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Sample records for filamentous alpha-smooth muscle

  1. Alpha Smooth Muscle Actin Expression in a Case of Ameloblastic Carcinoma: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Vipul

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The aim of the present article is to report a case of ameloblastic carcinoma and use a marker alpha smooth muscle actin as a tool to differentiate cases of ameloblastic carcinoma from that of ameloblastoma. Methods Case study reporting a case of ameloblastic carcinoma (AC) with expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) as a marker for emergence of stromal myofibroblasts. The expression of myofibroblasts was also compared with that of ameloblastoma. Results Difference between the two lesions in the pattern of expression of alpha smooth muscle actin was also observed. There was increase in the number of myofibroblasts in the stroma of AC while in ameloblastoma, it was comparatively less. Secondly, few areas of the carcinomatous ameloblastic island also exhibited a mild positivity towards alpha smooth muscle actin. Conclusions Increase in number of stromal myofibroblast may be taken as a predictor for carcinomatous transformation. Further studies with greater sample size can validate the use of alpha-SMA as a marker to differentiate ameloblastic carcinoma from ameloblastoma. PMID:24422027

  2. Rat alveolar myofibroblasts acquire alpha-smooth muscle actin expression during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vyalov, S. L.; Gabbiani, G.; Kapanci, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of fibroblasts in alveolar septa are characterized by the presence of cytoplasmic bundles of microfilaments that contain cytoplasmic actin isoforms; these cells have been named contractile interstitial cells or V-type myofibroblasts. In the rat, they express desmin as intermediate filament protein. In this study, we explored the possibility that modulation and replication of such septal fibroblasts result in the appearance of alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-SM) actin-positive myofibroblasts, typical of lung fibrosis. Experimental pulmonary fibrosis was produced by a unique intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to 28 rats. Eight additional rats used as controls received the equivalent volume of saline. Paraffin and frozen sections of lungs were examined at days 1, 3, 5 and 7 after treatment. Microfilaments and intermediate filaments were stained using antibodies against total actin, alpha-SM actin, desmin, vimentin, keratin, and SM myosin. Electron microscopic labeling of desmin and alpha-SM actin using immunogold technique was done on Lowicryl K4M resin-embedded specimens. alpha-SM actin appeared in desmin-positive alveolar fibroblasts as early as 24 hours after intratracheal bleomycin instillation; the modulation of alpha-SM actin in these cells was preceded by a lymphomonocytic infiltration of alveolar septa. Twenty-four hours to 3 days after bleomycin administration, a proliferation of alveolar myofibroblasts occurred. Fibrosis with laying down of collagen fibers took place after the above mentioned cellular modifications. Our results support the view that septal fibroblastic cells can modulate into typical alpha-SM actin-containing myofibroblasts during experimental bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In such a modulation a possible role of cytokines, particularly of transforming growth factor-beta, is considered. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14

  3. Nucleolar organizing regions and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in a case of ameloblastic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Kavitha P; Vidya, M; Shetty, Nandaprasad; Karkera, Bhavana V; Jogi, Hemanth

    2010-06-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma is a rare lesion of odontogenic origin. It is defined as a malignant epithelial odontogenic tumor that histologically has retained the features of ameloblastic differentiation and also exhibits cytologic features of malignancy, like atypia and mitotic activity. Although this lesion represents a separate entity, differentiating it from ameloblastoma has been often challenging to pathologists. In this case study reporting a case of ameloblastic carcinoma, we have attempted to verify the previous findings on the use of Argyrophilic nucleolar organizing regions (AgNORs) and immunohistochemical staining for the alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in differentiating ameloblastic carcinoma from ameloblastoma. It was observed that AgNORs was found to be almost twice in ameloblastic carcinoma as it was in ameloblastoma. A difference between the two lesions in the pattern of expression of alpha-SMA was also observed, with alpha-SMA being expressed in the odontogenic epithelium and the stroma of ameloblastic carcinoma whereas, in the case of ameloblastoma, it was found only in the stromal part. These findings suggest that AgNORs and alpha-SMA expression may be used as adjuncts to the routine histopathologic examination to differentiate ameloblastic carcinoma and ameloblastoma.

  4. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and structure integrity in chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Chieh; Kuo, Pei-Yin; Chang, Ching-Fang; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Ho, Larry Low-Tone

    2006-06-01

    The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis was investigated by the use of pellet culture. Undifferentiated hMSCs expressed low but detectable amounts of SMA and the addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) to the culture medium increased SMA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Differentiation in pellet culture was rapidly induced in the presence of TGF-beta1 and was accompanied by the development of annular layers at the surface of the pellet. These peripheral layers lacked expression of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen during early differentiation. Progress in differentiation increased the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen and the expression of SMA in these layers. Double-staining for type II collagen and SMA by immunofluorescence demonstrated the differentiation of hMSCs into cells positive for these two proteins. The addition of cytochalasin D, a potent inhibitor of the polymerization of actin microfilaments, caused damage to the structural integrity and surface smoothness of the chondrogenic pellets. The SMA-positive cells in the peripheral layers of the chondrogenic pellets mimic those within the superficial layer of articular cartilage and are speculated to play a major role in cartilage development and maintenance.

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in central giant-cell lesions.

    PubMed

    Maiz, Nancy Noya; de la Rosa-García, Estela; Camacho, María Esther Irigoyen

    2016-04-01

    Central giant-cell lesions (CGCLs) are reactive lesions that consist histologically of spindle-shaped stromal cells, (fibroblasts and myofibroblasts) loosely arranged in a fibrous stroma, multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells with haemorrhagic areas. This study identified the immunoexpression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in spindle-shaped stromal cells, and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells. Their association with the clinical and radiographic characteristics of these lesions was identified. Thirty-five cases of CGCLs were studied. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, glucocorticoid and calcitonin was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The labelling index was 100 times the quotient of the number of positive cells divided by the total number of cells of each type. Logistic regression analysis was applied. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was positive (54%) for spindle stromal cells (myofibroblasts). A significant association was observed with root resorption (P = 0.004) and cortical bone destruction (P = 0.024). Glucocorticoid immunoexpression was positive for 99% of the giant cells and 86.7% of the mononuclear cells. Glucocorticoid immunoexpression in the mononuclear cells was associated with root resorption (P = 0.031). A longer evolution time was associated with lower immunoexpression of glucocorticoid (OR 12.4: P = 0.047). Calcitonin immunoexpression was positive in 86% of the giant cells. Immunoexpression of calcitonin was associated with age (P = 0.040). Myofibroblasts are important components of CGCLs, stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle. Actin immunoexpression was associated with root and cortical bone resorption. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of Myofibroblasts by Expression of Alpha Smooth Muscle Actin: A Marker in Fibrosis, Dysplasia and Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malathi, N.; Narashiman, Sangeetha; Rajan, Sharada T

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of Myofibroblasts by studying expression of Alpha smooth muscle actin: A marker of Fibrosis, Dysplasia and Carcinoma. Background: Myofibroblasts are cells that have contractile properties and are involved in inflammation, wound healing, fibrosis and oncogenesis in most of the organs and tissues. They are involved in healing and granulation tissue formation which occur after tissue injuries, also produce inflammatory mediators, growth factors and help in extracellular matrix reorganization by secretion of proteins like collagen, fibronectin, etc. Because of their component, Alpha smooth muscle actin ([alpha]-SMA), they are involved in the contraction of extracellular matrix and aid in tissue contraction. The myofibroblasts disappear by apoptosis after completion of repair, but their persistence causes a dysfunction in the repair mechanism, leading to excessive contraction and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion and thus, fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of myofibroblasts in cases of Oral Submucous fibrosis (OSMF), which consisted of very early, early and moderately advanced OSMF, OSMF with dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), by detecting (alpha)-SMA, which is a specific marker for myofibroblasts. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of three groups which comprised of 41 cases of OSMF, 10 cases of OSMF with dysplasia and 11 cases of OSCC. All the cases were subjected to immunohistochemistry by using (alpha)-SMA antibody for detection of myofibroblasts. Results: The presence of myofibroblasts was significantly higher in oral squamous cell carcinomas as compared to that in OSMF with dysplasia and OSMF. A statistical significance was also noted between the staining index and age of the individuals and the staining index and duration of the habit. Conclusion: Myofibroblasts play a role in fibrosis, as was seen in OSMF. Activated myofibroblasts secrete proteolytic enzymes and cause matrix

  7. Modulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and desmin expression in perisinusoidal cells of normal and diseased human livers.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Gräff, A.; Krüger, S.; Bochard, F.; Gabbiani, G.; Denk, H.

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that perisinusoidal liver cells (PSC) play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of fibrocontractive changes. Using light and electron microscopic immunolocalization techniques, a series of 207 normal and pathologic human liver specimens were evaluated for the expression of alpha smooth muscle (SM) actin and desmin in this and other nonparenchymal cell types. In normal adult liver tissue, PSCs were practically devoid of desmin and exceptionally stained for alpha-SM actin, whereas this actin isoform frequently was encountered in PSCs from the embryonic to the adolescent period. A broad spectrum of pathologic conditions was accompanied by the presence of alpha-SM actin containing PSCs; these were detected preferentially in periportal or perivenular zones according to the predominant location of the underlying hepatocellular damage. The occurrence of this PSC phenotype generally was associated with fibrogenesis and was in some cases detected earlier than overt collagen accumulation. Fibrous bands subdividing liver tissue in cirrhosis and focal nodular hyperplasia, as well as desmoplastic reaction to malignant tumors, contained alpha-SM actin-rich cells admixed with variable proportions of cells coexpressing desmin. In end stages, this population was less numerous than in active fibrotic or cirrhotic processes. Using immunogold electron microscopy, alpha-SM actin was localized in microfilament bundles of typical PSCs. Our results are compatible with the assumption that the appearance of alpha-SM actin and desmin-expressing myofibroblasts results at least in part from a phenotypic modulation of PSCs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2024709

  8. Origin and characterization of alpha smooth muscle actin-positive cells during murine lung development.

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, Alena; Kheirollahi, Vahid; Chao, Cho-Ming; Ahmadvand, Negah; Quantius, Jennifer; Wilhelm, Jochen; Herold, Susanne; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Morty, Rory E; Rizvanov, Albert A; Minoo, Parviz; El Agha, Elie; Bellusci, Saverio

    2017-04-03

    ACTA2 expression identifies pulmonary airway and vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as well as alveolar myofibroblasts (MYF). Mesenchymal progenitors expressing fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), Wilms tumor 1 (Wt1), or glioma-associated oncogene 1 (Gli1) contribute to SMC formation from early stages of lung development. However, their respective contribution and specificity to the SMC and/or alveolar MYF lineages remain controversial. In addition, the contribution of mesenchymal cells undergoing active WNT signaling remains unknown. Using Fgf10(CreERT2) , Wt1(CreERT2) , Gli1(CreERT2) , and Axin2(CreERT2) inducible driver lines in combination with a tdTomato(flox) reporter line, the respective differentiation of each pool of labeled progenitor cells along the SMC and alveolar MYF lineages was quantified. The results revealed that while FGF10(+) and WT1(+) cells show a minor contribution to the SMC lineage, GLI1(+) and AXIN2(+) cells significantly contribute to both the SMC and alveolar MYF lineages, but with limited specificity. Lineage tracing using the Acta2-CreERT2 transgenic line showed that ACTA2(+) cells labeled at embryonic day (E)11.5 do not expand significantly to give rise to new SMCs at E18.5. However, ACTA2(+) cells labeled at E15.5 give rise to the majority (85%-97%) of the SMCs in the lung at E18.5 as well as alveolar MYF progenitors in the lung parenchyma. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based isolation of different subpopulations of ACTA2(+) lineage-traced cells followed by gene arrays, identified transcriptomic signatures for alveolar MYF progenitors versus airway and vascular SMCs at E18.5. Our results establish a new transcriptional landscape for further experiments addressing the function of signaling pathways in the formation of different subpopulations of ACTA2(+) cells. Stem Cells 2017.

  9. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and fibronectin in tubulointerstitial lesions of cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sawashima, K; Mizuno, S; Mizuno-Horikawa, Y; Shimada, A; Kudo, T; Kurosawa, T

    2000-09-01

    To examine renal expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and fibronectin in cats with tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) for use in predicting progression to renal fibrosis. 19 cats with TIN and 9 cats without nephritis. Serum creatinine and BUN concentrations were measured. Indices for glomerular extra-cellular matrix (ECM), tubular injury (TI), and fibronectin were determined in renal specimens to quantify the extent of injury and fibrotic lesions. Expression of alpha-SMA in renal tissue was immunohistochemically detected, and correlations were evaluated between the alpha-SMA index and other histologic and clinical variables. The alpha-SMA index in tubulointerstitial areas (1.63 +/- 0.78) was significantly higher in cats with TIN, especially in the periglomerular and peritubular areas, than in cats without nephritis (0.20 +/- 0.14). The alpha-SMA index was significantly associated with the TI index (r2 = 0.70), fibronectin index (r2 = 0.95), BUN concentration (r = 0.64), and serum creatinine concentration () = 0.66). Of special interest was that interstitial alpha-SMA expression appeared evident in the kidneys at an early stage of TIN, prior to the onset of ECM deposition. Analysis of results of histologic and clinical examinations revealed that interstitial alpha-SMA expression may have clinical importance and may be a useful early histologic marker for development of chronic renal failure in cats. An immunohistochemical examination for fibrogenic molecules (such as alpha-SMA expression) may provide fundamental information on the pathogenesis of early-stage renal disease and aid clinical management of cats with chronic renal failure, including TIN.

  10. Expression of embryonic fibronectin isoform EIIIA parallels alpha-smooth muscle actin in maturing and diseased kidney.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V L; Musa, J; Mitchell, R J; Barnes, J L

    1999-06-01

    In this study we examined if an association exists between expression of an alternatively spliced "embryonic" fibronectin isoform EIIIA (Fn-EIIIA) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in the maturing and adult rat kidney and in two unrelated models of glomerular disease, passive accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Habu venom (HV)-induced proliferative glomerulonephritis, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Fn-EIIIA and alpha-SMA proteins were abundantly expressed in mesangium and in periglomerular and peritubular interstitium of 20-day embryonic and 7-day (D-7) postnatal kidneys in regions of tubule and glomerular development. Staining was markedly reduced in these structures in maturing juvenile (D-14) kidney and was largely lost in adult kidney. Expression of Fn-EIIIA and alpha-SMA was reinitiated in the mesangium and the periglomerular and peritubular interstitium in both models and was also observed in glomerular crescents in anti-GBM nephritis. Increased expression of Fn-EIIIA mRNA by in situ hybridization corresponded to the localization of protein staining. Dual labeling experiments verified co-localization of Fn-EIIIA and alpha-SMA, showing a strong correlation of staining between location and staining intensity during kidney development, maturation, and disease. Expression of EIIIA mRNA corresponded to protein expression in developing and diseased kidneys and was lost in adult kidney. These studies show a recapitulation of the co-expression of Fn-EIIIA and alpha-SMA in anti-GBM disease and suggest a functional link for these two proteins.

  11. In vitro expression of the alpha-smooth muscle actin isoform by rat lung mesenchymal cells: regulation by culture condition and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J J; Woodcock-Mitchell, J L; Perry, L; Zhao, J; Low, R B; Baldor, L; Absher, P M

    1993-07-01

    alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha SM actin)-containing cells recently have been demonstrated in intraalveolar lesions in both rat and human tissues following lung injury. In order to develop model systems for the study of such cells, we examined cultured lung cell lines for this phenotype. The adult rat lung fibroblast-like "RL" cell lines were found to express alpha SM actin mRNA and protein and to organize this actin into stress fiber-like structures. Immunocytochemical staining of subclones of the RL87 line demonstrated the presence in the cultures of at least four cell phenotypes, one that fails to express alpha SM actin and three distinct morphologic types that do express alpha SM actin. The proportion of cellular actin that is the alpha-isoform was modulated by the culture conditions. RL cells growing at low density expressed minimal alpha SM actin. On reaching confluent densities, however, alpha SM actin increased to at least 20% of the total actin content. This effect, combined with the observation that the most immunoreactive cells were those that displayed overlapping cell processes in culture, suggests that cell-cell contact may be involved in actin isoform regulation in these cells. Similar to the response of some smooth muscle cell lines, alpha SM actin expression in RL cells also was promoted by conditions, e.g., maintenance in low serum medium, which minimize cell division. alpha SM actin expression was modulated in RL cells by the growth factor transforming growth factor-beta. Addition of this cytokine to growing cells substantially elevated the proportion of alpha SM actin protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Alpha-smooth muscle actin containing contractile fibroblastic cells in human knee arthrofibrosis tissue. Winner of the AGA-DonJoy Award 2003.

    PubMed

    Unterhauser, Frank N; Bosch, Ulrich; Zeichen, Johannes; Weiler, Andreas

    2004-11-01

    Primary arthrofibrosis is of major concern after joint trauma or knee ligament surgery. The underlying mechanism in detail remains unclear. Highly differentiated fibroblastic cells, so-called myofibroblasts, express the actin isoform alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) and have been found to play a major role in tissue contraction during wound healing and organ fibrosis. We therefore studied the expression of myofibroblasts in human primary knee arthrofibrosis tissue. Tissue samples were taken from the infrapatellar fat pad and intercondylar region of nine patients who underwent revision surgery due to arthrofibrosis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (study group). Control tissue was taken from five patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction (control group I) and from eight patients, who underwent second-look arthroscopy after primary ACL reconstruction (control group II). ASMA containing fibroblasts were immunostained with a monoclonal antibody. Histomorphometry was performed for total cell amount, ASMA containing fibroblasts, and vessel cross-sections. The arthrofibrosis group showed a tenfold higher amount of ASMA containing myofibroblasts (23.4% vs. 2.3%) than in control group I. There was a significantly higher total cell count and lower vessel density than in control group I. Control group II showed an upregulation of myofibroblasts almost five times that in control group I; nevertheless there was no evidence of scar formation or tissue fibrosis. Myofibroblasts are responsible for scar tissue contraction during wound healing. In arthrofibrosis tissue fibroblast contraction may be involved in tissue fibrosis and contraction with consecutive loss of motion. We found that myofibroblasts are upregulated in arthrofibrosis tissue. ACL reconstruction itself caused an up regulation of myofibroblast content. Nevertheless these patients did not show any clinical or histological signs of arthrofibrosis. Thus it is reasonable to assume that the

  13. INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dale D.

    2008-01-01

    The intermediate filament (IF) network is one of the three cytoskeletal systems in smooth muscle. The type III IF proteins vimentin and desmin are major constituents of the network in smooth muscle cells and tissues. Lack of vimentin or desmin impairs contractile ability of various smooth muscle preparations, implying their important role for smooth muscle force development. The IF framework has long been viewed as a fixed cytostructure that solely provides mechanical integrity for the cell. However, recent studies suggest that the IF cytoskeleton is dynamic in mammalian cells in response to various external stimulation. In this review, the structure and biological properties of IF proteins in smooth muscle are summarized. The role of IF proteins in the modulation of smooth muscle force development and redistribution/translocation of signaling partners (such as p130 Crk-associated substrate, CAS) is depicted. This review also summarizes our latest understanding on how the IF network may be regulated in smooth muscle. PMID:18256275

  14. Purification of native myosin filaments from muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, C; Padrón, R; Horowitz, R; Zhao, F Q; Craig, R

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the structure and function of native thick (myosin-containing) filaments of muscle has been hampered in the past by the difficulty of obtaining a pure preparation. We have developed a simple method for purifying native myosin filaments from muscle filament suspensions. The method involves severing thin (actin-containing) filaments into short segments using a Ca(2+)-insensitive fragment of gelsolin, followed by differential centrifugation to purify the thick filaments. By gel electrophoresis, the purified thick filaments show myosin heavy and light chains together with nonmyosin thick filament components. Contamination with actin is below 3.5%. Electron microscopy demonstrates intact thick filaments, with helical cross-bridge order preserved, and essentially complete removal of thin filaments. The method has been developed for striated muscles but can also be used in a modified form to remove contaminating thin filaments from native smooth muscle myofibrils. Such preparations should be useful for thick filament structural and biochemical studies. PMID:11606293

  15. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Piechocki, Marie P

    2008-01-01

    Background To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1) maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. Methods We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. Results The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. Conclusion This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving strategies that can dually or

  16. Myosin filament structure in vertebrate smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The in vivo structure of the myosin filaments in vertebrate smooth muscle is unknown. Evidence from purified smooth muscle myosin and from some studies of intact smooth muscle suggests that they may have a nonhelical, side-polar arrangement of crossbridges. However, the bipolar, helical structure characteristic of myosin filaments in striated muscle has not been disproved for smooth muscle. We have used EM to investigate this question in a functionally diverse group of smooth muscles (from the vascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and visual systems) from mammalian, amphibian, and avian species. Intact muscle under physiological conditions, rapidly frozen and then freeze substituted, shows many myosin filaments with a square backbone in transverse profile. Transverse sections of fixed, chemically skinned muscles also show square backbones and, in addition, reveal projections (crossbridges) on only two opposite sides of the square. Filaments gently isolated from skinned smooth muscles and observed by negative staining show crossbridges with a 14.5-nm repeat projecting in opposite directions on opposite sides of the filament. Such filaments subjected to low ionic strength conditions show bare filament ends and an antiparallel arrangement of myosin tails along the length of the filament. All of these observations are consistent with a side-polar structure and argue against a bipolar, helical crossbridge arrangement. We conclude that myosin filaments in all smooth muscles, regardless of function, are likely to be side-polar. Such a structure could be an important factor in the ability of smooth muscles to contract by large amounts. PMID:8698822

  17. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components.

  18. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  19. Muscle myosin filaments: cores, crowns and couplings.

    PubMed

    Squire, John M

    2009-09-01

    Myosin filaments in muscle, carrying the ATPase myosin heads that interact with actin filaments to produce force and movement, come in multiple varieties depending on species and functional need, but most are based on a common structural theme. The now successful journeys to solve the ultrastructures of many of these myosin filaments, at least at modest resolution, have not been without their false starts and erroneous sidetracks, but the picture now emerging is of both diversity in the rotational symmetries of different filaments and a degree of commonality in the way the myosin heads are organised in resting muscle. Some of the remaining differences may be associated with how the muscle is regulated. Several proteins in cardiac muscle myosin filaments can carry mutations associated with heart disease, so the elucidation of myosin filament structure to understand the effects of these mutations has a clear and topical clinical relevance.

  20. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark S.; Tanner, Bertrand C. W.; Nyland, Lori R.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2010-01-01

    The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanical properties of filaments impact muscle performance. PMID:20625489

  1. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 induces alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in granulation tissue myofibroblasts and in quiescent and growing cultured fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Granulation tissue fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) develop several ultrastructural and biochemical features of smooth muscle (SM) cells, including the presence of microfilament bundles and the expression of alpha-SM actin, the actin isoform typical of vascular SM cells. Myofibroblasts have been proposed to play a role in wound contraction and in retractile phenomena observed during fibrotic diseases. We show here that the subcutaneous administration of transforming growth factor- beta 1 (TGF beta 1) to rats results in the formation of a granulation tissue in which alpha-SM actin expressing myofibroblasts are particularly abundant. Other cytokines and growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, despite their profibrotic activity, do not induce alpha-SM actin in myofibroblasts. In situ hybridization with an alpha-SM actin probe shows a high level of alpha-SM actin mRNA expression in myofibroblasts of TGF beta 1-induced granulation tissue. Moreover, TGF beta 1 induces alpha-SM actin protein and mRNA expression in growing and quiescent cultured fibroblasts and preincubation of culture medium containing whole blood serum with neutralizing antibodies to TGF beta 1 results in a decrease of alpha-SM actin expression by fibroblasts in replicative and non-replicative conditions. These results suggest that TGF beta 1 plays an important role in myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing and fibrocontractive diseases by regulating the expression of alpha-SM actin in these cells. PMID:8314838

  2. Bending artificial muscle from nylon filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirvakili, Seyed M.; Hunter, Ian W.

    2016-04-01

    Highly oriented nylon and polyethylene fibers shrink in length and expand in diameter when heated. Using this property, in this work, for the first time we are introducing a type of bending artificial muscle from nylon filaments such as fishing line. Reversible radius of curvature of 0.23 mm-1 was achieved with maximum reversible bending amplitude of 115 mm for the nylon bending actuator. Peak force of up to 2040 mN was measured with a catch-state force of up to 40% of the active force. A 3 dB roll-off frequency of around 0.7 Hz was observed in the frequency response of the bending actuator in water.

  3. The invertebrate myosin filament: subfilament arrangement of the solid filaments of insect flight muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Beinbrech, G; Ashton, F T; Pepe, F A

    1992-01-01

    Transverse sections (approximately 140 nm thick) of solid myosin filaments of the flight muscles of the fleshfly, Phormia terrae-novae, the honey bee, Apis mellifica, and the waterbug, Lethocerus uhleri, were photographed in a JEM model 200A electron microscope at 200 kV. The images were digitized and computer processed by rotational filtering. In each of these filaments it was found that the symmetry of the core and the wall was not the same. The power spectra of the images showed sixfold symmetry for the wall and threefold symmetry for the core of the filaments. The images of the filaments in each muscle were superimposed according to the sixfold center of the wall. These averaged images for all three muscles showed six pairs of subunits in the wall similar to those found in the wall of tubular filaments. From serial sections of the fleshfly filaments, we conclude that the subunits in the wall of the filaments represent subfilaments essentially parallel to the long axis of the filament. In each muscle there are additional subunits in the core, closely related to the subunits in the wall. Evaluation of serial sections through fleshfly filaments suggests that the relationship of the three subunits observed in the core to those in the wall varies along the length of the filaments. In waterbug filaments there are three dense and three less dense subunits for a total of six all closely related to the wall. Bee filaments have three subunits related to the wall and three subunits located eccentrically in the core of the filaments. The presence of core subunits can be related to the paramyosin content of the filaments. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 12 PMID:1617135

  4. Connectin filaments in stretched skinned fibers of frog skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of highly stretched skinned frog semi-tendinous muscle fibers revealed that connectin, an elastic protein of muscle, is located in the gap between actin and myosin filaments and also in the region of myosin filaments except in their centers. Electron microscopic observations showed that there were easily recognizable filaments extending from the myosin filaments to the I band region and to Z lines in the myofibrils treated with antiserum against connectin. In thin sections prepared with tannic acid, very thin filaments connected myosin filaments to actin filaments. These filaments were also observed in myofibrils extracted with a modified Hasselbach-Schneider solution (0.6 M KCl, 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, 2 mM ATP, 2 mM MgCl2, and 1 mM EGTA) and with 0.6 M Kl. SDS PAGE revealed that connectin (also called titin) remained in extracted myofibrils. We suggest that connectin filaments play an important role in the generation of tension upon passive stretch. A scheme of the cytoskeletal structure of myofibrils of vertebrate skeletal muscle is presented on the basis of our present information of connectin and intermediate filaments. PMID:6384237

  5. Contractile properties of thin (actin) filament-reconstituted muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, S; Funatsu, T; Fujita, H

    1998-01-01

    Selective removal and reconstitution of the components of muscle fibers (fibrils) is a useful means of examining the molecular mechanism underlying the formation of the contractile apparatus. In addition, this approach is powerful for examining the structure-function relationship of a specific component of the contractile system. In previous studies, we have achieved the partial structural and functional reconstitution of thin filaments in the skeletal contractile apparatus and full reconstitution in the cardiac contractile apparatus. First, all thin filaments other than short fragments at the Z line were removed by treatment with plasma gelsolin, an actin filament-severing protein. Under these conditions, no active tension could be generated. By incorporating exogenous actin into these thin filament-free fibers, actin filaments were reconstituted by polymerization on the short actin fragments remaining at the Z line, and active tension, which was insensitive to Ca2+, was restored. The active tension after the reconstitution of thin filaments reached as high as 30% of the original level in skeletal muscle, while it reached 140% in cardiac muscle. The augmentation of tension in cardiac muscle is mainly attributable to the elongation of reconstituted filaments, longer than the average length of thin filaments in an intact muscle. These results indicate that a muscle contractile apparatus with a high order structure and function can be constructed by the self-assembly of constituent proteins. Recently, we applied this reconstitution system to the study of the mechanism of spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in thin (actin) filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers. As a result, we found that SPOC occurs even in regulatory protein-free actin filament-reconstituted fibers (Fujita & Ishiwata, manuscript submitted), although the SPOC conditions were slightly different from the standard SPOC conditions. This result strongly suggests that spontaneous oscillation

  6. Filamentous structures in skeletal muscle: anchors for the subsarcolemmal space.

    PubMed

    Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Soenggono, Arifin; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, intermediate filaments and actin filaments provide structural support to the myofibrils and the sarcolemma. For many years, it was poorly understood from ultrastructural observations that how these filamentous structures were kept anchored. The present study was conducted to determine the architecture of filamentous anchoring structures in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils. The diaphragms (Dp) of adult wild type and mdx mice (mdx is a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy) were subjected to tension applied perpendicular to the long axis of the muscle fibers, with or without treatment with 1% Triton X-100 or 0.03% saponin. These experiments were conducted to confirm the presence and integrity of the filamentous anchoring structures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these structures provide firm transverse connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. Most of the filamentous structures appeared to be inserted into subsarcolemmal densities, forming anchoring connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. In some cases, actin filaments were found to run longitudinally in the subsarcolemmal space to connect to the sarcolemma or in some cases to connect to the intermyofibrils as elongated thin filaments. These filamentous anchoring structures were less common in the mdx Dp. Our data suggest that the transverse and longitudinal filamentous structures form an anchoring system in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils.

  7. Expression of intermediate filaments at muscle insertions in human fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Shinichi; Rhee, Sun-ki; Osonoi, Makoto; Nakamura, Takuo; Cho, Baik Hwan; Murakami, Gen; Ide, Yoshinobu

    2010-01-01

    Desmin and vimentin are intermediate filaments that play crucial roles in the maturation, maintenance and recovery of muscle fibers and mesenchymal cells. The expression of these proteins has not been investigated extensively in human fetuses. In the present study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of intermediate filaments in skeletal muscles of the head, neck and thorax in 12 mid-term human fetuses at 9–18 weeks of gestation. We also used immunohistochemistry to localize the expression of the myosin heavy chain and silver impregnation to identify the fetal endomysium. Expression of desmin and vimentin was already detectable in intercostal muscle at 9 weeks, especially at sites of muscle attachment to the perichondrium. At this stage, myosin heavy chain was expressed throughout the muscle fibers and the endomysium had already developed. Beginning with punctate expression, the positive areas became diffusely distributed in the muscle fibers. At 15–18 weeks, intermediate filament proteins were extensively expressed in all of the muscles examined. Expression at the bone–muscle interface was continuous with expression along the intramuscular tendon fibres. These results suggest that the development of intermediate filaments begins in areas of mechanical stress due to early muscle contraction. Their initially punctate distribution, as observed here, probably corresponds to the earliest stage of fetal enthesis formation. PMID:20500537

  8. Regulation of actin filament length in erythrocytes and striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V M

    1996-02-01

    Actin filaments polymerize in vitro to lengths which display an exponential distribution, yet in many highly differentiated cells they can be precisely maintained at uniform lengths in elaborate supramolecular structures. Recent results obtained using two classic model systems, the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton and the striated muscle sarcomere, reveal surprising similarities and instructive differences in the molecules and mechanisms responsible for determining and maintaining actin filament lengths in these two systems. Tropomodulin caps the slow-growing, pointed filament ends in muscle and in erythrocytes. CapZ caps the fast-growing, barbed filament ends in striated muscle, whereas a newly discovered barbed end capping protein, adducin, may cap the barbed filament ends in erythrocytes. The mechanisms responsible for specifying the characteristic filament lengths in these systems are more elusive and may include strict control of the relative amounts of actin filament capping proteins and side-binding proteins, molecular templates (e.g. tropomyosin and nebulin) and/or verniers (e.g. tropomyosin).

  9. The kinetics underlying the velocity of smooth muscle myosin filament sliding on actin filaments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Haldeman, Brian D; Brizendine, Richard K; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2014-07-25

    Actin-myosin interactions are well studied using soluble myosin fragments, but little is known about effects of myosin filament structure on mechanochemistry. We stabilized unphosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (SMM) and phosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (pSMM) filaments against ATP-induced depolymerization using a cross-linker and attached fluorescent rhodamine (XL-Rh-SMM). Electron micrographs showed that these side polar filaments are very similar to unmodified filaments. They are ~0.63 μm long and contain ~176 molecules. Rate constants for ATP-induced dissociation and ADP release from acto-myosin for filaments and S1 heads were similar. Actin-activated ATPases of SMM and XL-Rh-SMM were similarly regulated. XL-Rh-pSMM filaments moved processively on F-actin that was bound to a PEG brush surface. ATP dependence of filament velocities was similar to that for solution ATPases at high [actin], suggesting that both processes are limited by the same kinetic step (weak to strong transition) and therefore are attachment- limited. This differs from actin sliding over myosin monomers, which is primarily detachment-limited. Fitting filament data to an attachment-limited model showed that approximately half of the heads are available to move the filament, consistent with a side polar structure. We suggest the low stiffness subfragment 2 (S2) domain remains unhindered during filament motion in our assay. Actin-bound negatively displaced heads will impart minimal drag force because of S2 buckling. Given the ADP release rate, the velocity, and the length of S2, these heads will detach from actin before slack is taken up into a backwardly displaced high stiffness position. This mechanism explains the lack of detachment- limited kinetics at physiological [ATP]. These findings address how nonlinear elasticity in assemblies of motors leads to efficient collective force generation.

  10. The Kinetics Underlying the Velocity of Smooth Muscle Myosin Filament Sliding on Actin Filaments in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Haldeman, Brian D.; Brizendine, Richard K.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Baker, Josh E.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Actin-myosin interactions are well studied using soluble myosin fragments, but little is known about effects of myosin filament structure on mechanochemistry. We stabilized unphosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (SMM) and phosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (pSMM) filaments against ATP-induced depolymerization using a cross-linker and attached fluorescent rhodamine (XL-Rh-SMM). Electron micrographs showed that these side polar filaments are very similar to unmodified filaments. They are ∼0.63 μm long and contain ∼176 molecules. Rate constants for ATP-induced dissociation and ADP release from acto-myosin for filaments and S1 heads were similar. Actin-activated ATPases of SMM and XL-Rh-SMM were similarly regulated. XL-Rh-pSMM filaments moved processively on F-actin that was bound to a PEG brush surface. ATP dependence of filament velocities was similar to that for solution ATPases at high [actin], suggesting that both processes are limited by the same kinetic step (weak to strong transition) and therefore are attachment-limited. This differs from actin sliding over myosin monomers, which is primarily detachment-limited. Fitting filament data to an attachment-limited model showed that approximately half of the heads are available to move the filament, consistent with a side polar structure. We suggest the low stiffness subfragment 2 (S2) domain remains unhindered during filament motion in our assay. Actin-bound negatively displaced heads will impart minimal drag force because of S2 buckling. Given the ADP release rate, the velocity, and the length of S2, these heads will detach from actin before slack is taken up into a backwardly displaced high stiffness position. This mechanism explains the lack of detachment-limited kinetics at physiological [ATP]. These findings address how nonlinear elasticity in assemblies of motors leads to efficient collective force generation. PMID:24907276

  11. Structural changes accompanying phosphorylation of tarantula muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to study the structural changes that occur in the myosin filaments of tarantula striated muscle when they are phosphorylated. Myosin filaments in muscle homogenates maintained in relaxing conditions (ATP, EGTA) are found to have nonphosphorylated regulatory light chains as shown by urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis and [32P]phosphate autoradiography. Negative staining reveals an ordered, helical arrangement of crossbridges in these filaments, in which the heads from axially neighboring myosin molecules appear to interact with each other. When the free Ca2+ concentration in a homogenate is raised to 10(-4) M, or when a Ca2+-insensitive myosin light chain kinase is added at low Ca2+ (10(-8) M), the regulatory light chains of myosin become rapidly phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is accompanied by potentiation of the actin activation of the myosin Mg- ATPase activity and by loss of order of the helical crossbridge arrangement characteristic of the relaxed filament. We suggest that in the relaxed state, when the regulatory light chains are not phosphorylated, the myosin heads are held down on the filament backbone by head-head interactions or by interactions of the heads with the filament backbone. Phosphorylation of the light chains may alter these interactions so that the crossbridges become more loosely associated with the filament backbone giving rise to the observed changes and facilitating crossbridge interaction with actin. PMID:2958483

  12. Thin Filament-Reconstituted Skinned Muscle Fibers for the Study of Muscle Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Sayaka; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Fukuda, Norio; Kurihara, Satoshi; Fujita, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    We review the use of thin filament-reconstituted muscle fibers in the study of muscle physiology. Thin filament extraction and reconstitution protocol is a powerful technique to study the role of each component of the thin filament. It is also useful for studying the properties of genetically modified molecules such as actin and tropomyosin. We also review the combination of this protocol with sinusoidal analysis, which will provide a solid technique for determining the effect of regulatory proteins on actomyosin interaction and concomitant cross-bridge kinetics. We suggest that thin filament-reconstituted muscle fibers are an ideal system for studying muscle physiology especially when gene modifications of actin or tropomyosin are involved. PMID:22131807

  13. Cofilin-2 controls actin filament length in muscle sarcomeres

    PubMed Central

    Kremneva, Elena; Makkonen, Maarit H.; Skwarek-Maruszewska, Aneta; Gateva, Gergana; Michelot, Alphee; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY ADF/cofilins drive cytoskeletal dynamics by promoting the disassembly of ‘aged’ ADP-actin filaments. Mammals express several ADF/cofilin isoforms, but their specific biochemical activities and cellular functions have not been studied in detail. Here we demonstrate that the muscle-specific isoform cofilin-2 promotes actin filament disassembly in sarcomeres to control the precise length of thin filaments in the contractile apparatus. In contrast to other isoforms, cofilin-2 efficiently binds and disassembles both ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin filaments. We mapped surface-exposed cofilin-2-specific residues required for ATP-actin binding and propose that these residues function as an ‘actin nucleotide-state sensor’ among ADF/cofilins. The results suggest that cofilin-2 evolved specific biochemical and cellular properties allowing it to control actin dynamics in sarcomeres, where filament pointed ends may contain a mixture of ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin subunits. Our findings also offer a rationale for why cofilin-2 mutations in humans lead to myopathies. PMID:25373779

  14. Intermediate filaments in muscle and epithelial cells of nematodes

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Current concepts of the developmentally controlled multigene family of intermediate filament (IF) proteins expect the origin of their complexity in evolutionary precursors preceding all vertebrate classes. Among invertebrates, however, firm ultrastructural as well as molecular documentation of IFs is restricted to some giant axons and to epithelia of a few molluscs and annelids. As Ascaris lumbricoides is easily dissected into clean tissues, IF expression in this large nematode was analyzed by electron microscopic and biochemical procedures and a monoclonal antibody reacting with all mammalian IF proteins. We document for the first time the presence of IFs in muscle cells of an invertebrate. They occur in three muscle types (irregular striated pharynx muscle, obliquely striated body muscle, uterus smooth muscle). IFs are also found in the epithelia studied (syncytial epidermis, intestine, ovary, testis). Immunoblots on muscles, pharynx, intestine, uterus, and epidermis identify a pair of polypeptides (with apparent molecular masses of 71 and 63 kD) as IF constituents. In vitro reconstitution of filaments was obtained with the proteins purified from body muscle. In the small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans IF proteins are so far found only in the massive desmosome-anchored tonofilament bundles which traverse a special epithelial cell type, the marginal cells of the pharynx. We speculate that IFs may occur in most but perhaps not all invertebrates and that they may not occur in all cells in large amounts. As electron micrographs of the epidermis of a planarian--a member of the Platyhelminthes--reveal IFs, the evolutionary origin of this cytoplasmic structure can be expected either among the lowest metazoa or already in some unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:3519620

  15. Atomic model of the human cardiac muscle myosin filament.

    PubMed

    Al-Khayat, Hind A; Kensler, Robert W; Squire, John M; Marston, Steven B; Morris, Edward P

    2013-01-02

    Of all the myosin filaments in muscle, the most important in terms of human health, and so far the least studied, are those in the human heart. Here we report a 3D single-particle analysis of electron micrograph images of negatively stained myosin filaments isolated from human cardiac muscle in the normal (undiseased) relaxed state. The resulting 28-Å resolution 3D reconstruction shows axial and azimuthal (no radial) myosin head perturbations within the 429-Å axial repeat, with rotations between successive 132 Å-, 148 Å-, and 149 Å-spaced crowns of heads close to 60°, 35°, and 25° (all would be 40° in an unperturbed three-stranded helix). We have defined the myosin head atomic arrangements within the three crown levels and have modeled the organization of myosin subfragment 2 and the possible locations of the 39 Å-spaced domains of titin and the cardiac isoform of myosin-binding protein-C on the surface of the myosin filament backbone. Best fits were obtained with head conformations on all crowns close to the structure of the two-headed myosin molecule of vertebrate chicken smooth muscle in the dephosphorylated relaxed state. Individual crowns show differences in head-pair tilts and subfragment 2 orientations, which, together with the observed perturbations, result in different intercrown head interactions, including one not reported before. Analysis of the interactions between the myosin heads, the cardiac isoform of myosin-binding protein-C, and titin will aid in understanding of the structural effects of mutations in these proteins known to be associated with human cardiomyopathies.

  16. Thick filament mechano-sensing is a calcium-independent regulatory mechanism in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fusi, L.; Brunello, E.; Yan, Z.; Irving, M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent X-ray diffraction studies on actively contracting fibres from skeletal muscle showed that the number of myosin motors available to interact with actin-containing thin filaments is controlled by the stress in the myosin-containing thick filaments. Those results suggested that thick filament mechano-sensing might constitute a novel regulatory mechanism in striated muscles that acts independently of the well-known thin filament-mediated calcium signalling pathway. Here we test that hypothesis using probes attached to the myosin regulatory light chain in demembranated muscle fibres. We show that both the extent and kinetics of thick filament activation depend on thick filament stress but are independent of intracellular calcium concentration in the physiological range. These results establish direct control of myosin motors by thick filament mechano-sensing as a general regulatory mechanism in skeletal muscle that is independent of the canonical calcium signalling pathway. PMID:27796302

  17. Differences in myosin head arrangement on relaxed thick filaments from Lethocerus and rabbit muscles.

    PubMed

    Levine, R J

    1997-10-01

    Relaxed thick filaments from insect asynchronous flight muscle appear different from those of other striated muscles, both in sections and as separated, negatively-stained structures. Unlike relaxed filaments of scallops, chelicerate arthropods, or vertebrate striated muscle, all of which display a predominantly helical arrangement of surface myosin heads, insect asynchronous flight muscle filaments appear striped, with cross-striations or shelves at spacings of 14.5 nm. Using a bifunctional agent to cross-link the active sites of nearest-neighbour myosin heads we previously demonstrated that the helical arrays on the surfaces of scallop, arthropod, fish and frog filaments are produced by the association of two oppositely-oriented myosin heads, each of which originates from an axially sequential molecule within the same helical strand. The effect of similarly cross-linking nearest-neighbour heads with the bifunctional agent 3,3'-dithiobis[3'(2')-O-(6-propionylamino)hexanoyl]adenosine 5'-triphosphate in the presence of vanadate on the solubility of thick filaments separated from Lethocerus indirect flight muscle (an insect asynchronous flight muscle) and rabbit psoas muscle was examined. After incubation on high salt, treated rabbit filaments retained their length and surface myosin, while untreated filaments and those with severed cross-links dissolved, indicating that the myosin head arrangement on rabbit filaments is similar to those previously studied. Treated indirect flight muscles filaments, however, separated into distinct segments of variable lengths, usually multiples of 150 nm, while untreated filaments and those with severed cross-links dissolved completely. This implies that intermolecular associations on indirect flight muscles filaments most likely occur between circumferentially-adjacent heads within each crown, but originating from different helical strands. We interpret this difference in the relaxed orientations of splayed myosin heads on the two

  18. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vetebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca++ binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved. PMID:18616971

  19. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Scott L; Hobbs, Kevin H; Thuma, Jeffrey B

    2008-10-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vertebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca(++) binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved.

  20. Tropomodulin Capping of Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle Development and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient striated muscle contraction requires precise assembly and regulation of diverse actin filament systems, most notably the sarcomeric thin filaments of the contractile apparatus. By capping the pointed ends of actin filaments, tropomodulins (Tmods) regulate actin filament assembly, lengths, and stability. Here, we explore the current understanding of the expression patterns, localizations, and functions of Tmods in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. We first describe the mechanisms by which Tmods regulate myofibril assembly and thin filament lengths, as well as the roles of closely related Tmod family variants, the leiomodins (Lmods), in these processes. We also discuss emerging functions for Tmods in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This paper provides abundant evidence that Tmods are key structural regulators of striated muscle cytoarchitecture and physiology. PMID:22013379

  1. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of tropomodulin isoforms leads to thin filament elongation in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gokhin, David S; Tierney, Matthew T; Sui, Zhenhua; Sacco, Alessandra; Fowler, Velia M

    2014-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) induces sarcolemmal mechanical instability and rupture, hyperactivity of intracellular calpains, and proteolytic breakdown of muscle structural proteins. Here we identify the two sarcomeric tropomodulin (Tmod) isoforms, Tmod1 and Tmod4, as novel proteolytic targets of m-calpain, with Tmod1 exhibiting ∼10-fold greater sensitivity to calpain-mediated cleavage than Tmod4 in situ. In mdx mice, increased m-calpain levels in dystrophic soleus muscle are associated with loss of Tmod1 from the thin filament pointed ends, resulting in ∼11% increase in thin filament lengths. In mdx/mTR mice, a more severe model of DMD, Tmod1 disappears from the thin filament pointed ends in both tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus muscles, whereas Tmod4 additionally disappears from soleus muscle, resulting in thin filament length increases of ∼10 and ∼12% in TA and soleus muscles, respectively. In both mdx and mdx/mTR mice, both TA and soleus muscles exhibit normal localization of α-actinin, the nebulin M1M2M3 domain, Tmod3, and cytoplasmic γ-actin, indicating that m-calpain does not cause wholesale proteolysis of other sarcomeric and actin cytoskeletal proteins in dystrophic skeletal muscle. These results implicate Tmod proteolysis and resultant thin filament length misspecification as novel mechanisms that may contribute to DMD pathology, affecting muscles in a use- and disease severity-dependent manner.

  2. Filament Compliance Influences Cooperative Activation of Thin Filaments and the Dynamics of Force Production in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Bertrand C. W.; Daniel, Thomas L.; Regnier, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Striated muscle contraction is a highly cooperative process initiated by Ca2+ binding to the troponin complex, which leads to tropomyosin movement and myosin cross-bridge (XB) formation along thin filaments. Experimental and computational studies suggest skeletal muscle fiber activation is greatly augmented by cooperative interactions between neighboring thin filament regulatory units (RU-RU cooperativity; 1 RU = 7 actin monomers+1 troponin complex+1 tropomyosin molecule). XB binding can also amplify thin filament activation through interactions with RUs (XB-RU cooperativity). Because these interactions occur with a temporal order, they can be considered kinetic forms of cooperativity. Our previous spatially-explicit models illustrated that mechanical forms of cooperativity also exist, arising from XB-induced XB binding (XB-XB cooperativity). These mechanical and kinetic forms of cooperativity are likely coordinated during muscle contraction, but the relative contribution from each of these mechanisms is difficult to separate experimentally. To investigate these contributions we built a multi-filament model of the half sarcomere, allowing RU activation kinetics to vary with the state of neighboring RUs or XBs. Simulations suggest Ca2+ binding to troponin activates a thin filament distance spanning 9 to 11 actins and coupled RU-RU interactions dominate the cooperative force response in skeletal muscle, consistent with measurements from rabbit psoas fibers. XB binding was critical for stabilizing thin filament activation, particularly at submaximal Ca2+ levels, even though XB-RU cooperativity amplified force less than RU-RU cooperativity. Similar to previous studies, XB-XB cooperativity scaled inversely with lattice stiffness, leading to slower rates of force development as stiffness decreased. Including RU-RU and XB-RU cooperativity in this model resulted in the novel prediction that the force-[Ca2+] relationship can vary due to filament and XB compliance

  3. Filament compliance influences cooperative activation of thin filaments and the dynamics of force production in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Bertrand C W; Daniel, Thomas L; Regnier, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Striated muscle contraction is a highly cooperative process initiated by Ca²⁺ binding to the troponin complex, which leads to tropomyosin movement and myosin cross-bridge (XB) formation along thin filaments. Experimental and computational studies suggest skeletal muscle fiber activation is greatly augmented by cooperative interactions between neighboring thin filament regulatory units (RU-RU cooperativity; 1 RU = 7 actin monomers+1 troponin complex+1 tropomyosin molecule). XB binding can also amplify thin filament activation through interactions with RUs (XB-RU cooperativity). Because these interactions occur with a temporal order, they can be considered kinetic forms of cooperativity. Our previous spatially-explicit models illustrated that mechanical forms of cooperativity also exist, arising from XB-induced XB binding (XB-XB cooperativity). These mechanical and kinetic forms of cooperativity are likely coordinated during muscle contraction, but the relative contribution from each of these mechanisms is difficult to separate experimentally. To investigate these contributions we built a multi-filament model of the half sarcomere, allowing RU activation kinetics to vary with the state of neighboring RUs or XBs. Simulations suggest Ca²⁺ binding to troponin activates a thin filament distance spanning 9 to 11 actins and coupled RU-RU interactions dominate the cooperative force response in skeletal muscle, consistent with measurements from rabbit psoas fibers. XB binding was critical for stabilizing thin filament activation, particularly at submaximal Ca²⁺ levels, even though XB-RU cooperativity amplified force less than RU-RU cooperativity. Similar to previous studies, XB-XB cooperativity scaled inversely with lattice stiffness, leading to slower rates of force development as stiffness decreased. Including RU-RU and XB-RU cooperativity in this model resulted in the novel prediction that the force-[Ca²⁺] relationship can vary due to filament and XB

  4. Paramyosin structures in the thick filaments of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Heumann, H G

    1980-10-01

    Freeze-substituted cells of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis contain paramyosin filaments which exhibit a characteristic fine structure. Longitudinally sectioned filaments show a variety of band patterns, those occurring most frequently being cross, oblique or double oblique striations. The periodic spacings within one pattern are precise as can be demonstrated by Markham analysis and optical diffractometry. The patterns arise from structures in the interior of the filament since they persist in serially sectioned filaments and a layered structure is visible in cross-sectioned filaments. The different patterns are found to be convertible by rotating the grid around the filament axis. The observations led to the conclusion that the paramyosin core has some kind of helical arrangement. A model is proposed which consists of concentric layers of parallel paramyosin molecules which are displaced along the molecular axis in such a way that the characteristic Bear-Selby net structure results.

  5. Tropomodulin isoforms regulate thin filament pointed-end capping and skeletal muscle physiology

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Lewis, Raymond A.; McKeown, Caroline R.; Nowak, Roberta B.; Kim, Nancy E.; Littlefield, Ryan S.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    During myofibril assembly, thin filament lengths are precisely specified to optimize skeletal muscle function. Tropomodulins (Tmods) are capping proteins that specify thin filament lengths by controlling actin dynamics at pointed ends. In this study, we use a genetic targeting approach to explore the effects of deleting Tmod1 from skeletal muscle. Myofibril assembly, skeletal muscle structure, and thin filament lengths are normal in the absence of Tmod1. Tmod4 localizes to thin filament pointed ends in Tmod1-null embryonic muscle, whereas both Tmod3 and -4 localize to pointed ends in Tmod1-null adult muscle. Substitution by Tmod3 and -4 occurs despite their weaker interactions with striated muscle tropomyosins. However, the absence of Tmod1 results in depressed isometric stress production during muscle contraction, systemic locomotor deficits, and a shift to a faster fiber type distribution. Thus, Tmod3 and -4 compensate for the absence of Tmod1 structurally but not functionally. We conclude that Tmod1 is a novel regulator of skeletal muscle physiology. PMID:20368620

  6. Myosin and Actin Filaments in Muscle: Structures and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Squire, John M; Paul, Danielle M; Morris, Edward P

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, improvements in electron microscopy and image processing have permitted significantly higher resolutions to be achieved (sometimes <1 nm) when studying isolated actin and myosin filaments. In the case of actin filaments the changing structure when troponin binds calcium ions can be followed using electron microscopy and single particle analysis to reveal what happens on each of the seven non-equivalent pseudo-repeats of the tropomyosin α-helical coiled-coil. In the case of the known family of myosin filaments not only are the myosin head arrangements under relaxing conditions being defined, but the latest analysis, also using single particle methods, is starting to reveal the way that the α-helical coiled-coil myosin rods are packed to give the filament backbones.

  7. The Intriguing Dual Lattices of the Myosin Filaments in Vertebrate Striated Muscles: Evolution and Advantage

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Pradeep K.; Squire, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180°) according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have. PMID:25478994

  8. The intriguing dual lattices of the Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscles: evolution and advantage.

    PubMed

    Luther, Pradeep K; Squire, John M

    2014-12-03

    Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180°) according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have.

  9. Disproportionate loss of thin filaments in human soleus muscle after 17-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Bain, J. L.; Thompson, J. L.; Fitts, R. H.; Widrick, J. J.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    Previously we reported that, after 17-day bed rest unloading of 8 humans, soleus slow fibers atrophied and exhibited increased velocity of shortening without fast myosin expression. The present ultrastructural study examined fibers from the same muscle biopsies to determine whether decreased myofilament packing density accounted for the observed speeding. Quantitation was by computer-assisted morphometry of electron micrographs. Filament densities were normalized for sarcomere length, because density depends directly on length. Thick filament density was unchanged by bed rest. Thin filaments/microm2 decreased 16-23%. Glycogen filled the I band sites vacated by filaments. The percentage decrease in thin filaments (Y) correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with the percentage increase in velocity (X), (Y = 0.1X + 20%, R2 = 0.62). An interpretation is that fewer filaments increases thick to thin filament spacing and causes earlier cross-bridge detachment and faster cycling. Increased velocity helps maintain power (force x velocity) as atrophy lowers force. Atrophic muscles may be prone to sarcomere reloading damage because force/microm2 was near normal, and force per thin filament increased an estimated 30%.

