved and recycled vesicles from the cloud of vesicles into the docking position at the active zone. The formation and release of synaptic vesicles has been extensively investigated. Explanations of the release of synaptic vesicles generally begin with the movement of vesicles from the cloud into the synaptic active zone. However, the presynaptic terminal is filled with filamentous material that would appear to limit vesicular diffusion. Here, we provide a systematic description of three filament types connecting synaptic vesicles. A picture emerges illustrating how the cooperative attachment and release of these three filament types facilitate the movement of vesicles to the active zone to become docked in preparation for release. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363222-09$15.00/0.

  19. Wide-field SCUBA-2 observations of NGC 2264: submillimetre clumps and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Richer, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    We present wide-field observations of the NGC 2264 molecular cloud in the dust continuum at 850 and 450 μm using SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Using 12CO 3 → 2 molecular line data, we determine that emission from CO contaminates the 850 μm emission at levels ˜30 per cent in localized regions associated with high-velocity molecular outflows. Much higher contamination levels of 60 per cent are seen in shocked regions near the massive star S Mon. If not removed, the levels of CO contamination would contribute an extra 13 per cent to the dust mass in NGC 2264. We use the FELLWALKER routine to decompose the dust into clumpy structures, and a Hessian-based routine to decompose the dust into filamentary structures. The filaments can be described as a hub-filament structure, with lower column density filaments radiating from the NGC 2264 C protocluster hub. Above mean filament column densities of 2.4 × 1022 cm-2, star formation proceeds with the formation of two or more protostars. Below these column densities, filaments are starless, or contain only a single protostar.

  20. The Regulation of Filamentous Growth in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul J.; Sprague, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous growth is a nutrient-regulated growth response that occurs in many fungal species. In pathogens, filamentous growth is critical for host–cell attachment, invasion into tissues, and virulence. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes filamentous growth, which provides a genetically tractable system to study the molecular basis of the response. Filamentous growth is regulated by evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways. One of these pathways is a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A remarkable feature of the filamentous growth MAPK pathway is that it is composed of factors that also function in other pathways. An intriguing challenge therefore has been to understand how pathways that share components establish and maintain their identity. Other canonical signaling pathways—rat sarcoma/protein kinase A (RAS/PKA), sucrose nonfermentable (SNF), and target of rapamycin (TOR)—also regulate filamentous growth, which raises the question of how signals from multiple pathways become integrated into a coordinated response. Together, these pathways regulate cell differentiation to the filamentous type, which is characterized by changes in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and cell shape. How these changes are accomplished is also discussed. High-throughput genomics approaches have recently uncovered new connections to filamentous growth regulation. These connections suggest that filamentous growth is a more complex and globally regulated behavior than is currently appreciated, which may help to pave the way for future investigations into this eukaryotic cell differentiation behavior. PMID:22219507

  1. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.

  2. Semiflexible biopolymers: Microrheology and single filament condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnurr, Bernhard

    Polymers and their elementary subunits, called monomers, come in an immense variety of structures and sizes, and are of great importance for their material properties as well as a multitude of biological functions. The emphasis here is on semiflexible polymers, which are identified by their intermediate degree of stiffness. Their individual as well as their collective properties when assembled into entangled networks is a topic of great interest to polymer physics, materials science, and biology. Some of the most important semiflexible polymers are biopolymers, with such prominent examples as DNA, F-actin, and microtubules. Their functions range from their use as structural elements in the cytoskeleton of most plant and animal cells, to their role as transport tracks for molecular motors, and the storage of genetic information in their linear sequence. The two parts of this experimental and theoretical thesis address single filament aspects as well as network properties of solutions of semiflexible polymers. In the first part, we describe an optical technique for measuring the bulk properties of soft materials at the local scale. We apply it to a solution of entangled, filamentous actin, a particularly difficult material to characterize with conventional techniques. Beyond a description of measurements and apparatus, we also discuss, from a theoretical point of view, the interpretation and fundamental limitations of this and other microrheological techniques. In the second part, we describe the condensation dynamics of a single, semiflexible filament, induced by changing solvent conditions. A biologically important example of this phenomenon is the condensation of DNA into toroidal structures, which occurs, for instance, in viral capsids. Our observations of a molecular simulation motivate an unexpected pathway of collapse via a series of metastable intermediates we call ``racquet'' states. The analysis of the conformational energies of these structures in the

  3. Viewpoint 9--molecular structure of aqueous interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    In this review we summarize recent progress in our understanding of the structure of aqueous interfaces emerging from molecular level computer simulations. It is emphasized that the presence of the interface induces specific structural effects which, in turn, influence a wide variety of phenomena occurring near the phase boundaries. At the liquid-vapor interface, the most probable orientations of a water molecule is such that its dipole moment lies parallel to the interface, one O-H bond points toward the vapor and the other O-H bond is directed toward the liquid. The orientational distributions are broad and slightly asymmetric, resulting in an excess dipole moment pointing toward the liquid. These structural preferences persist at interfaces between water and nonpolar liquids, indicating that the interactions between the two liquids in contact are weak. It was found that liquid-liquid interfaces are locally sharp but broadened by capillary waves. One consequence of anisotropic orientations of interfacial water molecules is asymmetric interactions, with respect to the sign of the charge, of ions with the water surface. It was found that even very close to the surface ions retain their hydration shells. New features of aqueous interfaces have been revealed in studies of water-membrane and water-monolayer systems. In particular, water molecules are strongly oriented by the polar head groups of the amphiphilic phase, and they penetrate the hydrophilic head-group region, but not the hydrophobic core. At infinite dilution near interfaces, amphiphilic molecules exhibit behavior different from that in the gas phase or in bulk water. This result sheds new light on the nature of hydrophobic effect in the interfacial regions. The presence of interfaces was also shown to affect both equilibrium and dynamic components of rates of chemical reactions. Applications of continuum models to interfacial problems have been, so far, unsuccessful. This, again, underscores the

  4. Viewpoint 9--molecular structure of aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pohorille, A; Wilson, M A

    1993-01-01

    In this review we summarize recent progress in our understanding of the structure of aqueous interfaces emerging from molecular level computer simulations. It is emphasized that the presence of the interface induces specific structural effects which, in turn, influence a wide variety of phenomena occurring near the phase boundaries. At the liquid-vapor interface, the most probable orientations of a water molecule is such that its dipole moment lies parallel to the interface, one O-H bond points toward the vapor and the other O-H bond is directed toward the liquid. The orientational distributions are broad and slightly asymmetric, resulting in an excess dipole moment pointing toward the liquid. These structural preferences persist at interfaces between water and nonpolar liquids, indicating that the interactions between the two liquids in contact are weak. It was found that liquid-liquid interfaces are locally sharp but broadened by capillary waves. One consequence of anisotropic orientations of interfacial water molecules is asymmetric interactions, with respect to the sign of the charge, of ions with the water surface. It was found that even very close to the surface ions retain their hydration shells. New features of aqueous interfaces have been revealed in studies of water-membrane and water-monolayer systems. In particular, water molecules are strongly oriented by the polar head groups of the amphiphilic phase, and they penetrate the hydrophilic head-group region, but not the hydrophobic core. At infinite dilution near interfaces, amphiphilic molecules exhibit behavior different from that in the gas phase or in bulk water. This result sheds new light on the nature of hydrophobic effect in the interfacial regions. The presence of interfaces was also shown to affect both equilibrium and dynamic components of rates of chemical reactions. Applications of continuum models to interfacial problems have been, so far, unsuccessful. This, again, underscores the

  5. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huai Liang; Chin, See Leang

    2011-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints) from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation. PMID:22346566

  6. Tunnel ionization, population trapping, filamentation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leang Chin, See; Xu, Huailiang

    2016-11-01

    The advances in femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser technology have led to the discovery of a profusion of new physics. This review starts with a brief historical account of the experimental realization of tunnel ionization, followed by high harmonic generation and the prediction of attosecond pulses. Then, the unique phenomenon of dynamic population trapping during the ionization of atoms and molecules in intense laser fields is introduced. One of the consequences of population trapping in the highly excited states is the neutral dissociation into simple molecular fragments which fluoresce. Such fluorescence could be amplified in femtosecond laser filamentation in gases. The experimental observations of filament-induced fluorescence and lasing in the atmosphere and combustion flames are given. Excitation of molecular rotational wave packets (molecular alignment) and their relaxation and revival in a gas filament are described. Furthermore, filament-induced condensation and precipitation inside a cloud chamber is explained. Lastly, a summary and future outlook is given.

  7. Effects of solution crowding on actin polymerization reveal the energetic basis for nucleotide-dependent filament stability

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Kendra B.; Sept, David; De La Cruz, Enrique M.

