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Sample records for filamentous fungus gibberella

  1. Mid1, a Mechanosensitive Calcium Ion Channel, Affects Growth, Development, and Ascospore Discharge in the Filamentous Fungus Gibberella zeae▿

    PubMed Central

    Cavinder, Brad; Hamam, Ahmed; Lew, Roger R.; Trail, Frances

    2011-01-01

    The role of Mid1, a stretch-activated ion channel capable of being permeated by calcium, in ascospore development and forcible discharge from asci was examined in the pathogenic fungus Gibberella zeae (anamorph Fusarium graminearum). The Δmid1 mutants exhibited a >12-fold reduction in ascospore discharge activity and produced predominately abnormal two-celled ascospores with constricted and fragile septae. The vegetative growth rate of the mutants was ∼50% of the wild-type rate, and production of macroconidia was >10-fold lower than in the wild type. To better understand the role of calcium flux, Δmid1 Δcch1 double mutants were also examined, as Cch1, an L-type calcium ion channel, is associated with Mid1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phenotype of the Δmid1 Δcch1 double mutants was similar to but more severe than the phenotype of the Δmid1 mutants for all categories. Potential and current-voltage measurements were taken in the vegetative hyphae of the Δmid1 and Δcch1 mutants and the wild type, and the measurements for all three strains were remarkably similar, indicating that neither protein contributes significantly to the overall electrical properties of the plasma membrane. Pathogenicity of the Δmid1 and Δmid1Δcch1 mutants on the host (wheat) was not affected by the mutations. Exogenous calcium supplementation partially restored the ascospore discharge and vegetative growth defects for all mutants, but abnormal ascospores were still produced. These results extend the known roles of Mid1 to ascospore development and forcible discharge. However, Neurospora crassa Δmid1 mutants were also examined and did not exhibit defects in ascospore development or in ascospore discharge. In comparison to ion channels in other ascomycetes, Mid1 shows remarkable adaptability of roles, particularly with regard to niche-specific adaptation. PMID:21357477

  2. Biotransformation of 7alpha-hydroxy- and 7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene derivatives by the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Gonzalez, Pedro; Gonzalez-Vallejo, Victoria; Guillermo, Ricardo; Diaz, Luz N

    2010-08-01

    The microbiological transformation of 7alpha,19-dihydroxy-ent-atis-16-ene by the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi gave 19-hydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene, 13(R),19-dihydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene, 7alpha,11beta,19-trihydroxy-ent-atis-16-ene and 7alpha,16beta,19-trihydroxy-ent-atis-16-ene, while the incubation of 19-hydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene afforded 13(R),19-dihydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene and 16beta,17-dihydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atisan-19-al. The biotransformation of 7-oxo-ent-atis-16-en-19-oic acid gave 6beta-hydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-en-19-oic acid, 6beta,16beta,17-trihydroxy-7-oxo-19-nor-ent-atis-4(18)-ene and 3beta,7alpha-dihydroxy-6-oxo-ent-atis-16-en-19-oic acid.

  3. Biotransformation of ent-kaur-16-ene and ent-trachylobane 7β-acetoxy derivatives by the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium fujikuroi).

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Bressa, Carlo; González-Vallejo, Victoria; González, Pedro; Guillermo, Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Candol A (7β-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene) (6) is efficiently transformed by Gibberella fujikuroi into the gibberellin plant hormones. In this work, the biotransformation of its acetate by this fungus has led to the formation of 7β-acetoxy-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (3), whose corresponding alcohol is a short-lived intermediate in the biosynthesis of gibberellins and seco-ring ent-kaurenoids in this fungus. Further biotransformation of this compound led to the hydroxylation of the 3β-positions to give 7β-acetoxy-3β-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (14), followed by a 2β- or 18-hydroxylation of this metabolite. The incubation of epicandicandiol 7β-monoacetate (7β-acetoxy-18-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene) (10) produces also the 19-hydroxylation to form the 18,19 diol (20), which is oxidized to give the corresponding C-18 or C-19 acids. These results indicated that the presence of a 7β-acetoxy group does not inhibit the fungal oxidation of C-19 in 7β-acetoxy-ent-kaur-16-ene, but avoids the ring B contraction that leads to the gibberellins and the 6β-hydroxylation necessary for the formation of seco-ring B ent-kaurenoids. The biotransformation of 7β-acetoxy-ent-trachylobane (trachinol acetate) (27) only led to the formation of 7β-acetoxy-18-hydroxy-ent-trachylobane (33).

  4. Engineering a filamentous fungus for L-rhamnose extraction.

    PubMed

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Richard, Peter

    2016-03-01

    L-Rhamnose is a high value rare sugar that is used as such or after chemical conversions. It is enriched in several biomass fractions such as the pectic polysaccharides rhamnogalacturonan I and II and in naringin, hesperidin, rutin, quercitrin and ulvan. We engineered the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger to not consume L-rhamnose, while it is still able to produce the enzymes for the hydrolysis of L-rhamnose rich biomass. As a result we present a strain that can be used for the extraction of L-rhamnose in a consolidated process. In the process the biomass is hydrolysed to the monomeric sugars which are consumed by the fungus leaving the L-rhamnose. PMID:27033543

  5. Microalgae harvesting via co-culture with filamentous fungus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultom, Sarman Oktovianus

    Microalgae harvesting is a labor- and energy-intensive process. For instance, classical harvesting technologies such as chemical addition and mechanical separation are economically prohibiting for biofuel production. Newer approaches to harvest microalgae have been developed in order to decrease costs. Among these new methods, fungal co-pelletization seems to be a promising technology. By co-culturing filamentous fungi with microalgae, it is possible to form pellets, which can easily be separated. In this study, different parameters for the cultivation of filamentous fungus (Aspergillus niger) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) to efficiently form cell pellets were evaluated under heterotrophic and phototrophic conditions, including organic carbon source (glucose, glycerol and sodium acetate) concentration, pH, initial concentration of fungal spores, initial concentration of microalgal cells, concentration of ionic strength (Calcium and Magnesium) and concentration of salinity (NaCl). In addition, zeta-potential measurements were carried out in order to get a better understanding of the mechanism of attraction. It was found that 2 g/L of glucose, a fungus to microalgae ratio of 1:300, and uncontrolled pH (around 7) are the best culturing conditions for co-pelletization. Under these conditions, it was possible to achieve a high harvesting performance (>90%). In addition, it was observed that most pellets formed in the co-culture were spherical with an average diameter of 3.5 mm and in concentrations of about 5 pellets per mL of culture media. Under phototrophic conditions, co-pelletization required the addition of glucose as organic carbon source to sustain the growth of fungi and to allow the harvesting of microalgae. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that (i) both microalgae and fungi have low zeta-potential values regardless of the pH on the bulk (i.e. <-10 mV) (ii) fungi can have a positive electric charge at low pH (ie. pH=3). These values suggest that it

  6. Cellular development associated with induced secondary metabolism in the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several species of the filamentous fungus Fusarium colonize plants and produce toxic small molecules that contaminate agricultural products, rendering them unsuitable for consumption. Among the most destructive of these species is F. graminearum, which causes disease in wheat and barley and often in...

  7. Light-mediated control of gene expression in filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Xiang-Yu; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2014-08-01

    We developed a light-mediated system based on synthetic light-switchable transactivators. The transactivators bind promoter upon blue-light exposure and rapidly initiate transcription of target transgenes in filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei. Light is inexpensive to apply, easily delivered, and instantly removed, and thus has significant advantages over chemical inducers.

  8. Two Cyclodepsipeptides, two Sesquiterpenoids and Other Cytotoxic Metabolites from the Filamentous Fungus Trichothecium sp. (MSX 51320)

    PubMed Central

    Sy-Cordero, Arlene A.; Graf, Tyler N.; Adcock, Audrey F.; Kroll, David J.; Shen, Qi; Swanson, Steven M.; Wani, Mansukh C.; Pearce, Cedric J.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2011-01-01

    Two new cyclodepsipeptides (1 and 2), two new sesquiterpenoids (3 and 4), and the known compounds guangomide A (5), roseotoxin S, and three simple trichothecenes were isolated from the cytotoxic organic extract of a terrestrial filamentous fungus, Trichothecium sp. The structures were determined using NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Absolute configurations of the cyclodepsipeptides were established by employing chiral HPLC, while the relative configurations of 3 and 4 were determined via NOESY data. The isolation of guangomide A was of particular interest, since it was reported previously from a marine derived fungus. PMID:21978324

  9. [Furfural degradation by filamentous fungus Amorphotheca resinae ZN1].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian; Xin, Xiujuan; Bao, Jie

    2012-09-01

    Some degradation products from lignocellulose pretreatment strongly inhibit the activities of cellulolytic enzymes and ethanol fermentation strains, thus the efficient removal of the inhibitor substances ("detoxification") is the inevitable step for the biotransformation processes. In this study, the biological detoxification of furfural by a newly isolated fungus, Amorphotheca resinae ZN1, was studied and the metabolic pathways of furfural degradation was analyzed. The metabolic pathway of furfural degradation in A. resinae ZN1 was described as follows: first, furfural was quickly converted into the low toxic furfuryl alcohol; then the furfuryl alcohol was gradually converted into furfural again but under the low concentration under aerobic condition, which was not lethal to the growth of the fungi; furfural continued to be oxidized to furoic acid by A. resinae ZN1. It is likely that furoic acid was further degraded in the TCA cycle to complete the biological degradation of furfural. The present study provided the important experimental basis for speeding up the biodetoxification of furfural by A. resinae ZN1 and the rate-limiting step in the lignocellulose biotransformation to ethanol.

  10. Defining individual size in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Linda; Song, Boya; Curran, Thomas; Phong, Nhu; Dressaire, Emilie; Roper, Marcus

    2016-03-16

    It is challenging to apply the tenets of individuality to filamentous fungi: a fungal mycelium can contain millions of genetically diverse but totipotent nuclei, each capable of founding new mycelia. Moreover, a single mycelium can potentially stretch over kilometres, and it is unlikely that its distant parts share resources or have the same fitness. Here, we directly measure how a single mycelium of the model ascomycete Neurospora crassa is patterned into reproductive units (RUs), meaning subpopulations of nuclei that propagate together as spores, and function as reproductive individuals. The density of RUs is sensitive to the geometry of growth; we detected 50-fold smaller RUs when mycelia had expanding frontiers than when they were constrained to grow in one direction only. RUs fragmented further when the mycelial network was perturbed. In mycelia with expanding frontiers, RU composition was strongly influenced by the distribution of genotypes early in development. Our results provide a concept of fungal individuality that is directly connected to reproductive potential, and therefore to theories of how fungal individuals adapt and evolve over time. Our data show that the size of reproductive individuals is a dynamic and environment-dependent property, even within apparently totally connected fungal mycelia. PMID:26962146

  11. SnoRNAs from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa: structural, functional and evolutionary insights

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background SnoRNAs represent an excellent model for studying the structural and functional evolution of small non-coding RNAs involved in the post-transcriptional modification machinery for rRNAs and snRNAs in eukaryotic cells. Identification of snoRNAs from Neurospora crassa, an important model organism playing key roles in the development of modern genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology will provide insights into the evolution of snoRNA genes in the fungus kingdom. Results Fifty five box C/D snoRNAs were identified and predicted to guide 71 2'-O-methylated sites including four sites on snRNAs and three sites on tRNAs. Additionally, twenty box H/ACA snoRNAs, which potentially guide 17 pseudouridylations on rRNAs, were also identified. Although not exhaustive, the study provides the first comprehensive list of two major families of snoRNAs from the filamentous fungus N. crassa. The independently transcribed strategy dominates in the expression of box H/ACA snoRNA genes, whereas most of the box C/D snoRNA genes are intron-encoded. This shows that different genomic organizations and expression modes have been adopted by the two major classes of snoRNA genes in N. crassa . Remarkably, five gene clusters represent an outstanding organization of box C/D snoRNA genes, which are well conserved among yeasts and multicellular fungi, implying their functional importance for the fungus cells. Interestingly, alternative splicing events were found in the expression of two polycistronic snoRNA gene hosts that resemble the UHG-like genes in mammals. Phylogenetic analysis further revealed that the extensive separation and recombination of two functional elements of snoRNA genes has occurred during fungus evolution. Conclusion This is the first genome-wide analysis of the filamentous fungus N. crassa snoRNAs that aids in understanding the differences between unicellular fungi and multicellular fungi. As compared with two yeasts, a more complex pattern of methylation guided by

  12. Nickel oxide nanoparticles film produced by dead biomass of filamentous fungus

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Marcia Regina; Nascimento, Cláudio Augusto Oller; Corrêa, Benedito

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of nickel oxide nanoparticles in film form using dead biomass of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus aculeatus as reducing agent represents an environmentally friendly nanotechnological innovation. The optimal conditions and the capacity of dead biomass to uptake and produce nanoparticles were evaluated by analyzing the biosorption of nickel by the fungus. The structural characteristics of the film-forming nickel oxide nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These techniques showed that the nickel oxide nanoparticles had a size of about 5.89 nm and were involved in a protein matrix which probably permitted their organization in film form. The production and uptake of nickel oxide nanoparticles organized in film form by dead fungal biomass bring us closer to sustainable strategies for the biosynthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25228324

  13. What’s in the genome of a filamentous fungus? Analysis of the Neurospora genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Mannhaupt, Gertrud; Montrone, Corinna; Haase, Dirk; Mewes, H. Werner; Aign, Verena; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Fartmann, Berthold; Nyakatura, Gerald; Kempken, Frank; Maier, Josef; Schulte, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The German Neurospora Genome Project has assembled sequences from ordered cosmid and BAC clones of linkage groups II and V of the genome of Neurospora crassa in 13 and 12 contigs, respectively. Including additional sequences located on other linkage groups a total of 12 Mb were subjected to a manual gene extraction and annotation process. The genome comprises a small number of repetitive elements, a low degree of segmental duplications and very few paralogous genes. The analysis of the 3218 identified open reading frames provides a first overview of the protein equipment of a filamentous fungus. Significantly, N.crassa possesses a large variety of metabolic enzymes including a substantial number of enzymes involved in the degradation of complex substrates as well as secondary metabolism. While several of these enzymes are specific for filamentous fungi many are shared exclusively with prokaryotes. PMID:12655011

  14. Improvement of tolerance to lead by filamentous fungus Pleurotus ostreatus HAU-2 and its oxidative responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shimin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Chang, Cheng; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ting; Zhao, Yong; Yang, Xitian; Zhang, Yuting; La, Guixiao; Wu, Kun; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Xuanzhen

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater contaminated with heavy metals is a world-wide concern. One biological treatment strategy includes filamentous fungi capable of extracellular adsorption and intracellular bioaccumulation. Here we report that an acclimated strain of filamentous fungus Pleurotus ostreatus HAU-2 can withstand Pb up to 1500 mg L(-1) Pb, conditions in which the wildtype strain cannot grow. The acclimated strain grew in liquid culture under 500 mg L(-1) Pb without significant abnormity in biomass and morphology, and was able to remove significant amounts of heavy metals with rate of 99.1% at 200 mg L(-1) and 63.3% at 1500 mg L(-1). Intracellular bioaccumulation as well as extracellular adsorption both contributed the Pb reduction. Pb induced levels of H2O2, and its concentration reached 72.9-100.9 μmol g(-1) under 200-1000 mg L(-1) Pb. A relatively higher malonaldehyde (MDA) concentration (8.06-7.59 nmol g(-1)) was also observed at 500-1500 mg L(-1) Pb, indicating that Pb exposure resulted in oxidative damage. The fungal cells also defended against the attack of reactive oxygen species by producing antioxidants. Of the three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT), CAT was the most responsive and the maximal enzyme activity was 15.8 U mg(-1) protein. Additionally, glutathione (GSH) might also play a role (3.16-3.21 mg g(-1) protein) in detoxification under relatively low Pb concentration (100-200 mg L(-1)). Our findings suggested that filamentous fungus could be selected for increased tolerance to heavy metals and that CAT and GSH might be important components of this tolerance. PMID:26891354

  15. Global Analysis of Predicted G Protein−Coupled Receptor Genes in the Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Ilva E.; Pacentine, Itallia V.; Lim, Andrew; Guerrero, Nayeli; Krystofova, Svetlana; Li, Liande; Michkov, Alexander V.; Servin, Jacqueline A.; Ahrendt, Steven R.; Carrillo, Alexander J.; Davidson, Liza M.; Barsoum, Andrew H.; Cao, Jackie; Castillo, Ronald; Chen, Wan-Ching; Dinkchian, Alex; Kim, Stephanie; Kitada, Sho M.; Lai, Taffani H.; Mach, Ashley; Malekyan, Cristin; Moua, Toua R.; Torres, Carlos Rojas; Yamamoto, Alaina; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    G protein−coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate facets of growth, development, and environmental sensing in eukaryotes, including filamentous fungi. The largest predicted GPCR class in these organisms is the Pth11-related, with members similar to a protein required for disease in the plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. However, the Pth11-related class has not been functionally studied in any filamentous fungal species. Here, we analyze phenotypes in available mutants for 36 GPCR genes, including 20 Pth11-related, in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We also investigate patterns of gene expression for all 43 predicted GPCR genes in available datasets. A total of 17 mutants (47%) possessed at least one growth or developmental phenotype. We identified 18 mutants (56%) with chemical sensitivity or nutritional phenotypes (11 uniquely), bringing the total number of mutants with at least one defect to 28 (78%), including 15 mutants (75%) in the Pth11-related class. Gene expression trends for GPCR genes correlated with the phenotypes observed for many mutants and also suggested overlapping functions for several groups of co-transcribed genes. Several members of the Pth11-related class have phenotypes and/or are differentially expressed on cellulose, suggesting a possible role for this gene family in plant cell wall sensing or utilization. PMID:26464358

  16. Using a model filamentous fungus to unravel mechanisms of lignocellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Znameroski, Elizabeth A; Glass, N Louise

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are the main source of enzymes used to degrade lignocellulose to fermentable sugars for the production of biofuels. While the most commonly used organism for the production of cellulases in an industrial setting is Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina), recent work in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa has shown that the variety of molecular, genetic and biochemical techniques developed for this organism can expedite analyses of the complexities involved in the utilization of lignocellulose as a source of carbon. These include elucidating regulatory networks associated with plant cell wall deconstruction, the identification of signaling molecules necessary for induction of the expression of genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes and the characterization of new cellulolytic enzymatic activities. In particular, the availability of a full genome deletion strain set for N. crassa has expedited high throughput screening for mutants that display a cellulolytic phenotype. This review summarizes the key findings of several recent studies using N. crassa to further understanding the mechanisms of plant cell wall deconstruction by filamentous fungi. PMID:23339486

  17. Global Analysis of Predicted G Protein-Coupled Receptor Genes in the Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ilva E; Pacentine, Itallia V; Lim, Andrew; Guerrero, Nayeli; Krystofova, Svetlana; Li, Liande; Michkov, Alexander V; Servin, Jacqueline A; Ahrendt, Steven R; Carrillo, Alexander J; Davidson, Liza M; Barsoum, Andrew H; Cao, Jackie; Castillo, Ronald; Chen, Wan-Ching; Dinkchian, Alex; Kim, Stephanie; Kitada, Sho M; Lai, Taffani H; Mach, Ashley; Malekyan, Cristin; Moua, Toua R; Torres, Carlos Rojas; Yamamoto, Alaina; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2015-10-13

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate facets of growth, development, and environmental sensing in eukaryotes, including filamentous fungi. The largest predicted GPCR class in these organisms is the Pth11-related, with members similar to a protein required for disease in the plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. However, the Pth11-related class has not been functionally studied in any filamentous fungal species. Here, we analyze phenotypes in available mutants for 36 GPCR genes, including 20 Pth11-related, in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We also investigate patterns of gene expression for all 43 predicted GPCR genes in available datasets. A total of 17 mutants (47%) possessed at least one growth or developmental phenotype. We identified 18 mutants (56%) with chemical sensitivity or nutritional phenotypes (11 uniquely), bringing the total number of mutants with at least one defect to 28 (78%), including 15 mutants (75%) in the Pth11-related class. Gene expression trends for GPCR genes correlated with the phenotypes observed for many mutants and also suggested overlapping functions for several groups of co-transcribed genes. Several members of the Pth11-related class have phenotypes and/or are differentially expressed on cellulose, suggesting a possible role for this gene family in plant cell wall sensing or utilization.

  18. Global Analysis of Predicted G Protein-Coupled Receptor Genes in the Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ilva E; Pacentine, Itallia V; Lim, Andrew; Guerrero, Nayeli; Krystofova, Svetlana; Li, Liande; Michkov, Alexander V; Servin, Jacqueline A; Ahrendt, Steven R; Carrillo, Alexander J; Davidson, Liza M; Barsoum, Andrew H; Cao, Jackie; Castillo, Ronald; Chen, Wan-Ching; Dinkchian, Alex; Kim, Stephanie; Kitada, Sho M; Lai, Taffani H; Mach, Ashley; Malekyan, Cristin; Moua, Toua R; Torres, Carlos Rojas; Yamamoto, Alaina; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2015-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate facets of growth, development, and environmental sensing in eukaryotes, including filamentous fungi. The largest predicted GPCR class in these organisms is the Pth11-related, with members similar to a protein required for disease in the plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. However, the Pth11-related class has not been functionally studied in any filamentous fungal species. Here, we analyze phenotypes in available mutants for 36 GPCR genes, including 20 Pth11-related, in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We also investigate patterns of gene expression for all 43 predicted GPCR genes in available datasets. A total of 17 mutants (47%) possessed at least one growth or developmental phenotype. We identified 18 mutants (56%) with chemical sensitivity or nutritional phenotypes (11 uniquely), bringing the total number of mutants with at least one defect to 28 (78%), including 15 mutants (75%) in the Pth11-related class. Gene expression trends for GPCR genes correlated with the phenotypes observed for many mutants and also suggested overlapping functions for several groups of co-transcribed genes. Several members of the Pth11-related class have phenotypes and/or are differentially expressed on cellulose, suggesting a possible role for this gene family in plant cell wall sensing or utilization. PMID:26464358

  19. Metabolism and Cometabolism of Cyclic Ethers by a Filamentous Fungus, a Graphium sp.▿

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Kristin; Cuiffetti, Lynda; Hyman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Graphium sp. (ATCC 58400) grows on gaseous n-alkanes and diethyl ether. n-Alkane-grown mycelia of this strain also cometabolically oxidize the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). In this study, we characterized the ability of this fungus to metabolize and cometabolize a range of cyclic ethers, including tetrahydrofuran (THF) and 1,4-dioxane (14D). This strain grew on THF and other cyclic ethers, including tetrahydropyran and hexamethylene oxide. However, more vigorous growth was consistently observed on the lactones and terminal diols potentially derived from these ethers. Unlike the case in all previous studies of microbial THF oxidation, a metabolite, γ-butyrolactone, was observed during growth of this fungus on THF. Growth on THF was inhibited by the same n-alkenes and n-alkynes that inhibit growth of this fungus on n-alkanes, while growth on γ-butyrolactone or succinate was unaffected by these inhibitors. Propane and THF also behaved as mutually competitive substrates, and propane-grown mycelia immediately oxidized THF, without a lag phase. Mycelia grown on propane or THF exhibited comparable high levels of hemiacetal-oxidizing activity that generated methyl formate from mixtures of formaldehyde and methanol. Collectively, these observations suggest that THF and n-alkanes may initially be oxidized by the same monooxygenase and that further transformation of THF-derived metabolites involves the activity of one or more alcohol dehydrogenases. Both propane- and THF-grown mycelia also slowly cometabolically oxidized 14D, although unlike THF oxidation, this reaction was not sustainable. Specific rates of THF, 14D, and MTBE degradation were very similar in THF- and propane-grown mycelia. PMID:19581469

  20. The filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii as a competitive industrial inosine producer.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Buey, Rubén M; Revuelta, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Inosine is a nucleoside with growing biotechnological interest due to its recently attributed beneficial health effects and as a convenient precursor of the umami flavor. At present, most of the industrial inosine production relies on bacterial fermentations. In this work, we have metabolically engineered the filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii to obtain strains able to excrete high amounts of inosine to the culture medium. We report that the disruption of only two key genes of the purine biosynthetic pathway efficiently redirect the metabolic flux, increasing 200-fold the excretion of inosine with respect to the wild type, up to 2.2 g/L. These results allow us to propose A. gossypii as a convenient candidate for large-scale nucleoside production, especially in view of the several advantages that Ashbya has with respect to the bacterial systems used at present for the industrial production of this food additive. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2060-2063. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Identification and functional analysis of endogenous nitric oxide in a filamentous fungus

    PubMed Central

    Pengkit, Anchalee; Jeon, Seong Sil; Son, Soo Ji; Shin, Jae Ho; Baik, Ku Yeon; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon

    2016-01-01

    In spite of its prevalence in animals and plants, endogenous nitric oxide (NO) has been rarely reported in fungi. We present here our observations on production of intracellular NO and its possible roles during development of Neurospora crassa, a model filamentous fungus. Intracellular NO was detected in hypha 8–16 hours after incubation in Vogel’s minimal liquid media and conidiophores during conidiation using a fluorescent indicator (DAF-FM diacetate). Treatment with cPTIO, an NO scavenger, significantly reduced fluorescence levels and hindered hyphal growth in liquid media and conidiation, whereas exogenous NO enhanced hyphal extension on VM agar media and conidia formation. NO scavenging also dramatically diminished transcription of con-10 and con-13, genes preferentially expressed during conidiation. Our results suggest that intracellular NO is generated in young hypha growing in submerged culture and during conidia development and regulate mycelial development and conidia formation. PMID:27425220

  2. Malachite green decolorization by the filamentous fungus Myrothecium roridum--Mechanistic study and process optimization.

    PubMed

    Jasińska, Anna; Paraszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Sip, Anna; Długoński, Jerzy

    2015-10-01

    The filamentous fungus Myrothecium roridum isolated from a dye-contaminated area was investigated in terms of its use for the treatment of Malachite green (MG). The mechanisms involved in this process were established. Peroxidases and cytochrome P-450 do not mediate MG elimination. The laccase of M. roridum IM 6482 was found to be responsible for the decolorization of 8-11% of MG. Thermostable low-molecular-weight factors (LMWF) resistant to sodium azide were found to be largely involved in dye decomposition. In addition, MG decolorization by M. roridum IM 6482 occurred in a non-toxic manner. Data from antimicrobial tests showed that MG toxicity decreased after decolorization. To optimize the MG decolorization process, the effects of operational parameters (such as the medium pH and composition, process temperature and culture agitation) were examined. The results demonstrate that M. roridum IM 6482 may be used effectively as an alternative to traditional decolorization agents. PMID:26185924

  3. Malachite green decolorization by the filamentous fungus Myrothecium roridum--Mechanistic study and process optimization.

    PubMed

    Jasińska, Anna; Paraszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Sip, Anna; Długoński, Jerzy

    2015-10-01

    The filamentous fungus Myrothecium roridum isolated from a dye-contaminated area was investigated in terms of its use for the treatment of Malachite green (MG). The mechanisms involved in this process were established. Peroxidases and cytochrome P-450 do not mediate MG elimination. The laccase of M. roridum IM 6482 was found to be responsible for the decolorization of 8-11% of MG. Thermostable low-molecular-weight factors (LMWF) resistant to sodium azide were found to be largely involved in dye decomposition. In addition, MG decolorization by M. roridum IM 6482 occurred in a non-toxic manner. Data from antimicrobial tests showed that MG toxicity decreased after decolorization. To optimize the MG decolorization process, the effects of operational parameters (such as the medium pH and composition, process temperature and culture agitation) were examined. The results demonstrate that M. roridum IM 6482 may be used effectively as an alternative to traditional decolorization agents.

  4. Exploring MicroRNA-Like Small RNAs in the Filamentous Fungus Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiyan; Sun, Xianjun; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Hu, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing such as quelling and meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD) and several other classes of special small RNAs have been discovered in filamentous fungi recently. More than four different mechanisms of microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs) production have been illustrated in the model fungus Neurospora crassa including a dicer-independent pathway. To date, very little work focusing on small RNAs in fungi has been reported and no universal or particular characteristic of milRNAs were defined clearly. In this study, small RNA and degradome libraries were constructed and subsequently deep sequenced for investigating milRNAs and their potential cleavage targets on the genome level in the filamentous fungus F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. As a result, there is no intersection of conserved miRNAs found by BLASTing against the miRBase. Further analysis showed that the small RNA population of F. oxysporum shared many common features with the small RNAs from N. crassa and other fungi. According to the known standards of miRNA prediction in plants and animals, milRNA candidates from 8 families (comprising 19 members) were screened out and identified. However, none of them could trigger target cleavage based on the degradome data. Moreover, most major signals of cleavage in transcripts could not match appropriate complementary small RNAs, suggesting that other predominant modes for milRNA-mediated gene regulation could exist in F. oxysporum. In addition, the PAREsnip program was utilized for comprehensive analysis and 3 families of small RNAs leading to transcript cleavage were experimentally validated. Altogether, our findings provided valuable information and important hints for better understanding the functions of the small RNAs and milRNAs in the fungal kingdom. PMID:25141304

  5. Cadmium induces cadmium-tolerant gene expression in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Cacciola, Santa O; Puglisi, Ivana; Faedda, Roberto; Sanzaro, Vincenzo; Pane, Antonella; Lo Piero, Angela R; Evoli, Maria; Petrone, Goffredo

    2015-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum, strain IMI 393899, was able to grow in the presence of the heavy metals cadmium and mercury. The main objective of this research was to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance of the fungus T. harzianum to cadmium. The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was used for the characterization of the genes of T. harzianum implicated in cadmium tolerance compared with those expressed in the response to the stress induced by mercury. Finally, the effects of cadmium exposure were also validated by measuring the expression levels of the putative genes coding for a glucose transporter, a plasma membrane ATPase, a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) transporter protein and a two-component system sensor histidine kinase YcbA, by real-time-PCR. By using the aforementioned SSH strategy, it was possible to identify 108 differentially expressed genes of the strain IMI 393899 of T. harzianum grown in a mineral substrate with the addition of cadmium. The expressed sequence tags identified by SSH technique were encoding different genes that may be involved in different biological processes, including those associated to primary and secondary metabolism, intracellular transport, transcription factors, cell defence, signal transduction, DNA metabolism, cell growth and protein synthesis. Finally, the results show that in the mechanism of tolerance to cadmium a possible signal transduction pathway could activate a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) transporter protein and/or a plasma membrane ATPase that could be involved in the compartmentalization of cadmium inside the cell. PMID:26349455

  6. Cadmium induces cadmium-tolerant gene expression in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Cacciola, Santa O; Puglisi, Ivana; Faedda, Roberto; Sanzaro, Vincenzo; Pane, Antonella; Lo Piero, Angela R; Evoli, Maria; Petrone, Goffredo

    2015-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum, strain IMI 393899, was able to grow in the presence of the heavy metals cadmium and mercury. The main objective of this research was to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance of the fungus T. harzianum to cadmium. The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was used for the characterization of the genes of T. harzianum implicated in cadmium tolerance compared with those expressed in the response to the stress induced by mercury. Finally, the effects of cadmium exposure were also validated by measuring the expression levels of the putative genes coding for a glucose transporter, a plasma membrane ATPase, a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) transporter protein and a two-component system sensor histidine kinase YcbA, by real-time-PCR. By using the aforementioned SSH strategy, it was possible to identify 108 differentially expressed genes of the strain IMI 393899 of T. harzianum grown in a mineral substrate with the addition of cadmium. The expressed sequence tags identified by SSH technique were encoding different genes that may be involved in different biological processes, including those associated to primary and secondary metabolism, intracellular transport, transcription factors, cell defence, signal transduction, DNA metabolism, cell growth and protein synthesis. Finally, the results show that in the mechanism of tolerance to cadmium a possible signal transduction pathway could activate a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) transporter protein and/or a plasma membrane ATPase that could be involved in the compartmentalization of cadmium inside the cell.

  7. Regulation of cellulase gene expression in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed Central

    Ilmén, M; Saloheimo, A; Onnela, M L; Penttilä, M E

    1997-01-01

    Basic features of regulation of expression of the genes encoding the cellulases of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei QM9414, the genes cbh1 and cbh2 encoding cellobiohydrolases and the genes egl1, egl2 and egl5 encoding endoglucanases, were studied at the mRNA level. The cellulase genes were coordinately expressed under all conditions studied, with the steady-state mRNA levels of cbh1 being the highest. Solka floc cellulose and the disaccharide sophorose induced expression to almost the same level. Moderate expression was observed when cellobiose or lactose was used as the carbon source. It was found that glycerol and sorbitol do not promote expression but, unlike glucose, do not inhibit it either, because the addition of 1 to 2 mM sophorose to glycerol or sorbitol cultures provokes high cellulase expression levels. These carbon sources thus provide a useful means to study cellulase regulation without significantly affecting the growth of the fungus. RNA slot blot experiments showed that no expression could be observed on glucose-containing medium and that high glucose levels abolish the inducing effect of sophorose. The results clearly show that distinct and clear-cut mechanisms of induction and glucose repression regulate cellulase expression in an actively growing fungus. However, derepression of cellulase expression occurs without apparent addition of an inducer once glucose has been depleted from the medium. This expression seems not to arise simply from starvation, since the lack of carbon or nitrogen as such is not sufficient to trigger significant expression. PMID:9097427

  8. The RNAi machinery regulates growth and development in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Carreras-Villaseñor, Nohemi; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo U; Villalobos-Escobedo, J Manuel; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    The RNAi machinery is generally involved in genome protection in filamentous fungi; however, the physiological role of RNAi has been poorly studied in fungal models. Here, we report that in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride, the products of the dcr2 and rdr3 genes control reproductive development, because mutations in these genes affect conidiation. In addition, Dcr1 together with Dcr2 control vegetative growth since Δdcr1, Δdcr2 and Δdcr1Δdcr2 present morphological alterations. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of WT, Δdcr1, Δdcr2 and Δdcr1Δdcr2 show that each Dicer controls different biological processes, such as development or metabolism, which could explain the lack of conidiation in the mutants. Finally, we observed sRNAs that are differentially expressed in the WT and Δdcr2. The expression of some of these sRNAs correlates with the expression of differential transcripts, suggesting that these mRNAs may contain the corresponding targets. Together these data show that in T. atroviride, the RNAi machinery plays a central role in endogenous processes such as development and fitness, beyond controlling genome protection against invasive nucleic acids as reported for other fungi.

  9. Isolation and structural elucidation of two secondary metabolites from the filamentous fungus Penicillium ochrochloron with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Rančić, Ana; Soković, Marina; Karioti, Anastasia; Vukojević, Jelena; Skaltsa, Helen

    2006-07-01

    In this investigation, the extracts of filamentous fungi exhibited inhibitory effect on the growth of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, as well as against the yeast Candida albicans. Penicillium ochrochloron has been proven as the most active fungus against all tested microorganisms. Further bio-guided chemical analysis of P. ochrochloron afforded two components with antimicrobial activity identified as (-) 2, 3, 4-trihydroxybutanamide and (-) erythritol.

  10. Genetically shaping morphology of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus glaucus for production of antitumor polyketide aspergiolide A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background For filamentous fungi, the basic growth unit of hyphae usually makes it sensitive to shear stress which is generated from mechanical force and dynamic fluid in bioreactor, and it severely decreases microbial productions. The conventional strategies against shear-sensitive conundrum in fungal fermentation usually focus on adapting agitation, impeller type and bioreactor configuration, which brings high cost and tough work in industry. This study aims to genetically shape shear resistant morphology of shear-sensitive filamentous fungus Aspergillus glaucus to make it adapt to bioreactor so as to establish an efficient fermentation process. Results Hyphal morphology shaping by modifying polarized growth genes of A. glaucus was applied to reduce its shear-sensitivity and enhance aspergiolide A production. Degenerate PCR and genome walking were used to obtain polarized growth genes AgkipA and AgteaR, followed by construction of gene-deficient mutants by homologous integration of double crossover. Deletion of both genes caused meandering hyphae, for which, ΔAgkipA led to small but intense curves comparing with ΔAgteaR by morphology analysis. The germination of a second germ tube from conidiospore of the mutants became random while colony growth and development almost maintained the same. Morphology of ΔAgkipA and ΔAgteaR mutants turned to be compact pellet and loose clump in liquid culture, respectively. The curved hyphae of both mutants showed no remarkably resistant to glass bead grinding comparing with the wild type strain. However, they generated greatly different broth rheology which further caused growth and metabolism variations in bioreactor fermentations. By forming pellets, the ΔAgkipA mutant created a tank environment with low-viscosity, low shear stress and high dissolved oxygen tension, leading to high production of aspergiolide A (121.7 ± 2.3 mg/L), which was 82.2% higher than the wild type. Conclusions A new strategy for shaping fungal

  11. Purification and characterization of a new laccase from the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    Durand, Fabien; Gounel, Sébastien; Mano, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    A new laccase from the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina has been isolated and identified. The 73 kDa protein containing 4 coppers, truncated from its first 31 amino acids, was successfully overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and purified in one step with a yield of 48% and a specific activity of 644Umg(-1). The kinetic parameters, k(cat) and K(M), determined at 37 °C and optimal pH are 1372 s(-1) and 307 μM for ABTS and, 1.29 s(-1) and 10.9 μM, for syringaldazine (SGZ). Unlike other laccases, the new protein displays a better thermostability, with a half life>400 min at 37 °C, is less sensitive to chloride and more stable at pH 7. Even though, the new 566 amino-acid enzyme displays a large homology with Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) from Myrothecium verrucaria (58%) and exhibits the four histidine rich domains consensus sequences of BODs, the new enzyme is not able to oxidize neither conjugated nor unconjugated bilirubin. PMID:23220637

  12. Cellular Development Associated with Induced Mycotoxin Synthesis in the Filamentous Fungus Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Menke, Jon; Weber, Jakob; Broz, Karen; Kistler, H. Corby

    2013-01-01

    Several species of the filamentous fungus Fusarium colonize plants and produce toxic small molecules that contaminate agricultural products, rendering them unsuitable for consumption. Among the most destructive of these species is F. graminearum, which causes disease in wheat and barley and often infests the grain with harmful trichothecene mycotoxins. Synthesis of these secondary metabolites is induced during plant infection or in culture in response to chemical signals. Our results show that trichothecene biosynthesis involves a complex developmental process that includes dynamic changes in cell morphology and the biogenesis of novel subcellular structures. Two cytochrome P-450 oxygenases (Tri4p and Tri1p) involved in early and late steps in trichothecene biosynthesis were tagged with fluorescent proteins and shown to co-localize to vesicles we provisionally call “toxisomes.” Toxisomes, the inferred site of trichothecene biosynthesis, dynamically interact with motile vesicles containing a predicted major facilitator superfamily protein (Tri12p) previously implicated in trichothecene export and tolerance. The immediate isoprenoid precursor of trichothecenes is the primary metabolite farnesyl pyrophosphate. Changes occur in the cellular localization of the isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme HMG CoA reductase when cultures non-induced for trichothecene biosynthesis are transferred to trichothecene biosynthesis inducing medium. Initially localized in the cellular endomembrane system, HMG CoA reductase, upon induction of trichothecene biosynthesis, increasingly is targeted to toxisomes. Metabolic pathways of primary and secondary metabolism thus may be coordinated and co-localized under conditions when trichothecene biosynthesis occurs. PMID:23667578

  13. Oxidation and ring cleavage of dibenzofuran by the filamentous fungus Paecilomyces lilacinus.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Manuela; Hammer, Elke; Mikolasch, Annett; Schauer, Frieder

    2004-09-01

    The ability of the imperfect soil fungus Paecilomyces lilacinus to transform the environmental pollutant dibenzofuran was investigated. Transformation of dibenzofuran and related derivatives lead to 14 products, which were identified by UV spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Biotransformation was initiated by two separate hydroxylation steps, leading to the accumulation of 4-monohydroxylated and 4-dihydroxylateddibenzofurans. Hydroxylation at both aromatic rings produced 2,7-dihydroxydibenzofuran, 3,7-dihydroxydibenzofuran, and 2,8-dihydroxydibenzofuran. Further oxidation yields ring cleavage of dibenzofuran, which has not been described before for filamentous fungi. The ring fission products were identified as benzo[ b]furo[3,2-d]-2-pyrone-6-carboxylic acid and [2-(1-carboxy-methylidene)-benzofuran-3-ylidene]-hydroxy-acetic acid and its derivatives hydroxylated at carbon 7 and 8 at the non-cleaved ring. Other metabolites were riboside-conjugates of 2-hydroxydibenzofuran and 3-hydroxydibenzofuran. The results showed that P. lilacinus transforms the hydrophobic compound dibenzofuran by phase I/phase II reactions to produce hydroxylated products and excretable sugar conjugates.

  14. Autophagy is dispensable to overcome ER stress in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Burggraaf, Anne-Marie; Ram, Arthur F J

    2016-08-01

    Secretory proteins are subjected to stringent quality control systems in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) which include the targeting of misfolded proteins for proteasomal destruction via the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Since deletion of ERAD genes in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger had hardly any effect on growth, this study investigates whether autophagy might function as an alternative process to eliminate misfolded proteins from the ER. We generated A. niger double mutants by deleting genes essential for ERAD (derA) and autophagy (atg1 or atg8), and assessed their growth both under normal and ER stress conditions. Sensitivity toward ER stress was examined by treatment with dithiothreitol (DTT) and by expressing a mutant form of glucoamylase (mtGlaA::GFP) in which disulfide bond sites in GlaA were mutated. Misfolding of mtGlaA::GFP was confirmed, as mtGlaA::GFP accumulated in the ER. Expression of mtGlaA::GFP in ERAD and autophagy mutants resulted in a twofold higher accumulation in ΔderA and ΔderAΔatg1 strains compared to Δatg1 and wild type. As ΔderAΔatg1 mutants did not show increased sensitivity toward DTT, not even when mtGlaA::GFP was expressed, the results indicate that autophagy does not act as an alternative pathway in addition to ERAD for removing misfolded proteins from the ER in A. niger.

  15. RNAi silencing of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase disrupts the ability of a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. to grow on short-chain gaseous alkanes and ethers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graphium sp. (ATCC 58400), a filamentous fungus, is one of the few eukaryotes that grows on short-chain alkanes and ethers. In this study, we investigated the genetic underpinnings that enable this fungus to catalyze the first step in the alkane and ether oxidation pathway. A gene, CYP52L1, was iden...

  16. A Putative Transcription Factor MYT2 Regulates Perithecium Size in the Ascomycete Gibberella zeae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yang; Son, Hokyoung; Min, Kyunghun; Lee, Jungkwan; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Lee, Yin-Won

    2012-01-01

    The homothallic ascomycete fungus Gibberella zeae is a plant pathogen that is found worldwide, causing Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereal crops and ear rot of maize. Ascospores formed in fruiting bodies (i.e., perithecia) are hypothesized to be the primary inocula for FHB disease. Perithecium development is a complex cellular differentiation process controlled by many developmentally regulated genes. In this study, we selected a previously reported putative transcription factor containing the Myb DNA-binding domain MYT2 for an in-depth study on sexual development. The deletion of MYT2 resulted in a larger perithecium, while its overexpression resulted in a smaller perithecium when compared to the wild-type strain. These data suggest that MYT2 regulates perithecium size differentiation. MYT2 overexpression affected pleiotropic phenotypes including vegetative growth, conidia production, virulence, and mycotoxin production. Nuclear localization of the MYT2 protein supports its role as a transcriptional regulator. Transcriptional analyses of trichothecene synthetic genes suggest that MYT2 additionally functions as a suppressor for trichothecene production. This is the first study characterizing a transcription factor required for perithecium size differentiation in G. zeae, and it provides a novel angle for understanding sexual development in filamentous fungi. PMID:22649560

  17. The phenotype of a phospholipase C (plc-1) mutant in a filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R; Giblon, Rachel E; Lorenti, Miranda S H

    2015-09-01

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, phospholipase C may play a role in hyphal extension at the growing tips as part of a growth-sensing mechanism that activates calcium release from internal stores to mediate continued expansion of the hyphal tip. One candidate for a tip-localized phospholipase C is PLC-1. We characterized morphology and growth characteristics of a knockout mutant (KO plc-1) and a RIP mutated strain (RIP plc-1) (missense mutations and a nonsense mutation render the gene product non-functional). Growth and hyphal cytology of wildtype and KO plc-1 were similar, but the RIP plc-1 mutant grew slower and exhibited abnormal membrane structures at the hyphal tip, imaged using the fluorescence dye FM4-64. To test for causes of the slower growth of the RIP plc-1 mutant, we examined its physiological poise compared to wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. The electrical properties of all three strains and the electrogenic contribution of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (identified by cyanide inhibition) were the same. Responses to high osmolarity were also similar. However, the RIP plc-1 mutant had a significantly lower turgor, a possible cause of its slower growth. While growth of all three strains was inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor 3-nitrocoumarin, the RIP plc-1 mutant did not exhibit hyphal bursting after addition of the inhibitor, observed in both wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. Although the plc-1 gene is not obligatory for tip growth, the phenotype of the RIP plc-1 mutant - abnormal tip cytology, lower turgor and resistance to inhibitor-induced hyphal bursting - suggest it does play a role in tip growth. The expression of a dysfunctional plc-1 gene may cause a shift to alternative mechanism(s) of growth sensing in hyphal extension.

  18. Epigenetic Manipulation of a Filamentous Fungus by the Proteasome-Inhibitor Bortezomib Induces the Production of an Additional Secondary Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    VanderMolen, Karen M.; Darveaux, Blaise A.; Chen, Wei-Lun; Swanson, Steven M.; Pearce, Cedric J.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of epigenetic modifiers, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, has been explored increasingly as a technique to induce the production of additional microbial secondary metabolites. The application of such molecules to microbial cultures has been shown to upregulate otherwise suppressed genes, and in several cases has led to the production of new molecular structures. In this study, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was used to induce the production of an additional metabolite from a filamentous fungus (Pleosporales). The induced metabolite was previously isolated from a plant, but the configuration was not assigned until now; in addition, an analogue was isolated from a degraded sample, yielding a new compound. Proteasome inhibitors have not previously been used in this application and offer an additional tool for microbial genome mining. PMID:24955237

  19. Structure of Importin-α from a Filamentous Fungus in Complex with a Classical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Natalia E; Takeda, Agnes A S; Dreyer, Thiago R; Freitas, Fernanda Z; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2015-01-01

    Neurospora crassa is a filamentous fungus that has been extensively studied as a model organism for eukaryotic biology, providing fundamental insights into cellular processes such as cell signaling, growth and differentiation. To advance in the study of this multicellular organism, an understanding of the specific mechanisms for protein transport into the cell nucleus is essential. Importin-α (Imp-α) is the receptor for cargo proteins that contain specific nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that play a key role in the classical nuclear import pathway. Structures of Imp-α from different organisms (yeast, rice, mouse, and human) have been determined, revealing that this receptor possesses a conserved structural scaffold. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Impα mechanism of action may vary significantly for different organisms or for different isoforms from the same organism. Therefore, structural, functional, and biophysical characterization of different Impα proteins is necessary to understand the selectivity of nuclear transport. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of an Impα from a filamentous fungus which is also the highest resolution Impα structure already solved to date (1.75 Å). In addition, we performed calorimetric analysis to determine the affinity and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction between Imp-α and the classical SV40 NLS peptide. The comparison of these data with previous studies on Impα proteins led us to demonstrate that N. crassa Imp-α possess specific features that are distinct from mammalian Imp-α but exhibit important similarities to rice Imp-α, particularly at the minor NLS binding site.

  20. Structure of Importin-α from a Filamentous Fungus in Complex with a Classical Nuclear Localization Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Thiago R.; Freitas, Fernanda Z.; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Fontes, Marcos R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurospora crassa is a filamentous fungus that has been extensively studied as a model organism for eukaryotic biology, providing fundamental insights into cellular processes such as cell signaling, growth and differentiation. To advance in the study of this multicellular organism, an understanding of the specific mechanisms for protein transport into the cell nucleus is essential. Importin-α (Imp-α) is the receptor for cargo proteins that contain specific nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that play a key role in the classical nuclear import pathway. Structures of Imp-α from different organisms (yeast, rice, mouse, and human) have been determined, revealing that this receptor possesses a conserved structural scaffold. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Impα mechanism of action may vary significantly for different organisms or for different isoforms from the same organism. Therefore, structural, functional, and biophysical characterization of different Impα proteins is necessary to understand the selectivity of nuclear transport. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of an Impα from a filamentous fungus which is also the highest resolution Impα structure already solved to date (1.75 Å). In addition, we performed calorimetric analysis to determine the affinity and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction between Imp-α and the classical SV40 NLS peptide. The comparison of these data with previous studies on Impα proteins led us to demonstrate that N. crassa Imp-α possess specific features that are distinct from mammalian Imp-α but exhibit important similarities to rice Imp-α, particularly at the minor NLS binding site. PMID:26091498

  1. Evaluation of the degradation of acetaminophen by the filamentous fungus Scedosporium dehoogii using carbon-based modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mbokou, Serge Foukmeniok; Pontié, Maxime; Razafimandimby, Bienvenue; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Njanja, Evangéline; Tonle Kenfack, Ignas

    2016-08-01

    The nonpathogenic filamentous fungus Scedosporium dehoogii was used for the first time to study the electrochemical biodegradation of acetaminophen (APAP). A carbon fiber microelectrode (CFME) modified by nickel tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (p-NiTSPc) and a carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with coffee husks (CH) were prepared to follow the kinetics of APAP biodegradation. The electrochemical response of APAP at both electrodes was studied by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry. p-NiTSPc-CFME was suitable to measure high concentrations of APAP, whereas CH-CPE gave rise to high current densities but was subject to the passivation phenomenon. p-NiTSPc-CFME was then successfully applied as a sensor to describe the kinetics of APAP biodegradation: this was found to be of first order with a kinetics constant of 0.11 day(-1) (at 25 °C) and a half-life of 6.30 days. APAP biodegradation by the fungus did not lead to the formation of p-aminophenol (PAP) and hydroquinone (HQ) that are carcinogenic, mutagenic, and reprotoxic (CMR). Graphical Abstract The kinetics of APAP biodegradation, followed by a poly-nickel tetrasulfonated phtalocyanine modified carbon fiber microelectrode. PMID:27349916

  2. Hydrophilins in the filamentous fungus Neosartorya fischeri (Aspergillus fischeri) have protective activity against several types of microbial water stress.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, M R; Wyatt, T T; van Doorn, T M; Lugones, L G; Wösten, H A B; Dijksterhuis, J

    2016-02-01

    Hydrophilins are proteins that occur in all domains of life and protect cells and organisms against drought and other stresses. They include most of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins and the heat shock protein (HSP) Hsp12. Here, the role of a predicted LEA-like protein (LeamA) and two Hsp12 proteins (Hsp12A and Hsp12B) of Neosartorya fischeri was studied. This filamentous fungus forms ascospores that belong to the most stress-resistant eukaryotic cells described to date. Heterologous expression of LeamA, Hsp12A and Hsp12B resulted in increased tolerance against salt and osmotic stress in Escherichia coli. These proteins were also shown to protect lactate dehydrogenase against dry heat and freeze-thaw cycles in vitro. Deletion of leamA caused diminished viability of sexual ascospores after drought and heat. This is the first report on functionality of Hsp12 and putative LeamA proteins derived from filamentous fungi, and their possible role in N. fischeri ascospore resistance against desiccation, high temperature and osmotic stress is discussed.