  10. Disproportionate loss of thin filaments in human soleus muscle after 17-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Bain, J. L.; Thompson, J. L.; Fitts, R. H.; Widrick, J. J.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    Previously we reported that, after 17-day bed rest unloading of 8 humans, soleus slow fibers atrophied and exhibited increased velocity of shortening without fast myosin expression. The present ultrastructural study examined fibers from the same muscle biopsies to determine whether decreased myofilament packing density accounted for the observed speeding. Quantitation was by computer-assisted morphometry of electron micrographs. Filament densities were normalized for sarcomere length, because density depends directly on length. Thick filament density was unchanged by bed rest. Thin filaments/microm2 decreased 16-23%. Glycogen filled the I band sites vacated by filaments. The percentage decrease in thin filaments (Y) correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with the percentage increase in velocity (X), (Y = 0.1X + 20%, R2 = 0.62). An interpretation is that fewer filaments increases thick to thin filament spacing and causes earlier cross-bridge detachment and faster cycling. Increased velocity helps maintain power (force x velocity) as atrophy lowers force. Atrophic muscles may be prone to sarcomere reloading damage because force/microm2 was near normal, and force per thin filament increased an estimated 30%.

  11. DAAM Is Required for Thin Filament Formation and Sarcomerogenesis during Muscle Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Imre; Migh, Ede; Szikora, Szilárd; Kalmár, Tibor; Végh, Attila G.; Deák, Ferenc; Barkó, Szilvia; Bugyi, Beáta; Orfanos, Zacharias; Kovács, János; Juhász, Gábor; Váró, György; Nyitrai, Miklós; Sparrow, John; Mihály, József

    2014-01-01

    During muscle development, myosin and actin containing filaments assemble into the highly organized sarcomeric structure critical for muscle function. Although sarcomerogenesis clearly involves the de novo formation of actin filaments, this process remained poorly understood. Here we show that mouse and Drosophila members of the DAAM formin family are sarcomere-associated actin assembly factors enriched at the Z-disc and M-band. Analysis of dDAAM mutants revealed a pivotal role in myofibrillogenesis of larval somatic muscles, indirect flight muscles and the heart. We found that loss of dDAAM function results in multiple defects in sarcomere development including thin and thick filament disorganization, Z-disc and M-band formation, and a near complete absence of the myofibrillar lattice. Collectively, our data suggest that dDAAM is required for the initial assembly of thin filaments, and subsequently it promotes filament elongation by assembling short actin polymers that anneal to the pointed end of the growing filaments, and by antagonizing the capping protein Tropomodulin. PMID:24586196

  12. The contributions of filaments and cross-bridges to sarcomere compliance in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Elisabetta; Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Linari, Marco; Fernandez-Martinez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Irving, Malcolm; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Reconditi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Force generation in the muscle sarcomere is driven by the head domain of the myosin molecule extending from the thick filament to form cross-bridges with the actin-containing thin filament. Following attachment, a structural working stroke in the head pulls the thin filament towards the centre of the sarcomere, producing, under unloaded conditions, a filament sliding of ∼11 nm. The mechanism of force generation by the myosin head depends on the relationship between cross-bridge force and movement, which is determined by compliances of the cross-bridge (Ccb) and filaments. By measuring the force dependence of the spacing of the high-order myosin- and actin-based X-ray reflections from sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta we find a combined filament compliance (Cf) of 13.1 ± 1.2 nm MPa−1, close to recent estimates from single fibre mechanics (12.8 ± 0.5 nm MPa−1). Ccb calculated using these estimates is 0.37 ± 0.12 nm pN−1, a value fully accounted for by the compliance of the myosin head domain, 0.38 ± 0.06 nm pN−1, obtained from the intensity changes of the 14.5 nm myosin-based X-ray reflection in response to 3 kHz oscillations imposed on single muscle fibres in rigor. Thus, a significant contribution to Ccb from the myosin tail that joins the head to the thick filament is excluded. The low Ccb value indicates that the myosin head generates isometric force by a small sub-step of the 11 nm stroke that drives filament sliding at low load. The implications of these results for the mechanism of force generation by myosins have general relevance for cardiac and non-muscle myosins as well as for skeletal muscle. PMID:25015916

  13. Myosin Heads Contribute to the Maintenance of Filament Order in Relaxed Rabbit Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, Sergey Y.; Koubassova, Natalia A.; Bennett, Pauline M.; Ferenczi, Michael A.; Shestakov, Dmitry A.; Tsaturyan, Andrey K.

    2010-01-01

    Raising the temperature of rabbit skeletal muscle from ∼0°C to ∼20°C has been shown to enhance the helical organization of the myosin heads and to change the intensities of the 10 and 11 equatorial reflections. We show here by time-resolved x-ray diffraction combined with temperature jump that the movement of the heads to enhance the organized myosin helix occurs at the same fast rate as the change in the intensities of the equatorial reflections. However, model calculations indicate that the change in the equatorials cannot be explained simply in terms of the movement of myosin heads. Analysis of electron micrographs of transverse sections of relaxed muscle fibers cryofixed at ∼5°C and ∼35°C shows that in addition to the reorganization of the heads the thin and thick filaments are less constrained to their positions in the hexagonal filament lattice in the warm muscle than in the cold. Incorporating the changes in filament order in model calculations reconciles these with the observed changes in equatorial reflections. We suggest the thin filaments in the cold muscle are boxed into their positions by the thermal movement of the disordered myosin heads. In the warmer muscle, the packed-down heads leave the thin filaments more room to diffuse laterally. PMID:20858427

  14. A novel three-filament model of force generation in eccentric contraction of skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Schappacher-Tilp, Gudrun; Leonard, Timothy; Desch, Gertrud; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We propose and examine a three filament model of skeletal muscle force generation, thereby extending classical cross-bridge models by involving titin-actin interaction upon active force production. In regions with optimal actin-myosin overlap, the model does not alter energy and force predictions of cross-bridge models for isometric contractions. However, in contrast to cross-bridge models, the three filament model accurately predicts history-dependent force generation in half sarcomeres for eccentric and concentric contractions, and predicts the activation-dependent forces for stretches beyond actin-myosin filament overlap.

  15. The carboxyl-terminal isoforms of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain determine thick filament assembly properties

    PubMed Central

    Rovner, Arthur S.; Fagnant, Patricia M.; Lowey, Susan; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2002-01-01

    The alternatively spliced SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chains differ at their respective carboxyl termini by 43 versus 9 unique amino acids. To determine whether these tailpieces affect filament assembly, SM1 and SM2 myosins, the rod region of these myosin isoforms, and a rod with no tailpiece (tailless), were expressed in Sf 9 cells. Paracrystals formed from SM1 and SM2 rod fragments showed different modes of molecular packing, indicating that the tailpieces can influence filament structure. The SM2 rod was less able to assemble into stable filaments than either SM1 or the tailless rods. Expressed full-length SM1 and SM2 myosins showed solubility differences comparable to the rods, establishing the validity of the latter as a model for filament assembly. Formation of homodimers of SM1 and SM2 rods was favored over the heterodimer in cells coinfected with both viruses, compared with mixtures of the two heavy chains renatured in vitro. These results demonstrate for the first time that the smooth muscle myosin tailpieces differentially affect filament assembly, and suggest that homogeneous thick filaments containing SM1 or SM2 myosin could serve distinct functions within smooth muscle cells. PMID:11781338

  16. Myosin filament sliding through the Z-disc relates striated muscle fibre structure to function.

    PubMed

    Rode, Christian; Siebert, Tobias; Tomalka, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-03-16

    Striated muscle contraction requires intricate interactions of microstructures. The classic textbook assumption that myosin filaments are compressed at the meshed Z-disc during striated muscle fibre contraction conflicts with experimental evidence. For example, myosin filaments are too stiff to be compressed sufficiently by the muscular force, and, unlike compressed springs, the muscle fibres do not restore their resting length after contractions to short lengths. Further, the dependence of a fibre's maximum contraction velocity on sarcomere length is unexplained to date. In this paper, we present a structurally consistent model of sarcomere contraction that reconciles these findings with the well-accepted sliding filament and crossbridge theories. The few required model parameters are taken from the literature or obtained from reasoning based on structural arguments. In our model, the transition from hexagonal to tetragonal actin filament arrangement near the Z-disc together with a thoughtful titin arrangement enables myosin filament sliding through the Z-disc. This sliding leads to swivelled crossbridges in the adjacent half-sarcomere that dampen contraction. With no fitting of parameters required, the model predicts straightforwardly the fibre's entire force-length behaviour and the dependence of the maximum contraction velocity on sarcomere length. Our model enables a structurally and functionally consistent view of the contractile machinery of the striated fibre with possible implications for muscle diseases and evolution. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  18. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  19. A network of 2-4 nm filaments found in sea urchin smooth muscle. Protein constituents and in situ localization.

    PubMed

    Pureur, R P; Coffe, G; Soyer-Gobillard, M O; de Billy, F; Pudles, J

    1986-01-01

    In this report the coisolation of two proteins from sea urchin smooth muscle of apparent molecular weights (Mr) 54 and 56 kD respectively, as determined on SDS-PAGE, is described. Like the intermediate filament proteins, these two proteins are insoluble in high ionic strength buffer solution. On two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and by immunological methods it is shown that these proteins are not related (by these criteria) to rat smooth muscle desmin (54 kD) or vimentin (56 kD). Furthermore, in conditions where both desmin and vimentin assemble in vitro into 10 nm filaments, the sea urchin smooth muscle proteins do not assemble into filaments. Ultrastructural studies on the sea urchin smooth muscle cell show that the thin and thick filaments organization resembles that described in the vertebrate smooth muscle. However, instead of 10 nm filaments, a network of filaments, 2-4 nm in diameter, is revealed, upon removal of the thin and thick filaments by 0.6 M KCl treatment. By indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and in particular by immunocytochemical electron microscopy studies on the sea urchin smooth muscle cell, it is shown that the antibodies raised against both 54 and 56 kD proteins appear to specifically label these 2-4 nm filaments. These findings indicate that both the 54 and 56 kD proteins might be constituents of this category of filaments. The possible significance of this new cytoskeletal element, that we have named echinonematin filaments, is discussed.

  20. Smooth muscle myosin filament assembly under control of a kinase-related protein (KRP) and caldesmon.

    PubMed

    Kudryashov, Dmitry S; Vorotnikov, Alexander V; Dudnakova, Tatyana V; Stepanova, Olga V; Lukas, Thomas J; Sellers, James R; Watterson, D Martin; Shirinsky, Vladimir P

    2002-01-01

    Kinase-related protein (KRP) and caldesmon are abundant myosin-binding proteins of smooth muscle. KRP induces the assembly of unphosphorylated smooth muscle myosin filaments in the presence of ATP by promoting the unfolded state of myosin. Based upon electron microscopy data, it was suggested that caldesmon also possessed a KRP-like activity (Katayama et al., 1995, J Biol Chem 270: 3919-3925). However, the nature of its activity remains obscure since caldesmon does not affect the equilibrium between the folded and unfolded state of myosin. Therefore, to gain some insight into this problem we compared the effects of KRP and caldesmon, separately, and together on myosin filaments using turbidity measurements, protein sedimentation and electron microscopy. Turbidity assays demonstrated that KRP reduced myosin filament aggregation, while caldesmon had no effect. Additionally, neither caldesmon nor its N-terminal myosin binding domain (N152) induced myosin polymerization at subthreshold Mg2+ concentrations in the presence of ATP, whereas the filament promoting action of KRP was enhanced by Mg2+. Moreover, the amino-terminal myosin binding fragment of caldesmon, like the whole protein, antagonizes Mg(2+)-induced myosin filament formation. In electron microscopy experiments, caldesmon shortened myosin filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and KRP, but N152 failed to change their appearance from control. Therefore, the primary distinction between caldesmon and KRP appears to be that caldesmon interacts with myosin to limit filament extension, while KRP induces filament propagation into defined polymers. Transfection of tagged-KRP into fibroblasts and overlay of fibroblast cytoskeletons with Cy3KRP demonstrated that KRP colocalizes with myosin structures in vivo. We propose a new model that through their independent binding to myosin and differential effects on myosin dynamics, caldesmon and KRP can, in concert, control the length and polymerization state of myosin filaments.

  1. Troponin-like regulation in muscle thin filaments of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Bivalvia: Mytiloida).

    PubMed

    Vyatchin, Ilya G; Shevchenko, Ulyana V; Lazarev, Stanislav S; Matusovsky, Oleg S; Shelud'ko, Nikolay S

    2015-10-01

    Muscles of bivalve molluscs have double calcium regulation--myosin-linked and actin-linked. While the mechanism of myosin-linked regulation is sufficiently studied, there is still no consensus on the mechanism of actin-linked regulation. Earlier we showed a high degree of Ca2+-sensitivity of thin filaments from the adductor muscle of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Mytiloida). In order to elucidate the nature of this regulation, we isolated the fraction of minor proteins from the mussel thin filaments, which confers Ca2+-sensitivity to reconstituted actomyosin-tropomyosin. Proteins of this fraction, ABP-19, ABP-20, and ABP-28, were chromatographically purified and identified. According to the results of mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis, as well as by their functional properties, these mussel actin-binding proteins appeared to correspond to the troponin components from the skeletal muscles of vertebrates (TnC, TnI and TnT). The reconstituted mussel troponin complex confers to actomyosin-tropomyosin more than 80% Ca2+-sensitivity. The in vivo molar ratio of actin/tropomyosin/troponin was calculated to be 7:1:0.5, i.e., the content of troponin in mussel thin filaments is two times lower than in thin filaments of skeletal muscles of vertebrates. These data demonstrate that troponin-like regulation found in the catch muscle of the mussel C. grayanus is present at least in two suborders of bivalves: Pectinoida and Mytiloida. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional organization of troponin on cardiac muscle thin filaments in the relaxed state.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shixin; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Orzechowski, Marek; Craig, Roger; Trinick, John; White, Howard; Lehman, William

    2014-02-18

    Muscle contraction is regulated by troponin-tropomyosin, which blocks and unblocks myosin binding sites on actin. To elucidate this regulatory mechanism, the three-dimensional organization of troponin and tropomyosin on the thin filament must be determined. Although tropomyosin is well defined in electron microscopy helical reconstructions of thin filaments, troponin density is mostly lost. Here, we determined troponin organization on native relaxed cardiac muscle thin filaments by applying single particle reconstruction procedures to negatively stained specimens. Multiple reference models led to the same final structure, indicating absence of model bias in the procedure. The new reconstructions clearly showed F-actin, tropomyosin, and troponin densities. At the 25 Å resolution achieved, troponin was considerably better defined than in previous reconstructions. The troponin density closely resembled the shape of troponin crystallographic structures, facilitating detailed interpretation of the electron microscopy density map. The orientation of troponin-T and the troponin core domain established troponin polarity. Density attributable to the troponin-I mobile regulatory domain was positioned where it could hold tropomyosin in its blocking position on actin, thus suggesting the underlying structural basis of thin filament regulation. Our previous understanding of thin filament regulation had been limited to known movements of tropomyosin that sterically block and unblock myosin binding sites on actin. We now show how troponin, the Ca(2+) sensor, may control these movements, ultimately determining whether muscle contracts or relaxes. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct contributions of the thin and thick filaments to length-dependent activation in heart muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemeng; Kampourakis, Thomas; Yan, Ziqian; Sevrieva, Ivanka; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao

    2017-01-01

    The Frank-Starling relation is a fundamental auto-regulatory property of the heart that ensures the volume of blood ejected in each heartbeat is matched to the extent of venous filling. At the cellular level, heart muscle cells generate higher force when stretched, but despite intense efforts the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. We applied a fluorescence-based method, which reports structural changes separately in the thick and thin filaments of rat cardiac muscle, to elucidate that mechanism. The distinct structural changes of troponin C in the thin filaments and myosin regulatory light chain in the thick filaments allowed us to identify two aspects of the Frank-Starling relation. Our results show that the enhanced force observed when heart muscle cells are maximally activated by calcium is due to a change in thick filament structure, but the increase in calcium sensitivity at lower calcium levels is due to a change in thin filament structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24081.001 PMID:28229860

  4. Flightin Is Essential for Thick Filament Assembly and Sarcomere Stability in Drosophila Flight Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Reedy, Mary C.; Bullard, Belinda; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2000-01-01

    Flightin is a multiply phosphorylated, 20-kD myofibrillar protein found in Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFM). Previous work suggests that flightin plays an essential, as yet undefined, role in normal sarcomere structure and contractile activity. Here we show that flightin is associated with thick filaments where it is likely to interact with the myosin rod. We have created a null mutation for flightin, fln0, that results in loss of flight ability but has no effect on fecundity or viability. Electron microscopy comparing pupa and adult fln0 IFM shows that sarcomeres, and thick and thin filaments in pupal IFM, are 25–30% longer than in wild type. fln0 fibers are abnormally wavy, but sarcomere and myotendon structure in pupa are otherwise normal. Within the first 5 h of adult life and beginning of contractile activity, IFM fibers become disrupted as thick filaments and sarcomeres are variably shortened, and myofibrils are ruptured at the myotendon junction. Unusual empty pockets and granular material interrupt the filament lattice of adult fln0 sarcomeres. Site-specific cleavage of myosin heavy chain occurs during this period. That myosin is cleaved in the absence of flightin is consistent with the immunolocalization of flightin on the thick filament and biochemical and genetic evidence suggesting it is associated with the myosin rod. Our results indicate that flightin is required for the establishment of normal thick filament length during late pupal development and thick filament stability in adult after initiation of contractile activity. PMID:11134077

  5. Head-head Interaction Characterizes the Relaxed State of Limulus Muscle Myosin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Woodhead, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of muscle contraction via the myosin filaments occurs in vertebrate smooth and many invertebrate striated muscles. Studies of unphosphorylated vertebrate smooth muscle myosin suggest that activity is switched off through an intramolecular interaction between the actin-binding region of one head and the converter and essential light chains of the other, inhibiting ATPase activity and actin interaction. The same interaction (and additional interaction with the tail) is seen in three-dimensional reconstructions of relaxed, native myosin filaments from tarantula striated muscle, suggesting that such interactions are likely to underlie the off-state of myosin across a wide spectrum of the animal kingdom. We have tested this hypothesis by carrying out cryo-electron microscopy and 3D image reconstruction of myosin filaments from horseshoe crab (Limulus) muscle. The same head-head and head-tail interactions seen in tarantula are also seen in Limulus, supporting the hypothesis. Other data suggest that this motif may underlie the relaxed state of myosin II in all species (including myosin II in nonmuscle cells), with the possible exception of insect flight muscle. The molecular organization of the myosin tails in the backbone of muscle thick filaments is unknown, and may differ between species. X-ray diffraction data support a general model for crustaceans in which tails associate together to form 4 nm diameter subfilaments, with these subfilaments assembling together to form the backbone. This model is supported by direct observation of 4 nm diameter, elongated strands in the tarantula reconstruction, suggesting that it might be a general structure across the arthropods. We observe a similar backbone organization in the Limulus reconstruction, supporting the general existence of such subfilaments. PMID:18976661

  6. A Method for 3D-Reconstruction of a Muscle Thick Filament Using the Tilt Series Images of a Single Filament Electron Tomogram

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, G.; Pinto, A.; Alamo, L.; Baumann, B.; Ye, F.; Winkler, H.; Taylor, K.; Padrón, R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Myosin interacting-heads (MIH) motifs are visualized in 3D-reconstructions of thick filaments from striated muscle. These reconstructions are calculated by averaging methods using images from electron micrographs of grids prepared using numerous filament preparations. Here we propose an alternative method to calculate the 3D-reconstruction of a single thick filament using only a tilt series images recorded by electron tomography. Relaxed thick filaments, prepared from tarantula leg muscle homogenates, were negatively stained. Single-axis tilt series of single isolated thick filaments were obtained with the electron microscope at a low electron dose, and recorded on a CCD camera by electron tomography. An IHRSR 3D-recontruction was calculated from the tilt series images of a single thick filament. The reconstruction was enhanced by including in the search stage dual tilt image segments while only single tilt along the filament axis is usually used, as well as applying a band pass filter just before the back projection. The reconstruction from a single filament has a 40 Å resolution and clearly shows the presence of MIH motifs. In contrast, the electron tomogram 3D-reconstruction of the same thick filament –calculated without any image averaging and/or imposition of helical symmetry- only reveals MIH motifs infrequently. This is –to our knowledge- the first application of the IHRSR method to calculate a 3D reconstruction from tilt series images. This single filament IHRSR reconstruction method (SF-IHRSR) should provide a new tool to assess structural differences between well-ordered thick (or thin) filaments in a grid by recording separately their electron tomograms. PMID:24727133

  7. A method for 3D-reconstruction of a muscle thick filament using the tilt series images of a single filament electron tomogram.

    PubMed

    Márquez, G; Pinto, A; Alamo, L; Baumann, B; Ye, F; Winkler, H; Taylor, K; Padrón, R

    2014-05-01

    Myosin interacting-heads (MIH) motifs are visualized in 3D-reconstructions of thick filaments from striated muscle. These reconstructions are calculated by averaging methods using images from electron micrographs of grids prepared using numerous filament preparations. Here we propose an alternative method to calculate the 3D-reconstruction of a single thick filament using only a tilt series images recorded by electron tomography. Relaxed thick filaments, prepared from tarantula leg muscle homogenates, were negatively stained. Single-axis tilt series of single isolated thick filaments were obtained with the electron microscope at a low electron dose, and recorded on a CCD camera by electron tomography. An IHRSR 3D-recontruction was calculated from the tilt series images of a single thick filament. The reconstruction was enhanced by including in the search stage dual tilt image segments while only single tilt along the filament axis is usually used, as well as applying a band pass filter just before the back projection. The reconstruction from a single filament has a 40 Å resolution and clearly shows the presence of MIH motifs. In contrast, the electron tomogram 3D-reconstruction of the same thick filament - calculated without any image averaging and/or imposition of helical symmetry - only reveals MIH motifs infrequently. This is - to our knowledge - the first application of the IHRSR method to calculate a 3D reconstruction from tilt series images. This single filament IHRSR reconstruction method (SF-IHRSR) should provide a new tool to assess structural differences between well-ordered thick (or thin) filaments in a grid by recording separately their electron tomograms.

  8. Thin filament proteins and thin filament-linked regulation of vertebrate muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Leavis, P C; Gergely, J

    1984-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of myofibrillar proteins will be reviewed. Consideration will be given to the proteins that participate in the contractile process itself as well as to those involved in Ca-dependent regulation of striated (skeletal and cardiac) and smooth muscle. The relation of protein structure to function will be emphasized and the relation of various physiologically and histochemically defined fiber types to the proteins found in them will be discussed.

  9. Skeletal muscle fiber atrophy: altered thin filament density changes slow fiber force and shortening velocity.

    PubMed

    Riley, D A; Bain, J L W; Romatowski, J G; Fitts, R H

    2005-02-01

    Single skinned fibers from soleus and adductor longus (AL) muscles of weight-bearing control rats and rats after 14-day hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU) were studied physiologically and ultrastructurally to investigate how slow fibers increase shortening velocity (V0) without fast myosin. We hypothesized that unloading and shortening of soleus during HSU reduces densities of thin filaments, generating wider myofilament separations that increase V0 and decrease specific tension (kN/m2). During HSU, plantarflexion shortened soleus working length 23%. AL length was unchanged. Both muscles atrophied as shown by reductions in fiber cross-sectional area. For AL, the 60% atrophy accounted fully for the 58% decrease in absolute tension (mN). In the soleus, the 67% decline in absolute tension resulted from 58% atrophy plus a 17% reduction in specific tension. Soleus fibers exhibited a 25% reduction in thin filaments, whereas there was no change in AL thin filament density. Loss of thin filaments is consistent with reduced cross bridge formation, explaining the fall in specific tension. V0 increased 27% in soleus but was unchanged in AL. The V0 of control and HSU fibers was inversely correlated (R = -0.83) with thin filament density and directly correlated (R = 0.78) with thick-to-thin filament spacing distance in a nonlinear fashion. These data indicate that reduction in thin filament density contributes to an increased V0 in slow fibers. Osmotically compacting myofilaments with 5% dextran returned density, spacing, and specific tension and slowed V0 to near-control levels and provided evidence for myofilament spacing modulating tension and V0.

  10. Sarcomere-length dependence of myosin filament structure in skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    PubMed

    Reconditi, Massimo; Brunello, Elisabetta; Fusi, Luca; Linari, Marco; Martinez, Manuel Fernandez; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Irving, Malcolm; Piazzesi, Gabriella

    2014-03-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were recorded at beamline ID02 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility from small bundles of skeletal muscle fibres from Rana esculenta at sarcomere lengths between 2.1 and 3.5 μm at 4°C. The intensities of the X-ray reflections from resting fibres associated with the quasi-helical order of the myosin heads and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) decreased in the sarcomere length range 2.6-3.0 μm but were constant outside it, suggesting that an OFF conformation of the thick filament is maintained by an interaction between MyBP-C and the thin filaments. During active isometric contraction the intensity of the M3 reflection from the regular repeat of the myosin heads along the filaments decreased in proportion to the overlap between thick and thin filaments, with no change in its interference fine structure. Thus, myosin heads in the regions of the thick filaments that do not overlap with thin filaments are highly disordered during isometric contraction, in contrast to their quasi-helical order at rest. Heads in the overlap region that belong to two-headed myosin molecules that are fully detached from actin are also highly disordered, in contrast to the detached partners of actin-attached heads. These results provide strong support for the concept of a regulatory structural transition in the thick filament involving changes in both the organisation of the myosin heads on its surface and the axial periodicity of the myosin tails in its backbone, mediated by an interaction between MyBP-C and the thin filaments.

  11. A molecular model of phosphorylation-based activation and potentiation of tarantula muscle thick filaments

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Reicy; Alamo, Lorenzo; Lundberg, Ulf; Guerrero, José R.; Pinto, Antonio; Sulbarán, Guidenn; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). To elucidate the structural mechanism of activation, we have studied RLC phosphorylation in tarantula thick filaments, whose high resolution structure is known. In the relaxed state, tarantula RLCs are ~50% non- and 50% mono-phosphorylated, while on activation mono-phosphorylation increases and some RLCs become bi-phosphorylated. Mass spectrometry shows that relaxed-state mono-phosphorylation occurs on Ser35 while Ca2+-activated phosphorylation is on Ser45, both located near the RLC N-terminus. The sequences around these serines suggest they are the targets for protein kinase C (PKC) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) respectively. The atomic model of the tarantula filament shows that the two myosin heads (“free” and “blocked”) are in different environments, with only the free head serines readily accessible to kinases. Thus PKC Ser35 mono-phosphorylation in relaxed filaments would occur only on the free heads. Structural considerations suggest these heads are less strongly bound to the filament backbone, and may oscillate occasionally between attached and detached states (“swaying” heads). These heads would be available for immediate actin interaction upon Ca2+-activation of the thin filaments. Once MLCK becomes activated, it phosphorylates free heads on Ser45. These heads become fully mobile, exposing blocked-head Ser45 to MLCK. This would release the blocked-heads, allowing their interaction with actin. On this model, twitch force would be produced by rapid interaction of swaying free heads with activated thin filaments, while prolonged exposure to Ca2+ on tetanus would recruit new, MLCK-activated heads, resulting in force potentiation. PMID:21959262

  12. A molecular model of phosphorylation-based activation and potentiation of tarantula muscle thick filaments.

    PubMed

    Brito, Reicy; Alamo, Lorenzo; Lundberg, Ulf; Guerrero, José R; Pinto, Antonio; Sulbarán, Guidenn; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2011-11-18

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). To elucidate the structural mechanism of activation, we have studied RLC phosphorylation in tarantula thick filaments, whose high-resolution structure is known. In the relaxed state, tarantula RLCs are ~50% non-phosphorylated and 50% mono-phosphorylated, while on activation, mono-phosphorylation increases, and some RLCs become bi-phosphorylated. Mass spectrometry shows that relaxed-state mono-phosphorylation occurs on Ser35, while Ca(2+)-activated phosphorylation is on Ser45, both located near the RLC N-terminus. The sequences around these serines suggest that they are the targets for protein kinase C and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), respectively. The atomic model of the tarantula filament shows that the two myosin heads ("free" and "blocked") are in different environments, with only the free head serines readily accessible to kinases. Thus, protein kinase C Ser35 mono-phosphorylation in relaxed filaments would occur only on the free heads. Structural considerations suggest that these heads are less strongly bound to the filament backbone and may oscillate occasionally between attached and detached states ("swaying" heads). These heads would be available for immediate actin interaction upon Ca(2)(+) activation of the thin filaments. Once MLCK becomes activated, it phosphorylates free heads on Ser45. These heads become fully mobile, exposing blocked head Ser45 to MLCK. This would release the blocked heads, allowing their interaction with actin. On this model, twitch force would be produced by rapid interaction of swaying free heads with activated thin filaments, while prolonged exposure to Ca(2+) on tetanus would recruit new MLCK-activated heads, resulting in force potentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Muscle intermediate filaments and their links to membranes and membranous organelles.

    PubMed

    Capetanaki, Yassemi; Bloch, Robert J; Kouloumenta, Asimina; Mavroidis, Manolis; Psarras, Stelios

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) play a key role in the integration of structure and function of striated muscle, primarily by mediating mechanochemical links between the contractile apparatus and mitochondria, myonuclei, the sarcolemma and potentially the vesicle trafficking apparatus. Linkage of all these membranous structures to the contractile apparatus, mainly through the Z-disks, supports the integration and coordination of growth and energy demands of the working myocyte, not only with force transmission, but also with de novo gene expression, energy production and efficient protein and lipid trafficking and targeting. Desmin, the most abundant and intensively studied muscle intermediate filament protein, is linked to proper costamere organization, myoblast and stem cell fusion and differentiation, nuclear shape and positioning, as well as mitochondrial shape, structure, positioning and function. Similar links have been established for lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles, consistent with the presence of widespread links between IFs and membranous structures and the regulation of their fusion, morphology and stabilization necessary for cell survival.

  14. Muscle intermediate filaments and their links to membranes and membranous organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Capetanaki, Yassemi . E-mail: ycapetanaki@bioacademy.gr; Bloch, Robert J.; Kouloumenta, Asimina; Mavroidis, Manolis; Psarras, Stelios

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) play a key role in the integration of structure and function of striated muscle, primarily by mediating mechanochemical links between the contractile apparatus and mitochondria, myonuclei, the sarcolemma and potentially the vesicle trafficking apparatus. Linkage of all these membranous structures to the contractile apparatus, mainly through the Z-disks, supports the integration and coordination of growth and energy demands of the working myocyte, not only with force transmission, but also with de novo gene expression, energy production and efficient protein and lipid trafficking and targeting. Desmin, the most abundant and intensively studied muscle intermediate filament protein, is linked to proper costamere organization, myoblast and stem cell fusion and differentiation, nuclear shape and positioning, as well as mitochondrial shape, structure, positioning and function. Similar links have been established for lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles, consistent with the presence of widespread links between IFs and membranous structures and the regulation of their fusion, morphology and stabilization necessary for cell survival.

  15. Impact of tropomyosin isoform composition on fast skeletal muscle thin filament regulation and force development.

    PubMed

    Scellini, B; Piroddi, N; Flint, G V; Regnier, M; Poggesi, C; Tesi, C

    2015-02-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) plays a central role in the regulation of muscle contraction and is present in three main isoforms in skeletal and cardiac muscles. In the present work we studied the functional role of α- and βTm on force development by modifying the isoform composition of rabbit psoas skeletal muscle myofibrils and of regulated thin filaments for in vitro motility measurements. Skeletal myofibril regulatory proteins were extracted (78%) and replaced (98%) with Tm isoforms as homogenous ααTm or ββTm dimers and the functional effects were measured. Maximal Ca(2+) activated force was the same in ααTm versus ββTm myofibrils, but ββTm myofibrils showed a marked slowing of relaxation and an impairment of regulation under resting conditions compared to ααTm and controls. ββTm myofibrils also showed a significantly shorter slack sarcomere length and a marked increase in resting tension. Both these mechanical features were almost completely abolished by 10 mM 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime, suggesting the presence of a significant degree of Ca(2+)-independent cross-bridge formation in ββTm myofibrils. Finally, in motility assay experiments in the absence of Ca(2+) (pCa 9.0), complete regulation of thin filaments required greater ββTm versus ααTm concentrations, while at full activation (pCa 5.0) no effect was observed on maximal thin filament motility speed. We infer from these observations that high contents of ββTm in skeletal muscle result in partial Ca(2+)-independent activation of thin filaments at rest, and longer-lasting and less complete tension relaxation following Ca(2+) removal.

  16. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Demonstration of the muscle type of intermediate filament protein, desmin, as a diagnostic aid.

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, M.; Lehto, V. P.; Badley, R. A.; Virtanen, I.

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of soft-tissue sarcomas with the characteristic histologic features of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, but lacking cytoplasmic cross-striations, were studied ultrastructurally and immunohistochemically to confirm the diagnosis and evaluate the histogenesis. The results showed that it was not possible to judge the skeletal muscle derivation of the cells at the ultrastructural level. However, immunohistochemically, the results of every case were positive for desmin-the muscle type of the intermediate filament protein. The results suggest that demonstration of desmin may be a helpful adjunct tool in the diagnosis of poorly differentiated alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6765734

  17. Differential effects of thin and thick filament disruption on zebrafish smooth muscle regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davuluri, G.; Seiler, C.; Abrams, J.; Soriano, A. J.; Pack, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The smooth muscle actin binding proteins Caldesmon and Tropomyosin (Tm) promote thin filament assembly by stabilizing actin polymerization, however, whether filament assembly affects either the stability or activation of these and other smooth muscle regulatory proteins is not known. Methods Measurement of smooth muscle regulatory protein levels in wild type zebrafish larvae following antisense knockdown of smooth muscle actin (Acta2) and myosin heavy chain (Myh11) proteins, and in colourless mutants that lack enteric nerves. Comparison of intestinal peristalsis in wild type and colourless larvae. Key Results Knockdown of Acta2 led to reduced levels of phospho-Caldesmon and Tm. Total Caldesmon and phospho-myosin light chain (p-Mlc) levels were unaffected. Knockdown of Myh11 had no effect on the levels of either of these proteins. Phospho-Caldesmon and p-Mlc levels were markedly reduced in colourless mutants that have intestinal motility comparable with wild type larvae. Conclusions & Inferences These in vivo findings provide new information regarding the activation and stability of smooth muscle regulatory proteins in zebrafish larvae and their role in intestinal peristalsis in this model organism. PMID:20591105

  18. Force maintenance and myosin filament assembly regulated by Rho-kinase in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lan, Bo; Deng, Linhong; Donovan, Graham M; Chin, Leslie Y M; Syyong, Harley T; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jenny; Pascoe, Christopher D; Norris, Brandon A; Liu, Jeffrey C-Y; Swyngedouw, Nicholas E; Banaem, Saleha M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle contraction can be divided into two phases: the initial contraction determines the amount of developed force and the second phase determines how well the force is maintained. The initial phase is primarily due to activation of actomyosin interaction and is relatively well understood, whereas the second phase remains poorly understood. Force maintenance in the sustained phase can be disrupted by strains applied to the muscle; the strain causes actomyosin cross-bridges to detach and also the cytoskeletal structure to disassemble in a process known as fluidization, for which the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study we investigated the ability of airway smooth muscle to maintain force after the initial phase of contraction. Specifically, we examined the roles of Rho-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) in force maintenance. We found that for the same degree of initial force inhibition, Rho-kinase substantially reduced the muscle's ability to sustain force under static conditions, whereas inhibition of PKC had a minimal effect on sustaining force. Under oscillatory strain, Rho-kinase inhibition caused further decline in force, but again, PKC inhibition had a minimal effect. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibition led to a decrease in the myosin filament mass in the muscle cells, suggesting that one of the functions of Rho-kinase is to stabilize myosin filaments. The results also suggest that dissolution of myosin filaments may be one of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of fluidization. These findings can shed light on the mechanism underlying deep inspiration induced bronchodilation.

  19. Ubiquitylation by Trim32 causes coupled loss of desmin, Z-bands, and thin filaments in muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shenhav; Zhai, Bo; Gygi, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    During muscle atrophy, myofibrillar proteins are degraded in an ordered process in which MuRF1 catalyzes ubiquitylation of thick filament components (Cohen et al. 2009. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.200901052). Here, we show that another ubiquitin ligase, Trim32, ubiquitylates thin filament (actin, tropomyosin, troponins) and Z-band (α-actinin) components and promotes their degradation. Down-regulation of Trim32 during fasting reduced fiber atrophy and the rapid loss of thin filaments. Desmin filaments were proposed to maintain the integrity of thin filaments. Accordingly, we find that the rapid destruction of thin filament proteins upon fasting was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of desmin filaments, which promoted desmin ubiquitylation by Trim32 and degradation. Reducing Trim32 levels prevented the loss of both desmin and thin filament proteins. Furthermore, overexpression of an inhibitor of desmin polymerization induced disassembly of desmin filaments and destruction of thin filament components. Thus, during fasting, desmin phosphorylation increases and enhances Trim32-mediated degradation of the desmin cytoskeleton, which appears to facilitate the breakdown of Z-bands and thin filaments. PMID:22908310

  20. Regulation of structure and function of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a valuable system to study structure and function of striated muscle. The body wall muscle of C. elegans is obliquely striated muscle with highly organized sarcomeric assembly of actin, myosin, and other accessary proteins. Genetic and molecular biological studies in C. elegans have identified a number of genes encoding structural and regulatory components for the muscle contractile apparatuses, and many of them have counterparts in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles or striated muscles in other invertebrates. Applicability of genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry has made C. elegans an excellent system to study mechanisms of muscle contractility and assembly and maintenance of myofibrils. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms of structure and function of actin filaments in the C. elegans body wall muscle. Sarcomeric actin filaments in C. elegans muscle are associated with the troponin-tropomyosin system that regulates the actin-myosin interaction. Proteins that bind to the side and ends of actin filaments support ordered assembly of thin filaments. Furthermore, regulators of actin dynamics play important roles in initial assembly, growth, and maintenance of sarcomeres. The knowledge acquired in C. elegans can serve as bases to understand the basic mechanisms of muscle structure and function. PMID:25125169

  1. Helical model of smooth muscle myosin filament and the ribbons made of caldesmon: history revisited.

    PubMed

    Sobieszek, Apolinary

    2016-12-01

    In early studies on smooth muscle, I described a crude myosin fraction (CMF) in which self-assembly of myosin filaments was observed. For the first time, the 14-nm periodicity stemming from regular arrangement of myosin heads on the filament surface was observed (Sobieszek in J Mol Biol 70:741-744, 1972). In this fraction, we also observed formation of long ribbon-shaped aggregates exhibiting a 5.6-nm periodicity, characteristic of tropomyosin (TM) paracrystals (Sobieszek and Small in Phil Trans R Soc Lond B 265:203-212, 1973). We therefore concluded that these ribbons were made of TM and they might be related to the myosin ribbons observed in electron micrographs (EM) of intact smooth muscle (Lowy and Small in Nature 227:46-51, 1970; Small and Squire in Mol Biol 67:117-149, 1972). Subsequently, Small (J Cell Sci 24:327-349, 1977) concluded that the ribbons observed in the EM sections were an artifact, but their observation in the CMF was not addressed. I have now revisited two aspects of the above studies. Firstly, based on my new multi-angle laser-scattering data and considering the length and stability of the building unit for the filament, a myosin trimer fit better to the previously proposed helical structure. Secondly, after two decades of systematic examinations of protein compositions in multiple smooth muscle extracts and isolated filaments, I concluded that the ribbons were made of caldesmon and not TM. Thirdly, actin-activated ATPase activity measurements indicated that modulation of this activity (by CaD and TM) was synergistic, cooperative and depended on myosin to actin ratio.

  2. Mg-ATPase activity and motility of native thick filaments isolated from the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, A; Ishii, N; Shimmen, T; Takahashi, K

    1989-04-01

    A method for isolating native thick filaments from the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis is described. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the isolated thick filament preparation contained mainly paramyosin and myosin but almost no actin. Electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations showed that the isolated thick filaments were tapered at both ends and of various sizes, in the range 5-31 microns in length and 51-94nm in width in the central region. Central bare zones were observed in the smaller filaments, but were not clearly seen in the larger filaments. Mg-ATPase activity of the isolated thick filaments was activated by skeletal muscle F-actin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The maximal activity was about 20 nmol min-1 mg-1 thick filaments (20 degrees C, pH7.0). Motility of the thick filaments attached to latex beads (diameter, 2 microns) was also studied using the native actin cables of the freshwater alga, Chara. In the presence of Mg-ATP and Ca2+, the beads moved along the actin cables at a maximal velocity of about 1 micron s-1. In the absence of Ca2+, almost no movement was observed. These results show that the isolated thick filaments are structurally intact and retain the essential mechanochemical characteristics of the ABRM myosin.

  3. Titin isoform size is not correlated with thin filament length in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Greaser, Marion L.; Pleitner, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling thin filament length (TFL) in muscle remain controversial. It was recently reported that TFL was related to titin size, and that the latter might be involved in TFL determination. Titin plays several crucial roles in the sarcomere, but its function as it pertains to the thin filament has not been explored. We tested this relationship using several muscles from wild type rats and from a mutant rat model (Greaser et al., 2008) which results in increased titin size. Myofibrils were isolated from skeletal muscles [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), external oblique (EO), gastrocnemius (GAS), longissimus dorsi (LD), psoas major (PM), and tibialis anterior(TA)] using both adult wild type (WT) and homozygous mutant (HM) rats (n = 6 each). Phalloidin and antibodies against tropomodulin-4 (Tmod-4) and nebulin's N-terminus were used to determine TFL. The WT rats studied express skeletal muscle titin sizes ranging from 3.2 to 3.7 MDa, while the HM rats express a giant titin isoform sized at 3.8 MDa. No differences in phalloidin based TFL, nebulin distance, or Tmod distance were observed across genotypes. However, the HM rats demonstrated a significantly increased (p < 0.01) rest sarcomere length relative to the WT phenotype. It appears that the increased titin size, predominantly observed in HM rats' middle Ig domain, allows for increased extensibility. The data indicates that, although titin performs many sarcomeric functions, its correlation with TFL and structure could not be demonstrated in the rat. PMID:24550844

  4. Length adaptation of smooth muscle contractile filaments in response to sustained activation.

    PubMed

    Stålhand, Jonas; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2016-05-21

    Airway and bladder smooth muscles are known to undergo length adaptation under sustained contraction. This adaptation process entails a remodelling of the intracellular actin and myosin filaments which shifts the peak of the active force-length curve towards the current length. Smooth muscles are therefore able to generate the maximum force over a wide range of lengths. In contrast, length adaptation of vascular smooth muscle has attracted very little attention and only a handful of studies have been reported. Although their results are conflicting on the existence of a length adaptation process in vascular smooth muscle, it seems that, at least, peripheral arteries and arterioles undergo such adaptation. This is of interest since peripheral vessels are responsible for pressure regulation, and a length adaptation will affect the function of the cardiovascular system. It has, e.g., been suggested that the inward remodelling of resistance vessels associated with hypertension disorders may be related to smooth muscle adaptation. In this study we develop a continuum mechanical model for vascular smooth muscle length adaptation by assuming that the muscle cells remodel the actomyosin network such that the peak of the active stress-stretch curve is shifted towards the operating point. The model is specialised to hamster cheek pouch arterioles and the simulated response to stepwise length changes under contraction. The results show that the model is able to recover the salient features of length adaptation reported in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Human muscle LIM protein dimerizes along the actin cytoskeleton and cross-links actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Céline; Moreau, Flora; Moes, Michèle; Luthold, Carole; Dieterle, Monika; Goretti, Emeline; Neumann, Katrin; Steinmetz, André; Thomas, Clément

    2014-08-01

    The muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein playing important roles in the regulation of myocyte remodeling and adaptation to hypertrophic stimuli. Missense mutations in human MLP or its ablation in transgenic mice promotes cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The exact function(s) of MLP in the cytoplasmic compartment and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that MLP autonomously binds to, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments (AFs) independently of calcium and pH. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have shown how MLP cross-links actin filaments into both unipolar and mixed-polarity bundles. Quantitative analysis of the actin cytoskeleton configuration confirmed that MLP substantially promotes actin bundling in live myoblasts. In addition, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays revealed MLP self-association. Remarkably, BiFC complexes mostly localize along actin filament-rich structures, such as stress fibers and sarcomeres, supporting a functional link between MLP self-association and actin cross-linking. Finally, we have demonstrated that MLP self-associates through its N-terminal LIM domain, whereas it binds to AFs through its C-terminal LIM domain. Together our data support that MLP contributes to the maintenance of cardiomyocyte cytoarchitecture by a mechanism involving its self-association and actin filament cross-linking. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Human Muscle LIM Protein Dimerizes along the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cross-Links Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Céline; Moreau, Flora; Moes, Michèle; Luthold, Carole; Dieterle, Monika; Goretti, Emeline; Neumann, Katrin; Steinmetz, André

    2014-01-01

    The muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein playing important roles in the regulation of myocyte remodeling and adaptation to hypertrophic stimuli. Missense mutations in human MLP or its ablation in transgenic mice promotes cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The exact function(s) of MLP in the cytoplasmic compartment and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that MLP autonomously binds to, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments (AFs) independently of calcium and pH. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have shown how MLP cross-links actin filaments into both unipolar and mixed-polarity bundles. Quantitative analysis of the actin cytoskeleton configuration confirmed that MLP substantially promotes actin bundling in live myoblasts. In addition, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays revealed MLP self-association. Remarkably, BiFC complexes mostly localize along actin filament-rich structures, such as stress fibers and sarcomeres, supporting a functional link between MLP self-association and actin cross-linking. Finally, we have demonstrated that MLP self-associates through its N-terminal LIM domain, whereas it binds to AFs through its C-terminal LIM domain. Together our data support that MLP contributes to the maintenance of cardiomyocyte cytoarchitecture by a mechanism involving its self-association and actin filament cross-linking. PMID:24934443

  7. A comparison of muscle thin filament models obtained from electron microscopy reconstructions and low-angle X-ray fibre diagrams from non-overlap muscle.

    PubMed

    Poole, Katrina J V; Lorenz, Michael; Evans, Gwyndaf; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Pirani, Alnoor; Craig, Roger; Tobacman, Larry S; Lehman, William; Holmes, Kenneth C

    2006-08-01

    The regulation of striated muscle contraction involves changes in the interactions of troponin and tropomyosin with actin thin filaments. In resting muscle, myosin-binding sites on actin are thought to be blocked by the coiled-coil protein tropomyosin. During muscle activation, Ca2+ binding to troponin alters the tropomyosin position on actin, resulting in cyclic actin-myosin interactions that accompany muscle contraction. Evidence for this steric regulation by troponin-tropomyosin comes from X-ray data [Haselgrove, J.C., 1972. X-ray evidence for a conformational change in the actin-containing filaments of verterbrate striated muscle. Cold Spring Habor Symp. Quant. Biol. 37, 341-352; Huxley, H.E., 1972. Structural changes in actin and myosin-containing filaments during contraction. Cold Spring Habor Symp. Quant. Biol. 37, 361-376; Parry, D.A., Squire, J.M., 1973. Structural role of tropomyosin in muscle regulation: analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns from relaxed and contracting muscles. J. Mol. Biol. 75, 33-55] and electron microscope (EM) data [Spudich, J.A., Huxley, H.E., Finch, J., 1972. Regulation of skeletal muscle contraction. II. Structural studies of the interaction of the tropomyosin-troponin complex with actin. J. Mol. Biol. 72, 619-632; O'Brien, E.J., Gillis, J.M., Couch, J., 1975. Symmetry and molecular arrangement in paracrystals of reconstituted muscle thin filaments. J. Mol. Biol. 99, 461-475; Lehman, W., Craig, R., Vibert, P., 1994. Ca2+-induced tropomyosin movement in Limulus thin filaments revealed by three-dimensional reconstruction. Nature 368, 65-67] each with its own particular strengths and limitations. Here we bring together some of the latest information from EM analysis of single thin filaments from Pirani et al. [Pirani, A., Xu, C., Hatch, V., Craig, R., Tobacman, L.S., Lehman, W. (2005). Single particle analysis of relaxed and activated muscle thin filaments. J. Mol. Biol. 346, 761-772], with synchrotron X-ray data from non

  8. Structural changes in myosin motors and filaments during relaxation of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, E; Fusi, L; Reconditi, M; Linari, M; Bianco, P; Panine, P; Narayanan, T; Piazzesi, G; Lombardi, V; Irving, M

    2009-01-01

    Structural changes in myosin motors and filaments during relaxation from short tetanic contractions of intact single fibres of frog tibialis anterior muscles at sarcomere length 2.14 μm, 4°C were investigated by X-ray diffraction. Force declined at a steady rate for several hundred milliseconds after the last stimulus, while sarcomere lengths remained almost constant. During this isometric phase of relaxation the intensities of the equatorial and meridional M3 X-ray reflections associated with the radial and axial distributions of myosin motors also recovered at a steady rate towards their resting values, consistent with progressive net detachment of myosin motors from actin filaments. Stiffness measurements confirmed that the fraction of motors attached to actin declined at a constant rate, but also revealed a progressive increase in force per motor. The interference fine structure of the M3 reflection suggested that actin-attached myosin motors are displaced towards the start of their working stroke during isometric relaxation. There was negligible recovery of the intensities of the meridional and layer-line reflections associated with the quasi-helical distribution of myosin motors in resting muscle during isometric relaxation, and the 1.5% increase in the axial periodicity of the myosin filament associated with muscle activation was not reversed. When force had decreased to roughly half its tetanus plateau value, the isometric phase of relaxation abruptly ended, and the ensuing chaotic relaxation had an exponential half-time of ca 60 ms. Recovery of the equatorial X-ray intensities was largely complete during chaotic relaxation, but the other X-ray signals recovered more slowly than force. PMID:19651765

  9. Drebrin-like protein DBN-1 is a sarcomere component that stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Bodensiek, Kai; Fakhri, Nikta; von Roden, Kerstin; Schaap, Iwan A T; Majoul, Irina; Schmidt, Christoph F; Klopfenstein, Dieter R

    2015-07-06

    Actin filament organization and stability in the sarcomeres of muscle cells are critical for force generation. Here we identify and functionally characterize a Caenorhabditis elegans drebrin-like protein DBN-1 as a novel constituent of the muscle contraction machinery. In vitro, DBN-1 exhibits actin filament binding and bundling activity. In vivo, DBN-1 is expressed in body wall muscles of C. elegans. During the muscle contraction cycle, DBN-1 alternates location between myosin- and actin-rich regions of the sarcomere. In contracted muscle, DBN-1 is accumulated at I-bands where it likely regulates proper spacing of α-actinin and tropomyosin and protects actin filaments from the interaction with ADF/cofilin. DBN-1 loss of function results in the partial depolymerization of F-actin during muscle contraction. Taken together, our data show that DBN-1 organizes the muscle contractile apparatus maintaining the spatial relationship between actin-binding proteins such as α-actinin, tropomyosin and ADF/cofilin and possibly strengthening actin filaments by bundling.

  10. Three-dimensional reconstruction of thick filaments from Limulus and scorpion muscle

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have produced three dimensional reconstructions, at a nominal resolution of 5 nm, of thick filaments from scorpion and Limulus skeletal muscle, both of which have a right-handed four-stranded helical arrangement of projecting subunits. In both reconstructions there was a distinct division of density within projecting subunits consistent with the presence of two myosin heads. Individual myosin heads appeared to be curved, with approximate dimensions of 16 X 5 X 5 nm and seemed more massive at one end. Our reconstructions were consistent with the two heads in a projecting subunit being arranged either antiparallel or parallel to each other and directed away from the bare zone. Although we cannot exclude the second of these interpretations, we favor the first as being more consistent with both filament models and also because it would enable easy phosphorylation of light chains. The antiparallel interpretation requires that the two heads within a subunit derive from different myosin molecules. In either interpretation, the two heads have different orientations relative to the thick filament shaft. PMID:2410430

  11. STEM Analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans muscle thick filaments: evidence for microdifferentiated substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, S. A.; Haner, M.; Ortiz, I.; Aebi, U.; Epstein, H. F.

    2001-01-01

    In the thick filaments of body muscle in Caenorhabditis elegans, myosin A and myosin B isoforms and a subpopulation of paramyosin, a homologue of myosin heavy chain rods, are organized about a tubular core. As determined by scanning transmission electron microscopy, the thick filaments show a continuous decrease in mass-per-length (MPL) from their central zones to their polar regions. This is consistent with previously reported morphological studies and suggests that both their content and structural organization are microdifferentiated as a function of position. The cores are composed of a second distinct subpopulation of paramyosin in association with the alpha, beta, and gamma-filagenins. MPL measurements suggest that cores are formed from seven subfilaments containing four strands of paramyosin molecules, rather than the two originally proposed. The periodic locations of the filagenins within different regions and the presence of a central zone where myosin A is located, implies that the cores are also microdifferentiated with respect to molecular content and structure. This differentiation may result from a novel "induced strain" assembly mechanism based upon the interaction of the filagenins, paramyosin and myosin A. The cores may then serve as "differentiated templates" for the assembly of myosin B and paramyosin in the tapering, microdifferentiated polar regions of the thick filaments.

  12. Myosin light chain phosphorylation enhances contraction of heart muscle via structural changes in both thick and thin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Contraction of heart muscle is triggered by calcium binding to the actin-containing thin filaments but modulated by structural changes in the myosin-containing thick filaments. We used phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (cRLC) by the cardiac isoform of its specific kinase to elucidate mechanisms of thick filament-mediated contractile regulation in demembranated trabeculae from the rat right ventricle. cRLC phosphorylation enhanced active force and its calcium sensitivity and altered thick filament structure as reported by bifunctional rhodamine probes on the cRLC: the myosin head domains became more perpendicular to the filament axis. The effects of cRLC phosphorylation on thick filament structure and its calcium sensitivity were mimicked by increasing sarcomere length or by deleting the N terminus of the cRLC. Changes in thick filament structure were highly cooperative with respect to either calcium concentration or extent of cRLC phosphorylation. Probes on unphosphorylated myosin heads reported similar structural changes when neighboring heads were phosphorylated, directly demonstrating signaling between myosin heads. Moreover probes on troponin showed that calcium sensitization by cRLC phosphorylation is mediated by the thin filament, revealing a signaling pathway between thick and thin filaments that is still present when active force is blocked by Blebbistatin. These results show that coordinated and cooperative structural changes in the thick and thin filaments are fundamental to the physiological regulation of contractility in the heart. This integrated dual-filament concept of contractile regulation may aid understanding of functional effects of mutations in the protein components of both filaments associated with heart disease. PMID:27162358

  13. Thick-to-Thin Filament Surface Distance Modulates Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Drosophila Flight Muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Miller, Mark S.