    2008-01-01

    Actin polymerization is a fundamental cellular process involved in cell structure maintenance, force generation, and motility. Phosphate release from filament subunits following ATP hydrolysis destabilizes the filament lattice and increases the critical concentration (Cc) for assembly. The structural differences between ATP- and ADP-actin are still debated, as well as the energetic factors that underlie nucleotide-dependent filament stability, particularly under crowded intracellular conditions. Here, we investigate the effect of crowding agents on ATP- and ADP-actin polymerization, and find that ATP-actin polymerization is largely unaffected by solution crowding, while crowding agents lower the Cc of ADP-actin in a concentration-dependent manner. The stabilities of ATP- and ADP-actin filaments are comparable in the presence of physiological amounts (~30% w/v) and types (sorbitol) of low molecular weight crowding agents. Crowding agents act to stabilize ADP-F-actin by slowing subunit dissociation. These observations suggest that nucleotide hydrolysis and phosphate release per se do not introduce intrinsic differences in the in vivo filament stability. Rather, the preferential disassembly of ADP-actin filaments in cells is driven through interactions with regulatory proteins. Interpretation of the experimental data according to osmotic stress theory implicates water as an allosteric regulator of actin activity and hydration as the molecular basis for nucleotide-dependent filament stability. PMID:18374941

  8. Scrape-Off-Layer Current Model for Filament Structure Observed during Edge-Localized Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hironori; Fredrickson, E. D.; Schaffer, M. J.

    2008-05-23

    The plasma in tokamaks often exhibits a relaxation oscillation called the edge-localized mode (ELM), which is generally attributed to MHD instability driven by strong gradients at the plasma boundary. It is shown here that field-aligned currents flowing just outside the boundary may also play a role in the ELM process. The poloidal perturbation magnetic field during ELMs in the DIII-D tokamak calculated from measured currents can reproduce prominent observed features, including a narrow magnetic structure at the outboard midplane similar to filaments observed earlier in DIII-D and NSTX.

  9. Scrape-off Layer Current Model for Filament Structure Observed during Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hironori; Fredrickson, E. D.; Schaffer, M. J.

    2008-04-15

    The plasma in tokamaks often exhibits a relaxation oscillation called the edge localized mode (ELM), which is generally attributed to MHD instability driven by strong gradients at the plasma boundary. It is shown here that field-aligned currents flowing just outside the boundary may also play a role in the ELM process. The poloidal perturbation magnetic field during ELMs in the DIII–D tokamak calculated from measured currents can reproduce prominent observed features, including a narrow magnetic structure at the outboard midplane similar to filaments observed earlier in DIII–D and NSTX.

  10. Molecular structure of the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Barbara; Persikov, Anton V

    2005-01-01

    The molecular conformation of the collagen triple helix confers strict amino acid sequence constraints, requiring a (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating pattern and a high content of imino acids. The increasing family of collagens and proteins with collagenous domains shows the collagen triple helix to be a basic motif adaptable to a range of proteins and functions. Its rodlike domain has the potential for various modes of self-association and the capacity to bind receptors, other proteins, GAGs, and nucleic acids. High-resolution crystal structures obtained for collagen model peptides confirm the supercoiled triple helix conformation, and provide new information on hydrogen bonding patterns, hydration, sidechain interactions, and ligand binding. For several peptides, the helix twist was found to be sequence dependent, and such variation in helix twist may serve as recognition features or to orient the triple helix for binding. Mutations in the collagen triple-helix domain lead to a variety of human disorders. The most common mutations are single-base substitutions that lead to the replacement of one Gly residue, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern. A single Gly substitution destabilizes the triple helix through a local disruption in hydrogen bonding and produces a discontinuity in the register of the helix. Molecular information about the collagen triple helix and the effect of mutations will lead to a better understanding of function and pathology.

  11. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-08-14

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation--a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  13. Filamentation in Laser Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Eva; Trines, Raoul; Silva, Luis; Bingham, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Laser filamentation instability is observed in plasma wakefields with sub-critical densities, and in high density inertial fusion plasmas. This leads to non-uniform acceleration or compression respectively. Here, we present simulation results on laser filamentation in plasma wakefields. The 2-D simulations are carried out using the particle-in-cell code Osiris. The filament intensity was found to increase exponentially before saturating. The maximum amplitude to which the highest intensity filament grew for a specific set of parameters was also recorded, and plotted against a corresponding parameter value. Clear, positively correlated linear trends were established between plasma density, transverse wavenumber k, laser pulse amplitude and maximum filament amplitude. Plasma density and maximum filament amplitude also showed a positive correlation, which saturated after a certain plasma density. Pulse duration and interaction length did not affect either filament intensity or transverse k value in a predictable manner. There was no discernible trend between pulse amplitude and filament width.

  14. Quantitative nanoscale imaging of orientational order in biological filaments by polarized superresolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Valades Cruz, Cesar Augusto; Shaban, Haitham Ahmed; Kress, Alla; Bertaux, Nicolas; Monneret, Serge; Mavrakis, Manos; Savatier, Julien; Brasselet, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Essential cellular functions as diverse as genome maintenance and tissue morphogenesis rely on the dynamic organization of filamentous assemblies. For example, the precise structural organization of DNA filaments has profound consequences on all DNA-mediated processes including gene expression, whereas control over the precise spatial arrangement of cytoskeletal protein filaments is key for mechanical force generation driving animal tissue morphogenesis. Polarized fluorescence is currently used to extract structural organization of fluorescently labeled biological filaments by determining the orientation of fluorescent labels, however with a strong drawback: polarized fluorescence imaging is indeed spatially limited by optical diffraction, and is thus unable to discriminate between the intrinsic orientational mobility of the fluorophore labels and the real structural disorder of the labeled biomolecules. Here, we demonstrate that quantitative single-molecule polarized detection in biological filament assemblies allows not only to correct for the rotational flexibility of the label but also to image orientational order of filaments at the nanoscale using superresolution capabilities. The method is based on polarized direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, using dedicated optical scheme and image analysis to determine both molecular localization and orientation with high precision. We apply this method to double-stranded DNA in vitro and microtubules and actin stress fibers in whole cells. PMID:26831082

  15. Filament Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We have been investigating filament eruptions in recent years. Use filament eruptions as markers of the coronal field evolution. Data from SoHO, Yohkoh, TRACE, Hinode, and other sources. We and others have observed: (1)Filaments often show slow rise, followed by fast rise, (2) Brightenings, preflares, microflares during slow rise (3) Magnetic evolution in hours prior to eruption onset. We investigated What do Hinode and SDO show for filament eruptions?

  16. Correlation between supercoiling and conformational motions of the bacterial flagellar filament.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Andreas M; Unruh, Tobias; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    2013-11-05

    The bacterial flagellar filament is a very large macromolecular assembly of a single protein, flagellin. Various supercoiled states of the filament exist, which are formed by two structurally different conformations of flagellin in different ratios. We investigated the correlation between supercoiling of the protofilaments and molecular dynamics in the flagellar filament using quasielastic and elastic incoherent neutron scattering on the picosecond and nanosecond timescales. Thermal fluctuations in the straight L- and R-type filaments were measured and compared to the resting state of the wild-type filament. Amplitudes of motion on the picosecond timescale were found to be similar in the different conformational states. Mean-square displacements and protein resilience on the 0.1 ns timescale demonstrate that the L-type state is more flexible and less resilient than the R-type, whereas the wild-type state lies in between. Our results provide strong support that supercoiling of the protofilaments in the flagellar filament is determined by the strength of molecular forces in and between the flagellin subunits.

  17. Filamentation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, N.J.; Barth, C.J.; Chu, C.C.; Lok, J.; Montvai, A.; Oomens, A.A.; Peters, M.; Pijper, F.J.; de Rover, M.; Schueller, F.C.; Steenbakkers, M.F.; RTP team

    1995-09-01

    The relevance of a nest of toroidal flux surfaces as a paradigm of the magnetic topology of a tokamak plasma is challenged. High resolution Thomson scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in RTP show several hot filaments in the plasma center and sharp gradients near the sawtooth inversion radius and structures outside the sawtooth region under central ECH. In ohmic plasmas, too, the pressure and temperature profiles show significant bumps. These measurements give evidence of a complex magnetic topology. Transport in a medium with spatially strongly varying diffusivity is considered. It is shown that macroscopic transport is determined by the microscopic structure: a transport theory must predict this structure and the diffusivity in the insulating regions, while the {open_quote}turbulent{close_quote} diffusivity is irrelevant. A numerical approach to equilibria with broken surfaces is presented. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Using cell structures to develop functional nanomaterials and nanostructures--case studies of actin filaments and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kevin Chia-Wen; Yang, Chung-Yao; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2014-04-25

    This article is based on the continued development of biologically relevant elements (i.e., actin filaments and microtubules in living cells) as building blocks to create functional nanomaterials and nanostructures that can then be used to manufacture nature-inspired small-scale devices or systems. Here, we summarize current progress in the field and focus specifically on processes characterized by (1) robustness and ease of use, (2) inexpensiveness, and (3) potential expandability to mass production. This article, we believe, will provide scientists and engineers with a more comprehensive understanding of how to mine biological materials and natural design features to construct functional materials and devices.