  3. Hydrophilins in the filamentous fungus Neosartorya fischeri (Aspergillus fischeri) have protective activity against several types of microbial water stress.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, M R; Wyatt, T T; van Doorn, T M; Lugones, L G; Wösten, H A B; Dijksterhuis, J

    2016-02-01

    Hydrophilins are proteins that occur in all domains of life and protect cells and organisms against drought and other stresses. They include most of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins and the heat shock protein (HSP) Hsp12. Here, the role of a predicted LEA-like protein (LeamA) and two Hsp12 proteins (Hsp12A and Hsp12B) of Neosartorya fischeri was studied. This filamentous fungus forms ascospores that belong to the most stress-resistant eukaryotic cells described to date. Heterologous expression of LeamA, Hsp12A and Hsp12B resulted in increased tolerance against salt and osmotic stress in Escherichia coli. These proteins were also shown to protect lactate dehydrogenase against dry heat and freeze-thaw cycles in vitro. Deletion of leamA caused diminished viability of sexual ascospores after drought and heat. This is the first report on functionality of Hsp12 and putative LeamA proteins derived from filamentous fungi, and their possible role in N. fischeri ascospore resistance against desiccation, high temperature and osmotic stress is discussed. PMID:26487515

  4. The unconventional secretion of PepN is independent of a functional autophagy machinery in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Burggraaf, Anne-Marie; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2016-08-01

    During unconventional protein secretion (UPS), proteins do not pass through the classical endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi-dependent pathway, but are transported to the cell membrane via alternative routes. One type of UPS is dependent on several autophagy-related (Atg) proteins in yeast and mammalian cells, but mechanisms for unconventional secretion are largely unknown for filamentous fungi. In this study, we investigated whether the autophagy machinery is used for UPS in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger An aspartic protease, which we called PepN, was identified as being likely to be secreted unconventionally, as this protein is highly abundant in culture filtrates during carbon starvation while it lacks a conventional N-terminal secretion sequence. We analysed the presence of PepN in the culture filtrates of carbon starved wild-type, atg1 and atg8 deletion mutant strains by Western blot analysis and by secretome analysis using nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS (wild-type and atg8 deletion mutant). Besides the presence of carbohydrate-active enzymes and other types of proteases, PepN was abundantly found in culture filtrates of both wild-type and atg deletion strains, indicating that the secretion of PepN is independent of the autophagy machinery in A. niger and hence most likely occurs via a different mechanism.

  5. Biosorption of cadmium by a metal-resistant filamentous fungus isolated from chicken manure compost.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingjian; Xia, Lu; Huang, Qiaoyun; Gu, Ji-Dong; Chen, Wenli

    2012-01-01

    A fungus, XJ-1, isolated from chicken manure compost was phylogenetically related to Penicillium chrysogenum. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the fungus for Cd2+, Cu2+, Cr3+, Cr6+, Co2+ and Zn2+ were 300, 85, 55, 8, 25 and 70mM on plates and 200, 65, 30, 2, 30 and 48mM in liquid media, respectively. Biosorption of Cd2+ by XJ-1 was investigated as a function of initial pH, contact time, biomass loading and Cd+ concentration. According to the Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorption of Cd2+ was 100.41 mg g(-1) dry biomass. Analyses using FTIR, SEM and XPS showed that the functional groups -OH and -C=O on the XJ-1 cell wall are the dominant binding sites for Cd2+. The results indicate that XJ-1 biomass is an efficient biosorbent for Cd2+ and has great potential for the in situ remediation of environments contaminated with heavy metals.

  6. β-Carbonic Anhydrases Play a Role in Fruiting Body Development and Ascospore Germination in the Filamentous Fungus Sordaria macrospora

    PubMed Central

    Elleuche, Skander; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is among the most important gases for all organisms. Its reversible interconversion to bicarbonate (HCO3−) reaches equilibrium spontaneously, but slowly, and can be accelerated by a ubiquitous group of enzymes called carbonic anhydrases (CAs). These enzymes are grouped by their distinct structural features into α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ζ-classes. While physiological functions of mammalian, prokaryotic, plant and algal CAs have been extensively studied over the past years, the role of β-CAs in yeasts and the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans has been elucidated only recently, and the function of CAs in multicellular filamentous ascomycetes is mostly unknown. To assess the role of CAs in the development of filamentous ascomycetes, the function of three genes, cas1, cas2 and cas3 (carbonic anhydrase of Sordaria) encoding β-class carbonic anhydrases was characterized in the filamentous ascomycetous fungus Sordaria macrospora. Fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the localization of GFP- and DsRED-tagged CAs. While CAS1 and CAS3 are cytoplasmic enzymes, CAS2 is localized to the mitochondria. To assess the function of the three isoenzymes, we generated knock-out strains for all three cas genes (Δcas1, Δcas2, and Δcas3) as well as all combinations of double mutants. No effect on vegetative growth, fruiting-body and ascospore development was seen in the single mutant strains lacking cas1 or cas3, while single mutant Δcas2 was affected in vegetative growth, fruiting-body development and ascospore germination, and the double mutant strain Δcas1/2 was completely sterile. Defects caused by the lack of cas2 could be partially complemented by elevated CO2 levels or overexpression of cas1, cas3, or a non-mitochondrial cas2 variant. The results suggest that CAs are required for sexual reproduction in filamentous ascomycetes and that the multiplicity of isoforms results in redundancy of specific and non-specific functions. PMID:19365544

  7. Dynamics of Actin Cables in Polarized Growth of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Bergs, Anna; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Evangelinos, Minoas; Nienhaus, G. U.; Takeshita, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although, specific marker proteins have been developed to visualize actin cables in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here, we observed actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA) and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in living Aspergillus nidulans hyphae and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules. PMID:27242709

  8. Functional Analysis of Sterol Transporter Orthologues in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Nicole; Hagiwara, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Polarized growth in filamentous fungi needs a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the growing hyphal tip. One of the important membrane compounds in fungi is ergosterol. At the apical plasma membrane ergosterol accumulations, which are called sterol-rich plasma membrane domains (SRDs). The exact roles and formation mechanism of the SRDs remained unclear, although the importance has been recognized for hyphal growth. Transport of ergosterol to hyphal tips is thought to be important for the organization of the SRDs. Oxysterol binding proteins, which are conserved from yeast to human, are involved in nonvesicular sterol transport. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae seven oxysterol-binding protein homologues (OSH1 to -7) play a role in ergosterol distribution between closely located membranes independent of vesicle transport. We found five homologous genes (oshA to oshE) in the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans. The functions of OshA-E were characterized by gene deletion and subcellular localization. Each gene-deletion strain showed characteristic phenotypes and different sensitivities to ergosterol-associated drugs. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Osh proteins showed specific localization in the late Golgi compartments, puncta associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, or diffusely in the cytoplasm. The genes expression and regulation were investigated in a medically important species Aspergillus fumigatus, as well as A. nidulans. Our results suggest that each Osh protein plays a role in ergosterol distribution at distinct sites and contributes to proper fungal growth. PMID:26116213

  9. Gibberella Ear Rot of Maize (Zea mays) in Nepal: Distribution of the Mycotoxins Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol in Naturally and Experimentally Infected Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium graminearum (sexual stage Gibberella zeae) causes ear rot of maize (Zea mays) and contamination with the 8-ketotrichothecenes nivalenol (NIV) or 4-deoxynivalenol (DON), depending on diversity of the fungal population for the 4-oxygenase gene (TRI13). To determine the importance ...

  10. Purification, characterization and enzymatic degradation of YCP, a polysaccharide from marine filamentous fungus Phoma herbarum YS4108.

    PubMed

    Yang, X B; Gao, X D; Han, F; Xu, B S; Song, Y C; Tan, R X

    2005-08-01

    YCP, a mitogenic polysaccharide with its molecular weight (MW) of 2.4 x 10(3) kDa, was isolated from the mycelium of the marine filamentous fungus Phoma herbarum YS4108 by a combination of ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-32 and gel permeation over Sephacryl S-400. The detailed compositional, spectroscopic and methylation analyses of the polysaccharide demonstrated that its backbone possessed most likely a linear alpha-(1 --> 4) bonded glucopyranoside main chain co-bearing through side alpha-(1 --> 6)-linkage. The alpha-(1 --> 4) bondage of the glucopyranoside building blocks in YCP was confirmed by the observation that it could be hydrolyzed by the alpha-amylase produced by Bacillus licheniformis. A reliable concentration monitoring experimentation highlighted that the reducing sugars released continuously from YCP during its incubation with the enzyme, and the MW of the main resulting fragment weighed 0.8 x 10(4) Da with approximately 10% of YCP converted to maltose, maltotriose and glucose after a 120-min enzymatic degradation. Finally, YCP was found to be able to increase phagocytic activity of mice in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it may be looked up as a potent immunomodulator that could activate macrophages. PMID:15885873

  11. Morphological changes of the filamentous fungus Mucor mucedo and inhibition of chitin synthase activity induced by anethole.

    PubMed

    Yutani, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Yukie; Ogita, Akira; Kubo, Isao; Tanaka, Toshio; Fujita, Ken-ichi

    2011-11-01

    trans-Anethole (anethole), a major component of anise oil, has a broad antimicrobial spectrum with antimicrobial activity relatively weaker than those of well-known antibiotics, and significantly enhances the antifungal activity of polygodial and dodecanol against the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. However, the antifungal mechanism of anethole is unresolved. Anethole demonstrated antifungal activity against the filamentous fungus, Mucor mucedo IFO 7684, accompanied by hyphal morphological changes such as swollen hyphae at the tips. Its minimum growth inhibitory concentration was 0.625 mM. A hyperosmotic condition (1.2 M sorbitol) restricted the induction of morphological changes, while hypoosmotic treatment (distilled water) induced bursting of hyphal tips and leakage of cytoplasmic constituents. Furthermore, anethole dose-dependently inhibited chitin synthase (CHS) activity in permeabilized hyphae in an uncompetitive manner. These results suggest that the morphological changes of M. mucedo could be explained by the fragility of cell walls caused by CHS inhibition.

  12. Supramolecular organization of cytochrome c oxidase- and alternative oxidase-dependent respiratory chains in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    Krause, Frank; Scheckhuber, Christian Q; Werner, Alexandra; Rexroth, Sascha; Reifschneider, Nicole H; Dencher, Norbert A; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2004-06-18

    To elucidate the molecular basis of the link between respiration and longevity, we have studied the organization of the respiratory chain of a wild-type strain and of two long-lived mutants of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. This established aging model is able to respire by either the standard or the alternative pathway. In the latter pathway, electrons are directly transferred from ubiquinol to the alternative oxidase and thus bypass complexes III and IV. We show that the cytochrome c oxidase pathway is organized according to the mammalian "respirasome" model (Schägger, H., and Pfeiffer, K. (2000) EMBO J. 19, 1777-1783). In contrast, the alternative pathway is composed of distinct supercomplexes of complexes I and III (i.e. I(2) and I(2)III(2)), which have not been described so far. Enzymatic analysis reveals distinct functional properties of complexes I and III belonging to either cytochrome c oxidase- or alternative oxidase-dependent pathways. By a gentle colorless-native PAGE, almost all of the ATP synthases from mitochondria respiring by either pathway were preserved in the dimeric state. Our data are of significance for the understanding of both respiratory pathways as well as lifespan control and aging.

  13. Genomic sequence of the pathogenic and allergenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Nierman, William C; Pain, Arnab; Anderson, Michael J; Wortman, Jennifer R; Kim, H Stanley; Arroyo, Javier; Berriman, Matthew; Abe, Keietsu; Archer, David B; Bermejo, Clara; Bennett, Joan; Bowyer, Paul; Chen, Dan; Collins, Matthew; Coulsen, Richard; Davies, Robert; Dyer, Paul S; Farman, Mark; Fedorova, Nadia; Fedorova, Natalie; Feldblyum, Tamara V; Fischer, Reinhard; Fosker, Nigel; Fraser, Audrey; García, Jose L; García, Maria J; Goble, Arlette; Goldman, Gustavo H; Gomi, Katsuya; Griffith-Jones, Sam; Gwilliam, Ryan; Haas, Brian; Haas, Hubertus; Harris, David; Horiuchi, H; Huang, Jiaqi; Humphray, Sean; Jiménez, Javier; Keller, Nancy; Khouri, Hoda; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Konzack, Sven; Kulkarni, Resham; Kumagai, Toshitaka; Lafon, Anne; Lafton, Anne; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Li, Weixi; Lord, Angela; Lu, Charles; Majoros, William H; May, Gregory S; Miller, Bruce L; Mohamoud, Yasmin; Molina, Maria; Monod, Michel; Mouyna, Isabelle; Mulligan, Stephanie; Murphy, Lee; O'Neil, Susan; Paulsen, Ian; Peñalva, Miguel A; Pertea, Mihaela; Price, Claire; Pritchard, Bethan L; Quail, Michael A; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Rawlins, Neil; Rajandream, Marie-Adele; Reichard, Utz; Renauld, Hubert; Robson, Geoffrey D; Rodriguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Rodríguez-Peña, Jose M; Ronning, Catherine M; Rutter, Simon; Salzberg, Steven L; Sanchez, Miguel; Sánchez-Ferrero, Juan C; Saunders, David; Seeger, Kathy; Squares, Rob; Squares, Steven; Takeuchi, Michio; Tekaia, Fredj; Turner, Geoffrey; Vazquez de Aldana, Carlos R; Weidman, Janice; White, Owen; Woodward, John; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Fraser, Claire; Galagan, James E; Asai, Kiyoshi; Machida, Masayuki; Hall, Neil; Barrell, Bart; Denning, David W

    2005-12-22

    Aspergillus fumigatus is exceptional among microorganisms in being both a primary and opportunistic pathogen as well as a major allergen. Its conidia production is prolific, and so human respiratory tract exposure is almost constant. A. fumigatus is isolated from human habitats and vegetable compost heaps. In immunocompromised individuals, the incidence of invasive infection can be as high as 50% and the mortality rate is often about 50% (ref. 2). The interaction of A. fumigatus and other airborne fungi with the immune system is increasingly linked to severe asthma and sinusitis. Although the burden of invasive disease caused by A. fumigatus is substantial, the basic biology of the organism is mostly obscure. Here we show the complete 29.4-megabase genome sequence of the clinical isolate Af293, which consists of eight chromosomes containing 9,926 predicted genes. Microarray analysis revealed temperature-dependent expression of distinct sets of genes, as well as 700 A. fumigatus genes not present or significantly diverged in the closely related sexual species Neosartorya fischeri, many of which may have roles in the pathogenicity phenotype. The Af293 genome sequence provides an unparalleled resource for the future understanding of this remarkable fungus. PMID:16372009

  14. The evolutionary imprint of domestication on genome variation and function of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, John G; Salichos, Leonidas; Slot, Jason C; Rinker, David C; McGary, Kriston L; King, Jonas G; Klich, Maren A; Tabb, David L; McDonald, W Hayes; Rokas, Antonis

    2012-08-01

    The domestication of animals, plants, and microbes fundamentally transformed the lifestyle and demography of the human species [1]. Although the genetic and functional underpinnings of animal and plant domestication are well understood, little is known about microbe domestication [2-6]. Here, we systematically examined genome-wide sequence and functional variation between the domesticated fungus Aspergillus oryzae, whose saccharification abilities humans have harnessed for thousands of years to produce sake, soy sauce, and miso from starch-rich grains, and its wild relative A. flavus, a potentially toxigenic plant and animal pathogen [7]. We discovered dramatic changes in the sequence variation and abundance profiles of genes and wholesale primary and secondary metabolic pathways between domesticated and wild relative isolates during growth on rice. Our data suggest that, through selection by humans, an atoxigenic lineage of A. flavus gradually evolved into a "cell factory" for enzymes and metabolites involved in the saccharification process. These results suggest that whereas animal and plant domestication was largely driven by Neolithic "genetic tinkering" of developmental pathways, microbe domestication was driven by extensive remodeling of metabolism.

  15. Sequences of stilboflavin C: towards the peptaibiome of the filamentous fungus Stilbella (= Trichoderma) flavipes.

    PubMed

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Götze, Lutz; von Döhren, Hans; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Brückner, Hans

    2016-08-01

    Filamentous fungi of the genus Stilbella are recognized as an abundant source of naturally occurring α-aminoisobutyric acid-containing peptides. The culture broth of Stilbella (Trichoderma) flavipes CBS 146.81 yielded a mixture of peptides named stilboflavins (SF), and these were isolated and separated by preparative TLC into groups named SF-A, SF-B, and SF-C. Although all three of these groups resolved as single spots on thin-layer chromatograms, HPLC analysis revealed that each of the groups represents very microheterogeneous mixtures of closely related peptides. Here, we report on the sequence analysis of SF-C peptides, formerly isolated by preparative TLC. HPLC coupled to QqTOF-ESI-HRMS provided the sequences of 10 16-residue peptides and five 19-residue peptides, all of which were N-terminally acetylated. In contrast to the previously described SF-A and SF-B peptaibols, SF-C peptaibols contain Ser-Alaol or Ser-Leuol, which are rarely found as C-termini, and repetitive Leu-Aib-Gly sequences, which have not been detected in peptaibols before. Taking the previously determined sequences of SF-A and SF-B into account, the entirety of peptides produced by S. flavipes (the 'peptaibiome') approaches or exceeds 100 non-ribosomally biosynthesized peptaibiotics. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27443977

  16. Presence and Functionality of Mating Type Genes in the Supposedly Asexual Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Ryuta; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Yamaguchi, Haruka; Yamamoto, Nanase; Wagu, Yutaka; Paoletti, Mathieu; Archer, David B.; Dyer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for sexual reproduction in Aspergillus oryzae was assessed by investigating the presence and functionality of MAT genes. Previous genome studies had identified a MAT1-1 gene in the reference strain RIB40. We now report the existence of a complementary MAT1-2 gene and the sequencing of an idiomorphic region from A. oryzae strain AO6. This allowed the development of a PCR diagnostic assay, which detected isolates of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genotypes among 180 strains assayed, including industrial tane-koji isolates. Strains used for sake and miso production showed a near-1:1 ratio of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating types, whereas strains used for soy sauce production showed a significant bias toward the MAT1-2 mating type. MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isogenic strains were then created by genetic manipulation of the resident idiomorph, and gene expression was compared by DNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) methodologies under conditions in which MAT genes were expressed. Thirty-three genes were found to be upregulated more than 10-fold in either the MAT1-1 host strain or the MAT1-2 gene replacement strain relative to each other, showing that both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes functionally regulate gene expression in A. oryzae in a mating type-dependent manner, the first such report for a supposedly asexual fungus. MAT1-1 expression specifically upregulated an α-pheromone precursor gene, but the functions of most of the genes affected were unknown. The results are consistent with a heterothallic breeding system in A. oryzae, and prospects for the discovery of a sexual cycle are discussed. PMID:22327593

  17. Regulation of the acuF gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Michael J; Draht, Oliver W; Davis, Meryl A

    2002-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key enzyme required for gluconeogenesis when microorganisms grow on carbon sources metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Aspergillus nidulans acuF mutants isolated by their inability to use acetate as a carbon source specifically lack PEPCK. The acuF gene has been cloned and shown to encode a protein with high similarity to PEPCK from bacteria, plants, and fungi. The regulation of acuF expression has been studied by Northern blotting and by the construction of lacZ fusion reporters. Induction by acetate is abolished in mutants unable to metabolize acetate via the TCA cycle, and induction by amino acids metabolized via 2-oxoglutarate is lost in mutants unable to form 2-oxoglutarate. Induction by acetate and proline is not additive, consistent with a single mechanism of induction. Malate and succinate result in induction, and it is proposed that PEPCK is controlled by a novel mechanism of induction by a TCA cycle intermediate or derivative, thereby allowing gluconeogenesis to occur during growth on any carbon source metabolized via the TCA cycle. It has been shown that the facB gene, which mediates acetate induction of enzymes specifically required for acetate utilization, is not directly involved in PEPCK induction. This is in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Cat8p and Sip4p, homologs of FacB, regulate PEPCK as well as the expression of other genes necessary for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in response to the carbon source present. This difference in the control of gluconeogenesis reflects the ability of A. nidulans and other filamentous fungi to use a wide variety of carbon sources in comparison with S. cerevisiae. The acuF gene was also found to be subject to activation by the CCAAT binding protein AnCF, a protein homologous to the S. cerevisiae Hap complex and the mammalian NFY complex.

  18. Regulation of the acuF Gene, Encoding Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Draht, Oliver W.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key enzyme required for gluconeogenesis when microorganisms grow on carbon sources metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Aspergillus nidulans acuF mutants isolated by their inability to use acetate as a carbon source specifically lack PEPCK. The acuF gene has been cloned and shown to encode a protein with high similarity to PEPCK from bacteria, plants, and fungi. The regulation of acuF expression has been studied by Northern blotting and by the construction of lacZ fusion reporters. Induction by acetate is abolished in mutants unable to metabolize acetate via the TCA cycle, and induction by amino acids metabolized via 2-oxoglutarate is lost in mutants unable to form 2-oxoglutarate. Induction by acetate and proline is not additive, consistent with a single mechanism of induction. Malate and succinate result in induction, and it is proposed that PEPCK is controlled by a novel mechanism of induction by a TCA cycle intermediate or derivative, thereby allowing gluconeogenesis to occur during growth on any carbon source metabolized via the TCA cycle. It has been shown that the facB gene, which mediates acetate induction of enzymes specifically required for acetate utilization, is not directly involved in PEPCK induction. This is in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Cat8p and Sip4p, homologs of FacB, regulate PEPCK as well as the expression of other genes necessary for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in response to the carbon source present. This difference in the control of gluconeogenesis reflects the ability of A. nidulans and other filamentous fungi to use a wide variety of carbon sources in comparison with S. cerevisiae. The acuF gene was also found to be subject to activation by the CCAAT binding protein AnCF, a protein homologous to the S. cerevisiae Hap complex and the mammalian NFY complex. PMID:11741859

  19. Metabolism of Diethyl Ether and Cometabolism of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by a Filamentous Fungus, a Graphium sp

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, L. K.; Curry, S. S.; Ciuffetti, L. M.; Hyman, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, evidence for two novel metabolic processes catalyzed by a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. strain ATCC 58400, is presented. First, our results indicate that this Graphium sp. can utilize the widely used solvent diethyl ether (DEE) as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. The kinetics of biomass accumulation and DEE consumption closely followed each other, and the molar growth yield on DEE was indistinguishable from that with n-butane. n-Butane-grown mycelia also immediately oxidized DEE without the extracellular accumulation of organic oxidation products. This suggests a common pathway for the oxidation of both compounds. Acetylene, ethylene, and other unsaturated gaseous hydrocarbons completely inhibited the growth of this Graphium sp. on DEE and DEE oxidation by n-butane-grown mycelia. Second, our results indicate that gaseous n-alkane-grown Graphium mycelia can cometabolically degrade the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The degradation of MTBE was also completely inhibited by acetylene, ethylene, and other unsaturated hydrocarbons and was strongly influenced by n-butane. Two products of MTBE degradation, tert-butyl formate (TBF) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), were detected. The kinetics of product formation suggest that TBF production temporally precedes TBA accumulation and that TBF is hydrolyzed both biotically and abiotically to yield TBA. Extracellular accumulation of TBA accounted for only a maximum of 25% of the total MTBE consumed. Our results suggest that both DEE oxidation and MTBE oxidation are initiated by cytochrome P-450-catalyzed reactions which lead to scission of the ether bonds in these compounds. Our findings also suggest a potential role for gaseous n-alkane-oxidizing fungi in the remediation of MTBE contamination. PMID:16535667

  20. Degradation of slime extracellular polymeric substances and inhibited sludge flocs destruction contribute to sludge dewaterability enhancement during fungal treatment of sludge using filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zheng, Guanyu; Zhou, Lixiang

    2015-09-01

    Mechanisms responsible for the sludge dewaterability enhanced by filamentous fungi during fungal treatment of sludge were investigated in the present study. The filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1, isolated from waste activated sludge, enhanced sludge dewaterability by 82.1% to achieve the lowest value of normalized sludge specific resistance to filtration (SRF), 8.18 × 10(10) m · L/kg · g-TSS. During the fungal treatment of sludge, 57.8% of slime extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and 51.1% of polysaccharide in slime EPS were degraded, respectively, by Mucor sp. GY-1, contributing to the improvement of sludge dewaterability. Slime EPS is much more available for Mucor sp. GY-1 than either LB-EPS or TB-EPS that bound with microbial cells. In addition, filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1 entrapped small sludge particles and inhibited the destruction of sludge flocs larger than 100 μm, thus enhancing sludge dewaterability, during fungal treatment of sludge using Mucor sp. GY-1.

  1. Degradation of slime extracellular polymeric substances and inhibited sludge flocs destruction contribute to sludge dewaterability enhancement during fungal treatment of sludge using filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zheng, Guanyu; Zhou, Lixiang

    2015-09-01

    Mechanisms responsible for the sludge dewaterability enhanced by filamentous fungi during fungal treatment of sludge were investigated in the present study. The filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1, isolated from waste activated sludge, enhanced sludge dewaterability by 82.1% to achieve the lowest value of normalized sludge specific resistance to filtration (SRF), 8.18 × 10(10) m · L/kg · g-TSS. During the fungal treatment of sludge, 57.8% of slime extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and 51.1% of polysaccharide in slime EPS were degraded, respectively, by Mucor sp. GY-1, contributing to the improvement of sludge dewaterability. Slime EPS is much more available for Mucor sp. GY-1 than either LB-EPS or TB-EPS that bound with microbial cells. In addition, filamentous fungus Mucor sp. GY-1 entrapped small sludge particles and inhibited the destruction of sludge flocs larger than 100 μm, thus enhancing sludge dewaterability, during fungal treatment of sludge using Mucor sp. GY-1. PMID:26086084

  2. Expanded Genetic Map of Gibberella moniliformis (Fusarium verticillioides)†

    PubMed Central

    Jurgenson, James E.; Zeller, Kurt A.; Leslie, John F.

    2002-01-01

    Gibberella moniliformis (Fusarium verticillioides) is primarily a pathogen of maize, but it can also cause disease in other crop species. This pathogenicity, as well as the contamination of food- and feedstuffs with the fumonisin mycotoxins, results in economically significant losses to both farmers and food processors. The dissection of important biological characters in this fungus has been hampered by the lack of a uniformly dense genetic map. The existing restriction fragment length polymorphism-based map contains significant gaps, making it difficult to routinely locate biologically important genes, such as those involved in pathogenicity or mycotoxin production, with precision. We utilized amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) to saturate the existing genetic map and added 486 AFLP markers to the ∼150 markers on the existing map. The resulting map has an average marker interval of 3.9 map units and averages ∼21 kb/map unit. The additional markers expanded the map from 1,452 to 2,188 map units distributed across 12 chromosomes. The maximum distance between adjacent markers is 29 map units. We identified AFLP markers less than 1 map unit from the mating type (MAT) locus and 2.5 map units from the spore killer (SK) locus; eight AFLP markers map within 8.5 units of the FUM1 (fumonisin biosynthetic) locus. The increased saturation of this map will facilitate further development of G. moniliformis as a model system for the genetic and population genetic studies of related, but less genetically tractable, plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:11916720

  3. Harvesting of Chlorella sorokiniana by co-culture with the filamentous fungus Isaria fumosorosea: A potential sustainable feedstock for hydrothermal gasification.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Stephen; Gomes, Eduardo; Holliger, Christof; Bauer, Rolene; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent advances in down-stream processing, production of microalgae remains substantially limited because of economical reasons. Harvesting and dewatering are the most energy-intensive processing steps in their production and contribute 20-30% of total operational cost. Bio-flocculation of microalgae by co-cultivation with filamentous fungi relies on the development of large structures that facilitate cost effective harvesting. A yet unknown filamentous fungus was isolated as a contaminant from a microalgal culture and identified as Isaria fumosorosea. Blastospores production was optimized in minimal medium and the development of pellets, possibly lichens, was followed when co-cultured with Chlorella sorokiniana under strict autotrophic conditions. Stable pellets (1-2mm) formed rapidly at pH 7-8, clearing the medium of free algal cells. Biomass was harvested with large inexpensive filters, generating wet slurry suitable for hydrothermal gasification. Nutrient rich brine from the aqueous phase of hydrothermal gasification supported growth of the fungus and may increase the process sustainability. PMID:25795450

  4. Three-dimensional image analysis of plugging at the septal pore by Woronin body during hypotonic shock inducing hyphal tip bursting in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Juvvadi, Praveen Rao; Ishi, Kazutomo; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2005-06-17

    We observed that the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, grown on agar media burst out cytoplasmic constituents from the hyphal tip soon after flooding with water. Woronin body is a specialized organelle known to plug the septal pore adjacent to the lysed compartment to prevent extensive loss of cytoplasm. A. oryzae Aohex1 gene homologous to Neurospora crassa HEX1 gene encoding a major protein in Woronin body was expressed as a fusion with DsRed2, resulting in visualization of Woronin body. Confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction of images visualized the septal pore as a dark region surrounded by green fluorescence of EGFP-fused secretory protein, RNase T1, on the septum. Dual fluorescent labeling revealed the plugging of the septal pores adjacent to the lysed apical compartments by Woronin bodies during hypotonic shock. Disruption of Aohex1 gene caused disappearance of Woronin bodies and the defect to prevent extensive loss of cytoplasm during hypotonic shock. PMID:15882988

  5. A mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome c1 leads to a decreased ROS content and to a long-lived phenotype in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    Sellem, Carole H; Marsy, Sophie; Boivin, Antoine; Lemaire, Claire; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie

    2007-07-01

    We present here the properties of a complex III loss-of-function mutant of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. The mutation corresponds to a single substitution in the second intron of the gene cyc1 encoding cytochrome c(1), leading to a splicing defect. The cyc1-1 mutant is long-lived, exhibits a defect in ascospore pigmentation, has a reduced growth rate and a reduced ROS production associated with a stabilisation of its mitochondrial DNA. We also show that increased longevity is linked with morphologically modified mitochondria and an increased number of mitochondrial genomes. Overexpression of the alternative oxidase rescues all these phenotypes and restores aging. Interestingly, the absence of complex III in this mutant is not paralleled with a deficiency in complex I activity as reported in mammals although the respiratory chain of P. anserina has recently been demonstrated to be organized according to the "respirasome" model.

  6. Three-dimensional image analysis of plugging at the septal pore by Woronin body during hypotonic shock inducing hyphal tip bursting in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Juvvadi, Praveen Rao; Ishi, Kazutomo; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko . E-mail: akitamo@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    We observed that the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, grown on agar media burst out cytoplasmic constituents from the hyphal tip soon after flooding with water. Woronin body is a specialized organelle known to plug the septal pore adjacent to the lysed compartment to prevent extensive loss of cytoplasm. A. oryzae Aohex1 gene homologous to Neurospora crassa HEX1 gene encoding a major protein in Woronin body was expressed as a fusion with DsRed2, resulting in visualization of Woronin body. Confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction of images visualized the septal pore as a dark region surrounded by green fluorescence of EGFP-fused secretory protein, RNase T1, on the septum. Dual fluorescent labeling revealed the plugging of the septal pores adjacent to the lysed apical compartments by Woronin bodies during hypotonic shock. Disruption of Aohex1 gene caused disappearance of Woronin bodies and the defect to prevent extensive loss of cytoplasm during hypotonic shock.

  7. Evidence that a Secondary Metabolic Biosynthetic Gene Cluster has Grown by Gene Relocation During Evolution of the Filamentous Fungus Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichothecenes are terpene-derived secondary metabolites produced by multiple genera of filamentous fungi, including many plant pathogenic species of Fusarium. These metabolites are of medical and agricultural interest because they are toxic to animals and plants and can contribute to pathogenesis ...

  8. GIP2, a Putative Transcription Factor That Regulates the Aurofusarin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Gibberella zeae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Eun; Jin, Jianming; Kim, Hun; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Yin-Won

    2006-01-01

    Gibberella zeae (anamorph: Fusarium graminearum) is an important pathogen of maize, wheat, and rice. Colonies of G. zeae produce yellow-to-tan mycelia with the white-to-carmine red margins. In this study, we focused on nine putative open reading frames (ORFs) closely linked to PKS12 and GIP1, which are required for aurofusarin biosynthesis in G. zeae. Among them is an ORF designated GIP2 (for Gibberella zeae pigment gene 2), which encodes a putative protein of 398 amino acids that carries a Zn(II)2Cys6 binuclear cluster DNA-binding domain commonly found in transcription factors of yeasts and filamentous fungi. Targeted gene deletion and complementation analyses confirmed that GIP2 is required for aurofusarin biosynthesis. Expression of GIP2 in carrot medium correlated with aurofusarin production by G. zeae and was restricted to vegetative mycelia. Inactivation of the 10 contiguous genes in the ΔGIP2 strain delineates an aurofusarin biosynthetic gene cluster. Overexpression of GIP2 in both the ΔGIP2 and the wild-type strains increases aurofusarin production and reduces mycelial growth. Thus, GIP2 is a putative positive regulator of the aurofusarin biosynthetic gene cluster, and aurofusarin production is negatively correlated with vegetative growth by G. zeae. PMID:16461721

  9. Establishment of an overall transformation system for an oil-producing filamentous fungus, Mortierella alpina 1S-4.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Seiki; Sakuradani, Eiji; Murata, Shoichi; Inohara-Ochiai, Misa; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Ashikari, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2004-09-01

    Oil-producing fungus Mortierella alpina 1S-4 is an industrial strain. To determine its physiological properties and to clarify the biosynthetic pathways for polyunsaturated fatty acids, a transformation system for this fungus was established using a derivative of it, i.e., a ura5- mutant lacking orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase, EC.2.4.2.10) activity. Transformation with a vector containing the homologous ura5 gene as a marker was successfully performed using microprojectile bombardment, other methods frequently used for transformation, such as the protoplasting, lithium acetate, or electroporation methods, not giving satisfactory results. As a result, two types of transformants were obtained: a few stable transformants overexpressing the ura5 gene, and many unstable transformants showing OPRTase activity comparable to that of the wild-type strain. The results of quantitative PCR indicated that the stable transformants could retain the ura5 genes originating from the transformation vector regardless of the culture conditions. On the other hand, unstable transformants easily lost the marker gene under uracil-containing conditions, as expected. In this paper, we report that an overall transformation system for this fungus was successfully established, and propose how to select useful transformants as experimental and industrial strains. PMID:15138730

  10. Glutamine Involvement in Nitrogen Control of Gibberellic Acid Production in Gibberella fujikuroi

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Gastón A.; Agosin, Eduardo

    1993-01-01

    When the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi ATCC 12616 was grown in fermentor cultures, both intracellular kaurene biosynthetic activities and extracellular GA3 accumulation reached high levels when exogenous nitrogen was depleted in the culture. Similar patterns were exhibited by several nonrelated enzymatic activities, such as formamidase and urease, suggesting that all are subject to nitrogen regulation. The behavior of the enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation (glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and glutamate synthase) during fungal growth in different nitrogen sources suggests that glutamine is the final product of nitrogen assimilation in G. fujikuroi. When ammonium or glutamine was added to hormone-producing cultures, extracellular GA3 did not accumulate. However, when the conversion of ammonium into glutamine was inhibited by L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine, only glutamine maintained this effect. These results suggest that glutamine may well be the metabolite effector in nitrogen repression of GA3 synthesis, as well as in other nonrelated enzymatic activities in G. fujikuroi. PMID:16349128

  11. Visualization of the endocytic pathway in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae using an EGFP-fused plasma membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Nakahama, Tomoyuki; Shoji, Jun-ya; Arioka, Manabu; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko . E-mail: akitamo@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-02-17

    Endocytosis is an important process for cellular activities. However, in filamentous fungi, the existence of endocytosis has been so far elusive. In this study, we used AoUapC-EGFP, the fusion protein of a putative uric acid-xanthine permease with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in Aspergillus oryzae, to examine whether the endocytic process occurs or not. Upon the addition of ammonium into the medium the fusion protein was internalized from the plasma membrane. The internalization of AoUapC-EGFP was completely blocked by sodium azide, cold, and cytochalasin A treatments, suggesting that the internalization possesses the general features of endocytosis. These results demonstrate the occurrence of endocytosis in filamentous fungi. Moreover, we discovered that the endosomal compartments appeared upon the induction of endocytosis and moved in a microtubule-dependent manner.

  12. Massive Changes in Genome Architecture Accompany the Transition to Self-Fertility in the filamentous Fungus Neurospora tetrasperma

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Christoper; Stajich, Jason; Jacobson, David; Nativ, Donald; Lapidus, Alla; Foster, Brian; Aerts, Andrea; Riley, Robert; Lindquist, Erika; Grigoriev, Igor; Taylor, John

    2011-05-16

    A large region of suppressed recombination surrounds the sex-determining locus of the self-fertile fungus Neurospora tetrasperma. This region encompasses nearly one-fifth of the N. tetrasperma genome and suppression of recombination is necessary for self-fertility. The similarity of the N. tetrasperma mating chromosome to plant and animal sex chromosomes and its recent origin (5 MYA), combined with a long history of genetic and cytological research, make this fungus an ideal model for studying the evolutionary consequences of suppressed recombination. Here we compare genome sequences from two N. tetrasperma strains of opposite mating type to determine whether structural rearrangements are associated with the nonrecombining region and to examine the effect of suppressed recombination for the evolution of the genes within it. We find a series of three inversions encompassing the majority of the region of suppressed recombination and provide evidence for two different types of rearrangement mechanisms: the recently proposed mechanism of inversion via staggered single-strand breaks as well as ectopic recombination between transposable elements. In addition, we show that the N. tetrasperma mat a mating-type region appears to be accumulating deleterious substitutions at a faster rate than the other mating type (mat A) and thus may be in the early stages of degeneration.

  13. A novel single-stranded RNA virus isolated from a phytopathogenic filamentous fungus, Rosellinia necatrix, with similarity to hypo-like viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shengxue; Chiba, Sotaro; Kondo, Hideki; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a biological and molecular characterization of a novel positive-sense RNA virus isolated from a field isolate (NW10) of a filamentous phytopathogenic fungus, the white root rot fungus that is designated as Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1). A recently developed technology using zinc ions allowed us to transfer RnFV1 to two mycelially incompatible Rosellinia necatrix strains. A biological comparison of the virus-free and -recipient isogenic fungal strains suggested that RnFV1 infects latently and thus has no potential as a virocontrol agent. The virus has an undivided positive-sense RNA genome of 6286 nucleotides excluding a poly (A) tail. The genome possesses two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs): a large ORF1 that encodes polypeptides with RNA replication functions and a smaller ORF2 that encodes polypeptides of unknown function. A lack of coat protein genes was suggested by the failure of virus particles from infected mycelia. No evidence was obtained by Northern analysis or classical 5′-RACE for the presence of subgenomic RNA for the downstream ORF. Sequence similarities were found in amino-acid sequence between RnFV1 putative proteins and counterparts of a previously reported mycovirus, Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1). Interestingly, several related sequences were detected by BLAST searches of independent transcriptome assembly databases one of which probably represents an entire virus genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase showed that RnFV1, FgV1, and these similar sequences are grouped in a cluster distinct from distantly related hypoviruses. It is proposed that a new taxonomic family termed Fusariviridae be created to include RnFV1 and FgV1. PMID:25101066

  14. Multiple effects of a commercial Roundup® formulation on the soil filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans at low doses: evidence of an unexpected impact on energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Valérie; Oestreicher, Nathalie; Vélot, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Soil microorganisms are highly exposed to glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), especially to Roundup® which is widely used worldwide. However, studies on the effects of GBH formulations on specific non-rhizosphere soil microbial species are scarce. We evaluated the toxicity of a commercial formulation of Roundup® (R450), containing 450 g/L of glyphosate (GLY), on the soil filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, an experimental model microorganism. The median lethal dose (LD50) on solid media was between 90 and 112 mg/L GLY (among adjuvants, which are also included in the Roundup® formulation), which corresponds to a dilution percentage about 100 times lower than that used in agriculture. The LOAEL and NOAEL (lowest- and no-observed-adverse-effect levels) associated to morphology and growth were 33.75 and 31.5 mg/L GLY among adjuvants, respectively. The formulation R450 proved to be much more active than technical GLY. At the LD50 and lower concentrations, R450 impaired growth, cellular polarity, endocytosis, and mitochondria (average number, total volume and metabolism). In contrast with the depletion of mitochondrial activities reported in animal studies, R450 caused a stimulation of mitochondrial enzyme activities, thus revealing a different mode of action of Roundup® on energetic metabolism. These mitochondrial disruptions were also evident at a low dose corresponding to the NOAEL for macroscopic parameters, indicating that these mitochondrial biomarkers are more sensitive than those for growth and morphological ones. Altogether, our data indicate that GBH toxic effects on soil filamentous fungi, and thus potential impairment of soil ecosystems, may occur at doses far below recommended agricultural application rate.

  15. Multiple effects of a commercial Roundup® formulation on the soil filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans at low doses: evidence of an unexpected impact on energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Valérie; Oestreicher, Nathalie; Vélot, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Soil microorganisms are highly exposed to glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), especially to Roundup® which is widely used worldwide. However, studies on the effects of GBH formulations on specific non-rhizosphere soil microbial species are scarce. We evaluated the toxicity of a commercial formulation of Roundup® (R450), containing 450 g/L of glyphosate (GLY), on the soil filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, an experimental model microorganism. The median lethal dose (LD50) on solid media was between 90 and 112 mg/L GLY (among adjuvants, which are also included in the Roundup® formulation), which corresponds to a dilution percentage about 100 times lower than that used in agriculture. The LOAEL and NOAEL (lowest- and no-observed-adverse-effect levels) associated to morphology and growth were 33.75 and 31.5 mg/L GLY among adjuvants, respectively. The formulation R450 proved to be much more active than technical GLY. At the LD50 and lower concentrations, R450 impaired growth, cellular polarity, endocytosis, and mitochondria (average number, total volume and metabolism). In contrast with the depletion of mitochondrial activities reported in animal studies, R450 caused a stimulation of mitochondrial enzyme activities, thus revealing a different mode of action of Roundup® on energetic metabolism. These mitochondrial disruptions were also evident at a low dose corresponding to the NOAEL for macroscopic parameters, indicating that these mitochondrial biomarkers are more sensitive than those for growth and morphological ones. Altogether, our data indicate that GBH toxic effects on soil filamentous fungi, and thus potential impairment of soil ecosystems, may occur at doses far below recommended agricultural application rate. PMID:27068896

  16. Evidence that a secondary metabolic biosynthetic gene cluster has grown by gene relocation during evolution of the filamentous fungus Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Robert H; McCormick, Susan P; Alexander, Nancy J; Desjardins, Anne E

    2009-12-01

    Trichothecenes are terpene-derived secondary metabolites produced by multiple genera of filamentous fungi, including many plant pathogenic species of Fusarium. These metabolites are of interest because they are toxic to animals and plants and can contribute to pathogenesis of Fusarium on some crop species. Fusarium graminearum and F. sporotrichioides have trichothecene biosynthetic genes (TRI) at three loci: a 12-gene TRI cluster and two smaller TRI loci that consist of one or two genes. Here, comparisons of additional Fusarium species have provided evidence that TRI loci have a complex evolutionary history that has included loss, non-functionalization and rearrangement of genes as well as trans-species polymorphism. The results also indicate that the TRI cluster has expanded in some species by relocation of two genes into it from the smaller loci. Thus, evolutionary forces have driven consolidation of TRI genes into fewer loci in some fusaria but have maintained three distinct TRI loci in others. PMID:19843228

  17. Promoter and signal sequence from filamentous fungus can drive recombinant protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Aravind; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-08-01

    Cross-recognition of promoters from filamentous fungi in yeast can have important consequences towards developing fungal expression systems, especially for the rapid evaluation of their efficacy. A truncated 510bp inducible Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1) promoter was tested for the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Kluyveromyces lactis after disrupting its native β-galactosidase (lac4) promoter. The efficiency of the CBH1 secretion signal was also evaluated by fusing it to the lac4 promoter of the yeast, which significantly increased the secretion of recombinant protein in K. lactis compared to the native α-mating factor secretion signal. The fungal promoter is demonstrated to have potential to drive heterologous protein production in K. lactis; and the small sized T. reesei cbh1 secretion signal can mediate the protein secretion in K. lactis with high efficiency. PMID:24661814

  18. Turgor and net ion flux responses to activation of the osmotic MAP kinase cascade by fludioxonil in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R

    2010-08-01

    The internal hydrostatic pressure (turgor) of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is regulated at about 400-500 kiloPascals, primarily by an osmotic MAP kinase cascade which activates ion uptake from the extracellular medium and glycerol synthesis. In the absence of hyperosmotic stress, the phenylpyrrole fungicide fludioxonil activates the osmotic MAP kinase cascade, resulting in cell death. Turgor, the electrical potential and net ion fluxes were measured after treatment with fludioxonil. In wildtype, fludioxonil causes a hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane and net H(+) efflux from the cell, consistent with activation of the H(+)-ATPase. At the same time, net K(+) uptake occurs, and turgor increases (about 2-fold above normal levels). None of these changes are observed in the os-2 mutant (which lacks a functional MAP kinase, the last of the three kinases in the osmotic MAP kinase cascade). Tip growth ceases as hyperpolarization, net ion flux changes, and turgor increases begin. The inappropriate turgor increase is the probable cause of eventual lysis and death. The results corroborate a multi-pathway response to hyperosmotic stress that includes activation of plasma membrane transport. The relation to cell expansion (tip growth) is not direct. Increases in turgor due to ion transport might be expected to increase growth rate, but this does not occur. Instead, there must be a complex regulatory interplay between the growth and the turgor driving force, possibly mediated by regulation of cell wall extensibility.

  19. A protein kinase C-encoding gene, pkcA, is essential to the viability of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Ichinomiya, Masayuki; Uchida, Hirotaka; Koshi, Yukako; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki

    2007-11-01

    A protein kinase C (PKC)-encoding gene (pkcA) was isolated from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Although we attempted to isolate pkcA deletion mutants, we obtained only heterokaryons that had both DeltapkcA and pkcA(+) nuclei. Conidia produced by the heterokaryon germinated. The germ tubes, however, lysed frequently and no colony formation was observed, indicating that the pkcA gene is essential to the viability of A. nidulans. We constructed conditional mutants (alcA(p)-pkcA mutants) that expressed pkcA under the control of the alcA promoter (alcA(p)). Under alcA(p)-repressing conditions, their colonies were smaller than those of the wild-type strains and their hyphae lysed frequently. These phenotypes were not remedied under moderate- or high-osmolarity conditions; the growth defect deteriorated further under the latter. Under alcA(p)-inducing conditions, the alcA(p)-pkcA mutants also showed growth-sensitivity to cell wall destabilizing agents. These results indicate that pkcA plays an important role in the maintenance of cell integrity.

  20. Uncovering the Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus niger to Lignocellulose Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gaddipati, Sanyasi; Kokolski, Matthew; Malla, Sunir; Blythe, Martin J.; Ibbett, Roger; Campbell, Maria; Liddell, Susan; Aboobaker, Aziz; Tucker, Gregory A.; Archer, David B.

    2012-01-01

    A key challenge in the production of second generation biofuels is the conversion of lignocellulosic substrates into fermentable sugars. Enzymes, particularly those from fungi, are a central part of this process, and many have been isolated and characterised. However, relatively little is known of how fungi respond to lignocellulose and produce the enzymes necessary for dis-assembly of plant biomass. We studied the physiological response of the fungus Aspergillus niger when exposed to wheat straw as a model lignocellulosic substrate. Using RNA sequencing we showed that, 24 hours after exposure to straw, gene expression of known and presumptive plant cell wall–degrading enzymes represents a huge investment for the cells (about 20% of the total mRNA). Our results also uncovered new esterases and surface interacting proteins that might form part of the fungal arsenal of enzymes for the degradation of plant biomass. Using transcription factor deletion mutants (xlnR and creA) to study the response to both lignocellulosic substrates and low carbon source concentrations, we showed that a subset of genes coding for degradative enzymes is induced by starvation. Our data support a model whereby this subset of enzymes plays a scouting role under starvation conditions, testing for available complex polysaccharides and liberating inducing sugars, that triggers the subsequent induction of the majority of hydrolases. We also showed that antisense transcripts are abundant and that their expression can be regulated by growth conditions. PMID:22912594

  1. Involvement of a caleosin in lipid storage, spore dispersal, and virulence in the entomopathogenic filamentous fungus, Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanhua; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Garrett, Timothy; Pei, Yan; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic cells store lipids in membrane-encased droplets. The entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, initiates infection via attachment of its spores to the epicuticle or waxy layer of target insects, degrading and assimilating host surface hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and proteins. Caleosins are components of the proteinaceous coat of lipid droplets and a single B. bassiana caleosin homologue, Bbcal1, was identified and characterized. The BbCal1 sequence contained an EF-hand Ca(2+) binding domain and potential hydrophobic stretches similar to those found in plant caleosins, along with a proline knot motif defined by only two proline residues. Targeted gene inactivation of Bbcal1 did not appear to affect spore germination, growth on lipid substrates or stress response, but changes in lipid, vacuole and endoplasmic reticulum/multilamellar vesicle-like structures, and altered cellular lipid profiles were seen in conidia grown on a variety of substrates including potato dextrose agar, olive oil, glyceride trioleate, oleic acid and the alkane, C16 . The ΔBbcal1 mutant produced more compact assemblages of conidia, displayed a reduced and delayed spore dispersal phenotype, and showed decreased virulence in insect bioassays using the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Our data indicate novel functions for caleosins in fungal virulence, spore development and the trafficking and/or turnover of lipid-related structures. PMID:26235819

  2. The roles of the alternative NADH dehydrogenases during oxidative stress in cultures of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Andrew; Harvey, Linda M; McNeil, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Despite the importance of filamentous fungi in the biotechnology industry, little is known about their metabolism under the stressful conditions experienced in typical production fermenters. In the present study, oxygen enrichment was used to recreate an industrial batch process, and the effects of the increasing dissolved oxygen tension were studied as regards the cellular metabolism. It was found that elevated dissolved oxygen tension led to an oxidatively stressful environment, as detailed by rapid initial increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activities. Intracellular protein concentrations also decreased in oxygenated cultures; this appeared to be concomitant with a decrease in the adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) pool in these cultures. Oxygenated cultures showed early senescence and death compared to aerated control cultures. Despite earlier studies proposing various mechanisms for such findings in fungal cultures subjected to oxidative stress, these findings can best be explained by the fact that in such cultures the activity of alternative NADH dehydrogenases was significantly increased, which served to maintain lower ROS concentrations throughout the duration of the process but in doing so also reduced the ability of the organism to create a proton motive force by which to drive ATP synthesis. The findings of the present study help further our understanding of the central roles of these highly conserved enzymes within fungal metabolism under oxidative stress.