    2012-09-19

    The demembranated (skinned) muscle fiber preparation is widely used to investigate muscle contraction because the intracellular ionic conditions can be precisely controlled. However, plasma membrane removal results in a loss of osmotic regulation, causing abnormal hydration of the myofilament lattice and its proteins. We investigated the structural and functional consequences of varied myofilament lattice spacing and protein hydration on cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle, using x-ray diffraction to compare the lattice spacing of dissected, osmotically compressed skinned fibers to native muscle fibers in living flies. Osmolytes of different sizes and exclusion properties (Dextran T-500 and T-10) were used to differentially alter lattice spacing and protein hydration. At in vivo lattice spacing, cross-bridge attachment time (t{sub on}) increased with higher osmotic pressures, consistent with a reduced cross-bridge detachment rate as myofilament protein hydration decreased. In contrast, in the swollen lattice, t{sub on} decreased with higher osmotic pressures. These divergent responses were reconciled using a structural model that predicts t{sub on} varies inversely with thick-to-thin filament surface distance, suggesting that cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment are modulated more by myofilament lattice geometry than protein hydration. Generalizing these findings, our results suggest that cross-bridge cycling rates slow as thick-to-thin filament surface distance decreases with sarcomere lengthening, and likewise, cross-bridge cycling rates increase during sarcomere shortening. Together, these structural changes may provide a mechanism for altering cross-bridge performance throughout a contraction-relaxation cycle.

  14. Modelling airway smooth muscle passive length adaptation via thick filament length distributions

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new model of airway smooth muscle (ASM), which surrounds and constricts every airway in the lung and thus plays a central role in the airway constriction associated with asthma. This new model of ASM is based on an extension of sliding filament/crossbridge theory, which explicitly incorporates the length distribution of thick sliding filaments to account for a phenomenon known as dynamic passive length adaptation; the model exhibits good agreement with experimental data for ASM force–length behaviour across multiple scales. Principally these are (nonlinear) force–length loops at short timescales (seconds), parabolic force–length curves at medium timescales (minutes) and length adaptation at longer timescales. This represents a significant improvement on the widely-used cross-bridge models which work so well in or near the isometric regime, and may have significant implications for studies which rely on crossbridge or other dynamic airway smooth muscle models, and thus both airway and lung dynamics. PMID:23721681

  15. Passive tension in cardiac muscle: contribution of collagen, titin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Granzier, H L; Irving, T C

    1995-01-01

    The passive tension-sarcomere length relation of rat cardiac muscle was investigated by studying passive (or not activated) single myocytes and trabeculae. The contribution of collagen, titin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments to tension and stiffness was investigated by measuring (1) the effects of KCl/KI extraction on both trabeculae and single myocytes, (2) the effect of trypsin digestion on single myocytes, and (3) the effect of colchicine on single myocytes. It was found that over the working range of sarcomeres in the heart (lengths approximately 1.9-2.2 microns), collagen and titin are the most important contributors to passive tension with titin dominating at the shorter end of the working range and collagen at longer lengths. Microtubules made a modest contribution to passive tension in some cells, but on average their contribution was not significant. Finally, intermediate filaments contributed about 10% to passive tension of trabeculae at sarcomere lengths from approximately 1.9 to 2.1 microns, and their contribution dropped to only a few percent at longer lengths. At physiological sarcomere lengths of the heart, cardiac titin developed much higher tensions (> 20-fold) than did skeletal muscle titin at comparable lengths. This might be related to the finding that cardiac titin has a molecular mass of 2.5 MDa, 0.3-0.5 MDa smaller than titin of mammalian skeletal muscle, which is predicted to result in a much shorter extensible titin segment in the I-band of cardiac muscle. Passive stress plotted versus the strain of the extensible titin segment showed that the stress-strain relationships are similar in cardiac and skeletal muscle. The difference in passive stress between cardiac and skeletal muscle at the sarcomere level predominantly resulted from much higher strains of the I-segment of cardiac titin at a given sarcomere length. By expressing a smaller titin isoform, without changing the properties of the molecule itself, cardiac muscle is able to

  16. Effect of oxidative stress on the expression of thin filament-associated proteins in gastric smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman Abdullah; Mustafa, Ayman; Mohammad, Mukhallad; Al-Shehabat, Mustafa; Yousef, Asmaa; Al-Hashimi, Farah

    2014-09-01

    Thin filament-associated proteins such as calponin, caldesmon, and smoothelin are believed to regulate acto-myosin interaction and thus, muscle contraction. Oxidative stress has been found to affect the normal contractile behavior of smooth muscle and is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the expression of smooth muscle contractile proteins. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on the expression of thin filament-associated proteins in rat gastric smooth muscle. Single smooth muscle cells of the stomach obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Muscle cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (500 μM) for 30 min or the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (1 mM) for 90 min to induce oxidative stress. Calponin, caldesmon, and smoothelin expressions were measured via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that exposure to exogenous H2O2 or incubation of dispersed gastric muscle cells with SIN-1 significantly increased the expression of calponin, caldesmon, and smoothelin proteins. In conclusion: oxidative stress increases the expression of thin filament-associated proteins in gastric smooth muscle, suggesting an important role in gastrointestinal motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  17. Bundle formation of smooth muscle desmin intermediate filaments by calponin and its binding site on the desmin molecule.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Takagi, H; Arimoto, M; Ootani, H; Ueeda, T

    2000-03-01

    Smooth muscle basic calponin, a major actin-, tropomyosin-, and calmodulin-binding protein, has been examined for its ability to interact with desmin intermediate filaments from smooth muscle cells using sedimentation analysis, turbidity changes, chemical cross-linking, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/MS), and electron microscopic observations. Calponin interacted with desmin intermediate filaments in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. The binding of calponin to desmin produced dense aggregates at 30 degrees C. The dense aggregates were observed by electron microscopy to be composed of large anisotropic bundles of desmin filaments, indicating that calponin forms bundles of desmin filaments. The addition of calmodulin or S100 to the mixture of calponin and desmin caused the removal of calponin from the desmin filaments and inhibited bundle formation in the presence of Ca(2+), but not in the presence of EGTA. Calponin-related proteins including G-actin, tropomyosin, and SM22, had little effect on the binding of calponin to desmin filaments, whereas tubulin weakly inhibited the binding. Desmin had little influence on the calponin-actin and calponin-tubulin interactions using the zero-length cross-linker, EDC. Domain mapping with chymotryptic digestion showed that the binding site of calponin resides within the central a-helical rod domain of the desmin molecule. The chemical cross-linked products of calponin and synthetic peptides (TQ27, TNEKVELQELNDRFANYIEKVRFLEQQ; EE24, EEELRELRRQVDALTGQRARVEVE) derived from the rod domain were detected by MALDI TOF/MS. Furthermore, the calponin-desmin interaction was significantly inhibited by the addition of EE24, but only slightly by TQ27. These results suggest that calponin may act as a cross-linking protein between desmin filaments as well as among intermediate filaments, microfilaments and microtubules in smooth muscle cells.

  18. Overexpression of troponin T in Drosophila muscles causes a decrease in the levels of thin-filament proteins

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Formation of the contractile apparatus in muscle cells requires co-ordinated activation of several genes and the proper assembly of their products. To investigate the role of TnT (troponin T) in the mechanisms that control and co-ordinate thin-filament formation, we generated transgenic Drosophila lines that overexpress TnT in their indirect flight muscles. All flies that overexpress TnT were unable to fly, and the loss of thin filaments themselves was coupled with ultrastructural perturbations of the sarcomere. In contrast, thick filaments remained largely unaffected. Biochemical analysis of these lines revealed that the increase in TnT levels could be detected only during the early stages of adult muscle formation and was followed by a profound decrease in the amount of this protein as well as that of other thin-filament proteins such as tropomyosin, troponin I and actin. The decrease in thin-filament proteins is not only due to degradation but also due to a decrease in their synthesis, since accumulation of their mRNA transcripts was also severely diminished. This decrease in expression levels of the distinct thin-filament components led us to postulate that any change in the amount of TnT transcripts might trigger the down-regulation of other co-regulated thin-filament components. Taken together, these results suggest the existence of a mechanism that tightly co-ordinates the expression of thin-filament genes and controls the correct stoichiometry of these proteins. We propose that the high levels of unassembled protein might act as a sensor in this process. PMID:15469415

  19. The effect of actin filament compliance on the interpretation of the elastic properties of skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Blangé, T; van der Heide, U A; Treijtel, B W; de Beer, E L

    1997-04-01

    Recently, X-ray diffraction studies provided direct evidence for an appreciable length change in the actin filament upon activation. This finding has profound implications on the interpretation of the elastic properties of skeletal muscle fibre. In this study we determined the compliance of the actin filament during activation, using the data obtained previously from quick stretch and release experiments on skeletal muscle fibres of the frog. The effects of filament compliance are demonstrated clearly in the elastic properties of partially activated fibres. The low-frequency elasticity increases linearly with tension, reflecting an increase in the number of force-producing cross-bridges. At higher frequencies, this linearity is lost. In this study we describe the data consistently in terms of a cross-bridge stiffness increasing linearly with tension and a constant Young's modulus for the actin filament of 44 MN m-2. This corresponds to a compliance of 23 pm microns-1 per kN m-2 tension developed. Using this value for the actin filament Young's modulus, its contribution to the elastic properties of skeletal muscle fibre of the frog is considered in rigor and relaxation. The filament compliance hardly affects the overall elasticity of the muscle fibre in relaxation. In contrast, it contributes to a large extent to the overall elasticity in rigor. Taking account of the filament compliance, we find that the Young's modulus in rigor exhibits an increase from 14 MN m-2 at frequencies below 500 Hz to 55 MN m-2 above 40 kHz.

  20. The 7-stranded structure of relaxed scallop muscle myosin filaments: support for a common head configuration in myosin-regulated muscles.

    PubMed

    Al-Khayat, Hind A; Morris, Edward P; Squire, John M

    2009-05-01

    Isolated relaxed myosin filaments from the myosin-regulated scallop striated adductor muscle have been reconstructed using electron microscopy and single particle analysis of negatively stained filaments. Three-dimensional reconstruction using 7-fold rotational symmetry but without imposed helical symmetry confirmed that the myosin head array is a 7-stranded, right-handed long-pitch 24/1 helix (or left-handed short-pitch 10/1 helix) with the whole structure having an axial repeat of 1440A. Reconstruction using the full helical symmetry revealed details of the myosin head density distribution within the head crowns in the relaxed scallop myosin filament. The resulting density distribution can best be explained by an arrangement in which the two heads from the same myosin molecule interact together within each crown in a compact parallel fashion along the filament axis. The configuration is consistent with the published configuration of the two heads within vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules observed in two-dimensional crystals of smooth muscle myosin and in the structure of tarantula myosin filaments. All these three muscle types are myosin-regulated, providing further support for a general motif of intramolecular interacting-heads structure in the relaxed state of myosin-regulated muscles as was proposed earlier by Woodhead et al. [Woodhead, J.L., Zhao, F.-Q., Craig, R., Egelman, E.H., Alamo, L., Padron, R.. 2005. Atomic model of a myosin filament in the relaxed state. Nature 436, 1195-1199]. However, the orientation of the Wendt structure is different from that found by Woodhead in that the outer head projects outwards and the inner head lies closer to the filament backbone, as in earlier work done on the insect flight muscle myosin filaments [AL-Khayat, H.A., Hudson, L., Reedy, M.K., Irving, T.C., Squire, J.M., 2003. Myosin head configuration in relaxed insect flight muscle: X-ray modelled resting crossbridges in a pre-powerstroke state are poised for

  1. Conformation of the troponin core complex in the thin filaments of skeletal muscle during relaxation and active contraction.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Andrea C; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao

    2012-08-03

    Contraction of skeletal and cardiac muscles is regulated by Ca(2+) binding to troponin in the actin-containing thin filaments, leading to an azimuthal movement of tropomyosin around the filament that uncovers the myosin binding sites on actin. Here, we use polarized fluorescence to determine the orientation of the C-terminal lobe of troponin C (TnC) in skeletal muscle cells as a step toward elucidating the molecular mechanism of troponin-mediated regulation. Assuming, as shown by X-ray crystallography, that this lobe of TnC is part of a well-defined troponin domain called the IT arm, we show that the coiled coil formed by troponin components I and T makes an angle of about 55° with the thin filament axis in relaxed muscle, in contrast with previous models based on electron microscopy in which this angle is close to 0°. The E helix of TnC makes an angle of about 45° with the thin filament axis. Both the IT coiled coil and the TnC E helix tilt by about 10° on muscle activation. By combining in situ measurements of the orientation of the IT arm and regulatory domain of troponin, which together form the troponin core complex, with published intermolecular distances between thin filament components, we derive models of thin filament structure in which the IT arm of troponin holds its regulatory domain close to the actin surface. Although the structure and function of troponin regions outside the core complex remain to be characterized, the present results provide useful constraints for molecular models of the mechanism of muscle regulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Leiomodin-2 is an antagonist of tropomodulin-1 at the pointed end of the thin filaments in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, Takehiro; Pappas, Christopher T.; Moroz, Natalia; Antin, Parker B.; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Gregorio, Carol C.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of actin filament assembly is essential for efficient contractile activity in striated muscle. Leiomodin is an actin-binding protein and homolog of the pointed-end capping protein, tropomodulin. These proteins are structurally similar, sharing a common domain organization that includes two actin-binding sites. Leiomodin also contains a unique C-terminal extension that has a third actin-binding WH2 domain. Recently, the striated-muscle-specific isoform of leiomodin (Lmod2) was reported to be an actin nucleator in cardiomyocytes. Here, we have identified a function of Lmod2 in the regulation of thin filament lengths. We show that Lmod2 localizes to the pointed ends of thin filaments, where it competes for binding with tropomodulin-1 (Tmod1). Overexpression of Lmod2 results in loss of Tmod1 assembly and elongation of the thin filaments from their pointed ends. The Lmod2 WH2 domain is required for lengthening because its removal results in a molecule that caps the pointed ends similarly to Tmod1. Furthermore, Lmod2 transcripts are first detected in the heart after it has begun to beat, suggesting that the primary function of Lmod2 is to maintain thin filament lengths in the mature heart. Thus, Lmod2 antagonizes the function of Tmod1, and together, these molecules might fine-tune thin filament lengths. PMID:20736303

  3. Contributions of Ca2+-Independent Thin Filament Activation to Cardiac Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Bonilla, Jordan A.; McCabe, Kimberly J.; Campbell, Stuart G.

    2015-01-01

    Although Ca2+ is the principal regulator of contraction in striated muscle, in vitro evidence suggests that some actin-myosin interaction is still possible even in its absence. Whether this Ca2+-independent activation (CIA) occurs under physiological conditions remains unclear, as does its potential impact on the function of intact cardiac muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate CIA using computational analysis. We added a structurally motivated representation of this phenomenon to an existing myofilament model, which allowed predictions of CIA-dependent muscle behavior. We found that a certain amount of CIA was essential for the model to reproduce reported effects of nonfunctional troponin C on myofilament force generation. Consequently, those data enabled estimation of ΔGCIA, the energy barrier for activating a thin filament regulatory unit in the absence of Ca2+. Using this estimate of ΔGCIA as a point of reference (∼7 kJ mol−1), we examined its impact on various aspects of muscle function through additional simulations. CIA decreased the Hill coefficient of steady-state force while increasing myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. At the same time, CIA had minimal effect on the rate of force redevelopment after slack/restretch. Simulations of twitch tension show that the presence of CIA increases peak tension while profoundly delaying relaxation. We tested the model’s ability to represent perturbations to the Ca2+ regulatory mechanism by analyzing twitch records measured in transgenic mice expressing a cardiac troponin I mutation (R145G). The effects of the mutation on twitch dynamics were fully reproduced by a single parameter change, namely lowering ΔGCIA by 2.3 kJ mol−1 relative to its wild-type value. Our analyses suggest that CIA is present in cardiac muscle under normal conditions and that its modulation by gene mutations or other factors can alter both systolic and diastolic function. PMID:26588569

  4. Expression of the intermediate filament protein synemin in myofibrillar myopathies and other muscle diseases.

    PubMed

    Olivé, Montse; Goldfarb, Lev; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Paulin, Denise; Li, Zhenlin; Goudeau, Bertrand; Vicart, Patrick; Ferrer, Isidro

    2003-07-01

    Synemin is a member of the intermediate protein superfamily. Previous studies in avian and rodent skeletal and cardiac muscles have demonstrated that synemin localises at the Z-band, where it associates with desmin and alpha-actinin. In the present study, the distribution of synemin was examined using immunohistochemistry in muscle biopsy specimens from patients suffering from myofibrillar myopathy (MM, n=6), dermatomyositis (DM, n=3), inclusion body myositis (IBM, n=5), oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPD, n=3) and denervation atrophy (DA, n=3), to investigate the possible participation of this protein in the pathogenesis of various muscular diseases. Of patients affected by MM, two showed the presence of mutations in the desmin gene; none had mutations in the alphaB-crystallin gene; and no mutations were identified in synemin or syncoilin genes of three patients. Synemin immunohistochemistry disclosed a faint staining corresponding to the Z-bands in the cytoplasm of control muscle fibres; in contrast, focal aggregates of synemin were seen in patients with MM. Increased synemin immunoreactivity was identified diffusely or in the subsarcolemmal space of scattered fibres in patients with DM, and in vacuolated fibres of patients with IBM and OPD. Strong synemin immunoreactivity was observed in target formations and atrophic fibres of patients with denervating disorders, as well as in atrophic fibres, regardless of their origin, in all patients studied. Synemin co-localised with desmin, as seen on consecutive serial sections immunostained with anti-synemin or anti-desmin antibodies. These observations demonstrate abnormal accumulations containing both synemin and desmin in muscle fibres in patients with MM, IBM, DM, OPD and DA. Considering the important role of synemin as one of intermediate filaments of skeletal and cardiac muscle, its destruction and accumulation in the intracellular debris suggest that synemin may participate in the pathogenesis of these

  5. Crossbridge and filament compliance in muscle: implications for tension generation and lever arm swing.

    PubMed

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2010-12-01

    The stiffness of myosin heads attached to actin is a crucial parameter in determining the kinetics and mechanics of the crossbridge cycle. It has been claimed that the stiffness of myosin heads in the anterior tibialis muscle of the common frog (Rana temporaria) is as high as 3.3 pN/nm, substantially higher than its value in rabbit muscle (~1.7 pN/nm). However, the crossbridge stiffness measurement has a large error since the contribution of crossbridges to half-sarcomere compliance is obtained by subtracting from the half-sarcomere compliance the contributions of the thick and thin filaments, each with a substantial error. Calculation of its value for isometric contraction also depends on the fraction of heads that are attached, for which there is no consensus. Surprisingly, the stiffness of the myosin head from the edible frog, Rana esculenta, determined in the same manner, is only 60% of that in Rana temporaria. In our view it is unlikely that the value of such a crucial parameter could differ so substantially between two frog species. Since the means of the myosin head stiffness in these two species are not significantly different, we suggest that the best estimate of the stiffness of the myosin heads for frog muscle is the average of these data, a value similar to that for rabbit muscle. This would allow both frog and rabbit muscles to operate the same low-cooperativity mechanism for the crossbridge cycle with only one or two tension-generating steps. We review evidence that much of the compliance of the myosin head is located in the pliant region where the lever arm emerges from the converter and propose that tension generation ("tensing") caused by the rotation and movement of the converter is a separate event from the passive swinging of the lever arm in its working stroke in which the strain energy stored in the pliant region is used to do work.

  6. Extraction and functional reformation of thick filaments in chemically skinned molluscan catch muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Tanaka, H

    1979-02-01

    A method for the almost complete extraction of myosin from smooth muscle fibers of the anterior byssal retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis was developed, and functional reformation of thick filaments in the fibers was achieved. Complete removal of myosin from the glycerol-extracted ABRM fibers with a solution containing 600 mM KCl, 5 mM MgCl2, and 5 mM ATP was difficult. However, successive treatments of the ABRM fibers with glycerol and saponin made the plasma membrane permeable to Mg-ATP and myosin. The extraction of myosin completely eliminated the tension induced by the addition of Mg-ATP. Partial recovery of tension development was observed by irrigation of myosin into fibers from which myosin had been extracted. Similar results were obtained using rabbit myosin instead of ABRM myosin. Addition of heavy meromyosin, on the other hand, had a suppressive effect on the tension development, as is the case in glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers.

  7. Calcium-induced movement of troponin-I relative to actin in skeletal muscle thin filaments.

    PubMed

    Tao, T; Gong, B J; Leavis, P C

    1990-03-16

    The role of troponin-I (the inhibitory subunit of troponin) in the regulation by Ca2+ of skeletal muscle contraction was investigated with resonance energy transfer and photo cross-linking techniques. The effect of Ca2+ on the proximity of troponin-I to actin in reconstituted rabbit skeletal thin filaments was determined. The distance between the cysteine residue at position 133 (Cys133) of troponin-I and Cys374 of actin increases by approximately 15 angstroms on binding of Ca2+ to troponin-C. Also, troponin-I labeled at Cys133 with benzophenone-4-maleimide could be photo cross-linked to actin in the absence of Ca2+, but not in its presence. These results suggest that troponin-I is attached to actin in the Ca2(+)-free or relaxed state of muscle, and that it detaches from actin on Ca2+ activation of contraction. Thus, troponin-I may function as a Ca2(+)-dependent molecular switch in regulation of skeletal muscle contraction.

  8. Fetal akinesia caused by a novel actin filament aggregate myopathy skeletal muscle actin gene (ACTA1) mutation.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Werner; Prokop, Stefan; Kress, Wolfram; Huppmann, Stephanie; Loui, Andrea; Sarioglu, Nanette M E; Laing, Nigel G; Sparrow, John C; Heppner, Frank L; Goebel, Hans H

    2010-08-01

    We report a female newborn, diagnosed with fetal akinesia in utero, who died one hour after birth. Post-mortem muscle biopsy demonstrated actin-filament myopathy based on immunolabelling for sarcomeric actin, and large areas of filaments, without rod formation, ultrastructurally. Analysis of DNA extracted from the muscle disclosed a novel de novo heterozygous c.44G>A, GGC>GAC, 'p.Gly15Asp' mutation in the ACTA1 gene. Analysis of the location of the mutated amino-acid in the actin molecule suggests the mutation most likely causes abnormal nucleotide binding, and consequent pathological actin polymerization. This case emphasizes the association of fetal akinesia with actin-filament myopathy.

  9. During muscle atrophy, thick, but not thin, filament components are degraded by MuRF1-dependent ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shenhav; Brault, Jeffrey J.; Gygi, Steven P.; Glass, David J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Gartner, Carlos; Latres, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Loss of myofibrillar proteins is a hallmark of atrophying muscle. Expression of muscle RING-finger 1 (MuRF1), a ubiquitin ligase, is markedly induced during atrophy, and MuRF1 deletion attenuates muscle wasting. We generated mice expressing a Ring-deletion mutant MuRF1, which binds but cannot ubiquitylate substrates. Mass spectrometry of the bound proteins in denervated muscle identified many myofibrillar components. Upon denervation or fasting, atrophying muscles show a loss of myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C) and myosin light chains 1 and 2 (MyLC1 and MyLC2) from the myofibril, before any measurable decrease in myosin heavy chain (MyHC). Their selective loss requires MuRF1. MyHC is protected from ubiquitylation in myofibrils by associated proteins, but eventually undergoes MuRF1-dependent degradation. In contrast, MuRF1 ubiquitylates MyBP-C, MyLC1, and MyLC2, even in myofibrils. Because these proteins stabilize the thick filament, their selective ubiquitylation may facilitate thick filament disassembly. However, the thin filament components decreased by a mechanism not requiring MuRF1. PMID:19506036

  10. Cross-bridge versus thin filament contributions to the level and rate of force development in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Regnier, M; Martin, H; Barsotti, R J; Rivera, A J; Martyn, D A; Clemmens, E

    2004-09-01

    In striated muscle thin filament activation is initiated by Ca(2+) binding to troponin C and augmented by strong myosin binding to actin (cross-bridge formation). Several lines of evidence have led us to hypothesize that thin filament properties may limit the level and rate of force development in cardiac muscle at all levels of Ca(2+) activation. As a test of this hypothesis we varied the cross-bridge contribution to thin filament activation by substituting 2 deoxy-ATP (dATP; a strong cross-bridge augmenter) for ATP as the contractile substrate and compared steady-state force and stiffness, and the rate of force redevelopment (k(tr)) in demembranated rat cardiac trabeculae as [Ca(2+)] was varied. We also tested whether thin filament dynamics limits force development kinetics during maximal Ca(2+) activation by comparing the rate of force development (k(Ca)) after a step increase in [Ca(2+)] with photorelease of Ca(2+) from NP-EGTA to maximal k(tr), where Ca(2+) binding to thin filaments should be in (near) equilibrium during force redevelopment. dATP enhanced steady-state force and stiffness at all levels of Ca(2+) activation. At similar submaximal levels of steady-state force there was no increase in k(tr) with dATP, but k(tr) was enhanced at higher Ca(2+) concentrations, resulting in an extension (not elevation) of the k(tr)-force relationship. Interestingly, we found that maximal k(tr) was faster than k(Ca), and that dATP increased both by a similar amount. Our data suggest the dynamics of Ca(2+)-mediated thin filament activation limits the rate that force develops in rat cardiac muscle, even at saturating levels of Ca(2+).

  11. Lessons from a tarantula: new insights into muscle thick filament and myosin interacting-heads motif structure and function.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Koubassova, Natalia; Pinto, Antonio; Gillilan, Richard; Tsaturyan, Andrey; Padrón, Raúl

    2017-09-04

    The tarantula skeletal muscle X-ray diffraction pattern suggested that the myosin heads were helically arranged on the thick filaments. Electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained relaxed tarantula thick filaments revealed four helices of heads allowing a helical 3D reconstruction. Due to its low resolution (5.0 nm), the unambiguous interpretation of densities of both heads was not possible. A resolution increase up to 2.5 nm, achieved by cryo-EM of frozen-hydrated relaxed thick filaments and an iterative helical real space reconstruction, allowed the resolving of both heads. The two heads, "free" and "blocked", formed an asymmetric structure named the "interacting-heads motif" (IHM) which explained relaxation by self-inhibition of both heads ATPases. This finding made tarantula an exemplar system for thick filament structure and function studies. Heads were shown to be released and disordered by Ca(2+)-activation through myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation, leading to EM, small angle X-ray diffraction and scattering, and spectroscopic and biochemical studies of the IHM structure and function. The results from these studies have consequent implications for understanding and explaining myosin super-relaxed state and thick filament activation and regulation. A cooperative phosphorylation mechanism for activation in tarantula skeletal muscle, involving swaying constitutively Ser35 mono-phosphorylated free heads, explains super-relaxation, force potentiation and post-tetanic potentiation through Ser45 mono-phosphorylated blocked heads. Based on this mechanism, we propose a swaying-swinging, tilting crossbridge-sliding filament for tarantula muscle contraction.

  12. The ALP-Enigma protein ALP-1 functions in actin filament organization to promote muscle structural integrity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Han, Hsiao-Fen; Beckerle, Mary C

    2009-05-01

    Mutations that affect the Z-disk-associated ALP-Enigma proteins have been linked to human muscular and cardiac diseases. Despite their clear physiological significance for human health, the mechanism of action of ALP-Enigma proteins is largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the ALP-Enigma protein family is encoded by a single gene, alp-1; thus C. elegans provides an excellent model to study ALP-Enigma function. Here we present a molecular and genetic analysis of ALP-Enigma function in C. elegans. We show that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin colocalize at dense bodies where actin filaments are anchored and that the proper localization of ALP-1 at dense bodies is dependent on alpha-actinin. Our analysis of alp-1 mutants demonstrates that ALP-1 functions to maintain actin filament organization and participates in muscle stabilization during contraction. Reducing alpha-actinin activity enhances the actin filament phenotype of the alp-1 mutants, suggesting that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin function in the same cellular process. Like alpha-actinin, alp-1 also interacts genetically with a connectin/titin family member, ketn-1, to provide mechanical stability for supporting body wall muscle contraction. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin function together to stabilize actin filaments and promote muscle structural integrity.

  13. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  14. On the relation between filament overlap and the number of calcium-binding sites on glycerinated muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, F

    1978-01-01

    The formation of rigor complexes between the thick and thin filaments of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers causes the fibers to bind more calcium at any given level of free calcium. I studied the maximum amount of calcium bound as a function of filament overlap under rigor conditions. Fibers stretched to zero filament overlap (sarcomere length greater than 3.8 micron) bound exactly 75% as much calcium as fibers with maximum overlap. Between these extremes a linear relationship was found between maximum bound calcium and the length of the overlap zone. The results support the hypothesis that in the intact filament lattice one of the four calcium-binding sites of troponin depends for its existence on attachment between myosin and actin. In addition, the linear relation between maximum bound calcium and filament overlap is consistent with the assumption that the cooperative effect of rigor complex formation on calcium binding is limited to the binding site in the immediate vicinity of the rigor complex. PMID:630044

  15. Complimentary endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell co-culture systems with alternate smooth muscle cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rose, Stacey L; Babensee, Julia E

    2007-08-01

    Development of in vitro models of native and injured vasculature is crucial for better understanding altered wound healing in disease, device implantation, or tissue engineering. Conditions were optimized using polyethyleneteraphalate transwell filters for human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC)/smooth muscle cell (HASMC) co-cultures with divergent HASMC phenotypes ('more or less secretory') while maintaining quiescent HAECs. Resulting HASMC phenotype was studied at 48 and 72 h following co-culture initiation, and compared to serum and growth factor starved monocultured 'forced contractile' HASMCs. Forced contractile HASMCs demonstrated organized alpha-smooth muscle actin filaments, minimal interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) secretion, and low intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and tissue factor expression. Organization of alpha-smooth muscle actin was lost in 'more secretory' HASMCs in co-culture with HAECs, and IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion, as well as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and tissue factor expression were significantly upregulated at both time points. Alternately, 'less secretory' HASMCs in co-culture with HAECs showed similar characteristics to forced contractile HASMCs at the 48 h time point, while by the 72 h time point they behaved similarly to 'more secretory' HASMCs. These co-culture systems could be useful in better understanding vascular healing, however there remain time constraint considerations for maintaining culture integrity/cell phenotype.

  16. Structure of myosin filaments from relaxed Lethocerus flight muscle by cryo-EM at 6 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongjun; Taylor, Dianne W.; Reedy, Michael K.; Edwards, Robert J.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a cryo–electron microscopy three-dimensional image reconstruction of relaxed myosin II–containing thick filaments from the flight muscle of the giant water bug Lethocerus indicus. The relaxed thick filament structure is a key element of muscle physiology because it facilitates the reextension process following contraction. Conversely, the myosin heads must disrupt their relaxed arrangement to drive contraction. Previous models predicted that Lethocerus myosin was unique in having an intermolecular head-head interaction, as opposed to the intramolecular head-head interaction observed in all other species. In contrast to the predicted model, we find an intramolecular head-head interaction, which is similar to that of other thick filaments but oriented in a distinctly different way. The arrangement of myosin’s long α-helical coiled-coil rod domain has been hypothesized as either curved layers or helical subfilaments. Our reconstruction is the first report having sufficient resolution to track the rod α helices in their native environment at resolutions ~5.5 Å, and it shows that the layer arrangement is correct for Lethocerus. Threading separate paths through the forest of myosin coiled coils are four nonmyosin peptides. We suggest that the unusual position of the heads and the rod arrangement separated by nonmyosin peptides are adaptations for mechanical signal transduction whereby applied tension disrupts the myosin heads as a component of stretch activation. PMID:27704041

  17. Loss of Sarcomere-associated Formins Disrupts Z-line Organization, but does not Prevent Thin Filament Assembly in Caenorhabditis elegans Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mi-Mi, Lei; Pruyne, David

    2015-01-01

    Members of the formin family of actin filament nucleation factors have been implicated in sarcomere formation, but precisely how these proteins affect sarcomere structure remains poorly understood. Of six formins in the simple nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, only FHOD-1 and CYK-1 contribute to sarcomere assembly in the worm's obliquely striated body-wall muscles. We analyze here the ultrastructure of body-wall muscle sarcomeres in worms with putative null fhod-1 and cyk-1 gene mutations. Contrary to a simple model that formins nucleate actin for thin filament assembly, formin mutant sarcomeres contain thin filaments. Rather, formin mutant sarcomeres are narrower and have deformed thin filament-anchoring Z-line structures. Thus, formins affect multiple aspects of sarcomere structure. PMID:26161293

  18. Cooperative cross-bridge activation of thin filaments contributes to the Frank-Starling mechanism in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Smith, L; Tainter, C; Regnier, M; Martyn, D A

    2009-05-06

    Myosin cross-bridges play an important role in the regulation of thin-filament activation in cardiac muscle. To test the hypothesis that sarcomere length (SL) modulation of thin-filament activation by strong-binding cross-bridges underlies the Frank-Starling mechanism, we inhibited force and strong cross-bridge binding to intermediate levels with sodium vanadate (Vi). Force and stiffness varied proportionately with [Ca(2+)] and [Vi]. Increasing [Vi] (decreased force) reduced the pCa(50) of force-[Ca(2+)] relations at 2.3 and 2.0 microm SL, with little effect on slope (n(H)). When maximum force was inhibited to approximately 40%, the effects of SL on force were diminished at lower [Ca(2+)], whereas at higher [Ca(2+)] (pCa < 5.6) the relative influence of SL on force increased. In contrast, force inhibition to approximately 20% significantly reduced the sensitivity of force-[Ca(2+)] relations to changes in both SL and myofilament lattice spacing. Strong cross-bridge binding cooperatively induced changes in cardiac troponin C structure, as measured by dichroism of 5' iodoacetamido-tetramethylrhodamine-labeled cardiac troponin C. This apparent cooperativity was reduced at shorter SL. These data emphasize that SL and/or myofilament lattice spacing modulation of the cross-bridge component of cardiac thin-filament activation contributes to the Frank-Starling mechanism.

  19. Cooperative Cross-Bridge Activation of Thin Filaments Contributes to the Frank-Starling Mechanism in Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L.; Tainter, C.; Regnier, M.; Martyn, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Myosin cross-bridges play an important role in the regulation of thin-filament activation in cardiac muscle. To test the hypothesis that sarcomere length (SL) modulation of thin-filament activation by strong-binding cross-bridges underlies the Frank-Starling mechanism, we inhibited force and strong cross-bridge binding to intermediate levels with sodium vanadate (Vi). Force and stiffness varied proportionately with [Ca2+] and [Vi]. Increasing [Vi] (decreased force) reduced the pCa50 of force-[Ca2+] relations at 2.3 and 2.0 μm SL, with little effect on slope (nH). When maximum force was inhibited to ∼40%, the effects of SL on force were diminished at lower [Ca2+], whereas at higher [Ca2+] (pCa < 5.6) the relative influence of SL on force increased. In contrast, force inhibition to ∼20% significantly reduced the sensitivity of force-[Ca2+] relations to changes in both SL and myofilament lattice spacing. Strong cross-bridge binding cooperatively induced changes in cardiac troponin C structure, as measured by dichroism of 5′ iodoacetamido-tetramethylrhodamine-labeled cardiac troponin C. This apparent cooperativity was reduced at shorter SL. These data emphasize that SL and/or myofilament lattice spacing modulation of the cross-bridge component of cardiac thin-filament activation contributes to the Frank-Starling mechanism. PMID:19413974

  20. Velocities of unloaded muscle filaments are not limited by drag forces imposed by myosin cross-bridges

    PubMed Central

    Brizendine, Richard K.; Alcala, Diego B.; Carter, Michael S.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Baker, Josh E.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2015-01-01

    It is not known which kinetic step in the acto-myosin ATPase cycle limits contraction speed in unloaded muscles (V0). Huxley’s 1957 model [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318] predicts that V0 is limited by the rate that myosin detaches from actin. However, this does not explain why, as observed by Bárány [Bárány M (1967) J Gen Physiol 50(6, Suppl):197–218], V0 is linearly correlated with the maximal actin-activated ATPase rate (vmax), which is limited by the rate that myosin attaches strongly to actin. We have observed smooth muscle myosin filaments of different length and head number (N) moving over surface-attached F-actin in vitro. Fitting filament velocities (V) vs. N to a detachment-limited model using the myosin step size d = 8 nm gave an ADP release rate 8.5-fold faster and ton (myosin’s attached time) and r (duty ratio) ∼10-fold lower than previously reported. In contrast, these data were accurately fit to an attachment-limited model, V = N·v·d, over the range of N found in all muscle types. At nonphysiologically high N, V = L/ton rather than d/ton, where L is related to the length of myosin’s subfragment 2. The attachment-limited model also fit well to the [ATP] dependence of V for myosin-rod cofilaments at three fixed N. Previously published V0 vs. vmax values for 24 different muscles were accurately fit to the attachment-limited model using widely accepted values for r and N, giving d = 11.1 nm. Therefore, in contrast with Huxley’s model, we conclude that V0 is limited by the actin–myosin attachment rate. PMID:26294254

  1. Loss of cortical actin filaments in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells impairs GLUT4 vesicle trafficking and glucose transport

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Alicia M.; Spisak, Kristen O.; Brozinick, Joseph T.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Study has demonstrated an essential role of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) in insulin-regulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. Here, we tested whether perturbations in F-actin contributed to impaired insulin responsiveness provoked by hyperinsulinemia. In L6 myo-tubes stably expressing GLUT4 that carries an exofacial myc-epitope tag, acute insulin stimulation (20 min, 100 nM) increased GLUT4myc translocation and glucose uptake by ~2-fold. In contrast, a hyperinsulinemic state, induced by inclusion of 5 nM insulin in the medium for 12 h decreased the ability of insulin to stimulate these processes. Defects in insulin signaling did not readily account for the observed disruption. In contrast, hyperinsulinemia reduced cortical F-actin. This occurred concomitant with a loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a lipid involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Restoration of plasma membrane PIP2 in hyperinsulinemic cells restored F-actin and insulin responsiveness. Consistent with these in vitro observations suggesting that the hyperinsulinemic state negatively affects cortical F-actin structure, epitrochlearis skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant hyperinsulinemic Zucker fatty rats displayed a similar loss of F-actin structure compared with that in muscle from lean insulin-sensitive littermates. We propose that a component of insulin-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle involves defects in PIP2/F-actin structure essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport. PMID:16774991

  2. Loss of cortical actin filaments in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells impairs GLUT4 vesicle trafficking and glucose transport.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Alicia M; Spisak, Kristen O; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2006-11-01

    Study has demonstrated an essential role of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) in insulin-regulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. Here, we tested whether perturbations in F-actin contributed to impaired insulin responsiveness provoked by hyperinsulinemia. In L6 myotubes stably expressing GLUT4 that carries an exofacial myc-epitope tag, acute insulin stimulation (20 min, 100 nM) increased GLUT4myc translocation and glucose uptake by approximately 2-fold. In contrast, a hyperinsulinemic state, induced by inclusion of 5 nM insulin in the medium for 12 h decreased the ability of insulin to stimulate these processes. Defects in insulin signaling did not readily account for the observed disruption. In contrast, hyperinsulinemia reduced cortical F-actin. This occurred concomitant with a loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), a lipid involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Restoration of plasma membrane PIP(2) in hyperinsulinemic cells restored F-actin and insulin responsiveness. Consistent with these in vitro observations suggesting that the hyperinsulinemic state negatively affects cortical F-actin structure, epitrochlearis skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant hyperinsulinemic Zucker fatty rats displayed a similar loss of F-actin structure compared with that in muscle from lean insulin-sensitive littermates. We propose that a component of insulin-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle involves defects in PIP(2)/F-actin structure essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport.

  3. Direct observation of a central bare zone in a native thick filament isolated from the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis using fluorescent ATP analogue.

    PubMed

    Oiwa, K; Yamaga, T; Yamada, A

    1998-04-01

    To investigate the existence of a central bare zone in native thick filaments isolated from the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis), the filaments were observed by fluorescence and dark-field microscopy after being incubated in the presence of Ca2+ with the fluorescent ATP analogue, Cy3-EDA-ATP. Filaments appeared under dark-field illumination as thin rods with tapered ends of length 5-30 microm. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that Cy3-EDA-ATP was bound to these filaments, except near their center. Although the boundary between this central non-fluorescent zone and fluorescent regions was not clearly defined, there was a trend for the width of the central non-fluorescent zone to increase with thick filament length (correlation coefficient = 0.45; n = 142). When Cy3-EDA-nucleotides bound to thick filaments were displaced by excess ATP, fluorescent images disappeared with a rate constant of 0. 024 s-1, close to the turnover rate of Cy3-EDA-ATP by myosin on the native thick filaments. These results indicate that each native thick filament isolated from the ABRM has a central bare zone, but its boundary was not sharply resolved.

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans Kettin, a Large Immunoglobulin-like Repeat Protein, Binds to Filamentous Actin and Provides Mechanical Stability to the Contractile Apparatuses in Body Wall Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Yu, Robinson; Mohri, Kurato

    2006-01-01

    Kettin is a large actin-binding protein with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats, which is associated with the thin filaments in arthropod muscles. Here, we report identification and functional characterization of kettin in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that one of the monoclonal antibodies that were raised against C. elegans muscle proteins specifically reacts with kettin (Ce-kettin). We determined the entire cDNA sequence of Ce-kettin that encodes a protein of 472 kDa with 31 Ig repeats. Arthropod kettins are splice variants of much larger connectin/titin-related proteins. However, the gene for Ce-kettin is independent of other connectin/titin-related genes. Ce-kettin localizes to the thin filaments near the dense bodies in both striated and nonstriated muscles. The C-terminal four Ig repeats and the adjacent non-Ig region synergistically bind to actin filaments in vitro. RNA interference of Ce-kettin caused weak disorganization of the actin filaments in body wall muscle. This phenotype was suppressed by inhibiting muscle contraction by a myosin mutation, but it was enhanced by tetramisole-induced hypercontraction. Furthermore, Ce-kettin was involved in organizing the cytoplasmic portion of the dense bodies in cooperation with α-actinin. These results suggest that kettin is an important regulator of myofibrillar organization and provides mechanical stability to the myofibrils during contraction. PMID:16597697

  5. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  6. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  7. Passive tension and stiffness of vertebrate skeletal and insect flight muscles: the contribution of weak cross-bridges and elastic filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Granzier, H L; Wang, K

    1993-01-01

    Tension and dynamic stiffness of passive rabbit psoas, rabbit semitendinosus, and waterbug indirect flight muscles were investigated to study the contribution of weak-binding cross-bridges and elastic filaments (titin and minititin) to the passive mechanical behavior of these muscles. Experimentally, a functional dissection of the relative contribution of actomyosin cross-bridges and titin and minititin was achieved by 1) comparing mechanically skinned muscle fibers before and after selective removal of actin filaments with a noncalcium-requiring gelsolin fragment (FX-45), and 2) studying passive tension and stiffness as a function of sarcomere length, ionic strength, temperature, and the inhibitory effect of a carboxyl-terminal fragment of smooth muscle caldesmon. Our data show that weak bridges exist in both rabbit skeletal muscle and insect flight muscle at physiological ionic strength and room temperature. In rabbit psoas fibers, weak bridge stiffness appears to vary with both thin-thick filament overlap and with the magnitude of passive tension. Plots of passive tension versus passive stiffness are multiphasic and strikingly similar for these three muscles of distinct sarcomere proportions and elastic proteins. The tension-stiffness plot appears to be a powerful tool in discerning changes in the mechanical behavior of the elastic filaments. The stress-strain and stiffness-strain curves of all three muscles can be merged into one, by normalizing strain rate and strain amplitude of the extensible segment of titin and minititin, further supporting the segmental extension model of resting tension development. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8298040

  8. Three-dimensional structure of the M-region (bare zone) of vertebrate striated muscle myosin filaments by single-particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Khayat, Hind A; Kensler, Robert W; Morris, Edward P; Squire, John M

    2010-11-12

    The rods of anti-parallel myosin molecules overlap at the centre of bipolar myosin filaments to produce an M-region (bare zone) that is free of myosin heads. Beyond the M-region edges, myosin molecules aggregate in a parallel fashion to yield the bridge regions of the myosin filaments. Adjacent myosin filaments in striated muscle A-bands are cross-linked by the M-band. Vertebrate striated muscle myosin filaments have a 3-fold rotational symmetry around their long axes. In addition, at the centre of the M-region, there are three 2-fold axes perpendicular to the filament long axis, giving the whole filament dihedral 32-point group symmetry. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure obtained by a single-particle analysis of the M-region of myosin filaments from goldfish skeletal muscle under relaxing conditions and as viewed in negative stain. This is the first single-particle reconstruction of isolated M-regions. The resulting three-dimensional reconstruction reveals details to about 55 Å resolution of the density distribution in the five main nonmyosin densities in the M-band (M6', M4', M1, M4 and M6) and in the myosin head crowns (P1, P2 and P3) at the M-region edges. The outermost crowns in the reconstruction were identified specifically by their close similarity to the corresponding crown levels in our previously published bridge region reconstructions. The packing of myosin molecules into the M-region structure is discussed, and some unidentified densities are highlighted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The apparently negatively cooperative phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin at low ionic strength is related to its filamentous state.

    PubMed

    Sellers, J R; Chock, P B; Adelstein, R S

    1983-12-10

    The correlation curve between phosphorylation and MgATPase activity suggests that the 20,000-dalton light chain of both heads of a smooth muscle myosin or heavy meromyosin (HMM) molecule must be phosphorylated before the MgATPase activity of either head can be activated by actin. The two heads of HMM appear to be phosphorylated randomly at equal rates, while those of myosin are phosphorylated in a negatively cooperative manner (Persechini, A., and Hartshorne, D.J. (1981) Science, 213, 1383-1385; Ikebe, M., Ogihara, S., and Tonomura, Y. (1982) J. Biochem. 91, 1809-1812). We have investigated the cause of this difference between HMM and myosin. We find that if myosin is first phosphorylated at high ionic strength (0.6 M KCl), where it is monomeric, and then assayed for MgATPase activity (in 0.05 M KCl), the data support a model where the two heads are phosphorylated randomly with equal rates (i.e. similarly to HMM). The correlation curves between MgATPase activity and dephosphorylation of fully phosphorylated myosin, both in a filamentous and monomeric state, are also best explained by a model where dephosphorylation of one head is sufficient to deactivate the entire molecule. With monomeric myosin, the dephosphorylation appears to occur randomly with equal rates, whereas with filamentous myosin the dephosphorylation appears to be negatively cooperative. The correlation between dephosphorylation of HMM and its MgATPase activity is more complex and is consistent with a positively cooperative dephosphorylation. Direct analyses of the time courses of phosphorylation of HMM and monomeric myosin show that a single exponential is sufficient to fit the data through greater than 90% of the reaction. However, when phosphorylation is carried out at low ionic strength (0.02 M KCl), where myosin is present as filaments, the time course consists of two exponential functions where the rate constant for the phosphorylation of one myosin head is 6-10 times greater than that for the

  10. Disorder profile of nebulin encodes a vernierlike position sensor for the sliding thin and thick filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Chya; Forbes, Jeffrey G.; Wang, Kuan

    2016-06-01

    Nebulin is an about 1 μ m long intrinsically disordered scaffold for the thin filaments of skeletal muscle sarcomere. It is a multifunctional elastic protein that wraps around actin filament, stabilizes thin filaments, and regulates Ca-dependent actomyosin interactions. This study investigates whether the disorder profile of nebulin might encode guidelines for thin and thick filament interactions in the sarcomere of the skeletal muscle. The question was addressed computationally by analyzing the predicted disorder profile of human nebulin (6669 residues, ˜200 actin-binding repeats) by pondr and the periodicity of the A-band stripes (reflecting the locations of myosin-associated proteins) in the electron micrographs of the sarcomere. Using the detrended fluctuation analysis, a scale factor for the A-band stripe image data with respect to the nebulin disorder profile was determined to make the thin and thick filaments aligned to have maximum correlation. The empirical mode decomposition method was then applied to identify hidden periodicities in both the nebulin disorder profile and the rescaled A-band data. The decomposition reveals three characteristic length scales (45 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm) that are relevant for correlational analysis. The dynamical cross-correlation analyses with moving windows at various sarcomere lengths depict a vernierlike design for both periodicities, thus enabling nebulin to sense position and fine tune sarcomere overlap. This shows that the disorder profile of scaffolding proteins may encode a guideline for cellular architecture.

  11. Fat-induced membrane cholesterol accrual provokes cortical filamentous actin destabilisation and glucose transport dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Habegger, K M; Penque, B A; Sealls, W; Tackett, L; Bell, L N; Blue, E K; Gallagher, P J; Sturek, M; Alloosh, M A; Steinberg, H O; Considine, R V; Elmendorf, J S

    2012-02-01

    Diminished cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) has been implicated in skeletal muscle insulin resistance, yet the mechanism(s) is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that changes in membrane cholesterol could be a causative factor, as organised F-actin structure emanates from cholesterol-enriched raft microdomains at the plasma membrane. Skeletal muscle samples from high-fat-fed animals and insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant human participants were evaluated. The study also used L6 myotubes to directly determine the impact of fatty acids (FAs) on membrane/cytoskeletal variables and insulin action. High-fat-fed insulin-resistant animals displayed elevated levels of membrane cholesterol and reduced F-actin structure compared with normal chow-fed animals. Moreover, human muscle biopsies revealed an inverse correlation between membrane cholesterol and whole-body glucose disposal. Palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myotubes displayed membrane cholesterol accrual and F-actin loss. Cholesterol lowering protected against the palmitate-induced defects, whereas characteristically measured defects in insulin signalling were not corrected. Conversely, cholesterol loading of L6 myotube membranes provoked a palmitate-like cytoskeletal/GLUT4 derangement. Mechanistically, we observed a palmitate-induced increase in O-linked glycosylation, an end-product of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP). Consistent with HBP activity affecting the transcription of various genes, we observed an increase in Hmgcr, a gene that encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. In line with increased HBP activity transcriptionally provoking a membrane cholesterol-based insulin-resistant state, HBP inhibition attenuated Hmgcr expression and prevented membrane cholesterol accrual, F-actin loss and GLUT4/glucose transport dysfunction. Our results suggest a novel cholesterolgenic-based mechanism of FA-induced membrane

  12. The histological quantification of alpha-smooth muscle actin predicts future graft fibrosis in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sharat; Stéphenne, Xavier; Komuta, Mina; Bouzin, Caroline; Ambroise, Jerome; Smets, Françoise; Reding, Raymond; Sokal, Etienne M

    2017-02-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells express cytoplasmic ASMA prior to secreting collagen and consequent liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that quantifying ASMA could predict severity of future fibrosis after LT. For this, 32 pairs of protocol biopsies, that is, "baseline" and "follow-up" biopsies taken at 1- to 2-year intervals from 18 stable pediatric LT recipients, transplanted between 2006 and 2012 were selected. Morphometric quantification of "ASMA-positive area percentage" was performed on the baseline biopsy. Histological and fibrosis assessment using Metavir and LAFSc was performed on all biopsies. The difference of fibrosis severity between the "baseline" and "follow-up" was termed "prospective change in fibrosis." Significant association was seen between extent of ASMA positivity on baseline biopsy and "prospective change in fibrosis" using Metavir (P=.02), cumulative LAFSc (P=.02), and portal LAFSc (P=.01) values. ASMA-positive area percentage >1.05 predicted increased fibrosis on next biopsy with 90.0% specificity. Additionally, an association was observed between extent of ASMA positivity and concomitant ductular reaction (P=.06), but not with histological inflammation in the portal tract or lobular area. Hence, ASMA quantification can predict the future course of fibrosis.

  13. Changes in keratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin during three-dimensional reconstitution of eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Bingna; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Wenlong; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-07-01

    We have examined the changes of keratins and alpha-SMA at various time points in order to investigate the development and differentiation of eccrine sweat gland cells during the course of three-dimensional (3D) reconstitution. Mixtures of eccrine sweat gland cells and Matrigel were injected subcutaneously into the inguinal regions of nude mice. At 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days post-implantation, Matrigel plugs were removed and immunostained. We found that during 3D reconstitution, keratin and alpha-SMA expression changed in a time-dependent manner. At day 1, all cells stained positively for keratin isoforms K5, K14, and K15, with the staining intensity of K15 being weak and K5 and K14 being strong, but none of the cells displayed K7, K8, or alpha-SMA. As time progressed, spheroid-like structures formed with the inner layer acquiring K7 and K8, but losing K5 and K14 expression, and the outer layer acquiring alpha-SMA expression, but losing K15 expression. K8 expression was first noted at day 14, and K7 and alpha-SMA at day 21. The loss of K15 expression was first noted at day 14, K14 at day 21, and K5 at day 28. At 28, 35, and 42 days, the spheroid-like structures could be distinguished, by immunohistochemistry, as having secretory coil-like and coiled duct-like structures. We conclude that the changes in expression of keratins and alpha-SMA in 3D-reconstituted eccrine sweat glands are similar to those of native eccrine sweat glands, indicating that the 3D reconstitution of sweat glands provides an excellent model for studying the development, cytodifferentiation, and regulation of eccrine sweat glands.

  14. Combination of keratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin distinguishes secretory coils from ducts of eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Xiang; Zeng, Shaopeng; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Bingna; Chen, Lu; Lin, Changmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-04-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are comprised of secretory coils and ducts, which are distinct in morphology and function. To better understand the roles of the two parts in development, homeostasis, wound repair and regeneration of eccrine sweat glands, we must distinguish between them. In this study, the localization of keratins and alpha-SMA in human eccrine sweat glands was examined by immunofluorescence staining. Based on the differential localization of keratins and alpha-SMA in different cell types, four pairs of antibodies (K5/K7, K5/alpha-SMA, K14/K7 and K14/alpha-SMA) were used to differentiate secretory coils from ducts by double-immunofluorescence staining. Immunofluorescence staining showed that myoepithelial cells of secretory coils expressed K5, K14 and alpha-SMA, whereas secretory cells of secretory coils expressed K7, K8, K15, K18 and K19. Ductal cells expressed K5, K8, K14 and K19. Double-staining showed that the secretory coils were K5(+)/K7(+), K5(+)/alpha-SMA(+), K14(+)/K7(+) and K14(+)/alpha-SMA(+), whereas ducts were K5(+)/K7(-), K5(+)/alpha-SMA(-), K14(+)/K7(-) and K14(+)/alpha-SMA(-). In conclusion, by combining use of keratins and alpha-SMA antibodies, secretory coils can be easily differentiated from ducts in morphology.