  19. HST imaging of the dusty filaments and nucleus swirl in NGC4696 at the centre of the Centaurus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, A. C.; Walker, S. A.; Russell, H. R.; Pinto, C.; Canning, R. E. A.; Salome, P.; Sanders, J. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Zweibel, E. G.; Conselice, C. J.; Combes, F.; Crawford, C. S.; Ferland, G. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Hatch, N. A.; Johnstone, R. M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    Narrow-band HST imaging has resolved the detailed internal structure of the 10 kpc diameter H α+[N II] emission line nebulosity in NGC4696, the central galaxy in the nearby Centaurus cluster, showing that the dusty, molecular, filaments have a width of about 60 pc. Optical morphology and velocity measurements indicate that the filaments are dragged out by the bubbling action of the radio source as part of the active galactic nucleus feedback cycle. Using the drag force we find that the magnetic field in the filaments is in approximate pressure equipartition with the hot gas. The filamentary nature of the cold gas continues inwards, swirling around and within the Bondi accretion radius of the central black hole, revealing the magnetic nature of the gas flows in massive elliptical galaxies. HST imaging resolves the magnetic, dusty, molecular filaments at the centre of the Centaurus cluster to a swirl around and within the Bondi radius.

  20. Amino acid sequence homologies in the hard keratins of birds and reptiles, and their implications for molecular structure and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Fraser, R D Bruce; Parry, David A D

    2014-12-01

    Avian and reptilian epidermal appendages such as feathers, claws and scales exhibit a filament-matrix texture. Previous studies have established that both components reside within the same single-chain molecule. In the present study the homology in a wide range of aligned sequences is used to gain insights into the structure and function of the molecular segments associated with the filament and with the matrix. The notion that all molecules contain a β-rich 34-residue segment associated with the framework of the filament is reinforced by the present study. In addition, the residues involved in the polymerization of the molecules to form filaments are identified. In the Archosaurs (birds, crocodiles and turtles), and the Squamates (snakes and lizards) segments rich in glycine and tyrosine can be identified in the C-terminal domain. In Rhynocephalians (tuataras) and Squamates a similar segment is inserted at a specific point in the N-terminal domain. In some Archosaurian appendages (both avian and reptilian) segments rich in charged residues and cysteine are found in the N-terminal domain. The likely effect of these segments will be to soften the tissue without compromising its insolubility. The structure and role of the various molecular segments identified in this study and the way in which they might manifest themselves in terms of the physical properties of the particular epidermal appendage in which they appear are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Galactic cold cores. VIII. Filament formation and evolution: Filament properties in context with evolutionary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.; Men'shchikov, A.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Marston, A.; Martin, P. G.; Pagani, L.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Ysard, N.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Marshall, D. J.; Montier, L.; Tóth, L. V.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The onset of star formation is intimately linked with the presence of massive unstable filamentary structures. These filaments are therefore key for theoretical models that aim to reproduce the observed characteristics of the star formation process in the Galaxy. Aims: As part of the filament study carried out by the Herschel Galactic Cold Cores Key Programme, here we study and discuss the filament properties presented in GCC VII (Paper I) in context with theoretical models of filament formation and evolution. Methods: A conservatively selected sample of filaments located at a distance D< 500 pc was extracted from the GCC fields with the getfilaments algorithm. The physical structure of the filaments was quantified according to two main components: the central (Gaussian) region of the filament (core component), and the power-law-like region dominating the filament column density profile at larger radii (wing component). The properties and behaviour of these components relative to the total linear mass density of the filament and the column density of its environment were compared with the predictions from theoretical models describing the evolution of filaments under gravity-dominated conditions. Results: The feasibility of a transition from a subcritical to supercritical state by accretion at any given time is dependent on the combined effect of filament intrinsic properties and environmental conditions. Reasonably self-gravitating (high Mline,core) filaments in dense environments (AV≳ 3 mag) can become supercritical on timescales of t 1 Myr by accreting mass at constant or decreasing width. The trend of increasing Mline,tot (Mline,core and Mline,wing) and ridge AV with background for the filament population also indicates that the precursors of star-forming filaments evolve coevally with their environment. The simultaneous increase of environment and filament AV explains the observed association between dense environments and high Mline,core values

  2. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Tarantula Myosin Filaments Suggests How Phosphorylation May Regulate Myosin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiría; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-01-01

    Summary Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLC). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that myosin is switched off by intramolecular interactions between its two heads, the free-head and the blocked head. Three-dimensional reconstruction of frozen-hydrated specimens reveals that this asymmetric head interaction is also present in native thick filaments of tarantula striated muscle. Our goal here has been to elucidate the structural features of the tarantula filament involved in phosphorylation-based regulation. A new reconstruction reveals intra- and intermolecular myosin interactions in addition to those seen previously. To help interpret the interactions, we sequenced the tarantula RLC, and fitted to the reconstruction an atomic model of the myosin head that included the predicted RLC atomic structure and an S2 crystal structure. The fitting suggests an intramolecular interaction between the cardiomyopathy loop of the free-head and its own S2 and two intermolecular interactions—between the cardio-loop of the free head and the ELC of the blocked head, and between the Leu-305 - Gln-327 “interaction loop” (loop I) of the free-head and the N-terminal fragment of the RLC of the blocked-head. These interactions, added to those previously described, would help to switch off the thick filament. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest how phosphorylation could increase the helical content of the RLC N-terminus, weakening these interactions, thus releasing both heads and activating the thick filament. PMID:18951904

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of tarantula myosin filaments suggests how phosphorylation may regulate myosin activity.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiria; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-12-26

    Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLCs). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that myosin is switched off by intramolecular interactions between its two heads, the free head and the blocked head. Three-dimensional reconstruction of frozen-hydrated specimens revealed that this asymmetric head interaction is also present in native thick filaments of tarantula striated muscle. Our goal in this study was to elucidate the structural features of the tarantula filament involved in phosphorylation-based regulation. A new reconstruction revealed intra- and intermolecular myosin interactions in addition to those seen previously. To help interpret the interactions, we sequenced the tarantula RLC and fitted an atomic model of the myosin head that included the predicted RLC atomic structure and an S2 (subfragment 2) crystal structure to the reconstruction. The fitting suggests one intramolecular interaction, between the cardiomyopathy loop of the free head and its own S2, and two intermolecular interactions, between the cardiac loop of the free head and the essential light chain of the blocked head and between the Leu305-Gln327 interaction loop of the free head and the N-terminal fragment of the RLC of the blocked head. These interactions, added to those previously described, would help switch off the thick filament. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest how phosphorylation could increase the helical content of the RLC N-terminus, weakening these interactions, thus releasing both heads and activating the thick filament.

  4. Structural changes in the myosin filament and cross-bridges during active force development in single intact frog muscle fibres: stiffness and X-ray diffraction measurements.

    PubMed

    Brunello, E; Bianco, P; Piazzesi, G; Linari, M; Reconditi, M; Panine, P; Narayanan, T; Helsby, W I; Irving, M; Lombardi, V

    2006-12-15

    Structural and mechanical changes occurring in the myosin filament and myosin head domains during the development of the isometric tetanus have been investigated in intact frog muscle fibres at 4 degrees C and 2.15 microm sarcomere length, using sarcomere level mechanics and X-ray diffraction at beamline ID2 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). The time courses of changes in both the M3 and M6 myosin-based reflections were recorded with 5 ms frames using the gas-filled RAPID detector (MicroGap Technology). Following the end of the latent period (11 ms after the start of stimulation), force increases to the tetanus plateau value (T(0)) with a half-time of 40 ms, and the spacings of the M3 and M6 reflections (S(M3) and S(M6)) increase by 1.5% from their resting values, with time courses that lead that of force by approximately 10 and approximately 20 ms, respectively. These temporal relations are maintained when the increase of force is delayed by approximately 10 ms by imposing, from 5 ms after the first stimulus, 50 nm (half-sarcomere)(-1) shortening at the velocity (V(0)) that maintains zero force. Shortening at V(0) transiently reduces S(M3) following the latent period and delays the subsequent increase in S(M3), but only delays the S(M6) increase without a transient decrease. Shortening at V(0) imposed at the tetanus plateau causes an abrupt reduction of the intensity of the M3 reflection (I(M3)), whereas the intensity of the M6 reflection (I(M6)) is only slightly reduced. The changes in half-sarcomere stiffness indicate that the isometric force at each time point is proportional to the number of myosin heads bound to actin. The different sensitivities of the intensity and spacing of the M3 and M6 reflections to the mechanical responses support the view that the M3 reflection in active muscle originates mainly from the myosin heads attached to the actin filament and the M6 reflection originates mainly from a fixed structure in the

  5. Solid friction between soft filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A.W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments1,2. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  6. Solid friction between soft filaments

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; ...