  3. Long-Distance Translocation of Protein during Morphogenesis of the Fruiting Body in the Filamentous Fungus, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Woolston, Benjamin M.; Schlagnhaufer, Carl; Wilkinson, Jack; Larsen, Jeffrey; Shi, Zhixin; Mayer, Kimberly M.; Walters, Donald S.; Curtis, Wayne R.; Romaine, C. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of the mushroom fungus, Agaricus bisporus, utilizes a substrate consisting of a lower layer of compost and upper layer of peat. Typically, the two layers are seeded with individual mycelial inoculants representing a single genotype of A. bisporus. Studies aimed at examining the potential of this fungal species as a heterologous protein expression system have revealed unexpected contributions of the mycelial inoculants in the morphogenesis of the fruiting body. These contributions were elucidated using a dual-inoculant method whereby the two layers were differientially inoculated with transgenic β-glucuronidase (GUS) and wild-type (WT) lines. Surprisingly, use of a transgenic GUS line in the lower substrate and a WT line in the upper substrate yielded fruiting bodies expressing GUS activity while lacking the GUS transgene. Results of PCR and RT-PCR analyses for the GUS transgene and RNA transcript, respectively, suggested translocation of the GUS protein from the transgenic mycelium colonizing the lower layer into the fruiting body that developed exclusively from WT mycelium colonizing the upper layer. Effective translocation of the GUS protein depended on the use of a transgenic line in the lower layer in which the GUS gene was controlled by a vegetative mycelium-active promoter (laccase 2 and β-actin), rather than a fruiting body-active promoter (hydrophobin A). GUS-expressing fruiting bodies lacking the GUS gene had a bonafide WT genotype, confirmed by the absence of stably inherited GUS and hygromycin phosphotransferase selectable marker activities in their derived basidiospores and mycelial tissue cultures. Differientially inoculating the two substrate layers with individual lines carrying the GUS gene controlled by different tissue-preferred promoters resulted in up to a ∼3.5-fold increase in GUS activity over that obtained with a single inoculant. Our findings support the existence of a previously undescribed phenomenon of long

  4. Biotransformation of two ent-Pimara-9(11),15-diene derivatives by Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Guillermo, Ricardo; Hernández, Melchor G; Chamy, María C; Garbarino, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    The incubation of 19-hydroxy-13-epi-ent-pimara-9(11),15-diene (4) with Gibberella fujikuroi gave 8 alpha,19-dihydroxy-9 alpha,11alpha-epoxy-13-epi-ent-pimara-15-ene (6), 7-oxo-11 alpha,19-dihydroxy-13-epi-ent-pimara-8(9),15-diene (7), 7-oxo-11beta,19-dihydroxy-13-epi-ent-pimara-8(9),15-diene (9), and 8 alpha,19-dihydroxy-9 alpha,11 alpha:15,16-diepoxy-13-epi-ent-pimarane (11), while the feeding of 13-epi-ent-pimara-9(11),15-diene-19-oic acid (5) with this fungus afforded 1-oxo-2 alpha,9 alpha-dihydroxy-13-epi-ent-pimara-11,15-dien-19-oic acid (13), 1-oxo-2 beta,9 alpha-dihydroxy-13-epi-ent-pimara-11,15-dien-19-oic acid (14), 13-epi-ent-pimara-9(11),15-dien-1,19-dioic acid 1,2-lactone (15), and 1-oxo-12 beta-hydroxy-13-epi-ent-pimara-9(11),15-dien-19-oic acid (16). In both biotransformations, the main reaction was the epoxidation of the 9(11)-double bond, followed by rearrangement to afford allylic alcohols. The formation of lactone 15 represents the first time that a Baeyer-Villiger oxidation has been observed in a microbiological transformation with this fungus.

  5. Biosynthesis of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids in microsomal membrane preparations from the filamentous fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Jackson, F M; Fraser, T C; Smith, M A; Lazarus, C; Stobart, A K; Griffiths, G

    1998-03-15

    The biosynthesis of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids has been studied in the fungus Mucor circinelloides. Microsomal membrane preparations contained delta9, delta12 and delta6 desaturase activities. The delta9 desaturase exhibited characteristics similar to those of the animal and yeast delta9 desaturases in being membrane bound and utilising stearoyl-CoA as substrate. Cytochrome b5 (a soluble form lacking the 20-amino-acid hydrophobic C-terminus) stimulated desaturation and was identified as a major cytochrome component of the membranes. A high ferricyanide reductase activity (indicative of NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase activity) coupled to inhibition by cyanide further supported the similarity with the mammalian and yeast enzymes. Time-course studies with radiolabelled oleoyl-CoA showed that the oleate [18:1(9)] was transferred to position sn-2 of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and was desaturated to linoleoyl-PtdCho. Removal of the excess oleoyl-CoA from the membranes prior to addition of reductant confirmed that oleoyl-PtdCho is a substrate for the delta12 desaturase. The entry of oleate at this position of the phospholipid was facilitated by the activity of lyso-PtdCho:acyl-CoA acyltransferase (LPCAT), which readily transferred oleate from oleoyl-CoA to lyso-PtdCho. Desaturation of oleate at the sn-1 position of PtdCho was also demonstrated after the entry of oleate in to the phospholipid by the enzymes of the Kennedy pathway. Thus oleate at sn-1 and sn-2 positions served as substrate for the delta12 desaturase and is consistent with observations in oil seed tissues. LPCAT activity was substantially higher than that observed with lysophosphatidylethanolamine:acyl-CoA acyltransferase (LPEAT) indicating that oleate is less effectively channelled to phosphatidylethanolamine for linoleate synthesis. No desaturation on phosphatidylinositol could be demonstrated. Delta6 desaturase utilised linoleate at the sn-2 position of exogenously supplied PtdCho presented to the

  6. Expression of the cercosporin toxin resistance gene ( CRG1) as a dicistronic mRNA in the filamentous fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuang-Ren; Daub, Margaret E; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn

    2003-09-01

    The CRG1 gene in Cercospora nicotianae encodes a transcription factor and is required for cercosporin toxin resistance and production. Cloning and sequencing of the downstream region of the CRG1 gene led to the discovery of an adjacent gene ( PUT1) encoding a putative uracil transporter. Expression of CRG1 and PUT1 as assessed by Northern analysis indicated that, in addition to the expected monocistronic mRNAs (2.6 kb and 2.0 kb, respectively), a common 4.5-kb mRNA could be identified, using either a CRG1 or a PUT1 gene probe. The 2.6-kb transcript identified only by the CRG1 probe was expressed constitutively, whereas the 2.0-kb transcript identified only by the PUT1 probe was differentially expressed in various media. Four cDNA clones containing CRG1, PUT1, and the CRG1- PUT1 intergenic region were identified as part of the products from the 4.5-kb transcript. Both the 4.5-kb and 2.6-kb transcripts were not detectable in three crg1-disrupted mutants, using the CRG1 probe. The 2.0-kb transcript, but not the 4.5-kb one was detected using the PUT1 probe in the three crg1-disrupted mutants. Taken together, we conclude that the 4.5-kb transcript is a dicistronic mRNA of both CRG1 and PUT1 in the fungus C. nicotianae. This is the first example of a dicistronic mRNA identified in filamentous fungi.

  7. High-Yield Production of a Bacterial Xylanase in the Filamentous Fungus Trichoderma reesei Requires a Carrier Polypeptide with an Intact Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Paloheimo, Marja; Mäntylä, Arja; Kallio, Jarno; Suominen, Pirkko

    2003-01-01

    A bacterial xylanase gene, Nonomuraea flexuosa xyn11A, was expressed in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei from the strong cellobiohydrolase 1 promoter as fusions to a variety of carrier polypeptides. By using single-copy isogenic transformants, it was shown that production of this xylanase was clearly increased (up to 820 mg/liter) when it was produced as a fusion protein with a carrier polypeptide having an intact domain structure compared to the production (150 to 300 mg/liter) of fusions to the signal sequence alone or to carriers having incomplete domain structures. The carriers tested were the T. reesei mannanase I (Man5A, or MANI) core-hinge and a fragment thereof and the cellulose binding domain of T. reesei cellobiohydrolase II (Cel6A, or CBHII) with and without the hinge region(s) and a fragment thereof. The flexible hinge region was shown to have a positive effect on both the production of Xyn11A and the efficiency of cleavage of the fusion polypeptide. The recombinant Xyn11A produced had properties similar to those of the native xylanase. It constituted 6 to 10% of the total proteins secreted by the transformants. About three times more of the Man5A core-hinge carrier polypeptide than of the recombinant Xyn11A was observed. Even in the best Xyn11A producers, the levels of the fusion mRNAs were only ∼10% of the level of cel7A (cbh1) mRNA in the untransformed host strain. PMID:14660351

  8. Interaction between TATA-Binding Protein (TBP) and Multiprotein Bridging Factor-1 (MBF1) from the Filamentous Insect Pathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chi; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Xia; Keyhani, Nemat O.

    2015-01-01

    TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic transcription factors that acts to nucleate assembly and position pre-initiation complexes. Multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1) is thought to interconnect TBP with gene specific transcriptional activators, modulating transcriptional networks in response to specific signal and developmental programs. The insect pathogen, Beauveria bassiana, is a cosmopolitan fungus found in most ecosystems where it acts as an important regulator of insect populations and can form intimate associations with certain plants. In order to gain a better understanding of the function of MBF1 in filamentous fungi, its interaction with TBP was demonstrated. The MBF1 and TBP homologs in B. bassiana were cloned and purified from a heterologous E. coli expression system. Whereas purified BbTBP was shown to be able to bind oligonucleotide sequences containing the TATA-motif (Kd ≈ 1.3 nM) including sequences derived from the promoters of the B. bassiana chitinase and protease genes. In contrast, BbMBF1 was unable to bind to these same target sequences. However, the formation of a ternary complex between BbMBF1, BbTBP, and a TATA-containing target DNA sequence was seen in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). These data indicate that BbMBF1 forms direct interactions with BbTBP, and that the complex is capable of binding to DNA sequences containing TATA-motifs, confirming that BbTBP can link BbMBF1 to target sequences as part of the RNA transcriptional machinery in fungi. PMID:26466369

  9. A Putative Transcription Factor MYT1 Is Required for Female Fertility in the Ascomycete Gibberella zeae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yang; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Jungkwan; Min, Kyunghun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Lee, Yin-Won

    2011-01-01

    Gibberella zeae is an important pathogen of major cereal crops. The fungus produces ascospores that forcibly discharge from mature fruiting bodies, which serve as the primary inocula for disease epidemics. In this study, we characterized an insertional mutant Z39P105 with a defect in sexual development and identified a gene encoding a putative transcription factor designated as MYT1. This gene contains a Myb DNA-binding domain and is conserved in the subphylum Pezizomycotina of Ascomycota. The MYT1 protein fused with green fluorescence protein localized in nuclei, which supports its role as a transcriptional regulator. The MYT1 deletion mutant showed similar phenotypes to the wild-type strain in vegetative growth, conidia production and germination, virulence, and mycotoxin production, but had defect in female fertility. A mutant overexpressing MYT1 showed earlier germination, faster mycelia growth, and reduced mycotoxin production compared to the wild-type strain, suggesting that improper MYT1 expression affects the expression of genes involved in the cell cycle and secondary metabolite production. This study is the first to characterize a transcription factor containing a Myb DNA-binding domain that is specific to sexual development in G. zeae. PMID:21984921

  10. Reduced virulence of Gibberella zeae caused by disruption of a trichothecene toxin biosynthetic gene.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R H; Hohn, T M; McCormick, S P

    1995-01-01

    The production of trichothecene mycotoxins by some plant pathogenic species of Fusarium is thought to contribute to their virulence. Gibberella zeae (F. graminearum) is an important cereal pathogen that produces the trichothecene deoxynivalenol. To determine if trichothecene production contributes to the virulence of G. zeae, we generated trichothecene-deficient mutants of the fungus by gene disruption. The disrupted gene, Tri5, encodes the enzyme trichodiene synthase, which catalyzes the first step in trichothecene biosynthesis. To disrupt Tri5, G. zeae was transformed with a plasmid carrying a doubly truncated copy of the Tri5 coding region interrupted by a hygromycin B resistance gene. Tri5- transformants were selected by screening for the inability to produce trichothecenes and by Southern blot analysis. Tri5- strains exhibited reduced virulence on seedlings of Wheaton wheat and common winter rye, but wild-type virulence on seedlings of Golden Bantam maize. On Caldwell and Marshall wheat and Porter oat seedlings, Tri5- strains were inconsistent in causing less disease than their wild-type progenitor strain. Head blight developed more slowly on Wheaton when inoculated with Tri5- mutants than when inoculated with wild-type strains. These results suggest that trichothecene production contributes to the virulence of G. zeae on some hosts. PMID:8589414

  11. The microbiological transformation of 7alpha-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene derivatives by Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Bressa, Carlo; González, Pedro; Guillermo, Ricardo; Hernández, Melchor G; Suárez, Sergio

    2007-06-01

    The biotransformation of 7alpha-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene (epi-candol A) by the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi gave 7alpha,16alpha,17-trihydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene and a seco-ring B derivative, fujenoic acid, whilst the incubation of candicandiol (7alpha,18-dihydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene) and canditriol (7alpha,15alpha,18-trihydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene) afforded 7alpha,18,19-trihydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene and 7alpha,11beta,15alpha,18-tetrahydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene, respectively. The presence of a 7alpha-hydroxyl group in epi-candol A avoids its biotransformation along the biosynthetic pathway of gibberellins, and directs it to the seco-ring B acids route. The 15alpha-hydroxyl group in canditriol inhibits oxidation at C-19 and direct hydroxylation at C-11(beta). The formation of fujenoic acid, from 7alpha-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene, probably occurs via 7alpha-hydroxykaurenoic acid and 7-oxokaurenoic acid, with subsequent hydroxylation at the C-6(beta) position.

  12. The microbiological transformation of two 15beta-hydroxy-ent-kaurene diterpenes by Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Guillermo, Ricardo; Hernández, Melchor G

    2004-01-01

    The incubation of 15beta-hydroxy-3-oxo-ent-kaur-16-ene (1) with the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi afforded 11beta-hydroxy-3,15-dioxo-ent-kaurane (6), 11beta,15beta-dihydroxy-3-oxo-ent-kaur-16-ene (8), 7beta,11beta,15beta-trihydroxy-3-oxo-ent-kaur-16-ene (9), 7alpha,11beta-dihydroxy-3,15-dioxo-ent-kaurane (7), and 7alpha,11beta,15beta-trihydroxy-3-oxo-ent-kaur-16-ene (10). The incubation of 15beta-hydroxy-ent-kaur-2,16-diene (3) with the same fungus yielded 7alpha,11beta-dihydroxy-15-oxo-ent-kaur-2-ene (12), 7alpha,11beta,15beta-trihydroxy-ent-kaur-2,16-diene (13), 7beta,15beta-dihydroxy-ent-kaur-2,16-dien-19,6-olide (14), 1beta,7beta,15beta-trihydroxy-ent-kaur-2,16-dien-19-oic acid (15), 7alpha,11beta,16alpha-trihydroxy-15-oxo-ent-kaur-2-ene (17), and 7alpha,15beta,17-trihydroxy-11beta,16beta-epoxy-ent-kaur-2-ene (19). These results indicated that a 3-oxo group in ent-kaur-16-ene derivatives inhibits the oxidation at C-19, typical of the biosynthetic pathway of gibberellins and kaurenolides, while a 2,3-double bond or a 15beta-OH does not. In both substrates a 15beta-alcohol directs hydroxylations at C-11(beta) and C-7(alpha), while in those with a 2,3-double bond the functionalization of C-1(beta) is favored.

  13. Analysis of aberrant virulence of Gibberella zeae following transformation-mediated complementation of a trichothecene-deficient (Tri5) mutant.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, A E; Bai, G h; Plattner, R D; Proctor, R H

    2000-08-01

    Gibberella zeae causes wheat ear blight and produces trichothecene toxins in infected grain. In previous studies, trichothecene production in this fungus was disabled by specific disruption of the trichodiene synthase gene (Tri5) and was restored by two methods: gene reversion and transformation-mediated mutant complementation. In previous field tests of wheat ear blight, trichothecene-nonproducing mutants were less virulent than the wild-type progenitor strain from which they were derived. Trichothecene-producing revertants also were restored to wild-type levels of virulence. In contrast, in the field test of wheat ear blight reported here, trichothecene-producing strains obtained by Tri5 mutant complementation were not restored to wild-type levels of virulence. The complemented mutants showed a slightly reduced radial growth compared to the wild-type strain, but otherwise appeared normal in morphology, pigmentation and sexual fertility. Genetic analysis indicated that the aberrant virulence of a complemented mutant was likely due to non-target effects that occurred during the process of transforming the trichothecene-nonproducing mutant with Tri5. These results confirm previous findings that trichothecenes contribute to the virulence of G. zeae, but also demonstrate that manipulating this fungus in the laboratory may cause it to undergo subtle changes that reduce its virulence. PMID:10931910

  14. Physiological and Morphological Modifications in Immobilized Gibberella fujikuroi Mycelia

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, José Edmundo Nava; Barbotin, Jean-Noël; Thomas, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Constraints created by immobilization conditions modified the physiological behavior and morphological characteristics of Gibberella fujikuroi mycelia in comparison with their development in free-cell conditions. G. fujikuroi mycelia were immobilized in different support matrices (polyurethane, carrageenan, and alginate) and showed a variety of reactions in response to the different microenvironmental factors encountered during and after immobilization. The best support with respect to gibberellic acid yield and biocatalyst stability was found to be an alginate with a high degree of polymerization. The most visible effects of immobilization included changes in growth development, morphological appearance, metabolite production, mycelial pigmentation, mycelial viability under starvation conditions, and induction of resting forms when previously immobilized mycelia were subcultured. Images PMID:16348017

  15. Fate of DNA encoding hygromycin resistance after meiosis in transformed strains of Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium moniliforme).

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, J F; Dickman, M B

    1991-01-01

    Stability of foreign DNA transformed into a novel host is an important parameter in decisions to permit the release of genetically engineered microorganisms into the environment. Meiotic instability of transformed DNA has been reported in fungi such as Ascobolus, Aspergillus, and Neurospora. We used strains of Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium moniliforme) transformed with the hygr gene from Escherichia coli to study meiotic stability of foreign DNA in this plant pathogenic fungus. Crosses with single-copy transformants segregated hygr:hygs in a 1:1 manner consistent with that expected for a Mendelian locus in a haploid organism. Multicopy transformants, however, segregated hygr:hygs in a 1:2 manner that was not consistent with Mendelian expectations for a chromosomal marker, even though two unrelated auxotrophic nuclear genes were segregating normally. Segregation ratios in crosses in which hygr was introduced via the male parent did not differ significantly from crosses in which the transformed strain served as the female parent. Some of the sensitive progeny from the crosses with the multicopy transformants carried hygr sequences. When these phenotypically sensitive progeny were crossed with a wild-type strain that carried no hygr sequences, some of the progeny were phenotypically hygr. Some progeny from some crosses were more resistant to hygromycin than were their sibs or the transformant strains that served as their parents. Transformants passaged through a maize plant only rarely segregated progeny with the high levels of resistance. The mechanism underlying these genetic instabilities is not clear but may involve unequal crossing over or methylation or both. Further work with cloned genes with homology to sequences already present in the Fusarium genome is warranted. Images PMID:1854200

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Ascomycetous Filamentous Fungus Cadophora malorum Mo12 from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Reveals Its Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rédou, Vanessa; Kumar, Abhishek; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Barbier, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Cadophora malorum Mo12 was isolated from the Rainbow hydrothermal site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We present the draft genome sequence of this filamentous fungal strain, which has high biotechnological potentials as revealed by the presence of genes encoding biotechnologically important enzymes and genes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:27389260

  17. Adaptive alterations in the fatty acids composition under induced oxidative stress in heavy metal-tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii cultured in ascorbic acid presence.

    PubMed

    Słaba, Mirosława; Gajewska, Ewa; Bernat, Przemysław; Fornalska, Magdalena; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the heavy metal-tolerant fungus Paecilomyces marquandii to modulate whole cells fatty acid composition and saturation in response to IC50 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu was studied. Cadmium and nickel caused the most significant growth reduction. In the mycelia cultured with all tested metals, with the exception of nickel, a rise in the fatty acid unsaturation was noted. The fungus exposure to Pb, Cu, and Ni led to significantly higher lipid peroxidation. P. marquandii incubated in the presence of the tested metals responded with an increase in the level of linoleic acid and escalation of electrolyte leakage. The highest efflux of electrolytes was caused by lead. In these conditions, the fungus was able to bind up to 100 mg g(-1) of lead, whereas the content of the other metals in the mycelium was significantly lower and reached from 3.18 mg g(-1) (Cu) to 15.21 mg g(-1) (Zn). Additionally, it was shown that ascorbic acid at the concentration of 1 mM protected fungal growth and prevented the changes in the fatty acid composition and saturation but did not alleviate lipid peroxidation or affect the increased permeability of membranes after lead exposure. Pro-oxidant properties of ascorbic acid in the copper-stressed cells manifested strong growth inhibition and enhanced metal accumulation as a result of membrane damage. Toxic metals action caused cellular modulations, which might contributed to P. marquandii tolerance to the studied metals. Moreover, these changes can enhance metal removal from contaminated environment. PMID:23132407

  18. Adaptive alterations in the fatty acids composition under induced oxidative stress in heavy metal-tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii cultured in ascorbic acid presence.

    PubMed

    Słaba, Mirosława; Gajewska, Ewa; Bernat, Przemysław; Fornalska, Magdalena; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the heavy metal-tolerant fungus Paecilomyces marquandii to modulate whole cells fatty acid composition and saturation in response to IC50 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu was studied. Cadmium and nickel caused the most significant growth reduction. In the mycelia cultured with all tested metals, with the exception of nickel, a rise in the fatty acid unsaturation was noted. The fungus exposure to Pb, Cu, and Ni led to significantly higher lipid peroxidation. P. marquandii incubated in the presence of the tested metals responded with an increase in the level of linoleic acid and escalation of electrolyte leakage. The highest efflux of electrolytes was caused by lead. In these conditions, the fungus was able to bind up to 100 mg g(-1) of lead, whereas the content of the other metals in the mycelium was significantly lower and reached from 3.18 mg g(-1) (Cu) to 15.21 mg g(-1) (Zn). Additionally, it was shown that ascorbic acid at the concentration of 1 mM protected fungal growth and prevented the changes in the fatty acid composition and saturation but did not alleviate lipid peroxidation or affect the increased permeability of membranes after lead exposure. Pro-oxidant properties of ascorbic acid in the copper-stressed cells manifested strong growth inhibition and enhanced metal accumulation as a result of membrane damage. Toxic metals action caused cellular modulations, which might contributed to P. marquandii tolerance to the studied metals. Moreover, these changes can enhance metal removal from contaminated environment.

  19. Recent advances in genes involved in secondary metabolite synthesis, hyphal development, energy metabolism and pathogenicity in Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph Gibberella zeae).

    PubMed

    Geng, Zongyi; Zhu, Wei; Su, Hao; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2014-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus, Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph Gibberella zeae), is the most common causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease for cereal crops worldwide. F. graminearum produces ascospores (sexual spores) and conidia (asexual spores), which can serve as disease inocula of FHB. Meanwhile, Fusarium-infected grains are often contaminated with mycotoxins such as trichothecenes (TRIs), fumonisins, and zearalenones, among which TRIs are related to the pathogenicity of F. graminearum, and these toxins are hazardous to humans and livestock. In recent years, with the complete genome sequencing of F. graminearum, an increasing number of functional genes involved in the production of secondary metabolites, hyphal differentiation, sexual and asexual reproduction, virulence and pathogenicity have been identified from F. graminearum. In this review, the secondary metabolite synthesis, hyphal development and pathogenicity related genes in F. graminearum were thoroughly summarized, and the genes associated with secondary metabolites, sexual reproduction, energy metabolism, and pathogenicity were highlighted.

  20. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12.

  1. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12. PMID:25356841

  2. The Transcription Factor Ste12 Mediates the Regulatory Role of the Tmk1 MAP Kinase in Mycoparasitism and Vegetative Hyphal Fusion in the Filamentous Fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12. PMID:25356841

  3. A genetic map of Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum).

    PubMed

    Jurgenson, J E; Bowden, R L; Zeller, K A; Leslie, J F; Alexander, N J; Plattner, R D

    2002-04-01

    We constructed a genetic linkage map of Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum) by crossing complementary nitrate-nonutilizing (nit) mutants of G. zeae strains R-5470 (from Japan) and Z-3639 (from Kansas). We selected 99 nitrate-utilizing (recombinant) progeny and analyzed them for amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). We used 34 pairs of two-base selective AFLP primers and identified 1048 polymorphic markers that mapped to 468 unique loci on nine linkage groups. The total map length is approximately 1300 cM with an average interval of 2.8 map units between loci. Three of the nine linkage groups contain regions in which there are high levels of segregation distortion. Selection for the nitrate-utilizing recombinant progeny can explain two of the three skewed regions. Two linkage groups have recombination patterns that are consistent with the presence of intercalary inversions. Loci governing trichothecene toxin amount and type (deoxynivalenol or nivalenol) map on linkage groups IV and I, respectively. The locus governing the type of trichothecene produced (nivalenol or deoxynivalenol) cosegregated with the TRI5 gene (which encodes trichodiene synthase) and probably maps in the trichothecene gene cluster. This linkage map will be useful in population genetic studies, in map-based cloning, for QTL (quantitative trait loci) analysis, for ordering genomic libraries, and for genomic comparisons of related species. PMID:11973300

  4. Fumonisin production by Gibberella fujikuroi strains from Pinus species.

    PubMed

    Mirete, S; Patiño, B; Vázquez, C; Jiménez, M; Hinojo, M J; Soldevilla, C; González-Jaén, M T

    2003-12-31

    Fumonisins are important mycotoxins basically produced by strains from the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex (with anamorphs in Fusarium genus) which contaminate food and feed products representing a risk to human and animal health. In this work, we report for the first time the fumonisin production of Fusarium moniliforme Sheldon strains associated to edible pine nuts of Pinus pinea. P. pinea is an important and widely distributed Pinus species in the Mediterranean area where their pine nuts are consumed raw or slightly processed in diverse food products. In this work, characterization and further identification of those strains were performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs) of the intergenic spacer region of the rDNA (IGS) with the aid of the eight mating populations (A-H) described for G. fujikuroi species complex. The method was powerful to detect polymorphism, allowing discrimination between individuals and could be used to study the genetic relationships among them and within the G. fujikuroi species complex. Fusarium strains associated to Pinus radiata were also included in the present study. These strains did not produce fumonisins and showed no close relation with the strains isolated from P. pinea. The approach used in this work was rapid and proved to be efficient to assist identification and to characterize and analyse relatedness of new isolates within the G. fujikuroi species complex.

  5. Characterization of ent-kaurene oxidase activity from Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Ashman, P J; Mackenzie, A; Bramley, P M

    1990-11-01

    Cell extracts of wild-type and mutant strains of Gibberella fujikuroi were assayed for kaurene oxidase activity, using ent-[3H]kaurene as the substrate. Extracts from strain SG78 exhibited the highest specific activity, and were used in subsequent experiments. The microsomal enzyme activity was solubilized with buffers or salt solutions at a concentration of 400 mM. Both the soluble and microsomal preparations showed characteristic cytochrome P-450 spectra, ligand binding spectra with the substrate and with the plant growth regulator, paclobutrazol, and inhibition of enzymic activity by carbon monoxide. The addition of 20% glycerol to the extraction buffer stabilized the activity to some extent. Loss of enzymic activity on storage was accompanied by conversion of P-450 to P-420. Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for the membrane-bound and soluble enzyme have been estimated, as have constants for the binding of ent-kaurene and paclobutrazol to the P-450 and P-420 forms of the protein.

  6. Genetic analysis of fumonisin production and virulence of Gibberella fujikuroi mating population A (Fusarium moniliforme) on maize (Zea mays) seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, A E; Plattner, R D; Nelsen, T C; Leslie, J F

    1995-01-01

    The phytopathogenic fungus Gibberella fujikuroi mating population A (anamorph, Fusarium moniliforme) produces fumonisins, which are toxic to a wide range of plant and animal species. Previous studies of field strains have identified a genetic locus, designated fum1, that can determine whether fumonisins are produced. To test the relationship between fumonisin production and virulence on maize seedlings, a cross between a fum1+ field strain that had a high degree of virulence and a fum1- field strain that had a low degree of virulence was made, and ascospore progeny were scored for these traits. Although a range of virulence levels was recovered among the progeny, high levels of virulence were associated with production of fumonisins, and highly virulent, fumonisin-nonproducing progeny were not obtained. A survey of field strains did identify a rare fumonisin-nonproducing strain that was quite high in virulence. Also, the addition of purified fumonisin B1 to virulence assays did not replicate all of the seedling blight symptoms obtained with autoclaved culture material containing fumonisin. These results support the hypothesis that fumonisin plays a role in virulence but also indicate that fumonisin production is not necessary or sufficient for virulence on maize seedlings. PMID:7887628

  7. The pcz1 Gene, which Encodes a Zn(II)2Cys6 Protein, Is Involved in the Control of Growth, Conidiation, and Conidial Germination in the Filamentous Fungus Penicillium roqueforti

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Exequiel; Vaca, Inmaculada; García-Rico, Ramón O.; Villagrán, Sebastián; Levicán, Gloria; Chávez, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Proteins containing Zn(II)2Cys6 domains are exclusively found in fungi and yeasts. Genes encoding this class of proteins are broadly distributed in fungi, but few of them have been functionally characterized. In this work, we have characterized a gene from the filamentous fungus Penicillium roqueforti that encodes a Zn(II)2Cys6 protein, whose function to date remains unknown. We have named this gene pcz1. We showed that the expression of pcz1 is negatively regulated in a P. roqueforti strain containing a dominant active Gαi protein, suggesting that pcz1 encodes a downstream effector that is negatively controlled by Gαi. More interestingly, the silencing of pcz1 in P. roqueforti using RNAi-silencing technology resulted in decreased apical growth, the promotion of conidial germination (even in the absence of a carbon source), and the strong repression of conidiation, concomitant with the downregulation of the genes of the central conidiation pathway brlA, abaA and wetA. A model for the participation of pcz1 in these physiological processes in P. roqueforti is proposed. PMID:25811807

  8. Determining the environmental fate of a filamentous fungus, Trichoderma reesei, in laboratory-contained intact soil-core microcosms using competitive PCR and viability plating.

    PubMed

    Providenti, Miguel A; Mautner, Selma I; Chaudhry, Omar; Bombardier, Manon; Scroggins, Richard; Gregorich, Edward; Smith, Myron L

    2004-08-01

    Trichoderma spp. are used extensively in industry and are routinely disposed of in landfill sites as spent biomass from fermentation plants. However, little is known regarding the environmental fate of this biomass. We tracked the survival of T. reesei strain QM6A#4 (a derivative of strain QM6A marked with a recombinant construct) over a 6-month period in laboratory-contained, intact soil-core microcosms incubated in a growth chamber. Survival was tested in 3 different soils and the effect of a plant rhizosphere (bush lima beans, Phaseolus limensis) was investigated. Levels and viability of the fungus were determined, respectively, by quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction analysis of total soil DNA extracts and dilution-plating of soil on a semiselective growth medium. Whereas chemically killed QM6A#4 became undetectable within 3 d, QM6A#4 added as a live inoculum decreased approximately 4- to approximately 160-fold over the first 1-3 months and then reached a steady state. After 4 months, soil cores were subjected to a 1.5-month simulated winter period, which did not significantly affect QM6A#4 levels. Throughout the experiment, QM6A#4 remained viable. These results indicate that, following release into the environment, live T. reesei will persist in soil for at least 2 seasons.

  9. Adapting High-Resolution Respirometry to Glucose-Limited Steady State Mycelium of the Filamentous Fungus Penicillium ochrochloron: Method Development and Standardisation

    PubMed Central

    Schinagl, Christoph W.; Vrabl, Pamela; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Fungal electron transport systems (ETS) are branched, involving alternative NADH dehydrogenases and an alternative terminal oxidase. These alternative respiratory enzymes were reported to play a role in pathogenesis, production of antibiotics and excretion of organic acids. The activity of these alternative respiratory enzymes strongly depends on environmental conditions. Functional analysis of fungal ETS under highly standardised conditions for cultivation, sample processing and respirometric assay are still lacking. We developed a highly standardised protocol to explore in vivo the ETS—and in particular the alternative oxidase—in Penicillium ochrochloron. This included cultivation in glucose-limited chemostat (to achieve a defined and reproducible physiological state), direct transfer without any manipulation of a broth sample to the respirometer (to maintain the physiological state in the respirometer as close as possible to that in the chemostat), and high-resolution respirometry (small sample volume and high measuring accuracy). This protocol was aimed at avoiding any changes in the physiological phenotype due to the high phenotypic plasticity of filamentous fungi. A stable oxygen consumption (< 5% change in 20 minutes) was only possible with glucose limited chemostat mycelium and a direct transfer of a broth sample into the respirometer. Steady state respiration was 29% below its maximum respiratory capacity. Additionally to a rotenone-sensitive complex I and most probably a functioning complex III, the ETS of P. ochrochloron also contained a cyanide-sensitive terminal oxidase (complex IV). Activity of alternative oxidase was present constitutively. The degree of inhibition strongly depended on the sequence of inhibitor addition. This suggested, as postulated for plants, that the alternative terminal oxidase was in dynamic equilibrium with complex IV—independent of the rate of electron flux. This means that the onset of activity does not depend on a

  10. Adapting High-Resolution Respirometry to Glucose-Limited Steady State Mycelium of the Filamentous Fungus Penicillium ochrochloron: Method Development and Standardisation.

    PubMed

    Schinagl, Christoph W; Vrabl, Pamela; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Fungal electron transport systems (ETS) are branched, involving alternative NADH dehydrogenases and an alternative terminal oxidase. These alternative respiratory enzymes were reported to play a role in pathogenesis, production of antibiotics and excretion of organic acids. The activity of these alternative respiratory enzymes strongly depends on environmental conditions. Functional analysis of fungal ETS under highly standardised conditions for cultivation, sample processing and respirometric assay are still lacking. We developed a highly standardised protocol to explore in vivo the ETS-and in particular the alternative oxidase-in Penicillium ochrochloron. This included cultivation in glucose-limited chemostat (to achieve a defined and reproducible physiological state), direct transfer without any manipulation of a broth sample to the respirometer (to maintain the physiological state in the respirometer as close as possible to that in the chemostat), and high-resolution respirometry (small sample volume and high measuring accuracy). This protocol was aimed at avoiding any changes in the physiological phenotype due to the high phenotypic plasticity of filamentous fungi. A stable oxygen consumption (< 5% change in 20 minutes) was only possible with glucose limited chemostat mycelium and a direct transfer of a broth sample into the respirometer. Steady state respiration was 29% below its maximum respiratory capacity. Additionally to a rotenone-sensitive complex I and most probably a functioning complex III, the ETS of P. ochrochloron also contained a cyanide-sensitive terminal oxidase (complex IV). Activity of alternative oxidase was present constitutively. The degree of inhibition strongly depended on the sequence of inhibitor addition. This suggested, as postulated for plants, that the alternative terminal oxidase was in dynamic equilibrium with complex IV-independent of the rate of electron flux. This means that the onset of activity does not depend on a complete

  11. Transcriptional comparison of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa growing on three major monosaccharides D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background D-glucose, D-xylose and L-arabinose are the three major monosaccharides in plant cell walls. Complete utilization of all three sugars is still a bottleneck for second-generation cellulolytic bioethanol production, especially for L-arabinose. However, little is known about gene expression profiles during L-arabinose utilization in fungi and a comparison of the genome-wide fungal response to these three major monosaccharides has not yet been reported. Results Using next-generation sequencing technology, we have analyzed the transcriptome of N. crassa grown on L-arabinose versus D-xylose, with D-glucose as the reference. We found that the gene expression profiles on L-arabinose were dramatically different from those on D-xylose. It appears that L-arabinose can rewire the fungal cell metabolic pathway widely and provoke the expression of many kinds of sugar transporters, hemicellulase genes and transcription factors. In contrast, many fewer genes, mainly related to the pentose metabolic pathway, were upregulated on D-xylose. The rewired metabolic response to L-arabinose was significantly different and wider than that under no carbon conditions, although the carbon starvation response was initiated on L-arabinose. Three novel sugar transporters were identified and characterized for their substrates here, including one glucose transporter GLT-1 (NCU01633) and two novel pentose transporters, XAT-1 (NCU01132), XYT-1 (NCU05627). One transcription factor associated with the regulation of hemicellulase genes, HCR-1 (NCU05064) was also characterized in the present study. Conclusions We conducted the first transcriptome analysis of Neurospora crassa grown on L-arabinose and performed a comparative analysis with cells grown on D-xylose and D-glucose, which deepens the understanding of the utilization of L-arabinose and D-xylose in filamentous fungi. The dataset generated by this research will be useful for mining target genes for D-xylose and L-arabinose utilization

  12. Variation and Transgression of Aggressiveness Among Two Gibberella Zeae Crosses Developed from Highly Aggressive Parental Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gibberella zeae (anamorph: Fusarium graminearum) is the most common cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Aggressiveness is the most important fungal trait affecting disease severity and stability of host resistance. Objectives were to analyze in two field exper...

  13. A major QTL for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot in maize.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Yin, Guangming; Guo, Yanling; Zhang, Dongfeng; Chen, Shaojiang; Xu, Mingliang

    2010-08-01

    Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, the conidial form of Gibberella zeae, is the causal fungal pathogen responsible for Gibberella stalk rot of maize. Using a BC(1)F(1) backcross mapping population derived from a cross between '1145' (donor parent, completely resistant) and 'Y331' (recurrent parent, highly susceptible), two quantitative trait loci (QTLs), qRfg1 and qRfg2, conferring resistance to Gibberella stalk rot have been detected. The major QTL qRfg1 was further confirmed in the double haploid, F(2), BC(2)F(1), and BC(3)F(1) populations. Within a qRfg1 confidence interval, single/low-copy bacterial artificial chromosome sequences, anchored expressed sequence tags, and insertion/deletion polymorphisms, were exploited to develop 59 markers to saturate the qRfg1 region. A step by step narrowing-down strategy was adopted to pursue fine mapping of the qRfg1 locus. Recombinants within the qRfg1 region, screened from each backcross generation, were backcrossed to 'Y331' to produce the next backcross progenies. These progenies were individually genotyped and evaluated for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. Significant (or no significant) difference in resistance reactions between homozygous and heterozygous genotypes in backcross progeny suggested presence (or absence) of qRfg1 in '1145' donor fragments. The phenotypes were compared to sizes of donor fragments among recombinants to delimit the qRfg1 region. Sequential fine mapping of BC(4)F(1) to BC(6)F(1) generations enabled us to progressively refine the qRfg1 locus to a ~500-kb interval flanked by the markers SSR334 and SSR58. Meanwhile, resistance of qRfg1 to Gibberella stalk rot was also investigated in BC(3)F(1) to BC(6)F(1) generations. Once introgressed into the 'Y331' genome, the qRfg1 locus could steadily enhance the frequency of resistant plants by 32-43%. Hence, the qRfg1 locus was capable of improving maize resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. PMID:20401458

  14. A major QTL for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot in maize.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Yin, Guangming; Guo, Yanling; Zhang, Dongfeng; Chen, Shaojiang; Xu, Mingliang

    2010-08-01

    Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, the conidial form of Gibberella zeae, is the causal fungal pathogen responsible for Gibberella stalk rot of maize. Using a BC(1)F(1) backcross mapping population derived from a cross between '1145' (donor parent, completely resistant) and 'Y331' (recurrent parent, highly susceptible), two quantitative trait loci (QTLs), qRfg1 and qRfg2, conferring resistance to Gibberella stalk rot have been detected. The major QTL qRfg1 was further confirmed in the double haploid, F(2), BC(2)F(1), and BC(3)F(1) populations. Within a qRfg1 confidence interval, single/low-copy bacterial artificial chromosome sequences, anchored expressed sequence tags, and insertion/deletion polymorphisms, were exploited to develop 59 markers to saturate the qRfg1 region. A step by step narrowing-down strategy was adopted to pursue fine mapping of the qRfg1 locus. Recombinants within the qRfg1 region, screened from each backcross generation, were backcrossed to 'Y331' to produce the next backcross progenies. These progenies were individually genotyped and evaluated for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. Significant (or no significant) difference in resistance reactions between homozygous and heterozygous genotypes in backcross progeny suggested presence (or absence) of qRfg1 in '1145' donor fragments. The phenotypes were compared to sizes of donor fragments among recombinants to delimit the qRfg1 region. Sequential fine mapping of BC(4)F(1) to BC(6)F(1) generations enabled us to progressively refine the qRfg1 locus to a ~500-kb interval flanked by the markers SSR334 and SSR58. Meanwhile, resistance of qRfg1 to Gibberella stalk rot was also investigated in BC(3)F(1) to BC(6)F(1) generations. Once introgressed into the 'Y331' genome, the qRfg1 locus could steadily enhance the frequency of resistant plants by 32-43%. Hence, the qRfg1 locus was capable of improving maize resistance to Gibberella stalk rot.

  15. The CCAAT-binding complex of eukaryotes: evolution of a second NLS in the HapB subunit of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans despite functional conservation at the molecular level between yeast, A.nidulans and human.

    PubMed

    Tüncher, André; Spröte, Petra; Gehrke, Alexander; Brakhage, Axel A

    2005-09-23

    The heterotrimeric CCAAT-binding complex is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotic organisms, including fungi, plants and mammals. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, the corresponding complex was designated AnCF (A.nidulans CCAAT-binding factor). AnCF consists of the subunits HapB, HapC and HapE. All three subunits are necessary for DNA binding. HapB contains two putative nuclear localisation signal sequences (NLSs) designated NLS1 and NLS2. Previously, it was shown that only NLS2 was required for nuclear localisation of HapB. Furthermore, HapC and HapE are transported to the nucleus only in complex with HapB via a piggy back mechanism. Here, by using various GFP constructs and by establishing a novel marker gene for transformation of A.nidulans, i.e. the pabaA gene encoding p-aminobenzoic acid synthase, it was shown that the HapB homologous proteins of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Hap2p) and human (NF-YA) use an NLS homologous to HapB NLS1 for nuclear localisation in S.cerevisiae. Interestingly, for A.nidulans HapB, NLS1 was sufficient for nuclear localisation in S.cerevisiae. In A.nidulans, HapB NLS1 was also functional when present in a different protein context. However, in A.nidulans, both S.cerevisiae Hap2p and human NF-YA entered the nucleus only when HapB NLS2 was present in the respective proteins. In that case, both proteins Hap2p and NF-YA complemented, at least in part, the hap phenotype of A.nidulans with respect to lack of growth on acetamide. Similarly, A.nidulans HapB and human NF-YA complemented a hap2 mutant of S.cerevisiae. In summary, HapB, Hap2p and NF-YA are interchangeable. Because the A.nidulans hapB mutant was complemented, at least in part, by both the human NF-YA and S.cerevisiae Hap2p this finding suggests that the piggy-back mechanism of nuclear transport found for A.nidulans is conserved in yeast and human.

  16. Fungus Amongus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakeley, Deidra

    2005-01-01

    This role-playing simulation is designed to help teach middle level students about the typical lifecycle of a fungus. In this interactive simulation, students assume the roles of fungi, spores, living and dead organisms, bacteria, and rain. As they move around a playing field collecting food and water chips, they discover how the organisms…

  17. Chemotaxonomy of Gibberella zeae with special reference to production of trichothecenes and zearalenone.

    PubMed Central

    Ichinoe, M; Kurata, H; Sugiura, Y; Ueno, Y

    1983-01-01

    By adopting a single-spore isolation technique, 113 isolates of Gibberella zeae, the perfect stage of Fusarium graminearum, were isolated from rice stubbles in barley and wheat fields and tested for production of trichothecenes and zearalenone on rice grains. Of the isolates, 93% produced the trichothecenes, and they could be subdivided into two chemotaxonomic groups: nivalenol and fusarenon-X producers and deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol producers. No cross production of these two types of trichothecenes was observed in these isolates. Zearalenone was detected in 68% of the isolates, but no clear relationship could be observed regarding its position with respect to the two chemotaxonomic groups. PMID:6229218

  18. Evidence for recombination and segregation of virulence to pine in a hybrid cross between Gibberella circinata and G subglutinans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two species associated with the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex, G. circinata (the cause of pitch canker in pines), and G. subglutinans (avirulent on pine), were found to have limited interfertility in hybrid crosses. MAT idiomorphs, polymorphisms in the histone H3 gene, vegetative compatibili...

  19. Species diversity of and toxin production by Gibberella fujikuroi species complex strains isolated from native prairie grasses in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Leslie, John F; Zeller, Kurt A; Logrieco, Antonio; Mulè, Giuseppina; Moretti, Antonio; Ritieni, Alberto

    2004-04-01

    Fusarium species from agricultural crops have been well studied with respect to toxin production and genetic diversity, while similar studies of communities from nonagricultural plants are much more limited. We examined 72 Fusarium isolates from a native North American tallgrass prairie and found that Gibberella intermedia (Fusarium proliferatum), Gibberella moniliformis (Fusarium verticillioides), and Gibberella konza (Fusarium konzum) dominated. Gibberella thapsina (Fusarium thapsinum) and Gibberella subglutinans (Fusarium subglutinans) also were recovered, as were seven isolates that could not be assigned to any previously described species on the basis of either morphological or molecular characters. In general, isolates from the prairie grasses produced the same toxins in quantities similar to those produced by isolates of the same species recovered from agricultural hosts. The G. konza isolates produce little or no fumonisins (up to 120 micro g/g by one strain), and variable but generally low to moderate amounts of beauvericin (4 to 320 micro g/g) and fusaproliferin (50 to 540 micro g/g). Toxicity to Artemia salina larvae within most species was correlated with the concentration of either beauvericin or fusaproliferin produced. Organic isolates from some cultures of G. moniliformis were highly toxic towards A. salina even though they produced little, if any, beauvericin or fusaproliferin. Thus, additional potentially toxigenic compounds may be synthesized by G. moniliformis strains isolated from prairie grasses. The Fusarium community from these grasses appears to contain some species not found in surrounding agricultural communities, including some that probably are undescribed, and could be capable of serving as a reservoir for strains of potential agricultural importance.

  20. Gibberella fujikuroi mutants obtained with UV radiation and N-methyl-N'-nitro-nitrosoguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Avalos, J.; Casadesus, J.; Cerda-Olmedo, E.

    1985-01-01

    N-methyl-N'-nitrosoguanidine and to a lesser extent UV radiation are very mutagenic for Gibberella microconidia. The recommended nitrosoguanidine doses lead to much higher frequencies of mutants than are found in other microorganisms. The frequency of mutants among the survivors increases linearly with the nitrosoguanidine dose (molar concentration x time); the absolute number of viable mutants in a given population reaches a maximum for a dose of ca. 0.7 M x s. The microconidia are uninucleate. The onset of germination brings about increased lethality of nitrosoguanidine, but it does not modify the action of UV radiation. Mycelia are more resistant than spores to both agents. Visible illumination effectively prevents lethality when given immediately after UV irradiation. Auxotrophs and color mutants are very easily obtained. Pink adenine auxotrophs and several classes of color mutants are affected in the biosynthesis of the carotenoid pigment, neurosporaxanthin.