  15. Regulatory mechanism of length-dependent activation in skinned porcine ventricular muscle: role of thin filament cooperative activation in the Frank-Starling relation.

    PubMed

    Terui, Takako; Shimamoto, Yuta; Yamane, Mitsunori; Kobirumaki, Fuyu; Ohtsuki, Iwao; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Kurihara, Satoshi; Fukuda, Norio

    2010-10-01

    Cardiac sarcomeres produce greater active force in response to stretch, forming the basis of the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. The purpose of this study was to provide the systematic understanding of length-dependent activation by investigating experimentally and mathematically how the thin filament "on-off" switching mechanism is involved in its regulation. Porcine left ventricular muscles were skinned, and force measurements were performed at short (1.9 µm) and long (2.3 µm) sarcomere lengths. We found that 3 mM MgADP increased Ca(2+) sensitivity of force and the rate of rise of active force, consistent with the increase in thin filament cooperative activation. MgADP attenuated length-dependent activation with and without thin filament reconstitution with the fast skeletal troponin complex (sTn). Conversely, 20 mM of inorganic phosphate (Pi) decreased Ca(2+) sensitivity of force and the rate of rise of active force, consistent with the decrease in thin filament cooperative activation. Pi enhanced length-dependent activation with and without sTn reconstitution. Linear regression analysis revealed that the magnitude of length-dependent activation was inversely correlated with the rate of rise of active force. These results were quantitatively simulated by a model that incorporates the Ca(2+)-dependent on-off switching of the thin filament state and interfilament lattice spacing modulation. Our model analysis revealed that the cooperativity of the thin filament on-off switching, but not the Ca(2+)-binding ability, determines the magnitude of the Frank-Starling effect. These findings demonstrate that the Frank-Starling relation is strongly influenced by thin filament cooperative activation.

  16. Regulatory mechanism of length-dependent activation in skinned porcine ventricular muscle: role of thin filament cooperative activation in the Frank-Starling relation

    PubMed Central

    Terui, Takako; Shimamoto, Yuta; Yamane, Mitsunori; Kobirumaki, Fuyu; Ohtsuki, Iwao; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi; Kurihara, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sarcomeres produce greater active force in response to stretch, forming the basis of the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. The purpose of this study was to provide the systematic understanding of length-dependent activation by investigating experimentally and mathematically how the thin filament “on–off” switching mechanism is involved in its regulation. Porcine left ventricular muscles were skinned, and force measurements were performed at short (1.9 µm) and long (2.3 µm) sarcomere lengths. We found that 3 mM MgADP increased Ca2+ sensitivity of force and the rate of rise of active force, consistent with the increase in thin filament cooperative activation. MgADP attenuated length-dependent activation with and without thin filament reconstitution with the fast skeletal troponin complex (sTn). Conversely, 20 mM of inorganic phosphate (Pi) decreased Ca2+ sensitivity of force and the rate of rise of active force, consistent with the decrease in thin filament cooperative activation. Pi enhanced length-dependent activation with and without sTn reconstitution. Linear regression analysis revealed that the magnitude of length-dependent activation was inversely correlated with the rate of rise of active force. These results were quantitatively simulated by a model that incorporates the Ca2+-dependent on–off switching of the thin filament state and interfilament lattice spacing modulation. Our model analysis revealed that the cooperativity of the thin filament on–off switching, but not the Ca2+-binding ability, determines the magnitude of the Frank-Starling effect. These findings demonstrate that the Frank-Starling relation is strongly influenced by thin filament cooperative activation. PMID:20876361

  17. Structural changes of the regulatory proteins bound to the thin filaments in skeletal muscle contraction by X-ray fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Yasunobu Takezawa, Yasunori; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Ueno, Yutaka; Minakata, Shiho; Tanaka, Hidehiro; Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    2008-04-25

    In order to clarify the structural changes related to the regulation mechanism in skeletal muscle contraction, the intensity changes of thin filament-based reflections were investigated by X-ray fiber diffraction. The time course and extent of intensity changes of the first to third order troponin (TN)-associated meridional reflections with a basic repeat of 38.4 nm were different for each of these reflections. The intensity of the first and second thin filament layer lines changed in a reciprocal manner both during initial activation and during the force generation process. The axial spacings of the TN-meridional reflections decreased by {approx}0.1% upon activation relative to the relaxing state and increased by {approx}0.24% in the force generation state, in line with that of the 2.7-nm reflection. Ca{sup 2+}-binding to TN triggered the shortening and a change in the helical symmetry of the thin filaments. Modeling of the structural changes using the intensities of the thin filament-based reflections suggested that the conformation of the globular core domain of TN altered upon activation, undergoing additional conformational changes at the tension plateau. The tail domain of TN moved together with tropomyosin during contraction. The results indicate that the structural changes of regulatory proteins bound to the actin filaments occur in two steps, the first in response to the Ca{sup 2+}-binding and the second induced by actomyosin interaction.

  18. Activation of thin-filament-regulated muscle by calcium ion: considerations based on nearest-neighbor lattice statistics.

    PubMed Central

    Shiner, J S; Solaro, R J

    1982-01-01

    We discuss the activation of thin-filament-regulated muscles by calcium ion in terms of a qualitative model based on nearest-neighbor lattice statistics. For the most part, the model takes into account only the essential features of the phenomenon--that there must be an interaction between calcium adsorption to troponin and crossbridge reaction with actin for calcium ion to activate contraction and that the relevant stationary states are nonequilibrium ones. Even so, the model predicts the following features which are seen experimentally but have generally not been considered in previous models: (i) the relative activations of stationary-state isometric force and ATPase are not equal; (ii) in general, neither activation of force nor that of ATPase is proportional to calcium adsorption to the activating sites; and (iii) the slopes of the relations between the activations and the logarithm of the calcium ion concentration generally depend on the necessary interaction between calcium ion adsorption and crossbridge reaction with actin. Thus, these relations show cooperative effects even if these is no interaction between calcium adsorption sites. PMID:6956882

  19. Colocalization properties of elementary Ca(2+) release signals with structures specific to the contractile filaments and the tubular system of intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Tihomir; Zapiec, Bolek; Förderer, Moritz; Fink, Rainer H A; Vogel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Ca(2+) regulates several important intracellular processes. We combined second harmonic generation (SHG) and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) to simultaneously record the SHG signal of the myosin filaments and localized elementary Ca(2+) release signals (LCSs). We found LCSs associated with Y-shaped structures of the myosin filament pattern (YMs), so called verniers, in intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers under hypertonic treatment. Ion channels crucial for the Ca(2+) regulation are located in the tubular system, a system that is important for Ca(2+) regulation and excitation-contraction coupling. We investigated the tubular system of intact, living mouse skeletal muscle fibers using 2PFM and the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 dissolved in the external solution or the membrane dye di-8-ANEPPS. We simultaneously measured the SHG signal from the myosin filaments of the skeletal muscle fibers. We found that at least a subset of the YMs observed in SHG images are closely juxtaposed with Y-shaped structures of the transverse tubules (YTs). The distances of corresponding YMs and YTs yield values between 1.3 μm and 4.1 μm including pixel uncertainty with a mean distance of 2.52±0.10 μm (S.E.M., n=41). Additionally, we observed that some of the linear-shaped areas in the tubular system are colocalized with linear-shaped areas in the SHG images. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Viscoelasticity of the sarcomere matrix of skeletal muscles. The titin-myosin composite filament is a dual-stage molecular spring.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K; McCarter, R; Wright, J; Beverly, J; Ramirez-Mitchell, R

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical roles of sarcomere-associated cytoskeletal lattices were investigated by studying the resting tension-sarcomere length curves of mechanically skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers over a wide range of sarcomere strain. Correlative immunoelectron microscopy of the elastic titin filaments of the endosarcomeric lattice revealed biphasic extensibility behaviors and provided a structural interpretation of the multiphasic tension-length curves. We propose that the reversible change of contour length of the extensible segment of titin between the Z line and the end of thick filaments underlies the exponential rise of resting tension. At and beyond an elastic limit near 3.8 microns, a portion of the anchored titin segment that adheres to thick filaments is released from the distal ends of thick filament. This increase in extensible length of titin results in a net length increase in the unstrained extensible segment, thereby lowering the stiffness of the fiber, lengthening the slack sarcomere length, and shifting the yield point in postyield sarcomeres. Thus, the titin-myosin composite filament behaves as a dual-stage molecular spring, consisting of an elastic connector segment for normal response and a longer latent segment that is recruited at and beyond the elastic limit of the sarcomere. Exosarcomeric intermediate filaments contribute to resting tension only above 4.5 microns. We conclude that the interlinked endo- and exosarcomeric lattices are both viscoelastic force-bearing elements. These distinct cytoskeletal lattices appear to operate over two ranges of sarcomere strains and collectively enable myofibrils to respond viscoelastically over a broad range of sarcomere and fiber lengths. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8494977

  1. Effects on shortening velocity of rabbit skeletal muscle due to variations in the level of thin-filament activation.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, R L

    1986-01-01

    The effect of Ca2+ upon maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) has been investigated in skinned single fibres from rabbit psoas muscles. Vmax was obtained at 15 degrees C by measuring the amounts of time (delta t) required to take up various amounts of slack (delta l) imposed at one end of the fibre. During maximal activation with Ca2+, plots of delta l vs. delta t were well fitted by a single straight line. Calculation of Vmax from the slopes of the fitted lines yielded a Vmax of 4.44 +/- 0.15 (S.E. of mean) muscle lengths per second (m.l./s). However, at lower levels of Ca2+ activation, plots of delta l vs. delta t were biphasic, containing an initial phase of steady high-velocity shortening and a subsequent phase of steady low-velocity shortening. The transition between these two phases occurred following active shortening equivalent to 60-80 nm/half-sarcomere. Vmax during the high-velocity phase was relatively insensitive to Ca2+ concentration between pCas (i.e. -log [Ca2+]) of 4.5 and 6.0; however, Vmax fell to 3.58 +/- 0.40 m.l./s at pCa 6.1 and further to 1.02 +/- 0.30 m.l./s at pCa 6.2. Vmax during the low-velocity phase decreased as Ca2+ was lowered within the entire range of pCas studied to a minimum value of 0.35 +/- 0.09 m.l./s at pCa 6.2. The degree of thin-filament activation at a particular pCa was varied by partial extraction of troponin-C, which resulted in a permanent though reversible inactivation of parts of the thin filaments. Partial extraction of troponin-C altered the plots of delta l vs. delta t obtained at pCa 4.5 to a biphasic form. In addition, Vmax during the high- and low-velocity phases of shortening was reduced at each pCa greater than 4.5. Vmax values obtained in control fibres at low Ca2+ concentrations and extracted fibres were in good agreement when generated isometric tensions were equivalent. This was the case for both the high- and low-velocity phases of shortening. Fibres were also activated in the absence of Ca2+ by partial

  2. Acceleration of the sliding movement of actin filaments with the use of a non-motile mutant myosin in in vitro motility assays driven by skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Kohei; Tanaka, Masateru; Hirose, Keiko; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Honda, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We examined the movement of an actin filament sliding on a mixture of normal and genetically modified myosin molecules that were attached to a glass surface. For this purpose, we used a Dictyostelium G680V mutant myosin II whose release rates of Pi and ADP were highly suppressed relative to normal myosin, leading to a significantly extended life-time of the strongly bound state with actin and virtually no motility. When the mixing ratio of G680V mutant myosin II to skeletal muscle HMM (heavy myosin) was 0.01%, the actin filaments moved intermittently. When they moved, their sliding velocities were about two-fold faster than the velocity of skeletal HMM alone. Furthermore, sliding movements were also faster when the actin filaments were allowed to slide on skeletal muscle HMM-coated glass surfaces in the motility buffer solution containing G680V HMM. In this case no intermittent movement was observed. When the actin filaments used were copolymerized with a fusion protein consisting of Dictyostelium actin and Dictyostelium G680V myosin II motor domain, similar faster sliding movements were observed on skeletal muscle HMM-coated surfaces. The filament sliding velocities were about two-fold greater than the velocities of normal actin filaments. We found that the velocity of actin filaments sliding on skeletal muscle myosin molecules increased in the presence of a non-motile G680V mutant myosin motor.

  3. Controlling skeletal muscle CPT-I malonyl-CoA sensitivity: the importance of AMPK-independent regulation of intermediate filaments during exercise.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Paula M; Steinberg, Gregory R; Holloway, Graham P

    2017-02-15

    The obligatory role of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I (CPT-I) in mediating mitochondrial lipid transport is well established, a process attenuated by malonyl-CoA (M-CoA). However, the necessity of reducing M-CoA concentrations to promote lipid oxidation has recently been challenged, suggesting external regulation on CPT-I. Since previous work in hepatocytes suggests the involvement of the intermediate filament fraction of the cytoskeleton in regulating CPT-I, we investigated in skeletal muscle if CPT-I sensitivity for M-CoA inhibition could be regulated by the intermediate filaments, and whether AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) could be involved in this process. Chemical disruption (3,3'-iminodipropionitrile, IDPN) of the intermediate filaments did not alter mitochondrial respiration or sensitivity for numerous substrates (palmitoyl-CoA, ADP, palmitoyl carnitine and pyruvate). In contrast, IDPN reduced CPT-I sensitivity for M-CoA inhibition in permeabilized muscle fibers, identifying M-CoA kinetics as a specific target for intermediate filament regulation. Importantly, exercise mimicked the effect of IDPN on M-CoA sensitivity, suggesting that intermediate filament disruption in vivo is physiologically important for CPT-I regulation. To ascertain a potential mechanism, since AMPK is activated during exercise, AMPK β1β2-KO mice were utilized in an attempt to ablate the observed exercise response. Unexpectedly, these mice displayed drastic attenuation in resting M-CoA sensitivity, such that exercise and IDPN could not further alter M-CoA sensitivity. These data suggest that AMPK is not required for the regulation of the intermediate filament interaction with CPT-I. Altogether, these data highlight that M-CoA sensitivity is important for regulating mitochondrial lipid transport. Moreover, M-CoA sensitivity appears to be regulated by intermediate filament interaction with CPT-I, a process that is important when metabolic homeostasis is challenged. © 2017 The

  4. Random myosin loss along thick-filaments increases myosin attachment time and the proportion of bound myosin heads to mitigate force decline in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; McNabb, Mark; Palmer, Bradley M.; Toth, Michael J.; Miller, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Diminished skeletal muscle performance with aging, disuse, and disease may be partially attributed to the loss of myofilament proteins. Several laboratories have found a disproportionate loss of myosin protein content relative to other myofilament proteins, but due to methodological limitations, the structural manifestation of this protein loss is unknown. To investigate how variations in myosin content affect ensemble cross-bridge behavior and force production we simulated muscle contraction in the half-sarcomere as myosin was removed either i) uniformly, from the Z-line end of thick-filaments, or ii) randomly, along the length of thick-filaments. Uniform myosin removal decreased force production, showing a slightly steeper force-to-myosin content relationship than the 1:1 relationship that would be expected from the loss of cross-bridges. Random myosin removal also decreased force production, but this decrease was less than observed with uniform myosin loss, largely due to increased myosin attachment time (ton) and fractional cross-bridge binding with random myosin loss. These findings support our prior observations that prolonged ton may augment force production in single fibers with randomly reduced myosin content from chronic heart failure patients. These simulation also illustrate that the pattern of myosin loss along thick-filaments influences ensemble cross-bridge behavior and maintenance of force throughout the sarcomere. PMID:24486373

  5. Random myosin loss along thick-filaments increases myosin attachment time and the proportion of bound myosin heads to mitigate force decline in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Bertrand C W; McNabb, Mark; Palmer, Bradley M; Toth, Michael J; Miller, Mark S

    2014-06-15

    Diminished skeletal muscle performance with aging, disuse, and disease may be partially attributed to the loss of myofilament proteins. Several laboratories have found a disproportionate loss of myosin protein content relative to other myofilament proteins, but due to methodological limitations, the structural manifestation of this protein loss is unknown. To investigate how variations in myosin content affect ensemble cross-bridge behavior and force production we simulated muscle contraction in the half-sarcomere as myosin was removed either (i) uniformly, from the Z-line end of thick-filaments, or (ii) randomly, along the length of thick-filaments. Uniform myosin removal decreased force production, showing a slightly steeper force-to-myosin content relationship than the 1:1 relationship that would be expected from the loss of cross-bridges. Random myosin removal also decreased force production, but this decrease was less than observed with uniform myosin loss, largely due to increased myosin attachment time (ton) and fractional cross-bridge binding with random myosin loss. These findings support our prior observations that prolonged ton may augment force production in single fibers with randomly reduced myosin content from chronic heart failure patients. These simulations also illustrate that the pattern of myosin loss along thick-filaments influences ensemble cross-bridge behavior and maintenance of force throughout the sarcomere. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of thin filament activation on the attachment of weak binding cross-bridges: A two-dimensional x-ray diffraction study on single muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Kraft, T; Xu, S; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1999-03-01

    To study possible structural changes in weak cross-bridge attachment to actin upon activation of the thin filament, two-dimensional (2D) x-ray diffraction patterns of skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle were recorded at low and high calcium concentration in the presence of saturating concentrations of MgATPgammaS, a nucleotide analog for weak binding states. We also studied 2D x-ray diffraction patterns recorded under relaxing conditions at an ionic strength above and below 50 mM, because it had been proposed from solution studies that reducing ionic strength below 50 mM also induces activation of the thin filament. For this project a novel preparation had to be established that allows recording of 2D x-ray diffraction patterns from single muscle fibers instead of natural fiber bundles. This was required to minimize substrate depletion or product accumulation within the fibers. When the calcium concentration was raised, the diffraction patterns recorded with MgATPgammaS revealed small changes in meridional reflections and layer line intensities that could be attributed in part to the effects of calcium binding to the thin filament (increase in I380, decrease in first actin layer line intensity, increase in I59) and in part to small structural changes of weakly attached cross-bridges (e.g., increase in I143 and I72). Calcium-induced small-scale structural rearrangements of cross-bridges weakly attached to actin in the presence of MgATPgammaS are consistent with our previous observation of reduced rate constants for attachment and detachment of cross-bridges with MgATPgammaS at high calcium. Yet, no evidence was found that weakly attached cross-bridges change their mode of attachment toward a stereospecific conformation when the actin filament is activated by adding calcium. Similarly, reducing ionic strength to less than 50 mM does not induce a transition from nonstereospecific to stereospecific attachment.

  7. Filament turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Joern

    2010-03-01

    How much information do you need to distinguish between different mechanisms for spatiotemporal chaos in three-dimensions? In this talk, I will show that the observation of the dynamics on the surface of a medium can be sufficient. Studying mechanisms for filament turbulence in the context of reaction-diffusion media, we found numerically that two major classes of instabilities leave a very different signature on what can be observed on the surface of a three-dimensional medium. These results are of direct relevance in the context of ventricular fibrillation - a turbulent electrical wave activity that destroys the coherent contraction of the ventricular muscle and its main pumping function leading to sudden cardiac death. While it has been proposed that the three-dimensional structure of the heart plays an important role in this type of filament turbulence, only the surface of the heart is currently accessible to experimental observation preventing the study of the full dynamics. Our results suggest that such observations might be sufficient.

  8. Demonstration of cytokeratin intermediate filaments in oocytes of the developing and adult human ovary.

    PubMed

    Santini, D; Ceccarelli, C; Mazzoleni, G; Pasquinelli, G; Jasonni, V M; Martinelli, G N

    1993-04-01

    The intermediate filaments (IF) present in the various cells of human ovaries were studied by immunolocalization using antibodies to cytokeratins (CKs), vimentin, desmin and alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-SM) actin. Oocytes revealed a single paranuclear aggregate, which reacted with antibodies to CKs 8, 18 and 19 both in adult and fetal ovaries. The existence of this aggregate was also documented by electron microscopy. Ovarian surface epithelium and granulosa cells consistently coexpressed CKs 8, 18, 19 and vimentin. During follicle maturation vimentin remained unchanged in the granulosa layer while CKs content decreased, showing variation in the amount and distribution of the different CK-types. Thecal cells of secondary and mature follicles showed alpha-SM actin positivity. These contractile fibres increased in mature follicles. Ordinary fibrous stromal cells showed isolated cells which were desmin and alpha-SM actin positive. A similar pattern of IF expression and distribution existed in all stages of development in fetal and embryonic ovaries. These results indicate that CKs are present in human oocytes and that the coexpression of vimentin and CKs can be regarded as a peculiar feature of all ovarian cell types except oocytes and ordinary stromal cells. Contractile properties have been documented associated with a modification in expression of IF proteins. This is likely to represent an integral part of folliculogenesis along with the functional hormone-dependent changes.

  9. A 295-kDA intermediate filament-associated protein in radial glia and developing muscle cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chanas-Sacré, G; Thiry, M; Pirard, S; Rogister, B; Moonen, G; Mbebi, C; Verdière-Sahuqué, M; Leprince, P

    2000-12-01

    The RC2 antibody is frequently used to label mouse radial glial cells in all parts of the nervous system where neuronal migration occurs during embryonic and early postnatal life. The antigen recognized by this antibody still needs to be identified. We have characterized further its localization in vivo, its expression and subcellular localization in vitro, as well as its molecular nature. Histologic investigations of whole mouse embryos reveal an equally intense expression of RC2 immunostaining in radial glial cells in brain and spinal cord and in skeletal muscle. In glial cells cultures, the RC2 antibody recognizes an epitope located on the glial cytoskeleton and identified as an intermediate filament associated protein (IFAP) at the ultrastructural level. RC2 immunostaining in those cells is strongly dependent on the presence of a serum-derived activity. Serum-removal causes a decrease of the staining while adding serum back to the cells induces reexpression of RC2 immunoreactivity. By Western blotting, we find that in intermediate filament (IF) preparations obtained from cultured cerebellar glia, the RC2 antibody recognizes a 295-kDa protein whose expression is also dependent on the presence of serum in culture medium. In developing muscle cells, RC2 immunostaining is observed from the myoblast stage and disappears after complete myotube fusion. Both in vivo and in vitro, staining is first seen as a loose capping around myoblasts nuclei and progressively concentrates into Z-disks in association with the muscle IF protein desmin. The RC2 antibody also recognizes a 295-kDa protein band in muscle tissue protein extracts. Thus, the RC2 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated cytoskeletal protein that is expressed, like other previously identified IFAPs, by cells of the glial and myogenic lineages and whose expression in vitro seems to be controlled by a signaling mechanism known to modulate astroglial morphology. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Seasonal changes in isoform composition of giant proteins of thick and thin filaments and titin (connectin) phosphorylation level in striated muscles of bears (Ursidae, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Salmov, N N; Vikhlyantsev, I M; Ulanova, A D; Gritsyna, Yu V; Bobylev, A G; Saveljev, A P; Makariushchenko, V V; Maksudov, G Yu; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2015-03-01

    Seasonal changes in the isoform composition of thick and thin filament proteins (titin, myosin heavy chains (MyHCs), nebulin), as well as in the phosphorylation level of titin in striated muscles of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and hibernating Himalayan black bear (Ursus thibetanus ussuricus) were studied. We found that the changes that lead to skeletal muscle atrophy in bears during hibernation are not accompanied by a decrease in the content of nebulin and intact titin-1 (T1) isoforms. However, a decrease (2.1-3.4-fold) in the content of T2 fragments of titin was observed in bear skeletal muscles (m. gastrocnemius, m. longissimus dorsi, m. biceps) during hibernation. The content of the stiffer N2B titin isoform was observed to increase relative to the content of its more compliant N2BA isoform in the left ventricles of hibernating bears. At the same time, in spite of the absence of decrease in the total content of T1 in the myocardium of hibernating brown bear, the content of T2 fragments decreased ~1.6-fold. The level of titin phosphorylation only slightly increased in the cardiac muscle of hibernating brown bear. In the skeletal muscles of brown bear, the level of titin phosphorylation did not vary between seasons. However, changes in the composition of MyHCs aimed at increasing the content of slow (I) and decreasing the content of fast (IIa) isoforms of this protein during hibernation of brown bear were detected. Content of MyHCs I and IIa in the skeletal muscles of hibernating Himalayan black bear corresponded to that in the skeletal muscles of hibernating brown bear.

  11. Cytoskeletal remodeling in differentiated vascular smooth muscle is actin isoform dependent and stimulus dependent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Gunst, Susan J; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton plays an essential role in the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. It has been suggested that actin remodeling may also play an important functional role in nonmigrating, nonproliferating differentiated vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). In the present study, we show that contractile agonists increase the net polymerization of actin in dVSM, as measured by the differential ultracentrifugation of vascular smooth muscle tissue and the costaining of single freshly dissociated cells with fluorescent probes specific for globular and filamentous actin. Furthermore, induced alterations of the actin polymerization state, as well as actin decoy peptides, inhibit contractility in a stimulus-dependent manner. Latrunculin pretreatment or actin decoy peptides significantly inhibit contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha-agonist, but these procedures have no effect on contractions induced by KCl. Aorta dVSM expresses alpha-smooth muscle actin, beta-actin, nonmuscle gamma-actin, and smooth muscle gamma-actin. The incorporation of isoform-specific cell-permeant synthetic actin decoy peptides, as well as isoform-specific probing of cell fractions and two-dimensional gels, demonstrates that actin remodeling during alpha-agonist contractions involves the remodeling of primarily gamma-actin and, to a lesser extent, beta-actin. Taken together, these results show that net isoform- and agonist-dependent increases in actin polymerization regulate vascular contractility.

  12. Structural changes in the myosin filament and cross-bridges during active force development in single intact frog muscle fibres: stiffness and X-ray diffraction measurements.

    PubMed

    Brunello, E; Bianco, P; Piazzesi, G; Linari, M; Reconditi, M; Panine, P; Narayanan, T; Helsby, W I; Irving, M; Lombardi, V

    2006-12-15

    Structural and mechanical changes occurring in the myosin filament and myosin head domains during the development of the isometric tetanus have been investigated in intact frog muscle fibres at 4 degrees C and 2.15 microm sarcomere length, using sarcomere level mechanics and X-ray diffraction at beamline ID2 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). The time courses of changes in both the M3 and M6 myosin-based reflections were recorded with 5 ms frames using the gas-filled RAPID detector (MicroGap Technology). Following the end of the latent period (11 ms after the start of stimulation), force increases to the tetanus plateau value (T(0)) with a half-time of 40 ms, and the spacings of the M3 and M6 reflections (S(M3) and S(M6)) increase by 1.5% from their resting values, with time courses that lead that of force by approximately 10 and approximately 20 ms, respectively. These temporal relations are maintained when the increase of force is delayed by approximately 10 ms by imposing, from 5 ms after the first stimulus, 50 nm (half-sarcomere)(-1) shortening at the velocity (V(0)) that maintains zero force. Shortening at V(0) transiently reduces S(M3) following the latent period and delays the subsequent increase in S(M3), but only delays the S(M6) increase without a transient decrease. Shortening at V(0) imposed at the tetanus plateau causes an abrupt reduction of the intensity of the M3 reflection (I(M3)), whereas the intensity of the M6 reflection (I(M6)) is only slightly reduced. The changes in half-sarcomere stiffness indicate that the isometric force at each time point is proportional to the number of myosin heads bound to actin. The different sensitivities of the intensity and spacing of the M3 and M6 reflections to the mechanical responses support the view that the M3 reflection in active muscle originates mainly from the myosin heads attached to the actin filament and the M6 reflection originates mainly from a fixed structure in the

  13. The effect of thin filament activation on the attachment of weak binding cross-bridges: A two-dimensional x-ray diffraction study on single muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, T; Xu, S; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1999-01-01

    To study possible structural changes in weak cross-bridge attachment to actin upon activation of the thin filament, two-dimensional (2D) x-ray diffraction patterns of skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle were recorded at low and high calcium concentration in the presence of saturating concentrations of MgATPgammaS, a nucleotide analog for weak binding states. We also studied 2D x-ray diffraction patterns recorded under relaxing conditions at an ionic strength above and below 50 mM, because it had been proposed from solution studies that reducing ionic strength below 50 mM also induces activation of the thin filament. For this project a novel preparation had to be established that allows recording of 2D x-ray diffraction patterns from single muscle fibers instead of natural fiber bundles. This was required to minimize substrate depletion or product accumulation within the fibers. When the calcium concentration was raised, the diffraction patterns recorded with MgATPgammaS revealed small changes in meridional reflections and layer line intensities that could be attributed in part to the effects of calcium binding to the thin filament (increase in I380, decrease in first actin layer line intensity, increase in I59) and in part to small structural changes of weakly attached cross-bridges (e.g., increase in I143 and I72). Calcium-induced small-scale structural rearrangements of cross-bridges weakly attached to actin in the presence of MgATPgammaS are consistent with our previous observation of reduced rate constants for attachment and detachment of cross-bridges with MgATPgammaS at high calcium. Yet, no evidence was found that weakly attached cross-bridges change their mode of attachment toward a stereospecific conformation when the actin filament is activated by adding calcium. Similarly, reducing ionic strength to less than 50 mM does not induce a transition from nonstereospecific to stereospecific attachment. PMID:10049330

  14. Mutation-Specific Effects on Thin Filament Length in Thin Filament Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    de Winter, Josine M.; Joureau, Barbara; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kiss, Balázs; Yuen, Michaela; Gupta, Vandana A.; Pappas, Christopher T.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Edvardson, Simon; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma B.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bönnemann, C. G.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Beggs, Alan H.; Granzier, Henk; Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thin filament myopathies are among the most common nondystrophic congenital muscular disorders, and are caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are associated with the skeletal muscle thin filament. Mechanisms underlying muscle weakness are poorly understood, but might involve the length of the thin filament, an important determinant of force generation. Methods We investigated the sarcomere length-dependence of force, a functional assay that provides insights into the contractile strength of muscle fibers as well as the length of the thin filaments, in muscle fibers from 51 patients with thin filament myopathy caused by mutations in NEB, ACTA1, TPM2, TPM3, TNNT1, KBTBD13, KLHL40, and KLHL41. Results Lower force generation was observed in muscle fibers from patients of all genotypes. In a subset of patients who harbor mutations in NEB and ACTA1, the lower force was associated with downward shifted force–sarcomere length relations, indicative of shorter thin filaments. Confocal microscopy confirmed shorter thin filaments in muscle fibers of these patients. A conditional Neb knockout mouse model, which recapitulates thin filament myopathy, revealed a compensatory mechanism; the lower force generation that was associated with shorter thin filaments was compensated for by increasing the number of sarcomeres in series. This allowed muscle fibers to operate at a shorter sarcomere length and maintain optimal thin–thick filament overlap. Interpretation These findings might provide a novel direction for the development of therapeutic strategies for thin filament myopathy patients with shortened thin filament lengths. PMID:27074222

  15. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  16. Ca(2+)- and S1-induced movement of troponin T on reconstituted skeletal muscle thin filaments observed by fluorescence energy transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Chieko; Maeda, Kayo; Maéda, Yuichiro; Miki, Masao

    2002-07-01

    Troponin T (TnT) is an essential component of troponin (Tn) for the Ca(2+)-regulation of vertebrate striated muscle contraction. TnT consists of an extended NH(2)-terminal domain that interacts with tropomyosin (Tm) and a globular COOH-terminal domain that interacts with Tm, troponin I (TnI), and troponin C (TnC). We have generated two mutants of a rabbit skeletal beta-TnT 25-kDa fragment (59-266) that have a unique cysteine at position 60 (N-terminal region) or 250 (C-terminal region). To understand the spatial rearrangement of TnT on the thin filament in response to Ca(2+) binding to TnC, we measured distances from Cys-60 and Cys-250 of TnT to Gln-41 and Cys-374 of F-actin on the reconstituted thin filament by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The distances from Cys-60 and Cys-250 of TnT to Gln-41 of F-actin were 39.5 and 30.0 A, respectively in the absence of Ca(2+), and increased by 2.6 and 5.8 A, respectively upon binding of Ca(2+) to TnC. The rigor binding of myosin subfragment 1 (S1) further increased these distances by 4 and 5 A respectively, when the thin filaments were fully decorated with S1. This indicates that not only the C-terminal but also the N-terminal region of TnT showed the Ca(2+)- and S1-induced movement, and the C-terminal region moved more than N-terminal region. In the absence of Ca(2+), the rigor S1 binding also increased the distances to the same extent as the presence of Ca(2+) when the thin filaments were fully decorated with S1. The addition of ATP completely reversed the changes in FRET induced by rigor S1 binding both in the presence and absence of Ca(2+). However, plots of the extent of S1-induced conformational change vs. molar ratio of S1 to actin showed hyperbolic curve in the presence of Ca(2+) but sigmoidal curve in the absence of Ca(2+). FRET measurement of the distances from Cys-60 and Cys-250 of TnT to Cys-374 of actin showed almost the same results as the case of Gln-41 of actin. The present FRET

  17. Role of Active Contraction and Tropomodulins in Regulating Actin Filament Length and Sarcomere Structure in Developing Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mazelet, Lise; Parker, Matthew O.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Ashworth, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Whilst it is recognized that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1ts25) which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors) in the muscle and pharmacological immobilization of embryos with a reversible anesthetic (Tricaine), allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anesthetized fish) and recovery of movement (reversal of anesthetic treatment). The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17 and 24 hours post-fertilization, hpf) on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localization of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 & 4 (Tmod) in fish aged from 17 hpf until 42 hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post-fertilization (dpf). Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf) resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralyzed fish by 42 hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organization is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localization of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric position

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to desmin: evidence for stage-dependent intermediate filament immunoreactivity during cardiac and skeletal muscle development.

    PubMed

    Fischman, D A; Danto, S I

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with desmin (D3 and D76) have been generated and their specificities validated by immunoblots, RIAs, and immunocytochemistry. No cross-reaction with other IFPs has been observed. The McAbs recognized different epitopes but both reside in the amino-terminal rod domain of desmin. Whereas McAb D3 produces a staining pattern characteristic of desmin throughout the development of cardiac and skeletal muscles, McAb D76 was selectively unreactive with certain regions of early (three days in ovo) embryonic cardiac anlage, with cultured cardiac myocytes derived from 7-day-old embryos, and with skeletal myotubes in early stages of myogenesis in vitro. Positive reactivity of D76 was seen at stages of myofibrillogenesis when the sarcomeres assume lateral alignment. Evidence was presented that differential reactivity of D76 did not result from the biosynthesis of a new desmin isoform or the post-translational modification of an existing protein. We suggest that the appearance of D76 immunoreactivity during striated muscle development represents an unmasking of the epitope by some IF-associated protein. Since this transition during skeletal muscle differentiation occurs during lateral alignment of the myofibrils, this antibody may serve as a useful probe for exploring this reorganization of the contractile apparatus during myogenesis and muscle regeneration.

  19. Overexpression of Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response and Autophagic Turnover of Thick Filament-associated Proteins in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kwartler, Callie S.; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V.; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A.; Epstein, Henry F.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications. PMID:24711452

  20. Overexpression of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain leads to activation of the unfolded protein response and autophagic turnover of thick filament-associated proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kwartler, Callie S; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A; Epstein, Henry F; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2014-05-16

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Role of stromal myofibroblasts in invasive breast cancer: stromal expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin correlates with worse clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masako; Ogawa, Tomoko; Zhang, Xinhui; Hanamura, Noriko; Kashikura, Yumi; Takamura, Mitsuyuki; Yoneda, Misao; Shiraishi, Taizo

    2012-04-01

    Recently, the desmoplastic reaction has been implicated as having an important function in epithelial solid tumor biology. There have been no reports showing the relativity of invasive breast cancer and the desmoplastic reaction by a quantitative analysis of the myofibroblasts that were an important player in the desmoplastic reaction. The purpose of this study was to immunohistochemically investigate the correlation between the desmoplastic reaction and the clinicopathology of invasive breast cancer. The study included 60 patients with a known prognosis of invasive breast cancer. We quantified the expression of α-SMA as a marker of myofibroblasts in the invasive breast cancer. After staining samples for α-SMA, their expression was extracted and quantified as a relative percentage by computer-assisted image analysis. There was relatively wide variation in the expression of α-SMA with the percentage of the area from 0.68 to 28.15% (mean 8.48 ± 5.40%). The metastasis group showed significantly higher α-SMA expression compared with the no metastasis group (p < 0.001). When the patients were divided into two groups according to their α-SMA expression using a cutoff point at the mean value of 8.48%, the high α-SMA group had a significantly poorer overall survival rate (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that α-SMA and lymph node metastasis were identified as independent predictive factors of metastasis. Myofibroblasts represent an important prognostic factor for invasive growth that is translated into a poor clinical prognosis for patients with invasive breast cancer.

  2. Filament Breakaway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-18

    A dark, elongated filament rose up and broke to the lower left and out from the sun seen by NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory, Apr.9-10, 2017. Filaments are cooler clouds of plasma tethered above the sun surface by magnetic forces. They are notoriously unstable and tend not to last more than a few days before they collapse into the sun or break away into space. A video, taken in extreme ultraviolet light, covers about nine hours of activity. Videos are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21592

  3. Both N-terminal myosin-binding and C-terminal actin-binding sites on smooth muscle caldesmon are required for caldesmon-mediated inhibition of actin filament velocity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Jiang, H; Yang, Z Q; Chacko, S

    1997-10-28

    It has been suggested that the tethering caused by binding of the N-terminal region of smooth muscle caldesmon (CaD) to myosin and its C-terminal region to actin contributes to the inhibition of actin-filament movement over myosin heads in an in vitro motility assay. However, direct evidence for this assumption has been lacking. In this study, analysis of baculovirus-generated N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants of chicken-gizzard CaD revealed that the major myosin-binding site on the CaD molecule resides in a 30-amino acid stretch between residues 24 and 53, based on the very low level of binding of CaDDelta24-53 lacking the residues 24-53 to myosin compared with the level of binding of CaDDelta54-85 missing the adjacent residues 54-85 or of the full-length CaD. As expected, deletion of the region between residues 24 and 53 or between residues 54 and 85 had no effect on either actin-binding or inhibition of actomyosin ATPase activity. Deletion of residues 24-53 nearly abolished the ability of CaD to inhibit actin filament velocity in the in vitro motility experiments, whereas CaDDelta54-85 strongly inhibited actin filament velocity in a manner similar to that of full-length CaD. Moreover, CaD1-597, which lacks the major actin-binding site(s), did not inhibit actin-filament velocity despite the presence of the major myosin-binding site. These data provide direct evidence for the inhibition of actin filament velocity in the in vitro motility assay caused by the tethering of myosin to actin through binding of both the CaD N-terminal region to myosin and the C-terminal region to actin.

  4. Filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, A. M.

    The major aspects of filament winding are discussed, emphasizing basic reinforcement and matrix materials, winding procedures, process controls, and cured composite properties. Fiberglass (E-glass and S-glass strengths are 500,000 and 665,000 psi respectively) and polyester resins are the principal reinforcement constituent materials. Graphite and aramid reinforcements are being used more frequently, primarily for the more critical pressure vessels. Matrix systems are most commonly based on epoxy as it has superior mechanical properties, fatigue behavior, and heat resistance as compard with polyesters. A fiberglass overwrap of PVC pipe is an anticipated development in on-site winding and combination winding, and the compression molding of filament wound lay-ups will be investigated. The fabrication of weight-sensitive structural components may be achieved by using such moldings.

  5. Filamentous Fungi.

    PubMed

    Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V; Kendall, Brian A; Griffin, Allen T; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous mycoses are often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment are essential for good clinical outcomes in immunocompromised patients. The host immune response plays an essential role in determining the course of exposure to potential fungal pathogens. Depending on the effectiveness of immune response and the burden of organism exposure, fungi can either be cleared or infection can occur and progress to a potentially fatal invasive disease. Nonspecific cellular immunity (i.e., neutrophils, natural killer [NK] cells, and macrophages) combined with T-cell responses are the main immunologic mechanisms of protection. The most common potential mold pathogens include certain hyaline hyphomycetes, endemic fungi, the Mucorales, and some dematiaceous fungi. Laboratory diagnostics aimed at detecting and differentiating these organisms are crucial to helping clinicians make informed decisions about treatment. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the medically important fungal pathogens, as well as to discuss the patient characteristics, antifungal-therapy considerations, and laboratory tests used in current clinical practice for the immunocompromised host.

  6. Thin filament activation probed by fluorescence of N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-labeled troponin I incorporated into skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle.

    PubMed

    Brenner, B; Kraft, T; Yu, L C; Chalovich, J M

    1999-11-01

    A method is described for the exchange of native troponin of single rabbit psoas muscle fibers for externally applied troponin complexes without detectable impairment of functional properties of the skinned fibers. This approach is used to exchange native troponin for rabbit skeletal troponin with a fluorescent label (N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole, IANBD) on Cys(133) of the troponin I subunit. IANBD-labeled troponin I has previously been used in solution studies as an indicator for the state of activation of reconstituted actin filaments (. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 77:7209-7213). In the skinned fibers, the fluorescence of this probe is unaffected when cross-bridges in their weak binding states attach to actin filaments but decreases either upon the addition of Ca(2+) or when cross-bridges in their strong binding states attach to actin. Maximum reduction is observed when Ca(2+) is raised to saturating concentrations. Additional attachment of cross-bridges in strong binding states gives no further reduction of fluorescence. Attachment of cross-bridges in strong binding states alone (low Ca(2+) concentration) gives only about half of the maximum reduction seen with the addition of calcium. This illustrates that fluorescence of IANBD-labeled troponin I can be used to evaluate thin filament activation, as previously introduced for solution studies. In addition, at nonsaturating Ca(2+) concentrations IANBD fluorescence can be used for straightforward classification of states of the myosin head as weak binding (nonactivating) and strong binding (activating), irrespective of ionic strength or other experimental conditions. Furthermore, the approach presented here not only can be used as a means of exchanging native skeletal troponin and its subunits for a variety of fluorescently labeled or mutant troponin subunits, but also allows the exchange of native skeletal troponin for cardiac troponin.

  7. Cross-bridge attachment during high-speed active shortening of skinned fibers of the rabbit psoas muscle: implications for cross-bridge action during maximum velocity of filament sliding.

    PubMed

    Stehle, R; Brenner, B

    2000-03-01

    To characterize the kinetics of cross-bridge attachment to actin during unloaded contraction (maximum velocity of filament sliding), ramp-shaped stretches with different stretch-velocities (2-40,000 nm per half-sarcomere per s) were applied to actively contracting skinned fibers of the rabbit psoas muscle. Apparent fiber stiffness observed during such stretches was plotted versus the speed of the imposed stretch (stiffness-speed relation) to derive the rate constants for cross-bridge dissociation from actin. The stiffness-speed relation obtained for unloaded shortening conditions was shifted by about two orders of magnitude to faster stretch velocities compared to isometric conditions and was almost identical to the stiffness-speed relation observed in the presence of MgATPgammaS at high Ca(2+) concentrations, i.e., under conditions where cross-bridges are weakly attached to the fully Ca(2+) activated thin filaments. These data together with several control experiments suggest that, in contrast to previous assumptions, most of the fiber stiffness observed during high-speed shortening results from weak cross-bridge attachment to actin. The fraction of strongly attached cross-bridges during unloaded shortening appears to be as low as some 1-5% of the fraction present during isometric contraction. This is about an order of magnitude less than previous estimates in which contribution of weak cross-bridge attachment to observed fiber stiffness was not considered. Our findings imply that 1) the interaction distance of strongly attached cross-bridges during high-speed shortening is well within the range consistent with conventional cross-bridge models, i.e., that no repetitive power strokes need to be assumed, and 2) that a significant part of the negative forces that limit the maximum speed of filament sliding might originate from weak cross-bridge interactions with actin.

  8. Direct tests of muscle cross-bridge theories: predictions of a Brownian dumbbell model for position-dependent cross-bridge lifetimes and step sizes with an optically trapped actin filament.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A

    1998-01-01

    Force and displacement events from a single myosin molecule interacting with an actin filament suspended between optically trapped beads (Finer, J. T., R. M. Simmons, and J. A. Spudich. 1994. Nature. 368:113-119) can be interpreted in terms of a generalized cross-bridge model that includes the effects of Brownian forces on the beads. Steady-state distributions of force and displacement can be obtained directly from a generalized Smoluchowski equation for Brownian motion of the actin-bead "dumbbell," and time series from Monte Carlo simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation. When the frequency spectrum of Brownian motion extends beyond cross-bridge transition rates, the inverse mean lifetimes of force/displacement pulses are given by cross-bridge rate constants averaged over a Boltzmann distribution of Brownian noise. These averaged rate constants reflect the strain-dependence of the rate constants for the stationary filament, most faithfully at high trap stiffness. Hence, measurements of the lifetimes and displacements of single events as a function of the resting position of the dumbbell can provide a direct test of different cross-bridge theories of muscle contraction. Quantitative demonstrations are given for Huxley models with 1) faster binding or 2) slower dissociation at positive cross-bridge strain. Predictions for other models can be inferred from the averaging procedure. PMID:9826619

  9. Isoform Composition and Gene Expression of Thick and Thin Filament Proteins in Striated Muscles of Mice after 30-Day Space Flight

    PubMed Central

    Ulanova, Anna; Gritsyna, Yulia; Vikhlyantsev, Ivan; Salmov, Nikolay; Bobylev, Alexander; Abdusalamova, Zarema; Rogachevsky, Vadim; Shenkman, Boris; Podlubnaya, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Changes in isoform composition, gene expression of titin and nebulin, and isoform composition of myosin heavy chains as well as changes in titin phosphorylation level in skeletal (m. gastrocnemius, m. tibialis anterior, and m. psoas) and cardiac muscles of mice were studied after a 30-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft “BION-M” number 1. A muscle fibre-type shift from slow-to-fast and a decrease in the content of titin and nebulin in the skeletal muscles of animals from “Flight” group was found. Using Pro-Q Diamond staining, an ~3-fold increase in the phosphorylation level of titin in m. gastrocnemius of mice from the “Flight” group was detected. The content of titin and its phosphorylation level in the cardiac muscle of mice from “Flight” and “Control” groups did not differ; nevertheless an increase (2.2 times) in titin gene expression in the myocardium of flight animals was found. The observed changes are discussed in the context of their role in the contractile activity of striated muscles of mice under conditions of weightlessness. PMID:25664316

  10. Isoform composition and gene expression of thick and thin filament proteins in striated muscles of mice after 30-day space flight.

    PubMed

    Ulanova, Anna; Gritsyna, Yulia; Vikhlyantsev, Ivan; Salmov, Nikolay; Bobylev, Alexander; Abdusalamova, Zarema; Rogachevsky, Vadim; Shenkman, Boris; Podlubnaya, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Changes in isoform composition, gene expression of titin and nebulin, and isoform composition of myosin heavy chains as well as changes in titin phosphorylation level in skeletal (m. gastrocnemius, m. tibialis anterior, and m. psoas) and cardiac muscles of mice were studied after a 30-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft "BION-M" number 1. A muscle fibre-type shift from slow-to-fast and a decrease in the content of titin and nebulin in the skeletal muscles of animals from "Flight" group was found. Using Pro-Q Diamond staining, an ~3-fold increase in the phosphorylation level of titin in m. gastrocnemius of mice from the "Flight" group was detected. The content of titin and its phosphorylation level in the cardiac muscle of mice from "Flight" and "Control" groups did not differ; nevertheless an increase (2.2 times) in titin gene expression in the myocardium of flight animals was found. The observed changes are discussed in the context of their role in the contractile activity of striated muscles of mice under conditions of weightlessness.

  11. Filamentation in Laser Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Eva; Trines, Raoul; Silva, Luis; Bingham, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Laser filamentation instability is observed in plasma wakefields with sub-critical densities, and in high density inertial fusion plasmas. This leads to non-uniform acceleration or compression respectively. Here, we present simulation results on laser filamentation in plasma wakefields. The 2-D simulations are carried out using the particle-in-cell code Osiris. The filament intensity was found to increase exponentially before saturating. The maximum amplitude to which the highest intensity filament grew for a specific set of parameters was also recorded, and plotted against a corresponding parameter value. Clear, positively correlated linear trends were established between plasma density, transverse wavenumber k, laser pulse amplitude and maximum filament amplitude. Plasma density and maximum filament amplitude also showed a positive correlation, which saturated after a certain plasma density. Pulse duration and interaction length did not affect either filament intensity or transverse k value in a predictable manner. There was no discernible trend between pulse amplitude and filament width.

  12. Collaborative protein filaments.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Debnath; Löwe, Jan

    2015-09-14

    It is now well established that prokaryotic cells assemble diverse proteins into dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that perform essential cellular functions. Although most of the filaments assemble on their own to form higher order structures, growing evidence suggests that there are a number of prokaryotic proteins that polymerise only in the presence of a matrix such as DNA, lipid membrane or even another filament. Matrix-assisted filament systems are frequently nucleotide dependent and cytomotive but rarely considered as part of the bacterial cytoskeleton. Here, we categorise this family of filament-forming systems as collaborative filaments and introduce a simple nomenclature. Collaborative filaments are frequent in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes and are involved in vital cellular processes including chromosome segregation, DNA repair and maintenance, gene silencing and cytokinesis to mention a few. In this review, we highlight common principles underlying collaborative filaments and correlate these with known functions.

  13. Filament Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We have been investigating filament eruptions in recent years. Use filament eruptions as markers of the coronal field evolution. Data from SoHO, Yohkoh, TRACE, Hinode, and other sources. We and others have observed: (1)Filaments often show slow rise, followed by fast rise, (2) Brightenings, preflares, microflares during slow rise (3) Magnetic evolution in hours prior to eruption onset. We investigated What do Hinode and SDO show for filament eruptions?

  14. Myosin filament 3D structure in mammalian cardiac muscle☆

    PubMed Central

    AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Morris, Edward P.; Kensler, Robert W.; Squire, John M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of cardiac myopathies (e.g. familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy) are linked to mutations in cardiac muscle myosin filament proteins, including myosin and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C). To understand the myopathies it is necessary to know the normal 3D structure of these filaments. We have carried out 3D single particle analysis of electron micrograph images of negatively stained isolated myosin filaments from rabbit cardiac muscle. Single filament images were aligned and divided into segments about 2 × 430 Å long, each of which was treated as an independent ‘particle’. The resulting 40 Å resolution 3D reconstruction showed both axial and azimuthal (no radial) myosin head perturbations within the 430 Å repeat, with successive crown rotations of approximately 60°, 60° and 0°, rather than the regular 40° for an unperturbed helix. However, it is shown that the projecting density peaks appear to start at low radius from origins closer to those expected for an unperturbed helical filament, and that the azimuthal perturbation especially increases with radius. The head arrangements in rabbit cardiac myosin filaments are very similar to those in fish skeletal muscle myosin filaments, suggesting a possible general structural theme for myosin filaments in all vertebrate striated muscles (skeletal and cardiac). PMID:18472277

  15. Special issue on filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxin; Milchberg, Howard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2014-05-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on filamentation, to appear in the spring of 2015, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will attempt to give an overview of the present status of this field in order to create synergies and foster future developments. The issue is open to papers on the following issues: Theoretical advances on filamentation. Self-focusing and collapse. Filamentation in various media. Pulse self-compression and ultrafast processes in filaments. Molecular alignment and rotation. Filamentation tailoring. Interaction between filaments. Filament weather and pollution control. Filament induced condensation and precipitation. Terahertz science with filaments. Lasing in filaments. Filament induced molecular excitation and reaction. Electric discharge and plasma. Cross-disciplinary applications. Novel concepts related to these topics are particularly welcome. Please submit your article by 1 October 2014 (expected web publication: spring 2015) using our website http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue. The issue will be edited by Ruxin Li, Howard Milchberg and André Mysyrowicz.

  16. Exercise training prevents skeletal muscle plasma membrane cholesterol accumulation, cortical actin filament loss, and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice fed a western-style high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Ambery, Ashley G; Tackett, Lixuan; Penque, Brent A; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2017-08-01

    Insulin action and glucose disposal are enhanced by exercise, yet the mechanisms involved remain imperfectly understood. While the causes of skeletal muscle insulin resistance also remain poorly understood, new evidence suggest excess plasma membrane (PM) cholesterol may contribute by damaging the cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) structure essential for GLUT4 glucose transporter redistribution to the PM upon insulin stimulation. Here, we investigated whether PM cholesterol toxicity was mitigated by exercise. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on low-fat (LF, 10% kCal) or high-fat (HF, 45% kCal) diets for a total of 8 weeks. During the last 3 weeks of this LF/HF diet intervention, all mice were familiarized with a treadmill for 1 week and then either sham-exercised (0 m/min, 10% grade, 50 min) or exercised (13.5 m/min, 10% grade, 50 min) daily for 2 weeks. HF-feeding induced a significant gain in body mass by 3 weeks. Sham or chronic exercise did not affect food consumption, water intake, or body mass gain. Prior to sham and chronic exercise, "pre-intervention" glucose tolerance tests were performed on all animals and demonstrated that HF-fed mice were glucose intolerant. While sham exercise did not affect glucose tolerance in the LF or HF mice, exercised mice showed an improvement in glucose tolerance. Muscle from sham-exercised HF-fed mice showed a significant increase in PM cholesterol, loss of cortical F-actin, and decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose transport compared to sham-exercised LF-fed mice. These HF-fed skeletal muscle membrane/cytoskeletal abnormalities and insulin resistance were improved in exercised mice. These data reveal a new therapeutic aspect of exercise being regulation of skeletal muscle PM cholesterol homeostasis. Further studies on this mechanism of insulin resistance and the benefits of exercise on its prevention are needed. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The

  17. Smooth muscle differentiation in scleroderma fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sappino, A. P.; Masouyé, I.; Saurat, J. H.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    Using antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin and desmin on paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue sections, the authors demonstrate that fibroblastic cells of localized and systemic scleroderma lesions express features of smooth muscle differentiation. Eleven of eleven skin specimens of systemic sclerosis patients and two of four skin specimens of localized scleroderma displayed the presence of fibroblasts expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin, a cell population that predominated in areas of prominent collagen deposition. A similar fibroblastic phenotype was found in the esophagus, the liver, and the lung specimens obtained from four patients who died of progressive systemic sclerosis. Immunostaining for desmin, performed on adjacent tissue sections, demonstrated that a minority of these fibroblastic cells present in skin and visceral lesions contained this protein. The authors' observations indicate that scleroderma fibroblasts are phenotypically related to the stromal cells previously identified in hypertrophic scars, fibromatoses, and desmoplasia; they might provide novel criteria for the characterization of scleroderma lesions and help to identify the factors responsible for phenotypic modulations in fibroblastic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698026

  18. Large-Scale Patterns of Filament Channels and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Duncan

    2016-07-01

    In this review the properties and large-scale patterns of filament channels and filaments will be considered. Initially, the global formation locations of filament channels and filaments are discussed, along with their hemispheric pattern. Next, observations of the formation of filament channels and filaments are described where two opposing views are considered. Finally, the wide range of models that have been constructed to consider the formation of filament channels and filaments over long time-scales are described, along with the origin of the hemispheric pattern of filaments.