    2015-03-02

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag,more » can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.« less

  7. Speculations on the molecular structure of eumelanin.

    PubMed

    Swift, J A

    2009-04-01

    Eumelanin is the polymeric black pigment commonly found in hair and skin. Its chemical intractability, to all but vigorous oxidizing agents, has hindered satisfactory understanding of its molecular structure. It is well-established that the immediate precursor to polymerization, indole-5,6-quinone (IQ), is biosynthesized from the amino acid tyrosine. Current views are that the polymer consists of single bond connections between random indole and degraded indole units. In this paper, an alternative chemical scheme for the polymerization of IQ is proposed based upon the original suggestion by Horner in 1949 that a Diels-Alder (D-A) reaction might be involved. The proposed basic chemical scheme for eumelanin formation is that D-A addition occurs specifically between the 2- and 3-positions of one IQ molecule and the 7- and 4- positions respectively of a second IQ molecule, that the ensuing diketo bridge is oxidized to carboxyl groups and that, by decarboxylation and aromatization, a fused indole dimer is produced. It is envisaged that, by further D-A addition of more IQ molecules, oligomers of greater molecular mass are produced. Calculations based on published bond lengths and angles for the indole nucleus show that oligomeric units containing a total of up to 11 fused indoles could be packed into a flat circular disc of 20 A diameter. The discs of the extensively conjugated polymer are envisaged to be stacked above each other by pi-pi interaction and with a spacing of 3.4 A to produce cylindrical units, the mass density of which is calculated to be 1.54 gm cm(-3); approximating with actual physical measurements. The size and shape of the predicted cylinders are in concordance with those observed in atomic force microscope investigations of eumelanin proto-particles. The model is also in agreement with published experimental data that 2/3rds of the carbon dioxide liberated during eumelanin formation derives from positions 5- and 6- of the IQ molecule.

  8. Structure and dynamics of the membrane-bound form of the filamentous bacteriophage coat proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bogusky, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the Pf1 and fd bacteriophage coat proteins in detergent micelles are characterized in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The coat proteins are found to exist within the bacterial inner cell membrane during viral infection and assembly. The coat proteins serve as a model system to investigate integral membrane proteins as well as the viral infection and assembly processes. The coat protein is insoluble in aqueous or organic solvents and can only be effectively solubilized in the presence of detergents that form micelles or phospholipids that form vesicles. The effective molecular weight of the detergent-micelle complex is ca. 30K daltons. Sequential assignment strategies were ineffective due to short T/sub 2s/ and severe resonance degeneracy. The backbone resonance assignments were completed by the combination of several homo- and heteronuclear correlation techniques with biosynthetic /sup 15/N labelling. 2D NOE experiments were used to locate and characterize the secondary structure of the membrane bound form of the proteins showing them to be largely helical with the hydrophobic core existing in a very stable helix.

  9. Community structure of free-floating filamentous cyanobacterial mats from the Wonder Lake geothermal springs in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Lacap, Donnabella C; Smith, Gavin J D; Warren-Rhodes, Kimberley; Pointing, Stephen B

    2005-07-01

    Cyanobacterial mats were characterized from pools of 45-60 degrees C in near-neutral pH, low-sulphide geothermal springs in the Philippines. Mat structure did not vary with temperature. All mats possessed highly ordered layers of airspaces at both the macroscopic and microscopic level, and these appear to be an adaptation to a free-floating growth habit. Upper mat layers supported biomass with elevated carotenoid:chlorophyll a ratios and an as yet uncharacterized waxy layer on the dorsal surface. Microscopic examination revealed mats comprised a single Fischerella morphotype, with abundant heterocysts throughout mats at all temperatures. Molecular analysis of mat community structure only partly matched morphological identification. All samples supported greater 16S rDNA-defined diversity than morphology suggested, with a progressive loss in the number of genotypes with increasing temperature. Fischerella-like sequences were recovered from mats occurring at all temperatures, but some mats also yielded Oscillatoria-like sequences, although corresponding phenotypes were not observed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Fischerella-like sequences were most closely affiliated with Fischerella major and the Oscillatoria-like sequences with Oscillatoria amphigranulata.

  10. STAR FORMATION IN THE TAURUS FILAMENT L 1495: FROM DENSE CORES TO STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzl, Markus; Kainulainen, Jouni; Henning, Thomas; Launhardt, Ralf; Quanz, Sascha P.; Alves, Joao; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.

    2010-12-10

    We present a study of dense structures in the L 1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud and examine its star-forming properties. In particular, we construct a dust extinction map of the filament using deep near-infrared observations, exposing its small-scale structure in unprecedented detail. The filament shows highly fragmented substructures and a high mass-per-length value of M{sub line} = 17 M{sub sun} pc{sup -1}, reflecting star-forming potential in all parts of it. However, a part of the filament, namely B 211, is remarkably devoid of young stellar objects. We argue that in this region the initial filament collapse and fragmentation is still taking place and star formation is yet to occur. In the star-forming part of the filament, we identify 39 cores with masses from 0.4 to 10 M{sub sun} and preferred separations in agreement with the local Jeans length. Most of these cores exceed the Bonnor-Ebert critical mass, and are therefore likely to collapse and form stars. The dense core mass function follows a power law with exponent {Gamma} = 1.2 {+-} 0.2, a form commonly observed in star-forming regions.

  11. Role of filament annealing in the kinetics and thermodynamics of nucleated polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2014-06-01

    The formation of nanoscale protein filaments from soluble precursor molecules through nucleated polymerization is a common form of supra-molecular assembly phenomenon. This process underlies the generation of a range of both functional and pathological structures in nature. Filament breakage has emerged as a key process controlling the kinetics of the growth reaction since it increases the number of filament ends in the system that can act as growth sites. In order to ensure microscopic reversibility, however, the inverse process of fragmentation, end-to-end annealing of filaments, is a necessary component of a consistent description of such systems. Here, we combine Smoluchowski kinetics with nucleated polymerization models to generate a master equation description of protein fibrillization, where filamentous structures can undergo end-to-end association, in addition to elongation, fragmentation, and nucleation processes. We obtain self-consistent closed-form expressions for the growth kinetics and discuss the key physics that emerges from considering filament fusion relative to current fragmentation only models. Furthermore, we study the key time scales that describe relaxation to equilibrium.

  12. A “Mechanistic” Explanation of the Multiple Helical Forms Adopted by Bacterial Flagellar Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Calladine, C.R.; Luisi, B.F.; Pratap, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    The corkscrew-like flagellar filaments emerging from the surface of bacteria such as Salmonella typhimurium propel the cells toward nutrient and away from repellents. This kind of motility depends upon the ability of the flagellar filaments to adopt a range of distinct helical forms. A filament is typically constructed from ~ 30,000 identical flagellin molecules, which self-assemble into a tubular structure containing 11 near-longitudinal protofilaments. A “mechanical” model, in which the flagellin building block has the capacity to switch between two principal interfacial states, predicts that the filament can assemble into a “canonical” family of 12 distinct helical forms, each having unique curvature and twist: these include two “extreme” straight forms having left- and right-handed twists, respectively, and 10 intermediate helical forms. Measured shapes of the filaments correspond well with predictions of the model. This report is concerned with two unanswered questions. First, what properties of the flagellin determine which of the 12 discrete forms is preferred? Second, how does the interfacial “switch” work, at a molecular level? Our proposed solution of these problems is based mainly on a detailed examination of differences between the available electron cryo-microscopy structures of the straight L and R filaments, respectively. PMID:23274110

  13. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  14. Various Barbs in Solar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Boris

    2017-07-01

    Interest to lateral details of the solar filament shape named barbs, motivated by their relationship to filament chirality and helicity, showed their different orientation relative to the expected direction of the magnetic field. While the majority of barbs are stretched along the field, some barbs seem to be transversal to it and are referred to as anomalous barbs. We analyse the deformation of helical field lines by a small parasitic polarity using a simple flux rope model with a force-free field. A rather small and distant source of parasitic polarity stretches the bottom parts of the helical lines in its direction creating a lateral extension of dips below the flux-rope axis. They can be considered as normal barbs of the filament. A stronger and closer source of parasitic polarity makes the flux-rope field lines to be convex below its axis and creates narrow and deep dips near its position. As a result, the narrow structure, with thin threads across it, is formed whose axis is nearly perpendicular to the field. The structure resembles an anomalous barb. Hence, the presence of anomalous barbs does not contradict the flux-rope structure of a filament.

  15. METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1962-12-18

    A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

  16. The Determination of Molecular Structure from Rotational Spectra

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laurie, V. W.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-07-01

    An analysis is presented concerning the average molecular configuration variations and their effects on molecular structure determinations. It is noted that the isotopic dependence of the zero-point is often primarily governed by the isotopic variation of the average molecular configuration. (J.R.D.)