  1. Media for identification of Gibberella zeae and production of F-2-(Zearalenone).

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, C W; Robbins, J D; Porter, J K

    1977-01-01

    Media are described for the isolaton of Fusarium graminearum in the perithecial state, Gibberella zeae, and for the production of F-2 (zearalenone) by Fusarium species. On soil extract-corn meal agar isolated medium, G. Zeae produced perithecia in 9 to 14 days under a 12-h photoperiod. Species of Fusarium were screened for F-2 production on a liquid medium. From strains that produced F-2, the yields, from stationary cultures of G. zeae and F. culmorum after 12 days of incubation, ranged from 22 to 86 mg/liter. Three strains produced no F-2. Glumatic acid, starch, yeast extract,and the proper ratio of medium volume-to-flask volume were necessary for F-2 synthesis. Images PMID:15512

  2. Isolation and gene disruption of the Tox5 gene encoding trichodiene synthase in Gibberella pulicaris.

    PubMed

    Hohn, T M; Desjardins, A E

    1992-01-01

    The trichodiene synthase gene (Tox5) was isolated from Gibberella pulicaris, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. Tox5 was disrupted through transformation with a plasmid carrying a doubly truncated copy of the coding region and a selectable marker for resistance to hygromycin B (Hygr). Analysis of 82 transformants for their ability to produce the trichothecene, 4,15-diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), resulted in the identification of five DAS- strains. Southern hybridization analysis of DAS- Hygr transformants indicated that the plasmid integrated at the Tox5 locus. The disrupted Tox5 gene was shown to be mitotically stable. Analysis of nine tetrads revealed either the cosegregation of the disrupter plasmid and the DAS- phenotype or the loss of the disrupter plasmid. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene disruption in G. pulicaris and suggest a general method for obtaining Tox5- mutants in other trichothecene-producing fungi. PMID:1421511

  3. Enzymic hydrolysis of raffinose and stachyose in soymilk by alpha-galactosidase from Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Mulimani, V H; Ramalingam

    1995-07-01

    The use of intracellular alpha-galactosidase from Gibberella fujikuroi to remove raffinose and stachyose in soymilk was studied. The optimum conditions for the enzymic hydrolysis of raffinose and stachyose was pH 5.5 to 6.0 at 55 degrees C. Alpha-galactosidase showed optimum activity at pH 5.0 and 50 degrees C with the substrate p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-galacto-pyranoside (PNGP). The enzyme showed no detectable loss of activity when held more than 8 hr at 50 degrees C. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) revealed the following composition of oligosaccharides in local soybean variety: sucrose, 5.53%; raffinose, 1.95%; and stachyose, 6.1%. Investigation by TLC showed complete hydrolysis of raffinose and stachyose in 3 hr. HPLC analysis of hydrolyzate indicated complete hydrolysis of stachyose, and more than 60% hydrolysis of raffinose in 2.5 hr.

  4. Metabolism of 24(R,S),25-epiminolanosterol to 25-aminolanosterol and lanosterol by Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Nes, W D; Xu, S H; Parish, E J

    1989-08-01

    Mycelia of Gibberella fujikuroi metabolized 2-tritio-24(R,S), 25-epiminolanosterol, a novel fungal sterol biosynthesis inhibitor that regulates delta 24-sterol methyltransferase, to 25-aminolanosterol (a new sterol) and lanosterol. The identities of the two sterols were established by cochromatography with authentic samples, mass spectroscopy, and isotopic dilution and recrystallization to constant specific activity. The newly biosynthesized tritiolanosterol was demonstrably introduced into the sterol pathway as evidenced by significant tritium label in the radiochemically purified sterols; 24(28)-methylene-24,25-dihydrolanosterol and 14-norlanosterol. The results demonstrate for the first time the direct reduction in situ of an aziridine ring to a tertiary amine and the stereocontrolled deamination of a C-25 aminosteroid to produce a delta 24, rather than a delta 25(27), steroid.

  5. Isozyme Variation among Biological Species in the Gibberella fujikuroi Species Complex (Fusarium Section Liseola)

    PubMed Central

    Huss, M. J.; Campbell, C. L.; Jennings, D. B.; Leslie, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Isozyme phenotypes were determined for 101 strains of Gibberella fujikuroi and 2 strains of Gibberella nygamai that represent seven biological species (mating populations) isolated from a variety of plant hosts in dispersed geographic locations. Fourteen enzymes were resolved in one or more of three buffer systems. Two of the enzymes, arylesterase and acid phosphatase, were polymorphic within two or more biological species and are suitable for intraspecific studies of population variation. Six enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, mannitol dehydrogenase, phosphoglucomutase, and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, were monomorphic in all of the isolates examined. The remaining six enzymes, fumarase, glucose phosphate isomerase, glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP), isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP), malate dehydrogenase, and triose-phosphate isomerase, could potentially be used to distinguish the different biological species. Mating populations C and D are the most similar, since the mating population C isolates examined had the same isozyme phenotype as did a subset of the isolates in mating population D. Mating population E is the least similar to the other taxa examined. Unique isozyme phenotypes are present but are composed of banding patterns shared among the biological species. This finding supports the hypothesis that these biological species, with the possible exception of mating populations C and D, are reproductively isolated from one another and that no significant gene flow is occurring between them. Isozyme analysis is a useful method to distinguish these closely related biological species. Examination of isozyme phenotypes is more rapid than the present technique, which is based on sexual crosses; can be applied to strains that are not sexually fertile; and is more sensitive than traditional morphological characters, which cannot distinguish more than three or four morphological groups among the seven

  6. Filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, A. M.

    The major aspects of filament winding are discussed, emphasizing basic reinforcement and matrix materials, winding procedures, process controls, and cured composite properties. Fiberglass (E-glass and S-glass strengths are 500,000 and 665,000 psi respectively) and polyester resins are the principal reinforcement constituent materials. Graphite and aramid reinforcements are being used more frequently, primarily for the more critical pressure vessels. Matrix systems are most commonly based on epoxy as it has superior mechanical properties, fatigue behavior, and heat resistance as compard with polyesters. A fiberglass overwrap of PVC pipe is an anticipated development in on-site winding and combination winding, and the compression molding of filament wound lay-ups will be investigated. The fabrication of weight-sensitive structural components may be achieved by using such moldings.

  7. Differential roles of pyruvate decarboxylase in aerial and embedded mycelia of the ascomycete Gibberella zeae.

    PubMed

    Son, Hokyoung; Min, Kyunghun; Lee, Jungkwan; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Lee, Yin-Won

    2012-04-01

    The pyruvate-acetaldehyde-acetate (PAA) pathway has diverse roles in eukaryotes. Our previous study on acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase 1 (ACS1) in Gibberella zeae suggested that the PAA pathway is important for lipid production, which is required for perithecia maturation. In this study, we deleted all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes, which encode enzymes that function upstream of ACS1 in the PAA pathway. Results suggest PDC1 is required for lipid accumulation in the aerial mycelia, and deletion of PDC1 resulted in highly wettable mycelia. However, the total amount of lipids in the PDC1 deletion mutants was similar to that of the wild-type strain, likely due to compensatory lipid production processes in the embedded mycelia. PDC1 was expressed both in the aerial and embedded mycelia, whereas ACS1 was observed only in the aerial mycelia in a PDC1-dependent manner. PDC1 is also involved in vegetative growth of embedded mycelia in G. zeae, possibly through initiating the ethanol fermentation pathway. Thus, PDC1 may function as a key metabolic enzyme crucial for lipid production in the aerial mycelia, but play a different role in the embedded mycelia, where it might be involved in energy generation by ethanol fermentation.

  8. Regulation of Trichodiene Synthase in Fusarium sporotrichioides and Gibberella pulicaris (Fusarium sambucinum).

    PubMed

    Hohn, T M; Beremand, M N

    1989-06-01

    The regulation of trichodiene synthase (TS) and its relationship to trichothecene biosynthesis was investigated in Fusarium sporotrichioides NRRL 3299 and Gibberella pulicaris R-6380. Cultures were analyzed for the presence of TS activity, trichothecenes, and immunodetectable TS polypeptide over a time period of 144 h. Enzyme activity increased from barely detectable to maximum levels over a period of 3 h for F. sporotrichioides, while in G. pulicaris, a steady increase was observed over 144 h. Increases in TS activity of 50-fold for F. sporotrichioides and 10-fold for G. pulicaris R-6380 preceded by several hours the detection of trichothecenes. Immunoblot analysis employing polyclonal serum specific for the enzyme from F. sporotrichioides showed that increases in the levels of TS polypeptide corresponded to the observed changes in enzyme activity for both organisms. These data indicate that the regulation of TS activity is accomplished through increases in its cellular concentration and that TS may serve as a useful indicator of trichothecene biosynthetic activity. PMID:16347944

  9. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eeltink, D.; Berti, N.; Marchiando, N.; Hermelin, S.; Gateau, J.; Brunetti, M.; Wolf, J. P.; Kasparian, J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This positive effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments, suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  10. Genetic Mapping of Pathogenicity and Aggressiveness of Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum) Toward Wheat.

    PubMed

    Cumagun, Christian Joseph R; Bowden, Robert L; Jurgenson, James E; Leslie, John F; Miedaner, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    ABSTRACT Gibberella zeae is the major fungal pathogen of Fusarium head blight of wheat and produces several mycotoxins that are harmful to humans and domesticated animals. We identified loci associated with pathogenicity and aggressiveness on an amplified fragment length polymorphism based genetic map of G. zeae in a cross between a lineage 6 nivalenol producer from Japan and a lineage 7 deoxynivalenol producer from Kansas. Ninety-nine progeny and the parents were tested in the greenhouse for 2 years. Progeny segregated qualitatively (61:38) for pathogenicity:nonpathogenicity, respectively. The trait maps to linkage group IV, which is adjacent to loci that affect colony pigmentation, perithecium production, and trichothecene toxin amount. Among the 61 pathogenic progeny, the amount of disease induced (aggressiveness) varied quantitatively. Two reproducible quantitative trait loci (QTL) for aggressiveness were detected on linkage group I using simple interval analysis. A QTL linked to the TRI5 locus (trichodiene synthase in the trichothecene pathway gene cluster) explained 51% of the variation observed, and a second QTL that was 50 centimorgans away explained 29% of the phenotypic variation. TRI5 is tightly linked to the locus controlling trichothecene toxin type. The two QTLs, however, were likely part of the same QTL using composite interval analysis. Progeny that produced deoxynivalenol were, on average, approximately twice as aggressive as those that produced nivalenol. No transgressive segregation for aggressiveness was detected. The rather simple inheritance of both traits in this interlineage cross suggests that relatively few loci for pathogenicity or aggressiveness differ between lineage 6 and 7. PMID:18943772

  11. Analysis of Tox5 gene expression in Gibberella pulicaris strains with different trichothecene production phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hohn, T M; Desjardins, A E; McCormick, S P

    1993-08-01

    The Tox5 gene encodes trichodiene synthase, the first unique enzyme in the trichothecene biosynthetic pathway. In Gibberella pulicaris R-6380, the level of Tox5 mRNA was found to increase 47-fold in early stationary phase. Sequence analysis of the Tox5 promoter regions from geographically distinct strains of G. pulicaris revealed the existence of two Tox5 alleles (Tox5-1 and Tox5-2). All G. pulicaris strains that produce high levels of trichothecenes in liquid culture carry a 42-nucleotide (nt) tandem repeat sequence (Tox5-1) in the Tox5 promoter region, whereas strains that produce low levels of trichothecenes carry a single copy of this sequence (Tox5-2). A genetic cross between high- and low-level trichothecene producers resulted in the cosegregation of higher-level trichothecene production with the Tox5-1 allele. To determine the importance of the 42-nt repeat sequence in the regulation of Tox5 expression, reporter gene constructs carrying either the Tox5-1 or the Tox5-2 promoter region fused to the beta-galactosidase gene of Escherichia coli were introduced into the high-level-trichothecene-producing strain, R-6380. Expression of reporter gene activity in transformants was found to be regulated in a manner similar to Tox5 expression but appeared to be independent of the 42-nt sequence copy number. These results indicate that transcriptional controls play an important role in the regulation of Tox5 expression and that genes involved in trichothecene biosynthesis in G. pulicaris may be linked to Tox5. PMID:8368827

  12. Fine-mapping of qRfg2, a QTL for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Liu, Yongjie; Guo, Yanling; Yang, Qin; Ye, Jianrong; Chen, Shaojiang; Xu, Mingliang

    2012-02-01

    Stalk rot is one of the most devastating diseases in maize worldwide. In our previous study, two QTLs, a major qRfg1 and a minor qRfg2, were identified in the resistant inbred line '1145' to confer resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. In the present study, we report on fine-mapping of the minor qRfg2 that is located on chromosome 1 and account for ~8.9% of the total phenotypic variation. A total of 22 markers were developed in the qRfg2 region to resolve recombinants. The progeny-test mapping strategy was developed to accurately determine the phenotypes of all recombinants for fine-mapping of the qRfg2 locus. This fine-mapping process was performed from BC(4)F(1) to BC(8)F(1) generations to narrow down the qRfg2 locus into ~300 kb, flanked by the markers SSRZ319 and CAPSZ459. A predicted gene in the mapped region, coding for an auxin-regulated protein, is believed to be a candidate for qRfg2. The qRfg2 locus could steadily increase the resistance percentage by ~12% across different backcross generations, suggesting its usefulness in enhancing maize resistance against Gibberella stalk rot. PMID:22048640

  13. Fine-mapping of qRfg2, a QTL for resistance to Gibberella stalk rot in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Liu, Yongjie; Guo, Yanling; Yang, Qin; Ye, Jianrong; Chen, Shaojiang; Xu, Mingliang

    2012-02-01

    Stalk rot is one of the most devastating diseases in maize worldwide. In our previous study, two QTLs, a major qRfg1 and a minor qRfg2, were identified in the resistant inbred line '1145' to confer resistance to Gibberella stalk rot. In the present study, we report on fine-mapping of the minor qRfg2 that is located on chromosome 1 and account for ~8.9% of the total phenotypic variation. A total of 22 markers were developed in the qRfg2 region to resolve recombinants. The progeny-test mapping strategy was developed to accurately determine the phenotypes of all recombinants for fine-mapping of the qRfg2 locus. This fine-mapping process was performed from BC(4)F(1) to BC(8)F(1) generations to narrow down the qRfg2 locus into ~300 kb, flanked by the markers SSRZ319 and CAPSZ459. A predicted gene in the mapped region, coding for an auxin-regulated protein, is believed to be a candidate for qRfg2. The qRfg2 locus could steadily increase the resistance percentage by ~12% across different backcross generations, suggesting its usefulness in enhancing maize resistance against Gibberella stalk rot.

  14. Virulence of Gibberella zeae on Wheat following Independent Disruptions of Trichothecene Biosynthetic Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant-fungal interaction that occurs when Fusarium graminearum invades small grains such as wheat and barley is complicated and involves many interactions between the invading fungus and the plant host. Although trichothecene toxins are not required for the initial infection of wheat, they are ...

  15. Filament Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We have been investigating filament eruptions in recent years. Use filament eruptions as markers of the coronal field evolution. Data from SoHO, Yohkoh, TRACE, Hinode, and other sources. We and others have observed: (1)Filaments often show slow rise, followed by fast rise, (2) Brightenings, preflares, microflares during slow rise (3) Magnetic evolution in hours prior to eruption onset. We investigated What do Hinode and SDO show for filament eruptions?

  16. Evidence for inter-specific recombination among the mitochondrial genomes of Fusarium species in the Gibberella fujikuroi complex

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The availability of mitochondrial genomes has allowed for the resolution of numerous questions regarding the evolutionary history of fungi and other eukaryotes. In the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex, the exact relationships among the so-called “African”, “Asian” and “American” Clades remain largely unresolved, irrespective of the markers employed. In this study, we considered the feasibility of using mitochondrial genes to infer the phylogenetic relationships among Fusarium species in this complex. The mitochondrial genomes of representatives of the three Clades (Fusarium circinatum, F. verticillioides and F. fujikuroi) were characterized and we determined whether or not the mitochondrial genomes of these fungi have value in resolving the higher level evolutionary relationships in the complex. Results Overall, the mitochondrial genomes of the three species displayed a high degree of synteny, with all the genes (protein coding genes, unique ORFs, ribosomal RNA and tRNA genes) in identical order and orientation, as well as introns that share similar positions within genes. The intergenic regions and introns generally contributed significantly to the size differences and diversity observed among these genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated protein-coding dataset separated members of the Gibberella fujikuroi complex from other Fusarium species and suggested that F. fujikuroi (“Asian” Clade) is basal in the complex. However, individual mitochondrial gene trees were largely incongruent with one another and with the concatenated gene tree, because six distinct phylogenetic trees were recovered from the various single gene datasets. Conclusion The mitochondrial genomes of Fusarium species in the Gibberella fujikuroi complex are remarkably similar to those of the previously characterized Fusarium species and Sordariomycetes. Despite apparently representing a single replicative unit, all of the genes encoded on the mitochondrial

  17. Enhancement of the Gibberella zeae growth inhibitory lipopeptides from a Bacillus subtilis mutant by ion beam implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Liu, M; Wang, J; Yao, J M; Pan, R R; Yu, Z L

    2005-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis JA antagonized the growth of Gibberella zeae. In order to reduce growth of this fungi pathogen to a greater extent, low-energy ion beam implantation was applied in mutant breeding. We studied the effects of different energies and different doses of nitrogen ion implantation. The mutant strain designated as JA026 was obtained showing higher inhibition activity in the screening plate. Its inhibition zone against indicator organism increased by 14.3% compared to the original strain. The electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) analysis indicated that the antifungal lipopeptides produced by the mutant were identical to those produced by the wild-type strain. The mutant strain exhibited favorable properties including the high yield of antifungal lipopeptides production and faster growth over the parent strain, which suggested that this strain would be a promising biocontrol candidate in agriculture.

  18. Genomic Islands in Pathogenic Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present the genome sequences of a new clinical isolate, CEA10, of an important human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, and two closely related, but rarely pathogenic species, Neosartorya fischeri NRRL181 and Aspergillus clavatus NRRL1. Comparative genomic analysis of CEA10 with the recently sequen...

  19. Genomic Islands in the Pathogenic Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Natalie D.; Khaldi, Nora; Joardar, Vinita S.; Maiti, Rama; Amedeo, Paolo; Anderson, Michael J.; Crabtree, Jonathan; Silva, Joana C.; Badger, Jonathan H.; Albarraq, Ahmed; Angiuoli, Sam; Bussey, Howard; Bowyer, Paul; Cotty, Peter J.; Dyer, Paul S.; Egan, Amy; Galens, Kevin; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Haas, Brian J.; Inman, Jason M.; Kent, Richard; Lemieux, Sebastien; Malavazi, Iran; Orvis, Joshua; Roemer, Terry; Ronning, Catherine M.; Sundaram, Jaideep P.; Sutton, Granger; Turner, Geoff; Venter, J. Craig; White, Owen R.; Whitty, Brett R.; Youngman, Phil; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Jiang, Bo; Denning, David W.; Nierman, William C.

    2008-01-01

    We present the genome sequences of a new clinical isolate of the important human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, A1163, and two closely related but rarely pathogenic species, Neosartorya fischeri NRRL181 and Aspergillus clavatus NRRL1. Comparative genomic analysis of A1163 with the recently sequenced A. fumigatus isolate Af293 has identified core, variable and up to 2% unique genes in each genome. While the core genes are 99.8% identical at the nucleotide level, identity for variable genes can be as low 40%. The most divergent loci appear to contain heterokaryon incompatibility (het) genes associated with fungal programmed cell death such as developmental regulator rosA. Cross-species comparison has revealed that 8.5%, 13.5% and 12.6%, respectively, of A. fumigatus, N. fischeri and A. clavatus genes are species-specific. These genes are significantly smaller in size than core genes, contain fewer exons and exhibit a subtelomeric bias. Most of them cluster together in 13 chromosomal islands, which are enriched for pseudogenes, transposons and other repetitive elements. At least 20% of A. fumigatus-specific genes appear to be functional and involved in carbohydrate and chitin catabolism, transport, detoxification, secondary metabolism and other functions that may facilitate the adaptation to heterogeneous environments such as soil or a mammalian host. Contrary to what was suggested previously, their origin cannot be attributed to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), but instead is likely to involve duplication, diversification and differential gene loss (DDL). The role of duplication in the origin of lineage-specific genes is further underlined by the discovery of genomic islands that seem to function as designated “gene dumps” and, perhaps, simultaneously, as “gene factories”. PMID:18404212

  20. Genomic sequence for the aflatoxigenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus nomius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the A. nomius type strain was sequenced using a personal genome machine. Annotation of the genes was undertaken, followed by gene ontology and an investigation into the number of secondary metabolite clusters. Comparative studies with other Aspergillus species involved shared/unique ge...

  1. [Extracellular proteinases of filamentous fungi as potential markers of phytopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Gruban', T N; Beliakova, G A; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of proteins in the culture liquid of filamentous fungi under study was found to induce the secretion of proteinases. The inhibitory analysis of the major extracellular proteinases of the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata showed that they both belong to the group of serine proteinases. The substrate specificity of these proteinases and their sensitivity to inhibitors suggest that the enzyme of T. harzianum is a subtilisin-like proteinase and the enzyme of A. alternata is a trypsin-like proteinase. This difference between the proteinases may reflect the physiological difference between their producers (saprotroph and phytopathogen). PMID:17205798

  2. [Extracellular proteinases of filamentous fungi as potential markers of phytopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Gruban', T N; Beliakova, G A; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of proteins in the culture liquid of filamentous fungi under study was found to induce the secretion of proteinases. The inhibitory analysis of the major extracellular proteinases of the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata showed that they both belong to the group of serine proteinases. The substrate specificity of these proteinases and their sensitivity to inhibitors suggest that the enzyme of T. harzianum is a subtilisin-like proteinase and the enzyme of A. alternata is a trypsin-like proteinase. This difference between the proteinases may reflect the physiological difference between their producers (saprotroph and phytopathogen).

  3. Biotransformation of Malachite Green by the Fungus Cunninghamella elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chang-Jun; Doerge, Daniel R.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2001-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Cunninghamella elegans ATCC 36112 metabolized the triphenylmethane dye malachite green with a first-order rate constant of 0.029 μmol h−1 (mg of cells)−1. Malachite green was enzymatically reduced to leucomalachite green and also converted to N-demethylated and N-oxidized metabolites, including primary and secondary arylamines. Inhibition studies suggested that the cytochrome P450 system mediated both the reduction and the N-demethylation reactions. PMID:11526047

  4. Villosiclava virens infects specifically rice and barley stamen filaments due to the unique host cell walls.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ming-Li; Fan, Lin-Lin; Li, Dan-Yang; Liu, Yi-Jia; Cheng, Fang-Min; Xu, Ying; Wang, Zheng-Yi; Hu, Dong-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Rice false smut, caused by the fungal pathogen Villosiclava virens, is one of the most important rice diseases in the world. Previous studies reported that the pathogen has less number of cell wall-degraded genes and attacks dominantly rice stamen filaments and extends intercellularly. To reveal why the fungus infects plant stamen filaments, inoculation test on barley was carried out with the similar protocol to rice. The experimental results showed that the fungus could penetrate quickly into barley stamen filaments and extends both intracellularly and intercellularly, usually resulting in severe damage of the stamen filament tissues. It also attacked young barley lodicules and grew intercellularly by chance. The light microscopic observations found that the epidermal and cortex cells in barley stamen filaments arranged loosely with very thick cell walls and large cell gaps. Cellulose microfibrils in barley stamen filament cell walls arranged very sparsely so that the cell walls looked like transparent. The cell walls were very soft and flexible, and often folded. However, V. virens extended dominantly in the noncellulose regions and seemed never to degrade microfibrils in barley and rice cell walls. This suggested that the unique structures of rice and barley stamen filaments should be fit for their function of elongation in anthesis, and also endow with the susceptibility to the fungus, V. virens. PMID:27357263

  5. Villosiclava virens infects specifically rice and barley stamen filaments due to the unique host cell walls.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ming-Li; Fan, Lin-Lin; Li, Dan-Yang; Liu, Yi-Jia; Cheng, Fang-Min; Xu, Ying; Wang, Zheng-Yi; Hu, Dong-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Rice false smut, caused by the fungal pathogen Villosiclava virens, is one of the most important rice diseases in the world. Previous studies reported that the pathogen has less number of cell wall-degraded genes and attacks dominantly rice stamen filaments and extends intercellularly. To reveal why the fungus infects plant stamen filaments, inoculation test on barley was carried out with the similar protocol to rice. The experimental results showed that the fungus could penetrate quickly into barley stamen filaments and extends both intracellularly and intercellularly, usually resulting in severe damage of the stamen filament tissues. It also attacked young barley lodicules and grew intercellularly by chance. The light microscopic observations found that the epidermal and cortex cells in barley stamen filaments arranged loosely with very thick cell walls and large cell gaps. Cellulose microfibrils in barley stamen filament cell walls arranged very sparsely so that the cell walls looked like transparent. The cell walls were very soft and flexible, and often folded. However, V. virens extended dominantly in the noncellulose regions and seemed never to degrade microfibrils in barley and rice cell walls. This suggested that the unique structures of rice and barley stamen filaments should be fit for their function of elongation in anthesis, and also endow with the susceptibility to the fungus, V. virens.

  6. Externally refuelled optical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Maik; Mills, Matthew S.; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Cheng, Weibo; Moloney, Jerome V.; Kolesik, Miroslav; Polynkin, Pavel; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2014-04-01

    Plasma channels produced in air through femtosecond laser filamentation hold great promise for a number of applications, including remote sensing, attosecond physics and spectroscopy, channelling microwaves and lightning protection. In such settings, extended filaments are desirable, yet their longitudinal span is limited by dissipative processes. Although various techniques aiming to prolong this process have been explored, the substantial extension of optical filaments remains a challenge. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the natural range of a plasma column can be enhanced by at least an order of magnitude when the filament is prudently accompanied by an auxiliary beam. In this arrangement, the secondary low-intensity `dressing' beam propagates linearly and acts as a distributed energy reservoir, continuously refuelling the optical filament. Our approach offers an efficient and viable route towards the generation of extended light strings in air without inducing premature wave collapse or an undesirable beam break-up into multiple filaments.

  7. Tungsten Filament Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  8. Tungsten filament fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  9. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-08-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for F2 rapid acceleration and have some relation with the largest solar storm. The comparison between the successful and failed filament eruptions suggests that the confining magnetic field plays an important role in the preconditions for an eruption.

  10. Fungus-growing ants.

    PubMed

    Weber, N A

    1966-08-01

    Fungus-growing ants (Attini) are in reality unique fungus-culturing insects.There are several hundred species in some dozen genera, of which Acromyrmex and Atta are the conspicuous leaf-cutters. The center of their activities is the fungus garden, which is also the site of the queen and brood. The garden, in most species, is made from fresh green leaves or other vegetal material. The ants forage for this, forming distinct trails to the vegetation that is being harvested. The cut leaves or other substrate are brought into the nest and prepared for the fungus. Fresh leaves and flowers are cut into pieces a millimeter or two in diameter; the ants form them into a pulpy mass by pinching them with the mandibles and adding saliva. Anal droplets are deposited on the pieces, which are then forced into place in the garden. Planting of the fungus is accomplished by an ant's picking up tufts of the adjacent mycelium and dotting the surface of the new substrate with it. The combination of salivary and anal secretions, together with the constant care given by the ants, facilitates the growth of the ant fungus only, despite constant possibilities for contamination. When the ants are removed, alien fungi and other organisms flourish. A mature nest of Atta Sexdens may consist of 2000 chambers, some temporarily empty, some with refuse, and the remainder with fungus gardens. Thousands of kilograms of fresh leaves will have been used. A young laboratory colony of Atta cephalotes will use 1 kilogram of fresh leaves for one garden. The attines are the chief agents for introducing organic matter into the soil in tropical rain forests; this matter becomes the nucleus for a host of other organisms, including nematodes and arthropods, after it is discarded by the ants. One ant species cultures a yeast; all others grow a mycelium. In the higher species the mycelium forms clusters of inflated hyphae. Mycologists accept as valid two names for confirmed fruiting stages: Leucocoprinus ( or

  11. Functional analysis of the kinome of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As in many other eukaryotes, protein kinases play major regulatory roles in filamentous fungi. Although the genomes of numerous plant pathogenic fungi have been sequenced, systematic characterization of their kinomes has not been reported. The wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum has 116 putative ...

  12. Kinetic analysis of the uptake of glucose and corn oil used as carbon sources in batch cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Rios-Iribe, Erika Y; Hernández-Calderón, Oscar M; Escamilla-Silva, Eleazar M

    2016-11-01

    This study determined the specific uptake rate of glucose and corn oil substrates used as carbon sources in batch cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi. We tested three biological models of growth rate: Monod, logistic and lag-exponential. With respect to the substrate consumption rate, we tested two models: constant cell yield (CCY) and law of mass action (LMA). The experimental data obtained from the culture with glucose as substrate correlated satisfactorily with the logistic/LMA model, indicating that the cell yield was variable. In the case of corn oil as carbon source, considering total residual lipids as substrate in the culture broth, the model with the best correlation was the lag-exp/CCY model. The quantification by GC of the three main fatty acids (linoleic, oleic and palmitic) in the culture medium showed a cumulative behavior, with a maximum concentration of each acid at 36 h. We established a more explicit mechanism of the consumption of corn oil, consisting of two stages: generation of fatty acids by hydrolysis and consumption by cellular uptake. The kinetic of hydrolysable lipids was of first order. We found that the hydrolysis rate of corn oil is not a limiting factor for the uptake of fatty acids by the microorganism. We also established, based on the analysis of the identical mathematical structure of consumption kinetics, that the uptake of fatty acids is faster than the uptake of glucose.

  13. Incidence, Molecular Characteristics and Pathogenicity of Gibberella fujikuroi Species Complex Associated with Rice Seeds from Asian Countries.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Ah; Yu, Seung-Hun; Lee, Young Yi; Park, Hong-Jae; Lee, Sokyoung; Sung, Jung Sook; Kim, Yeon-Gyu; Lee, Ho-Sun

    2013-12-01

    Gibberella fujikuroi species complex (GFSC) was isolated from rice (Oryza sativa L.) seed samples from ten Asian countries and investigated for incidence of GFSC, molecular characteristics, and pathogenicity. Regardless of geographic origin, GFSC was detected with incidences ranging from 3% to 80%. Four species, Fusarium fujikuroi, F. concentricum, F. proliferatum, and F. verticillioides, were found to show an association with rice seeds, with F. fujikuroi being the predominant species. In phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences, no relationship was found between species, isolates, and geographic sources of samples. Unidentified fragments of the β-tubulin gene were observed in ten isolates of F. fujikuroi and F. verticillioides. With the exception of three isolates of F. fujikuroi, F. fujikuroi, F. proliferatum, and F. verticillioides were found to have FUM1 (the fumonisin biosynthetic gene); however, FUM1 was not found in isolates of F. concentricum. Results of pathogenicity testing showed that all isolates caused reduced germination of rice seed. In addition, F. fujikuroi and F. concentricum caused typical symptoms of bakanae, leaf elongation and chlorosis, whereas F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides only caused stunting of seedlings. These findings provide insight into the characteristics of GFSC associated with rice seeds and might be helpful in development of strategies for management of bakanae.

  14. Kinetic analysis of the uptake of glucose and corn oil used as carbon sources in batch cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Rios-Iribe, Erika Y; Hernández-Calderón, Oscar M; Escamilla-Silva, Eleazar M

    2016-11-01

    This study determined the specific uptake rate of glucose and corn oil substrates used as carbon sources in batch cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi. We tested three biological models of growth rate: Monod, logistic and lag-exponential. With respect to the substrate consumption rate, we tested two models: constant cell yield (CCY) and law of mass action (LMA). The experimental data obtained from the culture with glucose as substrate correlated satisfactorily with the logistic/LMA model, indicating that the cell yield was variable. In the case of corn oil as carbon source, considering total residual lipids as substrate in the culture broth, the model with the best correlation was the lag-exp/CCY model. The quantification by GC of the three main fatty acids (linoleic, oleic and palmitic) in the culture medium showed a cumulative behavior, with a maximum concentration of each acid at 36 h. We established a more explicit mechanism of the consumption of corn oil, consisting of two stages: generation of fatty acids by hydrolysis and consumption by cellular uptake. The kinetic of hydrolysable lipids was of first order. We found that the hydrolysis rate of corn oil is not a limiting factor for the uptake of fatty acids by the microorganism. We also established, based on the analysis of the identical mathematical structure of consumption kinetics, that the uptake of fatty acids is faster than the uptake of glucose. PMID:27646209

  15. Snake Filament Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    A very long solar filament that had been snaking around the Sun erupted on Dec. 6, 2010 with a flourish. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) caught the action in dramatic detail in extreme ultr...

  16. Genome-wide macrosynteny among Fusarium species in the Gibberella fujikuroi complex revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Lieschen; Steenkamp, Emma T; Martin, Simon H; Santana, Quentin C; Fourie, Gerda; van der Merwe, Nicolaas A; Wingfield, Michael J; Wingfield, Brenda D

    2014-01-01

    The Gibberella fujikuroi complex includes many Fusarium species that cause significant losses in yield and quality of agricultural and forestry crops. Due to their economic importance, whole-genome sequence information has rapidly become available for species including Fusarium circinatum, Fusarium fujikuroi and Fusarium verticillioides, each of which represent one of the three main clades known in this complex. However, no previous studies have explored the genomic commonalities and differences among these fungi. In this study, a previously completed genetic linkage map for an interspecific cross between Fusarium temperatum and F. circinatum, together with genomic sequence data, was utilized to consider the level of synteny between the three Fusarium genomes. Regions that are homologous amongst the Fusarium genomes examined were identified using in silico and pyrosequenced amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fragment analyses. Homology was determined using BLAST analysis of the sequences, with 777 homologous regions aligned to F. fujikuroi and F. verticillioides. This also made it possible to assign the linkage groups from the interspecific cross to their corresponding chromosomes in F. verticillioides and F. fujikuroi, as well as to assign two previously unmapped supercontigs of F. verticillioides to probable chromosomal locations. We further found evidence of a reciprocal translocation between the distal ends of chromosome 8 and 11, which apparently originated before the divergence of F. circinatum and F. temperatum. Overall, a remarkable level of macrosynteny was observed among the three Fusarium genomes, when comparing AFLP fragments. This study not only demonstrates how in silico AFLPs can aid in the integration of a genetic linkage map to the physical genome, but it also highlights the benefits of using this tool to study genomic synteny and architecture.

  17. Subhalo Accretion through Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Roberto E.; Padilla, Nelson D.

    2016-09-01

    We track subhalo orbits of galaxy- and group-sized halos in cosmological simulations. We identify filamentary structures around halos and use these to define a sample of subhalos accreted from filaments, as well as a control sample of subhalos accreted from other directions. We use these samples to study differences in satellite orbits produced by filamentary accretion. Our results depend on host halo mass. We find that for low masses, subhalos accreted from filaments show ∼10% shorter lifetimes compared to the control sample, show a tendency toward more radial orbits, reach halo central regions earlier, and are more likely to merge with the host. For higher-mass halos this lifetime difference dissipates and even reverses for cluster-sized halos. This behavior appears to be connected to the fact that more massive hosts are connected to stronger filaments with higher velocity coherence and density, with slightly more radial subhalo orbits. Because subhalos tend to follow the coherent flow of the filament, it is possible that such thick filaments are enough to shield the subhalo from the effect of dynamical friction at least during their first infall. We also identify subhalo pairs/clumps that merge with one another after accretion. They survive as a clump for only a very short time, which is even shorter for higher subhalo masses, suggesting that the Magellanic Clouds and other Local group satellite associations may have entered the Milky Way virial radius very recently and probably are in their first infall.

  18. Evolution of filament barbs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within periods as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes, only one overlays a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward, and then departed from, each other in Halpha , with the barb endpoints migrating as far as ˜ 10 arcsec. We conclude that the evolution of the barbs was driven by flux emergence and cancellation of small bipolar units at the EFC border.

  19. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

  20. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  1. Semiflexible filamentous composites.

    PubMed

    Huisman, E M; Heussinger, C; Storm, C; Barkema, G T

    2010-09-10

    Inspired by the ubiquity of composite filamentous networks in nature, we investigate models of biopolymer networks that consist of interconnected floppy and stiff filaments. Numerical simulations carried out in three dimensions allow us to explore the microscopic partitioning of stresses and strains between the stiff and floppy fractions cs and cf and reveal a nontrivial relationship between the mechanical behavior and the relative fraction of stiff polymer: when there are few stiff polymers, nonpercolated stiff "inclusions" are protected from large deformations by an encompassing floppy matrix, while at higher fractions of stiff material the stiff network is independently percolated and dominates the mechanical response. PMID:20867610

  2. Gibberella xylarioides (anamorph: Fusarium xylarioides), a causative agent of coffee wilt disease in Africa, is a previously unrecognized member of the G. fujikuroi species complex.

    PubMed

    Geiser, David M; Ivey, Melanie L Lewis; Hakiza, Georgina; Juba, Jean H; Miller, Sally A

    2005-01-01

    Tracheomycosis or coffee wilt has emerged as a major disease of robusta coffee in Uganda in the past 10 years. Coffee wilt historically has been associated with Fusarium xylarioides Steyaert (teleomorph Gibberella xylarioides Heim and Sacc.), a species that has been classified as a member of Fusarium section Lateritium. We investigated the molecular phylogenetics of fusarial coffee wilt isolates by generating partial DNA sequences from two protein coding regions, translation elongation factor 1-alpha and beta-tubulin, in 36 isolates previously identified as F. xylarioides and related fusaria from coffee and other woody hosts, as well as from 12 isolates associated with a current coffee wilt outbreak in Uganda. These isolates fell into two morphologically and phylogenetically distinct groups. The first group was found to represent previously unidentified members of the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex (GFC), a clade that replaces the artificial Fusarium section Liseola. This group of isolates fit the original description of F. xylarioides, thus connecting it to the GFC. The second group, which was diverse in its morphology and DNA sequences, comprised four distinct lineages related to Fusarium lateritium. Our finding of unrelated species associated with coffee wilt disease has important implications regarding its epidemiology, etiology and control. PMID:16389971

  3. Plump kernels with high deoxynivalenol linked to late Gibberella zeae infection and marginal disease conditions in winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Cowger, Christina; Arrellano, Consuelo

    2010-07-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) concentrations in mature wheat grain are usually correlated with symptoms produced by Gibberella zeae infection. However, there have been numerous observations of unacceptably high DON in asymptomatic crops, which can lead to lower-than-expected milling reductions in DON. We conducted a field experiment with winter wheat to examine the effect of infection timing and postanthesis moisture on grain quality and DON accumulation. Seven to eight soft red winter wheat cultivars were grown in three successive years in a misted nursery in Kinston, NC. Spikes were randomly selected for individual spray inoculation at 0, 10, or 20 days after anthesis (daa). Starting at anthesis, plots were subjected to 0, 10, 20, or 30 days of mist. Inoculated spikes and noninoculated controls were collected at harvest-ripeness, and the threshed grain was assayed for Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK) and DON. In 2 of 3 years, percentages of FDK were significantly lower from 10-daa infections than from those at 0 daa, although DON concentrations were the same at the two inoculation timings in 2 of the 3 years. Those results indicate that the period of maximum susceptibility to wheat spike infections by G. zeae is close to or slightly less than 10 daa in North Carolina. In 2 of 3 years, FDK-DON correlation was greater for 0- and 10-daa inoculations and for 0- to 20-daa misted treatments than for the later-inoculated or longer-misted treatments, respectively. The percentage of "low-FDK, high DON" (LFHD) observations (defined as FDK < or = 4.0%, DON > or = 2 microg g(-1)) was higher in 2007 than in 2005 or 2006 (41, 14, and 18%, respectively). In both 2006 and 2007, high percentages of LFHD observations (> or = 60%) occurred under marginal disease conditions involving late infection. We conclude that late infection is an important factor leading to LFHD grain. Periods of rain soon after anthesis likely favor the low-symptom, high-DON scenario, and conditions that create greater

  4. Fusarium species of the Gibberella fujikuroi complex and fumonisin contamination of pearl millet and corn in Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Jurjevic, Z; Wilson, D M; Wilson, J P; Geiser, D M; Juba, J H; Mubatanhema, W; Widstrom, N W; Rains, G C

    2005-04-01

    This study was designed to identify and compare the Fusarium species of the Gibberella fujikuroi complex on pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br) and corn (Zea mays L.) crops grown in southern Georgia, and to determine their influence on potential fumonisin production. Pearl millet and corn samples were collected in Georgia in 1996, 1997 and 1998. Three percent of the pearl millet seeds had fungi similar to the Fusarium species of the G. fujikuroi species complex. One hundred and nineteen representative isolates visually similar to the G. fujikuroi species complex from pearl millet were paired with mating population A (Fusarium verticillioides (Sacc.) Nirenberg), mating population D (F. proliferatum (Matsushima) Nirenberg) and mating population F (F. thapsinum (Klittich, Leslie, Nelson and Marasas) tester strains. Successful crosses were obtained with 50.4%, 10.1% and 0.0% of these isolates with the A, D and F tester strains, while 39.5 of the isolates did not form perithecia with any tester strains. Two of the typical infertile isolates were characterized by DNA sequence comparisons and were identified as Fusarium pseudonygamai (Nirenberg and O'Donnell), which is the first known isolation of this species in the United States. Based on the pattern of cross-compatibility, conidiogenesis, colony characteristics and media pigmentation, a majority of the infertile isolates belong to this species. Fumonisins FB(1) and FB(2) were not detected in any of the 81 pearl millet samples analyzed. The species of the G. fujikuroi species complex were dominant in corn and were isolated from 84%, 74% and 65% of the seed in 1996, 1997 and 1998, respectively. Representative species of the G. fujikuroi species complex were isolated from 1996 to 1998 Georgia corn survey (162, 104 and 111 isolates, respectively) and tested for mating compatibility. The incidence of isolates belonging to mating population A (F. verticillioides) ranged from 70.2% to 89.5%. Corn survey samples were

  5. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  6. Dense fouling in acid transfer pipelines by an acidophilic rubber degrading fungus.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M Hiren; Balamurugan, P; Venugopalan, V P; Rao, T S

    2011-07-01

    An unique case of dense fouling by an acidophilic, hard rubber (polymerized rubber) degrading fungus in the acid transfer pipelines of a boron enrichment plant located at Kalpakkam, India is reported. In spite of a highly adverse environment for survival (pH 1.5, no dissolved nutrients), the fungus thrived and clogged the pipeline used for transferring 0.1N hydrochloric acid (HCl). Detailed investigations were carried out to isolate and identify the fungus and examine the nutrient source for such profuse growth inside the system. Microscopic observation showed the presence of a thick filamentous fungal biomass. Molecular characterization by 18S rRNA gene sequencing showed 98% similarity of the isolate with the acidophilic fungus Bispora sp. In laboratory studies the fungus showed luxuriant growth (specific growth rate of 13 mg day⁻¹) when scrapings of the hard rubber were used as the sole source of carbon. Scanning electron microscopy revealed extensive incursion of the fungus into the hard rubber matrix. In the laboratory, fungal growth was completely inhibited by the antifungal agent sodium omadine. The study illustrates an interesting example of biofouling under extreme conditions and demonstrates that organisms can physiologically adapt to grow under unfavourable conditions, provided that a nutrient source is available and competition is low. The use of this fungal strain in biodegradation and in development of environmentally compatible processes for disposal of rubber wastes is envisaged. PMID:21722066

  7. Bioproduction of Cinchona alkaloids by the endophytic fungus Diaporthe sp. associated with Cinchona ledgeriana.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Shoji; Simanjuntak, Partomuan; Kitamura, Chinami; Ohashi, Kazuyoshi; Shibuya, Hirotaka

    2012-01-01

    We report that an endophytic filamentous fungus species of the genus Diaporthe isolated from Cinchona ledgeriana (Rubiaceae) produces Cinchona alkaloids (quinine, quinidine, cinchonidine, and cinchonine) upon cultivation in a synthetic liquid medium. This study provides evidence that Cinchona alkaloids are produced not only in Cinchona plant cells, but also in the endophytic microbe cells, and will help to elucidate the relationship between endophytic microbes and their host plants.

  8. CJ-15,183, a new inhibitor of squalene synthase produced by a fungus, Aspergillus aculeatus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Hirai, H; Ishiguro, M; Kambara, T; Kojima, Y; Matsunaga, T; Nishida, H; Suzuki, Y; Sugiura, A; Harwood, H J; Huang, L H; Kojima, N

    2001-11-01

    A new squalene synthase (SSase) inhibitor, CJ-15,183 (I) was isolated from the fermentation broth of a fungus, Aspergillus aculeatus CL38916. The compound potently inhibited rat liver and Candida albicans microsomal SSases and also inhibited the human enzyme. It also showed antifungal activities against filamentous fungi and a yeast. The structure was determined to be an aliphatic tetracarboxylic acid compound consisting of an alkyl gamma-lactone, malic acid and isocitric acid moieties by spectroscopic studies.

  9. A Generalized Two-Dimensional Gaussian Model of Disease Foci of Head Blight of Wheat Caused by Gibberella zeae.

    PubMed

    Paulitz, T C; Dutilleul, P; Yamasaki, S H; Fernando, W G; Seaman, W L

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT A generalized two-dimensional Gaussian model is proposed to describe disease foci of head blight of wheat in plots (100 to 2,500 m(2)) originating from small areas (1 to 16 m(2)) inoculated with Gibberella zeae-colonized corn kernels. These anisotropic, asymmetrical foci arose from ascospores produced in perithecia. The model is Z = exp[-(AX(2) + BY(2) + CXY + DX + EY + F)], in which Z = the incidence of seed or spikelet infection at point (X,Y) located in the plot, exp = the exponential function, X = the abscissa or spatial coordinate of the point along a given axis (approximately parallel to the average wind vector during the period of spore release in these experiments), Y = the ordinate or spatial coordinate of the point along the axis perpendicular to the X axis (approximately perpendicular to the wind direction in these experiments), A and B = the quadratic coefficients of the second-order polynomial AX(2) + BY(2) + CXY + DX + EY + F, C = the bilinear coefficient, D and E = the linear coefficients, and exp(-F) = the incidence of seed or spikelet infection at the focus peak in which X = 0 and Y = 0. The generalized two-dimensional Gaussian model was tested on data from a circular or isotropic focus, an elliptical or anisotropic focus with two axes of symmetry, and two anisotropic foci with one and zero axis of symmetry. Its goodness-of-fit (r(2) and adjusted r(2)) was compared with the inverse power, modified inverse power, exponential, and classical Gaussian models. Submodels using only the linear terms, only the quadratic terms, or combinations selected from stepwise regression procedures using various probabilities to enter and to stay and a procedure maximizing the adjusted r (2) were also considered. Spatial analysis of the residuals was performed using Geary's c coefficient at the first distance class. For the circular and elliptical foci, our model provided a fit similar to the modified inverse power and exponential models. However, for

  10. A Generalized Two-Dimensional Gaussian Model of Disease Foci of Head Blight of Wheat Caused by Gibberella zeae.

    PubMed

    Paulitz, T C; Dutilleul, P; Yamasaki, S H; Fernando, W G; Seaman, W L

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT A generalized two-dimensional Gaussian model is proposed to describe disease foci of head blight of wheat in plots (100 to 2,500 m(2)) originating from small areas (1 to 16 m(2)) inoculated with Gibberella zeae-colonized corn kernels. These anisotropic, asymmetrical foci arose from ascospores produced in perithecia. The model is Z = exp[-(AX(2) + BY(2) + CXY + DX + EY + F)], in which Z = the incidence of seed or spikelet infection at point (X,Y) located in the plot, exp = the exponential function, X = the abscissa or spatial coordinate of the point along a given axis (approximately parallel to the average wind vector during the period of spore release in these experiments), Y = the ordinate or spatial coordinate of the point along the axis perpendicular to the X axis (approximately perpendicular to the wind direction in these experiments), A and B = the quadratic coefficients of the second-order polynomial AX(2) + BY(2) + CXY + DX + EY + F, C = the bilinear coefficient, D and E = the linear coefficients, and exp(-F) = the incidence of seed or spikelet infection at the focus peak in which X = 0 and Y = 0. The generalized two-dimensional Gaussian model was tested on data from a circular or isotropic focus, an elliptical or anisotropic focus with two axes of symmetry, and two anisotropic foci with one and zero axis of symmetry. Its goodness-of-fit (r(2) and adjusted r(2)) was compared with the inverse power, modified inverse power, exponential, and classical Gaussian models. Submodels using only the linear terms, only the quadratic terms, or combinations selected from stepwise regression procedures using various probabilities to enter and to stay and a procedure maximizing the adjusted r (2) were also considered. Spatial analysis of the residuals was performed using Geary's c coefficient at the first distance class. For the circular and elliptical foci, our model provided a fit similar to the modified inverse power and exponential models. However, for

  11. CVD-produced boron filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawner, F. E.; Debolt, H. E.; Suplinskas, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for producing boron filaments with an average tensile strength of 6.89 GPa has been developed which involves longitudinal splitting of the filament and core (substrate) removal by etching. Splitting is accomplished by a pinch wheel device which continuously splits filaments in lengths of 3.0 m by applying a force to the side of the filament to create a crack which is then propagated along the axis by a gentle sliding action. To facilitate the splitting, a single 10 mil tungsten substrate is used instead of the usual 0.5 mil substrate. A solution of hot 30% hydrogen peroxide is used to remove the core without attacking the boron. An alternative technique is to alter the residual stress by heavily etching the filament. Average strengths in the 4.83-5.52 GPa range have been obtained by etching an 8 mil filament to 4 mil.

  12. Filament wound structure and method

    DOEpatents

    Dritt, William S.; Gerth, Howard L.; Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

  13. Intermediate Filament Diseases: Desminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Lev G.; Olivé, Montse; Vicart, Patrick; Goebel, Hans H.

    2009-01-01

    Desminopathy is one of the most common intermediate filament human disorders associated with mutations in closely interacting proteins, desmin and alphaB-crystallin. The inheritance pattern in familial desminopathy is characterized as autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive, but many cases have no family history. At least some and likely most sporadic desminopathy cases are associated with de novo DES mutations. The age of disease onset and rate of progression may vary depending on the type of inheritance and location of the causative mutation. Typically, the illness presents with lower and later upper limb muscle weakness slowly spreading to involve truncal, neck-flexor, facial and bulbar muscles. Skeletal myopathy is often combined with cardiomyopathy manifested by conduction blocks, arrhythmias and chronic heart failure resulting in premature sudden death. Respiratory muscle weakness is a major complication in some patients. Sections of the affected skeletal and cardiac muscles show abnormal fibre areas containing chimeric aggregates consisting of desmin and other cytoskeletal proteins. Various DES gene mutations: point mutations, an insertion, small in-frame deletions and a larger exon-skipping deletion, have been identified in desminopathy patients. The majority of these mutations are located in conserved alpha-helical segments, but additional mutations have recently been identified in the tail domain. Filament and network assembly studies indicate that most but not all disease-causing mutations make desmin assembly-incompetent and able to disrupt a pre-existing filamentous network in dominant-negative fashion. AlphaB-crystallin serves as a chaperone for desmin preventing its aggregation under various forms of stress; mutant CRYAB causes cardiac and skeletal myopathies identical to those resulting from DES mutations. PMID:19181099

  14. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  15. Mycelial pellet formation by edible ascomycete filamentous fungi, Neurospora intermedia.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ramkumar B; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-12-01

    Pellet formation of filamentous fungi in submerged culture is an imperative topic of fermentation research. In this study, we report for the first time the growth of filamentous ascomycete fungus, Neurospora intermedia in its mycelial pellet form. In submerged culture, the growth morphology of the fungus was successfully manipulated into growing as pellets by modifying various cultivation conditions. Factors such as pH (2.0-10.0), agitation rate (100-150 rpm), carbon source (glucose, arabinose, sucrose, and galactose), the presence of additive agents (glycerol and calcium chloride) and trace metals were investigated for their effect on the pellet formation. Of the various factors screened, uniform pellets were formed only at pH range 3.0-4.0, signifying it as the most influential factor for N. intermedia pellet formation. The average pellet size ranged from 2.38 ± 0.12 to 2.86 ± 0.38 mm. The pellet formation remained unaffected by the inoculum type used and its size showed an inverse correlation with the agitation rate of the culture. Efficient glucose utilization was observed with fungal pellets, as opposed to the freely suspended mycelium, proving its viability for fast-fermentation processes. Scale up of the pelletization process was also carried out in bench-scale airlift and bubble column reactors (4.5 L).