  19. Tensile Properties of Single Desmin Intermediate Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Kreplak, Laurent; Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli

    2008-01-01

    Within muscle fibers, desmin intermediate filaments (IFs) are major constituents of the extrasarcomeric cytoskeleton. However, their contribution to the mechanical properties of myocytes has remained elusive. We present an experimental approach to measure the extensibility and the tensile strength of in vitro reconstituted desmin IFs adsorbed to a solid support. The tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to push on single filaments perpendicular to the filament axis. The torque of the AFM cantilever was monitored during the pushing events to yield an estimate of the lateral force necessary to bend and stretch the filaments. Desmin IFs were stretched up to 3.4-fold with a maximum force of ∼3.5 nN. Fully stretched filaments exhibited a much smaller diameter than did native IFs, i.e., ∼3.5 nm compared to 12.6 nm, both by AFM and electron microscopy. Moreover, we combined the morphological and lateral force data to compute an average stress-strain curve for a single desmin filament. The main features were a pronounced strain-hardening regime above 50% extension and a tensile strength of at least 240 MPa. Because of these nonlinear tensile properties, desmin IFs may dissipate mechanical energy and serve as a physical link between successive sarcomeres during large deformation. PMID:18178641

  20. Tungsten Filament Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  1. Tungsten filament fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  2. Tungsten Filament Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  3. Nuclear Lamins: Thin Filaments with Major Functions.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Rebecca; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Medalia, Ohad

    2017-09-08

    The nuclear lamina is a nuclear peripheral meshwork that is mainly composed of nuclear lamins, although a small fraction of lamins also localizes throughout the nucleoplasm. Lamins are classified as type V intermediate filament (IF) proteins. Mutations in lamin genes cause at least 15 distinct human diseases, collectively termed laminopathies, including muscle, metabolic, and neuronal diseases, and can cause accelerated aging. Most of these mutations are in the LMNA gene encoding A-type lamins. A growing number of nuclear proteins are known to bind lamins and are implicated in both nuclear and cytoskeletal organization, mechanical stability, chromatin organization, signaling, gene regulation, genome stability, and cell differentiation. Recent studies reveal the organization of the lamin filament meshwork in somatic cells where they assemble as tetramers in cross-section of the filaments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Snake Filament Eruption

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A very long solar filament that had been snaking around the Sun erupted on Dec. 6, 2010 with a flourish. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) caught the action in dramatic detail in extreme ultr...

  5. Fundamentals of Filament Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-19

    Report) 4.1.2 Single filament propagation through aerosol clouds . The work reported the final year on this topic refers principally to studies that...examine the propagation of filaments through clouds . With the support of a DURIP from AFOSR, we have designed, constructed, assembled and tested a...5 m long cloud chamber capable of creating clouds of aerosol of given diameter and density, with control over temperature and background pressure

  6. Filament-Filament Switching Can Be Regulated by Separation Between Filaments Together with Cargo Motor Number

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    How intracellular transport controls the probability that cargos switch at intersections between filaments is not well understood. In one hypothesis some motors on the cargo attach to one filament while others attach to the intersecting filament, and the ensuing tug-of-war determines which filament is chosen. We investigate this hypothesis using 3D computer simulations, and discover that switching at intersections increases with the number of motors on the cargo, but is not strongly dependent on motor number when the filaments touch. Thus, simply controlling the number of active motors on the cargo cannot account for in vivo observations that found reduced switching with increasing motor number, suggesting additional mechanisms of regulation. We use simulations to show that one possible way to regulate switching is by simultaneously adjusting the separation between planes containing the crossing filaments and the total number of active motors on the cargo. Heretofore, the effect of filament-filament separation on switching has been unexplored. We find that the switching probability decreases with increasing filament separation. This effect is particularly strong for cargos with only a modest number of motors. As the filament separation increases past the maximum head-to-head distance of the motor, individual motors walking along a filament will be unable to reach the intersecting filament. Thus, any switching requires that other motors on the cargo attach to the intersecting filament and haul the cargo along it, while motor(s) engaged on the original filament detach. Further, if the filament separation is large enough, the cargo can have difficulty proceeding along the initial filament because the engaged motors can walk underneath the intersecting filament, but the cargo itself cannot fit between the filaments. Thus, the cargo either detaches entirely from the original filament, or must dip to the side of the initial filament and then pass below the crossing

  7. Antifibrotic effects of suramin in injured skeletal muscle after laceration.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Sheng; Li, Yong; Foster, William; Horaguchi, Takashi; Somogyi, George; Fu, Freddie H; Huard, Johnny

    2003-08-01

    Muscle injuries are very common in traumatology and sports medicine. Although muscle tissue can regenerate postinjury, the healing process is slow and often incomplete; complete recovery after skeletal muscle injury is hindered by fibrosis. Our studies have shown that decreased fibrosis could improve muscle healing. Suramin has been found to inhibit transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 expression by competitively binding to the growth factor receptor. We conducted a series of tests to determine the antifibrotic effects of suramin on muscle laceration injuries. Our results demonstrate that suramin (50 microg/ml) can effectively decrease fibroblast proliferation and fibrotic-protein expression (alpha-smooth muscle actin) in vitro. In vivo, direct injection of suramin (2.5 mg) into injured murine muscle resulted in effective inhibition of muscle fibrosis and enhanced muscle regeneration, which led to efficient functional muscle recovery. These results support our hypothesis that prevention of fibrosis could enhance muscle regeneration, thereby facilitating more efficient muscle healing. This study could significantly contribute to the development of strategies to promote efficient muscle healing and functional recovery.

  8. Characterization of HI Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubar, Emily; Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2017-01-01

    We characterized the properties of dramatic interstellar HI filaments to learn more about the dynamics and structure of such features. Using Gauss fitting software, we searched the Effelsburg-Bonn HI Survey data for indications of a simple twisting (toroidal) motion across these filaments. Instead, we found that the structure was more complicated than expected. Apparent angular widths of several filaments were measured using the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI), Bonn, and Leident/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) surveys. Based on filament widths and other parameters, we conclude that magnetism is the dominant force opposing internal motion and maintaining the structure of these filaments. The apparent width as a function of beam width closely follows a relationship reported in 1993 for HI features in general. They tend to subtend an angle two times the beam width, suggesting that the features remain unresolved.The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968), and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana, and the Universities Space Research Association. The Arecibo Observatory REU is funded under grant AST-1559849 to Universidad Metropolitana.

  9. Two Long Filaments

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-08

    The two most noteworthy features on the sun this week were a pair of elongated filaments (Sept. 8, 2016). The central one was twisted into the shape of an elaborate arch at the center of the sun (yellow arrows). If this were straightened out, it would extend just about across the entire sun, almost a million miles (1.6 million Km). The other, smaller filament, (white arrows) if made straight, might reach about half that distance. Still, pretty impressive. Filaments are elongated strands of plasma suspended above the sun by magnetic forces. They are notoriously unstable and often break apart within a few days. The image was made by combining three images in different wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16996

  10. Filamentous Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Badham, Matthew D.; Rossman, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a pathogen of global medical importance causing significant health and socio-economic costs every year. Influenza virus is an unusual pathogen in that it is pleomorphic, capable of forming virions ranging in shape from spherical to filamentous. Despite decades of research on the influenza virus, much remains unknown about the formation of filamentous influenza viruses and their role in the viral replication cycle. Here, we discuss what is known about influenza virus assembly and budding, focusing on the viral and host factors that are involved in the determination of viral morphology. Whilst the biological function of the filamentous morphology remains unknown, recent results suggest a role in facilitating viral spread in vivo. We discuss these results and speculate on the consequences of viral morphology during influenza virus infection of the human respiratory tract. PMID:28042529

  11. Filaments in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  12. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  13. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

  14. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Star-Bursting Filament

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    ESA Herschel Space Observatory has discovered a giant, galaxy-packed filament ablaze with billions of new stars. The filament connects two clusters of galaxies that, along with a third cluster, will smash together in several billion years.

  16. Helical reconstruction of frozen-hydrated scallop myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Vibert, P

    1992-02-05

    Native myosin filaments from scallop striated muscle that have been rapidly frozen in relaxing solutions appear to be well preserved in vitreous ice. Electron micrographs of samples at -177 degrees C were recorded with an electron dose of 10 e/A2 at 1.5 microns defocus. After filament images were straightened by spline-fitting, several transforms showed well-defined layer-lines arising from the helical structure of the filament. A set of 17 near-meridional layer-lines has been collected and corrected for background and for phase and amplitude contrast functions. Preliminary helical reconstructions from this still incomplete data set reveal aspects of structure that were not apparent from earlier analysis of negatively stained filaments from scallop muscle. Individual pear-shaped myosin heads now appear to be well resolved from each other and from the filament backbone. The two heads of each myosin molecule appear to be splayed apart axially. The reconstructions also reveal that the filament backbone has a polygonal shape in cross-section, and that it appears to contain seven peripherally located subfilaments.

  17. Desmin filaments studied by quasi-elastic light scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Hohenadl, M; Storz, T; Kirpal, H; Kroy, K; Merkel, R

    1999-01-01

    We studied polymers of desmin, a muscle-specific type III intermediate filament protein, using quasi-elastic light scattering. Desmin was purified from chicken gizzard. Polymerization was induced either by 2 mM MgCl(2) or 150 mM NaCl. The polymer solutions were in the semidilute regime. We concluded that the persistence length of the filaments is between 0.1 and 1 microm. In all cases, we found a hydrodynamic diameter of desmin filaments of 16-18 nm. The filament dynamics exhibits a characteristic frequency in the sense that correlation functions measured on one sample but at different scattering vectors collapse onto a single master curve when time is normalized by the experimentally determined initial decay rate. PMID:10512839

  18. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Ishiwata, S

    1998-09-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). That is, thin filaments in glycerinated cardiac muscle fibers were selectively removed by treatment with gelsolin. Then, by adding exogenous actin to these thin filament-free cardiac muscle fibers under polymerizing conditions, actin filaments were reconstituted. The actin filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers generated active tension in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner because of the lack of regulatory proteins. Herein we have developed a new solvent condition under which SPOC occurs, even in actin filament-reconstituted fibers: the coexistence of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), a reversible inhibitor of actomyosin interactions, with MgATP, MgADP and Pi. The role of BDM in the mechanism of SPOC in the actin filament-reconstituted fibers was analogous to that of the inhibitory function of the tropomyosin-troponin complex (-Ca2+) in the control fibers. The present results suggest that SPOC is a phenomenon that is intrinsic to the actomyosin motor itself.

  19. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, H; Ishiwata, S

    1998-01-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). That is, thin filaments in glycerinated cardiac muscle fibers were selectively removed by treatment with gelsolin. Then, by adding exogenous actin to these thin filament-free cardiac muscle fibers under polymerizing conditions, actin filaments were reconstituted. The actin filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers generated active tension in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner because of the lack of regulatory proteins. Herein we have developed a new solvent condition under which SPOC occurs, even in actin filament-reconstituted fibers: the coexistence of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), a reversible inhibitor of actomyosin interactions, with MgATP, MgADP and Pi. The role of BDM in the mechanism of SPOC in the actin filament-reconstituted fibers was analogous to that of the inhibitory function of the tropomyosin-troponin complex (-Ca2+) in the control fibers. The present results suggest that SPOC is a phenomenon that is intrinsic to the actomyosin motor itself. PMID:9726945

  20. Spaceflight results in increase of thick filament but not thin filament proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, R.; Takaya, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Higashibata, A.; Ishioka, N.; Kagawa, H.

    We have investigated the effect of microgravity during spaceflight on body-wall muscle fiber size and muscle proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans. Both mutant and wild-type strains were subjected to 10 days of microgravity during spaceflight and compared to ground control groups. No significant change in muscle fiber size or quantity of the protein was observed in wild-type worms; where as atrophy of body-wall muscle and an increase in thick filament proteins were observed in the paramyosin mutant unc-15(e73) animals after spaceflight. We conclude that the mutant with abnormal muscle responded to microgravity by increasing the total amount of muscle protein in order to compensate for the loss of muscle function.

  1. Electrical contact resistance in filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Zhou, Zhengping; Zhou, Wang-Min

    2012-05-01

    Electrical contact resistance (ECR) influences the electrochemical performance of porous electrodes made of stacked discrete materials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, etc.) for use in supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries. This study establishes a simple elasticity-conductivity model for the ECR of filaments in adhesive contact. The elastic deformation and size of electrical contact zone of the filaments are determined by using an adhesive contact model of filaments, and the ECR of adhesive filaments is obtained in explicit form. Dependencies of the ECR upon the filament geometries, surface energy, and elasticity are examined.

  2. Overextended sarcomeres regain filament overlap following stretch.

    PubMed

    Panchangam, Appaji; Herzog, Walter

    2012-09-21

    Sarcomere overextension has been widely implicated in stretch-induced muscle injury. Yet, sarcomere overextensions are typically inferred based on indirect evidence obtained in muscle and fibre preparations, where individual sarcomeres cannot be observed during dynamic contractions. Therefore, it remains unclear whether sarcomere overextensions are permanent following injury-inducing stretch-shortening cycles, and thus, if they can explain stretch-induced force loss. We tested the hypothesis that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in isolated myofibrils from rabbit psoas muscles. Maximally activated myofibrils (n=13) were stretched from an average sarcomere length of 2.6±0.04μm by 0.9μm sarcomere(-1) at a speed of 0.1μm sarcomere(-1)s(-1) and immediately returned to the starting lengths at the same speed (sarcomere strain=34.1±2.3%). Myofibrils were then allowed to contract isometrically at the starting lengths (2.6μm) for ∼30s before relaxing. Force and individual sarcomere lengths were measured continuously. Out of the 182 sarcomeres, 35 sarcomeres were overextended at the peak of stretch, out of which 26 regained filament overlap in the shortening phase while 9 (∼5%) remained overextended. About 35% of the sarcomeres with initial lengths on the descending limb of the force-length relationship and ∼2% of the sarcomeres with shorter initial lengths were overextended. These findings provide first ever direct evidence that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in the shortening phase following stretch, and that the likelihood of overextension is higher for sarcomeres residing initially on the descending limb.

  3. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  4. Filament heater current modulation for increased filament lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.; Williams, H.E. III

    1996-06-01

    The surface conversion H-minus ion source employs two 60 mil tungsten filaments which are approximately 17 centimeters in length. These filaments are heated to approximately 2,800 degrees centigrade by 95--100 amperes of DC heater current. The arc is struck at a 120 hertz rate, for 800 microseconds and is generally run at 30 amperes peak current. Although sputtering is considered a contributing factor in the demise of the filament, evaporation is of greater concern. If the peak arc current can be maintained with less average heater current, the filament evaporation rate for this arc current will diminish. In the vacuum of an ion source, the authors expect the filaments to retain much of their heat throughout a 1 millisecond (12% duty) loss of heater current. A circuit to eliminate 100 ampere heater currents from filaments during the arc pulse was developed. The magnetic field due to the 100 ampere current tends to hold electrons to the filament, decreasing the arc current. By eliminating this magnetic field, the arc should be more efficient, allowing the filaments to run at a lower average heater current. This should extend the filament lifetime. The circuit development and preliminary filament results are discussed.

  5. Imaging the bipolarity of myosin filaments with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Maxime; Couture, Charles-André; Miri, Amir K; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Mongeau, Luc; Légaré, François

    2013-01-01

    We report that combining interferometry with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy provides valuable information about the relative orientation of noncentrosymmetric structures composing tissues. This is confirmed through the imaging of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The inteferometric Second Harmonic Generation (ISHG) images reveal that each side of the myosin filaments composing the A band of the sarcomere generates π phase shifted SHG signal which implies that the myosin proteins at each end of the filaments are oriented in opposite directions. This highlights the bipolar structural organization of the myosin filaments and shows that muscles can be considered as a periodically poled biological structure.

  6. Complex Flare Dynamics Initiated by a Filament-Filament Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunming; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong; McAteer, James

    2015-04-01

    We report on a filament eruption that led to a relatively rare filament-filament interaction event. The filaments were located at different heights above the same segment of a circular polarity inversion line (PIL) around a condensed leading sunspot. The onset of the eruption of the lower of the two filaments was accompanied by a simultaneous descent of the upper filament resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction led to the subsequent merger of the filaments into a single magnetically complex structure that erupted to create a large solar flare and an array of complex dynamical activity. A hard X-ray coronal source and an associated enhancement of hot plasma are observed at the interface between the two interacting filaments. These phenomena are related to the production of a small C flare and the subsequent development of a much stronger M flare. Magnetic loop shrinkage and descending dark voids were observed at different locations as part of the large flare energy release giving us a unique insight into these dynamic flare phenomena.

  7. Filament wound structure and method

    DOEpatents

    Dritt, William S.; Gerth, Howard L.; Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

  8. Thin Filament Structure and the Steric Blocking Model.

    PubMed

    Lehman, William

    2016-03-15

    By interacting with the troponin-tropomyosin complex on myofibrillar thin filaments, Ca2+ and myosin govern the regulatory switching processes influencing contractile activity of mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles. A possible explanation of the roles played by Ca2+ and myosin emerged in the early 1970s when a compelling "steric model" began to gain traction as a likely mechanism accounting for muscle regulation. In its most simple form, the model holds that, under the control of Ca2+ binding to troponin and myosin binding to actin, tropomyosin strands running along thin filaments either block myosin-binding sites on actin when muscles are relaxed or move away from them when muscles are activated. Evidence for the steric model was initially based on interpretation of subtle changes observed in X-ray fiber diffraction patterns of intact skeletal muscle preparations. Over the past 25 years, electron microscopy coupled with three-dimensional reconstruction directly resolved thin filament organization under many experimental conditions and at increasingly higher resolution. At low-Ca2+, tropomyosin was shown to occupy a "blocked-state" position on the filament, and switched-on in a two-step process, involving first a movement of tropomyosin away from the majority of the myosin-binding site as Ca2+ binds to troponin and then a further movement to fully expose the site when small numbers of myosin heads bind to actin. In this contribution, basic information on Ca2+-regulation of muscle contraction is provided. A description is then given relating the voyage of discovery taken to arrive at the present understanding of the steric regulatory model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Predicting Solar Filament Eruptions with HEK Filament Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, A.; Reeves, K.; Schanche, N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013) has shown a positive correlation (80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME's). If certain filament properties, such as length, chirality, and tilt, indicate a tendency towards filament eruptions, one may be able to further predict an oncoming CME. Towards this end, we present a novel algorithm based on spatiotemporal analysis that systematically correlates filament eruptions documented in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) with HEK filaments that have been grouped together using a tracking algorithm developed at Georgia State University (e.g. Kempton et al. 2014). We also find filament tracks that are not correlated with eruptions to form a null data set in a similar fashion. Finally, we compare the metadata from erupting and non-erupting filament tracks to discover which filament properties may present signs of an eruption onset. Through statistical methods such as the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and Random Forest Classifier, we find that a filament that is increasing in length or changing in tilt with respect to the equator may be a useful gauge to predict a filament eruption. However, the average values of length and tilt for both datasets follow similar distributions, leading us to conclude that these parameters do not indicate an eruption event. This work is supported by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1263241, and NSF DIBBS grant number ACI-1443061.

  10. Gravitational infall onto molecular filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2013-06-01

    Two aspects of filamentary molecular cloud evolution are addressed: (1) exploring analytically the role of the environment for the evolution of filaments demonstrates that considering them in isolation (i.e., just addressing the fragmentation stability) will result in unphysical conclusions about the filament's properties. Accretion can also explain the observed decorrelation between FWHM and peak column density. (2) Free-fall accretion onto finite filaments can lead to the characteristic 'fans' of infrared-dark clouds around star-forming regions. The fans may form due to tidal forces mostly arising at the ends of the filaments, consistent with numerical models and earlier analytical studies.

  11. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  12. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  13. Current filamentation model for the Weibel/Filamentation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chang-Mo; Huynh, Cong Tuan; Kim, Chul Min

    2016-10-01

    A current filamentaion model for a nonrelativistic plasma with e +/e- beam has been presented together with PIC simulations, which can explain the mangetic field enhancement during the Weibel/ Filamentation instabilities. This filament model assumes the Hammer-Rostoker equilibrium. In addition, this model predicts preferential acceleration/deceleration for electron-ion plasmas depending on the injected beam to be e +/e-.

  14. Smooth Muscle Cells of Penis in the Rat: Noninvasive Quantification with Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Jie; Qiao, Xiao-Hui; Gao, Feng; Bai, Ming; Li, Fan; Du, Lian-Fang; Xing, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of cavernosum play an important role in erection. It is of great significance to quantitatively analyze the level of SMCs in penis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of shear wave elastography (SWE) on evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively. Materials and Methods. Twenty healthy male rats were selected. The SWE imaging of penis was carried out and then immunohistochemistry analysis of penis was performed to analyze the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin in penis. The measurement index of SWE examination was tissue stiffness (TS). The measurement index of immunohistochemistry analysis was positive area percentage of alpha smooth muscle actin (AP). Results. Sixty sets of data of TS and AP were obtained. The results showed that TS was significantly correlated with AP and the correlation coefficient was −0.618 (p < 0.001). The result of TS had been plotted against the AP measurements. The relation between the two results has been fitted with quadric curve; the goodness-of-fit index was 0.364 (p < 0.001). Conclusions. The level of SMCs in penis was successfully quantified in vivo with SWE. SWE can be used clinically for evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively. PMID:26550573

  15. Smooth muscle cells of penis in the rat: noninvasive quantification with shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Jie; Qiao, Xiao-Hui; Gao, Feng; Bai, Ming; Li, Fan; Du, Lian-Fang; Xing, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of cavernosum play an important role in erection. It is of great significance to quantitatively analyze the level of SMCs in penis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of shear wave elastography (SWE) on evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively. Twenty healthy male rats were selected. The SWE imaging of penis was carried out and then immunohistochemistry analysis of penis was performed to analyze the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin in penis. The measurement index of SWE examination was tissue stiffness (TS). The measurement index of immunohistochemistry analysis was positive area percentage of alpha smooth muscle actin (AP). Sixty sets of data of TS and AP were obtained. The results showed that TS was significantly correlated with AP and the correlation coefficient was -0.618 (p < 0.001). The result of TS had been plotted against the AP measurements. The relation between the two results has been fitted with quadric curve; the goodness-of-fit index was 0.364 (p < 0.001). The level of SMCs in penis was successfully quantified in vivo with SWE. SWE can be used clinically for evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively.

  16. Phenotypic heterogeneity influences the behavior of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in collagen lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandi, Augusto . E-mail: orlandi@uniroma2.it; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Gabbiani, Giulio; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Ehrlich, Paul H.

    2005-12-10

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in atherosclerosis and restenosis involves responses to the surrounding microenvironment. SMCs obtained by enzymatic digestion from tunica media of newborn, young adult (YA) and old rats and from the thickened intima (TI) and underlying media of young adult rat aortas 15 days after ballooning were entrapped in floating populated collagen lattice (PCL). TI-SMCs elongated but were poor at PCL contraction and remodeling and expressed less {alpha}2 integrin compared to other SMCs that appeared more dendritic. During early phases of PCL contraction, SMCs showed a marked decrease in the expression of {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. SMCs other than TI-SMCs required 7 days to re-express {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. Only TI-SMCs in PCL were able to divide in 48 h, with a greater proportion in S and G2-M cell cycle phases compared to other SMCs. Anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibody markedly inhibited contraction but not proliferation in YA-SMC-PLCs; anti-{alpha}1 and anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibodies induced a similar slight inhibition in TI-SMC-PCLs. Finally, TI-SMCs rapidly migrated from PCL on plastic reacquiring their epithelioid phenotype. Heterogeneity in proliferation and cytoskeleton as well the capacity to remodel the extracellular matrix are maintained, when SMCs are suspended in PCLs.

  17. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-09-20

    In contrast to major flight muscles in the Mecynorrhina torquata beetle, the third axillary (3Ax) muscle is a minor flight muscle that uniquely displays a powerful mechanical function despite its considerably small volume, ∼1/50 that of a major flight muscle. The 3Ax muscle contracts relatively slowly, and in flight strongly pulls the beating wing to attenuate the stroke amplitude. This attenuation leads to left-right turning in flight or wing folding to cease flying. What enables this small muscle to be so powerful? To explore this question, we examined the microstructure of the 3Ax muscle using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the 3Ax muscle has long (∼5 μm) myofilaments and that the ratio of thick (myosin) filaments to thin (actin) filaments is 1:5 or 1:6. These characteristics are not observed in the major flight muscles, which have shorter myofilaments (∼3.5 μm) with a smaller ratio (1:3), and instead are more typical of a leg muscle. Furthermore, the flight-muscle-specific troponin isoform, TnH, is not expressed in the 3Ax muscle. Since such a microstructure is suitable for generating large tension, the 3Ax muscle is appropriately designed to pull the wing strongly despite its small volume. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface manipulation of protein filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreplak, Laurent; Staple, Douglas; Loparic, Marko; Kreuzer, Hans-Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Within mammalian tissues, cells move by actively remodeling a dense network of collagen fibrils. In order to study this situation, we analyze the force response of two types of filamentous protein structures, desmin intermediate filaments 12 nm in diameter and collagen fibrils 80 nm in diameter. Both types of filaments were adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface and locally moved with an AFM tip at constant velocity against surface friction in the interfacial plane. In the case of collagen fibrils, that have an extensibility below 30% extension, we observed that microns long fibrils could be moved by the tip and deformed into shapes that could not be explain by the linear elastic theory for a stiff rod. In the case of desmin filaments that can be stretched up to 3.5 times there length, we observed local stretching of the filaments and discreet steps in the torsional force measured with the cantilever. In order to describe both types of filaments' behaviors, we described the protein filaments as a chain of beads of mass m linked together by a mass-less polymer linker. By solving the Newtonian equations of motions for the coupled beads in the presence of a point load and a viscous drag due to the surface-filament interactions we were able to reproduced our experimental data and extract information on friction.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of conductive filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, V.; Niraula, D.; Karpov, I.

    2016-08-29

    We present a thermodynamic theory of the conductive filament growth and dissolution in random access memory describing the observed features of their current-voltage (IV) characteristics. Our theory is based on the self-consisted Fokker-Planck approach reducing the filament kinetics to its thermodynamics. Expressing the observed IV features through material parameters, our results pave a way to device improvements.

  20. Metabolomics protocols for filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Gummer, Joel P A; Krill, Christian; Du Fall, Lauren; Waters, Ormonde D C; Trengove, Robert D; Oliver, Richard P; Solomon, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and transcriptomics are established functional genomics tools commonly used to study filamentous fungi. Metabolomics has recently emerged as another option to complement existing techniques and provide detailed information on metabolic regulation and secondary metabolism. Here, we describe broad generic protocols that can be used to undertake metabolomics studies in filamentous fungi.

  1. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Thushara

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom-made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  2. Magnetic Fields in Massive Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, G. S. Thushara

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic fields pervade galaxies, shaping them from the largest scales to the smallest star forming scales. A firm understanding of their role is crucial to our understanding of the physics of ISM. A dominant phase of the ISM that has received considerable attention is that of filaments which are ubiquitous and dominate the mass reservoir in molecular clouds. Enormous progress has been made recently towards understanding filament properties. The next major step should be to understand the role of magnetic fields in filaments. We propose to take advantage of HAWC+ dust emission polarimeter now available on SOFIA to launch a pilot polarization study towards three major classes of filaments: (i) Pristine (ii) Hub-Filament systems and (iii) Perturbed. HAWC+ will trace the connection between the star forming cores and the filaments enveloping them. By covering a vast range in parameter space from quiescent to active filaments, we will be constraining the initial conditions prior to star formation, during star formation and after star formation (feedback from newly formed stars on their parent clouds.) The interpretation of observations will be supported by extensive custom--made numerical simulations of magnetized clouds and subsequent dust radiative transfer with various grain alignment mechanisms, as provided by collaborators. Combined, these observations will provide the first panoramic view of the magnetized nature of massive filaments in the ISM.

  3. The 'catch' mechanism in molluscan muscle: an electron microscopy study of freeze-substituted anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, P M; Elliott, A

    1989-08-01

    A method for quick-freezing muscles while observing their mechanical properties until the moment of freezing is described. This method was used to freeze the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis. Intact muscle in the presence of sucrose as a cryoprotectant was freeze-substituted in acetone, fixed and embedded for electron microscopy. ABRM was frozen in a number of mechanical states including 'catch', the state of high passive tension particularly associated with some molluscan muscles. Transverse sections were examined to determine the distribution of filaments in the muscle cells. In the relaxed muscle thick and thin filaments are fairly randomly distributed. Groups of thin filaments and of thick filaments are often seen, and there is no obvious association between the two types of filaments. In contrast, in rigor muscles, both glycerol-extracted and intact, most of the thin filaments were found to lie in rings or rosettes around the thick filaments. In some places bridges between thick and thin filaments could be distinguished. In actively contracting muscle (phasic contraction) the appearance is intermediate between that of the relaxed and rigor muscles. Many thick filaments are surrounded by rosettes of thin filaments but many of the thin filaments are grouped and have no connections with thick filaments. The 'catch' state, left after a period of tonic contraction, is similar in its distribution of thick and thin filaments to the active state, many of the thin filaments lying between the thick. Frequently thick and thin filaments seem to be closer together than in other states of the muscle where a pronounced exclusion zone is present around the thick filaments. There is no evidence for association between the thick filaments. The different distribution of thin filaments in the different states is consistent with the previously described X-ray diffraction data if it is assumed that most of the contribution to the equatorial reflection at 12

  4. Solid friction between soft filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-02

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  5. Solid friction between soft filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  6. Filamentation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, N.J.; Barth, C.J.; Chu, C.C.; Lok, J.; Montvai, A.; Oomens, A.A.; Peters, M.; Pijper, F.J.; de Rover, M.; Schueller, F.C.; Steenbakkers, M.F.; RTP team

    1995-09-01

    The relevance of a nest of toroidal flux surfaces as a paradigm of the magnetic topology of a tokamak plasma is challenged. High resolution Thomson scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in RTP show several hot filaments in the plasma center and sharp gradients near the sawtooth inversion radius and structures outside the sawtooth region under central ECH. In ohmic plasmas, too, the pressure and temperature profiles show significant bumps. These measurements give evidence of a complex magnetic topology. Transport in a medium with spatially strongly varying diffusivity is considered. It is shown that macroscopic transport is determined by the microscopic structure: a transport theory must predict this structure and the diffusivity in the insulating regions, while the {open_quote}turbulent{close_quote} diffusivity is irrelevant. A numerical approach to equilibria with broken surfaces is presented. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Leiomodin and tropomodulin in smooth muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that actin filament remodeling is critical for smooth muscle contraction, which implicates actin filament ends as important sites for regulation of contraction. Tropomodulin (Tmod) and smooth muscle leiomodin (SM-Lmod) have been found in many tissues containing smooth muscle by protein immunoblot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both proteins cofractionate with tropomyosin in the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of rabbit stomach smooth muscle and are solubilized by high salt. SM-Lmod binds muscle tropomyosin, a biochemical activity characteristic of Tmod proteins. SM-Lmod staining is present along the length of actin filaments in rat intestinal smooth muscle, while Tmod stains in a punctate pattern distinct from that of actin filaments or the dense body marker alpha-actinin. After smooth muscle is hypercontracted by treatment with 10 mM Ca(2+), both SM-Lmod and Tmod are found near alpha-actinin at the periphery of actin-rich contraction bands. These data suggest that SM-Lmod is a novel component of the smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, that the pointed ends of actin filaments in smooth muscle may be capped by Tmod in localized clusters.

  8. Leiomodin and tropomodulin in smooth muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that actin filament remodeling is critical for smooth muscle contraction, which implicates actin filament ends as important sites for regulation of contraction. Tropomodulin (Tmod) and smooth muscle leiomodin (SM-Lmod) have been found in many tissues containing smooth muscle by protein immunoblot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both proteins cofractionate with tropomyosin in the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of rabbit stomach smooth muscle and are solubilized by high salt. SM-Lmod binds muscle tropomyosin, a biochemical activity characteristic of Tmod proteins. SM-Lmod staining is present along the length of actin filaments in rat intestinal smooth muscle, while Tmod stains in a punctate pattern distinct from that of actin filaments or the dense body marker alpha-actinin. After smooth muscle is hypercontracted by treatment with 10 mM Ca(2+), both SM-Lmod and Tmod are found near alpha-actinin at the periphery of actin-rich contraction bands. These data suggest that SM-Lmod is a novel component of the smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, that the pointed ends of actin filaments in smooth muscle may be capped by Tmod in localized clusters.

  9. Stepwise dynamics of connecting filaments measured in single myofibrillar sarcomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, P; Tameyasu, T; Pollack, G H

    1998-01-01

    Single relaxed myofibrils of bumblebee flight muscle were subjected to motor-imposed ramp-length changes. The image of the striations was projected onto a linear photodiode array, and sarcomere length was computed as the spacing between centroids of contiguous A-bands. Centroid position was determined by integrating the respective A-band intensity peak and computing the location at which the area on one side was equal to the other. The resulting trace of centroid to centroid span versus time was stepwise, with periods of rapid shortening alternating with periods of pause. An alternative nondiscrete sensor gave similar steps. If thick filament length remains constant, stepwise sarcomere length changes imply that length changes in the connecting filament must be stepwise. Thus, shortening of the connecting filament occurs as a sequence of discrete events rather than as a continuous event. PMID:9512043

  10. Differential assembly of alpha- and gamma-filagenins into thick filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, F.; Ortiz, I.; Hutagalung, A.; Bauer, C. C.; Cook, R. G.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle thick filaments are highly organized supramolecular assemblies of myosin and associated proteins with lengths, diameters and flexural rigidities characteristic of their source. The cores of body wall muscle thick filaments of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are tubular structures of paramyosin sub-filaments coupled by filagenins and have been proposed to serve as templates for the assembly of native thick filaments. We have characterized alpha- and gamma-filagenins, two novel proteins of the cores with calculated molecular masses of 30,043 and 19,601 and isoelectric points of 10.52 and 11.49, respectively. Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy using affinity-purified antibodies confirmed that the two proteins are core components. Immunoelectron microscopy of the cores revealed that they assemble with different periodicities. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that alpha-filagenin is localized in the medial regions of the A-bands of body wall muscle cells whereas gamma-filagenin is localized in the flanking regions, and that alpha-filagenin is expressed in 1.5-twofold embryos while gamma-filagenin becomes detectable only in late vermiform embryos. The expression of both proteins continues throughout later stages of development. C. elegans body wall muscle thick filaments of these developmental stages have distinct lengths. Our results suggest that the differential assembly of alpha- and gamma-filagenins into thick filaments of distinct lengths may be developmentally regulated.

  11. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  12. Direct Observation of Tropomyosin Binding to Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, William M.; Lehman, William; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Tropomyosin is an elongated α-helical coiled-coil that binds to seven consecutive actin subunits along the long-pitch helix of actin filaments. Once bound, tropomyosin polymerizes end-to-end and both stabilizes F-actin and regulates access of various actin binding proteins including myosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. Single tropomyosin molecules bind weakly to F-actin with millimolar Kd, whereas the end-to-end linked tropomyosin associates with about a one thousand-fold greater affinity. Despite years of study, the assembly mechanism of tropomyosin onto actin filaments remains unclear. In the current study, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to directly monitor the cooperative binding of fluorescently labeled tropomyosin molecules to phalloidin-stabilized actin filaments. We find that tropomyosin molecules assemble from multiple growth sites following random low affinity binding of single molecules to actin. As the length of the tropomyosin chain increases, the probability of detachment decreases, which leads to further chain growth. Tropomyosin chain extension is linearly dependent on tropomyosin concentration, occurring at approximately 100 monomers/(μM*s). The random tropomyosin binding to F-actin leads to discontinuous end-to-end association where gaps in the chain continuity smaller than the required seven sequential actin monomers are available. Direct observation of tropomyosin detachment revealed the number of gaps in actin-bound tropomyosin, the time course of gap annealing, and the eventual filament saturation process. PMID:26033920

  13. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  14. Long-range self-organization of cytoskeletal myosin II filament stacks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shiqiong; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Guo, Zhenhuan; Tee, Yee-Han; Thiagarajan, Visalatchi; Hersen, Pascal; Chew, Teng-Leong; Safran, Samuel A; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Bershadsky, Alexander D

    2017-02-01

    Although myosin II filaments are known to exist in non-muscle cells, their dynamics and organization are incompletely understood. Here, we combined structured illumination microscopy with pharmacological and genetic perturbations, to study the process of actomyosin cytoskeleton self-organization into arcs and stress fibres. A striking feature of the myosin II filament organization was their 'registered' alignment into stacks, spanning up to several micrometres in the direction orthogonal to the parallel actin bundles. While turnover of individual myosin II filaments was fast (characteristic half-life time 60 s) and independent of actin filament turnover, the process of stack formation lasted a longer time (in the range of several minutes) and required myosin II contractility, as well as actin filament assembly/disassembly and crosslinking (dependent on formin Fmnl3, cofilin1 and α-actinin-4). Furthermore, myosin filament stack formation involved long-range movements of individual myosin filaments towards each other suggesting the existence of attractive forces between myosin II filaments. These forces, possibly transmitted via mechanical deformations of the intervening actin filament network, may in turn remodel the actomyosin cytoskeleton and drive its self-organization.

  15. Forces measured with micro-fabricated cantilevers during actomyosin interactions produced by filaments containing different myosin isoforms and loop 1 structures.

    PubMed

    Kalganov, Albert; Shalabi, Nabil; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kachmar, Linda Hussein; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Rassier, Dilson E

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that the actin-activated ATP kinetics and the mechanical work produced by muscle myosin molecules are regulated by two surface loops, located near the ATP binding pocket (loop 1), and in a region that interfaces with actin (loop 2). These loops regulate force and velocity of contraction, and have been investigated mostly in single molecules. There is a lack of information of the work produced by myosin molecules ordered in filaments and working cooperatively, which is the actual muscle environment. We use micro-fabricated cantilevers to measure forces produced by myosin filaments isolated from mollusk muscles, skeletal muscles, and smooth muscles containing variations in the structure of loop 1 (tonic and phasic myosins). We complemented the experiments with in-vitro assays to measure the velocity of actin motility. Smooth muscle myosin filaments produced more force than skeletal and mollusk myosin filaments when normalized per filament overlap. Skeletal muscle myosin propelled actin filaments in a higher sliding velocity than smooth muscle myosin. The values for force and velocity were consistent with previous studies using myosin molecules, and suggest a close correlation with the myosin isoform and structure of surface loop 1. The technique using micro-fabricated cantilevers to measure force of filaments allows for the investigation of the relation between myosin structure and contractility, allowing experiments to be conducted with an array of different myosin isoforms. Using the technique we observed that the work produced by myosin molecules is regulated by amino-acid sequences aligned in specific loops.

  16. Merging of Filaments in a Dual-Filament System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikurda, K.; Martin, S. F.

    2006-08-01

    Introduction: The dual filament system merges to form one extended filament. Methods: The filaments were observed at Helio Research at multiple wavelengths around Hα using a tunable filter and a narrow band Fabry-Perot etalon as part of the Joint Observing Campaign (JOP 178). These observations are used to create two-dimensional Dopplergrams. The Hα images are compared with data taken onboard the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) spacecraft (EIT at 304 A and LASCO C2). The GONG magnetograms provide the information on photospheric magnetic fields. Results and Discussion: The filaments were observed on the solar disk between October 10 and 16, 2004. We compare the morphology of the filament system in Hα and He II line at 304 A and discuss its evolution. We investigate the photospheric magnetic flux cancellation rate during the merging process. There is no clear evidence of an eruption associated with the merging of the filaments from either EIT or LASCO in contrary to some previous findings.

  17. Centromeres of filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kristina M.; Galazka, Jonathan M.; Phatale, Pallavi A.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Freitag, Michael

    2012-01-01

    How centromeres are assembled and maintained remains one of the fundamental questions in cell biology. Over the past 20 years the idea of centromeres as precise genetic loci has been replaced by the realization that it is predominantly the protein complement that defines centromere localization and function. Thus, placement and maintenance of centromeres are excellent examples of epigenetic phenomena in the strict sense. In contrast, the highly derived “point centromeres” of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives are counterexamples for this general principle of centromere maintenance. While we have learned much in the past decade, it remains unclear if mechanisms for epigenetic centromere placement and maintenance are shared amongst various groups of organisms. For that reason it seems prudent to examine species from many different phylogenetic groups with the aim to extract comparative information that will yield a more complete picture of cell division in all eukaryotes. This review addresses what has been learned by studying the centromeres of filamentous fungi, a large, heterogeneous group of organisms that includes important plant, animal and human pathogens, saprobes and symbionts that fulfill essential roles in the biosphere, as well as a growing number of taxa that have become indispensable for industrial use. PMID:22752455

  18. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  19. Dusty filaments in NGC 4696

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-01

    This picture, taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), shows NGC 4696, the largest galaxy in the Centaurus Cluster. The new images taken with Hubble show the dusty filaments surrounding the centre of this huge galaxy in greater detail than ever before. These filaments loop and curl inwards in an intriguing spiral shape, swirling around the supermassive black hole at such a distance that they are dragged into and eventually consumed by the black hole itself.

  20. Intermediate-sized filaments of the prekeratin type in myoepithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Myoepithelial cells from mammary glands, the modified sweat glands of bovine muzzle, and salivary glands have been studied by electron microscopy and by immunofluorescence microscopy in frozen sections in an attempt to further characterize the type of intermediate-sized filaments present in these cells. Electron microscopy has shown that all myoepithelial cells contain extensive meshworks of intermediate- sized (7--11-nm) filaments, many of which are anchored at typical desmosomes or hemidesmosomes. The intermediate-sized filaments are also intimately associated with masses of contractile elements, identified as bundles of typical 5--6-nm microfilaments and with characteristically spaced dense bodies. This organization resembles that described for various smooth muscle cells. In immunofluorescence microscopy, using antibodies specific for the various classes of intermediate-sized filaments, the myoepithelial cells are strongly decorated by antibodies to prekeratin. They are not specifically stained by antibodies to vimentin, which stain mesenchymal cells, nor by antibodies to chick gizzard desmin, which decorate fibrils in smooth muscle Z bands and intercalated disks in skeletal and cardiac muscle of mammals. Myoepithelial cells are also strongly stained by antibodies to actin. The observations show (a) that the epithelial character, as indicated by the presence of intermediate-sized filaments of the prekeratin type, is maintained in the differentiated contractile myoepithelial cell, and (b) that desmin and desmin-containing filaments are not generally associated with musclelike cell specialization for contraction but are specific to myogenic differentiation. The data also suggest that in myoepithelial cells prekeratin filaments are arranged-- and might function--in a manner similar to the desmin filaments in smooth muscle cells. PMID:6153658

  1. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Pincosy, Philip A.; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600.degree. C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for non-uniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  2. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1983-06-10

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600/sup 0/C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for nonuniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  3. Leiomodin-3 dysfunction results in thin filament disorganization and nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Michaela; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Dowling, James J.; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Moroz, Natalia; Quinlan, Kate G.; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Todd, Emily J.; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Gokhin, David S.; Maluenda, Jérome; Lek, Monkol; Nolent, Flora; Pappas, Christopher T.; Novak, Stefanie M.; D’Amico, Adele; Malfatti, Edoardo; Thomas, Brett P.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gupta, Namrata; Daly, Mark J.; Ilkovski, Biljana; Houweling, Peter J.; Davidson, Ann E.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; Gupta, Vandana A.; Medne, Livija; Shannon, Patrick; Martin, Nicole; Bick, David P.; Flisberg, Anders; Holmberg, Eva; Van den Bergh, Peter; Lapunzina, Pablo; Waddell, Leigh B.; Sloboda, Darcée D.; Bertini, Enrico; Chitayat, David; Telfer, William R.; Laquerrière, Annie; Gregorio, Carol C.; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Pelin, Katarina; Beggs, Alan H.; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Romero, Norma B.; Laing, Nigel G.; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Melki, Judith; Fowler, Velia M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; North, Kathryn N.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by muscle dysfunction and electron-dense protein accumulations (nemaline bodies) in myofibers. Pathogenic mutations have been described in 9 genes to date, but the genetic basis remains unknown in many cases. Here, using an approach that combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous variants in LMOD3 in 21 patients from 14 families with severe, usually lethal, NM. LMOD3 encodes leiomodin-3 (LMOD3), a 65-kDa protein expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. LMOD3 was expressed from early stages of muscle differentiation; localized to actin thin filaments, with enrichment near the pointed ends; and had strong actin filament-nucleating activity. Loss of LMOD3 in patient muscle resulted in shortening and disorganization of thin filaments. Knockdown of lmod3 in zebrafish replicated NM-associated functional and pathological phenotypes. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the gene encoding LMOD3 underlie congenital myopathy and demonstrate that LMOD3 is essential for the organization of sarcomeric thin filaments in skeletal muscle. PMID:25250574

  4. Leiomodin-3 dysfunction results in thin filament disorganization and nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Sandaradura, Sarah A; Dowling, James J; Kostyukova, Alla S; Moroz, Natalia; Quinlan, Kate G; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Todd, Emily J; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Gokhin, David S; Maluenda, Jérome; Lek, Monkol; Nolent, Flora; Pappas, Christopher T; Novak, Stefanie M; D'Amico, Adele; Malfatti, Edoardo; Thomas, Brett P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Gupta, Namrata; Daly, Mark J; Ilkovski, Biljana; Houweling, Peter J; Davidson, Ann E; Swanson, Lindsay C; Brownstein, Catherine A; Gupta, Vandana A; Medne, Livija; Shannon, Patrick; Martin, Nicole; Bick, David P; Flisberg, Anders; Holmberg, Eva; Van den Bergh, Peter; Lapunzina, Pablo; Waddell, Leigh B; Sloboda, Darcée D; Bertini, Enrico; Chitayat, David; Telfer, William R; Laquerrière, Annie; Gregorio, Carol C; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Pelin, Katarina; Beggs, Alan H; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Romero, Norma B; Laing, Nigel G; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Melki, Judith; Fowler, Velia M; MacArthur, Daniel G; North, Kathryn N; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-11-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by muscle dysfunction and electron-dense protein accumulations (nemaline bodies) in myofibers. Pathogenic mutations have been described in 9 genes to date, but the genetic basis remains unknown in many cases. Here, using an approach that combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous variants in LMOD3 in 21 patients from 14 families with severe, usually lethal, NM. LMOD3 encodes leiomodin-3 (LMOD3), a 65-kDa protein expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. LMOD3 was expressed from early stages of muscle differentiation; localized to actin thin filaments, with enrichment near the pointed ends; and had strong actin filament-nucleating activity. Loss of LMOD3 in patient muscle resulted in shortening and disorganization of thin filaments. Knockdown of lmod3 in zebrafish replicated NM-associated functional and pathological phenotypes. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the gene encoding LMOD3 underlie congenital myopathy and demonstrate that LMOD3 is essential for the organization of sarcomeric thin filaments in skeletal muscle.

  5. Mechanical coordination in motor ensembles revealed using engineered artificial myosin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, R. F.; Sommese, R. F.; Adhikari, A. S.; Taylor, R. E.; Sutton, S.; Spudich, J. A.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

    2015-08-01

    The sarcomere of muscle is composed of tens of thousands of myosin motors that self-assemble into thick filaments and interact with surrounding actin-based thin filaments in a dense, near-crystalline hexagonal lattice. Together, these actin-myosin interactions enable large-scale movement and force generation, two primary attributes of muscle. Research on isolated fibres has provided considerable insight into the collective properties of muscle, but how actin-myosin interactions are coordinated in an ensemble remains poorly understood. Here, we show that artificial myosin filaments, engineered using a DNA nanotube scaffold, provide precise control over motor number, type and spacing. Using both dimeric myosin V- and myosin VI-labelled nanotubes, we find that neither myosin density nor spacing has a significant effect on the gliding speed of actin filaments. This observation supports a simple model of myosin ensembles as energy reservoirs that buffer individual stochastic events to bring about smooth, continuous motion. Furthermore, gliding speed increases with cross-bridge compliance, but is limited by Brownian effects. As a first step to reconstituting muscle motility, we demonstrate human β-cardiac myosin-driven gliding of actin filaments on DNA nanotubes.

  6. Actin dynamics and competition for myosin monomer govern the sequential amplification of myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Beach, Jordan R; Bruun, Kyle S; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Swider, Zac; Remmert, Kirsten; Zhang, Yingfan; Conti, Mary A; Adelstein, Robert S; Rusan, Nasser M; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2017-02-01

    The cellular mechanisms governing non-muscle myosin II (NM2) filament assembly are largely unknown. Using EGFP-NM2A knock-in fibroblasts and multiple super-resolution imaging modalities, we characterized and quantified the sequential amplification of NM2 filaments within lamellae, wherein filaments emanating from single nucleation events continuously partition, forming filament clusters that populate large-scale actomyosin structures deeper in the cell. Individual partitioning events coincide spatially and temporally with the movements of diverging actin fibres, suppression of which inhibits partitioning. These and other data indicate that NM2A filaments are partitioned by the dynamic movements of actin fibres to which they are bound. Finally, we showed that partition frequency and filament growth rate in the lamella depend on MLCK, and that MLCK is competing with centrally active ROCK for a limiting pool of monomer with which to drive lamellar filament assembly. Together, our results provide new insights into the mechanism and spatio-temporal regulation of NM2 filament assembly in cells.

  7. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  8. Solid friction between soft filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A.W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments1,2. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  9. Solid friction between soft filaments

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; ...

    2015-03-02

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag,more » can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.« less

  10. Intermediate filaments in nervous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Liem, RKH; Yen, S; Salomon, GD; Shelanski, ML

    1978-01-01

    Intermediate filaments have been isolated from rabbit intradural spinal nerve roots by the axonal flotation method. This method was modified to avoid exposure of axons to low ionic strength medium. The purified filaments are morphologically 75-80 percent pure. The gel electrophoretogram shows four major bands migrating at 200,000, 145,000, 68,000, and 60,000 daltons, respectively. A similar preparation from rabbit brain shows four major polypeptides with mol wt of 200,000 145,000, 68,000, and 51,000 daltons. These results indicate that the neurofilament is composed of a triplet of polypepetides with mol wt of 200,000, 145,000, and 68,000 daltons. The 51,000-dalton band that appears in brain filament preparations as the major polypeptide seems to be of glial origin. The significance of the 60,000- dalton band in the nerve root filament preparation is unclear at this time. Antibodies raised against two of the triplet proteins isolated from calf brain localize by immunofluorescence to neurons in central and peripheral nerve. On the other hand, an antibody to the 51,000-dalton polypeptide gives only glial staining in the brain, and very weak peripheral nerve staining. Prolonged exposure of axons to low ionic strength medium solubilizes almost all of the triplet polypeptides, leaving behind only the 51,000- dalton component. This would indicate that the neurofilament is soluble at low ionic strength, whereas the glial filament is not. These results indicate that neurofilaments and glial filaments are composed of different polypeptides and have different solubility characteristics. PMID:83322

  11. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Tarantula Myosin Filaments Suggests How Phosphorylation May Regulate Myosin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiría; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-01-01

    Summary Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLC). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that myosin is switched off by intramolecular interactions between its two heads, the free-head and the blocked head. Three-dimensional reconstruction of frozen-hydrated specimens reveals that this asymmetric head interaction is also present in native thick filaments of tarantula striated muscle. Our goal here has been to elucidate the structural features of the tarantula filament involved in phosphorylation-based regulation. A new reconstruction reveals intra- and intermolecular myosin interactions in addition to those seen previously. To help interpret the interactions, we sequenced the tarantula RLC, and fitted to the reconstruction an atomic model of the myosin head that included the predicted RLC atomic structure and an S2 crystal structure. The fitting suggests an intramolecular interaction between the cardiomyopathy loop of the free-head and its own S2 and two intermolecular interactions—between the cardio-loop of the free head and the ELC of the blocked head, and between the Leu-305 - Gln-327 “interaction loop” (loop I) of the free-head and the N-terminal fragment of the RLC of the blocked-head. These interactions, added to those previously described, would help to switch off the thick filament. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest how phosphorylation could increase the helical content of the RLC N-terminus, weakening these interactions, thus releasing both heads and activating the thick filament. PMID:18951904

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction of tarantula myosin filaments suggests how phosphorylation may regulate myosin activity.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiria; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-12-26

    Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLCs). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that myosin is switched off by intramolecular interactions between its two heads, the free head and the blocked head. Three-dimensional reconstruction of frozen-hydrated specimens revealed that this asymmetric head interaction is also present in native thick filaments of tarantula striated muscle. Our goal in this study was to elucidate the structural features of the tarantula filament involved in phosphorylation-based regulation. A new reconstruction revealed intra- and intermolecular myosin interactions in addition to those seen previously. To help interpret the interactions, we sequenced the tarantula RLC and fitted an atomic model of the myosin head that included the predicted RLC atomic structure and an S2 (subfragment 2) crystal structure to the reconstruction. The fitting suggests one intramolecular interaction, between the cardiomyopathy loop of the free head and its own S2, and two intermolecular interactions, between the cardiac loop of the free head and the essential light chain of the blocked head and between the Leu305-Gln327 interaction loop of the free head and the N-terminal fragment of the RLC of the blocked head. These interactions, added to those previously described, would help switch off the thick filament. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest how phosphorylation could increase the helical content of the RLC N-terminus, weakening these interactions, thus releasing both heads and activating the thick filament.

  13. Coiling of a viscous filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, A. D. T.; Ryu, W. S.; Mahadevan, L.

    1997-11-01

    A classic demonstration of fluid buckling is a daily occurence at the breakfast table, where a continuous stream of viscous fluid (honey) is often poured onto a flat surface (toast) from a sufficient height. The thin fluid filament quickly settles into a steady state; near the surface it bends into a helical shape while simultaneously rotating about the vertical and is laid out in a regular coil. This behavior is reminiscent of the coiling of a falling flexible rope. We derive a simple scaling law that predicts the coiling frequency in terms of the filament radius and the flow rate. We also verify this scaling law with the results of experiments.