  17. Molecular cloning of chicken aggrecan. Structural analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, L; Tanzer, M L

    1992-01-01

    The large, aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of cartilage, aggrecan, has served as a generic model of proteoglycan structure. Molecular cloning of aggrecans has further defined their amino acid sequences and domain structures. In this study, we have obtained the complete coding sequence of chicken sternal cartilage aggrecan by a combination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. The composite sequence is 6117 bp in length, encoding 1951 amino acids. Comparison of chicken aggrecan protein primary structure with rat, human and bovine aggrecans has disclosed both similarities and differences. The domains which are most highly conserved at 70-80% identity are the N-terminal domains G1 and G2 and the C-terminal domain G3. The chondroitin sulphate domain of chicken aggrecan is smaller than that of rat and human aggrecans and has very distinctive repeat sequences. It has two separate sections, one comprising 12 consecutive Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 20 amino acids each, adjacent to the other which has 23 discontinuous Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 10 amino acids each; this latter region, N-terminal to the former one, appears to be unique to chicken aggrecan. The two regions contain a total of 94 potential chondroitin sulphate attachment sites. Genomic comparison shows that, although chicken exons 11-14 are identical in size to the rat and human exons, chicken exon 10 is the smallest of the three species. This is also reflected in the size of its chondroitin sulphate coding region and in the total number of Ser-Gly pairs. The putative keratan sulphate domain shows 31-45% identity with the other species and lacks the repetitive sequences seen in the others. In summary, while the linear arrangement of specific domains of chicken aggrecan is identical to that in the aggrecans of other species, and while there is considerable identity of three separate domains, chicken aggrecan demonstrates unique features, notably in its chondroitin sulphate domain and its keratan sulphate

  18. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  19. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  20. Stability and Reformation of Partially Eruptive Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Prasad Choudhary, Debi; Chandra, Ramesh; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Kayshap, Pradeep; Filippov, Boris; Uddin, Wahab

    We present an observation of the confined partial filament eruption on 4 August 2012 which later exhibits a rapid reformation along the same magnetic channel within ≈2 hours. We used BBSO and GONG Halpha as well as SDO AIA 171 Å observations to study the filament properties and its kinematics. SDO/AIA observations over the disk are used to study at coronal temperature the plasma dynamics associated with the filament. STEREO/SECCHI provides the limb observations of the filament dynamics. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure as evident in the Halpha observations and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, it is found that the filament chirality is sinistral. On the other hand, the activated enveloping flux rope shows right-handed twist in the SDO/AIA 171 Å observations. Therefore, this dynamic event exhibits one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). Filament plasma goes into dynamic motion at ≈11:20 UT from its middle part towards the north-west direction with an average speed of ≈100 km s(-1) . Brightening underneath the eruptive part of the filament shows the most likely signature of low atmospheric reconnection. After traveling a distance of around ≈215 Mm towards north-west, the cool filament plasma stops and returns back at ≈12:00 UT towards its eastern foot point with the speed of ≈60 km s(-1) . We calculated the coronal magnetic field decay index (n) near the flux rope. Using this estimation, we conjecture that the filament lies within the stability domain n <1, which is the cause of its stability and possibility of prompt reformation.

  1. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  2. Maintenance of electrostatic stabilization in altered tubulin lateral contacts may facilitate formation of helical filaments in foraminifera

    PubMed Central

    Bassen, David M.; Hou, Yubo; Bowser, Samuel S.; Banavali, Nilesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules in foraminiferan protists (forams) can convert into helical filament structures, in which longitudinal intraprotofilament interactions between tubulin heterodimers are thought to be lost, while lateral contacts across protofilaments are still maintained. The coarse geometric features of helical filaments are known through low-resolution negative stain electron microscopy (EM). In this study, geometric restraints derived from these experimental data were used to generate an average atomic-scale helical filament model, which anticipated a modest reorientation in the lateral tubulin heterodimer interface. Restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the nearest neighbor interactions combined with a Genalized Born implicit solvent model were used to assess the lateral, longitudinal, and seam contacts in 13-3 microtubules and the reoriented lateral contacts in the helical filament model. This electrostatic analysis suggests that the change in the lateral interface in the helical filament does not greatly diminish the lateral electrostatic interaction. After longitudinal dissociation, the 13-3 seam interaction is much weaker than the reoriented lateral interface in the helical filament model, providing a plausible atomic-detail explanation for seam-to-lateral contact transition that enables the transition to a helical filament structure. PMID:27539392

  3. Maintenance of electrostatic stabilization in altered tubulin lateral contacts may facilitate formation of helical filaments in foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassen, David M.; Hou, Yubo; Bowser, Samuel S.; Banavali, Nilesh K.

    2016-08-01

    Microtubules in foraminiferan protists (forams) can convert into helical filament structures, in which longitudinal intraprotofilament interactions between tubulin heterodimers are thought to be lost, while lateral contacts across protofilaments are still maintained. The coarse geometric features of helical filaments are known through low-resolution negative stain electron microscopy (EM). In this study, geometric restraints derived from these experimental data were used to generate an average atomic-scale helical filament model, which anticipated a modest reorientation in the lateral tubulin heterodimer interface. Restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the nearest neighbor interactions combined with a Genalized Born implicit solvent model were used to assess the lateral, longitudinal, and seam contacts in 13-3 microtubules and the reoriented lateral contacts in the helical filament model. This electrostatic analysis suggests that the change in the lateral interface in the helical filament does not greatly diminish the lateral electrostatic interaction. After longitudinal dissociation, the 13-3 seam interaction is much weaker than the reoriented lateral interface in the helical filament model, providing a plausible atomic-detail explanation for seam-to-lateral contact transition that enables the transition to a helical filament structure.

  4. Maintenance of electrostatic stabilization in altered tubulin lateral contacts may facilitate formation of helical filaments in foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Bassen, David M; Hou, Yubo; Bowser, Samuel S; Banavali, Nilesh K

    2016-08-19

    Microtubules in foraminiferan protists (forams) can convert into helical filament structures, in which longitudinal intraprotofilament interactions between tubulin heterodimers are thought to be lost, while lateral contacts across protofilaments are still maintained. The coarse geometric features of helical filaments are known through low-resolution negative stain electron microscopy (EM). In this study, geometric restraints derived from these experimental data were used to generate an average atomic-scale helical filament model, which anticipated a modest reorientation in the lateral tubulin heterodimer interface. Restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the nearest neighbor interactions combined with a Genalized Born implicit solvent model were used to assess the lateral, longitudinal, and seam contacts in 13-3 microtubules and the reoriented lateral contacts in the helical filament model. This electrostatic analysis suggests that the change in the lateral interface in the helical filament does not greatly diminish the lateral electrostatic interaction. After longitudinal dissociation, the 13-3 seam interaction is much weaker than the reoriented lateral interface in the helical filament model, providing a plausible atomic-detail explanation for seam-to-lateral contact transition that enables the transition to a helical filament structure.

  5. Striation and convection in penumbral filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruit, H. C.; Scharmer, G. B.; Löfdahl, M. G.

    2010-10-01

    Observations with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope of the flows seen in penumbral filaments are presented. Time sequences of bright filaments show overturning motions strikingly similar to those seen along the walls of small isolated structures in the active regions. The filaments show outward propagating striations with inclination angles suggesting that they are aligned with the local magnetic field. We interpret it as the equivalent of the striations seen in the walls of small isolated magnetic structures. Their origin is then a corrugation of the boundary between an overturning convective flow inside the filament and the magnetic field wrapping around it. The outward propagation is a combination of a pattern motion due to the downflow observed along the sides of bright filaments, and the Evershed flow. The observed short wavelength of the striation argues against the existence of a dynamically significant horizontal field inside the bright filaments. Its intensity contrast is explained by the same physical effect that causes the dark cores of filaments, light bridges and “canals”. In this way striation represents an important clue to the physics of penumbral structure and its relation with other magnetic structures on the solar surface. We put this in perspective with results from the recent 3-D radiative hydrodynamic simulations. 4 movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Structure and dynamics of layered molecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Jennifer Conrad

    This dissertation focuses on the goal of understanding and controlling layered material properties from a molecular perspective. With this understanding, materials can be synthetically tailored to exhibit predetermined bulk properties. This investigation describes the optical response of a family of metal-phosphonate (MP) monolayers and multilayers, materials that are potentially useful because the films are easy to synthesize and are chemically and thermally stable. MP films have shown potential in a variety of chemical sensing and optical applications, and in this dissertation, the suitability of MP films for optical information storage is explored For this application, the extent of photonic energy transport within and between optically active layers is an important factor in determining the stability and specificity of optical modifications made to a material. Intralayer and interlayer energy transport processes can be studied selectively in MP films because the composition, and thus the properties, of each layer are controlled synthetically. It was determined by fluorescence relaxation dynamics in conjunction with atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the substrate and layer morphologies are key factors in determining the layer optical and physical properties. The initial MP layers in a multilayer are structurally heterogeneous, characterized by randomly distributed islands that are ~50 A in diameter. The population dynamics measured for these layers are non-exponential, chromophore concentration-independent, and identical for two different chromophores. The data is explained in the context of an excitation hopping model in a system where the surface is characterized by islands of aggregated chromophores as well as non-aggregated monomers. Within a MP monolayer, the dynamics are dominated by intra-island excitation hopping. Forster (dipolar) energy transfer between the energetically overlapped chromophores does not play a significant role in determining the

  7. Large-Scale Patterns of Filament Channels and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Duncan

    2016-07-01

    In this review the properties and large-scale patterns of filament channels and filaments will be considered. Initially, the global formation locations of filament channels and filaments are discussed, along with their hemispheric pattern. Next, observations of the formation of filament channels and filaments are described where two opposing views are considered. Finally, the wide range of models that have been constructed to consider the formation of filament channels and filaments over long time-scales are described, along with the origin of the hemispheric pattern of filaments.