  16. Development of an Unmarked Gene Deletion System for the Filamentous Fungi Aspergillus niger and Talaromyces versatilis

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Stéphane; Llanos, Agustina; Parrou, Jean-Luc; Kokolski, Matthew; Pullan, Steven T.; Shunburne, Lee

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a method to delete genes in filamentous fungi that allows recycling of the selection marker and is efficient in a nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-proficient strain. We exemplify the approach by deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator XlnR in the fungus Aspergillus niger. To show the efficiency and advantages of the method, we deleted 8 other genes and constructed a double mutant in this species. Moreover, we showed that the same principle also functions in a different genus of filamentous fungus (Talaromyces versatilis, basionym Penicillium funiculosum). This technique will increase the versatility of the toolboxes for genome manipulation of model and industrially relevant fungi. PMID:24682295

  17. The Kinome of Edible and Medicinal Fungus Wolfiporia cocos

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Shu, Shaohua; Zhu, Wenjun; Xiong, Ying; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Wolfiporia cocos is an edible and medicinal fungus that grows in association with pine trees, and its dried sclerotium, known as Fuling in China, has been used as a traditional medicine in East Asian countries for centuries. Nearly 10% of the traditional Chinese medicinal preparations contain W. cocos. Currently, the commercial production of Fuling is limited because of the lack of pine-based substrate and paucity of knowledge about the sclerotial development of the fungus. Since protein kinase (PKs) play significant roles in the regulation of growth, development, reproduction, and environmental responses in filamentous fungi, the kinome of W. cocos was analyzed by identifying the PKs genes, studying transcript profiles and assigning PKs to orthologous groups. Of the 10 putative PKs, 11 encode atypical PKs, and 13, 10, 2, 22, and 11 could encoded PKs from the AGC, CAMK, CK, CMGC, STE, and TLK Groups, respectively. The level of transcripts from PK genes associated with sclerotia formation in the mycelium and sclerotium stages were analyzed by qRT-PCR. Based on the functions of the orthologs in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (a sclerotia-formation fungus) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the potential roles of these W. cocos PKs were assigned. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first identification and functional discussion of the kinome in the edible and medicinal fungus W. cocos. Our study systematically suggests potential roles of W. cocos PKs and provide comprehensive and novel insights into W. cocos sclerotial development and other economically important traits. Additionally, based on our result, genetic engineering can be employed for over expression or interference of some significant PKs genes to promote sclerotial growth and the accumulation of active compounds. PMID:27708635

  18. Purification and characterization of a novel phospholipid transfer protein from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Grondin, P; Vergnolle, C; Chavant, L; Kader, J C

    1990-01-01

    1. We have isolated from mycelia of Mucor mucedo, a filamentous fungus, a phospholipid transfer protein. 2. The purification steps were gel filtration, hydroxyapatite chromatography, blue affinity column and fast protein liquid chromatography on anion exchanger. 3. A purified protein was obtained with a molecular mass of 24 kDa and a pI of 5.05 and its N-terminal sequence was established. 4. This protein transfers phosphatidylinositol, as well as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of conductive filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V.; Niraula, D.; Karpov, I.

    2016-08-01

    We present a thermodynamic theory of the conductive filament growth and dissolution in random access memory describing the observed features of their current-voltage (IV) characteristics. Our theory is based on the self-consisted Fokker-Planck approach reducing the filament kinetics to its thermodynamics. Expressing the observed IV features through material parameters, our results pave a way to device improvements.

  20. Dynamics of contracting viscoelastic filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael; Appathurai, Santosh; Bhat, Pradeep; Basaran, Osman

    2009-11-01

    Satellite drops are detrimental to many industrial applications involving the formation of viscoelastic drops including inkjet printing, DNA microarraying, and printing of flexible solar cells. The precursor to these satellite drops is a slender liquid filament that connects an about-to-form drop to the rest of the liquid in the nozzle. Once a filament is formed, it contracts due to surface tension. A filament may undergo further breakup during recoil. Whereas the contraction of Newtonian filaments in a passive ambient fluid is well understood (Schulkes 1996 and Notz and Basaran 2004), the contraction dynamics of viscoelastic filaments remains largely unexplored and is addressed in this presentation. Here the filament shape is idealized as an axisymmetric fluid cylinder terminated by hemispherical end-caps, and the conformation tensor formalism (Pasquali & Scriven 2002) is used to model the viscoelasticity. The dynamics of contracting filaments are then analyzed by means of both a well-benchmarked two-dimensional finite element algorithm (Notz et al. 2001, Chen et al. 2002) and a one-dimensional slender-jet algorithm (Padgett et al. 1996). Regions of the parameter space are identified where recoiling filaments give rise to either a single satellite drop or multiple satellites.

  1. Intermediate Filaments: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular protein filaments intermediate in size between actin microfilaments and microtubules are composed of a surprising variety of tissue specific proteins commonly interconnected with other filamentous systems for mechanical stability and decorated by a variety of proteins that provide specialized functions. The sequence conservation of the coiled-coil, alpha-helical structure responsible for polymerization into individual 10 nm filaments defines the classification of intermediate filament proteins into a large gene family. Individual filaments further assemble into bundles and branched cytoskeletons visible in the light microscope. However, it is the diversity of the variable terminal domains that likely contributes most to different functions. The search for the functions of intermediate filament proteins has led to discoveries of roles in diseases of the skin, heart, muscle, liver, brain, adipose tissues and even premature aging. The diversity of uses of intermediate filaments as structural elements and scaffolds for organizing the distribution of decorating molecules contrasts with other cytoskeletal elements. This review is an attempt to provide some recollection of how such a diverse field emerged and changed over about 30 years. PMID:17493611

  2. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  3. Quiet-Region Filament Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad; Moore, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We report characteristics of quiescent filament eruptions that did not produce coronal mass ejections (CMEs). It is known that there is a dichotomy of quiescent filament eruptions: those that produce CMEs and those that do not. We examined the quiescent filament eruptions, each of which was located far from disk center (greater than or equal to 0.7 R(sub Sun)) in diffuse remnant magnetic fields of decayed active regions, was well observed in Ha observations and Fe XII, and had good coronagraph coverage. We present the similarity and differences of two classes of filament eruptions. From their lack of CME production and the appearance of their eruptive motion in Fe XII movies, we conclude that the non-CME-producing filament eruptions are confined eruptions like the confined filament eruptions in active regions. We take the similarity of the confined and eruptive quiescent filament eruptions with their active-region counterparts to favor runaway tether-cutting connection for unleashing the magnetic explosion in all these eruptions.

  4. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  5. Centromeres of filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kristina M.; Galazka, Jonathan M.; Phatale, Pallavi A.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Freitag, Michael

    2012-01-01

    How centromeres are assembled and maintained remains one of the fundamental questions in cell biology. Over the past 20 years the idea of centromeres as precise genetic loci has been replaced by the realization that it is predominantly the protein complement that defines centromere localization and function. Thus, placement and maintenance of centromeres are excellent examples of epigenetic phenomena in the strict sense. In contrast, the highly derived “point centromeres” of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives are counterexamples for this general principle of centromere maintenance. While we have learned much in the past decade, it remains unclear if mechanisms for epigenetic centromere placement and maintenance are shared amongst various groups of organisms. For that reason it seems prudent to examine species from many different phylogenetic groups with the aim to extract comparative information that will yield a more complete picture of cell division in all eukaryotes. This review addresses what has been learned by studying the centromeres of filamentous fungi, a large, heterogeneous group of organisms that includes important plant, animal and human pathogens, saprobes and symbionts that fulfill essential roles in the biosphere, as well as a growing number of taxa that have become indispensable for industrial use. PMID:22752455

  6. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1983-06-10

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600/sup 0/C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for nonuniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  7. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Pincosy, Philip A.; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600.degree. C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for non-uniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  8. Duckling toxicity and the production of fumonisin and moniliformin by isolates in the A and E mating populations of Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium moniliforme).

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, J F; Marasas, W F; Shephard, G S; Sydenham, E W; Stockenström, S; Thiel, P G

    1996-01-01

    Two biological species of Gibberella fujikuroi (A and F mating populations) share the Fusarium moniliforme anamorph. Twenty strains of each of these biological species were tested for the ability to produce fumonisins B1, B2, and B3 and moniliformin and for toxicity to 1-day-old ducklings. Most of the members of the A mating population (19 of 20 strains) produced more than 60 micrograms of total fumonisins per g, whereas only 3 of 20 members of the F mating population produced more than trace levels of these toxins and none produced more than 40 micrograms of total fumonisins per g. In addition, only 3 of 20 members of the A mating population produced more than 1 microgram of moniliformin per g (and none produced more than 175 micrograms/g), while all 20 strains of the F mating population produced more than 85 micrograms of this toxin per g and 1 strain produced 10,345 micrograms/g. The duckling toxicity profiles of the strains of the two mating populations were similar, however, and the level of either toxin by itself was not strongly correlated with duckling toxicity. On the basis of our data we think that it is likely that the members of both of these mating populations produce additional toxins that have yet to be chemically identified. These toxins may act singly or synergistically with other compounds to induce the observed duckling toxicity. PMID:8919779

  9. Secretome analysis of the fungus Trichoderma harzianum grown on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Do Vale, Luis H F; Gómez-Mendoza, Diana P; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Ricart, Carlos A O; Ximenes F Filho, Edivaldo; Sousa, Marcelo V

    2012-08-01

    Trichoderma harzianum is a mycoparasitic filamentous fungus that produces and secretes a wide range of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes used in cell wall degradation. Due to its potential in biomass conversion, T. harzianum draws great attention from biofuel and biocontrol industries and research. Here, we report an extensive secretome analysis of T. harzianum. The fungus was grown on cellulose medium, and its secretome was analyzed by a combination of enzymology, 2DE, MALDI-MS and -MS/MS (Autoflex II), and LC-MS/MS (LTQ-Orbitrap XL). A total of 56 proteins were identified using high-resolution MS. Interestingly, although cellulases were found, the major hydrolytic enzymes secreted in the cellulose medium were chitinases and endochitinases, which may reflect the biocontrol feature of T. harzianum. The glycoside hydrolase family, including chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14), endo-N-acetylglucosaminidases (EC 3.2.1.96), hexosaminidases (EC 3.2.1.52), galactosidases (EC 3.2.1.23), xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8), exo-1,3-glucanases (EC 3.2.1.58), endoglucanases (EC 3.2.1.4), xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37), α-L-arabinofuranosidase (EC 3.2.1.55), N-acetylhexosaminidases (EC 3.2.1.52), and other enzymes represented 51.36% of the total secretome. Few representatives were classified in the protease family (8.90%). Others (17.60%) are mostly intracellular proteins. A considerable part of the secretome was composed of hypothetical proteins (22.14%), probably because of the absence of an annotated T. harzianum genome. The T. harzianum secretome composition highlights the importance of this fungus as a rich source of hydrolytic enzymes for bioconversion and biocontrol applications.

  10. Mobile elements and mitochondrial genome expansion in the soil fungus and potato pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-3.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana; Pakala, Suman B; Fedorova, Natalie D; Joardar, Vinita; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Hostetler, Jessica; Pakala, Suchitra M; Zafar, Nikhat; Thomas, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Carres, Marianela; Dean, Ralph; Vilgalys, Rytas; Nierman, William C; Cubeta, Marc A

    2014-03-01

    The soil fungus Rhizoctonia solani is an economically important pathogen of agricultural and forestry crops. Here, we present the complete sequence and analysis of the mitochondrial genome of R. solani, field isolate Rhs1AP. The genome (235 849 bp) is the largest mitochondrial genome of a filamentous fungus sequenced to date and exhibits a rich accumulation of introns, novel repeat sequences, homing endonuclease genes, and hypothetical genes. Stable secondary structures exhibited by repeat sequences suggest that they comprise functional, possibly catalytic RNA elements. RNA-Seq expression profiling confirmed that the majority of homing endonuclease genes and hypothetical genes are transcriptionally active. Comparative analysis suggests that the mitochondrial genome of R. solani is an example of a dynamic history of expansion in filamentous fungi. PMID:24461055

  11. AbaA Regulates Conidiogenesis in the Ascomycete Fungus Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hokyoung; Kim, Myung-Gu; Min, Kyunghun; Seo, Young-Su; Lim, Jae Yun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Lee, Yin-Won

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph Gibberella zeae) is a prominent pathogen that infects major cereal crops such as wheat, barley, and maize. Both sexual (ascospores) and asexual (conidia) spores are produced in F. graminearum. Since conidia are responsible for secondary infection in disease development, our objective of the present study was to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying conidiogenesis in F. graminearum based on the framework previously described in Aspergillus nidulans. In this study, we firstly identified and functionally characterized the ortholog of AbaA, which is involved in differentiation from vegetative hyphae to conidia and known to be absent in F. graminearum. Deletion of abaA did not affect vegetative growth, sexual development, or virulence, but conidium production was completely abolished and thin hyphae grew from abnormally shaped phialides in abaA deletion mutants. Overexpression of abaA resulted in pleiotropic defects such as impaired sexual and asexual development, retarded conidium germination, and reduced trichothecene production. AbaA localized to the nuclei of phialides and terminal cells of mature conidia. Successful interspecies complementation using A. nidulans AbaA and the conserved AbaA-WetA pathway demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms responsible for AbaA activity are conserved in F. graminearum as they are in A. nidulans. Results from RNA-sequencing analysis suggest that AbaA plays a pivotal role in conidiation by regulating cell cycle pathways and other conidiation-related genes. Thus, the conserved roles of the AbaA ortholog in both A. nidulans and F. graminearum give new insight into the genetics of conidiation in filamentous fungi. PMID:24039821

  12. [Influence of lignin and oxygen on the growth and the lipid formation of the fungus Lentinus tigrinus].

    PubMed

    IIvashechkin, A A; Sergeeva, Ia É; Lunin, V V; Bogdan, V I; Mysiakina, I S; Feofilova, E P

    2014-01-01

    During cultivation of the filamentous fungus Lentinus tigrinus on a medium containing lignin, a high oxygen content stimulated the growth of the fungus and contributed to the yield of lipids. A high content of phosphatidic acid and a reduction in the level of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine were first detected in the composition of phospholipids. Changes in the composition of neutral lipids, such as variation in the ratio of esterified and free sterols, have occurred; thus, the amount of sterol esters reduced simultaneously with a decrease in the content of free fatty acids. Based on the obtained results, the possible role of phosphatidic acid as a second messenger in the process of the consumption of lignin by the fungus Lentinus tigrinus is discussed. PMID:25757341

  13. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  14. Droplets engulfing on a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Yu, Meng; Zhou, Zhengping; Bedarkar, Amol; Zhao, Youhao

    2014-03-01

    Two immiscible droplets wetting on a filament may assume engulfing, partial-engulfing, or non-engulfing morphology that depends on the wetting behavior and geometries of the resulting droplet-on-filament system. This paper studies the wetting behavior of two immiscible droplets contacting and sitting symmetrically on a straight filament. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for determining the wetting morphology of the droplet-on-filament system. In the limiting case of engulfing or non-engulfing, the morphology of the droplet-on-filament system is determined in explicit form. In the case of partial-engulfing, surface finite element method is further employed for determining the wetting morphology, surface energy, and internal pressures of droplets of the system. Numerical scaling study is performed to explore their dependencies upon the wetting properties and geometries of the system. The study can be applicable for analysis and design of textiles with tailorable wetting properties and development of novel multifunctional fibrous materials for environmental protection such as oil-spill sorption, etc.

  15. Methods for transforming and expression screening of filamentous fungal cells with a DNA library

    SciTech Connect

    Teter, Sarah; Lamsa, Michael; Cherry, Joel; Ward, Connie

    2015-06-02

    The present invention relates to methods for expression screening of filamentous fungal transformants, comprising: (a) isolating single colony transformants of a DNA library introduced into E. coli; (b) preparing DNA from each of the single colony E. coli transformants; (c) introducing a sample of each of the DNA preparations of step (b) into separate suspensions of protoplasts of a filamentous fungus to obtain transformants thereof, wherein each transformant contains one or more copies of an individual polynucleotide from the DNA library; (d) growing the individual filamentous fungal transformants of step (c) on selective growth medium, thereby permitting growth of the filamentous fungal transformants, while suppressing growth of untransformed filamentous fungi; and (e) measuring activity or a property of each polypeptide encoded by the individual polynucleotides. The present invention also relates to isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides of interest obtained by such methods, to nucleic acid constructs, expression vectors, and recombinant host cells comprising the isolated polynucleotides, and to methods of producing the polypeptides encoded by the isolated polynucleotides.

  16. Graphite filament wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Damico, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Filament wound NOL rings, 4-inch and 8-inch diameter closed-end vessels involving three epoxy resin systems and three graphite fibers were tested to develop property data and fabrication technology for filament wound graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst tests at room temperature. Manufacturing parameters were established for tooling, winding, and curing that resulted in the development of a pressure/vessel performance factor (pressure x volume/weight) or more than 900,000 in. for an oblate spheroid specimen.

  17. Intermediate Filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zuela, Noam; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    More than 70 different genes in humans and 12 different genes in Caenorhabditis elegans encode the superfamily of intermediate filament (IF) proteins. In C. elegans, similar to humans, these proteins are expressed in a cell- and tissue-specific manner, can assemble into heteropolymers and into 5-10nm wide filaments that account for the principal structural elements at the nuclear periphery, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. At least 5 of the 11 cytoplasmic IFs, as well as the nuclear IF, lamin, are essential. In this chapter, we will include a short review of our current knowledge of both cytoplasmic and nuclear IFs in C. elegans and will describe techniques used for their analyses.

  18. Nonequilibrium transport in superconducting filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arutyunov, K. YU.; Danilova, N. P.; Nikolaeva, A. A.

    1995-01-01

    The step-like current-voltage characteristics of highly homogeneous single-crystalline tin and indium thin filaments has been measured. The length of the samples L approximately 1 cm was much greater than the nonequilibrium quasiparticle relaxation length Lambda. It was found that the activation of a successive i-th voltage step occurs at current significantly greater than the one derived with the assumption that the phase slip centers are weakly interacting on a scale L much greater than Lambda. The observation of 'subharmonic' fine structure on the voltage-current characteristics of tin filaments confirms the hypothesis of the long-range phase slip centers interaction.

  19. Coiling of a viscous filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, A. D. T.; Ryu, W. S.; Mahadevan, L.

    1997-11-01

    A classic demonstration of fluid buckling is a daily occurence at the breakfast table, where a continuous stream of viscous fluid (honey) is often poured onto a flat surface (toast) from a sufficient height. The thin fluid filament quickly settles into a steady state; near the surface it bends into a helical shape while simultaneously rotating about the vertical and is laid out in a regular coil. This behavior is reminiscent of the coiling of a falling flexible rope. We derive a simple scaling law that predicts the coiling frequency in terms of the filament radius and the flow rate. We also verify this scaling law with the results of experiments.

  20. Genetic engineering of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, W E; Marshall, M A

    1989-06-16

    Filamentous fungi are important in medicine, industry, agriculture, and basic biological research. For example, some fungal species are pathogenic to humans, whereas others produce beta-lactam antibiotics (penicillin and cephalosporin). Industrial strains produce large amounts of enzymes, such as glucoamylase and proteases, and low molecular weight compounds, such as citric acid. The largest and most economically important group of plant pathogens are fungi. Several fungal species have biological properties and genetic systems that make them ideally suited for basic biological research. Recently developed techniques for genetic engineering of filamentous fungi make it possible to alter their detrimental and beneficial activities in novel ways.

  1. A pulmonary fungus ball produced by Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, K J; Schwartz, I S; Rybak, B J

    1975-10-01

    A case of pulmonary fungus ball produced by Cladosporium cladosporioides is reported. The fungus occupied a cavity in the upper lobe of right lung. Invasion of the cavitary wall or adjacent pulmonary tissue by the fungus was not observed.

  2. Deletions in the Gibberellin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Gibberella fujikuroi by Restriction Enzyme-Mediated Integration and Conventional Transformation-Mediated Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Linnemannstöns, Pia; Voß, Thorsten; Hedden, Peter; Gaskin, Paul; Tudzynski, Bettina

    1999-01-01

    We induced mutants of Gibberella fujikuroi deficient in gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis by transformation-mediated mutagenesis with the vector pAN7-1. We recovered 24 GA-defective mutants in one of nine transformation experiments performed without the addition of a restriction enzyme. Each mutant had a similar Southern blot pattern, suggesting the integration of the vector into the same site. The addition of a restriction enzyme by restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) significantly increased the transformation rate and the rate of single-copy integration events. Of 1,600 REMI transformants, two produced no GAs. Both mutants had multiple copies of the vector pAN7-1 and one had a Southern blot pattern similar to those of the 24 conventionally transformed GA-deficient mutants. Biochemical analysis of the two REMI mutants confirmed that they cannot produce ent-kaurene, the first specific intermediate of the GA pathway. Feeding the radioactively labelled precursors ent-kaurene and GA12-aldehyde followed by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that neither of these intermediates was converted to GAs in the mutants. Southern blot analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the transformants using the bifunctional ent-copalyl diphosphate/ent-kaurene synthase gene (cps/ks) and the flanking regions as probes revealed a large deletion in the GA-deficient REMI transformants and in the GA-deficient transformants obtained by conventional insertional transformation. We conclude that transformation procedures with and without the addition of restriction enzymes can lead to insertion-mediated mutations and to deletions and chromosome translocations. PMID:10347043

  3. A novel protease-resistant alpha-galactosidase with high hydrolytic activity from Gibberella sp. F75: gene cloning, expression, and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanan; Wang, Yaru; Meng, Kun; Bai, Yingguo; Shi, Pengjun; Luo, Huiying; Yang, Peilong; Zhou, Zhigang; Zhang, Zhifang; Yao, Bin

    2009-07-01

    A novel alpha-galactosidase gene (aga-F75) from Gibberella sp. F75 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene codes for a protein of 744 amino acids with a 24-residue putative signal peptide and a calculated molecular mass of 82.94 kDa. The native structure of the recombinant Aga-F75 was estimated to be a trimer or tetramer. The deduced amino acid sequence showed highest identity (69%) with an alpha-galactosidase from Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), a member of the glycoside hydrolase family 36. Purified recombinant Aga-F75 was optimally active at 60 degrees C and pH 4.0 and was stable at pH 3.0-12.0. The enzyme exhibited broad substrate specificity and substantial resistance to neutral and alkaline proteases. The enzyme K (m) values using pNPG, melibiose, stachyose, and raffinose as substrates were 1.06, 1.75, 54.26, and 8.23 mM, respectively. Compared with the commercial alpha-galactosidase (Aga-A) from Aspergillus niger var. AETL and a protease-resistant alpha-galactosidase (Aga-F78) from Rhizopus sp. F78, Aga-F75 released 1.4- and 4.9-fold more galactose from soybean meal alone, respectively, and 292.5- and 8.6-fold more galactose from soybean meal in the presence of trypsin, respectively. The pH and thermal stability and hydrolytic activity of Aga-F75 make it potentially useful in the food and feed industries.

  4. A reovirus of the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica that is infectious as particles and related to the coltivirus genus of animal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Bradley I; Supyani, S; Kondo, Hideki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2004-01-01

    RNA viruses of filamentous fungi fall into two broad categories, those that contain double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes in rigid particles and those that are more closely related to positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses with dsRNA replicative intermediates found within lipid vesicles. Effective infectivity systems have been described for the latter, using RNA transcripts, but not for the former. We report the characterization of a reovirus from Cryphonectria parasitica, the filamentous fungus that causes chestnut blight disease. The virus substantially reduces the virulence of the fungus and results in dramatically altered colony morphology, as well as changes in other associated fungal traits, relative to the virus-free isogenic strain. Virus particles from infected mycelium contained 11 segments of dsRNA and showed characteristics typical of the family Reoviridae. Sequences of the largest three segments revealed that the virus is closely related to the Coltivirus genus of animal pathogens, which includes the human pathogen Colorado tick fever virus. The introduction of purified virus particles into protoplasts from virus-free isolates of the fungus resulted in a newly infected mycelium with the same morphology and virus composition as the original virus-infected isolate. This represents the completion of Koch's postulates for a true dsRNA virus from a filamentous fungus and the description of a definitive fungal member of the family Reoviridae.

  5. SDO Watches Giant Filament on the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    A snaking, extended filament of solar material currently lies on the front of the sun-- some 1 million miles across from end to end. Filaments are clouds of solar material suspended above the sun b...

  6. SDO Sees a Dark Filament Circle

    NASA Video Gallery

    A dark, almost circular filament broke away from the sun in a gauzy, feathery swirl, on Nov. 15, 2015, in this video from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. This filament eruption was followed by a...

  7. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic.

    PubMed

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  8. Intermediate filaments: not just for structure anymore.

    PubMed

    Liem, Ronald K H

    2013-04-22

    A recent paper has identified the tumor suppressor APC as a linker protein between intermediate filaments and microtubules. In the absence of APC, intermediate filaments collapse and the cells are no longer polarized and fail to migrate.

  9. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  10. METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1962-12-18

    A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

  11. Tailor-made TALEN system for highly efficient targeted gene replacement in the rice blast fungus.

    PubMed

    Arazoe, Takayuki; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Kennosuke; Yamato, Tohru; Ohsato, Shuichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Arie, Tsutomu; Kuwata, Shigeru

    2015-07-01

    Genetic manipulation is key to unraveling gene functions and creating genetically modified strains of microbial organisms. Recently, engineered nucleases that can generate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at a specific site in the desired locus within genome are utilized in a rapidly developing genome editing technology via DSBs repair. However, the use of engineered nucleases in filamentous fungi has not been validated. In this study, we demonstrated that tailor-made transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) system, Platinum-Fungal TALENs (PtFg TALENs), could improve the efficiency of homologous recombination-mediated targeted gene replacement by up to 100% in the rice blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae. This high-efficiency PtFg TALEN has great potential for basic and applied biological applications in filamentous fungi. PMID:25683503

  12. Smectic filaments in colloidal suspensions of rods.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Daan; Schilling, Tanja

    2002-10-01

    In supersaturated isotropic mixtures of hard rods, smectic filaments have recently been observed. We propose a model for formation and growth of these filaments similar to the Hoffman-Lauritzen model for polymer crystallization. Filament thickness is determined by a compromise between maximizing the amount of smectic phase formed and minimizing the nucleation barrier for adding new segments to the growing filament. We compare our analytical results to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Single turnovers of fluorescent ATP bound to bipolar myosin filament during actin filaments sliding.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Takahiro; Kobatake, Takahiro; Okubo, Hiroyuki; Chaen, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide turnover rates of bipolar myosin thick filament along which actin filament slides were measured by the displacement of prebound fluorescent ATP analog 2'(3')-O-[N-[2-[(Cy3)]amindo]ethyl] carbamoyl]-adenosine 5' triphosphate (Cy3-EDA-ATP) upon flash photolysis of caged ATP. The fluorescence of the thick filament where actin filament slides decayed with two exponential processes. The slower rate constant was the same as that without actin filament. Along bipolar myosin thick filament, actin filaments slide at a fast speed towards the central bare zone (forward), but more slowly away from the bare zone (backward). The displacement rate constant of fluorescent ATP from the myosin filament where actin filament moved forward was 5.0 s(-1), whereas the rate constant where the actin filament slid backward was 1.7 s(-1). These findings suggest that the slow ADP release rate is responsible for the slow backward sliding movement.

  14. Estimating the spontaneous mutation rate of loss of sex in the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianping

    2002-01-01

    Few events have evolutionary consequences as pervasive as changes in reproductive behavior. Among those changes, the loss of the ability to undergo sexual reproduction is probably the most profound. However, little is known about the rate of loss of sex. Here I describe an experimental system using the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans and provide the first empirical estimate of the spontaneous mutation rate of loss of sex in fungi. Two critical steps in sexual reproduction in C. neoformans were examined: mating and filamentation. Mating, the fusion of cells of opposite sexes, is a universal first step in eukaryotic sexual reproduction. In contrast, filamentation, a prerequisite process preceding meiosis and sexual spore development, is restricted to C. neoformans and a few other fungal species. After approximately 600 mitotic divisions under favorable asexual growth conditions, mean abilities for mating and filamentation decreased significantly by >67 and 24%, respectively. Similarly, though statistically not significant, the mean vegetative growth rates also decreased and among the mutation accumulation lines, the vegetative growth rates were negatively correlated to the mating ability. The estimated mutation rates to decreases in mating ability and filamentation were in excess of 0.0172 and 0.0036, respectively. The results show that C. neoformans can be a highly attractive model for analyses of reproductive system evolution in fungi. PMID:12454063

  15. Programmed cell cycle arrest is required for infection of corn plants by the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Sónia; Mielnichuk, Natalia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a plant pathogen that requires a specific structure called infective filament to penetrate the plant tissue. Although able to grow, this filament is cell cycle arrested on the plant surface. This cell cycle arrest is released once the filament penetrates the plant tissue. The reasons and mechanisms for this cell cycle arrest are unknown. Here, we have tried to address these questions. We reached three conclusions from our studies. First, the observed cell cycle arrest is the result of the cooperation of at least two distinct mechanisms: one involving the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade; and the other relying on the transcriptional downregulation of Hsl1, a kinase that modulates the G2/M transition. Second, a sustained cell cycle arrest during the infective filament step is necessary for the virulence in U. maydis, as a strain unable to arrest the cell cycle was severely impaired in its ability to infect corn plants. Third, production of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, is incompatible with an active cell cycle. The inability to infect plants by strains defective in cell cycle arrest seems to be caused by their failure to induce the appressorium formation process. In summary, our findings uncover genetic circuits to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on the plant surface, thus allowing the penetration into plant tissue.

  16. Dynamics of 3D isolated thermal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, N. R.; Easy, L.; Militello, F.; Omotani, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations have been carried out to establish how electron thermal physics, introduced in the form of a dynamic electron temperature, affects isolated filament motion and dynamics in 3D. It is found that thermal effects impact filament motion in two major ways when the pressure perturbation within the filament is supported primarily through a temperature increase as opposed to density: they lead to a strong increase in filament propagation in the bi-normal direction and a significant decrease in net radial propagation. Both effects arise from the temperature dependence of the sheath current which leads to a non-uniform floating potential, with the latter effect supplemented by faster pressure loss. The reduction in radial velocity can only occur when the filament cross-section loses angular symmetry. The behaviour is observed across different filament sizes and suggests that filaments with much larger temperature perturbations than density perturbations are more strongly confined to the near SOL region.

  17. PARTIAL SLINGSHOT RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yunchun; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Zheng, Ruisheng; Yang, Bo; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan

    2013-02-10

    We present a rare observation of an interaction between two filaments around AR 11358 and AR 11361 on 2011 December 3 that is strongly suggestive of the occurrence of slingshot reconnection. A small elbow-shaped active-region filament (F12) underwent a failed eruption that brought it into contact with a nearby larger, thicker filament (F34). Accompanied by the appearance of complicated internal structures below the erupting F12, its two legs separated away from each other and then connected into F34. This process led the filaments to change their connectivity to form two newly linked filaments, and one of them showed a clear inverse {gamma}-shape. However, the alteration in the filament connectivity was imperfect since F34 is discernible after the eruption. These observations can be interpreted as a partial slingshot reconnection between two filaments that had unequal axial magnetic flux.

  18. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  19. The stability of viscous liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driessen, Theo; Jeurissen, Roger; Wijshoff, Herman; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-11-01

    The stability of liquid filaments is relevant both in industrial applications, such as inkjet printing and atomization, and in nature, where the stability of filaments has a large influence on the final drop size distribution of rain droplets and waterfalls. The liquid filament may either stably collapse into a single droplet, or break up into multiple droplets. Which scenario is realized depends on the viscosity and the aspect ratio of the filament. Here we study the collapse of an axisymmetric liquid filament is analytically and with a numerical model. We find that a long, high viscous filament can only break up due to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability, whereas a low viscous filament can break up due to end-pinching. The theory shows quantitative agreement with recent experimental findings by Castréjon-Pita et al., PRL 108, 074506 (2012).

  20. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system.

  1. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    PubMed

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system. PMID:26718101

  2. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Kurz, Heiko G.; Bergé, Luc; Skupin, Stefan; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled to the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which has been paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions in the picosecond regime are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. In focused propagation geometry, a unique feature of picosecond filamentation is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for many applications including laser-guided electrical breakdown of air, channeling microwave beams and air lasing.

  3. UNUSUAL FILAMENTS INSIDE THE UMBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kleint, L.

    2013-06-10

    We analyze several unusual filamentary structures which appeared in the umbra of one of the sunspots in AR 11302. They do not resemble typical light bridges in morphology or in evolution. We analyze data from SDO/HMI to investigate their temporal evolution, Hinode/SP for photospheric inversions, IBIS for chromospheric imaging, and SDO/AIA for the overlying corona. Photospheric inversions reveal a horizontal, inverse Evershed flow along these structures, which we call umbral filaments. Chromospheric images show brightenings and energy dissipation, while coronal images indicate that bright coronal loops seem to end in these umbral filaments. These rapidly evolving features do not seem to be common, and are possibly related to the high flare-productivity of the active region. Their analysis could help to understand the complex evolution of active regions.

  4. Intermediate Filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zuela, Noam; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    More than 70 different genes in humans and 12 different genes in Caenorhabditis elegans encode the superfamily of intermediate filament (IF) proteins. In C. elegans, similar to humans, these proteins are expressed in a cell- and tissue-specific manner, can assemble into heteropolymers and into 5-10nm wide filaments that account for the principal structural elements at the nuclear periphery, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. At least 5 of the 11 cytoplasmic IFs, as well as the nuclear IF, lamin, are essential. In this chapter, we will include a short review of our current knowledge of both cytoplasmic and nuclear IFs in C. elegans and will describe techniques used for their analyses. PMID:26795488

  5. Metabolites from Aspergillus fumigatus, an endophytic fungus associated with Melia azedarach, and their antifungal, antifeedant, and toxic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, An-Ling; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Thirty-nine fungal metabolites 1-39, including two new alkaloids, 12β-hydroxy-13α-methoxyverruculogen TR-2 (6) and 3-hydroxyfumiquinazoline A (16), were isolated from the fermentation broth of Aspergillus fumigatus LN-4, an endophytic fungus isolated from the stem bark of Melia azedarach. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis (mass spectrometry and one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments) and by comparison of their NMR data with those reported in the literature. These isolated compounds were evaluated for in vitro antifungal activities against some phytopathogenic fungi, toxicity against brine shrimps, and antifeedant activities against armyworm larvae (Mythimna separata Walker). Among them, sixteen compounds showed potent antifungal activities against phytopathogenic fungi (Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, and Gibberella saubinettii), and four of them, 12β-hydroxy-13α-methoxyverruculogen TR-2 (6), fumitremorgin B (7), verruculogen (8), and helvolic acid (39), exhibited antifungal activities with MIC values of 6.25-50 μg/mL, which were comparable to the two positive controls carbendazim and hymexazol. In addition, of eighteen that exerted moderate lethality toward brine shrimps, compounds 7 and 8 both showed significant toxicities with median lethal concentration (LC(50)) values of 13.6 and 15.8 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, among nine metabolites that were found to possess antifeedant activity against armyworm larvae, compounds 7 and 8 gave the best activity with antifeedant indexes (AFI) of 50.0% and 55.0%, respectively. Structure-activity relationships of the metabolites were also discussed. PMID:22409377

  6. Mechanics of vimentin intermediate filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Stamenovic, Dimitrijie

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that the cytoskeleton of living cells plays important roles in mechanical and biological functions of the cells. Here we focus on the contribution of intermediate filaments (IFs) to the mechanical behaviors of living cells. Vimentin, a major structural component of IFs in many cell types, is shown to play an important role in vital mechanical and biological functions such as cell contractility, migration, stiffness, stiffening, and proliferation.

  7. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  8. Pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene metabolism by the filamentous fungus, Penicillium janthinellum

    SciTech Connect

    Launen, L.; Pinto, L.; Kiehlmann, E.; Moore, M.

    1995-12-31

    The incomplete combustion of fossil fuels generates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These include 4-5 ring PAH, of which many are potent carcinogens and mutagens that persist in soil for years. Fungi can oxidize these compounds via two mechanisms: (1) by extracellular peroxidases (Basidiomycete fungi), or (2) by a putative cytochrome P450 enzyme system. The authors have previously isolated Penicillium janthinellum from petroleum-contaminated soil and shown that it possesses high activity to oxidize pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene and chrysene in liquid culture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of changing growth condition glucose, nitrate and agitation levels, on pyrene metabolism by P. janthinellum using a 3 x 2 x 2 factorial design. Spores were inoculated into minimal salts media amended with varying carbon or nitrogen concentrations and containing {sup 14}C-pyrene. The level of glucose and nitrate significantly affected the bioconversion: low glucose and nitrate levels increased the loss of parent PAH from the medium. However this effect was independent of biomass. Biometer flask experiments using {sup 14}C-pyrene showed that most pyrene became cell-associated within 7 days of incubation. Cell associated {sup 14}C-pyrene was inextractable by ethyl acetate but was recovered in methylene chloride. This result was confirmed by the mass balance result from a 10 day time course experiment using {sup 14}C-pyrene or {sup 14}C-BaP. Greater than 70% of the radiolabel in cultures containing live cells was strongly associated with the cell matter within 7 days, relative to < 1 % association with dead cells. The authors conclude that: (1) pyrene and BaP oxidation was affected by C and N levels in the growth medium independent of cell mass and (2) {sup 14}C-PAH became strongly associated with live but not dead cells within 7 days in liquid culture.

  9. Construction of a promoter collection for genes co-expression in filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Meng, Fanju; Liu, Pei; Yang, Shengli; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-11-01

    Trichoderma reesei is the preferred organism for producing industrial cellulases. However, cellulases derived from T. reesei have their highest activity at acidic pH. When the pH value increased above 7, the enzyme activities almost disappeared, thereby limiting the application of fungal cellulases under neutral or alkaline conditions. A lot of heterologous alkaline cellulases have been successfully expressed in T. reesei to improve its cellulolytic profile. To our knowledge, there are few reports describing the co-expression of two or more heterologous cellulases in T. reesei. We designed and constructed a promoter collection for gene expression and co-expression in T. reesei. Taking alkaline cellulase as a reporter gene, we assessed our promoters with strengths ranging from 4 to 106 % as compared to the pWEF31 expression vector (Lv D, Wang W, Wei D (2012) Construction of two vectors for gene expression in Trichoderma reesei. Plasmid 67(1):67-71). The promoter collection was used in a proof-of-principle approach to achieve the co-expression of an alkaline endoglucanase and an alkaline cellobiohydrolase. We observed higher activities of both cellulose degradation and biostoning by the co-expression of an endoglucanase and a cellobiohydrolase than the activities obtained by the expression of only endoglucanase or cellobiohydrolase. This study makes the process of engineering expression of multiple genes easier in T. reesei.

  10. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) produced in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kraševec, Nada; Milunović, Tatjana; Lasnik, Marija Anžur; Lukančič, Irena; Komel, Radovan; Porekar, Vladka Gaberc

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a fungal production system is described for expression and secretion of the medically important human protein G-CSF, in Aspergillus niger. A reliable strategy was chosen with in-frame fusion of G-CSF behind a KEX2 cleavage site downstream of the coding region of the highly secreted homologous glucoamylase. This provided secretion levels of 5-10 mg/l culture medium of correctly processed G-CSF, although the majority of the protein (>90%) was biologically inactive. Following denaturation/ concentration and chromatographic separation/ renaturation, the G-CSF proliferation activity increased considerably, and analytical immobilised metal affinity chromatography confirmed the monomeric and correctly folded protein. These data suggest that this human secretory protein secreted into the medium of A. niger was not correctly folded, and that it escaped the endoplasmic reticulum folding control systems. This is compared to the folding of G-CSF produced in bacteria and yeast. PMID:25551710

  11. Mutations affecting extracellular protease production in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Katz, M E; Flynn, P K; vanKuyk, P A; Cheetham, B F

    1996-04-10

    The extracellular proteases of Aspergillus nidulans are known to be regulated by carbon, nitrogen and sulphur metabolite repression. In this study, a mutant with reduced levels of extracellular protease was isolated by screening for loss of halo production on milk plates. Genetic analysis of the mutant showed that it contains a single, recessive mutation, in a gene which we have designated xprE, located on chromosome VI. The xprE1 mutation affected the production of extracellular proteases in response to carbon, nitrogen and, to a lesser extent, sulphur limitation. Three reversion mutations, xprF1, xprF2 and xprG1, which suppress xprE1, were characterised. Both xprF and xprG map to chromosome VII but the two genes are unlinked. The xprF1, xprF2 and xprG1 mutants showed high levels of milk-clearing activity on medium containing milk as a carbon source but reduced growth on a number of nitrogen sources. Evidence is presented that the xprE1 and xprG1 mutations alter expression of more than one protease and affect levels of alkaline protease gene mRNA.

  12. Identification and characterisation of non-coding small RNAs in the pathogenic filamentous fungus Trichophyton rubrum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence demonstrates that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are indispensable components of many organisms and play important roles in cellular events, regulation, and development. Results Here, we analysed the small non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcriptome of Trichophyton rubrum by constructing and sequencing a cDNA library from conidia and mycelia. We identified 352 ncRNAs and their corresponding genomic loci. These ncRNA candidates included 198 entirely novel ncRNAs and 154 known ncRNAs classified as snRNAs, snoRNAs and other known ncRNAs. Further bioinformatic analysis detected 96 snoRNAs, including 56 snoRNAs that had been annotated in other organisms and 40 novel snoRNAs. All snoRNAs belonged to two major classes—C/D box snoRNAs and H/ACA snoRNAs—and their potential target sites in rRNAs and snRNAs were predicted. To analyse the evolutionary conservation of the ncRNAs in T. rubrum, we aligned all 352 ncRNAs to the genomes of six dermatophytes and to the NCBI non-redundant nucleotide database (NT). The results showed that most of the identified snRNAs were conserved in dermatophytes. Of the 352 ncRNAs, 102 also had genomic loci in other dermatophytes, and 27 were dermatophyte-specific. Conclusions Our systematic analysis may provide important clues to the function and evolution of ncRNAs in T. rubrum. These results also provide important information to complement the current annotation of the T. rubrum genome, which primarily comprises protein-coding genes. PMID:24377353

  13. Construction of a shuttle vector for the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Stohl, L L; Lambowitz, A M

    1983-01-01

    We have constructed a recombinant plasmid, pALS-1, that replicates autonomously in both Neurospora and Escherichia coli. pALS-1 consists of the mitochondrial plasmid from Neurospora strain P405-Labelle, the Neurospora qa-2+ gene, and E. coli plasmid pBR325. pALS-1 transforms the Neurospora qa-2+ gene at frequencies 5- to 10-fold higher than those for plasmids that transform mainly by integration. When E. coli was transformed with DNA from Neurospora transformants, we recovered not only pALS-1 but also a smaller plasmid, pALS-2, which had undergone deletion of most and possibly all Labelle sequences, and the immediately flanking sequences in pBR325. pALS-2 also appears to replicate autonomously in Neurospora, but less efficiently than does pALS-1. Southern blots show that free pALS-1 and pALS-2 are present in nuclear and cytosolic (supernatant from high-speed centrifugation) fractions of Neurospora transformants and that small, variable proportions of the plasmids also can be detected in mitochondria. pALS-1 and pALS-2 constitute putative shuttle vectors for Neurospora. Images PMID:6302667

  14. Transposition of the autonomous Fot1 element in the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed Central

    Migheli, Q; Laugé, R; Davière, J M; Gerlinger, C; Kaper, F; Langin, T; Daboussi, M J

    1999-01-01

    Autonomous mobility of different copies of the Fot1 element was determined for several strains of the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum to develop a transposon tagging system. Two Fot1 copies inserted into the third intron of the nitrate reductase structural gene (niaD) were separately introduced into two genetic backgrounds devoid of endogenous Fot1 elements. Mobility of these copies was observed through a phenotypic assay for excision based on the restoration of nitrate reductase activity. Inactivation of the Fot1 transposase open reading frame (frameshift, deletion, or disruption) prevented excision in strains free of Fot1 elements. Molecular analysis of the Nia+ revertant strains showed that the Fot1 element reintegrated frequently into new genomic sites after excision and that it can transpose from the introduced niaD gene into a different chromosome. Sequence analysis of several Fot1 excision sites revealed the so-called footprint left by this transposable element. Three reinserted Fot1 elements were cloned and the DNA sequences flanking the transposon were determined using inverse polymerase chain reaction. In all cases, the transposon was inserted into a TA dinucleotide and created the characteristic TA target site duplication. The availability of autonomous Fot1 copies will now permit the development of an efficient two-component transposon tagging system comprising a trans-activator element supplying transposase and a cis-responsive marked element. PMID:10049918

  15. A glucose-derepressed promoter for expression of heterologous products in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Hintz, W E; Lagosky, P A

    1993-07-01

    We describe a putative binding sequence (GCGGGGC) for the glucose-responsive repressor protein CreA at two positions upstream of the transcription start site of the alcohol dehydrogenase I (alcA) gene of Aspergillus nidulans. To positively identify the putative binding sites as CreA-specific, the GCGGGGC blocks were mutated at five internal nucleotide positions to GTACTAC and reintroduced into the wild type alcA promoter driving expression of the endogenous alcohol dehydrogenase I gene. This CreA-binding site variant was then transformed into an AlcR constitutive A. nidulans host strain (T2625) and growth was monitored in the presence of the non-metabolized glucose analogue, 2-deoxyglucose. Positive transformants were selected by their ability to grow using ethanol as a carbon source in the presence of 2-deoxyglucose. Similar CreA binding site variant alcA promoters should permit the alcA-driven expression of heterologous genes in A. nidulans in the presence of glucose, the preferred carbon source for biomass accumulation and provides a model for controlling carbon-catabolite regulated expression in other expression systems.

  16. Structural features of sugars that trigger or support conidial germination in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Hayer, Kimran; Stratford, Malcolm; Archer, David B

    2013-11-01

    The asexual spores (conidia) of Aspergillus niger germinate to produce hyphae under appropriate conditions. Germination is initiated by conidial swelling and mobilization of internal carbon and energy stores, followed by polarization and emergence of a hyphal germ tube. The effects of different pyranose sugars, all analogues of d-glucose, on the germination of A. niger conidia were explored, and we define germination as the transition from a dormant conidium into a germling. Within germination, we distinguish two distinct stages, the initial swelling of the conidium and subsequent polarized growth. The stage of conidial swelling requires a germination trigger, which we define as a compound that is sensed by the conidium and which leads to catabolism of d-trehalose and isotropic growth. Sugars that triggered germination and outgrowth included d-glucose, d-mannose, and d-xylose. Sugars that triggered germination but did not support subsequent outgrowth included d-tagatose, d-lyxose, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Nontriggering sugars included d-galactose, l-glucose, and d-arabinose. Certain nontriggering sugars, including d-galactose, supported outgrowth if added in the presence of a complementary triggering sugar. This division of functions indicates that sugars are involved in two separate events in germination, triggering and subsequent outgrowth, and the structural features of sugars that support each, both, or none of these events are discussed. We also present data on the uptake of sugars during the germination process and discuss possible mechanisms of triggering in the absence of apparent sugar uptake during the initial swelling of conidia.

  17. Removal of copper ions by the filamentous fungus, Rhizopus oryzae from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bhainsa, Kuber C; D'Souza, S F

    2008-06-01

    Removal of heavy metals present in wastewaters has been a major concern due to their non-biodegradability and toxicity. Removal of copper ion using NaOH treated Rhizopus oryzae biomass was investigated in a batch reactor. The copper uptake exhibited substantial enhancement both in terms of kinetics of uptake as well as the loading capacity. The copper biosorption by viable and pretreated fungal biomass fit well to a Lagergren's pseudo second order reaction in comparison to pseudo first order kinetics. Investigation on effect of pH indicated improved performance in the range of pH 4-6 in alkali treated biomass. Copper uptake exhibited by viable biomass was highest at 21 degrees C, unlike pretreated biomass that showed maximum uptake across the range of temperature 21-55 degrees C. The maximum copper loading capacity of the viable and pretreated biomass according to Langmuir isotherm was 19.4 and 43.7 mg/g, respectively. Distribution coefficient of pretreated biomass showed improvement at lower residual concentration, indicating a change in the nature of binding by the treated biomass. Copper uptake decreased with an increasing dose of biosorbent, although enhancement in the total metal ion removal was observed at higher dose.