  14. Graphite filament wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Damico, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Filament wound NOL rings, 4-inch and 8-inch diameter closed-end vessels involving three epoxy resin systems and three graphite fibers were tested to develop property data and fabrication technology for filament wound graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst tests at room temperature. Manufacturing parameters were established for tooling, winding, and curing that resulted in the development of a pressure/vessel performance factor (pressure x volume/weight) or more than 900,000 in. for an oblate spheroid specimen.

  15. Beam distribution function after filamentation

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Decker, F.J.; Seeman, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors calculate the beam distribution function after filamentation (phase-mixing) of a focusing mismatch. This distribution is relevant when interpreting beam measurements and sources of emittance dilution in linear colliders. It is also important when considering methods of diluting the phase space density, which may be required for the machine protection system in future linear colliders, and it is important when studying effects of trapped ions which filament in the electron beam potential. Finally, the resulting distribution is compared with measured beam distributions from the SLAC linac.

  16. Virtual filaments that mimic conventional light bulb filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Julio; Munoz, Fernando; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Parkyn, Bill; Falicoff, Waqidi; Sun, Yupin

    2004-09-01

    Conventional incandescent light bulbs have a wire filament acting as an extended light source with nearly constant intensity throughout its quasi-spherical emission pattern. Here we present a novel family of optical devices that make use of commercially available Lambertian or near-Lambertian LED light sources, in conjunction with tailored optical element bonded to the top surface of the LED. These hybrid devices can emulate the output of traditional incandescent filaments, or can be designed to produce a wide range of light output beam patterns. We call these new devices Virtual Filaments, as they can be designed to appear the same as an incandescent filament, with a similar light output pattern, and having a similar focal position above the base. These new lamps can then be used in the same applications as those they replace, thus eliminating the need to redesign or replace the original luminaire. We present several possible optical designs that can be used with a number of standard LEDs to replace standard incandescent bulbs. In one example we show a design that provides an output with near-uniform intensity across a full beam angle of 300 degrees, from a focal position 20 mm above an LED. Other major advantages of these new devices include their ability to be given sharp cutoffs, to homogenize non-uniform LED light sources and to color-mix the output of RGB LEDs.

  17. Cardiac thin filament regulation and the Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Fuyu; Inoue, Takahiro; Shintani, Seine A; Oyama, Kotaro; Terui, Takako; Minamisawa, Susumu; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Norio

    2014-07-01

    The heart has an intrinsic ability to increase systolic force in response to a rise in ventricular filling (the Frank-Starling law of the heart). It is widely accepted that the length dependence of myocardial activation underlies the Frank-Starling law of the heart. Recent advances in muscle physiology have enabled the identification of the factors involved in length-dependent activation, viz., titin (connectin)-based interfilament lattice spacing reduction and thin filament "on-off" regulation, with the former triggering length-dependent activation and the latter determining the number of myosin molecules recruited to thin filaments. Patients with a failing heart have demonstrated reduced exercise tolerance at least in part via depression of the Frank-Starling mechanism. Recent studies revealed that various mutations occur in the thin filament regulatory proteins, such as troponin, in the ventricular muscle of failing hearts, which consequently alter the Frank-Starling mechanism. In this article, we review the molecular mechanisms of length-dependent activation, and the influence of troponin mutations on the phenomenon.

  18. The role of titin in eccentric muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Walter

    2014-08-15

    Muscle contraction and force regulation in skeletal muscle have been thought to occur exclusively through the relative sliding of and the interaction between the contractile filaments actin and myosin. While this two-filament sarcomere model has worked well in explaining the properties of isometrically and concentrically contracting muscle, it has failed miserably in explaining experimental observations in eccentric contractions. Here, I suggest, and provide evidence, that a third filament, titin, is involved in force regulation of sarcomeres by adjusting its stiffness in an activation-dependent (calcium) and active force-dependent manner. Upon muscle activation, titin binds calcium at specific sites, thereby increasing its stiffness, and cross-bridge attachment to actin is thought to free up binding sites for titin on actin, thereby reducing titin's free-spring length, thus increasing its stiffness and force upon stretch of active muscle. This role of titin as a third force regulating myofilament in sarcomeres, although not fully proven, would account for many of the unexplained properties of eccentric muscle contraction, while simultaneously not affecting the properties predicted by the two-filament cross-bridge model in isometric and concentric muscle function. Here, I identify the problems of the two-filament sarcomere model and demonstrate the advantages of the three-filament model by providing evidence of titin's contribution to active force in eccentric muscle function.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  20. Multidirectional Artificial Muscles from Nylon.

    PubMed

    Mirvakili, Seyed M; Hunter, Ian W

    2017-01-01

    Multidirectional artificial muscles are made from highly oriented nylon filaments. Thanks to the low thermal conductivity of nylon and its anisotropic thermal expansion, bending occurs when a nylon beam is differentially heated. This heat can be generated via a Joule heating mechanism or high power laser pulses.

  1. Various Barbs in Solar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Boris

    2017-07-01

    Interest to lateral details of the solar filament shape named barbs, motivated by their relationship to filament chirality and helicity, showed their different orientation relative to the expected direction of the magnetic field. While the majority of barbs are stretched along the field, some barbs seem to be transversal to it and are referred to as anomalous barbs. We analyse the deformation of helical field lines by a small parasitic polarity using a simple flux rope model with a force-free field. A rather small and distant source of parasitic polarity stretches the bottom parts of the helical lines in its direction creating a lateral extension of dips below the flux-rope axis. They can be considered as normal barbs of the filament. A stronger and closer source of parasitic polarity makes the flux-rope field lines to be convex below its axis and creates narrow and deep dips near its position. As a result, the narrow structure, with thin threads across it, is formed whose axis is nearly perpendicular to the field. The structure resembles an anomalous barb. Hence, the presence of anomalous barbs does not contradict the flux-rope structure of a filament.

  2. Star-forming Filament Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2017-03-01

    New models of star-forming filamentary clouds are presented in order to quantify their properties and to predict their evolution. These 2D axisymmetric models describe filaments that have no core, one low-mass core, and one cluster-forming core. They are based on Plummer-like cylinders and spheroids that are bounded by a constant-density surface of finite extent. In contrast to 1D Plummer-like models, they have specific values of length and mass, they approximate observed column density maps, and their distributions of column density (N-pdfs) are pole-free. Each model can estimate the star-forming potential of a core-filament system by identifying the zone of gas dense enough to form low-mass stars and by counting the number of enclosed thermal Jeans masses. This analysis suggests that the Musca central filament may be near the start of its star-forming life, with enough dense gas to make its first ∼3 protostars, while the Coronet filament is near the midpoint of its star formation, with enough dense gas to add ∼8 protostars to its ∼20 known stars. In contrast, L43 appears to be near the end of its star-forming life, since it lacks enough dense gas to add any new protostars to the two young stellar objectsalready known.

  3. METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1962-12-18

    A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

  4. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  5. SDO Watches Giant Filament on the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A snaking, extended filament of solar material currently lies on the front of the sun-- some 1 million miles across from end to end. Filaments are clouds of solar material suspended above the sun b...

  6. SDO Sees a Dark Filament Circle

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A dark, almost circular filament broke away from the sun in a gauzy, feathery swirl, on Nov. 15, 2015, in this video from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. This filament eruption was followed by a...

  7. The Drosophila formin Fhos is a primary mediator of sarcomeric thin-filament array assembly

    PubMed Central

    Shwartz, Arkadi; Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-01-01

    Actin-based thin filament arrays constitute a fundamental core component of muscle sarcomeres. We have used formation of the Drosophila indirect flight musculature for studying the assembly and maturation of thin-filament arrays in a skeletal muscle model system. Employing GFP-tagged actin monomer incorporation, we identify several distinct phases in the dynamic construction of thin-filament arrays. This sequence includes assembly of nascent arrays after an initial period of intensive microfilament synthesis, followed by array elongation, primarily from filament pointed-ends, radial growth of the arrays via recruitment of peripheral filaments and continuous barbed-end turnover. Using genetic approaches we have identified Fhos, the single Drosophila homolog of the FHOD sub-family of formins, as a primary and versatile mediator of IFM thin-filament organization. Localization of Fhos to the barbed-ends of the arrays, achieved via a novel N-terminal domain, appears to be a critical aspect of its sarcomeric roles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16540.001 PMID:27731794

  8. Protein machines and self assembly in muscle organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barral, J. M.; Epstein, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    The remarkable order of striated muscle is the result of a complex series of protein interactions at different levels of organization. Within muscle, the thick filament and its major protein myosin are classical examples of functioning protein machines. Our understanding of the structure and assembly of thick filaments and their organization into the regular arrays of the A-band has recently been enhanced by the application of biochemical, genetic, and structural approaches. Detailed studies of the thick filament backbone have shown that the myosins are organized into a tubular structure. Additional protein machines and specific myosin rod sequences have been identified that play significant roles in thick filament structure, assembly, and organization. These include intrinsic filament components, cross-linking molecules of the M-band and constituents of the membrane-cytoskeleton system. Muscle organization is directed by the multistep actions of protein machines that take advantage of well-established self-assembly relationships. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Protein machines and self assembly in muscle organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barral, J. M.; Epstein, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    The remarkable order of striated muscle is the result of a complex series of protein interactions at different levels of organization. Within muscle, the thick filament and its major protein myosin are classical examples of functioning protein machines. Our understanding of the structure and assembly of thick filaments and their organization into the regular arrays of the A-band has recently been enhanced by the application of biochemical, genetic, and structural approaches. Detailed studies of the thick filament backbone have shown that the myosins are organized into a tubular structure. Additional protein machines and specific myosin rod sequences have been identified that play significant roles in thick filament structure, assembly, and organization. These include intrinsic filament components, cross-linking molecules of the M-band and constituents of the membrane-cytoskeleton system. Muscle organization is directed by the multistep actions of protein machines that take advantage of well-established self-assembly relationships. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Filament Winding Of Carbon/Carbon Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoy, Paul J.; Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method of winding carbon filaments for carbon/carbon composite structures less costly and labor-intensive, also produces more consistent results. Involves use of roller squeegee to ensure filaments continuously wet with resin during winding. Also involves control of spacing and resin contents of plies to obtain strong bonds between carbon filaments and carbon matrices. Lends itself to full automation and involves use of filaments and matrix-precursor resins in their simplest forms, thereby reducing costs.

  11. Diamond film by hot filament CVD method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Diamond synthesis by the hot filament CVD method is discussed. A hot filament decomposes gas mixtures and oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols. which are carbon sources. The resulting thin films, growth mechanisms, and characteristics and problems associated with the hot filament CVD method are analyzed and evaluated.

  12. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Elise; Mongin, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-02

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, that relies on the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation.

  13. Dynamics of Filaments of Scroll Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktashev, Vadim N.; Biktasheva, Irina V.

    The following sections are included: * A Brief History and Motivation * Wave-Particle Duality of Spiral Waves * Perturbative Dynamics of Scrolls, and Tension of Filaments * Scroll Wave Turbulence * Rigidity of Scroll Filaments: Pinning and Buckling * Filament Statics, Geodesic Principle and Snell's Law * References

  14. Three-dimensional structure of the Z band in a normal mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the vertebrate skeletal muscle Z band reflects its function as the muscle component essential for tension transmission between successive sarcomeres. We have investigated this structure as well as that of the nearby I band in a normal, unstimulated mammalian skeletal muscle by tomographic three- dimensional reconstruction from electron micrograph tilt series of sectioned tissue. The three-dimensional Z band structure consists of interdigitating axial filaments from opposite sarcomeres connected every 18 +/- 12 nm (mean +/- SD) to one to four cross-connecting Z- filaments are observed to meet the axial filaments in a fourfold symmetric arrangement. The substantial variation in the spacing between cross-connecting Z-filament to axial filament connection points suggests that the structure of the Z band is not determined solely by the arrangement of alpha-actinin to actin-binding sites along the axial filament. The cross-connecting filaments bind to or form a "relaxed interconnecting body" halfway between the axial filaments. This filamentous body is parallel to the Z band axial filaments and is observed to play an essential role in generating the small square lattice pattern seen in electron micrographs of unstimulated muscle cross sections. This structure is absent in cross section of the Z band from muscles fixed in rigor or in tetanus, suggesting that the Z band lattice must undergo dynamic rearrangement concomitant with crossbridge binding in the A band. PMID:8636232

  15. The Effects of Hsp90α1 Mutations on Myosin Thick Filament Organization.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuxia; Liu, Kechun; Tian, Zhenjun; Du, Shao Jun

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90α plays a key role in myosin folding and thick filament assembly in muscle cells. To assess the structure and function of Hsp90α and its potential regulation by post-translational modification, we developed a combined knockdown and rescue assay in zebrafish embryos to systematically analyze the effects of various mutations on Hsp90α function in myosin thick filament organization. DNA constructs expressing the Hsp90α1 mutants with altered putative ATP binding, phosphorylation, acetylation or methylation sites were co-injected with Hsp90α1 specific morpholino into zebrafish embryos. Myosin thick filament organization was analyzed in skeletal muscles of the injected embryos by immunostaining. The results showed that mutating the conserved D90 residue in the Hsp90α1 ATP binding domain abolished its function in thick filament organization. In addition, phosphorylation mimicking mutations of T33D, T33E and T87E compromised Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization. Similarly, K287Q acetylation mimicking mutation repressed Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization. In contrast, K206R and K608R hypomethylation mimicking mutations had not effect on Hsp90α1 function in thick filament organization. Given that T33 and T87 are highly conserved residues involved post-translational modification (PTM) in yeast, mouse and human Hsp90 proteins, data from this study could indicate that Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization is potentially regulated by PTMs involving phosphorylation and acetylation.

  16. The Effects of Hsp90α1 Mutations on Myosin Thick Filament Organization

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiuxia; Liu, Kechun; Tian, Zhenjun; Du, Shao Jun

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90α plays a key role in myosin folding and thick filament assembly in muscle cells. To assess the structure and function of Hsp90α and its potential regulation by post-translational modification, we developed a combined knockdown and rescue assay in zebrafish embryos to systematically analyze the effects of various mutations on Hsp90α function in myosin thick filament organization. DNA constructs expressing the Hsp90α1 mutants with altered putative ATP binding, phosphorylation, acetylation or methylation sites were co-injected with Hsp90α1 specific morpholino into zebrafish embryos. Myosin thick filament organization was analyzed in skeletal muscles of the injected embryos by immunostaining. The results showed that mutating the conserved D90 residue in the Hsp90α1 ATP binding domain abolished its function in thick filament organization. In addition, phosphorylation mimicking mutations of T33D, T33E and T87E compromised Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization. Similarly, K287Q acetylation mimicking mutation repressed Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization. In contrast, K206R and K608R hypomethylation mimicking mutations had not effect on Hsp90α1 function in thick filament organization. Given that T33 and T87 are highly conserved residues involved post-translational modification (PTM) in yeast, mouse and human Hsp90 proteins, data from this study could indicate that Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization is potentially regulated by PTMs involving phosphorylation and acetylation. PMID:26562659

  17. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in 10-nm filaments and microtubule preparations from bovine brain

    PubMed Central

    Runge, Marschall S.; Hewgley, Paula B.; Puett, David; Williams, Robley C.

    1979-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity (3′:5′-cyclic-AMP 5′-nucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.17), which is activatable by Ca2+-dependent regulator protein (CDR), has been identified in cycled microtubule preparations from bovine brain. By using various methods to fractionate the microtubule preparation into subfractions (e.g., phosphocellulose chromatography to obtain purified 6S tubulin and soluble microtubule-associated proteins, and gel exclusion chromatography on Bio-Gel A-150m to obtain 10-nm filaments), we found that all the fractions exhibited some enzymic activity, but that most of the phosphodiesterase activity was localized in the 10-nm filament fraction. By using cyclic GMP as substrate, a specific activity of 921 ± 168 pmol/mg of filament protein·min was determined. Also, 10-nm filaments were prepared directly from brain homogenates by differential centrifugation and gel exclusion chromatography. This fraction also contained phosphodiesterase activity but of slightly lower specific activity (752 ± 9 pmol/mg of protein·min). The filament-associated enzymic activity was stable during storage (-70°C) and to several salt extractions at moderate ionic strength (0.5 M); the latter finding indicates that the phosphodiesterase is not adsorbed to the filaments via nonspecific electrostatic interactions. Although a chelating agent was present in the initial homogenization buffer and generally in all buffers used in preparing fractions, an activator of a smooth muscle phosphodiesterase was released upon boiling the 10-nm filaments. This activator obtained in the boiled supernatant was Ca2+-sensitive, trifluoperazine-sensitive, and stimulated smooth muscle phosphodiesterase to nearly the same extent as purified (exogenous) CDR; thus, it probably represents filament-associated CDR. Images PMID:223149

  18. Actin filaments in the acrosomal reaction of Limulus sperm. Motion generated by alterations in the packing of the filaments

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    When Limulus sperm are induced to undergo the acrosomal reaction, a process, 50 mum in length, is generated in a few seconds. This process rotates as it elongates; thus the acrosomal process literally screws through the jelly of the egg. Within the process is a bundle of filaments which before induction are coiled up inside the sperm. The filament bundle exists in three stable states in the sperm. One of the states can be isolated in pure form. It is composed of only three proteins whose molecular weights (mol wt) are 43,000, 55,000, and 95,000. The 43,000 mol wt protein is actin, based on its molecular weight, net charge, morphology, G-F transformation, and heavy meromyosin (HMM) binding. The 55,000 mol wt protein is in equimolar ratio to actin and is not tubulin, binds tenaciously to actin, and inhibits HMM binding. Evidence is presented that both the 55,000 mol wt protein and the 95,000 mol wt protein (possibly alpha-actinin) are also present in Limulus muscle. Presumably these proteins function in the sperm in holding the actin filaments together. Before the acrosomal reaction, the actin filaments are twisted over one another in a supercoil; when the reaction is completed, the filaments lie parallel to each other and form an actin paracrystal. This change in their packing appears to give rise to the motion of the acrosomal process and is under the control of the 55,000 mol wt protein and the 95,000 mol wt protein. PMID:1117029

  19. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation.

    PubMed

    Lehman, William; Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems.

  20. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation

    PubMed Central

    Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems. PMID:23666668

  1. E93K charge reversal on actin perturbs steric regulation of thin filaments.

    PubMed

    Cammarato, Anthony; Craig, Roger; Sparrow, John C; Lehman, William

    2005-04-15

    Contraction in striated muscles is regulated by Ca2+-dependent movement of tropomyosin-troponin on thin filaments. Interactions of charged amino acid residues between the surfaces of tropomyosin and actin are believed to play an integral role in this steric mechanism by influencing the position of tropomyosin on the filaments. To investigate this possibility further, thin filaments were isolated from troponin-regulated, indirect flight muscles of Drosophila mutants that express actin with an amino acid charge reversal at residue 93 located at the interface between actin subdomains 1 and 2, in which a lysine residue is substituted for a glutamic acid. Electron microscopy and 3D helical reconstruction were employed to evaluate the structural effects of the mutation. In the absence of Ca2+, tropomyosin was in a position that blocked the myosin-binding sites on actin, as previously found with wild-type filaments. However, in the presence of Ca2+, tropomyosin position in the mutant filaments was much more variable than in the wild-type ones. In most cases (approximately 60%), tropomyosin remained in the blocking position despite the presence of Ca2+, failing to undergo a normal Ca2+-induced change in position. Thus, switching of a negative to a positive charge at position 93 on actin may stabilize negatively charged tropomyosin in the Ca2+-free state regardless of Ca2+ levels, an alteration that, in turn, is likely to interfere with steric regulation and consequently muscle activation. These results highlight the importance of actin's surface charges in determining the distribution of tropomyosin positions on thin filaments derived from troponin-regulated striated muscles.

  2. The Many Fates of Retracting Newtonian Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Christopher; Thete, Sumeet; Harris, Michael; Basaran, Osman

    2016-11-01

    The retraction of Newtonian filaments plays a central role in applications as diverse as inkjet printing and atomization where formation of satellite droplets is undesirable. In order to avoid satellite drop production, filaments formed after drop, jet, or sheet breakup should contract to spheres without undergoing further pinch-off. Therefore, it is important to understand all of the dynamical responses that can arise during filament recoil. To accomplish this goal, we use high accuracy simulations to analyze the retraction of Newtonian filaments in a passive ambient fluid. Previously, Notz and Basaran described the fate of low-viscosity filaments. More recent works by Hoepffner and Pare on intermediate viscosity filaments and by Lohse et al. on high viscosity filaments have greatly enhanced our understanding of filament recoil. Unfortunately, taking all of these works in aggregate does not provide a comprehensive picture of filament dynamics. Here, we overcome the deficiencies of these earlier studies to provide a comprehensive analysis of filament recoil and arrive at a complete phase diagram of the system response. While doing so, we also uncover a new mode of filament breakup that has been missed by earlier investigators.

  3. Intermediate Filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zuela, Noam; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    More than 70 different genes in humans and 12 different genes in Caenorhabditis elegans encode the superfamily of intermediate filament (IF) proteins. In C. elegans, similar to humans, these proteins are expressed in a cell- and tissue-specific manner, can assemble into heteropolymers and into 5-10nm wide filaments that account for the principal structural elements at the nuclear periphery, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. At least 5 of the 11 cytoplasmic IFs, as well as the nuclear IF, lamin, are essential. In this chapter, we will include a short review of our current knowledge of both cytoplasmic and nuclear IFs in C. elegans and will describe techniques used for their analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Kurz, Heiko G.; Bergé, Luc; Skupin, Stefan; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled to the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which has been paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions in the picosecond regime are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. In focused propagation geometry, a unique feature of picosecond filamentation is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for many applications including laser-guided electrical breakdown of air, channeling microwave beams and air lasing.

  5. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system.

  6. UNUSUAL FILAMENTS INSIDE THE UMBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kleint, L.

    2013-06-10

    We analyze several unusual filamentary structures which appeared in the umbra of one of the sunspots in AR 11302. They do not resemble typical light bridges in morphology or in evolution. We analyze data from SDO/HMI to investigate their temporal evolution, Hinode/SP for photospheric inversions, IBIS for chromospheric imaging, and SDO/AIA for the overlying corona. Photospheric inversions reveal a horizontal, inverse Evershed flow along these structures, which we call umbral filaments. Chromospheric images show brightenings and energy dissipation, while coronal images indicate that bright coronal loops seem to end in these umbral filaments. These rapidly evolving features do not seem to be common, and are possibly related to the high flare-productivity of the active region. Their analysis could help to understand the complex evolution of active regions.

  7. PARTIAL SLINGSHOT RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yunchun; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Zheng, Ruisheng; Yang, Bo; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan

    2013-02-10

    We present a rare observation of an interaction between two filaments around AR 11358 and AR 11361 on 2011 December 3 that is strongly suggestive of the occurrence of slingshot reconnection. A small elbow-shaped active-region filament (F12) underwent a failed eruption that brought it into contact with a nearby larger, thicker filament (F34). Accompanied by the appearance of complicated internal structures below the erupting F12, its two legs separated away from each other and then connected into F34. This process led the filaments to change their connectivity to form two newly linked filaments, and one of them showed a clear inverse {gamma}-shape. However, the alteration in the filament connectivity was imperfect since F34 is discernible after the eruption. These observations can be interpreted as a partial slingshot reconnection between two filaments that had unequal axial magnetic flux.

  8. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  9. The stability of viscous liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driessen, Theo; Jeurissen, Roger; Wijshoff, Herman; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-11-01

    The stability of liquid filaments is relevant both in industrial applications, such as inkjet printing and atomization, and in nature, where the stability of filaments has a large influence on the final drop size distribution of rain droplets and waterfalls. The liquid filament may either stably collapse into a single droplet, or break up into multiple droplets. Which scenario is realized depends on the viscosity and the aspect ratio of the filament. Here we study the collapse of an axisymmetric liquid filament is analytically and with a numerical model. We find that a long, high viscous filament can only break up due to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability, whereas a low viscous filament can break up due to end-pinching. The theory shows quantitative agreement with recent experimental findings by Castréjon-Pita et al., PRL 108, 074506 (2012).

  10. Dynamics of 3D isolated thermal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, N. R.; Easy, L.; Militello, F.; Omotani, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations have been carried out to establish how electron thermal physics, introduced in the form of a dynamic electron temperature, affects isolated filament motion and dynamics in 3D. It is found that thermal effects impact filament motion in two major ways when the pressure perturbation within the filament is supported primarily through a temperature increase as opposed to density: they lead to a strong increase in filament propagation in the bi-normal direction and a significant decrease in net radial propagation. Both effects arise from the temperature dependence of the sheath current which leads to a non-uniform floating potential, with the latter effect supplemented by faster pressure loss. The reduction in radial velocity can only occur when the filament cross-section loses angular symmetry. The behaviour is observed across different filament sizes and suggests that filaments with much larger temperature perturbations than density perturbations are more strongly confined to the near SOL region.

  11. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  12. Temperature of a lightbulb filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardo, Bruce

    2002-02-01

    A standard problem in introductory physics books is to use the temperature coefficient of resistivity to calculate the operating temperature of an incandescent lightbulb filament or heating wire. This assumes a linear variation of resistivity with temperature, which is shown to be significantly incorrect for a 120-V 60-W lightbulb. A discussion of this error can be included with a lecture calculation of the temperature.

  13. Mechanics of vimentin intermediate filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Stamenovic, Dimitrijie

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that the cytoskeleton of living cells plays important roles in mechanical and biological functions of the cells. Here we focus on the contribution of intermediate filaments (IFs) to the mechanical behaviors of living cells. Vimentin, a major structural component of IFs in many cell types, is shown to play an important role in vital mechanical and biological functions such as cell contractility, migration, stiffness, stiffening, and proliferation.

  14. Mechanics of vimentin intermediate filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Stamenovic, Dimitrijie

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that the cytoskeleton of living cells plays important roles in mechanical and biological functions of the cells. Here we focus on the contribution of intermediate filaments (IFs) to the mechanical behaviors of living cells. Vimentin, a major structural component of IFs in many cell types, is shown to play an important role in vital mechanical and biological functions such as cell contractility, migration, stiffness, stiffening, and proliferation.

  15. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies.

  16. Simulations of Filament Channel Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    A major unexplained feature of the solar atmosphere is the accumulation of magnetic shear, in the form of filament channels, at photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). In addition to free energy, this shear also represents magnetic helicity, which is conserved under reconnection. In this work, we address the problem of filament channel formation and show how they acquire their shear and magnetic helicity. Results of 3D MHD simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) are presented that support the magnetic helicity-condensation model of filament-channel formation described by Antiochos, 2013. We consider the supergranular twisting of a quasi-potential flux system that is bounded by a PIL and contains a coronal hole (CH). The magnetic helicity injected by the small-scale photospheric motions is shown to inverse-cascade up to the largest allowable scales that define the closed flux system: the PIL and the CH boundary. This process produces field lines that are both sheared and smooth, and are sheared in opposite senses at the PIL and the CH. The accumulated helicity and shear flux are shown to be in excellent quantitative agreement with the helicity-condensation model. We present a detailed analysis of the simulation, including comparisons of our analytical and numerical results, and discuss their implications for observations.

  17. Dynamics of heteromolecular filament formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dear, Alexander J.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-11-01

    The self-assembly of molecular building blocks into linear filaments is a common form of self-organization in nature and underlies the formation of supra-molecular polymers in a variety of contexts, including in both functional and aberrant biology. To date, attention has focused mainly on homomolecular assembly phenomena; however, it has recently become apparent that heteromolecular assemblies can be common, and, for instance, pathological protein filaments such as amyloid aggregates form in vivo in environments supporting copolymerization. Here, we present a general kinetic scheme for heteromolecular filament formation and derive closed-form analytical expressions that describe the dynamics of such systems. Our results reveal the existence of a demixing transition time controlled by the relative rates of depletion of the different aggregating species, after which predominantly homomolecular polymers are formed even when the initial solution is heteromolecular. Furthermore, these results may be applied to the analysis of experimental kinetic data on the aggregation of mixtures of proteins, to determine which fundamental reaction steps occur between unlike proteins, and to provide accurate estimates of their rate constants.

  18. Structural basis of the relaxed state of a Ca2+-regulated myosin filament and its evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Woodhead, John L; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger

    2013-05-21

    Myosin filaments of muscle are regulated either by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains or Ca(2+) binding to the essential light chains, contributing to on-off switching or modulation of contraction. Phosphorylation-regulated filaments in the relaxed state are characterized by an asymmetric interaction between the two myosin heads, inhibiting their actin binding or ATPase activity. Here, we have tested whether a similar interaction switches off activity in myosin filaments regulated by Ca(2+) binding. Cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle image reconstruction of Ca(2+)-regulated (scallop) filaments reveals a helical array of myosin head-pair motifs above the filament surface. Docking of atomic models of scallop myosin head domains into the motifs reveals that the heads interact in a similar way to those in phosphorylation-regulated filaments. The results imply that the two major evolutionary branches of myosin regulation--involving phosphorylation or Ca(2+) binding--share a common structural mechanism for switching off thick-filament activity in relaxed muscle. We suggest that the Ca(2+)-binding mechanism evolved from the more ancient phosphorylation-based system to enable rapid response of myosin-regulated muscles to activation. Although the motifs are similar in both systems, the scallop structure is more tilted and higher above the filament backbone, leading to different intermolecular interactions. The reconstruction reveals how the myosin tail emerges from the motif, connecting the heads to the filament backbone, and shows that the backbone is built from supramolecular assemblies of myosin tails. The reconstruction provides a native structural context for understanding past biochemical and biophysical studies of this model Ca(2+)-regulated myosin.

  19. The tymbal muscle of cicada has flight muscle-type sarcomeric architecture and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The structural and biochemical features of the tymbal (sound-producing) muscle of cicadas were studied by X-ray diffraction and immunochemistry, and compared with those of flight muscles from the same species. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the tymbal muscle was very similar to that of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscle: In both muscles, the 2,0 equatorial reflection is much more intense than the 1,1, indicating that both muscles have a flight muscle-type myofilament lattice. In rigor, the first myosin/actin layer line reflection was finely lattice-sampled, indicating that the contractile proteins are arranged with a crystalline regularity as in asynchronous flight muscles. In contrast, the diffraction pattern from the tensor muscle, which modulates the sound by stressing the tymbal, did not show signs of such high regularity or flight muscle-type filament lattice. Electrophoretic patterns of myofibrillar proteins were also very similar in the tymbal muscle and flight muscles, but distinct from those from the tensor or leg muscles. The antibody raised against the flight muscle-specific troponin-I isoform reacted with an 80-kDa band from both tymbal and flight muscles, but with none of the bands from the tensor or leg muscles. The close similarities of the structural and biochemical profiles between the tymbal and the flight muscles suggest the possibility that a set of flight muscle-specific proteins is diverted to the tymbal muscle to meet its demand for fast, repetitive contractions.

  20. A new paradigm for muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Walter; Powers, Krysta; Johnston, Kaleena; Duvall, Mike

    2015-01-01

    For the past 60 years, muscle contraction had been thought to be governed exclusively by the contractile filaments, actin, and myosin. This thinking explained most observations for concentric and isometric, but not for eccentric muscle contractions. Just over a decade ago, we discovered that eccentric contractions were associated with a force that could not be assigned to actin and myosin, but was at least in part associated with the filamentous protein titin. Titin was found to bind calcium upon activation, thereby increasing its structural stability, and thus its stiffness and force. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that the proximal part of titin binds to actin in an activation- and force-dependent manner, thereby shortening its free length, thus increasing its stiffness and force. Therefore, we propose that muscle contraction involves three filaments, actin, myosin and titin, and that titin regulates force by binding calcium and by shortening its spring length by binding to actin. PMID:26113821

  1. Photospheric flows around a quiescent filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondi, S.; Roudier, Th.; Molodij, G.; Bommier, V.; Keil, S.; Sütterlin, P.; Malherbe, J. M.; Meunier, N.; Schmieder, B.; Maloney, P.

    2007-06-01

    Context: The horizontal photospheric flows below and around a filament are one of the components in the formation and evolution of filaments. Few studies exist because they require multiwalength time sequences at high spatial resolution. Aims: Our objective is to measure the horizontal photospheric flows associated with the evolution and eruption of a filament. Methods: We present observations obtained in 2004 during the international JOP 178 campaign which involved eleven instruments both in space and at ground based observatories. We use TRACE WL, DOT and DST observation to derive flow maps which are then coaligned with intensity images and with the vector magnetic field map obtained with THEMIS/MTR. Results: Several supergranulation cells cross the Polarity Inversion Line (PIL) and can transport magnetic flux through the PIL, in particular parasitic polarities. We present a detailed example of the formation of a secondary magnetic dip at the location of a filament footpoint. Large-scale converging flows, which could exist along the filament channel and contribute to its formation, are not observed. Before the filament's eruptive phase, we observe both parasitic and normal polarities being swept by a continuously diverging horizontal flow located in the filament gap. The disappearance of the filament initiates in this gap. Such purely horizontal motions could lead to destabilization of the filament and could trigger the sudden filament disappearance.

  2. Chirality and Magnetic Configurations of Solar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Y.; Zhou, Y. H.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.

    2017-01-01

    It has been revealed that the magnetic topology in the solar atmosphere displays hemispheric preference, i.e., helicity is mainly negative/positive in the northern/southern hemispheres, respectively. However, the strength of the hemispheric rule and its cyclic variation are controversial. In this paper, we apply a new method based on the filament drainage to 571 erupting filaments from 2010 May to 2015 December in order to determine the filament chirality and its hemispheric preference. It is found that 91.6% of our sample of erupting filaments follows the hemispheric rule of helicity sign. It is also found that the strength of the hemispheric preference of the quiescent filaments decreases slightly from ˜97% in the rising phase to ˜85% in the declining phase of solar cycle 24, whereas the strength of the intermediate filaments keeps a high value around 96 ± 4% at all times. Only the active-region filaments show significant variations. Their strength of the hemispheric rule rises from ˜63% to ˜95% in the rising phase, and keeps a high value of 82% ± 5% during the declining phase. Furthermore, during a half-year period around the solar maximum, their hemispheric preference totally vanishes. Additionally, we also diagnose the magnetic configurations of the filaments based on our indirect method and find that in our sample of erupting events, 89% are inverse-polarity filaments with a flux rope magnetic configuration, whereas 11% are normal-polarity filaments with a sheared arcade configuration.

  3. Actin filament curvature biases branching direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evan; Risca, Viviana; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Chia, Jia-Jun; Geissler, Phillip; Fletcher, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Actin filaments are key components of the cellular machinery, vital for a wide range of processes ranging from cell motility to endocytosis. Actin filaments can branch, and essential in this process is a protein complex known as the Arp2/3 complex, which nucleate new ``daughter'' filaments from pre-existing ``mother'' filaments by attaching itself to the mother filament. Though much progress has been made in understanding the Arp2/3-actin junction, some very interesting questions remain. In particular, F-actin is a dynamic polymer that undergoes a wide range of fluctuations. Prior studies of the Arp2/3-actin junction provides a very static notion of Arp2/3 binding. The question we ask is how differently does the Arp2/3 complex interact with a straight filament compared to a bent filament? In this study, we used Monte Carlo simulations of a surface-tethered worm-like chain to explore possible mechanisms underlying the experimental observation that there exists preferential branch formation by the Arp2/3 complex on the convex face of a curved filament. We show that a fluctuation gating model in which Arp2/3 binding to the actin filament is dependent upon a rare high-local-curvature shape fluctuation of the filament is consistent with the experimental data.

  4. Dynamics of Contracting Asymmetric Viscoelastic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Christopher; Thete, Sumeet; Appathurai, Santosh; Bhat, Pradeep; Basaran, Osman; Harris, Michael

    2013-11-01

    In ink-jet printing and atomization, slender filaments are routinely formed. Such filaments either contract to form a single drop or breakup into multiple drops, e.g. by end pinching. Beginning with papers by Schulkes (1996) and Notz & Basaran (2004), past studies have focused exclusively on the contraction dynamics of Newtonian filaments. Also in these studies, initial filament shapes are taken to be long cylinders terminated by two identical spherical caps (symmetric filaments). In emerging applications, e.g. ink-jet printing of complex fluids, the filaments are viscoelastic (VE) fluids. Moreover, older experiments by Notz et al. (2001) and more recent ones by Castrejón-Pita et al. (2012) show that initial filament shapes resemble long, tapered cylinders terminated by hemispherical caps of unequal radii (asymmetric filaments). Therefore, we analyze the contraction dynamics of both asymmetric and symmetric filaments of VE fluids using the Giesekus model. Rather than solving the full set of equations governing the problem, we take advantage of filament slenderness and solve a much simpler set of 1D equations (Eggers, 1997). We then use a finite element method with Streamline Upwind/Petrov Galerkin (SUPG) formulation (Brooks & Hughes, 1982) to solve the reduced equations.

  5. Actin filament curvature biases branching direction

    PubMed Central

    Risca, Viviana I.; Wang, Evan B.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Chia, Jia Jun; Geissler, Phillip L.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical cues affect many important biological processes in metazoan cells, such as migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Such cues are thought to be detected by specialized mechanosensing molecules linked to the cytoskeleton, an intracellular network of protein filaments that provide mechanical rigidity to the cell and drive cellular shape change. The most abundant such filament, actin, forms branched networks nucleated by the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex that support or induce membrane protrusions and display adaptive behavior in response to compressive forces. Here we show that filamentous actin serves in a mechanosensitive capacity itself, by biasing the location of actin branch nucleation in response to filament bending. Using an in vitro assay to measure branching from curved sections of immobilized actin filaments, we observed preferential branch formation by the Arp2/3 complex on the convex face of the curved filament. To explain this behavior, we propose a fluctuation gating model in which filament binding or branch nucleation by Arp2/3 occur only when a sufficiently large, transient, local curvature fluctuation causes a favorable conformational change in the filament, and we show with Monte Carlo simulations that this model can quantitatively account for our experimental data. We also show how the branching bias can reinforce actin networks in response to compressive forces. These results demonstrate how filament curvature can alter the interaction of cytoskeletal filaments with regulatory proteins, suggesting that direct mechanotransduction by actin may serve as a general mechanism for organizing the cytoskeleton in response to force. PMID:22308368

  6. A penny-shaped crack in a filament reinforced matrix. 1: The filament model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack was studied. The elastic filament model was developed for application to evaluation studies of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. The requirements expected of the model are a sufficiently accurate representation of the filament and applicability to the interaction problems involving a cracked elastic continuum with multi-filament reinforcements. The technique for developing the model and numerical examples of it are shown.

  7. Diagnosis of femtosecond plasma filament by channeling microwaves along the filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Ren, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a simple, fast, and non-intrusive experimental method to obtain the basic parameters of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filament. The method is based on the channeling of microwaves along both a plasma filament and a well-defined conducting wire. By comparing the detected microwaves that propagate along the plasma filament and a copper wire with known conductivity and spatial dimension, the basic parameters of the plasma filament can be easily obtained. As a result of the possibility of channeling microwave radiation along the plasma filament, we were then able to obtain the plasma density distribution along the filament length.

  8. Diagnosis of femtosecond plasma filament by channeling microwaves along the filament

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Ren, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-05-20

    We introduce a simple, fast, and non-intrusive experimental method to obtain the basic parameters of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filament. The method is based on the channeling of microwaves along both a plasma filament and a well-defined conducting wire. By comparing the detected microwaves that propagate along the plasma filament and a copper wire with known conductivity and spatial dimension, the basic parameters of the plasma filament can be easily obtained. As a result of the possibility of channeling microwave radiation along the plasma filament, we were then able to obtain the plasma density distribution along the filament length.

  9. Structure and Dynamics of the Actin-Based Smooth Muscle Contractile and Cytoskeletal Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, William; Morgan, Kathleen G.

    2012-01-01

    The thin filaments of differentiated smooth muscle cells are composed of actin and tropomyosin isoforms and numerous ancillary actin-binding proteins that assemble together into distinct thin filament classes. These different filament classes are segregated in smooth muscle cells into structurally and functionally separated contractile and cytoskeletal cellular domains. Typically, thin filaments in smooth muscle cells have been considered to be relatively stable structures like those in striated cells. However, recent efforts have shown that smooth muscle thin filaments indeed are dynamic and that remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, in particular, regulates smooth muscle function. Thus, the cytoskeleton of differentiated smooth muscle cells appears to function midway between that of less dynamic striated muscle cells and that of very plastic proliferative cells such as fibroblasts. Michael and Kate Bárány keenly followed and participated in some of these studies, consistent with their broad interest in actin function and smooth muscle mechanisms. As a way of honoring the memory of these two pioneer members of the muscle research community, we review data on distribution and remodeling of thin filaments in smooth muscle cells, one of the many research topics that intrigued them. PMID:22311558

  10. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huai Liang; Chin, See Leang

    2011-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints) from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation. PMID:22346566

  11. Intestinal smooth muscle cell maintenance by basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M; Stelzner, Matthias; Reichardt, Holger M; Dunn, James C Y

    2008-08-01

    Intestinal tissue engineering is a potential therapy for patients with short bowel syndrome. Tissue engineering scaffolds that promote smooth muscle cell proliferation and angiogenesis are essential toward the regeneration of functional smooth muscles for peristalsis and motility. Since basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) can stimulate smooth muscle proliferation and angiogenesis, the delivery of bFGF was employed to stimulate proliferation and survival of primary intestinal smooth muscle cells. Two methods of local bFGF delivery were examined: the incorporation of bFGF into the collagen coating and the encapsulation of bFGF into poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. Cell-seeded scaffolds were implanted into the omentum and were retrieved after 4, 14, and 28 days. The seeded cells proliferated from day 4 to day 14 in all implants; however, at 28 days, significantly higher density of implanted cells and blood vessels was observed, when 10 microg of bFGF was incorporated into the collagen coating of scaffolds as compared to scaffolds with either no bFGF or 1 microg of bFGF in collagen. Microsphere encapsulation of 1 microg of bFGF produced similar effects as 10 microg of bFGF mixed in collagen and was more effective than the delivery of 1 microg of bFGF by collagen incorporation. The majority of the implanted cells also expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin. Scaffolds coated with microsphere-encapsulated bFGF and seeded with smooth muscle cells may be a useful platform for the regeneration of the intestinal smooth muscle.

  12. Sequential Myosin Phosphorylation Activates Tarantula Thick Filament via a Disorder-Order Transition

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D.; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscle and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscle, which is regulated by Ca2+ via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca2+4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectories analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridges network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif made up by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural change. However, phosphorylation of free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH inter-domain folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head, facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID:26038232

  13. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition.

  14. Motion, decay and merging of vortex filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Ting, L.

    1988-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for vortex filaments of finite strength with small effective vortical cores are summarized. Emphases are placed on the physical meaning and the practical limit to the applicability of the asymptotic solution. Finite-difference solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for the merging of the filament(s) are described. It is focused on the development of the approximate boundary conditions for the computational domain.

  15. Studies on UV filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.; Rambo, P.; Diels, J.C.; Luk, T.S.; Bernstein, A.C.; Cameron, S.M.

    2000-01-05

    UV filaments in air have been examined on the basis of the diameter and length of the filament, the generation of new spectral components, and the ionization by multiphoton processes. There have been numerous observations of filaments at 800 nm. The general perception is that, above a critical power, the beam focuses because nonlinear self-lensing overcomes diffraction. The self-focusing proceeds until an opposing higher order nonlinearity forms a stable balance.

  16. Filamentous Biological Entities Obtained from the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, Milton; Rose, Christopher E.; Baker, Alexander J.; Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra

    2013-03-01

    We previously reported the presence of large, non-filamentous, biological entities including a diatom fragment in the stratosphere at heights of between 22-27km. Here we report clear evidence for the presence of filamentous entities associated with a relatively large particle mass collected from the stratosphere. Although viable fungi have previously been isolated from the stratosphere, this is the first report of a filamentous microorganism being observed in situ on a stratospheric particle mass.

  17. Self-Organization of Treadmilling Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovinski, K.; Kruse, K.

    2007-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is an active network of polar filaments. The activity can lead to the polymerization of filaments at one end and depolymerization at the other. This phenomenon is called treadmilling and is essential for many cellular processes, in particular, the crawling of cells on a substrate. We develop a microscopic theoretical framework for describing systems of treadmilling filaments. We show that such systems can self-organize into structures observed in cell fragments, in particular, asters and moving spots.

  18. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.

  19. Aluminum modifies the viscosity of filamentous actin solutions as measured by optical displacement microviscometry.

    PubMed

    Arnoys, E J; Schindler, M

    2000-01-01

    A microtechnique has been developed that is capable of measuring the viscosity of filamentous actin (F-actin) solutions. This method, called optical displacement microviscometry (ODM), was utilized to determine the changes in viscosity of solutions of rabbit muscle, human platelet, and maize pollen actin when measured in the absence and presence of aluminum. Measurements demonstrated that the viscosity of the different actin solutions decreased with aluminum concentration. In contrast, increases in viscosity were observed when aluminum was added to F-actin solutions containing filamin (chicken gizzard), a protein that bundles actin filaments. Confocal fluorescence imaging of pure actin solutions in the presence of aluminum showed a disrupted actin network composed of fragmented actin filaments in the form of small aggregates. In contrast, in the presence of filamin, aluminum promoted the formation of thicker actin filaments. These measurements demonstrate that aluminum can affect actin filaments differentially depending on the presence of an actin-binding protein. In addition, a strong correlation is observed between the changes in viscosity as measured by ODM and the thickness and assembled state of bundles of actin filaments.

  20. Isolation, Electron Microscopy and 3D Reconstruction of Invertebrate Muscle Myofilaments

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction and its regulation has been greatly influenced and aided by studies of myofilament structure in invertebrate muscles. Invertebrates are easily obtained and cover a broad spectrum of species and functional specializations. The thick (myosin-containing) filaments from some invertebrates are especially stable and simple in structure and thus much more amenable to structural analysis than those of vertebrates. Comparative studies of invertebrate filaments by electron microscopy and image processing have provided important generalizations of muscle molecular structure and function. This article reviews methods for preparing thick and thin filaments from invertebrate muscle, for imaging filaments by electron microscopy, and for determining their three dimensional structure by image processing. It also highlights some of the key insights into filament function that have come from these studies. PMID:22155190

  1. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three- dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells. PMID:6682423

  2. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Niederman, R; Amrein, P C; Hartwig, J

    1983-05-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three-dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells.

  3. Roles of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 in fibrogenic/adipogenic differentiation in skeletal muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shiho; Nakano, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Ozoe, Atsufumi; Chien, Peggie; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Saeki, Yasushi; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2016-10-01

    Intramuscular adipose tissue and fibrous tissue are observed in some skeletal muscle pathologies such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia, and affect muscle strength and myogenesis. They originate from common fibrogenic/adipogenic cells in the skeletal muscle. Thus, elucidating the regulatory mechanisms underlying fibrogenic/adipogenic cell differentiation is an important step toward the mediation of these disorders. Previously, we established a highly adipogenic progenitor clone, 2G11, from rat skeletal muscle and showed that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is pro-adipogenic in these cells. Here, we demonstrated that 2G11 cells give rise to fibroblasts upon transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulation, indicating that they possess mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC)-like characteristics. The previously reported MPC marker PDGFRα is expressed in other cell populations. Accordingly, we produced monoclonal antibodies that specifically bind to 2G11 cell surface antigens and identified chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) as a potential MPC marker. Based on an RNA interference analysis, we found that CSPG4 is involved in both the pro-adipogenic effect of bFGF and in TGF-β-induced alpha smooth muscle actin expression and stress fiber formation. By establishing an additional marker for MPC detection and characterizing its role in fibrogenic/adipogenic differentiation, these results will facilitate the development of effective treatments for skeletal muscle pathologies.

  4. Observations of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.; Xu, A. A.

    An active region filament was well observed on September 4, 2002 with THEMIS at the Teide observatory and SOHO/MDI. The full Stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα and FeI 6302 Å lines. Using the data, we have studied the fine structure of the filament and obtained the parameters at the barb endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Our results indicate: (a) the Doppler velocities are quiet different at barb endpoints; (b) the longitudinal magnetic fields at the barb endpoints are very weak; (c) there is a strong magnetic field structure under the filament spine.

  5. Hydrodynamic interactions between nearby slender filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yi; Koens, Lyndon; Lauga, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Cellular biology abound with filaments interacting through fluids, from intracellular microtubules, to rotating flagella and beating cilia. While previous work has demonstrated the complexity of capturing nonlocal hydrodynamic interactions between moving filaments, the problem remains difficult theoretically. We show here that when filaments are closer to each other than their relevant length scale, the integration of hydrodynamic interactions can be approximately carried out analytically. This leads to a set of simplified local equations, illustrated on a simple model of two interacting filaments, which can be used to tackle theoretically a range of problems in biology and physics.

  6. Measurement of birefringence inside a filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Shuai; Wang, Tie-Jun; Chin, See Leang; Kosareva, Olga; Panov, Nikolay; Makarov, Vladimir; Zeng Heping

    2011-07-15

    We quantified the ultrafast birefringence induced in the filament in an atomic gas by measuring the filament-induced polarization rotation of a probe pulse. Based on the dephasing of the probe's orthogonal polarization components in argon, the experiment was done at 1 atm by copropagating a linearly polarized 400-nm probe pulse with an 800-nm pump pulse which generated the filament. The probe's elliptical polarization states were shown under various initial pump-probe polarization schemes. These states were verified by comparing the filament-induced probe polarization rotation angle and the ellipticity of the probe polarization.

  7. The Regulation of Filamentous Growth in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul J.; Sprague, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous growth is a nutrient-regulated growth response that occurs in many fungal species. In pathogens, filamentous growth is critical for host–cell attachment, invasion into tissues, and virulence. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes filamentous growth, which provides a genetically tractable system to study the molecular basis of the response. Filamentous growth is regulated by evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways. One of these pathways is a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A remarkable feature of the filamentous growth MAPK pathway is that it is composed of factors that also function in other pathways. An intriguing challenge therefore has been to understand how pathways that share components establish and maintain their identity. Other canonical signaling pathways—rat sarcoma/protein kinase A (RAS/PKA), sucrose nonfermentable (SNF), and target of rapamycin (TOR)—also regulate filamentous growth, which raises the question of how signals from multiple pathways become integrated into a coordinated response. Together, these pathways regulate cell differentiation to the filamentous type, which is characterized by changes in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and cell shape. How these changes are accomplished is also discussed. High-throughput genomics approaches have recently uncovered new connections to filamentous growth regulation. These connections suggest that filamentous growth is a more complex and globally regulated behavior than is currently appreciated, which may help to pave the way for future investigations into this eukaryotic cell differentiation behavior. PMID:22219507

  8. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  9. Deep coronal hole associated with quiescent filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesumaningrum, Rasdewita; Herdiwidjaya, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the morphology of quiescent filament observed by H-alpha Solar Telescope at Bosscha Observatory in association with coronal hole observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in 193 Å from Solar Dynamics Observatory. H-alpha images were processed by imaging softwares, namely Iris 5.59 and ImageJ, to enhance the signal to noise ratio and to identify the filament features associated with coronal hole. For images observed on October 12, 2011, November 14, 2011 and January 2, 2012, we identified distinct features of coronal holes above the quiescent filaments. This associated coronal holes have filament-like morphology with a thick long thread as it's `spine', defined as Deep Coronal Hole. Because of strong magnetic field of sunspot, these filaments and coronal holes emerged far from active region and lasted for several days. It is interesting as for segmented filament, deep coronal holes above the filaments lasted for a quite long period of time and merged. This association between filament and deep coronal hole can be explained by filament magnetic loop.

  10. Capillary breakup of armored liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Lin, Fangye; Ji, Chen

    2017-06-01

    An armored liquid filament is a liquid column wherein particles reside on the liquid-air interface rather than in the bulk of the filament, as is true of a suspension filament. Herein, the capillary breakup of armored liquid filaments is studied using a high-speed camera, where the thinning process can be divided into three stages: the armored liquid stage, the transition stage, and the liquid stage. At the armored liquid stage, the thinning is approximately uniform along the filament. In the transition stage, local deformation occurs and thinning is accelerated owing to the large curvature along the filament. Finally, at the liquid stage, the thinning behavior is similar to that of particle-free filaments. The main focus in the present work is on the armored liquid stage, wherein the volume density of particles in the liquid filament remains nearly constant. In addition, the relative distances between particles in the axial direction on the filament do not change at this stage. By defining an effective surface tension γeff, a model is established to estimate the neck thinning process at this stage.

  11. Radial Infall onto a Massive Molecular Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara

    2015-08-01

    The newly discovered massive molecular filament G32.02+0.05 (~70 pc long, 10^5 Msun) has been shaped and compressed by older generations of massive stars. The similarity of this filament in physical structure (density profile, temperature) to much smaller star-forming filaments, suggests that the mechanism to form such filaments is a universal process. The densest portion of the filament, apparent as an Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) appears to have been compressed on both sides by a pair of bubbles and now shows a range of massive star formation signatures throughout. We investigate the kinematics in this massive star-forming filament and find velocity coherence along the filament and global blue asymmetric line profiles. These line asymmetries are interpreted as a signature of large-scale radial collapse. Using line asymmetries observed with optically thick HCO+ (1-0) and optically thin H13CO+ (1-0) across a range of massive star forming regions in the filament, we estimate the global radial infall rate of the filament to range from a few 100 to a few 1000 Msun/Myr/pc^2. At its current infall rate the densest portions of the cloud will more than double their current mass within a Myr. The discovery of such a reservoir of infalling gas has important ramifications on the course of star formation in the cloud and on our overall understanding of star cluster formation.

  12. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  13. The specificity of the interaction between αB-crystallin and desmin filaments and its impact on filament aggregation and cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jayne L.; Der Perng, Ming; Prescott, Alan R.; Jansen, Karin A.; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Quinlan, Roy A.