  8. Enigmatic reticulated filaments in subsurface granite.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Z; Hernández-Mariné, M; Jurado, V; Dionísio, A; Barquinha, P; Fortunato, E; Afonso, M J; Chaminé, H I; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, geomicrobiologists have focused their researches on the nature and origin of enigmatic reticulated filaments reported in modern and fossil samples from limestone caves and basalt lava tubes. Researchers have posed questions on these filaments concerning their nature, origin, chemistry, morphology, mode of formation and growth. A tentative microbial origin has been elusive since these filaments are found as hollow tubular sheaths and could not be affiliated to any known microorganism. We describe the presence of similar structures in a 16th century granite tunnel in Porto, Northwest Portugal. The reticulated filaments we identify exhibit fine geometry surface ornamentation formed by cross-linked Mn-rich nanofibres, surrounded by a large amount of extracellular polymeric substances. Within these Mn-rich filaments we report for the first time the occurrence of microbial cells.

  9. Structure of the mitochondrial creatine kinase octamer: high-resolution shadowing and image averaging of single molecules and formation of linear filaments under specific staining conditions

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The combination of high-resolution tantalum/tungsten (Ta/W) shadowing at very low specimen temperature (-250 degrees C) under ultrahigh vacuum (less than 2 x 10(-9) mbar) with circular harmonic image averaging revealed details on the surface structure of mitochondrial creatine kinase (Mi-CK) molecules with a resolution less than 2.5 nm. Mi-CK octamers exhibit a cross-like surface depression dividing the square shaped projection of 10 x 10 nm into four equally sized subdomains, which correspond to the four dimers forming the octameric Mi-CK molecule. By a combination of positive staining (with uranyl acetate) and heavy metal shadowing, internal structures as well as the surface relief of Mi-CK were visualized at the same time at high resolution. Computational image analysis revealed only a single projection class of molecules, but the ability of Mi-CK to form linear filaments, as well as geometrical considerations concerning the formation of octamers by four equal, asymmetric dimers, suggest the existence of at least two distinct faces on the molecule. By image processing of Mi-CK filaments a side view of the octamer differing from the top-bottom projections of single molecules became evident showing a funnel-like access each form the top and bottom of the octamer connected by a central channel. The general structure of the Mi-CK octamer described here is relevant to the localization of the molecule at the inner-outer mitochondrial contact sites and to the function of Mi-CK as an "energy channeling" molecule. PMID:1702444

  10. Kinetic theory of protein filament growth: Self-consistent methods and perturbative techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Filamentous protein structures are of high relevance for the normal functioning of the cell, where they provide the structural component for the cytoskeleton, but are also implicated in the pathogenesis of many disease states. The self-assembly of these supra-molecular structures from monomeric proteins has been studied extensively in the past 50 years and much interest has focused on elucidating the microscopic events that drive linear growth phenomena in a biological setting. Master equations have proven to be particularly fruitful in this context, allowing specific assembly mechanisms to be linked directly to experimental observations of filamentous growth. Recently, these approaches have increasingly been applied to aberrant protein polymerization, elucidating potential implications for controlling or combating the formation of pathological filamentous structures. This article reviews recent theoretical advances in the field of filamentous growth phenomena through the use of the master-equation formalism. We use perturbation and self-consistent methods for obtaining analytical solutions to the rate equations describing fibrillar growth and show how the resulting closed-form expressions can be used to shed light on the general physical laws underlying this complex phenomenon. We also present a connection between the underlying ideas of the self-consistent analysis of filamentous growth and the perturbative renormalization group.

  11. Distinct contributions of the thin and thick filaments to length-dependent activation in heart muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemeng; Kampourakis, Thomas; Yan, Ziqian; Sevrieva, Ivanka; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao

    2017-01-01

    The Frank-Starling relation is a fundamental auto-regulatory property of the heart that ensures the volume of blood ejected in each heartbeat is matched to the extent of venous filling. At the cellular level, heart muscle cells generate higher force when stretched, but despite intense efforts the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. We applied a fluorescence-based method, which reports structural changes separately in the thick and thin filaments of rat cardiac muscle, to elucidate that mechanism. The distinct structural changes of troponin C in the thin filaments and myosin regulatory light chain in the thick filaments allowed us to identify two aspects of the Frank-Starling relation. Our results show that the enhanced force observed when heart muscle cells are maximally activated by calcium is due to a change in thick filament structure, but the increase in calcium sensitivity at lower calcium levels is due to a change in thin filament structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24081.001 PMID:28229860

  12. Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lawrence K.; Ginsburg, Michael A.; Crovace, Claudia; Donohoe, Mhairi; Stock, Daniela

    2010-09-13

    The flagellar motor drives the rotation of flagellar filaments at hundreds of revolutions per second, efficiently propelling bacteria through viscous media. The motor uses the potential energy from an electrochemical gradient of cations across the cytoplasmic membrane to generate torque. A rapid switch from anticlockwise to clockwise rotation determines whether a bacterium runs smoothly forward or tumbles to change its trajectory. A protein called FliG forms a ring in the rotor of the flagellar motor that is involved in the generation of torque through an interaction with the cation-channel-forming stator subunit MotA. FliG has been suggested to adopt distinct conformations that induce switching but these structural changes and the molecular mechanism of switching are unknown. Here we report the molecular structure of the full-length FliG protein, identify conformational changes that are involved in rotational switching and uncover the structural basis for the formation of the FliG torque ring. This allows us to propose a model of the complete ring and switching mechanism in which conformational changes in FliG reverse the electrostatic charges involved in torque generation.

  13. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shangwei; Su, Yingna; Zhou, Tuanhui; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan; Sun, Xudong; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-07-01

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations. The two filaments start from active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts first, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions failed, since the filaments first rise up, then flow toward the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeated activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO/HMI magnetograms via the flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while the weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  14. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.; Sun, Xudong; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-08-01

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding SDO/AIA observations. The two filaments start from the east border of active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts firstly, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions are failed, since the filaments firstly rise up, then flow towards the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeating activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO/HMI magnetograms by flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  15. Dynamics of heteromolecular filament formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dear, Alexander J.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-11-01

    The self-assembly of molecular building blocks into linear filaments is a common form of self-organization in nature and underlies the formation of supra-molecular polymers in a variety of contexts, including in both functional and aberrant biology. To date, attention has focused mainly on homomolecular assembly phenomena; however, it has recently become apparent that heteromolecular assemblies can be common, and, for instance, pathological protein filaments such as amyloid aggregates form in vivo in environments supporting copolymerization. Here, we present a general kinetic scheme for heteromolecular filament formation and derive closed-form analytical expressions that describe the dynamics of such systems. Our results reveal the existence of a demixing transition time controlled by the relative rates of depletion of the different aggregating species, after which predominantly homomolecular polymers are formed even when the initial solution is heteromolecular. Furthermore, these results may be applied to the analysis of experimental kinetic data on the aggregation of mixtures of proteins, to determine which fundamental reaction steps occur between unlike proteins, and to provide accurate estimates of their rate constants.