  18. Enhanced Production of Bovine Chymosin by Autophagy Deficiency in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae has been utilized as a host for heterologous protein production because of its high protein secretory capacity and food-safety properties. However, A. oryzae often produces lower-than-expected yields of target heterologous proteins due to various underlying mechanisms, including degradation processes such as autophagy, which may be a significant bottleneck for protein production. In the present study, we examined the production of heterologous protein in several autophagy (Aoatg) gene disruptants of A. oryzae. We transformed A. oryzae gene disruptants of Aoatg1, Aoatg13, Aoatg4, Aoatg8, or Aoatg15, with a bovine chymosin (CHY) expression construct and found that the production levels of CHY increased up to three fold compared to the control strain. Notably, however, conidia formation by the Aoatg gene disruptants was significantly reduced. As large amounts of conidia are necessary for inoculating large-scale cultures, we also constructed Aoatg gene-conditional expression strains in which the promoter region of the Aoatg gene was replaced with the thiamine-controllable thiA promoter. Conidiation by the resultant transformants was clearly enhanced in the absence of thiamine, while autophagy remained repressed in the presence of thiamine. Moreover, these transformants displayed increased CHY productivity, which was comparable to that of the Aoatg gene disruptants. Consequently, we succeeded in the construction of A. oryzae strains capable of producing high levels of CHY due to defects in autophagy. Our finding suggests that the conditional regulation of autophagy is an effective method for increasing heterologous protein production in A. oryzae. PMID:23658635

  19. Mycosphaerella graminicola sequencing heads towards the first finished genome of a filamentous plant pathogenic fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella is one of the largest genera of plant pathogenic fungi with more than 1,000 named species, a few of which cause disease in humans and other vertebrates. The genomes of M. graminicola and M. fijiensis, two of the most economically important pathogens of wheat and banana, respectively, ...

  20. Enhancement of extracellular cellobiase activity by reducing agents in the filamentous fungus Termitomyces clypeatus.

    PubMed

    Banik, Samudra Prosad; Mukherjee, Soumya; Pal, Swagata; Ghorai, Shakuntala; Majumder, Rajib; Khowala, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular cellobiase activity of Termitomyces clypeatus increased from 2.9 U ml(-1) to 4.4 and 4.1 in presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) and β-mercaptoethanol (ME), respectively, with a decrease in Km from 0.4 to 0.3 mM (DTT) and 0.35 mM (ME). Catalysis was further enhanced if the reduced enzyme was alkylated and activity increased from 11.4 U ml(-1) (control) to 15.2 (DTT+N-ethylmaleimide) and 15.3 (DTT+iodoacetamide) using p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and from 14.6 U ml(-1)(control) to 21.9 (DTT+N-ethylmaleimide) and 18.7 (DTT+iodoacetamide) using cellobiose. The reduced enzyme showed 17 % lesser glucose inhibition. CD and tryptophan fluorescence showed no change in secondary structure was caused by DTT up to 50 mM. Cysteine content of the enzyme was 24 %. It is postulated that reduction of disulphide bonds allows better substrate affinity for cellobiase. The studies describe a novel and simple method to increase cellobiase activity for industrial applications.

  1. A CRISPR-Cas9 System for Genetic Engineering of Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Nødvig, Christina S.; Nielsen, Jakob B.; Kogle, Martin E.; Mortensen, Uffe H.

    2015-01-01

    The number of fully sequenced fungal genomes is rapidly increasing. Since genetic tools are poorly developed for most filamentous fungi, it is currently difficult to employ genetic engineering for understanding the biology of these fungi and to fully exploit them industrially. For that reason there is a demand for developing versatile methods that can be used to genetically manipulate non-model filamentous fungi. To facilitate this, we have developed a CRISPR-Cas9 based system adapted for use in filamentous fungi. The system is simple and versatile, as RNA guided mutagenesis can be achieved by transforming a target fungus with a single plasmid. The system currently contains four CRISPR-Cas9 vectors, which are equipped with commonly used fungal markers allowing for selection in a broad range of fungi. Moreover, we have developed a script that allows identification of protospacers that target gene homologs in multiple species to facilitate introduction of common mutations in different filamentous fungi. With these tools we have performed RNA-guided mutagenesis in six species of which one has not previously been genetically engineered. Moreover, for a wild-type Aspergillus aculeatus strain, we have used our CRISPR Cas9 system to generate a strain that contains an AACU_pyrG marker and demonstrated that the resulting strain can be used for iterative gene targeting. PMID:26177455

  2. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated. PMID:27312010

  3. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated.

  4. A penny-shaped crack in a filament reinforced matrix. 1: The filament model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack was studied. The elastic filament model was developed for application to evaluation studies of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. The requirements expected of the model are a sufficiently accurate representation of the filament and applicability to the interaction problems involving a cracked elastic continuum with multi-filament reinforcements. The technique for developing the model and numerical examples of it are shown.

  5. Diagnosis of femtosecond plasma filament by channeling microwaves along the filament

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Ren, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-05-20

    We introduce a simple, fast, and non-intrusive experimental method to obtain the basic parameters of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filament. The method is based on the channeling of microwaves along both a plasma filament and a well-defined conducting wire. By comparing the detected microwaves that propagate along the plasma filament and a copper wire with known conductivity and spatial dimension, the basic parameters of the plasma filament can be easily obtained. As a result of the possibility of channeling microwave radiation along the plasma filament, we were then able to obtain the plasma density distribution along the filament length.

  6. Accumulation and chemical states of radiocesium by fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian

    2014-05-01

    After accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the fall-out radiocesium was deposited on the ground. Filamentous fungus is known to accumulate radiocesium in environment, even though many minerals are involved in soil. These facts suggest that fungus affect the migration behavior of radiocesium in the environment. However, accumulation mechanism of radiocesium by fungus is not understood. In the present study, accumulation and chemical states change of Cs by unicellular fungus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied to elucidate the role of microorganisms in the migration of radiocesium in the environment. Two different experimental conditions were employed; one is the accumulation experiments of radiocesium by S. cerevisiae from the agar medium containing 137Cs and a mineral of zeolite, vermiculite, smectite, mica, or illite. The other is the experiments using stable cesium to examine the chemical states change of Cs. In the former experiment, the cells were grown on membrane filter of 0.45 μm installed on the agar medium. After the grown cells were weighed, radioactivity in the cells was measured by an autoradiography technique. The mineral weight contents were changed from 0.1% to 1% of the medium. In the latter experiment, the cells were grown in the medium containing stable Cs between 1 mM and 10mM. The Cs accumulated cells were analyzed by SEM-EDS and EXAFS. The adsorption experiments of cesium by the cells under resting condition were also conducted to test the effect of cells metabolic activity. Without mineral in the medium, cells of S. cerevisiae accumulated 1.5x103 Bq/g from the medium containing 137Cs of 2.6x102 Bq/g. When mineral was added in the medium, concentration of 137Cs in the cells decreased. The concentration of 137Cs in the cells from the medium containing different minerals were in the following order; smectite, illite, mica > vermiculite > zeolite. This order was nearly the same as the inverse of distribution coefficient of

  7. Entomology: A Bee Farming a Fungus.

    PubMed

    Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Aanen, Duur K

    2015-11-16

    Farming is done not only by humans, but also by some ant, beetle and termite species. With the discovery of a stingless bee farming a fungus that provides benefits to its larvae, bees can be added to this list.

  8. A Case of Filament - Active Region Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, C.; Dumitru, L.

    2010-09-01

    We analyze a huge filament observed between 5 and 19 September 2001. In its evolution it is linked to the active region 9612, observed between 7 and 16 September 2001. The filament has a strange morphology and dynamics: starting as two parallel components (A and B), it becomes a double sigmoid filament when a third component (C ) appears linking the other two. An unusual magnetic topology characterizes this evolution: the active region is located between the parallel components. When the third component becomes observable, it links these ones first below the active region. After a spectacular plasma movement registered in filament (A), this one becomes linked to (B) above the active region. In spite of these dramatically changes of the magnetic topology and filament -- active region switch, no CME is observed. Only a few flares occurring in AR9612 are registered and these ones can be seen in the dynamics of the filament as an expression of large scale magnetic reconnections.

  9. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huai Liang; Chin, See Leang

    2011-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints) from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation. PMID:22346566

  10. [Morphogenesis in a community of filamentous cyanobacteria].

    PubMed

    Sumina, E L; Sumin, D L

    2013-01-01

    Reversible differentiation was experimentally discovered in a community of modern filamentous cyanobacteria Oscillatoria terebriformis. Splitting of the initially uniform community into differentiated parts (strands, multiradiate aggregates, networks, etc.) occurs only for the duration of a function facilitating the activity of this community as an integral unit. The structures are formed as a result of regrouping of the filaments, without their specialization. A morphologically regulatory system (polygonal network) was found to develop under the impact of extreme factors. The levels of structural organization of filamentous cyanobacteria and multicellular eukaryotes were compared (individual cells in a filament--cell organelles; filaments--individual cells; community--organism), and the similarities and differences in morphogenesis of these groups were analyzed using the data on the embryonic regulation in multicellular eukaryotes. Spatial information in morphogenesis was shown to result not from direct realization of an inherited program but is created by the elements of integral organisms (cells and filaments) in the course of development.

  11. Evolution of Barb Angle and Filament Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H. Q.; Kurokawa, H.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Shibata, K.; Bao, X. M.; Wang, G. P.; Li, C.

    2005-09-01

    Hα observations of a quiescent U-shaped filament were obtained at Big Bear Solar Observatory and at Hida Observatory with the Flare Monitoring Telescope. The filament was located in the southern hemisphere on 1998 November 4. We study the evolution of the angle of a barb with respect to the axis of the filament and find the evolution can be divided into two phases: a rise from the acute phase to the obtuse phase and a fall. Thus, this indicates that the chirality of this barb changes with time. Moreover, in the process of evolution, we find that interconnection of the part of the filament bearing the barb with the whole filament became either weakened or strengthened. We impute the final eruption of the filament to the chirality evolution of the barb.

  12. Femtosecond laser filamentation for atmospheric sensing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huai Liang; Chin, See Leang

    2011-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints) from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation. PMID:22346566

  13. Studies on UV filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.; Rambo, P.; Diels, J.C.; Luk, T.S.; Bernstein, A.C.; Cameron, S.M.

    2000-01-05

    UV filaments in air have been examined on the basis of the diameter and length of the filament, the generation of new spectral components, and the ionization by multiphoton processes. There have been numerous observations of filaments at 800 nm. The general perception is that, above a critical power, the beam focuses because nonlinear self-lensing overcomes diffraction. The self-focusing proceeds until an opposing higher order nonlinearity forms a stable balance.

  14. Motion, decay and merging of vortex filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Ting, L.

    1988-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for vortex filaments of finite strength with small effective vortical cores are summarized. Emphases are placed on the physical meaning and the practical limit to the applicability of the asymptotic solution. Finite-difference solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for the merging of the filament(s) are described. It is focused on the development of the approximate boundary conditions for the computational domain.

  15. Magnetic field generated by current filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the magnetic field generated by two straight current filaments using the analogy between steady MHD and Euler flows. Using the Biot-Savart law, we present a dynamical system describing the extension of magnetic lines around the current filaments. It is demonstrated that, if two current filaments are non-parallel, a magnetic line starting near one current goes to infinity by the drifting effect of the other.

  16. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Elise; Mongin, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, that relies on the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation. PMID:26561133

  17. Self-Organization of Treadmilling Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovinski, K.; Kruse, K.

    2007-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is an active network of polar filaments. The activity can lead to the polymerization of filaments at one end and depolymerization at the other. This phenomenon is called treadmilling and is essential for many cellular processes, in particular, the crawling of cells on a substrate. We develop a microscopic theoretical framework for describing systems of treadmilling filaments. We show that such systems can self-organize into structures observed in cell fragments, in particular, asters and moving spots.

  18. Methods for modeling cytoskeletal and DNA filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Steven S.

    2014-02-01

    This review summarizes the models that researchers use to represent the conformations and dynamics of cytoskeletal and DNA filaments. It focuses on models that address individual filaments in continuous space. Conformation models include the freely jointed, Gaussian, angle-biased chain (ABC), and wormlike chain (WLC) models, of which the first three bend at discrete joints and the last bends continuously. Predictions from the WLC model generally agree well with experiment. Dynamics models include the Rouse, Zimm, stiff rod, dynamic WLC, and reptation models, of which the first four apply to isolated filaments and the last to entangled filaments. Experiments show that the dynamic WLC and reptation models are most accurate. They also show that biological filaments typically experience strong hydrodynamic coupling and/or constrained motion. Computer simulation methods that address filament dynamics typically compute filament segment velocities from local forces using the Langevin equation and then integrate these velocities with explicit or implicit methods; the former are more versatile and the latter are more efficient. Much remains to be discovered in biological filament modeling. In particular, filament dynamics in living cells are not well understood, and current computational methods are too slow and not sufficiently versatile. Although primarily a review, this paper also presents new statistical calculations for the ABC and WLC models. Additionally, it corrects several discrepancies in the literature about bending and torsional persistence length definitions, and their relations to flexural and torsional rigidities.

  19. Flux emergence event underneath a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Cerrato, Y.; Cid, C.; Guerrero, A.; Saiz, E.

    2015-10-01

    Flux emergence phenomena are relevant at different temporal and spatial scales. We have studied a flux emergence region underneath a filament. This filament elevated itself smoothly, and the associated CME reached the Earth. In this study we investigate the size and the amount of flux in the emergence event. The flux emergence site appeared just beneath a filament. The emergence acquired a size of 24 Mm in half a day. The unsigned magnetic flux density from LOS-magnetograms was around 1 kG at its maximum. The transverse field as well as the filament eruption were also analysed.

  20. Observations of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.; Xu, A. A.

    An active region filament was well observed on September 4, 2002 with THEMIS at the Teide observatory and SOHO/MDI. The full Stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα and FeI 6302 Å lines. Using the data, we have studied the fine structure of the filament and obtained the parameters at the barb endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Our results indicate: (a) the Doppler velocities are quiet different at barb endpoints; (b) the longitudinal magnetic fields at the barb endpoints are very weak; (c) there is a strong magnetic field structure under the filament spine.

  1. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  2. Assembly of Superparamagnetic Filaments in External Field.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiachen; Song, Fan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-09-13

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of anchored magneto-elastic filaments in external magnetic field. The filaments are composed of a mixture of superparamagnetic and nonmagnetic colloidal beads interlinked with elastic springs. We explore the steady-state structures of filaments with various composition and bending rigidity subject to external magnetic field parallel to the surface. The interplay of elastic and induced magnetic interactions results in a rich phase behavior with morphologies reminiscent of macromolecular folding: bent filaments, loops, sheets, helicoids, and other collapsed structures. Our results provide new insights into the design of hierarchically assembled supramolecular structures with controlled response to external stimuli. PMID:27536958

  3. Deep coronal hole associated with quiescent filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesumaningrum, Rasdewita; Herdiwidjaya, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the morphology of quiescent filament observed by H-alpha Solar Telescope at Bosscha Observatory in association with coronal hole observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in 193 Å from Solar Dynamics Observatory. H-alpha images were processed by imaging softwares, namely Iris 5.59 and ImageJ, to enhance the signal to noise ratio and to identify the filament features associated with coronal hole. For images observed on October 12, 2011, November 14, 2011 and January 2, 2012, we identified distinct features of coronal holes above the quiescent filaments. This associated coronal holes have filament-like morphology with a thick long thread as it's `spine', defined as Deep Coronal Hole. Because of strong magnetic field of sunspot, these filaments and coronal holes emerged far from active region and lasted for several days. It is interesting as for segmented filament, deep coronal holes above the filaments lasted for a quite long period of time and merged. This association between filament and deep coronal hole can be explained by filament magnetic loop.

  4. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  5. Direct electrochemistry of nitrate reductase from the fungus Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Palraj; Ringel, Phillip; Kruse, Tobias; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2016-09-01

    We report the first direct (unmediated) catalytic electrochemistry of a eukaryotic nitrate reductase (NR). NR from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, is a member of the mononuclear molybdenum enzyme family and contains a Mo, heme and FAD cofactor which are involved in electron transfer from NAD(P)H to the (Mo) active site where reduction of nitrate to nitrite takes place. NR was adsorbed on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPG) working electrode. Non-turnover redox responses were observed in the absence of nitrate from holo NR and three variants lacking the FAD, heme or Mo cofactor. The FAD response is due to dissociated cofactor in all cases. In the presence of nitrate, NR shows a pronounced cathodic catalytic wave with an apparent Michaelis constant (KM) of 39μM (pH7). The catalytic cathodic current increases with temperature from 5 to 35°C and an activation enthalpy of 26kJmol(-1) was determined. In spite of dissociation of the FAD cofactor, catalytically activity is maintained. PMID:27060250

  6. Force-Induced Dynamical Properties of Multiple Cytoskeletal Filaments Are Distinct from that of Single Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipjyoti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    How cytoskeletal filaments collectively undergo growth and shrinkage is an intriguing question. Collective properties of multiple bio-filaments (actin or microtubules) undergoing hydrolysis have not been studied extensively earlier within simple theoretical frameworks. In this paper, we study the collective dynamical properties of multiple filaments under force, and demonstrate the distinct properties of a multi-filament system in comparison to a single filament. Comparing stochastic simulation results with recent experimental data, we show that multi-filament collective catastrophes are slower than catastrophes of single filaments. Our study also shows further distinctions as follows: (i) force-dependence of the cap-size distribution of multiple filaments are quantitatively different from that of single filaments, (ii) the diffusion constant associated with the system length fluctuations is distinct for multiple filaments, and (iii) switching dynamics of multiple filaments between capped and uncapped states and the fluctuations therein are also distinct. We build a unified picture by establishing interconnections among all these collective phenomena. Additionally, we show that the collapse times during catastrophes can be sharp indicators of collective stall forces exceeding the additive contributions of single filaments. PMID:25531397

  7. Mutation-Specific Effects on Thin Filament Length in Thin Filament Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    de Winter, Josine M.; Joureau, Barbara; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kiss, Balázs; Yuen, Michaela; Gupta, Vandana A.; Pappas, Christopher T.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Edvardson, Simon; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma B.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bönnemann, C. G.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Beggs, Alan H.; Granzier, Henk; Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thin filament myopathies are among the most common nondystrophic congenital muscular disorders, and are caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are associated with the skeletal muscle thin filament. Mechanisms underlying muscle weakness are poorly understood, but might involve the length of the thin filament, an important determinant of force generation. Methods We investigated the sarcomere length-dependence of force, a functional assay that provides insights into the contractile strength of muscle fibers as well as the length of the thin filaments, in muscle fibers from 51 patients with thin filament myopathy caused by mutations in NEB, ACTA1, TPM2, TPM3, TNNT1, KBTBD13, KLHL40, and KLHL41. Results Lower force generation was observed in muscle fibers from patients of all genotypes. In a subset of patients who harbor mutations in NEB and ACTA1, the lower force was associated with downward shifted force–sarcomere length relations, indicative of shorter thin filaments. Confocal microscopy confirmed shorter thin filaments in muscle fibers of these patients. A conditional Neb knockout mouse model, which recapitulates thin filament myopathy, revealed a compensatory mechanism; the lower force generation that was associated with shorter thin filaments was compensated for by increasing the number of sarcomeres in series. This allowed muscle fibers to operate at a shorter sarcomere length and maintain optimal thin–thick filament overlap. Interpretation These findings might provide a novel direction for the development of therapeutic strategies for thin filament myopathy patients with shortened thin filament lengths. PMID:27074222

  8. Intermediate filaments of the lung.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hayan; Ku, Nam-On

    2013-07-01

    Intermediate filaments (IF), a subfamily of the cytoskeletal filaments, provide structural support to cells. Human diseases related to mutations in IF proteins in which their tissue-specific expression is reflected have been found in a broad range of patients. The properties of identified IF mutants are well-studied in vitro in cultured cells and in vivo using transgenic mice expressing IF mutants. However, the association of IF proteins with diseases of the lung is not fully studied yet. Epithelial cells in normal lung express vimentin and various keratins, and the patterns of their expression are altered depending on the progression of the lung diseases. A growing number of studies performed in alveolar epithelial cells demonstrated IF involvement in disease-related aspects including their usefulness as tumor marker, in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell migration. However, the lung disease-associated IF functions in animal models are poorly understood, and IF mutations associated with lung diseases in humans have not been reported. In this review, we summarize recent studies that show the significance of IF proteins in lung epithelial cells. Understanding these aspects is an important prerequisite for further investigations on the role of lung IF in animal models and human lung diseases.

  9. Filamentation with nonlinear Bessel vortices.

    PubMed

    Jukna, V; Milián, C; Xie, C; Itina, T; Dudley, J; Courvoisier, F; Couairon, A

    2014-10-20

    We present a new type of ring-shaped filaments featured by stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions to the laser beam propagation equation. Two different regimes are identified by direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear propagation of axicon focused Gaussian beams carrying helicity in a Kerr medium with multiphoton absorption: the stable nonlinear propagation regime corresponds to a slow beam reshaping into one of the stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions, called nonlinear Bessel vortices. The region of existence of nonlinear Bessel vortices is found semi-analytically. The influence of the Kerr nonlinearity and nonlinear losses on the beam shape is presented. Direct numerical simulations highlight the role of attractors played by nonlinear Bessel vortices in the stable propagation regime. Large input powers or small cone angles lead to the unstable propagation regime where nonlinear Bessel vortices break up into an helical multiple filament pattern or a more irregular structure. Nonlinear Bessel vortices are shown to be sufficiently intense to generate a ring-shaped filamentary ionized channel in the medium which is foreseen as opening the way to novel applications in laser material processing of transparent dielectrics. PMID:25401574

  10. A polypeptide of 59 kDa is associated with bundles of cytoplasmic filaments in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, A L; Alvarez, M E; Lawson, D; Maccioni, H J

    1990-01-01

    Complex arrangements of filamentous structures have been isolated from vegetative cells of the fungus Neurospora crassa. They were enriched by differential centrifugation and purified by permeation chromatography. The filamentous structures are made up of units of 8-10 nm diameter and were isolated in bundles of up to six to nine units. The main constituent of these structures is a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 59 kDa (P59Nc), which represents 4-5% of the total N. crassa proteins. The filamentous structures are cold-stable and are not affected by high-ionic-strength solutions or by the presence of 10 mM-EDTA or 1% (w/v) Triton X-100; they were disassembled by raising the pH of the solution or by using Tris-based buffers. The disassembled form assembled into structures sedimentable at 105,000 g after dialysis against the isolation buffer. The sedimentable structures were organized in the form of regular aggregates of 42-45 nm polypeptides and reacted weakly with anti-IFA, a monoclonal antibody which recognizes an epitope common to many of the higher-eukaryote intermediate-filament polypeptides. Immunofluorescence examination of wall-digested hyphae of N. crassa using affinity-purified antibodies prepared against P59Nc showed immunostaining of abundant filamentous and dot-shaped structures distributed in the cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2141976

  11. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  12. Stability and Reformation of Partially Eruptive Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Prasad Choudhary, Debi; Chandra, Ramesh; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Kayshap, Pradeep; Filippov, Boris; Uddin, Wahab

    We present an observation of the confined partial filament eruption on 4 August 2012 which later exhibits a rapid reformation along the same magnetic channel within ≈2 hours. We used BBSO and GONG Halpha as well as SDO AIA 171 Å observations to study the filament properties and its kinematics. SDO/AIA observations over the disk are used to study at coronal temperature the plasma dynamics associated with the filament. STEREO/SECCHI provides the limb observations of the filament dynamics. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure as evident in the Halpha observations and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, it is found that the filament chirality is sinistral. On the other hand, the activated enveloping flux rope shows right-handed twist in the SDO/AIA 171 Å observations. Therefore, this dynamic event exhibits one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). Filament plasma goes into dynamic motion at ≈11:20 UT from its middle part towards the north-west direction with an average speed of ≈100 km s(-1) . Brightening underneath the eruptive part of the filament shows the most likely signature of low atmospheric reconnection. After traveling a distance of around ≈215 Mm towards north-west, the cool filament plasma stops and returns back at ≈12:00 UT towards its eastern foot point with the speed of ≈60 km s(-1) . We calculated the coronal magnetic field decay index (n) near the flux rope. Using this estimation, we conjecture that the filament lies within the stability domain n <1, which is the cause of its stability and possibility of prompt reformation.

  13. Growth of filaments and saturation of the filamentation instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gedalin, M.; Medvedev, M.; Spitkovsky, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Vaivads, A.; Perri, S.

    2010-03-15

    The filamentation instability of counterstreaming beams is a nonresonant hydrodynamic-type instability whose growth rate is a smooth function of the wavelength (scale). As a result, perturbations with all unstable wavelengths develop, and the growth saturates due to the saturation of available current. For a given scale, the magnetic field at saturation is proportional to the scale. As a result, the instability develops in a nearly linear regime, where the unstable modes stop growing as soon as the saturation of the corresponding wavelength is reached. At each moment there exists a dominant scale of the magnetic field which is the scale that reached saturation at this particular time. The smaller scales do not disappear and can be easily distinguished in the current structure. The overall growth of the instability stops when the loss of the streaming ion energy because of deceleration is comparable to the initial ion energy.

  14. Fungus-insect gall of Phlebopus portentosus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Xia; He, Ming-Xia; Cao, Yang; Liu, Jing; Gao, Feng; Wang, Wen-Bing; Ji, Kai-Ping; Shao, Shi-Cheng; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Phlebopus portentosus is a popular edible wild mushroom found in the tropical Yunnan, China, and northern Thailand. In its natural habitats, a gall often has been found on some plant roots, around which fungal fruiting bodies are produced. The galls are different from common insect galls in that their cavity walls are not made from plant tissue but rather from the hyphae of P. portentosus. Therefore we have termed this phenomenon "fungus-insect gall". Thus far six root mealy bug species in the family Pseudococcidae that form fungus-insect galls with P. portentosus have been identified: Formicococcus polysperes, Geococcus satellitum, Planococcus minor, Pseudococcus cryptus, Paraputo banzigeri and Rastrococcus invadens. Fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of more than 21 plant species, including Delonix regia, Citrus maxima, Coffea arabica and Artocarpus heterophyllus. Greenhouse inoculation trials showed that fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of A. heterophyllus 1 mo after inoculation. The galls were subglobose to globose, fulvous when young and became dark brown at maturation. Each gall harbored one or more mealy bugs and had a chimney-like vent for ventilation and access to the gall. The cavity wall had three layers. Various shaped mealy bug wax deposits were found inside the wall. Fungal hyphae invaded the epidermis of plant roots and sometimes even the cortical cells during the late stage of gall development. The identity of the fungus inside the cavity was confirmed by molecular methods. PMID:25344264

  15. Fungus-insect gall of Phlebopus portentosus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Xia; He, Ming-Xia; Cao, Yang; Liu, Jing; Gao, Feng; Wang, Wen-Bing; Ji, Kai-Ping; Shao, Shi-Cheng; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Phlebopus portentosus is a popular edible wild mushroom found in the tropical Yunnan, China, and northern Thailand. In its natural habitats, a gall often has been found on some plant roots, around which fungal fruiting bodies are produced. The galls are different from common insect galls in that their cavity walls are not made from plant tissue but rather from the hyphae of P. portentosus. Therefore we have termed this phenomenon "fungus-insect gall". Thus far six root mealy bug species in the family Pseudococcidae that form fungus-insect galls with P. portentosus have been identified: Formicococcus polysperes, Geococcus satellitum, Planococcus minor, Pseudococcus cryptus, Paraputo banzigeri and Rastrococcus invadens. Fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of more than 21 plant species, including Delonix regia, Citrus maxima, Coffea arabica and Artocarpus heterophyllus. Greenhouse inoculation trials showed that fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of A. heterophyllus 1 mo after inoculation. The galls were subglobose to globose, fulvous when young and became dark brown at maturation. Each gall harbored one or more mealy bugs and had a chimney-like vent for ventilation and access to the gall. The cavity wall had three layers. Various shaped mealy bug wax deposits were found inside the wall. Fungal hyphae invaded the epidermis of plant roots and sometimes even the cortical cells during the late stage of gall development. The identity of the fungus inside the cavity was confirmed by molecular methods.

  16. One Half Million Mile Solar Filament

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captures a very long, whip-like solar filament extending over half a million miles in a long arc above the sun’s surface. Filaments are cooler clouds of ...

  17. A First Approach to Filament Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, P. E. S.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo; Simoes, R.; Dias, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive…

  18. Process for making silver metal filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1998-04-01

    This invention relates to a process for making filaments of metal compounds and more particularly to a process for making silver metal filaments. The United States Government has rights to this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC05-8421400 with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. awarded by the US Department of Energy.

  19. Lamp automatically switches to new filament on burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingle, W. B.

    1966-01-01

    Lamp with primary and secondary filaments has a means for automatic switching to the secondary filament at primary filament burnout. Lamp failures and resultant expenses during oscillograph printing are appreciably reduced.

  20. Enigmatic reticulated filaments in subsurface granite.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Z; Hernández-Mariné, M; Jurado, V; Dionísio, A; Barquinha, P; Fortunato, E; Afonso, M J; Chaminé, H I; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, geomicrobiologists have focused their researches on the nature and origin of enigmatic reticulated filaments reported in modern and fossil samples from limestone caves and basalt lava tubes. Researchers have posed questions on these filaments concerning their nature, origin, chemistry, morphology, mode of formation and growth. A tentative microbial origin has been elusive since these filaments are found as hollow tubular sheaths and could not be affiliated to any known microorganism. We describe the presence of similar structures in a 16th century granite tunnel in Porto, Northwest Portugal. The reticulated filaments we identify exhibit fine geometry surface ornamentation formed by cross-linked Mn-rich nanofibres, surrounded by a large amount of extracellular polymeric substances. Within these Mn-rich filaments we report for the first time the occurrence of microbial cells. PMID:23760930

  1. Enigmatic reticulated filaments in subsurface granite.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Z; Hernández-Mariné, M; Jurado, V; Dionísio, A; Barquinha, P; Fortunato, E; Afonso, M J; Chaminé, H I; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, geomicrobiologists have focused their researches on the nature and origin of enigmatic reticulated filaments reported in modern and fossil samples from limestone caves and basalt lava tubes. Researchers have posed questions on these filaments concerning their nature, origin, chemistry, morphology, mode of formation and growth. A tentative microbial origin has been elusive since these filaments are found as hollow tubular sheaths and could not be affiliated to any known microorganism. We describe the presence of similar structures in a 16th century granite tunnel in Porto, Northwest Portugal. The reticulated filaments we identify exhibit fine geometry surface ornamentation formed by cross-linked Mn-rich nanofibres, surrounded by a large amount of extracellular polymeric substances. Within these Mn-rich filaments we report for the first time the occurrence of microbial cells.

  2. Quantifying protein diffusion and capture on filaments.

    PubMed

    Reithmann, Emanuel; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2015-02-17

    The functional relevance of regulating proteins is often limited to specific binding sites such as the ends of microtubules or actin-filaments. A localization of proteins on these functional sites is of great importance. We present a quantitative theory for a diffusion and capture process, where proteins diffuse on a filament and stop diffusing when reaching the filament's end. It is found that end-association after one-dimensional diffusion is the main source for tip-localization of such proteins. As a consequence, diffusion and capture is highly efficient in enhancing the reaction velocity of enzymatic reactions, where proteins and filament ends are to each other as enzyme and substrate. We show that the reaction velocity can effectively be described within a Michaelis-Menten framework. Together, one-dimensional diffusion and capture beats the (three-dimensional) Smoluchowski diffusion limit for the rate of protein association to filament ends.

  3. Epithelial Intermediate Filaments: Guardians against Microbial Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Florian; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are abundant cytoskeletal components of epithelial tissues. They have been implicated in overall stress protection. A hitherto poorly investigated area of research is the function of intermediate filaments as a barrier to microbial infection. This review summarizes the accumulating knowledge about this interaction. It first emphasizes the unique spatial organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton in different epithelial tissues to protect the organism against microbial insults. We then present examples of direct interaction between viral, bacterial, and parasitic proteins and the intermediate filament system and describe how this affects the microbe-host interaction by modulating the epithelial cytoskeleton, the progression of infection, and host response. These observations not only provide novel insights into the dynamics and function of intermediate filaments but also indicate future avenues to combat microbial infection. PMID:27355965

  4. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  5. The myosin filament XIV backbone structure.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, F T; Weisel, J; Pepe, F A

    1992-01-01

    The substructure of the thick filaments of chemically skinned chicken pectoralis muscle was investigated by electron microscopy. Images of transverse sections of the myosin filaments were determined to have threefold symmetry by cross-correlation analysis, which gives an unbiased determination of the rotational symmetry of the images. Resolution, using the phase residual test (Frank et al. 1981. Science [Wash. DC]. 214:1353-1355), was found to be between 3.2 and 3.6 nm. Three arrangements of nine subfilaments in the backbone were found in all regions of the filament at ionic strengths of 20 and 200 mM. In the average images of two of these, there were three dense central subfilaments and three pairs of subfilaments on the surface of the thick filament. In the average image of the third arrangement, all of the protein mass of the nine subfilaments was on the surface of the filament with three of them showing less variation in position than the others. A fourth arrangement appearing to be transitional between two of these was seen often at 200 mM ionic strength and only rarely at 20 mM. On average, the myosin subfilaments were parallel to the long axis of the filament. The different arrangements of subfilaments appear to be randomly distributed among the filaments in a transverse section of the A-band. Relative rotational orientations with respect to the hexagonal filament lattice, using the three densest subfilaments as reference showed a major clustering (32%) of filaments within one 10 degrees spread, a lesser clustering (15%) at 90 degrees to the first, and the remainder scattered thinly over the rest of the 120 degrees range. There was no obvious pattern of distribution of the two predominant orientations that could define a superlattice in the filament lattice. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 PMID:1617136

  6. Conductive Anodic Filament (CAF) Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Antonio

    Conductive anodic filament (CAF) is a failure mode in printed wiring boards (PWBs) which occurs under high humidity and high voltage gradient conditions. The filament, a copper salt, grows from anode to cathode along the epoxy-glass interface. Ready and Turbini (2000) identified this copper salt as the Cu 2(OH)3Cl, atacamite compound. This work has investigated the influence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene propylene glycol (PEPG) fluxing agents on the chemical nature of CAF. For coupons processed with PEPG flux, with and without chloride, a copper-chloride containing compound was formed in the polymer matrix. This compound was characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as CuCl and an electrochemical mechanism for the formation of the chloride-containing CAF has been proposed. For PEG flux, with and without chloride, it has been shown that CAF only formed, but no copper containing compound formed in the matrix. It appears for PEG fluxed coupons, a PEG-Cu-Cl complex forms, binds the available Cu and acts as a barrier to the formation of CuCl in the polymer matrix. Meeker and Lu Valle (1995) have previously proposed that CAF failure is best represented by two competing reactions -- the formation of a copper chloride corrosion compound (now identified as Cu2(OH)3Cl) and the formation of innocuous trapped chlorine compounds. Since no evidence of any trapped chloride compounds has been found, we propose that the formation of CAF is best represented by a single non-reversible reaction. For coupons processed with a high bromide-containing flux, bromide containing CAF was created and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to be Cu2(OH)3Br. In addition, a copper-containing compound was formed in the polymer matrix and characterized using XPS as CuBr. An electrochemical mechanism for the formation of bromide-containing CAF has been proposed based on the XPS data.

  7. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  8. The invertebrate myosin filament: subfilament arrangement of the solid filaments of insect flight muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Beinbrech, G; Ashton, F T; Pepe, F A

    1992-01-01

    Transverse sections (approximately 140 nm thick) of solid myosin filaments of the flight muscles of the fleshfly, Phormia terrae-novae, the honey bee, Apis mellifica, and the waterbug, Lethocerus uhleri, were photographed in a JEM model 200A electron microscope at 200 kV. The images were digitized and computer processed by rotational filtering. In each of these filaments it was found that the symmetry of the core and the wall was not the same. The power spectra of the images showed sixfold symmetry for the wall and threefold symmetry for the core of the filaments. The images of the filaments in each muscle were superimposed according to the sixfold center of the wall. These averaged images for all three muscles showed six pairs of subunits in the wall similar to those found in the wall of tubular filaments. From serial sections of the fleshfly filaments, we conclude that the subunits in the wall of the filaments represent subfilaments essentially parallel to the long axis of the filament. In each muscle there are additional subunits in the core, closely related to the subunits in the wall. Evaluation of serial sections through fleshfly filaments suggests that the relationship of the three subunits observed in the core to those in the wall varies along the length of the filaments. In waterbug filaments there are three dense and three less dense subunits for a total of six all closely related to the wall. Bee filaments have three subunits related to the wall and three subunits located eccentrically in the core of the filaments. The presence of core subunits can be related to the paramyosin content of the filaments. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 12 PMID:1617135

  9. Filamentous fungi as a source of natural antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Helen; Doyle, Sean; Murphy, Richard

    2015-10-15

    Ten species of filamentous fungi grown in submerged flask cultures were investigated for antioxidant capacity. Effective antioxidant activity was demonstrated in terms of β-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching, radical scavenging, reduction of metal ions and chelating abilities against ferrous ions. Different extraction methods affected antioxidant activities through their effect on biologically active compounds produced in fungal mycelia. The methanolic extract of each fungus was typically more effective in antioxidant properties. Phenolic content was established in the range of 0.44-9.33 mg/g, flavonoid contents were in the range of 0.02-3.90 mg/g and condensed tannin contents were in the range of 1.77-18.83 mg/g. Total phenol content of each extract was attributed to overall antioxidant capacity (r ⩾ 0.883-1.000). Submerged cultivation of Grifola frondosa, Monascus purpureus, Pleurotus spp., Lentinula edodes and Trametes versicolor proved to be an effective method for the production of natural antioxidants. PMID:25952884

  10. Characterization and structure of the mitochondrial small rRNA gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, D D; Pfeifer, T A; Mulyk, D S; Khachatourians, G G

    1998-06-01

    The entire mitochondrial (mt) small ribosomal RNA (srRNA) gene from the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana was sequenced. Alignment of the sequence to those of other filamentous fungi revealed gross length differences in their respective products. Construction of a secondary structural model showed that these differences were restricted to known variable srRNA subdomains. Several features were identified that were common only to the hyphomycetous fungi examined. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the anamorph B. bassiana was more closely related to the pyrenomycete than to the plectomycete ascomycetous fungi. Based on our previous comparison of mt gene arrangement in filamentous fungi, this was unexpected. The possibility that the smaller mt genomes reflect the ancestral arrangement of genes is discussed.

  11. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  12. Automatic Detect and Trace of Solar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng; Chen, P. F.; Tang, Yu-hua; Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang

    We developed a series of methods to automatically detect and trace solar filaments in solar Hα images. The programs are able to not only recognize filaments and determine their properties, such as the position, the area and other relevant parameters, but also to trace the daily evolution of the filaments. For solar full disk Hα images, the method consists of three parts: first, preprocessing is applied to correct the original images; second, the Canny edge-detection method is used to detect the filaments; third, filament properties are recognized through the morphological operators. For each Hα filament and its barb features, we introduced the unweighted undirected graph concept and adopted Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm to recognize the filament spine; then, using polarity inversion line shift method for measuring the polarities in both sides of the filament to determine the filament axis chirality; finally, employing connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculating the angle between each barb and spine to indicate the barb chirality. Our algorithms are applied to the observations from varied observatories, including the Optical & Near Infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) in Nanjing University, Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) and Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The programs are demonstrated to be effective and efficient. We used our method to automatically process and analyze 3470 images obtained by MLSO from January 1998 to December 2009, and a butterfly diagram of filaments is obtained. It shows that the latitudinal migration of solar filaments has three trends in the Solar Cycle 23: The drift velocity was fast from 1998 to the solar maximum; after the solar maximum, it became relatively slow and after 2006, the migration became divergent, signifying the solar minimum. About 60% filaments with the latitudes larger than 50 degree migrate towards the Polar Regions with relatively high velocities, and the latitudinal migrating

  13. Open-Ended Experimentation with the Fungus Pilobolus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coble, Charles R.; Bland, Charles E.

    This paper describes open-ended experimentation with the fungus Pilobolus for laboratory work by high school students. The fungus structure and reproduction is described and sources of the fungus are suggested. Four areas for investigation are suggested: the effect of a diffuse light source, the effect of a point light source, the effect of light…

  14. White-nose syndrome fungus (Geomyces destructans) in bat, France.

    PubMed

    Puechmaille, Sebastien J; Verdeyroux, Pascal; Fuller, Hubert; Gouilh, Meriadeg Ar; Bekaert, Michael; Teeling, Emma C

    2010-02-01

    White-nose syndrome is caused by the fungus Geomyces destructans and is responsible for the deaths of >1,000,000 bats since 2006. This disease and fungus had been restricted to the northeastern United States. We detected this fungus in a bat in France and assessed the implications of this finding. PMID:20113562

  15. Filamentation of Campylobacter in broth cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffar, Nacheervan M.; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    The transition from rod to filamentous cell morphology has been identified as a response to stressful conditions in many bacterial species and has been ascribed to confer certain survival advantages. Filamentation of Campylobacter jejuni was demonstrated to occur spontaneously on entry in to stationary phase distinguishing it from many other bacteria where a reduction in size is more common. The aim of this study was to investigate the cues that give rise to filamentation of C. jejuni and C. coli and gain insights into the process. Using minimal medium, augmentation of filamentation occurred and it was observed that this morphological change was wide spread amongst C. jejuni strains tested but was not universal in C. coli strains. Filamentation did not appear to be due to release of diffusible molecules, toxic metabolites, or be in response to oxidative stress in the medium. Separated filaments exhibited greater intracellular ATP contents (2.66 to 17.4 fg) than spiral forms (0.99 to 1.7 fg) and showed enhanced survival in water at 4 and 37°C compared to spiral cells. These observations support the conclusion that the filaments are adapted to survive extra-intestinal environments. Differences in cell morphology and physiology need to be considered in the context of the design of experimental studies and the methods adopted for the isolation of campylobacters from food, clinical, and environmental sources. PMID:26175723

  16. Automatic Solar Filament Segmentation and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Shih, F. Y.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.; Chae, J.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a generic method to automatically segment and characterize solar filaments from various Hα full-disk solar images, obtained by different solar observatories, with different dynamic ranges and statistical properties. First, a cascading Hough circle detector is designed to find the center location and radius of the solar disks. Second, polynomial surface fitting is adopted to correct unbalanced luminance. Third, an adaptive thresholding method is put forward to segment solar filaments. Finally, for each piece of a solar filament, its centroid location, area, and length are characterized, in which morphological thinning and graph theory are used for identifying the main skeletons of filaments. To test the performance of the proposed methods, a dataset composed of 125 Hα images is considered. These images were obtained by four solar observatories from January 2000 to May 2010, one image per month. Experimental results show that the accuracy rate is above 95% as measured by filament number and above 99% as measured by filament area, indicating that only a few tiny filaments are not detected.

  17. Single turnovers of fluorescent ATP bound to bipolar myosin filament during actin filaments sliding

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Takahiro; Kobatake, Takahiro; Okubo, Hiroyuki; Chaen, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide turnover rates of bipolar myosin thick filament along which actin filament slides were measured by the displacement of prebound fluorescent ATP analog 2′(3′)-O-[N-[2-[(Cy3)]amindo]ethyl] carbamoyl]-adenosine 5′ triphosphate (Cy3-EDA-ATP) upon flash photolysis of caged ATP. The fluorescence of the thick filament where actin filament slides decayed with two exponential processes. The slower rate constant was the same as that without actin filament. Along bipolar myosin thick filament, actin filaments slide at a fast speed towards the central bare zone (forward), but more slowly away from the bare zone (backward). The displacement rate constant of fluorescent ATP from the myosin filament where actin filament moved forward was 5.0 s−1, whereas the rate constant where the actin filament slid backward was 1.7 s−1. These findings suggest that the slow ADP release rate is responsible for the slow backward sliding movement. PMID:27493536

  18. Filamentous Biopolymers on Surfaces: Atomic Force Microscopy Images Compared with Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Filament Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Mücke, Norbert; Klenin, Konstantin; Kirmse, Robert; Bussiek, Malte; Herrmann, Harald; Hafner, Mathias; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarly on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i) For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii) For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a ‘trapping’ mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these ‘ideal’ adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica (‘ideal’ trapping) and on glass (‘ideal’ equilibrated) with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions. PMID:19888472

  19. Tailor-made CRISPR/Cas system for highly efficient targeted gene replacement in the rice blast fungus.

    PubMed

    Arazoe, Takayuki; Miyoshi, Kennosuke; Yamato, Tohru; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Ohsato, Shuichi; Arie, Tsutomu; Kuwata, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    CRISPR/Cas-derived RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) that can generate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at a specific sequence are widely used for targeted genome editing by induction of DSB repair in many organisms. The CRISPR/Cas system consists of two components: a single Cas9 nuclease and a single-guide RNA (sgRNA). Therefore, the system for constructing RGNs is simple and efficient, but the utilization of RGNs in filamentous fungi has not been validated. In this study, we established the CRISPR/Cas system in the model filamentous fungus, Pyricularia oryzae, using Cas9 that was codon-optimized for filamentous fungi, and the endogenous RNA polymerase (RNAP) III U6 promoter and a RNAP II fungal promoter for the expression of the sgRNA. We further demonstrated that RGNs could recognize the desired sequences and edit endogenous genes through homologous recombination-mediated targeted gene replacement with high efficiency. Our system will open the way for the development of various CRISPR/Cas-based applications in filamentous fungi. PMID:26039904

  20. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  1. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  2. Natural plasmids of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, A J

    1995-01-01

    Among eukaryotes, plasmids have been found in fungi and plants but not in animals. Most plasmids are mitochondrial. In filamentous fungi, plasmids are commonly encountered in isolates from natural populations. Individual populations may show a predominance of one type, but some plasmids have a global distribution, often crossing species boundaries. Surveys have shown that strains can contain more than one type of plasmid and that different types appear to be distributed independently. In crosses, plasmids are generally inherited maternally. Horizontal transmission is by cell contact. Circular plasmids are common only in Neurospora spp., but linear plasmids have been found in many fungi. Circular plasmids have one open reading frame (ORF) coding for a DNA polymerase or a reverse transcriptase. Linear plasmids generally have two ORFs, coding for presumptive DNA and RNA polymerases with amino acid motifs showing homology to viral polymerases. Plasmids often attain a high copy number, in excess of that of mitochondrial DNA. Linear plasmids have a protein attached to their 5' end, and this is presumed to act as a replication primer. Most plasmids are neutral passengers, but several linear plasmids integrate into mitochondrial DNA, causing death of the host culture. Inferred amino acid sequences of linear plasmid ORFs have been used to plot phylogenetic trees, which show a fair concordance with conventional trees. The circular Neurospora plasmids have replication systems that seem to be evolutionary intermediates between the RNA and the DNA worlds. PMID:8531891

  3. Filament overwrapped motor case technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Joel P.

    1993-11-01

    Atlantic Research Corporation (ARC) joined with the French Societe Europeenne de Propulsion (SEP) to develop and deliver to the U.S. Navy a small quantity of composite filament wound rocket motors to demonstrate a manufacturing technique that was being applied at the two companies. It was perceived that the manufacturing technique could produce motors that would be light in weight, inexpensive to produce, and that had a good chance of meeting insensitive munitions (IM) requirements that were being formulated by the Navy in the early 1980s. Under subcontract to ARC, SEP designed, tested, and delivered 2.75-inch rocket motors to the U.S. Navy for IM tests that were conducted in 1989 at China Lake, California. The program was one of the first to be founded by Nunn Amendment money. The Government-to-Government program was sponsored by the Naval Air Systems Command and was monitored by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head (NSWC-IH), Maryland. The motor propellant that was employed was a new, extruded composite formulation that was under development at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. The following paper describes the highlights of the program and gives the results of structural and ballistic static tests and insensitive munitions tests that were conducted on demonstration motors.

  4. Cytoplasmic filaments of Amoeba proteus. I. The role of filaments in consistency changes and movement.

    PubMed

    Pollard, T D; Ito, S

    1970-08-01

    The role of filaments in consistency changes and movement in a motile cytoplasmic extract of Amoeba proteus was investigated by correlating light and electron microscopic observations with viscosity measurements. The extract is prepared by the method of Thompson and Wolpert (1963). At 0 degrees C, this extract is nonmotile and similar in structure to ameba cytoplasm, consisting of groundplasm, vesicles, mitochondria, and a few 160 A filaments. The extract undergoes striking ATP-stimulated streaming when warmed to 22 degrees C. Two phases of movement are distinguished. During the first phase, the apparent viscosity usually increases and numerous 50-70 A filaments appear in samples of the extract prepared for electron microscopy, suggesting that the increase in viscosity in caused, at least in part, by the formation of these thin filaments. During this initial phase of ATP-stimulated movement, these thin filaments are not detectable by phase-contrast or polarization microscopy, but later, in the second phase of movement, 70 A filaments aggregate to form birefringent microscopic fibrils. A preparation of pure groundplasm with no 160 A filaments or membranous organelles exhibits little or no ATP-stimulated movement, but 50-70 A filaments form and aggregate into birefringent fibrils. This observation and the structural relationship of the 70 A and the 160 A filaments in the motile extract suggest that both types of filaments may be required for movement. These two types of filaments, 50-70 A and 160 A, are also present in the cytoplasm of intact amebas. Fixed cells could not be used to study the distribution of these filaments during natural ameboid movement because of difficulties in preserving the normal structure of the ameba during preparation for electron microscopy.

  5. Actin Filament Segmentation Using Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongsheng; Shen, Tian; Huang, Xiaolei

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for actin filament segmentation in 2D TIRFM image sequences. This problem is difficult because actin filaments dynamically change shapes during their growth, and the TIRFM images are usually noisy. We ask a user to specify the two tips of a filament of interest in the first frame. We then model the segmentation problem in an image sequence as a temporal chain, where its states are tip locations; given candidate tip locations, actin filaments' body points are inferred by a dynamic programming method, which adaptively generates candidate solutions. Combining candidate tip locations and their inferred body points, the temporal chain model is efficiently optimized using another dynamic programming method. Evaluation on noisy TIRFM image sequences demonstrates the accuracy and robustness of this approach. PMID:21761674

  6. Intermediate filaments in small configuration spaces.

    PubMed

    Nöding, Bernd; Köster, Sarah

    2012-02-24

    Intermediate filaments play a key role in cell mechanics. Apart from their great importance from a biomedical point of view, they also act as a very suitable micrometer-sized model system for semiflexible polymers. We perform a statistical analysis of the thermal fluctuations of individual filaments confined in microchannels. The small channel width and the resulting deflections at the walls give rise to a reduction of the configuration space by about 2 orders of magnitude. This circumstance enables us to precisely measure the intrinsic persistence length of vimentin intermediate filaments and to show that they behave as ideal wormlike chains; we observe that small fluctuations in perpendicular planes decouple. Furthermore, the inclusion of results for confined actin filaments demonstrates that the Odijk confinement regime is valid over at least 1 order of magnitude in persistence length. PMID:22463576

  7. Filamentous bacteria existence in aerobic granular reactors.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, M; Val del Río, A; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2015-05-01

    Filamentous bacteria are associated to biomass settling problems in wastewater treatment plants. In systems based on aerobic granular biomass they have been proposed to contribute to the initial biomass aggregation process. However, their development on mature aerobic granular systems has not been sufficiently studied. In the present research work, filamentous bacteria were studied for the first time after long-term operation (up to 300 days) of aerobic granular systems. Chloroflexi and Sphaerotilus natans have been observed in a reactor fed with synthetic wastewater. These filamentous bacteria could only come from the inoculated sludge. Thiothrix and Chloroflexi bacteria were observed in aerobic granular biomass treating wastewater from a fish canning industry. Meganema perideroedes was detected in a reactor treating wastewater from a plant processing marine products. As a conclusion, the source of filamentous bacteria in these mature aerobic granular systems fed with industrial effluents was the incoming wastewater.