    2013-01-01

    CRYAB (αB-crystallin) is expressed in many tissues and yet the R120G mutation in CRYAB causes tissue-specific pathologies, namely cardiomyopathy and cataract. Here, we present evidence to demonstrate that there is a specific functional interaction of CRYAB with desmin intermediate filaments that predisposes myocytes to disease caused by the R120G mutation. We use a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques to show that plant, animal and ascidian small heat-shock proteins (sHSPs) can interact with intermediate filaments. Nevertheless, the mutation R120G in CRYAB does specifically change that interaction when compared with equivalent substitutions in HSP27 (R140G) and into the Caenorhabditis elegans HSP16.2 (R95G). By transient transfection, we show that R120G CRYAB specifically promotes intermediate filament aggregation in MCF7 cells. The transient transfection of R120G CRYAB alone has no significant effect upon cell viability, although bundling of the endogenous intermediate filament network occurs and the mitochondria are concentrated into the perinuclear region. The combination of R120G CRYAB co-transfected with wild-type desmin, however, causes a significant reduction in cell viability. Therefore, we suggest that while there is an innate ability of sHSPs to interact with and to bind to intermediate filaments, it is the specific combination of desmin and CRYAB that compromises cell viability and this is potentially the key to the muscle pathology caused by the R120G CRYAB. PMID:23530264

  14. Filamentation with nonlinear Bessel vortices.

    PubMed

    Jukna, V; Milián, C; Xie, C; Itina, T; Dudley, J; Courvoisier, F; Couairon, A

    2014-10-20

    We present a new type of ring-shaped filaments featured by stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions to the laser beam propagation equation. Two different regimes are identified by direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear propagation of axicon focused Gaussian beams carrying helicity in a Kerr medium with multiphoton absorption: the stable nonlinear propagation regime corresponds to a slow beam reshaping into one of the stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions, called nonlinear Bessel vortices. The region of existence of nonlinear Bessel vortices is found semi-analytically. The influence of the Kerr nonlinearity and nonlinear losses on the beam shape is presented. Direct numerical simulations highlight the role of attractors played by nonlinear Bessel vortices in the stable propagation regime. Large input powers or small cone angles lead to the unstable propagation regime where nonlinear Bessel vortices break up into an helical multiple filament pattern or a more irregular structure. Nonlinear Bessel vortices are shown to be sufficiently intense to generate a ring-shaped filamentary ionized channel in the medium which is foreseen as opening the way to novel applications in laser material processing of transparent dielectrics.

  15. Microcyle conidiation in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Jung, Boknam; Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jungkwan

    2014-03-01

    The typical life cycle of filamentous fungi commonly involves asexual sporulation after vegetative growth in response to environmental factors. The production of asexual spores is critical in the life cycle of most filamentous fungi. Normally, conidia are produced from vegetative hyphae (termed mycelia). However, fungal species subjected to stress conditions exhibit an extremely simplified asexual life cycle, in which the conidia that germinate directly generate further conidia, without forming mycelia. This phenomenon has been termed as microcycle conidiation, and to date has been reported in more than 100 fungal species. In this review, first, we present the morphological properties of fungi during microcycle conidiation, and divide microcycle conidiation into four simple categories, even though fungal species exhibit a wide variety of morphological differences during microcycle conidiogenesis. Second, we describe the factors that influence microcycle conidiation in various fungal species, and present recent genetic studies that have identified the genes responsible for this process. Finally, we discuss the biological meaning and application of microcycle conidiation.

  16. The WSRT virgo filament survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, A.; Braun, R.

    2007-02-01

    In the last few years, the realization has emerged that the universal baryons are almost equally distributed by mass in three components: (1) galactic concentrations, (2) a warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) and (3) a diffuse intergalactic medium. These three components are predicted by hydrodynamical simulations and are probed by QSO absorption lines. To observe the WHIM in neutral hydrogen, observations are needed which are deeper than log( NHI) = 18. The WHIM should appear as a Cosmic Web, underlying the galaxies with higher column densities. We have used the WSRT to simulate a filled aperture by observing at very high hour angles, to reach very high column density sensitivity. To achieve even higher image fidelity, an accurate model of the WSRT primary beam was developed. This will be used in the joint deconvolution of the observations. To get a good overview of the distribution and kinematics of the Cosmic Web, a deep survey of 1500 square degrees of sky was undertaken, containing the galaxy filament extending between the Local Group and the Virgo Cluster. The auto-correlation data have been reduced and has an RMS of Δ NHI = 4.2 × 10 16 cm -2 over 20 km s -1. Several sources have been tentatively detected, which were previously unknown, as well as an indication for diffuse intergalactic filaments.

  17. Intermediate Filaments: Structure and Assembly.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the intermediate filament (IF) supergene family are ubiquitous structural components that comprise, in a cell type-specific manner, the cytoskeleton proper in animal tissues. All IF proteins show a distinctly organized, extended α-helical conformation prone to form two-stranded coiled coils, which are the basic building blocks of these highly flexible, stress-resistant cytoskeletal filaments. IF proteins are highly charged, thus representing versatile polyampholytes with multiple functions. Taking vimentin, keratins, and the nuclear lamins as our prime examples, we present an overview of their molecular and structural parameters. These, in turn, document the ability of IF proteins to form distinct, highly diverse supramolecular assemblies and biomaterials found, for example, at the inner nuclear membrane, throughout the cytoplasm, and in highly complex extracellular appendages, such as hair and nails, of vertebrate organisms. Ultimately, our aim is to set the stage for a more rational understanding of the immediate effects that missense mutations in IF genes have on cellular functions and for their far-reaching impact on the development of the numerous IF diseases caused by them.

  18. Stability and Reformation of Partially Eruptive Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Prasad Choudhary, Debi; Chandra, Ramesh; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Kayshap, Pradeep; Filippov, Boris; Uddin, Wahab

    We present an observation of the confined partial filament eruption on 4 August 2012 which later exhibits a rapid reformation along the same magnetic channel within ≈2 hours. We used BBSO and GONG Halpha as well as SDO AIA 171 Å observations to study the filament properties and its kinematics. SDO/AIA observations over the disk are used to study at coronal temperature the plasma dynamics associated with the filament. STEREO/SECCHI provides the limb observations of the filament dynamics. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure as evident in the Halpha observations and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, it is found that the filament chirality is sinistral. On the other hand, the activated enveloping flux rope shows right-handed twist in the SDO/AIA 171 Å observations. Therefore, this dynamic event exhibits one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). Filament plasma goes into dynamic motion at ≈11:20 UT from its middle part towards the north-west direction with an average speed of ≈100 km s(-1) . Brightening underneath the eruptive part of the filament shows the most likely signature of low atmospheric reconnection. After traveling a distance of around ≈215 Mm towards north-west, the cool filament plasma stops and returns back at ≈12:00 UT towards its eastern foot point with the speed of ≈60 km s(-1) . We calculated the coronal magnetic field decay index (n) near the flux rope. Using this estimation, we conjecture that the filament lies within the stability domain n <1, which is the cause of its stability and possibility of prompt reformation.

  19. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  20. Growth of filaments and saturation of the filamentation instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gedalin, M.; Medvedev, M.; Spitkovsky, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Vaivads, A.; Perri, S.

    2010-03-15

    The filamentation instability of counterstreaming beams is a nonresonant hydrodynamic-type instability whose growth rate is a smooth function of the wavelength (scale). As a result, perturbations with all unstable wavelengths develop, and the growth saturates due to the saturation of available current. For a given scale, the magnetic field at saturation is proportional to the scale. As a result, the instability develops in a nearly linear regime, where the unstable modes stop growing as soon as the saturation of the corresponding wavelength is reached. At each moment there exists a dominant scale of the magnetic field which is the scale that reached saturation at this particular time. The smaller scales do not disappear and can be easily distinguished in the current structure. The overall growth of the instability stops when the loss of the streaming ion energy because of deceleration is comparable to the initial ion energy.

  1. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  2. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  3. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  4. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  5. Skeletal muscle tissue in movement and health: positives and negatives.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Stan L

    2016-01-01

    The history of muscle physiology is a wonderful lesson in 'the scientific method'; our functional hypotheses have been limited by our ability to decipher (observe) muscle structure. The simplistic understanding of how muscles work made a large leap with the remarkable insights of A. V. Hill, who related muscle force and power to shortening velocity and energy use. However, Hill's perspective was largely limited to isometric and isotonic contractions founded on isolated muscle properties that do not always reflect how muscles function in vivo. Robert Josephson incorporated lengthening contractions into a work loop analysis that shifted the focus to dynamic muscle function, varying force, length and work done both by and on muscle during a single muscle work cycle. It became apparent that muscle is both a force generator and a spring. Titin, the missing filament in the sliding filament model, is a muscle spring, which functions very differently in cardiac versus skeletal muscle; its possible role in these two muscle types is discussed relative to their contrasting function. The good news for those of us who choose to work on skeletal muscle is that muscle has been reluctant to reveal all of its secrets. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Radial Infall onto a Massive Molecular Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Myers, Philip C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Keto, Eric; Kirk, Helen

    The newly discovered Massive Molecular Filament (MMF) G32.02+0.05 (~ 70 pc long, 105 M⊙) has been shaped and compressed by older generations of massive stars. The similarity of this filament in physical structure (density profile, temperature) to much smaller star-forming filaments, suggests that the mechanism to form such filaments may be a universal process. The densest portion of the filament, apparent as an Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) shows a range of massive star formation signatures throughout. We investigate the kinematics in this filament and find widespread inverse P cygni asymmetric line profiles. These line asymmetries are interpreted as a signature of large-scale radial collapse. Using line asymmetries observed with optically thick HCO+ (1-0) and optically thin H13CO+ (1-0) across a range of massive star forming regions in the filament, we estimate the global radial infall rate of the filament to range from a few 100 to a few 1000 M⊙ Myr-1 pc-1. At its current infall rate the densest portions of the cloud will more than double their current mass within a Myr.

  7. Filament-induced laser machining (FILM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, D.; Woeste, L.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2010-09-01

    Laser filamentation provides high intensity plasma strings of micrometric diameters and lengths of tens of centimeters. We demonstrate that these filaments can be used for remotely drilling and cutting metals and biological materials such as flesh and bones. Since no tight focusing is needed, complex 3D shapes can be machined without any adjustment of the laser while processing.

  8. One Half Million Mile Solar Filament

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captures a very long, whip-like solar filament extending over half a million miles in a long arc above the sun’s surface. Filaments are cooler clouds of ...

  9. Scanning For Hotspots In Lamp Filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.; Van Sant, Tim; Leidecker, Henning

    1993-01-01

    Scanning photometer designed for use in investigation of failures of incandescent lamp filaments. Maps brightness as function of position along each filament to identify bright (hot) spots, occurring at notches and signifying incipient breaks or rewelds. Also used to measure nonuniformity in outputs of such linear devices as light-emitting diodes, and to measure diffraction patterns of lenses.

  10. A First Approach to Filament Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, P. E. S.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo; Simoes, R.; Dias, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive…

  11. A First Approach to Filament Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, P. E. S.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo; Simoes, R.; Dias, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive…

  12. Process for making silver metal filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1998-04-01

    This invention relates to a process for making filaments of metal compounds and more particularly to a process for making silver metal filaments. The United States Government has rights to this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC05-8421400 with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. awarded by the US Department of Energy.

  13. KLHL40 deficiency destabilizes thin filament proteins and promotes nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ankit; O'Rourke, Jason; Long, Chengzu; Doering, Jonathan; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Nelson, Benjamin R; Beetz, Nadine; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Laing, Nigel G; Grange, Robert W; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-08-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital myopathy that can result in lethal muscle dysfunction and is thought to be a disease of the sarcomere thin filament. Recently, several proteins of unknown function have been implicated in NM, but the mechanistic basis of their contribution to disease remains unresolved. Here, we demonstrated that loss of a muscle-specific protein, kelch-like family member 40 (KLHL40), results in a nemaline-like myopathy in mice that closely phenocopies muscle abnormalities observed in KLHL40-deficient patients. We determined that KLHL40 localizes to the sarcomere I band and A band and binds to nebulin (NEB), a protein frequently implicated in NM, as well as a putative thin filament protein, leiomodin 3 (LMOD3). KLHL40 belongs to the BTB-BACK-kelch (BBK) family of proteins, some of which have been shown to promote degradation of their substrates. In contrast, we found that KLHL40 promotes stability of NEB and LMOD3 and blocks LMOD3 ubiquitination. Accordingly, NEB and LMOD3 were reduced in skeletal muscle of both Klhl40-/- mice and KLHL40-deficient patients. Loss of sarcomere thin filament proteins is a frequent cause of NM; therefore, our data that KLHL40 stabilizes NEB and LMOD3 provide a potential basis for the development of NM in KLHL40-deficient patients.

  14. KLHL40 deficiency destabilizes thin filament proteins and promotes nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ankit; O’Rourke, Jason; Long, Chengzu; Doering, Jonathan; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Nelson, Benjamin R.; Beetz, Nadine; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Laing, Nigel G.; Grange, Robert W.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital myopathy that can result in lethal muscle dysfunction and is thought to be a disease of the sarcomere thin filament. Recently, several proteins of unknown function have been implicated in NM, but the mechanistic basis of their contribution to disease remains unresolved. Here, we demonstrated that loss of a muscle-specific protein, kelch-like family member 40 (KLHL40), results in a nemaline-like myopathy in mice that closely phenocopies muscle abnormalities observed in KLHL40-deficient patients. We determined that KLHL40 localizes to the sarcomere I band and A band and binds to nebulin (NEB), a protein frequently implicated in NM, as well as a putative thin filament protein, leiomodin 3 (LMOD3). KLHL40 belongs to the BTB-BACK-kelch (BBK) family of proteins, some of which have been shown to promote degradation of their substrates. In contrast, we found that KLHL40 promotes stability of NEB and LMOD3 and blocks LMOD3 ubiquitination. Accordingly, NEB and LMOD3 were reduced in skeletal muscle of both Klhl40–/– mice and KLHL40-deficient patients. Loss of sarcomere thin filament proteins is a frequent cause of NM; therefore, our data that KLHL40 stabilizes NEB and LMOD3 provide a potential basis for the development of NM in KLHL40-deficient patients. PMID:24960163

  15. Enigmatic reticulated filaments in subsurface granite.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Z; Hernández-Mariné, M; Jurado, V; Dionísio, A; Barquinha, P; Fortunato, E; Afonso, M J; Chaminé, H I; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, geomicrobiologists have focused their researches on the nature and origin of enigmatic reticulated filaments reported in modern and fossil samples from limestone caves and basalt lava tubes. Researchers have posed questions on these filaments concerning their nature, origin, chemistry, morphology, mode of formation and growth. A tentative microbial origin has been elusive since these filaments are found as hollow tubular sheaths and could not be affiliated to any known microorganism. We describe the presence of similar structures in a 16th century granite tunnel in Porto, Northwest Portugal. The reticulated filaments we identify exhibit fine geometry surface ornamentation formed by cross-linked Mn-rich nanofibres, surrounded by a large amount of extracellular polymeric substances. Within these Mn-rich filaments we report for the first time the occurrence of microbial cells.

  16. Epithelial Intermediate Filaments: Guardians against Microbial Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Florian; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are abundant cytoskeletal components of epithelial tissues. They have been implicated in overall stress protection. A hitherto poorly investigated area of research is the function of intermediate filaments as a barrier to microbial infection. This review summarizes the accumulating knowledge about this interaction. It first emphasizes the unique spatial organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton in different epithelial tissues to protect the organism against microbial insults. We then present examples of direct interaction between viral, bacterial, and parasitic proteins and the intermediate filament system and describe how this affects the microbe-host interaction by modulating the epithelial cytoskeleton, the progression of infection, and host response. These observations not only provide novel insights into the dynamics and function of intermediate filaments but also indicate future avenues to combat microbial infection. PMID:27355965

  17. Quantifying protein diffusion and capture on filaments.

    PubMed

    Reithmann, Emanuel; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2015-02-17

    The functional relevance of regulating proteins is often limited to specific binding sites such as the ends of microtubules or actin-filaments. A localization of proteins on these functional sites is of great importance. We present a quantitative theory for a diffusion and capture process, where proteins diffuse on a filament and stop diffusing when reaching the filament's end. It is found that end-association after one-dimensional diffusion is the main source for tip-localization of such proteins. As a consequence, diffusion and capture is highly efficient in enhancing the reaction velocity of enzymatic reactions, where proteins and filament ends are to each other as enzyme and substrate. We show that the reaction velocity can effectively be described within a Michaelis-Menten framework. Together, one-dimensional diffusion and capture beats the (three-dimensional) Smoluchowski diffusion limit for the rate of protein association to filament ends.

  18. Kinetics of filamentous phage assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploss, Martin; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Filamentous phages release their progeny particles by a secretory process without lysing the bacterial cell. By this process about 6 viral particles per min are secreted from each cell. We show here that when the major coat protein (gp8) is provided from a plasmid we observe a phage progeny production rate depending on the induction of gp8 by IPTG. We also show that a transfection of Escherichia coli lacking F-pili is observed using a mutant of M13 that carries an ampicillin resistance gene, and phage particles are secreted in the absence of an F-plasmid. Extruding phage was visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using gold-labeled antibodies to the major coat protein.

  19. Natural colorants from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Torres, Fábio Aurélio Esteves; Zaccarim, Bruna Regina; de Lencastre Novaes, Letícia Celia; Jozala, Angela Faustino; Dos Santos, Carolina Alves; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    In the last years, there is a trend towards the replacement of synthetic colorants by natural ones, mainly due to the increase of consumer demand for natural products. The natural colorants are used to enhance the appearance of pharmaceutical products, food, and different materials, making them preferable or attractive. This review intends to provide and describe a comprehensive overview of the history of colorants, from prehistory to modern time, of their market and their applications, as well as of the most important aspects of the fermentation process to obtain natural colorants. Focus is given to colorants produced by filamentous fungal species, aiming to demonstrate the importance of these microorganisms and biocompounds, highlighting the production performance to get high yields and the aspects of conclusion that should be taken into consideration in future studies about natural colorants.

  20. Cell crawling on filamentous tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jorge; Schwarz, Jennifer; Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments suggest that the migration of some cells in three dimensions has strong resemblance to one-dimensional migration. Motivated by this observation, we simulate a one-dimensional model cell made of beads and springs that moves on a tense semiflexible filamentous track. Physical parameters, such as the spring constants and friction coefficients, are calculated using effective theories. We investigate the mechanical feedback between the model cell and this track, as mediated by the active myosin-driven contractility and the catch/slip bond behavior of the focal adhesions, as the model cell crawls. We then compare our calculations of cell speed and the amount of deformation in the track with experiments.

  1. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  2. Lamp automatically switches to new filament on burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingle, W. B.

    1966-01-01

    Lamp with primary and secondary filaments has a means for automatic switching to the secondary filament at primary filament burnout. Lamp failures and resultant expenses during oscillograph printing are appreciably reduced.

  3. Polar patterns of driven filaments.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Volker; Weber, Christoph; Semmrich, Christine; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R

    2010-09-02

    The emergence of collective motion exhibited by systems ranging from flocks of animals to self-propelled microorganisms to the cytoskeleton is a ubiquitous and fascinating self-organization phenomenon. Similarities between these systems, such as the inherent polarity of the constituents, a density-dependent transition to ordered phases or the existence of very large density fluctuations, suggest universal principles underlying pattern formation. This idea is followed by theoretical models at all levels of description: micro- or mesoscopic models directly map local forces and interactions using only a few, preferably simple, interaction rules, and more macroscopic approaches in the hydrodynamic limit rely on the systems' generic symmetries. All these models characteristically have a broad parameter space with a manifold of possible patterns, most of which have not yet been experimentally verified. The complexity of interactions and the limited parameter control of existing experimental systems are major obstacles to our understanding of the underlying ordering principles. Here we demonstrate the emergence of collective motion in a high-density motility assay that consists of highly concentrated actin filaments propelled by immobilized molecular motors in a planar geometry. Above a critical density, the filaments self-organize to form coherently moving structures with persistent density modulations, such as clusters, swirls and interconnected bands. These polar nematic structures are long lived and can span length scales orders of magnitudes larger than their constituents. Our experimental approach, which offers control of all relevant system parameters, complemented by agent-based simulations, allows backtracking of the assembly and disassembly pathways to the underlying local interactions. We identify weak and local alignment interactions to be essential for the observed formation of patterns and their dynamics. The presented minimal polar-pattern-forming system

  4. Dust filaments of NGC 4217

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-19

    In this image the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope takes a close look at the spiral galaxy NGC 4217, 60 million light-years away. The galaxy is seen almost perfectly edge on and is a perfect candidate for studying the nature of extraplanar dust structures — the patterns of gas and dust above and below the plane on the galaxy, seen here as brown wisps coming off NGC 4217. These tentacle-like filaments are visible in the Hubble image only because the contrast with their surroundings is so high. This implies that the structures are denser than their surroundings. The image shows dozens of dust structures some of which reach as far as 7000 light-years away from the central plane. Typically the structures have a length of about 1000 light-years and are about 400 light-years in width. Some of the dust filaments are round or irregular clouds, others are vertical columns, looplike structures or vertical cones. These structures can help astronomers to identify the mechanisms responsible for the ejection of gas and dust from the galactic plane of spiral galaxies and reveal information on the transport of the interstellar medium to large distances away from galactic discs. The properties of the observed dust structures in NGC 4217 suggest that the gas and dust was driven out of the midplane of the galaxy by powerful stellar winds resulting from supernovae — explosions that mark the deaths of massive stars. This image was entered into the Hubble Hidden Treasures competition by contestant Ralf Schoofs.

  5. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells as a Source of Smooth Muscle Cells in the Regeneration of Muscular Layer of Urinary Bladder Wall

    PubMed Central

    SALEM, Salah Abood; HWIE, Angela Ng Min; SAIM, Aminuddin; CHEE KONG, Christopher Ho; SAGAP, Ismail; SINGH, Rajesh; YUSOF, Mohd Reusmaazran; MD ZAINUDDIN, Zulkifili; HJ IDRUS, Ruszymah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adipose tissue provides an abundant source of multipotent cells, which represent a source of cell-based regeneration strategies for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. Our objective was to confirm that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can be differentiated into smooth muscle cells. Methods: In this study, adipose tissue samples were digested with 0.075% collagenase, and the resulting ADSCs were cultured and expanded in vitro. ADSCs at passage two were differentiated by incubation in smooth muscle inductive media (SMIM) consisting of MCDB I31 medium, 1% FBS, and 100 U/mL heparin for three and six weeks. ADSCs in non-inductive media were used as controls. Characterisation was performed by cell morphology and gene and protein expression. Result: The differentiated cells became elongated and spindle shaped, and towards the end of six weeks, sporadic cell aggregation appeared that is typical of smooth muscle cell culture. Smooth muscle markers (i.e. alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA), calponin, and myosin heavy chain (MHC)) were used to study gene expression. Expression of these genes was detected by PCR after three and six weeks of differentiation. At the protein expression level, ASMA, MHC, and smoothelin were expressed after six weeks of differentiation. However, only ASMA and smoothelin were expressed after three weeks of differentiation. Conclusion: Adipose tissue provides a possible source of smooth muscle precursor cells that possess the potential capability of smooth muscle differentiation. This represents a promising alternative for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. PMID:24044001

  6. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks. PMID:26935805

  7. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks.

  8. The biology of desmin filaments: how do mutations affect their structure, assembly, and organisation?

    PubMed

    Bär, Harald; Strelkov, Sergei V; Sjöberg, Gunnar; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2004-11-01

    Desmin, the major intermediate filament (IF) protein of muscle, is evolutionarily highly conserved from shark to man. Recently, an increasing number of mutations of the desmin gene has been described to be associated with human diseases such as certain skeletal and cardiac myopathies. These diseases are histologically characterised by intracellular aggregates containing desmin and various associated proteins. Although there is progress regarding our knowledge on the cellular function of desmin within the cytoskeleton, the impact of each distinct mutation is currently not understood at all. In order to get insight into how such mutations affect filament assembly and their integration into the cytoskeleton we need to establish IF structure at atomic detail. Recent progress in determining the dimer structure of the desmin-related IF-protein vimentin allows us to assess how such mutations may affect desmin filament architecture.

  9. Evaluation of muscle function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo and tibialis anterior muscle in situ in mice.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Nalinda B; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-02-09

    Body movements are mainly provided by mechanical function of skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle is composed of numerous bundles of myofibers that are sheathed by intramuscular connective tissues. Each myofiber contains many myofibrils that run longitudinally along the length of the myofiber. Myofibrils are the contractile apparatus of muscle and they are composed of repeated contractile units known as sarcomeres. A sarcomere unit contains actin and myosin filaments that are spaced by the Z discs and titin protein. Mechanical function of skeletal muscle is defined by the contractile and passive properties of muscle. The contractile properties are used to characterize the amount of force generated during muscle contraction, time of force generation and time of muscle relaxation. Any factor that affects muscle contraction (such as interaction between actin and myosin filaments, homeostasis of calcium, ATP/ADP ratio, etc.) influences the contractile properties. The passive properties refer to the elastic and viscous properties (stiffness and viscosity) of the muscle in the absence of contraction. These properties are determined by the extracellular and the intracellular structural components (such as titin) and connective tissues (mainly collagen) (1-2). The contractile and passive properties are two inseparable aspects of muscle function. For example, elbow flexion is accomplished by contraction of muscles in the anterior compartment of the upper arm and passive stretch of muscles in the posterior compartment of the upper arm. To truly understand muscle function, both contractile and passive properties should be studied. The contractile and/or passive mechanical properties of muscle are often compromised in muscle diseases. A good example is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle wasting disease caused by dystrophin deficiency (3). Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle cell membrane (sarcolemma) during muscle contraction (4). In the

  10. ANG1 treatment reduces muscle pathology and prevents a decline in perfusion in DMD mice

    PubMed Central

    Tasevski, Nikola; Wong, Boaz; Hrinivich, William Thomas; Su, Feng; Hadway, Jennifer; Desjardins, Lise; Lee, Ting-Yim; Hoffman, Lisa Marie

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other pro-angiogenic growth factors have been investigated to enhance muscle tissue perfusion and repair in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Current understanding is limited by a lack of functional data following in vivo delivery of these growth factors. We previously used dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography to monitor disease progression in murine models of DMD, but no study to date has utilized this imaging technique to assess vascular therapy in a preclinical model of DMD. In the current study, we locally delivered VEGF and ANG1 alone or in combination to dystrophic hind limb skeletal muscle. Using functional imaging, we found the combination treatment as well as ANG1 alone prevented decline in muscle perfusion whereas VEGF alone had no effect compared to controls. These findings were validated histologically as demonstrated by increased alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive vessels in muscles that received either VEGF+ANG1 or ANG1 alone compared to the sham group. We further show that ANG1 alone slows progression of fibrosis compared to either sham or VEGF treatment. The findings from this study shed new light on the functional effects of vascular therapy and suggest that ANG1 alone may be a candidate therapy in the treatment of DMD. PMID:28334037

  11. The length-tension curve in muscle depends on lattice spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. D.; Salcedo, M. K.; Irving, T. C.; Regnier, M.; Daniel, T. L.

    2013-07-10

    Classic interpretations of the striated muscle length–tension curve focus on how force varies with overlap of thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. New models of sarcomere geometry and experiments with skinned synchronous insect flight muscle suggest that changes in the radial distance between the actin and myosin filaments, the filament lattice spacing, are responsible for between 20% and 50% of the change in force seen between sarcomere lengths of 1.4 and 3.4 µm. Thus, lattice spacing is a significant force regulator, increasing the slope of muscle's force–length dependence.

  12. The length–tension curve in muscle depends on lattice spacing

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Salcedo, Mary K.; Irving, Thomas C.; Regnier, Michael; Daniel, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Classic interpretations of the striated muscle length–tension curve focus on how force varies with overlap of thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. New models of sarcomere geometry and experiments with skinned synchronous insect flight muscle suggest that changes in the radial distance between the actin and myosin filaments, the filament lattice spacing, are responsible for between 20% and 50% of the change in force seen between sarcomere lengths of 1.4 and 3.4 µm. Thus, lattice spacing is a significant force regulator, increasing the slope of muscle's force–length dependence. PMID:23843386

  13. Galactic cold cores. VIII. Filament formation and evolution: Filament properties in context with evolutionary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.; Men'shchikov, A.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Marston, A.; Martin, P. G.; Pagani, L.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Ysard, N.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Marshall, D. J.; Montier, L.; Tóth, L. V.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The onset of star formation is intimately linked with the presence of massive unstable filamentary structures. These filaments are therefore key for theoretical models that aim to reproduce the observed characteristics of the star formation process in the Galaxy. Aims: As part of the filament study carried out by the Herschel Galactic Cold Cores Key Programme, here we study and discuss the filament properties presented in GCC VII (Paper I) in context with theoretical models of filament formation and evolution. Methods: A conservatively selected sample of filaments located at a distance D< 500 pc was extracted from the GCC fields with the getfilaments algorithm. The physical structure of the filaments was quantified according to two main components: the central (Gaussian) region of the filament (core component), and the power-law-like region dominating the filament column density profile at larger radii (wing component). The properties and behaviour of these components relative to the total linear mass density of the filament and the column density of its environment were compared with the predictions from theoretical models describing the evolution of filaments under gravity-dominated conditions. Results: The feasibility of a transition from a subcritical to supercritical state by accretion at any given time is dependent on the combined effect of filament intrinsic properties and environmental conditions. Reasonably self-gravitating (high Mline,core) filaments in dense environments (AV≳ 3 mag) can become supercritical on timescales of t 1 Myr by accreting mass at constant or decreasing width. The trend of increasing Mline,tot (Mline,core and Mline,wing) and ridge AV with background for the filament population also indicates that the precursors of star-forming filaments evolve coevally with their environment. The simultaneous increase of environment and filament AV explains the observed association between dense environments and high Mline,core values

  14. Unwinding Motion of a Twisted Active Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Liu, J. H.; Kong, D. F.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  15. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  16. Clonal multipotency of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells between mesodermal and ectodermal lineage.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-09-01

    The differentiation potential of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) after in vitro culture and in vivo transplantation has been extensively studied. However, the clonal multipotency of MDSCs has yet to be fully determined. Here, we show that single skeletal muscle-derived CD34-/CD45- (skeletal muscle-derived double negative [Sk-DN]) cells exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, vasculogenic, and neural cell lineages after in vivo single cell-derived single sphere implantation and in vitro clonal single cell culture. Muscles from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were enzymatically dissociated and sorted based on CD34 and CD45. Sk-DN cells were clone-sorted into a 96-well plate and were cultured in collagen-based medium with basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor for 14 days. Individual colony-forming units (CFUs) were then transplanted directly into severely damaged muscle together with 1 x 10(5) competitive carrier Sk-DN cells obtained from wild-type mice muscle expanded for 5 days under the same culture conditions using 35-mm culture dishes. Four weeks after transplantation, implanted GFP+ cells demonstrated differentiation into endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, skeletal muscle, and neural cell (Schwann cell) lineages. This multipotency was also confirmed by expression of mRNA markers for myogenic (MyoD, myf5), neural (Musashi-1, Nestin, neural cell adhesion molecule-1, peripheral myelin protein-22, Nucleostemin), and vascular (alpha-smooth muscle actin, smoothelin, vascular endothelial-cadherin, tyrosine kinase-endothelial) stem cells by clonal (single-cell derived) single-sphere reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Approximately 70% of clonal CFUs exhibited expression of all three cell lineages. These findings support the notion that Sk-DN cells are a useful tool for damaged muscle-related tissue reconstitution by synchronized vasculogenesis, myogenesis, and neurogenesis.

  17. Striation and convection in penumbral filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruit, H. C.; Scharmer, G. B.; Löfdahl, M. G.

    2010-10-01

    Observations with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope of the flows seen in penumbral filaments are presented. Time sequences of bright filaments show overturning motions strikingly similar to those seen along the walls of small isolated structures in the active regions. The filaments show outward propagating striations with inclination angles suggesting that they are aligned with the local magnetic field. We interpret it as the equivalent of the striations seen in the walls of small isolated magnetic structures. Their origin is then a corrugation of the boundary between an overturning convective flow inside the filament and the magnetic field wrapping around it. The outward propagation is a combination of a pattern motion due to the downflow observed along the sides of bright filaments, and the Evershed flow. The observed short wavelength of the striation argues against the existence of a dynamically significant horizontal field inside the bright filaments. Its intensity contrast is explained by the same physical effect that causes the dark cores of filaments, light bridges and “canals”. In this way striation represents an important clue to the physics of penumbral structure and its relation with other magnetic structures on the solar surface. We put this in perspective with results from the recent 3-D radiative hydrodynamic simulations. 4 movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. The Hydrodynamic Stability of Gaseous Cosmic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnboim, Yuval; Padnos, Dan; Zinger, Elad

    2016-11-01

    Virial shocks at the edges of cosmic-web structures are a clear prediction of standard structure formation theories. We derive a criterion for the stability of the post-shock gas and of the virial shock itself in spherical, filamentary, and planar infall geometries. When gas cooling is important, we find that shocks become unstable, and gas flows uninterrupted toward the center of the respective halo, filament, or sheet. For filaments, we impose this criterion on self-similar infall solutions. We find that instability is expected for filament masses between 1011 and 1013 {M}⊙ Mpc-1. Using a simplified toy model, we then show that these filaments will likely feed halos with 1010 M ⊙ ≲ M halo ≲ 1013 M ⊙ at redshift z = 3, as well as 1012 M ⊙ ≲ M halo ≲ 1015 M ⊙ at z = 0. The instability will affect the survivability of the filaments as they penetrate gaseous halos in a non-trivial way. Additionally, smaller halos accreting onto non-stable filaments will not be subject to ram pressure inside the filaments. The instreaming gas will continue toward the center and stop either once its angular momentum balances the gravitational attraction, or when its density becomes so high that it becomes self-shielded to radiation.

  19. Intact connecting filaments change length in 2.3-nm quanta.

    PubMed

    Blyakhman, F; Tourovskaya, A; Pollack, G H

    2000-01-01

    In isolated titin molecules, length changes may occur in discrete steps (Tskhovrebova et al., 1997; Rief et al., 1997). The extent to which such steps are preserved in the intact muscle-filament lattice has remained unclear. We carried out experiments on single isolated insect-flight-muscle myofibrils in which thin filaments had been functionally removed either by stretch beyond overlap or by a "rigor-stretch" protocol, leaving the connecting (titin) filaments as the sole length-absorbing agent. The myofibril was released or stretched by a motor in ramp-like fashion. The time course of length change in the single sarcomere was stepwise. The same was true for half-sarcomere lengths. The presence of steps at the sarcomere level implies that parallel filaments step synchronously, with high cooperativity. Step sizes showed a consistent distribution: The smallest size was approximately 2.3 nm, and others were integer multiples of that value. Similar results were found for stretch and release. To our knowledge, the approximately 2.3-nm step quantum is the smallest consistent biomechanical event ever demonstrated. This quantum is an order of magnitude smaller than anticipated from the folding/unfolding of a complete Ig- or fibronectin-like domain, and may imply that folding occurs in sub-domain increments. The 2.3-nm incremental length change corresponds to a single turn of the domains' beta sheet.

  20. Filamentous Biopolymers on Surfaces: Atomic Force Microscopy Images Compared with Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Filament Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Mücke, Norbert; Klenin, Konstantin; Kirmse, Robert; Bussiek, Malte; Herrmann, Harald; Hafner, Mathias; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarly on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i) For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii) For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a ‘trapping’ mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these ‘ideal’ adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica (‘ideal’ trapping) and on glass (‘ideal’ equilibrated) with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions. PMID:19888472

  1. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  2. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  3. Quasiperiodic distribution of rigor cross-bridges along a reconstituted thin filament in a skeletal myofibril.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2011-12-07

    Electron microscopy has shown that cross-bridges (CBs) are formed at the target zone that is periodically distributed on the thin filament in striated muscle. Here, by manipulating a single bead-tailed actin filament with optical tweezers, we measured the unbinding events of rigor CBs one by one on the surface of the A-band in rabbit skeletal myofibrils. We found that the spacings between adjacent CBs were not always the same, and instead were 36, 72, or 108 nm. Tropomyosin and troponin did not affect the CB spacing except for a relative increase in the appearance of longer spacing in the presence of Ca(2+). In addition, in an in vitro assay where myosin molecules were randomly distributed, were obtained the same spacing, i.e., a multiple of 36 nm. These results indicate that the one-dimensional distribution of CBs matches with the 36-nm half pitch of a long helical structure of actin filaments. A stereospecific model composed of three actin protomers per target zone was shown to explain the experimental results. Additionally, the unbinding force (i.e., the binding affinity) of CBs for the reconstituted thin filaments was found to be larger and smaller relative to that for actin filaments with and without Ca(2+), respectively.

  4. Optical rogue wave statistics in laser filamentation.

    PubMed

    Kasparian, Jérôme; Béjot, Pierre; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Dudley, John M

    2009-07-06

    We experimentally observed optical rogue wave statistics during high power femtosecond pulse filamentation in air. We characterized wavelength-dependent intensity fluctuations across 300 nm broadband filament spectra generated by pulses with several times the critical power for filamentation. We show how the statistics vary from a near-Gaussian distribution in the vicinity of the pump to a long tailed "L-shaped" distribution at the short wavelength and long wavelength edges. The results are interpreted in terms of pump noise transfer via self-phase modulation.

  5. System Applies Polymer Powder To Filament Tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Snoha, John J.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer powder applied uniformly and in continuous manner. Powder-coating system applies dry polymer powder to continuous fiber tow. Unique filament-spreading technique, combined with precise control of tension on fibers in system, ensures uniform application of polymer powder to web of spread filaments. Fiber tows impregnated with dry polymer powders ("towpregs") produced for preform-weaving and composite-material-molding applications. System and process valuable to prepreg industry, for production of flexible filament-windable tows and high-temperature polymer prepregs.

  6. Automatic filament warm-up controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, J.; Daeges, J.

    1979-01-01

    As part of the unattended operations objective of the Deep Space Network deep space stations, this filament controller serves as a step between manual operation of the station and complete computer control. Formerly, the operator was required to devote five to fifteen minutes of his time just to properly warm up the filaments on the klystrons of the high power transmitters. The filament controller reduces the operator's duty to a one-step command and is future-compatible with various forms of computer control.

  7. Vimentin filaments and centrosomes. Are they associated?

    PubMed

    Maro, B; Paintrand, M; Sauron, M E; Paulin, D; Bornens, M

    1984-02-01

    HeLa cells were examined by immunofluorescence using anti-vimentin and anti-centrosphere anti-bodies, and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), after vimentin redistribution induced by the action of nocodazole or taxol. A redistribution of vimentin bundles in the centriolar area was observed after nocodazole treatment, although no direct interaction between centrioles and vimentin filaments could be detected. After taxol treatment, the juxtanuclear accumulation of vimentin filaments and the centrioles were rarely observed in the same area. Our results do not support the concept of a direct association between centrioles and vimentin filaments.

  8. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  9. h-Caldesmon as a specific marker of smooth muscle cell differentiation in some soft tissue tumors of the skin.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, Stephen F; Morgan, Michael; Talley, Lori; Smoller, Bruce R

    2002-08-01

    An existing problem in contemporary pathology is the classification and distinction of spindle cell soft tissue tumors of the skin. Markers such as alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and desmin, considered specific for smooth muscle cell (SMC), have been shown to be expressed in a variety of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic processes. High-molecular-weight caldesmon (h-caldesmon), one of two isoforms, is reported to be expressed exclusively by SMC and has recently been shown to be a specific marker of SMC tumors. Tumors were obtained from 11 patients taken from the surgical pathology archives of the University of South Florida and cases were coded as smooth muscle hamartoma, myofibroma, and dermatomyofibroma. The case of smooth muscle hamartoma had greater than 90% of tumor cells labeling with anti-h-caldesmon antibodies. Three of three cases of myofibroma had focal areas of positivity representing less than 10% of total tumor cells. Seven of seven dermatomyofibromas showed no apparent labeling with anti-h-caldesmon antibody. Dense reactivity was noted in vascular wall smooth muscle, indicating internal controls. We can conclude that h-caldesmon is a specific marker of fully differentiated smooth muscle and that it can serve to differentiate spindled SMC soft tissue tumors of the skin from tumors of myofibroblastic and/or fibroblastic origin.

  10. Filament overwrapped motor case technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Joel P.

    1993-11-01

    Atlantic Research Corporation (ARC) joined with the French Societe Europeenne de Propulsion (SEP) to develop and deliver to the U.S. Navy a small quantity of composite filament wound rocket motors to demonstrate a manufacturing technique that was being applied at the two companies. It was perceived that the manufacturing technique could produce motors that would be light in weight, inexpensive to produce, and that had a good chance of meeting insensitive munitions (IM) requirements that were being formulated by the Navy in the early 1980s. Under subcontract to ARC, SEP designed, tested, and delivered 2.75-inch rocket motors to the U.S. Navy for IM tests that were conducted in 1989 at China Lake, California. The program was one of the first to be founded by Nunn Amendment money. The Government-to-Government program was sponsored by the Naval Air Systems Command and was monitored by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head (NSWC-IH), Maryland. The motor propellant that was employed was a new, extruded composite formulation that was under development at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. The following paper describes the highlights of the program and gives the results of structural and ballistic static tests and insensitive munitions tests that were conducted on demonstration motors.

  11. Towards a molecular description of intermediate filament structure and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, David A.D.; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Burkhard, Peter; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald . E-mail: h.herrmann@dkfz.de

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) represent one of the prominent cytoskeletal elements of metazoan cells. Their constituent proteins are coded by a multigene family, whose members are expressed in complex patterns that are controlled by developmental programs of differentiation. Hence, IF proteins found in epidermis differ significantly from those in muscle or neuronal tissues. Due to their fibrous nature, which stems from a fairly conserved central {alpha}-helical coiled-coil rod domain, IF proteins have long resisted crystallization and thus determination of their atomic structure. Since they represent the primary structural elements that determine the shape of the nucleus and the cell more generally, a major challenge is to arrive at a more rational understanding of how their nanomechanical properties effect the stability and plasticity of cells and tissues. Here, we review recent structural results of the coiled-coil dimer, assembly intermediates and growing filaments that have been obtained by a hybrid methods approach involving a rigorous combination of X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, cryo-electron tomography, computational analysis and molecular modeling.

  12. Cysteine-rich protein 2 accelerates actin filament cluster formation

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Satoko; Takaoka, Shunpei; Miyake, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Filamentous actin (F-actin) forms many types of structures and dynamically regulates cell morphology and movement, and plays a mechanosensory role for extracellular stimuli. In this study, we determined that the smooth muscle-related transcription factor, cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2), regulates the supramolecular networks of F-actin. The structures of CRP2 and F-actin in solution were analyzed by small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS). The general shape of CRP2 was partially unfolded and relatively ellipsoidal in structure, and the apparent cross sectional radius of gyration (Rc) was about 15.8 Å. The predicted shape, derived by ab initio modeling, consisted of roughly four tandem clusters: LIM domains were likely at both ends with the middle clusters being an unfolded linker region. From the SAXS analysis, the Rc of F-actin was about 26.7 Å, and it was independent of CRP2 addition. On the other hand, in the low angle region of the CRP2-bound F-actin scattering, the intensities showed upward curvature with the addition of CRP2, which indicates increasing branching of F-actin following CRP2 binding. From biochemical analysis, the actin filaments were augmented and clustered by the addition of CRP2. This F-actin clustering activity of CRP2 was cooperative with α-actinin. Thus, binding of CRP2 to F-actin accelerates actin polymerization and F-actin cluster formation. PMID:28813482

  13. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  14. Shaping helical electrospun filaments: a review.

    PubMed

    Silva, P E S; Vistulo de Abreu, F; Godinho, M H

    2017-10-04

    Nature abounds with helical filaments designed for specific tasks. For instance, some plants use tendrils to coil and attach to the surroundings, while Spiroplasma, a helical bacterium, moves by inverting the helical handedness along the filament axis. Therefore, developing methods to shape filaments on demand to exhibit a diversity of physical properties and shapes could be of interest to many fields, such as the textile industry, biomedicine or nanotechnology. Electrospinning is a simple and versatile technique that allows the production of micro and nanofibres with many different helical shapes. In this work, we review the different electrospinning procedures that can be used to obtain helical shapes similar to those found in natural materials. These techniques also demonstrate that the creation of helical shapes at the micro/nanoscale is not limited by the chirality of the building blocks at the molecular level, a finding which opens new horizons on filament shaping.

  15. Tunnel ionization, population trapping, filamentation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leang Chin, See; Xu, Huailiang

    2016-11-01

    The advances in femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser technology have led to the discovery of a profusion of new physics. This review starts with a brief historical account of the experimental realization of tunnel ionization, followed by high harmonic generation and the prediction of attosecond pulses. Then, the unique phenomenon of dynamic population trapping during the ionization of atoms and molecules in intense laser fields is introduced. One of the consequences of population trapping in the highly excited states is the neutral dissociation into simple molecular fragments which fluoresce. Such fluorescence could be amplified in femtosecond laser filamentation in gases. The experimental observations of filament-induced fluorescence and lasing in the atmosphere and combustion flames are given. Excitation of molecular rotational wave packets (molecular alignment) and their relaxation and revival in a gas filament are described. Furthermore, filament-induced condensation and precipitation inside a cloud chamber is explained. Lastly, a summary and future outlook is given.

  16. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  17. Thioredoxin is required for filamentous phage assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Russel, M; Model, P

    1985-01-01

    Sequence comparisons show that the fip gene product of Escherichia coli, which is required for filamentous phage assembly, is thioredoxin. Thioredoxin serves as a cofactor for reductive processes in many cell types and is a constituent of phage T7 DNA polymerase. The fip-1 mutation makes filamentous phage and T7 growth temperature sensitive in cells that carry it. The lesion lies within a highly conserved thioredoxin active site. Thioredoxin reductase (NADPH), as well as thioredoxin, is required for efficient filamentous phage production. Mutant phages defective in phage gene I are particularly sensitive to perturbations in the fip-thioredoxin system. A speculative model is presented in which thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin, and the gene I protein interact to drive an engine for filamentous phage assembly. Images PMID:3881756

  18. Huge Filament Rises From Sun's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On August 1, 2010 following a C3-class solar flare from sunspot 1092, an enormous magnetic filament stretching across the sun's northern hemisphere erupted. This 304 angstrom video shows that filam...

  19. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  20. Immunocytochemical analysis of intermediate filaments in embryonic heart cells with monoclonal antibodies to desmin.

    PubMed

    Danto, S I; Fischman, D A

    1984-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies ( McAbs ) have been generated against a preparation of intermediate filament proteins (IFP) from adult chicken gizzard. Two antibodies, D3 and D76 , have been characterized in detail. They bind specifically to desmin but recognize different epitopes. In the adult chicken, both McAbs produced equivalent immunofluorescent staining patterns, reacting in frozen sections with all forms of muscle tissue, including vascular smooth muscle, but with no other tissue types. In isolated skeletal myofibrils and in longitudinal frozen sections of cardiac and skeletal muscle, desmin was detected with both McAbs at the Z-band and in longitudinally-oriented filament bundles between myofibrils. In contrast to these results in the adult, the intermediate filaments (IF) of embryonic cardiac myocytes in primary cultures were decorated only with McAb D3, whereas McAb D76 was completely unreactive with these cells. Similarly, frozen sections through the heart at early stages of embryonic chick development (Hamburger-Hamilton stages 17-18) revealed regions of myocytes, identified by double immunofluorescence with myosin-specific McAbs , that were unstained with McAb D76 even though similar regions were stained by McAb D3. That McAb D76 reacted with desmin in all adult cardiac myocytes but not with all embryonic heart cells indicates that embryonic and adult cardiac IF are immunologically distinct and implies a conversion in IF immunoreactivity during cardiac development.

  1. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  2. Intense EM filamentation in relativistic hot plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang-Lin; Chen, Zhong-Ping; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2017-03-01

    Through 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we demonstrate that the nature of filamentation of a high intensity electromagnetic (EM) pulse propagating in an underdense plasma, is profoundly affected at relativistically high temperatures. The "relativistic" filaments are sharper, are dramatically extended (along the direction of propagation), and live much longer than their lower temperature counterparts. The thermally boosted electron inertia is invoked to understand this very interesting and powerful phenomenon.

  3. Making Linked, Wound-Filament Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.; Stephens, James B.

    1987-01-01

    Chains produced by use of rotating mandrel. Mandrel and locating and driving disks assembled around first band. Mandrel and band then mounted in respective positions on filament-winding machine. Second band linked to first by winding filament around first band on rotating mandrel. Short chains made this way have variety of uses; example, thermal isolators, each consisting of two linked bands of insulating material, used to support two separated insulating sheilds surrounding container of liquid helium.

  4. Filamentation nonlinear optics: a new frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, S. L.; Théberge, F.; Xu, H.; Liu, W.; Daigle, J.-F.; Luo, Q.; Sharifi, S. M.; Chen, Y.; Aközbek, N.; Becker, A.; Marceau, C.; Tremblay-Simard, P.; Kamali, Y.; Azarm, A.; Bernhardt, J.; Mathieu, P.; Roy, G.; Simard, J.-R.

    2007-06-01

    The filament core of a femtosecond laser pulse propagating in an optical medium has extra-ordinary quality for exploitation that includes high quality tunable pulse generation from the UV to the THz. The peak intensity inside the filament is also high enough to dissociate/ionize any molecules resulting in remarkably distinct spectra which can be use for remote sensing of Chem-bio agent.

  5. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  6. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    PubMed

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts grown in

  7. Flux Cancellation Leading to Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, R. M.; Panesar, N. K.; Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Solar filaments are strands of relatively cool, dense plasma magnetically suspended in the lower density hotter solar corona. They trace magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) in the photosphere below, and are supported against gravity at heights of up to 100 Mm above the chromosphere by the magnetic field in and around them. This field erupts when it is rendered unstable by either magnetic flux cancellation or emergence at or near the PIL. We have studied the evolution of photospheric magnetic flux leading to ten observed filament eruptions. Specifically, we look for gradual magnetic changes in the neighborhood of the PIL prior to and during eruption. We use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), both onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), to study filament eruptions and their photospheric magnetic fields. We examine whether flux cancellation or/and emergence leads to filament eruptions and find that continuous flux cancellation was present at the PIL for many hours prior to each eruption. We present two events in detail and find the following: (a) the pre-eruption filament-holding core field is highly sheared and appears in the shape of a sigmoid above the PIL; (b) at the start of the eruption the opposite arms of the sigmoid reconnect in the middle above the site of (tether-cutting) flux cancellation at the PIL; (c) the filaments first show a slow-rise, followed by a fast-rise as they erupt. We conclude that these two filament eruptions result from flux cancellation in the middle of the sheared field and are in agreement with the standard model for a CME/flare filament eruption from a closed bipolar magnetic field [flux cancellation (van Ballegooijen and Martens 1989 and Moore and Roumelrotis 1992) and runaway tether-cutting (Moore et. al 2001)].

  8. Making Linked, Wound-Filament Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.; Stephens, James B.

    1987-01-01

    Chains produced by use of rotating mandrel. Mandrel and locating and driving disks assembled around first band. Mandrel and band then mounted in respective positions on filament-winding machine. Second band linked to first by winding filament around first band on rotating mandrel. Short chains made this way have variety of uses; example, thermal isolators, each consisting of two linked bands of insulating material, used to support two separated insulating sheilds surrounding container of liquid helium.

  9. Filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. S.; Timberlake, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports for a LH2 tank, a LF2/FLOX tank and a CH4 tank. These supports consist of filament-wound fiberglass tubes with titanium end fittings. These units were satisfactorily tested at cryogenic temperatures, thereby offering a design that can be reliably and economically produced in large or small quantities. The basic design concept is applicable to any situation where strong, lightweight axial load members are desired.

  10. Flux Cancellation Leading to CME Filament Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popescu, Roxana M.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filaments are strands of relatively cool, dense plasma magnetically suspended in the lower density hotter solar corona. They trace magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) in the photosphere below, and are supported against gravity at heights of up to approx.100 Mm above the chromosphere by the magnetic field in and around them. This field erupts when it is rendered unstable, often by magnetic flux cancellation or emergence at or near the PIL. We have studied the evolution of photospheric magnetic flux leading to ten observed filament eruptions. Specifically, we look for gradual magnetic changes in the neighborhood of the PIL prior to and during eruption. We use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), both on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), to study filament eruptions and their photospheric magnetic fields. We examine whether flux cancellation or/and emergence leads to filament eruptions. We find that continuous flux cancellation was present at the PIL for many hours prior to each eruption. We present two CME-producing eruptions in detail and find the following: (a) the pre-eruption filament-holding core field is highly sheared and appears in the shape of a sigmoid above the PIL; (b) at the start of the eruption the opposite arms of the sigmoid reconnect in the middle above the site of (tether-cutting) flux cancellation at the PIL; (c) the filaments first show a slow-rise, followed by a fast-rise as they erupt. We conclude that these two filament eruptions result from flux cancellation in the middle of the sheared field, and thereafter evolve in agreement with the standard model for a CME/flare filament eruption from a closed bipolar magnetic field [flux cancellation (van Ballegooijen and Martens 1989 and Moore and Roumelrotis 1992) and runaway tether-cutting (Moore et. al 2001)].

  11. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Tremblin, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Hill, T.; Molinari, S.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of ˜1.5 × 1021 cm-2 and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  12. Vortex dynamics in three-dimensional continuous myocardium with fiber rotation: Filament instability and fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Flavio; Karma, Alain

    1998-03-01

    Wave propagation in ventricular muscle is rendered highly anisotropic by the intramural rotation of the fiber. This rotational anisotropy is especially important because it can produce a twist of electrical vortices, which measures the rate of rotation (in degree/mm) of activation wavefronts in successive planes perpendicular to a line of phase singularity, or filament. This twist can then significantly alter the dynamics of the filament. This paper explores this dynamics via numerical simulation. After a review of the literature, we present modeling tools that include: (i) a simplified ionic model with three membrane currents that approximates well the restitution properties and spiral wave behavior of more complex ionic models of cardiac action potential (Beeler-Reuter and others), and (ii) a semi-implicit algorithm for the fast solution of monodomain cable equations with rotational anisotropy. We then discuss selected results of a simulation study of vortex dynamics in a parallelepipedal slab of ventricular muscle of varying wall thickness (S) and fiber rotation rate (theta(z)). The main finding is that rotational anisotropy generates a sufficiently large twist to destabilize a single transmural filament and cause a transition to a wave turbulent state characterized by a high density of chaotically moving filaments. This instability is manifested by the propagation of localized disturbances along the filament and has no previously known analog in isotropic excitable media. These disturbances correspond to highly twisted and distorted regions of filament, or "twistons," that create vortex rings when colliding with the natural boundaries of the ventricle. Moreover, when sufficiently twisted, these rings expand and create additional filaments by further colliding with boundaries. This instability mechanism is distinct from the commonly invoked patchy failure or wave breakup that is not observed here during the initial instability. For modified Beeler

  13. Hydrodynamic interactions between two semiflexible inextensible filaments in Stokes flow.

    PubMed

    Young, Y-N

    2009-04-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions between two semiflexible inextensible filaments are shown to have a significant impact on filament buckling and their subsequent motion in Stokesian fluids. In linear shear flow, hydrodynamic interactions lead to filament shear dispersion that depends on the filament aspect ratio and the initial filament separation. In linear extensional flow, hydrodynamic interactions lead to complex filament dynamics around the stagnation point. These results suggest that hydrodynamic interactions need to be taken into account to determine the self-diffusion of non-Brownian semiflexible filaments in a cellular flow [Y.-N. Young and M. J. Shelley, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 058303 (2007)].