  16. The carboxyl-terminal isoforms of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain determine thick filament assembly properties

    PubMed Central

    Rovner, Arthur S.; Fagnant, Patricia M.; Lowey, Susan; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2002-01-01

    The alternatively spliced SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chains differ at their respective carboxyl termini by 43 versus 9 unique amino acids. To determine whether these tailpieces affect filament assembly, SM1 and SM2 myosins, the rod region of these myosin isoforms, and a rod with no tailpiece (tailless), were expressed in Sf 9 cells. Paracrystals formed from SM1 and SM2 rod fragments showed different modes of molecular packing, indicating that the tailpieces can influence filament structure. The SM2 rod was less able to assemble into stable filaments than either SM1 or the tailless rods. Expressed full-length SM1 and SM2 myosins showed solubility differences comparable to the rods, establishing the validity of the latter as a model for filament assembly. Formation of homodimers of SM1 and SM2 rods was favored over the heterodimer in cells coinfected with both viruses, compared with mixtures of the two heavy chains renatured in vitro. These results demonstrate for the first time that the smooth muscle myosin tailpieces differentially affect filament assembly, and suggest that homogeneous thick filaments containing SM1 or SM2 myosin could serve distinct functions within smooth muscle cells. PMID:11781338

  17. Differential assembly of alpha- and gamma-filagenins into thick filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, F.; Ortiz, I.; Hutagalung, A.; Bauer, C. C.; Cook, R. G.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle thick filaments are highly organized supramolecular assemblies of myosin and associated proteins with lengths, diameters and flexural rigidities characteristic of their source. The cores of body wall muscle thick filaments of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are tubular structures of paramyosin sub-filaments coupled by filagenins and have been proposed to serve as templates for the assembly of native thick filaments. We have characterized alpha- and gamma-filagenins, two novel proteins of the cores with calculated molecular masses of 30,043 and 19,601 and isoelectric points of 10.52 and 11.49, respectively. Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy using affinity-purified antibodies confirmed that the two proteins are core components. Immunoelectron microscopy of the cores revealed that they assemble with different periodicities. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that alpha-filagenin is localized in the medial regions of the A-bands of body wall muscle cells whereas gamma-filagenin is localized in the flanking regions, and that alpha-filagenin is expressed in 1.5-twofold embryos while gamma-filagenin becomes detectable only in late vermiform embryos. The expression of both proteins continues throughout later stages of development. C. elegans body wall muscle thick filaments of these developmental stages have distinct lengths. Our results suggest that the differential assembly of alpha- and gamma-filagenins into thick filaments of distinct lengths may be developmentally regulated.

  18. Spatial distribution of filament elasticity determines the migratory behaviors of a cell

    PubMed Central

    Harn, Hans I-Chen; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Wang, Yang-Kao; Huang, Yi-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Cheng, Chao-Min; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Any cellular response leading to morphological changes is highly tuned to balance the force generated from structural reorganization, provided by actin cytoskeleton. Actin filaments serve as the backbone of intracellular force, and transduce external mechanical signal via focal adhesion complex into the cell. During migration, cells not only undergo molecular changes but also rapid mechanical modulation. Here we focus on determining, the role of spatial distribution of mechanical changes of actin filaments in epithelial, mesenchymal, fibrotic and cancer cells with non-migration, directional migration, and non-directional migration behaviors using the atomic force microscopy. We found 1) non-migratory cells only generated one type of filament elasticity, 2) cells generating spatially distributed two types of filament elasticity showed directional migration, and 3) pathologic cells that autonomously generated two types of filament elasticity without spatial distribution were actively migrating non-directionally. The demonstration of spatial regulation of filament elasticity of different cell types at the nano-scale highlights the coupling of cytoskeletal function with physical characters at the sub-cellular level, and provides new research directions for migration related disease. PMID:26919488

  19. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    Galactic CO line emission at 115 GHz was surveyed in order to study the distribution of molecular clouds in the inner galaxy. Comparison of this survey with similar H1 data reveals a detailed correlation with the most intense 21 cm features. To each of the classical 21 cm H1 spiral arms of the inner galaxy there corresponds a CO molecular arm which is generally more clearly defined and of higher contrast. A simple model is devised for the galactic distribution of molecular clouds. The modeling results suggest that molecular clouds are essentially transient objects, existing for 15 to 40 million years after their formation in a spiral arm, and are largely confined to spiral features about 300 pc wide.

  20. Ionisation in turbulent magnetic molecular clouds. I. Effect on density and mass-to-flux ratio structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu; Caselli, Paola

    2017-05-01

    Context. Previous studies show that the physical structures and kinematics of a region depend significantly on the ionisation fraction. These studies have only considered these effects in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations with microturbulence. The next logical step is to explore the effects of turbulence on ionised magnetic molecular clouds and then compare model predictions with observations to assess the importance of turbulence in the dynamical evolution of molecular clouds. Aims: In this paper, we extend our previous studies of the effect of ionisation fractions on star formation to clouds that include both non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics and turbulence. We aim to quantify the importance of a treatment of the ionisation fraction in turbulent magnetised media and investigate the effect of the turbulence on shaping the clouds and filaments before star formation sets in. In particular, here we investigate how the structure, mass and width of filamentary structures depend on the amount of turbulence in ionised media and the initial mass-to-flux ratio. Methods: To determine the effects of turbulence and mass-to-flux ratio on the evolution of non-ideal magnetised clouds with varying ionisation profiles, we have run two sets of simulations. The first set assumes different initial turbulent Mach values for a fixed initial mass-to-flux ratio. The second set assumes different initial mass-to-flux ratio values for a fixed initial turbulent Mach number. Both sets explore the effect of using one of two ionisation profiles: step-like (SL) or cosmic ray only (CR-only). We compare the resulting density and mass-to-flux ratio structures both qualitatively and quantitatively via filament and core masses and filament fitting techniques (Gaussian and Plummer profiles). Results: We find that even with almost no turbulence, filamentary structure still exists although at lower density contours. Comparison of simulations shows that for turbulent Mach numbers above 2, there is

  1. Similarity Measure for Molecular Structure: A Brief Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bero, S. A.; Muda, A. K.; Choo, Y. H.; Muda, N. A.; Pratama, S. F.

    2017-09-01

    Similarity or distance measures have been used widely to calculate the similarity or dissimilarity between two samples of dataset. Cheminformatics is known as the domain that dealing with chemical information and both similarity and distance coefficient have been an important role for matching, searching and classification of chemical information. There are various types of similarity/distance coefficient used in molecular structure similarity searching. Generally, the calculation using similarity/distance coefficient is focusing more on 2-dimensional (2D) rather than 3-dimensional (3D) structure. In this paper, the popular similarity/distance coefficients for molecular structure will be reviewed together with the review on 3D molecular structure.

  2. The near-atomic cryoEM structure of a flexible filamentous plant virus shows homology of its coat protein with nucleoproteins of animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Lasso, Gorka; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel; Valle, Mikel

    2015-12-16

    Flexible filamentous viruses include economically important plant pathogens. Their viral particles contain several hundred copies of a helically arrayed coat protein (CP) protecting a (+)ssRNA. We describe here a structure at 3.9 Å resolution, from electron cryomicroscopy, of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a representative of the genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae). Our results allow modeling of the CP and its interactions with viral RNA. The overall fold of PepMV CP resembles that of nucleoproteins (NPs) from the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae), a group of enveloped (-)ssRNA viruses. The main difference between potexvirus CP and phlebovirus NP is in their C-terminal extensions, which appear to determine the characteristics of the distinct multimeric assemblies - a flexuous, helical rod or a loose ribonucleoprotein. The homology suggests gene transfer between eukaryotic (+) and (-)ssRNA viruses.

  3. The near-atomic cryoEM structure of a flexible filamentous plant virus shows homology of its coat protein with nucleoproteins of animal viruses

    PubMed Central

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Lasso, Gorka; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel; Valle, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    Flexible filamentous viruses include economically important plant pathogens. Their viral particles contain several hundred copies of a helically arrayed coat protein (CP) protecting a (+)ssRNA. We describe here a structure at 3.9 Å resolution, from electron cryomicroscopy, of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a representative of the genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae). Our results allow modeling of the CP and its interactions with viral RNA. The overall fold of PepMV CP resembles that of nucleoproteins (NPs) from the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae), a group of enveloped (-)ssRNA viruses. The main difference between potexvirus CP and phlebovirus NP is in their C-terminal extensions, which appear to determine the characteristics of the distinct multimeric assemblies – a flexuous, helical rod or a loose ribonucleoprotein. The homology suggests gene transfer between eukaryotic (+) and (-)ssRNA viruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11795.001 PMID:26673077

  4. The dynamics of filament assembly define cytoskeletal network morphology

    PubMed Central

    Foffano, Giulia; Levernier, Nicolas; Lenz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key component in the machinery of eukaryotic cells, and it self-assembles out of equilibrium into a wide variety of biologically crucial structures. Although the molecular mechanisms involved are well characterized, the physical principles governing the spatial arrangement of actin filaments are not understood. Here we propose that the dynamics of actin network assembly from growing filaments results from a competition between diffusion, bundling and steric hindrance, and is responsible for the range of observed morphologies. Our model and simulations thus predict an abrupt dynamical transition between homogeneous and strongly bundled networks as a function of the actin polymerization rate. This suggests that cells may effect dramatic changes to their internal architecture through minute modifications of their nonequilibrium dynamics. Our results are consistent with available experimental data. PMID:28000681

  5. The dynamics of filament assembly define cytoskeletal network morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffano, Giulia; Levernier, Nicolas; Lenz, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key component in the machinery of eukaryotic cells, and it self-assembles out of equilibrium into a wide variety of biologically crucial structures. Although the molecular mechanisms involved are well characterized, the physical principles governing the spatial arrangement of actin filaments are not understood. Here we propose that the dynamics of actin network assembly from growing filaments results from a competition between diffusion, bundling and steric hindrance, and is responsible for the range of observed morphologies. Our model and simulations thus predict an abrupt dynamical transition between homogeneous and strongly bundled networks as a function of the actin polymerization rate. This suggests that cells may effect dramatic changes to their internal architecture through minute modifications of their nonequilibrium dynamics. Our results are consistent with available experimental data.