  8. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  9. Huge Filament Rises From Sun's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 1, 2010 following a C3-class solar flare from sunspot 1092, an enormous magnetic filament stretching across the sun's northern hemisphere erupted. This 304 angstrom video shows that filam...

  10. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  11. Intermediate filaments in small configuration spaces.

    PubMed

    Nöding, Bernd; Köster, Sarah

    2012-02-24

    Intermediate filaments play a key role in cell mechanics. Apart from their great importance from a biomedical point of view, they also act as a very suitable micrometer-sized model system for semiflexible polymers. We perform a statistical analysis of the thermal fluctuations of individual filaments confined in microchannels. The small channel width and the resulting deflections at the walls give rise to a reduction of the configuration space by about 2 orders of magnitude. This circumstance enables us to precisely measure the intrinsic persistence length of vimentin intermediate filaments and to show that they behave as ideal wormlike chains; we observe that small fluctuations in perpendicular planes decouple. Furthermore, the inclusion of results for confined actin filaments demonstrates that the Odijk confinement regime is valid over at least 1 order of magnitude in persistence length.

  12. Breaking the Silence: Protein Stabilization Uncovers Silenced Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in the Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Jennifer; Bayram, Özgür; Feussner, Kirstin; Landesfeind, Manuel; Shelest, Ekaterina; Feussner, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of filamentous fungi comprise numerous putative gene clusters coding for the biosynthesis of chemically and structurally diverse secondary metabolites (SMs), which are rarely expressed under laboratory conditions. Previous approaches to activate these genes were based primarily on artificially targeting the cellular protein synthesis apparatus. Here, we applied an alternative approach of genetically impairing the protein degradation apparatus of the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans by deleting the conserved eukaryotic csnE/CSN5 deneddylase subunit of the COP9 signalosome. This defect in protein degradation results in the activation of a previously silenced gene cluster comprising a polyketide synthase gene producing the antibiotic 2,4-dihydroxy-3-methyl-6-(2-oxopropyl)benzaldehyde (DHMBA). The csnE/CSN5 gene is highly conserved in fungi, and therefore, the deletion is a feasible approach for the identification of new SMs. PMID:23001671

  13. Cytotoxic Xanthone-Anthraquinone Heterodimers from an Unidentified Fungus of the Order Hypocreales (MSX 17022)

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Sloan; Graf, Tyler N.; Adcock, Audrey F.; Kroll, David J.; Shen, Qi; Swanson, Steven M.; Matthew, Susan; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Wani, Mansukh C.; Darveaux, Blaise A.; Pearce, Cedric J.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2011-01-01

    Two new xanthone-anthraquinone heterodimers, acremoxanthone C (5) and acremoxanthone D (2), have been isolated from an extract of an unidentified fungus of the Order Hypocreales (MSX 17022) by bioactivity-directed fractionation as part of a search for anticancer leads from filamentous fungi. Two known related compounds, acremonidin A (4) and acremonidin C (3) were also isolated, as was a known benzophenone, moniliphenone (1). The structures of these isolates were determined via extensive use of spectroscopic and spectrometric tools in conjunction with comparisons to the literature. All compounds (1–5) were evaluated against a suite of biological assays, including those for cytotoxicity, inhibition of the 20S proteasome, mitochondria transmembrane potential, and NF-κB. PMID:22068158

  14. Aspergillus mulundensis sp. nov., a new species for the fungus producing the antifungal echinocandin lipopeptides, mulundocandins.

    PubMed

    Bills, Gerald F; Yue, Qun; Chen, Li; Li, Yan; An, Zhiqiang; Frisvad, Jens C

    2016-03-01

    The invalidly published name Aspergillus sydowii var. mulundensis was proposed for a strain of Aspergillus that produced new echinocandin metabolites designated as the mulundocadins. Reinvestigation of this strain (Y-30462=DSMZ 5745) using phylogenetic, morphological, and metabolic data indicated that it is a distinct and novel species of Aspergillus sect. Nidulantes. The taxonomic novelty, Aspergillus mulundensis, is introduced for this historically important echinocandin-producing strain. The closely related A. nidulans FGSC A4 has one of the most extensively characterized secondary metabolomes of any filamentous fungus. Comparison of the full-genome sequences of DSMZ 5745 and FGSC A4 indicated that the two strains share 33 secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters. These shared gene clusters represent ~45% of the total secondary metabolome of each strain, thus indicating a high level intraspecific divergence in terms of secondary metabolism.

  15. Isolation, Structure Elucidation and Total Synthesis of Lajollamide A from the Marine Fungus Asteromyces cruciatus

    PubMed Central

    Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Hong, Hanna; Correa, Jhonny; Egereva, Ekaterina; Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Gross, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The marine-derived filamentous fungus Asteromyces cruciatus 763, obtained off the coast of La Jolla, San Diego, USA, yielded the new pentapeptide lajollamide A (1), along with the known compounds regiolone (2), hyalodendrin (3), gliovictin (4), 1N-norgliovicitin (5), and bis-N-norgliovictin (6). The planar structure of lajollamide A (1) was determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration of lajollamide A (1) was unambiguously solved by total synthesis which provided three additional diastereomers of 1 and also revealed that an unexpected acid-mediated partial racemization (2:1) of the L-leucine and L-N-Me-leucine residues occurred during the chemical degradation process. The biological activities of the isolated metabolites, in particular their antimicrobial properties, were investigated in a series of assay systems. PMID:23342379

  16. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations.

  17. Filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. S.; Timberlake, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports for a LH2 tank, a LF2/FLOX tank and a CH4 tank. These supports consist of filament-wound fiberglass tubes with titanium end fittings. These units were satisfactorily tested at cryogenic temperatures, thereby offering a design that can be reliably and economically produced in large or small quantities. The basic design concept is applicable to any situation where strong, lightweight axial load members are desired.

  18. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  19. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    PubMed

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts grown in

  20. Helicity as a Component of Filament Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. H.; Gaizauskas, V.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we seek the origin of the axial component of the magnetic field in filaments by adapting theory to observations. A previous paper (Mackay, Gaizauskas, and van Ballegooijen, 2000) showed that surface flows acting on potential magnetic fields for 27 days the maximum time between the emergence of magnetic flux and the formation of large filaments between the resulting activity complexes cannot explain the chirality or inverse polarity nature of the observed filaments. We show that the inclusion of initial helicity, for which there is observational evidence, in the flux transport model results in sufficiently strong dextral fields of inverse polarity to account for the existence and length of an observed filament within the allotted time. The simulations even produce a large length of dextral chirality when just small amounts of helicity are included in the initial configuration. The modeling suggests that the axial field component in filaments can result from a combination of surface (flux transport) and sub-surface (helicity) effects acting together. Here surface effects convert the large-scale helicity emerging in active regions into a smaller-scale magnetic-field component parallel to the polarity inversion line so as to form a magnetic configuration suitable for a filament.

  1. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Tremblin, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Hill, T.; Molinari, S.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of ˜1.5 × 1021 cm-2 and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  2. The cell end marker Tea4 regulates morphogenesis and pathogenicity in the basidiomycete fungus Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Valinluck, Michael; Woraratanadharm, Tad; Lu, Ching-yu; Quintanilla, Rene H; Banuett, Flora

    2014-05-01

    Positional cues localized to distinct cell domains are critical for the generation of cell polarity and cell morphogenesis. These cues lead to assembly of protein complexes that organize the cytoskeleton resulting in delivery of vesicles to sites of polarized growth. Tea4, an SH3 domain protein, was first identified in fission yeast, and is a critical determinant of the axis of polarized growth, a role conserved among ascomycete fungi. Ustilago maydis is a badiomycete fungus that exhibits a yeast-like form that is nonpathogenic and a filamentous form that is pathogenic on maize and teozintle. We are interested in understanding how positional cues contribute to generation and maintenance of these two forms, and their role in pathogenicity. We identified a homologue of fission yeast tea4 in a genetic screen for mutants with altered colony and cell morphology and present here analysis of Tea4 for the first time in a basidiomycete fungus. We demonstrate that Tea4 is an important positional marker for polarized growth and septum location in both forms. We uncover roles for Tea4 in maintenance of cell and neck width, cell separation, and cell wall deposition in the yeast-like form, and in growth rate, formation of retraction septa, growth reversal, and inhibition of budding in the filamentous form. We show that Tea4::GFP localizes to sites of polarized or potential polarized growth in both forms, as observed in ascomycete fungi. We demonstrate an essential role of Tea4 in pathogencity in the absence of cell fusion. Basidiomycete and ascomycete Tea4 homologues share SH3 and Glc7 domains. Tea4 in basidiomycetes has additional domains, which has led us to hypothesize that Tea4 has novel functions in this group of fungi.

  3. Filamentation of collimated Ti:sapphire-laser pulses in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apeksimov, D. V.; Bukin, O. A.; Golik, S. S.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Kabanov, A. M.; Kuchinskaya, O. I.; Mayor, A. Y.; Matvienko, G. G.; Petrov, A. V.; Sokolova, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    The results of experimental studies of the spatial characteristics of multiple filamentation terawatt femtosecond Ti:Salaser in water are presented. With an increase in initial power laser pulses increases the number of filaments, the length of the field is increased filamentation and reducing the length of the filaments have been shown. The distribution of the filaments in the longitudinal direction of the field of multiple filamentation has a maximum cross-sectional filament is shifted from the center to the periphery of the beam at the end region of filamentation. The minimum diameter of the beam on the track corresponds to the position of the maximum number of filaments. After the point of maximum impulse essentially loses energy in the initial direction of propagation. Upon reaching the pulse power 2 104 Pcr of multiple filamentation area is formed of a hollow cone, the apex directed to the radiation source.

  4. Multiple filamentation Ti:Sapphire-laser pulses in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apeksimov, D. V.; Bukin, O. A.; Golik, S. S.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Kabanov, A. M.; Kuchinskaya, O. I.; Mayor, A. Yu.; Matvienko, G. G.; Petrov, A. V.; Sokolova, E. B.

    2015-11-01

    The results of experimental studies of the spatial characteristics of multiple filamentation terawatt femtosecond Ti:Salaser in water are presented. With an increase in initial power laser pulses increases the number of filaments, the length of the field is increased filamentation and reducing the length of the filaments have been shown. The distribution of the filaments in the longitudinal direction of the field of multiple filamentation has a maximum cross-sectional filament is shifted from the center to the periphery of the beam at the end region of filamentation. The minimum diameter of the beam on the track corresponds to the position of the maximum number of filaments. After the point of maximum impulse essentially loses energy in the initial direction of propagation. Upon reaching the pulse power 2 104 Pcr of multiple filamentation area is formed of a hollow cone, the apex directed to the radiation source.

  5. Crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus

    SciTech Connect

    Cassetta, Alberto; Büdefeld, Tomaž; Lanišnik Rižner, Tea; Kristan, Katja; Stojan, Jure; Lamba, Doriano

    2005-12-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the filamentous fungus C. lunatus and its Y167F mutant, both in the apo form, are described. X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing by Patterson-search techniques are reported. 17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the filamentous fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is an NADP(H)-dependent enzyme that preferentially catalyses the oxidoreduction of oestrogens and androgens. The enzyme belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and is the only fungal hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase known to date. 17β-HSDcl has recently been characterized and cloned and has been the subject of several functional studies. Although several hypotheses on the physiological role of 17β-HSDcl in fungal metabolism have been formulated, its function is still unclear. An X-ray crystallographic study has been undertaken and the optimal conditions for crystallization of 17β-HSDcl (apo form) were established, resulting in well shaped crystals that diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution. The space group was identified as I4{sub 1}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 67.14, c = 266.77 Å. Phasing was successfully performed by Patterson search techniques. A catalytic inactive mutant Tyr167Phe was also engineered, expressed, purified and crystallized for functional and structural studies.

  6. Genome-wide characterization of methylguanosine-capped and polyadenylated small RNAs in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Malali; Nunes, Cristiano C.; Sailsbery, Joshua; Xue, Minfeng; Chen, Feng; Nelson, Cassie A.; Brown, Douglas E.; Oh, Yeonyee; Meng, Shaowu; Mitchell, Thomas; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Dean, Ralph A.

    2010-01-01

    Small RNAs are well described in higher eukaryotes such as mammals and plants; however, knowledge in simple eukaryotes such as filamentous fungi is limited. In this study, we discovered and characterized methylguanosine-capped and polyadenylated small RNAs (CPA-sRNAs) by using differential RNA selection, full-length cDNA cloning and 454 transcriptome sequencing of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. This fungus causes blast, a devastating disease on rice, the principle food staple for over half the world’s population. CPA-sRNAs mapped primarily to the transcription initiation and termination sites of protein-coding genes and were positively correlated with gene expression, particularly for highly expressed genes including those encoding ribosomal proteins. Numerous CPA-sRNAs also mapped to rRNAs, tRNAs, snRNAs, transposable elements and intergenic regions. Many other 454 sequence reads could not be mapped to the genome; however, inspection revealed evidence for non-template additions and chimeric sequences. CPA-sRNAs were independently confirmed using a high affinity variant of eIF-4E to capture 5′-methylguanosine-capped RNA followed by 3′-RACE sequencing. These results expand the repertoire of small RNAs in filamentous fungi. PMID:20660015

  7. FgFlbD regulates hyphal differentiation required for sexual and asexual reproduction in the ascomycete fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Son, Hokyoung; Kim, Myung-Gu; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Lee, Yin-Won

    2014-11-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a filamentous fungal plant pathogen that infects major cereal crops. The fungus produces both sexual and asexual spores in order to endure unfavorable environmental conditions and increase their numbers and distribution across plants. In a model filamentous fungus, Aspergillus nidulans, early induction of conidiogenesis is orchestrated by the fluffy genes. The objectives of this study were to characterize fluffy gene homologs involved in conidiogenesis and their mechanism of action in F. graminearum. We characterized five fluffy gene homologs in F. graminearum and found that FlbD is the only conserved regulator for conidiogenesis in A. nidulans and F. graminearum. Deletion of fgflbD prevented hyphal differentiation and the formation of perithecia. Successful interspecies complementation using A. nidulans flbD demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms responsible for FlbD functions are conserved in F. graminearum. Moreover, abaA-wetA pathway is positively regulated by FgFlbD during conidiogenesis in F. graminearum. Deleting fgflbD abolished morphological effects of abaA overexpression, which suggests that additional factors for FgFlbD or an AbaA-independent pathway for conidiogenesis are required for F. graminearum conidiation. Importantly, this study led to the construction of a genetic pathway of F. graminearum conidiogenesis and provides new insights into the genetics of conidiogenesis in fungi.

  8. Ant-fungus species combinations engineer physiological activity of fungus gardens.

    PubMed

    Seal, J N; Schiøtt, M; Mueller, U G

    2014-07-15

    Fungus-gardening insects are among the most complex organisms because of their extensive co-evolutionary histories with obligate fungal symbionts and other microbes. Some fungus-gardening insect lineages share fungal symbionts with other members of their lineage and thus exhibit diffuse co-evolutionary relationships, while others exhibit little or no symbiont sharing, resulting in host-fungus fidelity. The mechanisms that maintain this symbiont fidelity are currently unknown. Prior work suggested that derived leaf-cutting ants in the genus Atta interact synergistically with leaf-cutter fungi (Attamyces) by exhibiting higher fungal growth rates and enzymatic activities than when growing a fungus from the sister-clade to Attamyces (so-called 'Trachymyces'), grown primarily by the non-leaf cutting Trachymyrmex ants that form, correspondingly, the sister-clade to leaf-cutting ants. To elucidate the enzymatic bases of host-fungus specialization in leaf-cutting ants, we conducted a reciprocal fungus-switch experiment between the ant Atta texana and the ant Trachymyrmex arizonensis and report measured enzymatic activities of switched and sham-switched fungus gardens to digest starch, pectin, xylan, cellulose and casein. Gardens exhibited higher amylase and pectinase activities when A. texana ants cultivated Attamyces compared with Trachymyces fungi, consistent with enzymatic specialization. In contrast, gardens showed comparable amylase and pectinase activities when T. arizonensis cultivated either fungal species. Although gardens of leaf-cutting ants are not known to be significant metabolizers of cellulose, T. arizonensis were able to maintain gardens with significant cellulase activity when growing either fungal species. In contrast to carbohydrate metabolism, protease activity was significantly higher in Attamyces than in Trachymyces, regardless of the ant host. Activity of some enzymes employed by this symbiosis therefore arises from complex interactions between the

  9. Green Chemistry Approach for the Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using the Fungus Alternaria sp.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Naresh Niranjan; Rahul, Ganga Ravindran; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Raman, Gurusamy; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles has gained tremendous attention owing to their immense applications in the field of biomedical sciences. Although several chemical procedures are used for the synthesis of nanoparticles, the release of toxic and hazardous by-products restricts their use in biomedical applications. In the present investigation, gold nanoparticles were synthesized biologically using the culture filtrate of the filamentous fungus Alternaria sp. The culture filtrate of the fungus was exposed to three different concentrations of chloroaurate ions. In all cases, the gold ions were reduced to Au(0), leading to the formation of stable gold nanoparticles of variable sizes and shapes. UV-Vis spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of nanoparticles by reduction of Au(3+) to Au(0). TEM analysis revealed the presence of spherical, rod, square, pentagonal, and hexagonal morphologies for 1 mM chloroaurate solution. However, quasi-spherical and spherical nanoparticles/heart-like morphologies with size range of about 7-13 and 15-18 nm were observed for lower molar concentrations of 0.3 and 0.5 mM gold chloride solution, respectively. The XRD spectrum revealed the face-centered cubic crystals of synthesized gold nanoparticles. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of aromatic primary amines, and the additional SPR bands at 290 and 230 nm further suggested that the presence of amino acids such as tryptophan/tyrosine or phenylalanine acts as the capping agent on the synthesized mycogenic gold nanoparticles. PMID:25737119

  10. Rhf1 gene is involved in the fruiting body production of Cordyceps militaris fungus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Keqing; Han, Richou

    2015-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris is an important medicinal fungus. Commercialization of this fungus needs to improve the fruiting body production by molecular engineering. An improved Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) method was used to select an insertional mutant (g38) which exhibited fast stromatal differentiation and increased yield. The Rhf1 gene encoding filamentation protein was destroyed by a single T-DNA and no Rhf1 transcription was detected in mutant g38. To verify the function of the Rhf1 gene, RNA interference plasmid and overexpression vector of the Rhf1 gene were constructed and transferred to the wild-type JM4 by ATMT. Fast stromatal differentiation and larger fruiting bodies were found in the RNAi-Rhf1 mutants (JM-iRhf1). In the overexpression mutants (JM-OERhf1), neither stromata nor fruiting bodies appeared. The rescued strain (38-OERhf1) showed similar growth characteristics as JM4. These results indicated that the Rhf1 gene was involved in the stromatal differentiation and the shape formation of fruiting bodies. PMID:26047996

  11. Occurrence of fungi in combs of fungus-growing termites (Isoptera: Termitidae, Macrotermitinae).

    PubMed

    Guedegbe, Herbert J; Miambi, Edouard; Pando, Anne; Roman, Jocelyne; Houngnandan, Pascal; Rouland-Lefevre, Corinne

    2009-10-01

    Fungus-growing termites cultivate their mutualistic basidiomycete Termitomyces species on a substrate called a fungal comb. Here, the Suicide Polymerase Endonuclease Restriction (SuPER) method was adapted for the first time to a fungal study to determine the entire fungal community of fungal combs and to test whether fungi other than the symbiotic cultivar interact with termite hosts. Our molecular analyses show that although active combs are dominated by Termitomyces fungi isolated with direct Polymerase Endonuclease Restriction - Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), they can also harbor some filamentous fungi and yeasts only revealed by SuPER PCR-DGGE. This is the first molecular evidence of the presence of non-Termitomyces species in active combs. However, because there is no evidence for a species-specific relationship between these fungi and termites, they are mere transient guests with no specialization in the symbiosis. It is however surprising to notice that termite-associated Xylaria strains were not isolated from active combs even though they are frequently retrieved when nests are abandoned by termites. This finding highlights the implication of fungus-growing termites in the regulation of fungi occurring within the combs and also suggests that they might not have any particular evolutionary-based association with Xylaria species.

  12. Green Chemistry Approach for the Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using the Fungus Alternaria sp.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Naresh Niranjan; Rahul, Ganga Ravindran; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Raman, Gurusamy; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles has gained tremendous attention owing to their immense applications in the field of biomedical sciences. Although several chemical procedures are used for the synthesis of nanoparticles, the release of toxic and hazardous by-products restricts their use in biomedical applications. In the present investigation, gold nanoparticles were synthesized biologically using the culture filtrate of the filamentous fungus Alternaria sp. The culture filtrate of the fungus was exposed to three different concentrations of chloroaurate ions. In all cases, the gold ions were reduced to Au(0), leading to the formation of stable gold nanoparticles of variable sizes and shapes. UV-Vis spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of nanoparticles by reduction of Au(3+) to Au(0). TEM analysis revealed the presence of spherical, rod, square, pentagonal, and hexagonal morphologies for 1 mM chloroaurate solution. However, quasi-spherical and spherical nanoparticles/heart-like morphologies with size range of about 7-13 and 15-18 nm were observed for lower molar concentrations of 0.3 and 0.5 mM gold chloride solution, respectively. The XRD spectrum revealed the face-centered cubic crystals of synthesized gold nanoparticles. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of aromatic primary amines, and the additional SPR bands at 290 and 230 nm further suggested that the presence of amino acids such as tryptophan/tyrosine or phenylalanine acts as the capping agent on the synthesized mycogenic gold nanoparticles.

  13. The NADPH oxidase Cpnox1 is required for full pathogenicity of the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea.

    PubMed

    Giesbert, Sabine; Schürg, Timo; Scheele, Sandra; Tudzynski, Paul

    2008-05-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in interactions between phytopathogenic fungi and their hosts is well established. An oxidative burst mainly caused by superoxide formation by membrane-associated NADPH oxidases is an essential element of plant defence reactions. Apart from primary effects, ROS play a major role as a second messenger in host response. Recently, NADPH oxidase (nox)-encoding genes have been identified in filamentous fungi. Functional analyses have shown that these fungal enzymes are involved in sexual differentiation, and there is growing evidence that they also affect developmental programmes involved in fungus-plant interactions. Here we show that in the biotrophic plant pathogen Claviceps purpurea deletion of the cpnox1 gene, probably encoding an NADPH oxidase, has impact on germination of conidia and pathogenicity: Deltacpnox1 mutants can penetrate the host epidermis, but they are impaired in colonization of the plant ovarian tissue. In the few cases where macroscopic signs of infection (honeydew) appear, they are extremely delayed and fully developed sclerotia have never been observed. C. purpurea Nox1 is important for the interaction with its host, probably by directly affecting pathogenic differentiation of the fungus.

  14. Active pharmaceutical ingredient (api) from an estuarine fungus, Microdochium nivale (Fr.).

    PubMed

    Bhosale, S H; Patil, K B; Parameswaran, P S; Naik, C G; Jagtap, T G

    2011-09-01

    Various marine habitats sustain variety of bio-sources of ecological and biotech potentials. Pharmaceutical potential compound Cyclosporine A was reported from marine fungus Microdochium nivale associated with Porteresia coarctata, a marine salt marsh grass from mangrove environment distributed along the Central West Coast (CWC) of India. This study involves association of M. nivale with P. coarctata plant, fermentation conditions, purification of Cyclosporine A, chemical characterization etc. Its antifungal inhibition and MIC (Minimum inhibitory concentration) against Aspergillus strains (A. niger, A. japonicus, A. fresenii), yeasts and dermatophytes (Candida sp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. tonsurans, T. violaceum, Microsporium gypsum and Fusarium sp.) were evaluated. However, the MIC against A. japonicus, C. neoformans, Candida sp. and T. tonsurans were confirmed to be as low as 12.5-25 mg disc(-1). The antifungal properties of Cyclosporine A against Aspergillus species, yeast and dermatophytes revealed that CyclosporineAwould be a potential compound for life threatening diseases caused by above fungi in both human and animals. Furthermore, we have reported herewith another source of Cyclosporin Aderived from filamentous fungus, M. nivale. occurring in marine environment. PMID:22319884

  15. Comparative analysis of mixing distribution in aerobic stirred bioreactor for simulated yeasts and fungus broths.

    PubMed

    Cascaval, Dan; Galaction, Anca-Irina; Turnea, Marius

    2007-01-01

    The study on mixing distribution for an aerobic stirred bioreactor and simulated (solutions of carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt), yeasts (S. cerevisiae) and fungus (P. chrysogenum pellets and free mycelia) broths indicated the significant variation of mixing time on the bioreactor height. The experiments suggested the possibility to reach a uniform mixing in whole bulk of the real broths for a certain value of rotation speed or biomass concentration domain. For S. cerevisiae broths the optimum rotation speed increased to 500 rpm with the biomass accumulation from 40 to 150 g/l d.w. Irrespective of their morphology, for fungus cultures the existence of optimum rotation speed (500 rpm) has been recorded only for biomass concentration below 24 g/l d.w. The influence of aeration rate depends on the apparent viscosity/biomass concentration and on the impellers and sparger positions. By increasing the apparent viscosity for simulated broths, or biomass amount for real broths, the shape of the curves describing the mixing time variation is significantly changed for all the considered positions. The intensification of the aeration induced the increase of mixing time, which reached a maximum value, decreasing then, due to the flooding phenomena. This variation became more pronounced at higher viscosities for simulated broths, at higher yeasts concentration, and at lower pellets or filamentous fungus concentration, respectively. By means of the experimental data and using MATLAB software, some mathematical correlations for mixing time have been proposed for each broth and considered position inside the bioreactor. These equations offer a good agreement with the experiment, the maximum deviation being +/-7.3% for S. cerevisiae broths.

  16. [Report on a fungus parasitizing Entamoeba histolytica].

    PubMed

    Cao, C Q; Feng, Y S

    1989-01-01

    Infection of Entamoeba histolytica with chytridiaceous fungus Sphaerita was observed in some specimens obtained from a farmer and stained with iron-haematoxylin. The fungi were found in 78% of the cysts, mostly immature ones. Within the amoebae this parasite occurred singly, in groups, or in the form of a sporangium. It was located in the cytoplasm, the glycogen mass or the chromatoidal bars. In the same specimen, the parasitic fungus was also found in 18% of E. coli cysts; in 11% of E. nana cysts; while only one of 16 E. hartmanni cysts was parasitized. It is an interesting case of superimposed parasitism so far reported in China as well as a rare case of several species of amoebae being heavily involved with the same in the scientific literature. PMID:2548767

  17. Heterologous expression of VHb can improve the yield and quality of biocontrol fungus Paecilomyces lilacinus, during submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumeng; Wang, Jieping; Wei, Yale; Tang, Qing; Ali, Maria Kanwal; He, Jin

    2014-10-10

    Paecilomyces lilacinus is an egg-parasitic fungus which is effective against plant-parasitic nematodes and it has been successfully commercialized for the control of many plant-parasitic nematodes. However, during the large-scale industrial fermentation process of the filamentous fungus, the dissolved oxygen supply is a limiting factor, which influences yield, product quality and production cost. To solve this problem, we intended to heterologously express VHb in P. lilacinus ACSS. After optimizing the vgb gene, we fused it with a selection marker gene nptII, a promoter PgpdA and a terminator TtrpC. The complete expression cassette PgpdA-nptII-vgb-TtrpC was transferred into P. lilacinus ACSS by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Consequently, we successfully screened an applicable fungus strain PNVT8 which efficiently expressed VHb. The submerged fermentation experiments demonstrated that the expression of VHb not only increased the production traits of P. lilacinus such as biomass and spore production, but also improved the beneficial product quality and application value, due to the secretion of more protease and chitinase. It can be speculated that the recombinant strain harboring vgb gene will have a growth advantage over the original strain under anaerobic conditions in soil and therefore will possess higher biocontrol efficiency against plant-parasitic nematodes.

  18. Filamentous Fungi with High Cytosolic Phospholipid Transfer Activity in the Presence of Exogenous Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Record, Eric; Lesage, Laurence; Cahagnier, Bernard; Marion, Didier; Asther, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The phospholipid transfer activity of cell extracts from 15 filamentous fungus strains grown on a medium containing phospholipids as the carbon source was measured by a fluorescence assay. This assay was based on the transfer of pyrene-labeled phosphatidylcholines forming the donor vesicles to acceptor vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholines. The highest phosphatidylcholine transfer activity was obtained with cell extracts from Aspergillus oryzae. The presence of exogenous phospholipids in the culture medium of A. oryzae was shown to increase markedly the activity of phospholipid transfer as well as the pool of exocellular proteins during the primary phase of growth. Modifications in the biochemical marker activities of cellular organelles were observed: succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial marker; inosine diphosphatase, a Golgi system marker; and cytochrome c oxidoreductase, an endoplasmic reticulum marker, were increased 7.3-, 2-, and 22-fold, respectively, when A. oryzae was grown in the presence of phospholipids. PMID:16349388

  19. New tricycloalternarenes from fungus Alternaria sp.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiu; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Hua, Cheng-Pin; Chen, Chao-Jun; Ge, Hui-Ming; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Jiao, Rui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Two new tricycloalternarenes I (1) and J (2), together with five known derivatives (3-7), were isolated from the culture of marine fungus Alternaria sp. The structures were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic approach ((1)H, (13)C NMR, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY) and the low-temperature (100 K) single-crystal X-ray crystallography analysis. The antimicrobial assays of tricycloalternarenes I (1) and J (2) were tested.

  20. Interaction and merging of two sinistral filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Liu, Yu; Li, Haidong; Wang, Haimin; Ji, Haisheng; Li, Jianping

    2014-09-20

    In this paper, we report the interaction and subsequent merging of two sinistral filaments (F1 and F2) occurring at the boundary of AR 9720 on 2001 December 6. The two filaments were close and nearly perpendicular to each other. The interaction occurred after F1 was erupted and the eruption was impeded by a more extended filament channel (FC) standing in the way, in which F2 was embedded. The erupted material ran into FC along its axis, causing F1 and F2 to merge into a single structure that subsequently underwent a large-amplitude to-and-fro motion. A significant plasma heating process was observed in the merging process, making the mixed material largely disappear from the Hα passband, but appear in Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope 195 Å images for a while. These observations can serve as strong evidence of merging reconnection between the two colliding magnetic structures. A new sinistral filament was formed along FC after the cooling of the merged and heated material. No coronal mass ejection was observed to be associated with the event; though, the eruption was accompanied by a two-ribbon flare with a separation motion, indicating that the eruption had failed. This event shows that, in addition to overlying magnetic fields, such an interaction is an effective restraint to make a filament eruption fail in this way.

  1. Interaction and Merging of two Sinistral Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Wang, Haimin; Ji, Haisheng; Liu, Yu; Li, Haidong; Li, Jianping

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report the interaction and subsequent merging of two sinistral filaments (F1 and F2) occurring at the boundary of AR 9720 on 2001 December 6. The two filaments were close and nearly perpendicular to each other. The interaction occurred after F1 was erupted and the eruption was impeded by a more extended filament channel (FC) standing in the way, in which F2 was embedded. The erupted material ran into FC along its axis, causing F1 and F2 to merge into a single structure that subsequently underwent a large-amplitude to-and-fro motion. A significant plasma heating process was observed in the merging process, making the mixed material largely disappear from the Hα passband, but appear in Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope 195 Å images for a while. These observations can serve as strong evidence of merging reconnection between the two colliding magnetic structures. A new sinistral filament was formed along FC after the cooling of the merged and heated material. No coronal mass ejection was observed to be associated with the event; though, the eruption was accompanied by a two-ribbon flare with a separation motion, indicating that the eruption had failed. This event shows that, in addition to overlying magnetic fields, such an interaction is an effective restraint to make a filament eruption fail in this way.

  2. SYMPATHETIC FILAMENT ERUPTIONS CONNECTED BY CORONAL DIMMINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Hong Junchao; Bi Yi; Zheng Ruisheng

    2011-09-10

    We present for the first time detailed observations of three successive, interdependent filament eruptions that occurred one by one within 5 hr from different locations beyond the range of a single active region. The first eruption was observed from an active region and was associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME), during which diffuse and complex coronal dimmings formed, largely extending to the two other filaments located in quiet-Sun regions. Then, both quiescent filaments consecutively underwent the second and third eruptions, while the nearby dimmings were persistent. Comparing the result of a derived coronal magnetic configuration, the magnetic connectivity between the dimmings suggested that they were caused by the joint effect of simple expansion of overlying loop systems forced by the first eruption, as well as by its erupting field interacting or reconnecting with the surrounding magnetic structures. Note that the dimming process in the first eruption indicated a weakening and partial removal of an overlying magnetic field constraint on the two other filaments, and thus one can physically connect these eruptions as sympathetic. It appears that the peculiar magnetic field configuration in our event was largely favorable to the occurrence of sympathetic filament eruptions. Because coronal dimmings are frequent and common phenomena in solar eruptions, especially in CME events, it is very likely that they represent a universal agent that can link consecutive eruptions nearby with sympathetic eruptions.

  3. Nonlinear elasticity of semiflexible filament networks.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanlong; Terentjev, Eugene M

    2016-08-10

    We develop a continuum theory for equilibrium elasticity of a network of crosslinked semiflexible filaments, spanning the full range between flexible entropy-driven chains to stiff athermal rods. We choose the 3-chain constitutive model of network elasticity over several plausible candidates, and derive analytical expressions for the elastic energy at arbitrary strain, with the corresponding stress-strain relationship. The theory fits well to a wide range of experimental data on simple shear in different filament networks, quantitatively matching the differential shear modulus variation with stress, with only two adjustable parameters (which represent the filament stiffness and the pre-tension in the network, respectively). The general theory accurately describes the crossover between the positive and negative Poynting effect (normal stress on imposed shear) on increasing the stiffness of filaments forming the network. We discuss the network stability (the point of marginal rigidity) and the phenomenon of tensegrity, showing that filament pre-tension on crosslinking into the network determines the magnitude of linear modulus G0. PMID:27444846

  4. Nonlinear elasticity of semiflexible filament networks.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanlong; Terentjev, Eugene M

    2016-08-10

    We develop a continuum theory for equilibrium elasticity of a network of crosslinked semiflexible filaments, spanning the full range between flexible entropy-driven chains to stiff athermal rods. We choose the 3-chain constitutive model of network elasticity over several plausible candidates, and derive analytical expressions for the elastic energy at arbitrary strain, with the corresponding stress-strain relationship. The theory fits well to a wide range of experimental data on simple shear in different filament networks, quantitatively matching the differential shear modulus variation with stress, with only two adjustable parameters (which represent the filament stiffness and the pre-tension in the network, respectively). The general theory accurately describes the crossover between the positive and negative Poynting effect (normal stress on imposed shear) on increasing the stiffness of filaments forming the network. We discuss the network stability (the point of marginal rigidity) and the phenomenon of tensegrity, showing that filament pre-tension on crosslinking into the network determines the magnitude of linear modulus G0.

  5. A possible mechanism of metabolic regulation in Gibberella fujikuroi using a mixed carbon source of glucose and corn oil inferred from analysis of the kinetics data obtained in a stirrer tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Rios-Iribe, Erika Y; Hernández-Calderón, Oscar M; Reyes-Moreno, C; Contreras-Andrade, I; Flores-Cotera, Luis B; Escamilla-Silva, Eleazar M

    2013-01-01

    A nonstructured model was used to study the dynamics of gibberellic acid production in a stirred tank bioreactor. Experimental data were obtained from submerged batch cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi (CDBB H-984) grown in varying ratios of glucose-corn oil as the carbon source. The nitrogen depletion effect was included in mathematical model by considering the specific kinetic constants as a linear function of the normalized nitrogen consumption rate. The kinetics of biomass growth and consumption of phosphate and nitrogen were based on the logistic model. The traditional first-order kinetic model was used to describe the specific consumption of glucose and corn oil. The nitrogen effect was solely included in the phosphate and corn oil consumption and biomass growth. The model fit was satisfactory, revealing the dependence of the kinetics with respect to the nitrogen assimilation rate. Through simulations, it was possible to make diagrams of specific growth rate and specific rate of substrate consumptions, which was a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic interactions that occurred during the various stages of fermentation process. This kinetic analysis provided the proposal of a possible mechanism of regulation on growth, substrate consumptions, and production of gibberellic acid (GA3 ) in G. fujikuroi. PMID:23825106

  6. Terahertz waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Hai-Wei; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Otani, Chiko; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-11-23

    Terahertz (THz) waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments with a crossing angle of 25° are investigated. The irradiated THz waves from the crossing filaments show a small THz pulse after the main THz pulse, which was not observed in those from single-filament scheme. Since the position of the small THz pulse changes with the time-delay of two filaments, this phenomenon can be explained by a model in which the small THz pulse is from the second filament. The denser plasma in the overlap region of the filaments changes the movement of space charges in the plasma, thereby changing the angular distribution of THz radiation. As a result, this schematic induces some THz wave from the second filament to propagate along the path of the THz wave from the first filament. Thus, this schematic alters the direction of the THz radiation from the filamentation, which can be used in THz wave remote sensing.

  7. Void galaxy properties depending on void filament straightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the properties of galaxies belonging to the filaments in cosmic void regions, using the void catalogue constructed by Pan et al. (2012) from the SDSS DR7. To identify galaxy filaments within a void, voids with 30 or more galaxies are selected as a sample. We identify 3172 filaments in 1055 voids by applying the filament finding algorithm utilizing minimal spanning tree (MST) which is an unique linear pattern into which connects all the galaxies in a void. We study the correlations between galaxy properties and the specific size of filament which quantifies the degree of the filament straightness. For example, the average magnitude and the magnitude of the faintest galaxy in filament decrease as the straightness of the filament increases. We also find that the correlations become stronger in rich filaments with many member galaxies than in poor ones. We discuss a physical explanation to our findings and their cosmological implications.

  8. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Müller, S. H.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2013-10-15

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  9. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christoph A.; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S.; Bausch, Andreas R.; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system’s dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model. PMID:26261319

  10. SOLAR MAGNETIZED 'TORNADOES': RELATION TO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang Tongjiang; Gan Weiqun

    2012-09-10

    Solar magnetized 'tornadoes', a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar 'tornadoes' (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  11. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S; Bausch, Andreas R; Frey, Erwin

    2015-08-25

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system's dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model.

  12. Rheology of Vimentin Intermediate Filament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huayin

    2012-02-01

    A cell's ability to function is highly dependent on its structure and material properties - its capacity to withstand and respond to forces in its environment. The cytoskeleton, which largely determines the cellular mechanical properties, is comprised of biopolymer networks, including filamentous actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments (IF). Intermediate filaments are much less studied than actin and microtubules. They are much more varied and specialized as well, and have been suggested as being an important platform in mechanotransduction processes in cells. It is thought that they can withstand very high strains and exhibit strain stiffening behavior. We are characterizing vimentin, a type III IF that is found in all vertebrate cells, using rheological techniques. Vimentin elasticity increases upon addition of multivalent cations, which act like molecular crosslinkers. By varying the concentration of cations, we can extract valuable information about how the networks assemble and function.

  13. Spatiotemporal rogue events in optical multiple filamentation.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Simon; Nibbering, Erik T J; Brée, Carsten; Skupin, Stefan; Demircan, Ayhan; Genty, Goëry; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2013-12-13

    The transient appearance of bright spots in the beam profile of optical filaments formed in xenon is experimentally investigated. Fluence profiles are recorded with high-speed optical cameras at the kilohertz repetition rate of the laser source. A statistical analysis reveals a thresholdlike appearance of heavy-tailed fluence distributions together with the transition from single to multiple filamentation. The multifilament scenario exhibits near-exponential probability density functions, with extreme events exceeding the significant wave height by more than a factor of 10. The extreme events are isolated in space and in time. The macroscopic origin of these experimentally observed heavy-tail statistics is shown to be local refractive index variations inside the nonlinear medium, induced by multiphoton absorption and subsequent plasma thermalization. Microscopically, mergers between filament strings appear to play a decisive role in the observed rogue wave statistics. PMID:24483663

  14. Two-color resonant filamentation in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussot, J.; Béjot, P.; Faucher, O.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, it is shown that two-photon resonance involving a fundamental field and one of its odd harmonic strongly influences the filamentation process, i.e., the nonlinear propagation of an ultrashort and ultraintense laser field. This particular situation happens, for instance, when a 400 nm fundamental field propagates together with its third harmonic in krypton. Using three-dimensional ab initio calculations, the optical response of krypton is evaluated and the underlying nonlinear refractive indices are extracted. It is found that the resonance also exacerbates higher-order nonlinear processes. Injecting the retrieved higher-order Kerr indices in a nonlinear propagation solver, it is found that the resonance leads to an enhanced defocusing cross-phase modulation that strongly participates to the filament stabilization. This work sheds a light on the mechanism of filamentation, in particular, in the ultraviolet range, where two-color two-photon resonances are expected to occur in many atomic gases.

  15. Solar Magnetized "Tornadoes:" Relation to Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Wang, Tongjiang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2012-09-01

    Solar magnetized "tornadoes," a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar "tornadoes" (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  16. Theoretical and Experimental study on multiple filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jie; Lu Xin; Hao Zuoqiang; Xi Tingting; Zhang Zhe; Jin Zhan

    2007-07-11

    The physics of filaments formed by femtosecond laser pulses propagating in air is revealed both in theory and in experiment. An analytical method is used to investigate the interaction of two filaments. The interaction Hamiltonian of two filaments with different phase shifts is obtained and used to judge the properly of filaments interaction. The analytical results are in good agreement with simulation results. The influence of energy background on propagation of filaments is investigated in experiment. It is found that the characteristics of filaments can be changed by spatial and temporal control of laser pulses.

  17. Polarized radio filaments outside the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Matias; Dickinson, C.; Davies, R. D.; Leahy, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    We used data from the WMAP satellite at 23, 33 and 41 GHz to study the diffuse polarized emission over the entire sky. The emission originates mostly from filamentary structures with well-ordered magnetic fields. Some of these structures have been known for decades in radio continuum maps. Their origin is not clear and there are many filaments that are visible for the first time. We have identified and studied 11 filaments. The polarization fraction of some of them can be as high as 40 per cent, which is a signature of a well-ordered magnetic field. The polarization spectral indices, averaged over 18 regions in the sky is β = -3.06 ± 0.02, consistent with synchrotron radiation. There are significant variations in β over the sky (Δβ ≈ 0.2). We explore the link between the large-scale filaments and the local interstellar medium, using the model of an expanding shell in the solar vicinity. We compared observed polarization angles with the predictions from the model and found good agreement. This strongly suggests that many large-scale filaments and loops are nearby structures. This is important in the context of the Galactic magnetic field as these structures are normally included in global models, neglecting the fact that they might be local. We also studied the level of contamination added by the diffuse filaments to the CMB (cosmic microwave background) polarization power spectra. We conclude that, even though these filaments present low radio brightness, a careful removal will be necessary for future all-sky CMB polarization analysis.

  18. U. radio emission from quiescent filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    Full-disk Very Large Array (VLA) synthesis maps of the quiet Sun indicate that filaments can be seen in emission at 91.6 cm wavelength; they are detected in absorption at shorter microwave wavelengths. The 91.6 cm emission has a brightness temperature of T sub B = 3 x 10(exp 5) K. It is hotter, wider and longer than the underlying filament detected at H alpha wavelengths, but the similarity between the shape, position, elongation and orientation of the radio and optical features suggests their close association. The 91.6 cm emission is attributed to the thermal-bremsstrahlung of a hot transition sheath that envelopes the H alpha filament and acts as an interface between the cool, dense H alpha filament and the hotter, rarefied corona. The transition sheath is seen in emission because of the lower optical depth of the corona at 90 cm wavelength, and the width of this sheet is 10(exp 9) cm. A power law gradient in pressure provides a better match to the observations than a constant pressure model; definitive tests of theoretical models await simultaneous multi-wavelength studies of filaments at different observing angles. When the thermal bremsstrahlung is optically thin, the magnetic field strength in the transition sheath can be inferred from the observed circular polarization. Variable physical parameters of the sheath, such as width, electron density, and electron temperature, can explain controversial reports of the detection of, or the failure to detect, the meter-wavelength counterpart of H alpha filaments.

  19. Integration of hydrodynamic interactions between filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yi; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In many biological situations, slender filaments interact through a viscous fluid, and these hydrodynamic interactions play a crucial cellular role. Examples include the ability of peritrichous bacteria to bundle their flagella or the generation of metachronal waves in cilia arrays. In most cases of interest, three distinct length scales characterize the filaments, their typical thickness a, relative distance h, and length L, which are asymptotically separated as a << h << L . In this talk, we demonstrate how to analytically develop a long-wavelength integration of hydrodynamic singularities in this biologically-relevant limit.

  20. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Edward A.

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  1. Filament assemblies in foreign nucleic acid sensors.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jungsan; Hur, Sun

    2016-04-01

    Helical filamentous assembly is ubiquitous in biology, but was only recently realized to be broadly employed in the innate immune system of vertebrates. Accumulating evidence suggests that the filamentous assemblies and helical oligomerization play important roles in detection of foreign nucleic acids and activation of the signaling pathways to produce antiviral and inflammatory mediators. In this review, we focus on the helical assemblies observed in the signaling pathways of RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and AIM2-like receptors (ALRs). We describe ligand-dependent oligomerization of receptor, receptor-dependent oligomerization of signaling adaptor molecules, and their functional implications and regulations.

  2. Terahertz radiation from a laser plasma filament

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.-C.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ruhl, H.; Sheng, Z.-M.

    2011-03-15

    By the use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we clarify the terahertz (THz) radiation mechanism from a plasma filament formed by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The nonuniform plasma density of the filament leads to a net radiating current for THz radiation. This current is mainly located within the pulse and the first cycle of the wakefield. As the laser pulse propagates, a single-cycle and radially polarized THz pulse is constructively built up forward. The single-cycle shape is mainly due to radiation damping effect.

  3. Structure of Flexible Filamentous Plant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.; Havens, Wendy M.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2008-10-23

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  4. Global collapse of the DR21 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying the most massive and dense star-forming clump in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing DR21 and DR21(OH), we obtained observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. For that, we used molecular line data from our 13CO 1→0, CS 2→1, and N_2H^+ 1→0 survey of the Cygnus X region (FCRAO) and high-angular resolution observations in isotopomeric lines of CO, CS, HCO^+, N_2H^+, and H_2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. The observations reveal a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e. dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO^+ and 12CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of ˜0.6 km s-1 and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1 for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M_⊙ at densities of around 10^5 cm-3 within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting (with free-fall times much shorter than sound crossing times and low virial parameter α). The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large scales and is now in a state of global gravitational

  5. Fatal congenital myopathy with actin filament deposits.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, A; Petersen, M B; Schmalbruch, H

    1996-07-01

    We present the clinical and morphological findings in a case of progressive congenital myopathy. The symptoms present at birth included severe general muscular hypotonia, diffuse muscular atrophy, arthrogryposis, absence of spontaneous movements, and left ventricular hypertrophy. A biopsy specimen taken from the gastrocnemius muscle when the patient was 2 weeks old revealed deposits which consisted of actin filaments as shown by electron microscopy. The infant was occasionally respirator dependent but was mostly able to breathe unassisted. At the age of 5 months he died of respiratory failure. The actin filament deposits may explain the clinical findings.

  6. Myosin binding protein-C activates thin filaments and inhibits thick filaments in heart muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Yan, Ziqian; Gautel, Mathias; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2014-12-30

    Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) is a key regulatory protein in heart muscle, and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene are frequently associated with cardiomyopathy. However, the mechanism of action of MyBP-C remains poorly understood, and both activating and inhibitory effects of MyBP-C on contractility have been reported. To clarify the function of the regulatory N-terminal domains of MyBP-C, we determined their effects on the structure of thick (myosin-containing) and thin (actin-containing) filaments in intact sarcomeres of heart muscle. We used fluorescent probes on troponin C in the thin filaments and on myosin regulatory light chain in the thick filaments to monitor structural changes associated with activation of demembranated trabeculae from rat ventricle by the C1mC2 region of rat MyBP-C. C1mC2 induced larger structural changes in thin filaments than calcium activation, and these were still present when active force was blocked with blebbistatin, showing that C1mC2 directly activates the thin filaments. In contrast, structural changes in thick filaments induced by C1mC2 were smaller than those associated with calcium activation and were abolished or reversed by blebbistatin. Low concentrations of C1mC2 did not affect resting force but increased calcium sensitivity and reduced cooperativity of force and structural changes in both thin and thick filaments. These results show that the N-terminal region of MyBP-C stabilizes the ON state of thin filaments and the OFF state of thick filaments and lead to a novel hypothesis for the physiological role of MyBP-C in the regulation of cardiac contractility.

  7. Cores, Filaments, and Bundles: Hierarchical core formation in the B213 filament in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacar, Alvaro; Tafalla, Mario; Kauffmann, Jens; Kovacs, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the dense core formation in filaments is a critical step for our understanding of the star formation process within molecular clouds. Using different molecular tracers to study the gas kinematics at different scales and density regimes, we have investigated the dense core formation in the B213/L1495 filament in Taurus, one of the most prominent structures identified in nearby clouds (see Hacar et al 2013, A&A, 554, A55). Our analysis of its internal kinematics demonstrates that this filament is actually a bundle of 35 velocity-coherent filaments, typically with lengths of ˜ 0.5 pc and oscillatory-like and sonic velocity field, each of them exhibiting linear masses close to the expected mass for a filament in hydrostatic equilibrium. Among them, only a small fraction of these filaments (˜1/4) are "fertile" and efficiently fragment forming all the cores identified within this region, while most of them (˜3/4) do not form cores and remain "sterile". Our observations then suggest that core formation in Taurus occurs in two steps. First, 0.5 pc-long velocity-coherent filaments condense out of the cloud gas, probably as a result of the turbulent cascade. After that, the dense cores condense quasi-statically in only those "fertile" filaments that have accumulated enough mass to became gravitational unstable, inheriting their kinematic properties. The formation of these velocity-coherent filaments appears therefore as a critical step on the star formation process being the first subsonic structures formed out of the turbulent regime that dominates the cloud dynamics at large scales.