  14. Otomycosis due to filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    García-Agudo, Lidia; Aznar-Marín, Pilar; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Martos, Pedro; Marín-Casanova, Pilar; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Otomycosis is common throughout the world but barely studied in Spain. Our objective was to determine the microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of this pathology in Cadiz (Spain) between 2005 and 2010. Samples from patients with suspicion of otomycosis underwent a direct microscopic examination and culture on different media for fungi and bacteria. Mycological cultures were incubated at 30°C for at least seven days. Identification of fungi was based on colonial morphology and microscopic examination of fungal structure. From a total of 2,633 samples, microbial growth was present in 1,375 (52.2%) and fungal isolation in 390 (28.4%). We identified 228 yeasts and 184 filamentous fungi (13.4% of positive cultures and 47.2% of otomycosis), associated with yeasts in 22 cases (5.6%). The most frequent species were Aspergillus flavus (42.4%), A. niger (35.9%), A. fumigatus (12.5%), A. candidus (7.1%), A. terreus (1.6%), and Paecilomyces variotii (0.5%). Infection was predominant in men (54.9%) and patients beyond 55 years old (46.8%). The most common clinical symptoms were itching (98.9%), otalgia (59.3%), and hypoacusis (56.0%). Fall season reported the lowest number of cases (20.1%). Incidence of otomycosis and fungi producing otomycosis vary within the distinct geographical areas. In Cadiz, this infection is endemic due to warm temperatures, high humidity, sea bathing, and wind, which contributes to disseminate the conidia. Despite Aspergillus niger has been reported as the main causative agent, A. flavus is predominant in Cadiz. Although infection is usually detected in warm months, we observed a homogeneous occurrence of otomycosis in almost all the seasons.

  15. Segregated assembly of muscle myosin expressed in nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed

    Moncman, C L; Rindt, H; Robbins, J; Winkelmann, D A

    1993-10-01

    Skeletal muscle myosin cDNAs were expressed in a simian kidney cell line (COS) and a mouse myogenic cell line to investigate the mechanisms controlling early stages of myosin filament assembly. An embryonic chicken muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) cDNA was linked to constitutive promoters from adenovirus or SV40 and transiently expressed in COS cells. These cells accumulate hybrid myosin molecules composed of muscle MHCs and endogenous, nonmuscle, myosin light chains. The muscle myosin is found associated with a Triton insoluble fraction from extracts of the COS cells by immunoprecipitation and is detected in 2.4 +/- 0.8-micron-long filamentous structures distributed throughout the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence microscopy. These structures are shown by immunoelectron microscopy to correspond to loosely organized bundles of 12-16-nm-diameter myosin filaments. The muscle and nonmuscle MHCs are segregated in the transfected cells; the endogenous nonmuscle myosin displays a normal distribution pattern along stress fibers and does not colocalize with the muscle myosin filament bundles. A similar assembly pattern and distribution are observed for expression of the muscle MHC in a myogenic cell line. The myosin assembles into filament bundles, 1.5 +/- 0.6 micron in length, that are distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the undifferentiated myoblasts and segregated from the endogenous nonmuscle myosin. In both cell lines, formation of the myosin filament bundles is dependent on the accumulation of the protein. In contrast to these results, the expression of a truncated MHC that lacks much of the rod domain produces an assembly deficient molecule. The truncated MHC is diffusely distributed throughout the cytoplasm and not associated with cellular stress fibers. These results establish that the information necessary for the segregation of myosin isotypes into distinct cellular structures is contained within the primary structure of the MHC and that other factors are not

  16. Filament hunting: integrated H i 21 cm emission from filaments inferred by galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooistra, Robin; Silva, Marta B.; Zaroubi, Saleem

    2017-06-01

    Large-scale filaments, with lengths that can reach tens of Mpc, are the most prominent features in the cosmic web. These filaments have only been observed indirectly through the positions of galaxies in large galaxy surveys or through absorption features in the spectra of high-redshift sources. In this study, we propose to go one step further and directly detect intergalactic medium filaments through their emission in the H i 21 cm line. We make use of high-resolution cosmological simulations to estimate the intensity of this emission in low-redshift filaments and use it to make predictions for the direct detectability of specific filaments previously inferred from galaxy surveys, in particular the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Given the expected signal of these filaments, our study shows that H i emission from large filaments can be observed by current and next-generation radio telescopes. We estimate that gas in filaments of length l ≳ 15 h-1 Mpc with relatively small inclinations to the line of sight (≲ 10°) can be observed in ˜40-100 h with telescopes such as Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope or Expanded Very Large Array, potentially providing large improvements over our knowledge of the astrophysical properties of these filaments. Due to their large field of view and sufficiently long integration times, upcoming H i surveys with the Apertif and Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder instruments will be able to detect large filaments independently of their orientation and curvature. Furthermore, our estimates indicate that a more powerful future radio telescope like Square Kilometre Array can be used to map most of these filaments, which will allow them to be used as a strong cosmological probe.

  17. A study on the blood vascular system of the lamprey gill filament.

    PubMed

    Nakao, T; Uchinomiya, K

    1978-02-01

    The blood vessels in the gill filaments of lamprey, Lampetra japonica, were studied with an electron microscope. Each gill filament is supplied by an afferent filament artery (afa) flanked by a pair of filament veins (fv), along the outer border of the axial plate, and an efferent filament artery (efa) along the inner, free border. Between these arteries are interposed the cavernous body and the blood lacunae. The marginal channel arises from the cavernous body, which leads to the afa, runs along the free border of the secondary lamella collecting oxygenated blood from the lamellar blood lacunae, and finally joins efa. This channel is considered to play an important role in the gill circulation as a bypass between afa and efa. Pillar cells were found only in the blood lacunae of the axial plate and the secondary lamellae. The basal lamina is generally absent on the vascular wall, but only a small amount of dense material could be seen on the basal surface of endothelial cells of afa and fv: this is regarded as an anchoring device between the cell and connective tissue fibrils. Fenestrations are generally absent in the endothelial layer but numerous gaps were seen in the wall of fv. Arterio-venus anastomoses were found between afa or the cavernous body and fv, and between efa or the collecting arteries of the efferent branchial artery and the peribranchial venous sinus. The anastomosing channel consists of the inner endothelial layer and the outer smooth muscle layer, which is thicker in the intermediate portion of the channel. The endothelial cells called "AVA cells" here are characterized by (1) dense cytoplasms, (2) apical microvilli and (3) basal cytoplasmic processes closely associated with smooth muscle cells.

  18. Electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction of native thin filaments reveal species-specific differences in regulatory strand densities

    SciTech Connect

    Cammarato, Anthony; Craig, Roger; Lehman, William

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom striated muscle contraction is regulated by the thin filament troponin-tropomyosin complex. Homologous regulatory components are shared among vertebrate and arthropod muscles; however, unique protein extensions and/or components characterize the latter. The Troponin T (TnT) isoforms of Drosophila indirect flight and tarantula femur muscle for example contain distinct C-terminal extensions and are {approx}20% larger overall than their vertebrate counterpart. Using electron microscopy and three-dimensional helical reconstruction of native Drosophila, tarantula and frog muscle thin filaments we have identified species-specific differences in tropomyosin regulatory strand densities. The strands on the arthropod thin filaments were significantly larger in diameter than those from vertebrates, although not significantly different from each other. These findings reflect differences in the regulatory troponin-tropomyosin complex, which are likely due to the larger TnT molecules aligning and extending along much of the tropomyosin strands' length. Such an arrangement potentially alters the physical properties of the regulatory strands and may help establish contractile characteristics unique to certain arthropod muscles.

  19. PDGF induces reorganization of vimentin filaments.

    PubMed

    Valgeirsdóttir, S; Claesson-Welsh, L; Bongcam-Rudloff, E; Hellman, U; Westermark, B; Heldin, C H

    1998-07-30

    In this study we demonstrate that stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) leads to a marked reorganization of the vimentin filaments in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells ectopically expressing the PDGF beta-receptor. Within 20 minutes after stimulation, the well-spread fine fibrillar vimentin was reorganized as the filaments aggregated into a dense coil around the nucleus. The solubility of vimentin upon Nonidet-P40-extraction of cells decreased considerably after PDGF stimulation, indicating that PDGF caused a redistribution of vimentin to a less soluble compartment. In addition, an increased tyrosine phosphorylation of vimentin was observed. The redistribution of vimentin was not a direct consequence of its tyrosine phosphorylation, since treatment of cells with an inhibitor for the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Src, attenuated phosphorylation but not redistribution of vimentin. These changes in the distribution of vimentin occurred in conjunction with reorganization of actin filaments. In PAE cells expressing a Y740/751F mutant receptor that is unable to bind and activate phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-kinase), the distribution of vimentin was virtually unaffected by PDGF stimulation. Thus, PI3-kinase is important for vimentin reorganization, in addition to its previously demonstrated role in actin reorganization. The small GTPase Rac has previously been shown to be involved downstream of PI3-kinase in the reorganization of actin filaments. In PAE cells overexpressing dominant negative Rac1 (N17Rac1), no change in the fine fibrillar vimentin network was seen after PDGF-BB stimulation, whereas in PAE cells overexpressing constitutively active Rac1 (V12Rac1), there was a dramatic change in vimentin filament organization independent of PDGF stimulation. These data indicate that PDGF causes a reorganization of microfilaments as well as intermediate filaments in its target cells and suggest an important role for Rac downstream of PI3-kinase in

  20. Development of single crystal filaments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.V.; Shoultz, R.A.; Bourque-McConnell, M.M.

    1995-04-01

    The program just completed addresses a route to a more efficient longer-lasting electric light bulb filament. All current filaments for light bulbs are metallic in nature. They are subject to embrittlement with age (large grain growth) and relatively high vapor pressures which limits their operating temperature. There is evidence which suggests advantages to using high temperature refractory single crystal fibers as a filament for a light bulb. These refractory materials may include materials such as hafnium or tantalum carbide which have melting points about 500{degrees}C higher than tungsten. Another advantage is that single crystal fibers have a very high degree of crystalline perfection with very few voids and dislocations. Without these imperfections, the atomic mobility at high temperatures is highly restricted. Thus single crystal fibers are very stable at high temperature and will last longer. The efficiencies result from running these single crystal ceramic fiber filaments at higher temperatures and the higher emissivity of the carbide filaments compared to tungsten. The amount of visible light is proportional to the 4the power of the temperature thus a 500{degrees}C higher operating give about a 3-fold increase in radiation in the visible range. The program accomplishments can be summarized as follows: (1) Single crystal fibers of JfC sufficient crystal quality for light bulb filament applications were made. (2) The HfC fiber furnace growth chamber, power control and data collection system was developed for the laboratory scale plant. (3) method for mounting and apparatuses for testing the single crystal fiber filaments were developed and built.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing eNOS and a Cav1 Mutant Inhibit Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation in a Rat Model of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiying; Yang, Hongli; Yue, Hongmei; Strappe, Pádraig Michael; Xia, Peng; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yingxin; Chai, Shoudong; Chen, Shuangfeng; Ma, Longle; Wang, Lexin

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and/or a mutant caveolin-1(F92A-Cav1), on the pulmonary haemodynamics and structure in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary arterial hypertension was induced with monocrotaline (MCT) in 60 adult male Wistar rats prior to delivery of lentiviral vector transduced rBMSCs expressing Cav1, eNOS and/or F92A-Cav1. Changes in pulmonary haemodynamics, right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI), and serum nitric oxide (NO) were evaluated. Ultrastructure changes in lung tissues were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Expression of Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), p53, P21, eNOS, and alpha-smooth muscle actin were evaluated by real time PCR, western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Treatment of PAH rats with gene modified rBMSCs (eNOS +/- Cav1 F92A) decreased right ventricular systolic pressure and improved pulmonary haemodynamics. The protein of alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was decreased whilst KLF4, p53, P21, eNOS expression, and serum NO concentration was elevated. The survival rate of rats in the treatment groups was also improved, after 35 days of observation. Intravenous delivery of rBMSCs expressing eNOS/F92A-Cav1 to PAH rats inhibits pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, and improves pulmonary haemodynamics, vascular remodelling and short-term survival. Activation of KLF4-p53 signalling pathway may be involved in these beneficial effects. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship of Species-Specific Filament Levels to Filamentous Bulking in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiangying; Lou, Inchio; de los Reyes, Francis L.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the relationship between activated-sludge bulking and levels of specific filamentous bacteria, we developed a statistics-based quantification method for estimating the biomass levels of specific filaments using 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The results of quantitative FISH for the filament Sphaerotilus natans were similar to the results of quantitative membrane hybridization in a sample from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Laboratory-scale reactors were operated under different flow conditions to develop bulking and nonbulking sludge and were bioaugmented with S. natans cells to stimulate bulking. Instead of S. natans, the filament Eikelboom type 1851 became dominant in the reactors. Levels of type 1851 filaments extending out of the flocs correlated strongly with the sludge volume index, and extended filament lengths of approximately 6 × 108 μm ml−1 resulted in bulking in laboratory-scale and full-scale activated-sludge samples. Quantitative FISH showed that high levels of filaments occurred inside the flocs in nonbulking sludge, supporting the “substrate diffusion limitation” hypothesis for bulking. The approach will allow the monitoring of incremental improvements in bulking control methods and the delineation of the operational conditions that lead to bulking due to specific filaments. PMID:15066840

  3. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  4. Polymerization of Escherichia coli bacteriophage T4D short tail fibers into filaments and filament bundles.

    PubMed

    Zorzopulos, J; DeLong, S; Chapman, V; Kozloff, L M

    1981-01-01

    Crude preparations of short tail fibers of E. coli T4D bacteriophage were found to be readily soluble in 0.01 M EDTA, but after dialysis against H2O, and a 10-fold concentration, the fibers aggregated into long filaments and filament bundles. However, since the filaments from these crude preparations were associated with nonfilamentous material, the fibers were purified in the presence of 0.01 M EDTA. After dialysis of the purified short tail fiber preparation against water, and 10-fold concentration, a precipitate was again formed that could be readily separated by low speed centrifugation. In micrographs, this precipitated material showed large aggregates of short tail fibers but did not show well-defined filaments. However, when these aggregates were incubated with 0.02 M MgSO4 and 0.06 M KC1, well-defined filaments were again formed.

  5. Filament Eruption without Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad; Moore, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We report characteristics of quiescent filament eruptions that were not associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We examined 12 quiescent filament eruptions, each of which was located far from disk center (20.7 R(sub sun)) in diffuse remnant magnetic fields of decayed active regions, was well observed in full-disk movies in Ha and Fe XI, and had good coronagraph coverage. Of the 12 events, 9 were associated with CMEs and 3 were not. Even though the two kinds of eruption were indistinguishable in their magnetic setting and in the eruptive motion of the filament in the Ha movies, each of the CME-producing eruptions produced a two-ribbon flare in Ha and a coronal arcade and/or two-ribbon flare in Fe XII, and each of the non-CME-producing eruptions did not. From this result, and the appearance of the eruptive motion in the Fe XII movies, we conclude that the non-CME-associated filament eruptions are confined eruptions like the confined filament eruptions in active regions.

  6. Interaction and merging of two sinistral filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Liu, Yu; Li, Haidong; Wang, Haimin; Ji, Haisheng; Li, Jianping

    2014-09-20

    In this paper, we report the interaction and subsequent merging of two sinistral filaments (F1 and F2) occurring at the boundary of AR 9720 on 2001 December 6. The two filaments were close and nearly perpendicular to each other. The interaction occurred after F1 was erupted and the eruption was impeded by a more extended filament channel (FC) standing in the way, in which F2 was embedded. The erupted material ran into FC along its axis, causing F1 and F2 to merge into a single structure that subsequently underwent a large-amplitude to-and-fro motion. A significant plasma heating process was observed in the merging process, making the mixed material largely disappear from the Hα passband, but appear in Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope 195 Å images for a while. These observations can serve as strong evidence of merging reconnection between the two colliding magnetic structures. A new sinistral filament was formed along FC after the cooling of the merged and heated material. No coronal mass ejection was observed to be associated with the event; though, the eruption was accompanied by a two-ribbon flare with a separation motion, indicating that the eruption had failed. This event shows that, in addition to overlying magnetic fields, such an interaction is an effective restraint to make a filament eruption fail in this way.

  7. Terahertz waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Hai-Wei; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Otani, Chiko; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-11-23

    Terahertz (THz) waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments with a crossing angle of 25° are investigated. The irradiated THz waves from the crossing filaments show a small THz pulse after the main THz pulse, which was not observed in those from single-filament scheme. Since the position of the small THz pulse changes with the time-delay of two filaments, this phenomenon can be explained by a model in which the small THz pulse is from the second filament. The denser plasma in the overlap region of the filaments changes the movement of space charges in the plasma, thereby changing the angular distribution of THz radiation. As a result, this schematic induces some THz wave from the second filament to propagate along the path of the THz wave from the first filament. Thus, this schematic alters the direction of the THz radiation from the filamentation, which can be used in THz wave remote sensing.

  8. Void galaxy properties depending on void filament straightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the properties of galaxies belonging to the filaments in cosmic void regions, using the void catalogue constructed by Pan et al. (2012) from the SDSS DR7. To identify galaxy filaments within a void, voids with 30 or more galaxies are selected as a sample. We identify 3172 filaments in 1055 voids by applying the filament finding algorithm utilizing minimal spanning tree (MST) which is an unique linear pattern into which connects all the galaxies in a void. We study the correlations between galaxy properties and the specific size of filament which quantifies the degree of the filament straightness. For example, the average magnitude and the magnitude of the faintest galaxy in filament decrease as the straightness of the filament increases. We also find that the correlations become stronger in rich filaments with many member galaxies than in poor ones. We discuss a physical explanation to our findings and their cosmological implications.

  9. An atomic model of the thin filament in the relaxed and Ca2+-activated states.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Alnoor; Vinogradova, Maia V; Curmi, Paul M G; King, William A; Fletterick, Robert J; Craig, Roger; Tobacman, Larry S; Xu, Chen; Hatch, Victoria; Lehman, William

    2006-03-31

    Contraction of striated muscles is regulated by tropomyosin strands that run continuously along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin blocks myosin-binding sites on actin in resting muscle and unblocks them during Ca2+-activation. This steric effect controls myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin that drives contraction. Troponin, bound to the thin filaments, couples Ca2+-concentration changes to the movement of tropomyosin. Ca2+-free troponin is thought to trap tropomyosin in the myosin-blocking position, while this constraint is released after Ca2+-binding. Although the location and movements of tropomyosin are well known, the structural organization of troponin on thin filaments is not. Its mechanism of action therefore remains uncertain. To determine the organization of troponin on the thin filament, we have constructed atomic models of low and high-Ca2+ states based on crystal structures of actin, tropomyosin and the "core domain" of troponin, and constrained by distances between filament components and by their location in electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions. Alternative models were also built where troponin was systematically repositioned or reoriented on actin. The accuracy of the different models was evaluated by determining how well they corresponded to EM images. While the initial low and high-Ca2+ models fitted the data precisely, the alternatives did not, suggesting that the starting models best represented the correct structures. Thin filament reconstructions were generated from the EM data using these starting models as references. In addition to showing the core domain of troponin, the reconstructions showed additional detail not present in the starting models. We attribute this to an extension of TnI linking the troponin core domain to actin at low (but not at high) Ca2+, thereby trapping tropomyosin in the OFF-state. The bulk of the core domain of troponin appears not to move significantly on actin, regardless of Ca2+ level. Our

  10. Spatiotemporal rogue events in optical multiple filamentation.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Simon; Nibbering, Erik T J; Brée, Carsten; Skupin, Stefan; Demircan, Ayhan; Genty, Goëry; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2013-12-13

    The transient appearance of bright spots in the beam profile of optical filaments formed in xenon is experimentally investigated. Fluence profiles are recorded with high-speed optical cameras at the kilohertz repetition rate of the laser source. A statistical analysis reveals a thresholdlike appearance of heavy-tailed fluence distributions together with the transition from single to multiple filamentation. The multifilament scenario exhibits near-exponential probability density functions, with extreme events exceeding the significant wave height by more than a factor of 10. The extreme events are isolated in space and in time. The macroscopic origin of these experimentally observed heavy-tail statistics is shown to be local refractive index variations inside the nonlinear medium, induced by multiphoton absorption and subsequent plasma thermalization. Microscopically, mergers between filament strings appear to play a decisive role in the observed rogue wave statistics.

  11. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S; Bausch, Andreas R; Frey, Erwin

    2015-08-25

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system's dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model.

  12. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Müller, S. H.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2013-10-15

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  13. SOLAR MAGNETIZED 'TORNADOES': RELATION TO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang Tongjiang; Gan Weiqun

    2012-09-10

    Solar magnetized 'tornadoes', a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar 'tornadoes' (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  14. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christoph A.; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S.; Bausch, Andreas R.; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system’s dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model. PMID:26261319

  15. Transverse sarcomere splitting. A possible means of longitudinal growth in crab muscles

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Transversely split sarcomeres are seen in mouthpart muscles of the blue crab in the electron microscope. Sarcomeres split only at the H zone. Two new sarcomeres are formed by a Z disk which appears in the H zone of the splitting sarcomere. Splitting may involve breaking of the thick filaments in the H zone, elongation of these filaments, and formation of both new actin filaments and Z-disk materials, Sarcomere splitting would allow longitudinal growth of muscle cells without lengthening of sarcomeres and concomitant changes in contractile properties. PMID:457766

  16. Optimized method for isolating highly purified and functional porcine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Farideh; Patel, Mitalben; Morales-Garza, Marco A; Winebrenner, Caitlin; Gobin, Andrea S; Chau, Eric; Sampaio, Luiz C; Taylor, Doris A

    2017-11-01

    Numerous protocols exist for isolating aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells from small animals. However, establishing a protocol for isolating pure cell populations from large animal vessels that are more elastic has been challenging. We developed a simple sequential enzymatic approach to isolate highly purified populations of porcine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The lumen of a porcine aorta was filled with 25 U/ml dispase solution and incubated at 37°C to dissociate the endothelial cells. The smooth muscle cells were isolated by mincing the tunica media of the treated aorta and incubating the pieces in 0.2% and then 0.1% collagenase type I solution. The isolated endothelial cells stained positive for von Willebrand factor, and 97.2% of them expressed CD31. Early and late passage endothelial cells had a population doubling time of 38 hr and maintained a capacity to take up DiI-Ac-LDL and form tubes in Matrigel®. The isolated smooth muscle cells stained highly positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin, and an impurities assessment showed that only 1.8% were endothelial cells. Population doubling time for the smooth muscle cells was ∼70 hr at passages 3 and 7; and the cells positively responded to endothelin-1, as shown by a 66% increase in the intracellular calcium level. This simple protocol allows for the isolation of highly pure populations of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from porcine aorta that can survive continued passage in culture without losing functionality or becoming overgrown by fibroblasts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Heterologous gene expression in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoyun; Schmitz, George; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are critical to production of many commercial enzymes and organic compounds. Fungal-based systems have several advantages over bacterial-based systems for protein production because high-level secretion of enzymes is a common trait of their decomposer lifestyle. Furthermore, in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins of eukaryotic origin, the filamentous fungi become the vehicle of choice due to critical processes shared in gene expression with other eukaryotic organisms. The complexity and relative dearth of understanding of the physiology of filamentous fungi, compared to bacteria, have hindered rapid development of these organisms as highly efficient factories for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review, we highlight several of the known benefits and challenges in using filamentous fungi (particularly Aspergillus spp., Trichoderma reesei, and Neurospora crassa) for the production of proteins, especially heterologous, nonfungal enzymes. We review various techniques commonly employed in recombinant protein production in the filamentous fungi, including transformation methods, selection of gene regulatory elements such as promoters, protein secretion factors such as the signal peptide, and optimization of coding sequence. We provide insights into current models of host genomic defenses such as repeat-induced point mutation and quelling. Furthermore, we examine the regulatory effects of transcript sequences, including introns and untranslated regions, pre-mRNA (messenger RNA) processing, transcript transport, and mRNA stability. We anticipate that this review will become a resource for researchers who aim at advancing the use of these fascinating organisms as protein production factories, for both academic and industrial purposes, and also for scientists with general interest in the biology of the filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Production of recombinant proteins by filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Ward, Owen P

    2012-01-01

    The initial focus of recombinant protein production by filamentous fungi related to exploiting the extraordinary extracellular enzyme synthesis and secretion machinery of industrial strains, including Aspergillus, Trichoderma, Penicillium and Rhizopus species, was to produce single recombinant protein products. An early recognized disadvantage of filamentous fungi as hosts of recombinant proteins was their common ability to produce homologous proteases which could degrade the heterologous protein product and strategies to prevent proteolysis have met with some limited success. It was also recognized that the protein glycosylation patterns in filamentous fungi and in mammals were quite different, such that filamentous fungi are likely not to be the most suitable microbial hosts for production of recombinant human glycoproteins for therapeutic use. By combining the experience gained from production of single recombinant proteins with new scientific information being generated through genomics and proteomics research, biotechnologists are now poised to extend the biomanufacturing capabilities of recombinant filamentous fungi by enabling them to express genes encoding multiple proteins, including, for example, new biosynthetic pathways for production of new primary or secondary metabolites. It is recognized that filamentous fungi, most species of which have not yet been isolated, represent an enormously diverse source of novel biosynthetic pathways, and that the natural fungal host harboring a valuable biosynthesis pathway may often not be the most suitable organism for biomanufacture purposes. Hence it is expected that substantial effort will be directed to transforming other fungal hosts, non-fungal microbial hosts and indeed non microbial hosts to express some of these novel biosynthetic pathways. But future applications of recombinant expression of proteins will not be confined to biomanufacturing. Opportunities to exploit recombinant technology to unravel the

  19. Theoretical and Experimental study on multiple filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jie; Lu Xin; Hao Zuoqiang; Xi Tingting; Zhang Zhe; Jin Zhan

    2007-07-11

    The physics of filaments formed by femtosecond laser pulses propagating in air is revealed both in theory and in experiment. An analytical method is used to investigate the interaction of two filaments. The interaction Hamiltonian of two filaments with different phase shifts is obtained and used to judge the properly of filaments interaction. The analytical results are in good agreement with simulation results. The influence of energy background on propagation of filaments is investigated in experiment. It is found that the characteristics of filaments can be changed by spatial and temporal control of laser pulses.

  20. Impaired tropomyosin-troponin interactions reduce activation of the actin thin filament.

    PubMed

    Robaszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Ostrowska, Zofia; Cyranka-Czaja, Anna; Moraczewska, Joanna

    2015-05-01

    Tropomyosin and troponin are bound to the actin filament to control the contraction of striated muscle in the Ca-dependent manner. The interactions between both regulatory proteins important for the regulation process are not fully understood. To gain more insight into the mechanisms of the thin filament regulation by skeletal α-tropomyosin and troponin, we analyzed effects of seven myopathy-related substitutions: Leu99Met, Ala155Thr, Arg167Gly, Arg167Cys, Arg167His, Lys168Glu, and Arg244Gly. All substitutions reduced Ca-dependent activation of the actomyosin ATPase. The effects of mutations in Arg167 and Lys168 were the most severe. The amino acid substitutions did not significantly affect troponin binding to the whole filament, but reduced 1.2-2.8 fold the affinity of troponin to tropomyosin alone. The excimer fluorescence of N-(1-pyrene)iodoacetamide, a probe attached to the central Cys190, demonstrated that substitutions located near the troponin core domain-binding region strongly affected conformational changes accompanying the tropomyosin-troponin interactions. The thermal stability of all tropomyosin mutants was lower than the stability of the wild type tropomyosin, with TM reduced by 5.3-8.5°C. Together the analyses demonstrated that the myopathy-causing mutations affected tropomyosin structure and led to changes in interactions between tropomyosin and troponin, which impaired the transition of the thin filament from the inactive off to the active on state.

  1. Electric field modulation of the motility of actin filaments on myosin-functionalised surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, L. C.; Aveyard, J.; van Zalinge, H.; Persson, M.; Mânsson, A.; Nicolau, D. V.

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the difference in electrically guided acto-myosin motility on two surfaces. Rabbit skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin (HMM) was absorbed onto surfaces coated with Nitrocellulose (NC) and Poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA). A modified in vitro motility assay with sealed chambers for the insertion of electrodes allowed an electrical field to be applied across the flow cell. On all surfaces a small increase in velocity and general guidance of the actin filaments towards the positive electrode is seen at field strengths in the range of ~3000 - 4000Vm-1. A large increase in velocity was observed at ~5000Vm-1 and a significant change in the velocity of the actin filaments present in field strengths higher than this. NC supported the highest percentage of motile filaments and at a field of 8000Vm-1 reached ~66%. PBMA however supported the least percentage of motile filaments and irregular motility was observed even at higher fields where guidance was expected to be strong. The change in velocity in the range of fields tested varied significantly on the surfaces with NC displaying a 46% increase from 0 to 8000Vm-1 whereas on PBMA this value was just 37%.

  2. A coarse-grained model to study calcium activation of the cardiac thin filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is one of the most common heart disease caused by genetic mutations. Cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation involve regulation of crossbridge binding to the cardiac thin filament, which regulates actomyosin interactions through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cardiac troponin (cTn) and tropomyosin (Tm). An atomistic model of cTn complex interacting with Tm has been studied by our group. A more realistic model requires the inclusion of the dynamics of actin filament, which is almost 6 times larger than cTn and Tm in terms of atom numbers, and extensive sampling of the model becomes very resource-demanding. By using physics-based protein united-residue force field, we introduce a coarse-grained model to study the calcium activation of the thin filament resulting from cTn's allosteric regulation of Tm dynamics on actin. The time scale is much longer than that of all-atom molecular dynamics simulation because of the reduction of the degrees of freedom. The coarse-grained model is a good template for studying cardiac thin filament mutations that cause FHC, and reduces the cost of computational resources.

  3. Structure, sarcomeric organization, and thin filament binding of cardiac myosin-binding protein-C.

    PubMed

    Craig, Roger; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Mun, Ji Young; Torre, Iratxe; Luther, Pradeep K

    2014-03-01

    Myosin-binding protein-C (MyBP-C) is an accessory protein of the myosin filaments of vertebrate striated muscle. In the heart, it plays a key role in modulating contractility in response to β-adrenergic stimulation. Mutations in the cardiac isoform (cMyBP-C) are a leading cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Understanding cMyBP-C function and its role in disease requires knowledge of the structure of the molecule, its organization in the sarcomere, and its interactions with other sarcomeric proteins. Here we review the main structural features of this modular, elongated molecule and the properties of some of its key domains. We describe observations suggesting that the bulk of the molecule extends perpendicular to the thick filament, enabling it to reach neighboring thin filaments in the sarcomere. We review structural and functional evidence for interaction of its N-terminal domains with actin and how this may modulate thin filament activation. We also discuss the effects that phosphorylation of cMyBP-C has on some of these structural features and how this might relate to cMyBP-C function in the beating heart.

  4. Filament winding - Waking the sleeping giant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, W. T., Jr.; Stein, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of filament winding (FW) in the production of aerospace composite structures is examined. The FW process applies spools of fiber and prepreg tow or prepreg tape to a male mandrel; the process is more efficient and cost effective than metallic construction. The fibers used in FW and the curing process are explained. The reduced storage and fabrication costs that result from FW are discussed. The use of FW to produce a filament-wound case for a solid rocket motor and the substructure and skin of an aircraft fuselage are described. Areas which require further development in order to expand the use of FW are listed and discussed.

  5. Biotechnological implications of filamentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2008-07-01

    The genetics governing the morphological switch from round or ovoid cells to filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has received significant interest in relation to sensing and signaling pathways as well as the control of cell processes including budding, elongation and adhesion. Little is known about the environmental signals which trigger these morphological changes from a biotechnological point of view. This review aims to highlight the main causes of filamentous growth in S. cerevisiae in its industrial setting with the purpose of stimulating additional studies within this field.

  6. Integration of hydrodynamic interactions between filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yi; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In many biological situations, slender filaments interact through a viscous fluid, and these hydrodynamic interactions play a crucial cellular role. Examples include the ability of peritrichous bacteria to bundle their flagella or the generation of metachronal waves in cilia arrays. In most cases of interest, three distinct length scales characterize the filaments, their typical thickness a, relative distance h, and length L, which are asymptotically separated as a << h << L . In this talk, we demonstrate how to analytically develop a long-wavelength integration of hydrodynamic singularities in this biologically-relevant limit.

  7. Structure of flexible filamentous plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C; Havens, Wendy M; Ghabrial, Said A; Wall, Joseph S; Stubbs, Gerald

    2008-10-01

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  8. Carbon nanotube filaments in household light bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jinquan; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Wei, Bingqing

    2004-06-01

    Household light bulbs made from macroscopic single-walled and double-walled carbon nanotube filaments were fabricated and tested. The nanotube bulbs are found to possess several interesting features when compared to a conventional tungsten filament in safelight (36 V, 40 W), such as lower threshold voltage for light emission and higher brightness at high voltages. Electrically induced excited peaks at 407, 417, 655 nm were identified to be an intrinsic property of nanotubes and these peaks are observed to become stronger in the light emission spectra at high temperatures which cannot be explained easily with the concept of blackbody emission.

  9. Structure of Flexible Filamentous Plant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.; Havens, Wendy M.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2008-10-23

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  10. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Edward A.

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  11. Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Zhang, Qingmin; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang; Yang, Kai

    2017-02-01

    Using the high-quality observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the interaction of two filaments (F1 and F2) in a long filament channel associated with twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2016 January 26. Before the eruption, a sequence of rapid cancellation and emergence of the magnetic flux has been observed, which likely triggered the ascending of the west filament (F1). The east footpoints of rising F1 moved toward the east far end of the filament channel, accompanied by post-eruption loops and flare ribbons. This likely indicated a large-scale eruption involving the long filament channel, which resulted from the interaction between F1 and the east filament (F2). Some bright plasma flew over F2, and F2 stayed at rest during the eruption, likely due to the confinement of its overlying lower magnetic field. Interestingly, the impulsive F1 pushed its overlying magnetic arcades to form the first CME, and F1 finally evolved into the second CME after the collision with the nearby coronal hole. We suggest that the interaction of F1 and the overlying magnetic field of F2 led to the merging reconnection that forms a longer eruptive filament loop. Our results also provide a possible picture of the origin of twin CMEs and show that the large-scale magnetic topology of the coronal hole is important for the eventual propagation direction of CMEs.

  12. Analytical Core Mass Function (CMF) from Filaments: Under Which Circumstances Can Filament Fragmentation Reproduce the CMF?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles

    2017-10-01

    Observations suggest that star formation in filamentary molecular clouds occurs in a two-step process, with the formation of filaments preceding that of prestellar cores and stars. Here, we apply the gravoturbulent fragmentation theory of Hennebelle & Chabrier to a filamentary environment, taking into account magnetic support. We discuss the induced geometrical effect on the cores, with a transition from 3D geometry at small scales to 1D at large ones. The model predicts the fragmentation behavior of a filament for a given mass per unit length (MpL) and level of magnetization. This core mass function (CMF) for individual filaments is then convolved with the distribution of filaments to obtain the final system CMF. The model yields two major results. (i) The filamentary geometry naturally induces a hierarchical fragmentation process, first into groups of cores, separated by a length equal to a few filament Jeans lengths, i.e., a few times the filament width. These groups then fragment into individual cores. (ii) Non-magnetized filaments with high MpL are found to fragment excessively, at odds with observations. This is resolved by taking into account the magnetic field (treated simply as additional pressure support). The present theory suggests two complementary modes of star formation: although small (spherical or filamentary) structures will collapse directly into prestellar cores, according to the standard Hennebelle–Chabrier theory, the large (filamentary) ones, the dominant population according to observations, will follow the aforedescribed two-step process.

  13. Different Head Environments in Tarantula Thick Filaments Support a Cooperative Activation Process

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Biasutto, Antonio; Alamo, Lorenzo; Riggs, Claire; Pinto, Antonio; Méndez, Franklin; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). Structural analysis of relaxed tarantula thick filaments shows that the RLCs of the interacting free and blocked myosin heads are in different environments. This and other data suggested a phosphorylation mechanism in which Ser-35 of the free head is exposed and constitutively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, whereas the blocked head is hidden and unphosphorylated; on activation, myosin light chain kinase phosphorylates the monophosphorylated free head followed by the unphosphorylated blocked head, both at Ser-45. Our goal was to test this model of phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry of quickly frozen, intact muscles showed that only Ser-35 was phosphorylated in the relaxed state. The location of this constitutively phosphorylated Ser-35 was analyzed by immunofluorescence, using antibodies specific for unphosphorylated or phosphorylated Ser-35. In the relaxed state, myofibrils were labeled by anti-pSer-35 but not by anti-Ser-35, whereas in rigor, labeling was similar with both. This suggests that only pSer-35 is exposed in the relaxed state, while in rigor, Ser-35 is also exposed. In the interacting-head motif of relaxed filaments, only the free head RLCs are exposed, suggesting that the constitutive pSer-35 is on the free heads, consistent with the proposed mechanism. PMID:24209856

  14. Different head environments in tarantula thick filaments support a cooperative activation process.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Biasutto, Antonio; Alamo, Lorenzo; Riggs, Claire; Pinto, Antonio; Méndez, Franklin; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2013-11-05

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). Structural analysis of relaxed tarantula thick filaments shows that the RLCs of the interacting free and blocked myosin heads are in different environments. This and other data suggested a phosphorylation mechanism in which Ser-35 of the free head is exposed and constitutively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, whereas the blocked head is hidden and unphosphorylated; on activation, myosin light chain kinase phosphorylates the monophosphorylated free head followed by the unphosphorylated blocked head, both at Ser-45. Our goal was to test this model of phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry of quickly frozen, intact muscles showed that only Ser-35 was phosphorylated in the relaxed state. The location of this constitutively phosphorylated Ser-35 was analyzed by immunofluorescence, using antibodies specific for unphosphorylated or phosphorylated Ser-35. In the relaxed state, myofibrils were labeled by anti-pSer-35 but not by anti-Ser-35, whereas in rigor, labeling was similar with both. This suggests that only pSer-35 is exposed in the relaxed state, while in rigor, Ser-35 is also exposed. In the interacting-head motif of relaxed filaments, only the free head RLCs are exposed, suggesting that the constitutive pSer-35 is on the free heads, consistent with the proposed mechanism. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron microscopic recording of myosin head power stroke in hydrated myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Chaen, Shigeru; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Minoda, Hiroki; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-10-26

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic attachment and detachment between myosin heads and actin filaments, coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Despite extensive studies, however, the amplitude of myosin head power stroke still remains to be a mystery. Using the gas environmental chamber, we have succeeded in recording the power stroke of position-marked myosin heads in hydrated mixture of actin and myosin filaments in a nearly isometric condition, in which myosin heads do not produce gross myofilament sliding, but only stretch adjacent elastic structures. On application of ATP, individual myosin heads move by ~3.3 nm at the distal region, and by ~2.5 nm at the proximal region of myosin head catalytic domain. After exhaustion of applied ATP, individual myosin heads return towards their initial position. At low ionic strength, the amplitude of myosin head power stroke increases to >4 nm at both distal and proximal regions of myosin heads catalytic domain, being consistent with the report that the force generated by individual myosin heads in muscle fibers is enhanced at low ionic strength. The advantages of the present study over other in vitro motility assay systems, using myosin heads detached from myosin filaments, are discussed.

  16. Slowed Dynamics of Thin Filament Regulatory Units Reduces Ca2+-Sensitivity of Cardiac Biomechanical Function

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Campion K. P.; Takeda, Aya K.; Badr, Myriam A.; Rogers, Jordan S.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2013-01-01

    Actomyosin kinetics in both skinned skeletal muscle fibers at maximum Ca2+-activation and unregulated in vitro motility assays are modulated by solvent microviscosity in a manner consistent with a diffusion limited process. Viscosity might also influence cardiac thin filament Ca2+-regulatory protein dynamics. In vitro motility assays were conducted using thin filaments reconstituted with recombinant human cardiac troponin and tropomyosin; solvent microviscosity was varied by addition of sucrose or glucose. At saturating Ca2+, filament sliding speed (s) was inversely proportional to viscosity. Ca2+-sensitivity (pCa50) of s decreased markedly with elevated viscosity (η/η0 ≥ ~1.3). For comparison with unloaded motility assays, steady-state isometric force (F) and kinetics of isometric tension redevelopment (kTR) were measured in single, permeabilized porcine cardiomyocytes when viscosity surrounding the myofilaments was altered. Maximum Ca2+-activated F changed little for sucrose ≤ 0.3 M (η/η0 ~1.4) or glucose ≤ 0.875 M (η/η0 ~1.66), but decreased at higher concentrations. Sucrose (0.3 M) or glucose (0.875 M) decreased pCa50 for F. kTR at saturating Ca2+ decreased steeply and monotonically with increased viscosity but there was little effect on kTR at sub-maximum Ca2+. Modeling indicates that increased solutes affect dynamics of cardiac muscle Ca2+-regulatory proteins to a much greater extent than actomyosin cross-bridge cycling. PMID:23833690

  17. Modelling the chemistry of star-forming filaments - II. Testing filament characteristics with synthetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Suri, S.; Walch, S.

    2017-06-01

    We present synthetic continuum and 13CO and C18O line emission observations of dense and cold filaments. The filaments are dynamically evolved using 3D-magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include one of the largest on-the-fly chemical networks used to date, which models the detailed evolution of H2 and CO. We investigate the reliability of observable properties, in particular filament mass and width, under different simulation conditions like magnetic field orientation and cosmic ray ionization rate. We find that filament widths of ˜0.1 pc can be probed with both line and continuum emission observations with a high accuracy (deviations ≤20 per cent). However, the width of more narrow filaments can be significantly overestimated by up to a factor of a few. Masses obtained via the dust emission are accurate within a few per cent whereas the masses inferred from molecular line emission observations deviate from the actual mass by up to a factor of 10 and show large differences for different J transitions. The inaccurate estimate of filament masses and widths of narrow filaments using molecular line observations can be attributed to (i) the non-isothermal state of the filaments, (ii) optical depth effects and (iii) the subthermally excited state of CO, while inclination effects and opacity correction only influence the obtained masses and widths by less than 50 per cent. Both, mass and width estimates, can be improved by using two isotopes to correct for the optical depth. Since gas and dust temperatures generally differ (by up to 25 K), the filaments appear more gravitationally unstable if the (too low) dust temperature is used for the stability analysis.

  18. Biological behavior of mesenchymal stem cells on poly-ε-caprolactone filaments and a strategy for tissue engineering of segments of the peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Carrier-Ruiz, A; Evaristo-Mendonça, F; Mendez-Otero, R; Ribeiro-Resende, V T

    2015-07-07

    Peripheral nerves may fail to regenerate across tube implants because these lack the microarchitecture of native nerves. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) secrete soluble factors that improve the regeneration of the peripheral nerves. Also, microstructured poly-caprolactone (PCL) filaments are capable of inducing bands of Büngner and promote regeneration in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We describe here the interaction between PCL filaments and MSC, aiming to optimize PNS tubular implants. MSC were plated on PCL filaments for 48 h and the adhesion profile, viability, proliferation and paracrine capacity were evaluated. Also, Schwann cells were plated on PCL filaments covered with MSC for 24 h to analyze the feasibility of the co-culture system. Moreover, E16 dorsal root ganglia were plated in contact with PCL filaments for 4 days to analyze neurite extension. Right sciatic nerves were exposed and a 10 mm nerve segment was removed. Distal and proximal stumps were reconnected inside a 14-mm polyethylene tube, leaving a gap of approximately 13 mm between the two stumps. Animals then received phosphate-buffered saline 1×, PCL filaments or PCL filaments previously incubated with MSC and, after 12 weeks, functional gait performance and histological analyses were made. Statistical analyses were made using Student's unpaired t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) or two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post-test. MSC were confined to lateral areas and ridges of PCL filaments, aligning along the longitudinal. MSC showed high viability (90 %), and their proliferation and secretion capabilities were not completely inhibited by the filaments. Schwann cells adhered to filaments plated with MSC, maintaining high viability (90 %). Neurites grew and extended over the surface of PCL filaments, reaching greater distances when over MSC-plated filaments. Axons showed more organized and myelinized fibers and reinnervated significantly more muscle fibers when they

  19. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shangwei; Su, Yingna; Zhou, Tuanhui; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan; Sun, Xudong; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-07-01

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations. The two filaments start from active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts first, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions failed, since the filaments first rise up, then flow toward the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeated activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO/HMI magnetograms via the flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while the weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  20. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.; Sun, Xudong; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-08-01

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding SDO/AIA observations. The two filaments start from the east border of active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts firstly, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions are failed, since the filaments firstly rise up, then flow towards the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeating activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO/HMI magnetograms by flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  1. Branchial arch muscle innervation by the glossopharyngeal (IX) and vagal (X) nerves in tetraodontiformes, with special reference to muscle homologies.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Masanori; Sasaki, Kunio

    2008-06-01

    Branchial arch muscle innervation by the glossopharyngeal (IX) and vagal (X) nerves in 10 tetraodontiform families and five outgroup taxa was examined, with special reference to muscle homologies. Basic innervation patterns and their variations were described for all muscle elements (except gill filament muscles). In the tetraodontids Takifugu poecilonotus and Canthigaster rivulata, diodontid Diodon holocanthus, and molid Mola mola, levator externus 4 was innervated by the 3rd vagal branchial trunk (BX3) in addition to BX2, owing to strong posterior expansion of the muscle. Based on nerve innervation, migrations of the muscle attachment sites (i.e., origins and insertions) were recognized in levator internus 2 (in Mola mola), obliquus dorsalis 3 (in Ostracion immaculatus and Canthigaster rivulata), and obliquus ventralis 2 (in Stephanolepis cirrhifer), muscle topologies not necessarily being indicative of homologies. Embryonic origin of the retractor dorsalis and parallel attainment of the swimbladder muscle within the order were also discussed.

  2. Time course of isotonic shortening and the underlying contraction mechanism in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Syyong, Harley T; Raqeeb, Abdul; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2011-09-01

    Although the structure of the contractile unit in smooth muscle is poorly understood, some of the mechanical properties of the muscle suggest that a sliding-filament mechanism, similar to that in striated muscle, is also operative in smooth muscle. To test the applicability of this mechanism to smooth muscle function, we have constructed a mathematical model based on a hypothetical structure of the smooth muscle contractile unit: a side-polar myosin filament sandwiched by actin filaments, each attached to the equivalent of a Z disk. Model prediction of isotonic shortening as a function of time was compared with data from experiments using ovine tracheal smooth muscle. After equilibration and establishment of in situ length, the muscle was stimulated with ACh (100 μM) until force reached a plateau. The muscle was then allowed to shorten isotonically against various loads. From the experimental records, length-force and force-velocity relationships were obtained. Integration of the hyperbolic force-velocity relationship and the linear length-force relationship yielded an exponential function that approximated the time course of isotonic shortening generated by the modeled sliding-filament mechanism. However, to obtain an accurate fit, it was necessary to incorporate a viscoelastic element in series with the sliding-filament mechanism. The results suggest that a large portion of the shortening is due to filament sliding associated with muscle activation and that a small portion is due to continued deformation associated with an element that shows viscoelastic or power-law creep after a step change in force.

  3. Large-scale Models Reveal the Two-component Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jarosch, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive explanation of striated muscle mechanics and contraction on the basis of filament rotations. Helical proteins, particularly the coiled-coils of tropomyosin, myosin and α-actinin, shorten their H-bonds cooperatively and produce torque and filament rotations when the Coulombic net-charge repulsion of their highly charged side-chains is diminished by interaction with ions. The classical “two-component model” of active muscle differentiated a “contractile component” which stretches the “series elastic component” during force production. The contractile components are the helically shaped thin filaments of muscle that shorten the sarcomeres by clockwise drilling into the myosin cross-bridges with torque decrease (= force-deficit). Muscle stretch means drawing out the thin filament helices off the cross-bridges under passive counterclockwise rotation with torque increase (= stretch activation). Since each thin filament is anchored by four elastic α-actinin Z-filaments (provided with force-regulating sites for Ca2+ binding), the thin filament rotations change the torsional twist of the four Z-filaments as the “series elastic components”. Large scale models simulate the changes of structure and force in the Z-band by the different Z-filament twisting stages A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Stage D corresponds to the isometric state. The basic phenomena of muscle physiology, i. e. latency relaxation, Fenn-effect, the force-velocity relation, the length-tension relation, unexplained energy, shortening heat, the Huxley-Simmons phases, etc. are explained and interpreted with the help of the model experiments. PMID:19330099

  4. Muscle cell attachment in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the body wall muscles exert their force on the cuticle to generate locomotion. Interposed between the muscle cells and the cuticle are a basement membrane and a thin hypodermal cell. The latter contains bundles of filaments attached to dense plaques in the hypodermal cell membranes, which together we have called a fibrous organelle. In an effort to define the chain of molecules that anchor the muscle cells to the cuticle we have isolated five mAbs using preparations enriched in these components. Two antibodies define a 200-kD muscle antigen likely to be part of the basement membrane at the muscle/hypodermal interface. Three other antibodies probably identify elements of the fibrous organelles in the adjacent hypodermis. The mAb IFA, which reacts with mammalian intermediate filaments, also recognizes these structures. We suggest that the components recognized by these antibodies are likely to be involved in the transmission of tension from the muscle cell to the cuticle. PMID:1860880

  5. Helicity within the vortex filament model.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, R; Hietala, N; Salman, H

    2016-11-24

    Kinetic helicity is one of the invariants of the Euler equations that is associated with the topology of vortex lines within the fluid. In superfluids, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining a spanwise vector to the vortex through the use of a Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. We present several examples for calculating internal twist to illustrate why the centreline helicity alone will lead to ambiguous results if a twist contribution is not introduced. Our choice of the spanwise vector can be expressed in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since the tangential velocity does not alter the configuration of the vortex at later times, we are able to recover a similar equation for the internal twist angle to that of classical vortex tubes. Our results allow us to explain how a quasi-classical limit of helicity emerges from helicity considerations for individual superfluid vortex filaments.

  6. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  7. Morphology and rheology in filamentous cultivations.

    PubMed

    Wucherpfennig, T; Kiep, K A; Driouch, H; Wittmann, C; Krull, R

    2010-01-01

    Because of their metabolic diversity, high production capacity, secretion efficiency, and capability of carrying out posttranslational modifications, filamentous fungi are widely exploited as efficient cell factories in the production of metabolites, bioactive substances, and native or heterologous proteins, respectively. There is, however, a complex relationship between the morphology of these microorganisms, transport phenomena, the viscosity of the cultivation broth, and related productivity. The morphological characteristics vary between freely dispersed mycelia and distinct pellets of aggregated biomass, every growth form having a distinct influence on broth rheology. Hence, the advantages and disadvantages for mycelial or pellet cultivation have to be balanced out carefully. Because of the still inadequate understanding of the morphogenesis of filamentous microorganisms, fungal morphology is often a bottleneck of productivity in industrial production. To obtain an optimized production process, it is of great importance to gain a better understanding of the molecular and cell biology of these microorganisms as well as the relevant approaches in biochemical engineering. In this chapter, morphology and growth of filamentous fungi are described, with special attention given to specific problems as they arise from fungal growth forms; growth and mass transfer in fungal biopellets are discussed as an example. To emphasize the importance of the flow behavior of filamentous cultivation broths, an introduction to rheology is also given, reviewing important rheological models and recent studies concerning rheological parameters. Furthermore, current knowledge on morphology and productivity in relation to the environom is outlined in the last section of this review. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments

    DOEpatents

    Zutavern, Fred J.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Buttram, Malcolm T.; Mar, Alan; Helgeson, Wesley D.; O'Malley, Martin W.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Baca, Albert G.; Chow, Weng W.; Vawter, G. Allen

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

  9. Multiple breathers on a vortex filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, H.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the correspondence between the Da Rios-Betchov equation, which appears in the three-dimensional motion of a vortex filament, and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Using this correspondence we map a set of solutions corresponding to breathers in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation to waves propagating along a vortex filament. The work presented generalizes the recently derived family of vortex configurations associated with these breather solutions to a wider class of configurations that are associated with combination homoclinic/heteroclinic orbits of the 1D self-focussing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that by considering these solutions of the governing nonlinear Schrödinger equation, highly nontrivial vortex filament configurations can be obtained that are associated with a pair of breather excitations. These configurations can lead to loop-like excitations emerging from an otherwise weakly perturbed helical vortex. The results presented further demonstrate the rich class of solutions that are supported by the Da Rios-Betchov equation that is recovered within the local induction approximation for the motion of a vortex filament.

  10. SRM filament wound case resin characterization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The amine cured epoxy wet winding resin used in fabrication of the SRM filament wound case is analyzed. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPSC) is utilized extensively to study lot-to-lot variation in both resin and curing agent. The validity of quantitative hplc methodology currently under development in-process resin/catalyst assay is assessed.

  11. Using Drosophila for Studies of Intermediate Filaments.

    PubMed

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Thiemann, Dylan A; Magin, Thomas M; Wallrath, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a useful organism for determining protein function and modeling human disease. Drosophila offers a rapid generation time and an abundance of genomic resources and genetic tools. Conservation in protein structure, signaling pathways, and developmental processes make studies performed in Drosophila relevant to other species, including humans. Drosophila models have been generated for neurodegenerative diseases, muscular dystrophy, cancer, and many other disorders. Recently, intermediate filament protein diseases have been modeled in Drosophila. These models have revealed novel mechanisms of pathology, illuminated potential new routes of therapy, and make whole organism compound screens feasible. The goal of this chapter is to outline steps to study intermediate filament function and model intermediate filament-associated diseases in Drosophila. The steps are general and can be applied to study the function of almost any protein. The protocols outlined here are for both the novice and experienced Drosophila researcher, allowing the rich developmental and cell biology that Drosophila offers to be applied to studies of intermediate filaments. Copyright © 2016 Else