  6. Lewis Structures Are Models for Predicting Molecular Structure, Not Electronic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1999-07-01

    This article argues against a close relationship between Lewis dot structures and electron structure obtained from quantum mechanical calculations. Lewis structures are a powerful tool for structure prediction, though they are classical models of bonding and do not predict electronic structure. The "best" Lewis structures are those that, when combined with the VSEPR model, allow the accurate prediction of molecular properties, such as polarity, bond length, bond angle, and bond strength. These structures are achieved by minimizing formal charges within the molecule, even if it requires an expanded octet on atoms beyond the second period. Lewis structures that show an expanded octet do not imply full d-orbital involvement in the bonding. They suggest that the presence of low-lying d-orbitals is important in producing observed molecular structures. Based on this work, the presence of electron density, not a large separation in charge, is responsible for the short bond lengths and large angles in species containing nonmetal atoms from beyond the second period. This result contradicts results obtained from natural population analysis, a method that attempts to derive Lewis structures from molecular orbital calculations.

  7. A Survey of Quantitative Descriptions of Molecular Structure

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi; Willighagen, Egon

    2013-01-01

    Numerical characterization of molecular structure is a first step in many computational analysis of chemical structure data. These numerical representations, termed descriptors, come in many forms, ranging from simple atom counts and invariants of the molecular graph to distribution of properties, such as charge, across a molecular surface. In this article we first present a broad categorization of descriptors and then describe applications and toolkits that can be employed to evaluate them. We highlight a number of issues surrounding molecular descriptor calculations such as versioning and reproducibility and describe how some toolkits have attempted to address these problems. PMID:23110530

  8. A survey of quantitative descriptions of molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Guha, Rajarshi; Willighagen, Egon

    2012-01-01

    Numerical characterization of molecular structure is a first step in many computational analysis of chemical structure data. These numerical representations, termed descriptors, come in many forms, ranging from simple atom counts and invariants of the molecular graph to distribution of properties, such as charge, across a molecular surface. In this article we first present a broad categorization of descriptors and then describe applications and toolkits that can be employed to evaluate them. We highlight a number of issues surrounding molecular descriptor calculations such as versioning and reproducibility and describe how some toolkits have attempted to address these problems.

  9. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  10. Shaping helical electrospun filaments: a review.

    PubMed

    Silva, P E S; Vistulo de Abreu, F; Godinho, M H

    2017-10-04

    Nature abounds with helical filaments designed for specific tasks. For instance, some plants use tendrils to coil and attach to the surroundings, while Spiroplasma, a helical bacterium, moves by inverting the helical handedness along the filament axis. Therefore, developing methods to shape filaments on demand to exhibit a diversity of physical properties and shapes could be of interest to many fields, such as the textile industry, biomedicine or nanotechnology. Electrospinning is a simple and versatile technique that allows the production of micro and nanofibres with many different helical shapes. In this work, we review the different electrospinning procedures that can be used to obtain helical shapes similar to those found in natural materials. These techniques also demonstrate that the creation of helical shapes at the micro/nanoscale is not limited by the chirality of the building blocks at the molecular level, a finding which opens new horizons on filament shaping.

  11. Myosin 18A coassembles with nonmuscle myosin 2 to form mixed bipolar filaments.

    PubMed

    Billington, Neil; Beach, Jordan R; Heissler, Sarah M; Remmert, Kirsten; Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Nagy, Attila; Takagi, Yasuharu; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yingfan; Barzik, Melanie; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A; Sellers, James R

    2015-03-30

    Class-18 myosins are most closely related to conventional class-2 nonmuscle myosins (NM2). Surprisingly, the purified head domains of Drosophila, mouse, and human myosin 18A (M18A) lack actin-activated ATPase activity and the ability to translocate actin filaments, suggesting that the functions of M18A in vivo do not depend on intrinsic motor activity. M18A has the longest coiled coil of any myosin outside of the class-2 myosins, suggesting that it might form bipolar filaments similar to conventional myosins. To address this possibility, we expressed and purified full-length mouse M18A using the baculovirus/Sf9 system. M18A did not form large bipolar filaments under any of the conditions tested. Instead, M18A formed an ∼ 65-nm-long bipolar structure with two heads at each end. Importantly, when NM2 was polymerized in the presence of M18A, the two myosins formed mixed bipolar filaments, as evidenced by cosedimentation, electron microscopy, and single-molecule imaging. Moreover, super-resolution imaging of NM2 and M18A using fluorescently tagged proteins and immunostaining of endogenous proteins showed that NM2 and M18A are present together within individual filaments inside living cells. Together, our in vitro and live-cell imaging data argue strongly that M18A coassembles with NM2 into mixed bipolar filaments. M18A could regulate the biophysical properties of these filaments and, by virtue of its extra N- and C-terminal domains, determine the localization and/or molecular interactions of the filaments. Given the numerous, fundamental cellular and developmental roles attributed to NM2, our results have far-reaching biological implications.

  12. The Hydrodynamic Stability of Gaseous Cosmic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnboim, Yuval; Padnos, Dan; Zinger, Elad

    2016-11-01

    Virial shocks at the edges of cosmic-web structures are a clear prediction of standard structure formation theories. We derive a criterion for the stability of the post-shock gas and of the virial shock itself in spherical, filamentary, and planar infall geometries. When gas cooling is important, we find that shocks become unstable, and gas flows uninterrupted toward the center of the respective halo, filament, or sheet. For filaments, we impose this criterion on self-similar infall solutions. We find that instability is expected for filament masses between 1011 and 1013 {M}⊙ Mpc-1. Using a simplified toy model, we then show that these filaments will likely feed halos with 1010 M ⊙ ≲ M halo ≲ 1013 M ⊙ at redshift z = 3, as well as 1012 M ⊙ ≲ M halo ≲ 1015 M ⊙ at z = 0. The instability will affect the survivability of the filaments as they penetrate gaseous halos in a non-trivial way. Additionally, smaller halos accreting onto non-stable filaments will not be subject to ram pressure inside the filaments. The instreaming gas will continue toward the center and stop either once its angular momentum balances the gravitational attraction, or when its density becomes so high that it becomes self-shielded to radiation.

  13. Tungsten Filament Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  14. Tungsten filament fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  15. Tungsten Filament Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  16. Structural and molecular conformation of myosin in intact muscle fibers by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the use of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) for imaging biological samples has been explored with regard to intrinsic SHG in highly ordered biological samples. As shown by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal in skeletal muscle. SHG is highly dependent on symmetries and provides selective information on the structural order and orientation of the emitting proteins and the dynamics of myosin molecules responsible for the mechano-chemical transduction during contraction. We characterise the polarization-dependence of SHG intensity in three different physiological states: resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction in a sarcomere length range between 2.0 μm and 4.0 μm. The orientation of motor domains of the myosin molecules is dependent on their physiological states and modulate the SHG signal. We can discriminate the orientation of the emitting dipoles in four different molecular conformations of myosin heads in intact fibers during isometric contraction, in resting and rigor. We estimate the contribution of the myosin motor domain to the total second order bulk susceptibility from its molecular structure and its functional conformation. We demonstrate that SHG is sensitive to the fraction of ordered myosin heads by disrupting the order of myosin heads in rigor with an ATP analog. We estimate the fraction of myosin motors generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber from the dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction.

  17. UNUSUAL FILAMENTS INSIDE THE UMBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kleint, L.

    2013-06-10

    We analyze several unusual filamentary structures which appeared in the umbra of one of the sunspots in AR 11302. They do not resemble typical light bridges in morphology or in evolution. We analyze data from SDO/HMI to investigate their temporal evolution, Hinode/SP for photospheric inversions, IBIS for chromospheric imaging, and SDO/AIA for the overlying corona. Photospheric inversions reveal a horizontal, inverse Evershed flow along these structures, which we call umbral filaments. Chromospheric images show brightenings and energy dissipation, while coronal images indicate that bright coronal loops seem to end in these umbral filaments. These rapidly evolving features do not seem to be common, and are possibly related to the high flare-productivity of the active region. Their analysis could help to understand the complex evolution of active regions.

  18. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  19. Role and structural mechanism of WAS