  8. Symbiotic Fungi Produce Laccases Potentially Involved in Phenol Degradation in Fungus Combs of Fungus-Growing Termites in Thailand†

    PubMed Central

    Taprab, Yaovapa; Johjima, Toru; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moriya, Shigeharu; Trakulnaleamsai, Savitr; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2005-01-01

    Fungus-growing termites efficiently decompose plant litter through their symbiotic relationship with basidiomycete fungi of the genus Termitomyces. Here, we investigated phenol-oxidizing enzymes in symbiotic fungi and fungus combs (a substrate used to cultivate symbiotic fungi) from termites belonging to the genera Macrotermes, Odontotermes, and Microtermes in Thailand, because these enzymes are potentially involved in the degradation of phenolic compounds during fungus comb aging. Laccase activity was detected in all the fungus combs examined as well as in the culture supernatants of isolated symbiotic fungi. Conversely, no peroxidase activity was detected in any of the fungus combs or the symbiotic fungal cultures. The laccase cDNA fragments were amplified directly from RNA extracted from fungus combs of five termite species and a fungal isolate using degenerate primers targeting conserved copper binding domains of basidiomycete laccases, resulting in a total of 13 putative laccase cDNA sequences being identified. The full-length sequences of the laccase cDNA and the corresponding gene, lcc1-2, were identified from the fungus comb of Macrotermes gilvus and a Termitomyces strain isolated from the same fungus comb, respectively. Partial purification of laccase from the fungus comb showed that the lcc1-2 gene product was a dominant laccase in the fungus comb. These findings indicate that the symbiotic fungus secretes laccase to the fungus comb. In addition to laccase, we report novel genes that showed a significant similarity with fungal laccases, but the gene product lacked laccase activity. Interestingly, these genes were highly expressed in symbiotic fungi of all the termite hosts examined. PMID:16332742

  9. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-dependent membrane traffic is critical for fungal filamentous growth.

    PubMed

    Ghugtyal, Vikram; Garcia-Rodas, Rocio; Seminara, Agnese; Schaub, Sébastien; Bassilana, Martine; Arkowitz, Robert Alan

    2015-07-14

    The phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate [PI(4)P], generated at the Golgi and plasma membrane, has been implicated in many processes, including membrane traffic, yet its role in cell morphology changes, such as the budding to filamentous growth transition, is unknown. We show that Golgi PI(4)P is required for such a transition in the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Quantitative analyses of membrane traffic revealed that PI(4)P is required for late Golgi and secretory vesicle dynamics and targeting and, as a result, is important for the distribution of a multidrug transporter and hence sensitivity to antifungal drugs. We also observed that plasma membrane PI(4)P, which we show is functionally distinct from Golgi PI(4)P, forms a steep gradient concomitant with filamentous growth, despite uniform plasma membrane PI-4-kinase distribution. Mathematical modeling indicates that local PI(4)P generation and hydrolysis by phosphatases are crucial for this gradient. We conclude that PI(4)P-regulated membrane dynamics are critical for morphology changes.

  10. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-dependent membrane traffic is critical for fungal filamentous growth

    PubMed Central

    Ghugtyal, Vikram; Garcia-Rodas, Rocio; Seminara, Agnese; Schaub, Sébastien; Bassilana, Martine; Arkowitz, Robert Alan

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate [PI(4)P], generated at the Golgi and plasma membrane, has been implicated in many processes, including membrane traffic, yet its role in cell morphology changes, such as the budding to filamentous growth transition, is unknown. We show that Golgi PI(4)P is required for such a transition in the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Quantitative analyses of membrane traffic revealed that PI(4)P is required for late Golgi and secretory vesicle dynamics and targeting and, as a result, is important for the distribution of a multidrug transporter and hence sensitivity to antifungal drugs. We also observed that plasma membrane PI(4)P, which we show is functionally distinct from Golgi PI(4)P, forms a steep gradient concomitant with filamentous growth, despite uniform plasma membrane PI-4-kinase distribution. Mathematical modeling indicates that local PI(4)P generation and hydrolysis by phosphatases are crucial for this gradient. We conclude that PI(4)P-regulated membrane dynamics are critical for morphology changes. PMID:26124136

  11. Assay of Antioxidant Potential of Two Filamentous Fungi Isolated from the Indonesian Fermented Dried Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Yudiarti, Turrini; Isroli, Isroli

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant capacity and antioxidant constituents of two filamentous fungi (Acremonium charticola and Rhizopus oryzae) isolated from the Indonesian fermented dried cassava (gathot) were evaluated in the present study. The antioxidant capacity of the fungal crude extracts was assessed based on the 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzthiazolin-6-sulfonicacid) (ABTS) method. Total phenolics were determined based on the Folin-Ciocalteu method, while the flavonoids content in the fungal extracts was determined by the spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride. Total tannins were estimated by the Folin-Denis method. The ABTS+ radical scavenging activity was higher (p < 0.01) in A. charticola compared to that in R. oryzae and ascorbic acid (as a control). A higher (p < 0.01) content of total phenolics was detected in A. charticola than that in R. oryzae. Total flavonoids were higher (p < 0.01) in R. oryzae as compared with that in A. charticola. The fungus A. charticola had a higher (p < 0.01) level of total tannins than R. oryzae. In conclusion, both filamentous fungi isolated from the Indonesian fermented dried cassava exhibited antioxidant potentials as indicated by their capabilities to scavenge ABTS+. A. charticola had a higher antioxidant capacity than R. oryzae. The antioxidant capacity of A. charticola was attributed mainly to its phenolics and tannins contents. PMID:26848695

  12. Improved gene ontology annotation for biofilm formation, filamentous growth, and phenotypic switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Diane O; Skrzypek, Marek S; Arnaud, Martha B; Binkley, Jonathan; Shah, Prachi; Wymore, Farrell; Sherlock, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is a significant medical threat, especially for immunocompromised patients. Experimental research has focused on specific areas of C. albicans biology, with the goal of understanding the multiple factors that contribute to its pathogenic potential. Some of these factors include cell adhesion, invasive or filamentous growth, and the formation of drug-resistant biofilms. The Gene Ontology (GO) (www.geneontology.org) is a standardized vocabulary that the Candida Genome Database (CGD) (www.candidagenome.org) and other groups use to describe the functions of gene products. To improve the breadth and accuracy of pathogenicity-related gene product descriptions and to facilitate the description of as yet uncharacterized but potentially pathogenicity-related genes in Candida species, CGD undertook a three-part project: first, the addition of terms to the biological process branch of the GO to improve the description of fungus-related processes; second, manual recuration of gene product annotations in CGD to use the improved GO vocabulary; and third, computational ortholog-based transfer of GO annotations from experimentally characterized gene products, using these new terms, to uncharacterized orthologs in other Candida species. Through genome annotation and analysis, we identified candidate pathogenicity genes in seven non-C. albicans Candida species and in one additional C. albicans strain, WO-1. We also defined a set of C. albicans genes at the intersection of biofilm formation, filamentous growth, pathogenesis, and phenotypic switching of this opportunistic fungal pathogen, which provides a compelling list of candidates for further experimentation.

  13. Assay of Antioxidant Potential of Two Filamentous Fungi Isolated from the Indonesian Fermented Dried Cassava.

    PubMed

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Yudiarti, Turrini; Isroli, Isroli

    2016-02-02

    The antioxidant capacity and antioxidant constituents of two filamentous fungi (Acremonium charticola and Rhizopus oryzae) isolated from the Indonesian fermented dried cassava (gathot) were evaluated in the present study. The antioxidant capacity of the fungal crude extracts was assessed based on the 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzthiazolin-6-sulfonicacid) (ABTS) method. Total phenolics were determined based on the Folin-Ciocalteu method, while the flavonoids content in the fungal extracts was determined by the spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride. Total tannins were estimated by the Folin-Denis method. The ABTS⁺ radical scavenging activity was higher (p < 0.01) in A. charticola compared to that in R. oryzae and ascorbic acid (as a control). A higher (p < 0.01) content of total phenolics was detected in A. charticola than that in R. oryzae. Total flavonoids were higher (p < 0.01) in R. oryzae as compared with that in A. charticola. The fungus A. charticola had a higher (p < 0.01) level of total tannins than R. oryzae. In conclusion, both filamentous fungi isolated from the Indonesian fermented dried cassava exhibited antioxidant potentials as indicated by their capabilities to scavenge ABTS⁺. A. charticola had a higher antioxidant capacity than R. oryzae. The antioxidant capacity of A. charticola was attributed mainly to its phenolics and tannins contents.

  14. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-dependent membrane traffic is critical for fungal filamentous growth.

    PubMed

    Ghugtyal, Vikram; Garcia-Rodas, Rocio; Seminara, Agnese; Schaub, Sébastien; Bassilana, Martine; Arkowitz, Robert Alan

    2015-07-14

    The phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate [PI(4)P], generated at the Golgi and plasma membrane, has been implicated in many processes, including membrane traffic, yet its role in cell morphology changes, such as the budding to filamentous growth transition, is unknown. We show that Golgi PI(4)P is required for such a transition in the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Quantitative analyses of membrane traffic revealed that PI(4)P is required for late Golgi and secretory vesicle dynamics and targeting and, as a result, is important for the distribution of a multidrug transporter and hence sensitivity to antifungal drugs. We also observed that plasma membrane PI(4)P, which we show is functionally distinct from Golgi PI(4)P, forms a steep gradient concomitant with filamentous growth, despite uniform plasma membrane PI-4-kinase distribution. Mathematical modeling indicates that local PI(4)P generation and hydrolysis by phosphatases are crucial for this gradient. We conclude that PI(4)P-regulated membrane dynamics are critical for morphology changes. PMID:26124136

  15. Questions Concerning the Disconnection and Eruption of Filaments and CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    Reviews examples of eruptions and failed eruptions of filaments and CMEs and review questions concerning the processes and mechanisms involved. Where and how does disconnection occur? What can we learn (if anything!) about CME eruptions by observing related filament eruptions?

  16. Side-binding proteins modulate actin filament dynamics.

    PubMed

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dupont, Aurélie; Mizuno, Naoko; Kowalska, Kaja; Lange, Oliver F; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Lamb, Don C

    2015-01-01

    Actin filament dynamics govern many key physiological processes from cell motility to tissue morphogenesis. A central feature of actin dynamics is the capacity of filaments to polymerize and depolymerize at their ends in response to cellular conditions. It is currently thought that filament kinetics can be described by a single rate constant for each end. In this study, using direct visualization of single actin filament elongation, we show that actin polymerization kinetics at both filament ends are strongly influenced by the binding of proteins to the lateral filament surface. We also show that the pointed-end has a non-elongating state that dominates the observed filament kinetic asymmetry. Estimates of flexibility as well as effects on fragmentation and growth suggest that the observed kinetic diversity arises from structural alteration. Tuning elongation kinetics by exploiting the malleability of the filament structure may be a ubiquitous mechanism to generate a rich variety of cellular actin dynamics. PMID:25706231

  17. Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin; Pu Ye; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2005-06-15

    We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Rupture and recoil of bent-core liquid crystal filaments.

    PubMed

    Salili, S M; Ostapenko, T; Kress, O; Bailey, C; Weissflog, W; Harth, K; Eremin, A; Stannarius, R; Jákli, A

    2016-05-25

    The recoil process of free-standing liquid crystal filaments is investigated experimentally and theoretically. We focus on two aspects, the contraction speed of the filament and a spontaneously formed undulation instability. At the moment of rupture, the filaments buckle similarly to the classical Euler buckling of elastic rods. The tip velocity decays with decreasing filament length. The wavelength of buckling affinely decreases with the retracting filament tip. The energy gain related to the decrease of the total length and surface area of the filaments is mainly dissipated by layer rearrangements during thickening of the fibre. A flow back into the meniscus is relevant only in the final stage of the recoil process. We introduce a model for the quantitative description of the filament retraction speed. The dynamics of this recoil behaviour may find relevance as a model for biology-related filaments. PMID:27140824

  19. GRAVITATIONAL INFALL ONTO MOLECULAR FILAMENTS. II. EXTERNALLY PRESSURIZED CYLINDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2013-10-10

    Two aspects of the evolution of externally pressurized, hydrostatic filaments are discussed. (1) The free-fall accretion of gas onto such a filament will lead to filament parameters (specifically, FWHM-column-density relations) inconsistent with the observations of Arzoumanian et al., except for two cases: for low-mass, isothermal filaments, agreement is found as in the analysis by Fischera and Martin. Magnetized cases, for which the field scales weakly with the density as B∝n {sup 1/2}, also reproduce observed parameters. (2) Realistically, the filaments will be embedded not only in gas of non-zero pressure, but also of non-zero density. Thus, the appearance of sheet-embedded filaments is explored. Generating a grid of filament models and comparing the resulting column density ratios and profile shapes with observations suggests that the three-dimensional filament profiles are intrinsically flatter than isothermal, beyond projection and evolution effects.

  20. Using Drosophila for Studies of Intermediate Filaments.

    PubMed

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Thiemann, Dylan A; Magin, Thomas M; Wallrath, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a useful organism for determining protein function and modeling human disease. Drosophila offers a rapid generation time and an abundance of genomic resources and genetic tools. Conservation in protein structure, signaling pathways, and developmental processes make studies performed in Drosophila relevant to other species, including humans. Drosophila models have been generated for neurodegenerative diseases, muscular dystrophy, cancer, and many other disorders. Recently, intermediate filament protein diseases have been modeled in Drosophila. These models have revealed novel mechanisms of pathology, illuminated potential new routes of therapy, and make whole organism compound screens feasible. The goal of this chapter is to outline steps to study intermediate filament function and model intermediate filament-associated diseases in Drosophila. The steps are general and can be applied to study the function of almost any protein. The protocols outlined here are for both the novice and experienced Drosophila researcher, allowing the rich developmental and cell biology that Drosophila offers to be applied to studies of intermediate filaments.

  1. Filament-wound composite vessel materials technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Review of recent developments in advanced filament-wound fiber/resin composite vessel technology for cryogen and high-pressure gas containment applications. Design and fabrication procedures have been developed for small-diameter closed-end vessels equipped with thin elastomeric or thin metallic liners. Specific results are discussed.

  2. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  3. Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments

    DOEpatents

    Zutavern, Fred J.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Buttram, Malcolm T.; Mar, Alan; Helgeson, Wesley D.; O'Malley, Martin W.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Baca, Albert G.; Chow, Weng W.; Vawter, G. Allen

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

  4. Nonlinear Binormal Flow of Vortex Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Scott; Carr, Lincoln

    2015-11-01

    With the current advances in vortex imaging of Bose-Einstein condensates occurring at the Universities of Arizona, São Paulo and Cambridge, interest in vortex filament dynamics is experiencing a resurgence. Recent simulations, Salman (2013), depict dissipative mechanisms resulting from vortex ring emissions and Kelvin wave generation associated with vortex self-intersections. As the local induction approximation fails to capture reconnection events, it lacks a similar dissipative mechanism. On the other hand, Strong&Carr (2012) showed that the exact representation of the velocity field induced by a curved segment of vortex contains higher-order corrections expressed in powers of curvature. This nonlinear binormal flow can be transformed, Hasimoto (1972), into a fully nonlinear equation of Schrödinger type. Continued transformation, Madelung (1926), reveals that the filament's square curvature obeys a quasilinear scalar conservation law with source term. This implies a broader range of filament dynamics than is possible with the integrable linear binormal flow. In this talk we show the affect higher-order corrections have on filament dynamics and discuss physical scales for which they may be witnessed in future experiments. Partially supported by NSF.

  5. Light bullets from a femtosecond filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekalin, S. V.; Dokukina, A. E.; Dormidonov, A. E.; Kompanets, V. O.; Smetanina, E. O.; Kandidov, V. P.

    2015-05-01

    The scenario of the formation of light bullets in the presence of anomalous group velocity dispersion is presented within the same general scenario for condensed matter and humid air. The temporal and spectral parameters of light bullets during filamentation in fused silica and humid air are obtained. A light bullet (LB) is a short-lived formation in a femtosecond filament with a high spatiotemporal light field localization. The sequence formation of the quasi-periodical LB is obtained numerically and is confirmed experimentally by autocorrelation measurements of the LB’s duration. The estimation of the LB duration reaches few-cycle value. It is established that the generation of each LB is accompanied by the ejection of a supercontinuum (SC) in the visible spectrum and an isolated anti-Stokes wing is formed in the visible area of the SC as a result of destructive interference of broadband spectral components. It was found that the energy of a visible SC increases discretely according to the number of LBs in the filament. We demonstrated that the model of ionization in solid dielectric which is used in numerical simulation fundamentally affects the obtained scenario of LB formation. The possibility of the formation of LBs under the filamentation of middle-IR pulses in the atmosphere was shown with numerical simulation.

  6. The Apis mellifera filamentous virus genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A complete reference genome of the Apis mellifera Filamentous virus (AmFV) was determined using Illumina Hiseq sequencing. The AmFV genome is a double strand DNA molecule of approximately 498’500 nucleotides with a GC content of 50.8%. It encompasses 251 non overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), e...

  7. The Tidal Filament of NGC 4660

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, S. N.; Martínez-Robles, C.; Márquez-Lugo, R. A.; Zepeda-García, D.; Franco-Hernández, R.; Nigoche-Netro, A.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.

    2016-10-01

    NGC 4660, in the Virgo cluster, is a well-studied elliptical galaxy which has a strong disk component (D/T approximately 0.2–0.3). The central regions, including the disk component, have stellar populations approximately 12–13 Gyr in age, based on SAURON studies. However, we report the discovery of a long, narrow tidal filament associated with the galaxy, as seen in deep co-added Schmidt plate images and deep CCD frames, implying that the galaxy has undergone a tidal interaction and merger within the last few Gyr. The relative narrowness of the filament implies a wet merger with at least one spiral galaxy involved, but the current state of the system shows little evidence of such. However, a two-component photometric fit using GALFIT shows much bluer B-V colors for the disk component than for the elliptical component, which may represent a residual trace of enhanced star formation in the disk caused by the interaction 1–2 Gyr ago. There are brighter concentrations within the filament that resemble tidal dwarf galaxies, although they are at least 40 times fainter. These concentrations may represent faint, evolved versions of those galaxies. A previously detected stripped satellite galaxy south of the nucleus seen in our residual image may imply that the filament is a tidal stream produced by perigalactic passages of this satellite.

  8. Mechanical Heterogeneity Favors Fragmentation of Strained Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We present a general model of actin filament deformation and fragmentation in response to compressive forces. The elastic free energy density along filaments is determined by their shape and mechanical properties, which were modeled in terms of bending, twisting, and twist-bend coupling elasticities. The elastic energy stored in filament deformation (i.e., strain) tilts the fragmentation-annealing reaction free-energy profile to favor fragmentation. The energy gradient introduces a local shear force that accelerates filament intersubunit bond rupture. The severing protein, cofilin, renders filaments more compliant in bending and twisting. As a result, filaments that are partially decorated with cofilin are mechanically heterogeneous (i.e., nonuniform) and display asymmetric shape deformations and energy profiles distinct from mechanically homogenous (i.e., uniform), bare actin, or saturated cofilactin filaments. The local buckling strain depends on the relative size of the compliant segment as well as the bending and twisting rigidities of flanking regions. Filaments with a single bare/cofilin-decorated boundary localize energy and force adjacent to the boundary, within the compliant cofilactin segment. Filaments with small cofilin clusters were predicted to fragment within the compliant cofilactin rather than at boundaries. Neglecting contributions from twist-bend coupling elasticity underestimates the energy density and gradients along filaments, and thus the net effects of filament strain to fragmentation. Spatial confinement causes compliant cofilactin segments and filaments to adopt higher deformation modes and store more elastic energy, thereby promoting fragmentation. The theory and simulations presented here establish a quantitative relationship between actin filament fragmentation thermodynamics and elasticity, and reveal how local discontinuities in filament mechanical properties introduced by regulatory proteins can modulate both the severing efficiency

  9. SMART Observation of Magnetic Helicity in Solar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, M.; Kitai, R.; Shibata, K.

    2006-08-01

    We examined the magnetic helicity of solar filaments from their structure in the chromosphere and corona. The H-alpha telescope of the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope (SMART) observed 239 intermediate filaments from 2005 July 1 to 2006 May 15. The intermediate filament usually locates between two active regions. Using these images, we identified the filament spine and its barbs, and determined the chromospheric filament helicity from the mean angle between each barbs and a spine. We found that 71% (78 of 110) of intermediate filaments in the northern hemisphere are negative helicity and 67% (87 of 129) of filaments in the southern hemisphere are positive, which agreed with the well-known hemispheric tendency of the magnetic helicity. Additionally, we studied the coronal helicity of intermediate filaments. The coronal filament helicity is defined as the crossing angle of threads formed a filament. The helicity pattern of coronal filaments obtained with EIT/SOHO 171A also shows the helicity hemispheric tendency. Namely, 65% (71 of 110) of coronal filaments in the northern hemisphere exhibit negative helicity and the 65% (84 of 129) of filaments in the southern hemisphere show negative helicity. These data were observed in the same day with the SMART H-alpha data. Moreover, we found 12 filament eruptions in our data. The 7 of 12 filaments show the clear opposite sign of the hemispheric tendency of the magnetic helicity. The helicity seems to be change during temporal evolution. This results suggest that filament instability may be driven by the opposite sign helicity injection from the foot point of the barb.

  10. Peculair Abundances in the Crab Nebula's Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances of supernova remnants can provide invaluable information concerning the properties of the progenitor star as well as details of stellar nucleosynthesis. In this regard, the Crab Nebula is especially useful, it being the youngest supernova remnant observable with IUE. Despite being fairly heavily reddened, UV emission-lines from its filaments have been successfully obtained many times early in the history of IUE. These UV spectra provided important and unique data for determining elemental composition of the filamentary ejecta, especially for C, N, and O. Analysis of these data by Davidson et al (1982) indicated nearly solar C/O and N/O ratios despite the large general enrichment of helium in the remnant. Although not realized at the time, there is considerable recent evidence which indicates that significant abundance variations do exist among the filaments. The strongest anomalies in composition are puzzlingly confined to a few relatively bright northern filaments which exhibit nearly solar He abundance yet show possibly large Ni enrichment. If we hope to understand the elemental composition of remnants in general and the Crab Nebula in particular, we then need to determine the composition of these peculiar filaments and to what extent they differ from the rest of the remnant. Towards that goal, we therefore propose to obtain IUE low dispersion SWP spectra on the brightest of these peculiar filaments where we have already obtained matching optical data. Analysis will follow that of Davidson el al but with much more detailed photoionization models for the Crab already developed by us. These data should help determine the true range of abundances present in the Crab's filamentary ejecta.

  11. Electric events synchronized with laser filaments in thunderclouds.

    PubMed

    Kasparian, Jérôme; Ackermann, Roland; André, Yves-Bernard; Méchain, Grégoire; Méjean, Guillaume; Prade, Bernard; Rohwetter, Philipp; Salmon, Estelle; Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Yu, Jin; Mysyrowicz, André; Sauerbrey, Roland; Wöste, Ludger; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2008-04-14

    We investigated the possibility to trigger real-scale lightning using ionized filaments generated by ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere. Under conditions of high electric field during two thunderstorms, we observed a statistically significant number of electric events synchronized with the laser pulses, at the location of the filaments. This observation suggests that corona discharges may have been triggered by filaments. PMID:18542684

  12. Solar filament material oscillations and drainage before eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan; Yang, Bo

    2014-08-01

    Both large-amplitude longitudinal (LAL) oscillations and material drainage in a solar filament are associated with the flow of material along the filament axis, often followed by an eruption. However, the relationship between these two motions and a subsequent eruption event is poorly understood. We analyze a filament eruption using EUV imaging data captured by the Atmospheric Imaging Array on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Hα images from the Global Oscillation Network Group. Hours before the eruption, the filament was activated, with one of its legs undergoing a slow rising motion. The asymmetric activation inclined the filament relative to the solar surface. After the active phase, LAL oscillations were observed in the inclined filament. The oscillation period increased slightly over time, which may suggest that the magnetic fields supporting the filament evolve to be flatter during the slow rising phase. After the oscillations, a significant amount of filament material was drained toward one filament endpoint, followed immediately by the violent eruption of the filament. The material drainage may further support the change in magnetic topology prior to the eruption. Moreover, we suggest that the filament material drainage could play a role in the transition from a slow to a fast rise of the erupting filament.

  13. Expanding Distribution of Lethal Amphibian Fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans in Europe.

    PubMed

    Spitzen-van der Sluijs, Annemarieke; Martel, An; Asselberghs, Johan; Bales, Emma K; Beukema, Wouter; Bletz, Molly C; Dalbeck, Lutz; Goverse, Edo; Kerres, Alexander; Kinet, Thierry; Kirst, Kai; Laudelout, Arnaud; Marin da Fonte, Luis F; Nöllert, Andreas; Ohlhoff, Dagmar; Sabino-Pinto, Joana; Schmidt, Benedikt R; Speybroeck, Jeroen; Spikmans, Frank; Steinfartz, Sebastian; Veith, Michael; Vences, Miguel; Wagner, Norman; Pasmans, Frank; Lötters, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Emerging fungal diseases can drive amphibian species to local extinction. During 2010-2016, we examined 1,921 urodeles in 3 European countries. Presence of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans at new locations and in urodeles of different species expands the known geographic and host range of the fungus and underpins its imminent threat to biodiversity.

  14. Phomalactone from a phytopathogenic fungus infecting Zinnia elegans (Asteraceae) leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinnia elegans plants are infected by a fungus that causes necrosis with dark red spots particularly in late spring to the middle of summer in the Mid-South part of the United States. This fungal disease when untreated causes the leaves to wilt and eventually kills the plant. The fungus was isolated...

  15. Genome Sequence of the Pathogenic Fungus Sporothrix schenckii (ATCC 58251).

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Christina A; Rodriguez-Del Valle, Nuri; Perez-Sanchez, Lizaida; Abouelleil, Amr; Goldberg, Jonathan; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Birren, Bruce W

    2014-05-22

    Sporothrix schenckii is a pathogenic dimorphic fungus that grows as a yeast and as mycelia. This species is the causative agent of sporotrichosis, typically a skin infection. We report the genome sequence of S. schenckii, which will facilitate the study of this fungus and of the Sporothrix schenckii group.

  16. Expanding Distribution of Lethal Amphibian Fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Spitzen-van der Sluijs, Annemarieke; Martel, An; Asselberghs, Johan; Bales, Emma K.; Beukema, Wouter; Bletz, Molly C.; Dalbeck, Lutz; Goverse, Edo; Kerres, Alexander; Kinet, Thierry; Kirst, Kai; Laudelout, Arnaud; Marin da Fonte, Luis F.; Nöllert, Andreas; Ohlhoff, Dagmar; Sabino-Pinto, Joana; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Speybroeck, Jeroen; Spikmans, Frank; Steinfartz, Sebastian; Veith, Michael; Vences, Miguel; Wagner, Norman; Pasmans, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Emerging fungal diseases can drive amphibian species to local extinction. During 2010–2016, we examined 1,921 urodeles in 3 European countries. Presence of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans at new locations and in urodeles of different species expands the known geographic and host range of the fungus and underpins its imminent threat to biodiversity. PMID:27070102

  17. Expanding Distribution of Lethal Amphibian Fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans in Europe.

    PubMed

    Spitzen-van der Sluijs, Annemarieke; Martel, An; Asselberghs, Johan; Bales, Emma K; Beukema, Wouter; Bletz, Molly C; Dalbeck, Lutz; Goverse, Edo; Kerres, Alexander; Kinet, Thierry; Kirst, Kai; Laudelout, Arnaud; Marin da Fonte, Luis F; Nöllert, Andreas; Ohlhoff, Dagmar; Sabino-Pinto, Joana; Schmidt, Benedikt R; Speybroeck, Jeroen; Spikmans, Frank; Steinfartz, Sebastian; Veith, Michael; Vences, Miguel; Wagner, Norman; Pasmans, Frank; Lötters, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Emerging fungal diseases can drive amphibian species to local extinction. During 2010-2016, we examined 1,921 urodeles in 3 European countries. Presence of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans at new locations and in urodeles of different species expands the known geographic and host range of the fungus and underpins its imminent threat to biodiversity. PMID:27070102

  18. Filamentary structures in dense plasma focus: Current filaments or vortex filaments?

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José; Castillo, Fermin; Veloso, Felipe; Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-07-15

    Recent observations of an azimuthally distributed array of sub-millimeter size sources of fusion protons and correlation between extreme ultraviolet (XUV) images of filaments with neutron yield in PF-1000 plasma focus have re-kindled interest in their significance. These filaments have been described variously in literature as current filaments and vortex filaments, with very little experimental evidence in support of either nomenclature. This paper provides, for the first time, experimental observations of filaments on a table-top plasma focus device using three techniques: framing photography of visible self-luminosity from the plasma, schlieren photography, and interferometry. Quantitative evaluation of density profile of filaments from interferometry reveals that their radius closely agrees with the collision-less ion skin depth. This is a signature of relaxed state of a Hall fluid, which has significant mass flow with equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy, supporting the “vortex filament” description. This interpretation is consistent with empirical evidence of an efficient energy concentration mechanism inferred from nuclear reaction yields.

  19. Assembly of complex plant–fungus networks

    PubMed Central

    Toju, Hirokazu; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Olesen, Jens M.; Thompson, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Species in ecological communities build complex webs of interaction. Although revealing the architecture of these networks is fundamental to understanding ecological and evolutionary dynamics in nature, it has been difficult to characterize the structure of most species-rich ecological systems. By overcoming this limitation through next-generation sequencing technology, we herein uncover the network architecture of below-ground plant–fungus symbioses, which are ubiquitous to terrestrial ecosystems. The examined symbiotic network of a temperate forest in Japan includes 33 plant species and 387 functionally and phylogenetically diverse fungal taxa, and the overall network architecture differs fundamentally from that of other ecological networks. In contrast to results for other ecological networks and theoretical predictions for symbiotic networks, the plant–fungus network shows moderate or relatively low levels of interaction specialization and modularity and an unusual pattern of ‘nested’ network architecture. These results suggest that species-rich ecological networks are more architecturally diverse than previously recognized. PMID:25327887

  20. Bacterial farming by the fungus Morchella crassipes

    PubMed Central

    Pion, Martin; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Simon, Anaele; Bindschedler, Saskia; Flury, Coralie; Chatelain, Auriel; Bshary, Redouan; Job, Daniel; Junier, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between bacteria and fungi, the main actors of the soil microbiome, remain poorly studied. Here, we show that the saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal soil fungus Morchella crassipes acts as a bacterial farmer of Pseudomonas putida, which serves as a model soil bacterium. Farming by M. crassipes consists of bacterial dispersal, bacterial rearing with fungal exudates, as well as harvesting and translocation of bacterial carbon. The different phases were confirmed experimentally using cell counting and 13C probing. Common criteria met by other non-human farming systems are also valid for M. crassipes farming, including habitual planting, cultivation and harvesting. Specific traits include delocalization of food production and consumption and separation of roles in the colony (source versus sink areas), which are also found in human agriculture. Our study evidences a hitherto unknown mutualistic association in which bacteria gain through dispersal and rearing, while the fungus gains through the harvesting of an additional carbon source and increased stress resistance of the mycelium. This type of interaction between fungi and bacteria may play a key role in soils. PMID:24174111

  1. Assessing fungus prevalence in domestic interiors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, W R

    1975-09-01

    Single-plate, Andersen sampler collections of mesonphilic imperfect fungi were made at three points in and immediately outside a series of midwestern homes. During frost-free periods, emanations of dark-spored form genera predominated at both points with indoor levels averaging 25% of those in outside air. At these times, volumetric recoveries and those by 30-min exposure of open culture plates have correlated tenuously (r = 0.29) in bedroom air of 20 homes. During winter, form species of Penicillium, Aspergillus, Oospora, Sporothrix, yeasts, etc. predominated indoors, with levels exceeding 1,000 particles/M3 noted in over 18% of homes; outdoor concentrations never exceeded 230 particles/M3. Comparisons of volumetric and open-plate recoveries from 50 homes during winter have revealed an almost random relationship (r = 0.06). These findings reflect the case with which outdoor spore clouds may penetrate structures and obscure evidence of internal fungus cources. The data also imply that, because of size-related undersampling, open plates often seriously misrepresent prevalence levels and occasionally can exclude abundant types from recovery. The fungus flora of enclosed spaces merits further critical study by volumetric techniques of calculable efficiency in a setting that minimizes contamination from without.

  2. Hazardous waste treatment using fungus enters marketplace

    SciTech Connect

    Illman, D.L.

    1993-07-01

    When the announcement was made eight years ago that a common fungus had been found that could degrade a variety of environmental pollutants, the news stirred interest in the scientific community, the private sector, and the general public. Here was the promise of a new technology that might be effective and economical in treating hazardous waste, especially the most recalcitrant of toxic pollutants. Today, commercialization is beginning amid a mixture of optimism and skepticism. The organism in question is white rot fungus, or Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and it belongs to a family of woodrotting fungi common all over North America. The fungi secrete enzymes that break down lignin in wood to carbon dioxide and water--a process called mineralization. These lignin-degrading enzymes are not very discriminating, however. The white rot fungi have been shown to degrade such materials as DDT, the herbicide (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4,5-T), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentachlorophenol (PCP), creosote, coal tars, and heavy fuels, in many cases mineralizing these pollutants to a significant extent.

  3. Bacterial farming by the fungus Morchella crassipes.

    PubMed

    Pion, Martin; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Simon, Anaele; Bindschedler, Saskia; Flury, Coralie; Chatelain, Auriel; Bshary, Redouan; Job, Daniel; Junier, Pilar

    2013-12-22

    The interactions between bacteria and fungi, the main actors of the soil microbiome, remain poorly studied. Here, we show that the saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal soil fungus Morchella crassipes acts as a bacterial farmer of Pseudomonas putida, which serves as a model soil bacterium. Farming by M. crassipes consists of bacterial dispersal, bacterial rearing with fungal exudates, as well as harvesting and translocation of bacterial carbon. The different phases were confirmed experimentally using cell counting and (13)C probing. Common criteria met by other non-human farming systems are also valid for M. crassipes farming, including habitual planting, cultivation and harvesting. Specific traits include delocalization of food production and consumption and separation of roles in the colony (source versus sink areas), which are also found in human agriculture. Our study evidences a hitherto unknown mutualistic association in which bacteria gain through dispersal and rearing, while the fungus gains through the harvesting of an additional carbon source and increased stress resistance of the mycelium. This type of interaction between fungi and bacteria may play a key role in soils. PMID:24174111

  4. General metabolism of the dimorphic and pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Arraes, Fabrício B M; Benoliel, Bruno; Burtet, Rafael T; Costa, Patrícia L N; Galdino, Alexandro S; Lima, Luanne H A; Marinho-Silva, Camila; Oliveira-Pereira, Luciana; Pfrimer, Pollyanna; Procópio-Silva, Luciano; Reis, Viviane Castelo-Branco; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2005-06-30

    Annotation of the transcriptome of the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has set the grounds for a global understanding of its metabolism in both mycelium and yeast forms. This fungus is able to use the main carbohydrate sources, including starch, and it can store reduced carbons in the form of glycogen and trehalose; these provide energy reserves that are relevant for metabolic adaptation, protection against stress and infectivity mechanisms. The glyoxylate cycle, which is also involved in pathogenicity, is present in this fungus. Classical pathways of lipid biosynthesis and degradation, including those of ketone body and sterol production, are well represented in the database of P. brasiliensis. It is able to synthesize de novo all nucleotides and amino acids, with the sole exception of asparagine, which was confirmed by the fungus growth in minimal medium. Sulfur metabolism, as well as the accessory synthetic pathways of vitamins and co-factors, are likely to exist in this fungus.

  5. Laser filamentation induced bubbles and their motion in water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengjiang; Yuan, Shuai; Zuo, Zhong; Li, Wenxue; Ding, Liang'en; Zeng, Heping

    2016-06-13

    We demonstrate femtosecond filamentation induced convection in water by using a microscope directly observing the dynamic processes of the generated bubbles on a macroscopic time scale. The bubbles are driven by the filament in water and do directional movements. The angles between the bubbles' moving directions and the laser propagation direction varied at different positions along the filament, exhibiting a fusiform distribution. It indicates a fluid dynamic phenomenon depending on the local filament intensity, and reveals the convection processes induced by filamentation in water indirectly. PMID:27410343

  6. The structures, mass motions and footpoints of solar filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    This thesis focuses on identifying the mechanism by which solar filaments acquire mass. Some of the speculations for how a filament gets its mass are 1) injection of mass from the chromosphere into the filament structure, and 2) condensation of mass from the corona into the region of the filament channel. Mass motion at the footpoints of the filaments is studied to detect mass entering and leaving the filament body. The magnetic properties of the footpoints of the filaments are also studied. Recommendations are drawn by comparing observational properties obtained in this study with the features used in some of the previously developed models. The datasets used for this study are high-resolution image sets of centerline and Doppler wings of Halpha, obtained using the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT). The data were obtained on Oct 30, 2010. The data set contains three filaments in an active region in the northern hemisphere of the Sun. The images in each wavelength are aligned and made into movies to find the footpoints of the filaments through which the mass goes into and comes out of the filaments from and to the chromosphere, respectively. The magnetic properties of the footpoints are studied by overlaying the magnetogram images with the DOT images by using full-disk Halpha images for matching the features in the two. Of the three filaments, one of the filaments is observed to be stable throughout the duration of the observations; another filament erupts after about two hours of the beginning of observations; and the third filament is in its early stages of formation. The ends of the stable filament are clearly observed whereas the ends of the erupting filament and the forming filament are observed clearly intermittently during the duration of the observations. The animations of the region near the ends of filament 1 reveal definite injection and draining of mass via the footpoints into and out of the filament. The mass motion into and out of the filaments are observed

  7. A Comparison Study of an Active Region Eruptive Filament and a Neighboring Non-Eruptive Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Jiang, C.; Feng, X. S.; Hu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    We perform a comparison study of an eruptive filament in the core region of AR 11283 and a nearby non-eruptive filament. The coronal magnetic field supporting these two filaments is extrapolated using our data-driven CESE-MHD-NLFFF code (Jiang et al. 2013, Jiang etal. 2014), which presents two magnetic flux ropes (FRs) in the same extrapolation box. The eruptive FR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) spatially co-aligned very well with a pre-eruption EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for the coronal sigmoids. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the FRs match observations of the filaments strikingly well, which supports strongly the FR-dip model for filaments. The FR that supports the AR eruptive filament is much smaller (with a length of 3 Mm) compared with the large-scale FR holding the quiescent filament (with a length of 30 Mm). But the AR eruptive FR contains most of the magnetic free energy in the extrapolation box and holds a much higher magnetic energy density than the quiescent FR, because it resides along the main polarity inversion line (PIL) around sunspots with strong magnetic shear. Both the FRs are weakly twisted and cannot trigger kink instability. The AR eruptive FR is unstable because its axis reaches above a critical height for torus instability (TI), at which the overlying closed arcades can no longer confine the FR stably. To the contrary, the quiescent FR is firmly held down by its overlying field, as its axis apex is far below the TI threshold height. (This work is partially supported by NSF AGS-1153323 and 1062050)

  8. Interaction between titin and thin filaments in intact cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Trombitás, K; Greaser, M L; Pollack, G H

    1997-06-01

    A 'freeze break' technique and immunoelectron microscopy were used to study the elastic properties of cardiac titin filaments. Small bundles consisting of a few fibres from freshly prepared dog papillary muscle were quickly frozen and broken under liquid nitrogen to fracture sarcomeres in planes perpendicular to the filament axes. Breaks occurred at each of several regions along the sarcomeres. The still-frozen specimens were thawed during fixation to allow elastic filaments to retract. The broken muscle segments were then treated with monoclonal titin antibody 9D10 which labelled a unique epitope in the I-band. In sarcomeres broken at the A-I junction, the titin filaments reacted toward the Z-line, independently of the thin filaments. The retracted epitopes did not reach the Z-line; retraction stopped at the N1-line level. In sarcomeres broken near the Z-line, the titin filaments retracted in the opposite direction, to the tip of the thick filaments. When the break occurred in the A-band, by contrast, the titin-epitope position was unaffected. On the basis of these results, and despite the reported interaction of titin and actin in vitro, it appears that cardiac titin molecules form elastic filaments that are functionally independent of the thin filaments. Near the Z-line, however, the titin filaments seem to associate firmly with the thin filaments. PMID:9172076

  9. High-Resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the sympathetic eruptions of two solar filaments side by side as observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. These two filaments start from the complex active region NOAA 12434 (north) and end in a large quiescent region (south). The corresponding SDO/HMI magnetic field observations suggest that the two small filaments are located above two different polarity inversion lines in the northern part. The SDO/AIA observations of the eruption show that these two filaments appear to merge into one in the southern quiescent region. The north-eastern filament starts eruption firstly, which is followed by the north-western filament eruption about 20 minutes later. Clear untwisting motions (i.e., signature of flux ropes) are observed in both filaments during the eruption. After the lifts off of the north-western filament, mini filaments are observed to emerge from the surface and rise up multiple times. The high-resolution observations reveal the fact that the filament is composed of multiple sections and multiple layers. The filament in the lower layer can merge into the upper layer, which leads to the increase of non-potentiality of the upper layer. Magnetic field models using the flux rope insertion method are also constructed in order to understand the complex magnetic configuration as well as the initiation and dynamics of the eruptions.

  10. Transition from linear- to nonlinear-focusing regime in filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Laser filamentation in gases is often carried out in the laboratory with focusing optics to better stabilize the filament, whereas real-world applications of filaments frequently involve collimated or near-collimated beams. It is well documented that geometrical focusing can alter the properties of laser filaments and, consequently, a transition between a collimated and a strongly focused filament is expected. Nevertheless, this transition point has not been identified. Here, we propose an analytical method to determine the transition, and show that it corresponds to an actual shift in the balance of physical mechanisms governing filamentation. In high-NA conditions, filamentation is primarily governed by geometrical focusing and plasma effects, while the Kerr nonlinearity plays a more significant role as NA decreases. We find the transition between the two regimes to be relatively insensitive to the intrinsic laser parameters, and our analysis agrees well with a wide range of parameters found in published literature. PMID:25434678

  11. The Dark Matter filament between Abell 222/223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Jörg P.; Werner, Norbert; Clowe, Douglas; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kitching, Tom; Miller, Lance; Simionescu, Aurora

    2016-10-01

    Weak lensing detections and measurements of filaments have been elusive for a long time. The reason is that the low density contrast of filaments generally pushes the weak lensing signal to unobservably low scales. To nevertheless map the dark matter in filaments exquisite data and unusual systems are necessary. SuprimeCam observations of the supercluster system Abell 222/223 provided the required combination of excellent seeing images and a fortuitous alignment of the filament with the line-of-sight. This boosted the lensing signal to a detectable level and led to the first weak lensing mass measurement of a large-scale structure filament. The filament connecting Abell 222 and Abell 223 is now the only one traced by the galaxy distribution, dark matter, and X-ray emission from the hottest phase of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. The combination of these data allows us to put the first constraints on the hot gas fraction in filaments.

  12. Dynamics of in vitro intermediate filament length distributions.

    PubMed

    Portet, Stéphanie

    2013-09-01

    An aggregation model with explicit expression of association rate constants is considered to study in vitro type III intermediate filament length distribution dynamics. Different assumptions on the properties of filaments and probability of aggregation are considered, leading to four models. Fitting of model responses to experimental data leads to the identification of the most appropriate model to represent each time point of the assembly. A combination of models allows the construction of a mixed model that represents well the complete assembly dynamics: it is found that the rate constants decrease with respect to filament size when the aggregation involves at least one short filament, whereas for longer filaments they are almost independent of size. The flexible nature of filaments is thus important in the assembly of intermediate filaments.

  13. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  14. Ultraminiature broadband light source with spiral shaped filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L. (Inventor); Collura, Joseph S. (Inventor); Helvajian, Henry (Inventor); Pocha, Michael D. (Inventor); Meyer, Glenn A. (Inventor); McConaghy, Charles F. (Inventor); Olsen, Barry L. (Inventor); Hansen, William W (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An ultraminiature light source using a double-spiral shaped tungsten filament includes end contact portions which are separated to allow for radial and length-wise unwinding of the spiral. The double-spiral filament is spaced relatively far apart at the end portions thereof so that contact between portions of the filament upon expansion is avoided. The light source is made by fabricating a double-spiral ultraminiature tungsten filament from tungsten foil and housing the filament in a ceramic package having a reflective bottom and a well wherein the filament is suspended. A vacuum furnace brazing process attaches the filament to contacts of the ceramic package. Finally, a cover with a transparent window is attached onto the top of the ceramic package by solder reflow in a second vacuum furnace process to form a complete hermetically sealed package.

  15. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined. PMID:27789971

  16. Statistical study of solar filaments since 1919

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboudarham, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Science board of Paris Observatory funded the data capture of tables associated with Meudon synoptic maps of Solar activity, which were published for observations ranging from 1919 to 1992. The EU HELIO project developed automatic recognition codes, especially concerning filaments based on observations between 1996 en 2014 (and soon, up to now). We plan to fill the gap between the two catalogues in the short term. But it is already possible to study filaments behavior over quite long periods of time. We present here the first series of results obtained from this analysis which give some clue about the way Solar activity behaves in various parts of the cycle, and about the way if depends on the hemisphere where activity occurs. This information could then be correlated with events catalogues (e.g. flares, CMEs, …) in order to link those phenomena with concrete Solar activity.

  17. Experiments on the Propagation of Plasma Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Noam; Egedal, Jan; Fox, Will; Le, Ari; Porkolab, Miklos

    2008-07-04

    We investigate experimentally the motion and structure of isolated plasma filaments propagating through neutral gas. Plasma filaments, or 'blobs,' arise from turbulent fluctuations in a range of plasmas. Our experimental geometry is toroidally symmetric, and the blobs expand to a larger major radius under the influence of a vertical electric field. The electric field, which is caused by {nabla}B and curvature drifts in a 1/R magnetic field, is limited by collisional damping on the neutral gas. The blob's electrostatic potential structure and the resulting ExB flow field give rise to a vortex pair and a mushroom shape, which are consistent with nonlinear plasma simulations. We observe experimentally this characteristic mushroom shape for the first time. We also find that the blob propagation velocity is inversely proportional to the neutral density and decreases with time as the blob cools.

  18. Online Catalog for Filament-Sigmoid Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriot, Ivy; Pevtsov, A.; Martens, P.

    2007-05-01

    A new online catalog correlating H-alpha filaments with SXT sigmoids gives researchers, teachers and pre-college students the ability to access digital H-alpha images online that were previously available only at the physical location of the NSO at Sunspot, NM. This web-based catalog correlates SOHO's SXT sigmoids from 1993-1998 as described in a non-online catalog created by Zach Blehm under the direction of Richard Canfield, MSU-Bozeman, with H-alpha filament activity as described by Ivy Merriot under the direction of Alexei Pevtsov, NSO, and Petrus Martens, MSU-Bozeman. The H-alpha images were digitized from film archives of the Flare Patrol Telescope at Sunspot, NM. Use of the online catalog will be demonstrated at the poster site with critical comments encouraged.

  19. Collective dynamics of active filament complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogucci, Hironobu; Ishihara, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures that support various biological functions. For the most part, previous studies have investigated the collective dynamics of rodlike biofilaments; however, the shapes of the actual subcellular components are often more elaborate. In this study, we considered an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents the progression from rodlike biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects in two dimensions and observed several types of dynamics, depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, a moving density band that we named a "moving smectic" is introduced here for the first time. By analyzing the trajectories of individual objects and the interactions among them, this study demonstrated how interactions among active biofilaments with complex shapes could produce collective dynamics in a nontrivial manner.

  20. Filament-wound composite vessels material technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Programs are reviewed that were conducted to establish a technology base for applying advanced fibers or resins to high performance filament-wound pressure vessels for containment of cryogens and high pressure gases. Materials evaluated included boron, graphite, PRD 49-1 and 3/epoxy and S-glass/polyimide composites. Closed-end cylindrical, and oblate spheroid-shaped vessels were fabricated in 4- and 8-inch diameter sizes. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst, low-cycle fatigue, and sustained loading tests over a -423 F to room temperature range for epoxy composites and a -423 to 500 F temperature range for the polyimide composites. Vessels tested at cryogenic and/or 500 F had thin (3 to 20 mils) metallic liners whereas vessels tested at room temperature had elastomeric liners. Correlations between acoustic emissions and burst and cyclic properties of PRD 49-1 filament-wound vessels are discussed.

  1. Cold Milky Way HI Gas in Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Haud, U.; Winkel, B.; Ben Bekhti, N.; Flöer, L.; Lenz, D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate data from the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn H i Survey, supplemented with data from the third release of the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS III) observed at Parkes. We explore the all-sky distribution of the local Galactic H i gas with | {v}{{LSR}}| \\lt 25 km s-1 on angular scales of 11‧-16‧. Unsharp masking is applied to extract small-scale features. We find cold filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission and conclude that the cold neutral medium (CNM) is mostly organized in sheets that are, because of projection effects, observed as filaments. These filaments are associated with dust ridges, aligned with the magnetic field measured on the structures by Planck at 353 GHz. The CNM above latitudes | b| \\gt 20^\\circ is described by a log-normal distribution, with a median Doppler temperature TD = 223 K, derived from observed line widths that include turbulent contributions. The median neutral hydrogen (H i) column density is NH i ≃ 1019.1 cm-2. These CNM structures are embedded within a warm neutral medium with NH i ≃ 1020 cm-2. Assuming an average distance of 100 pc, we derive for the CNM sheets a thickness of ≲0.3 pc. Adopting a magnetic field strength of Btot = (6.0 ± 1.8) μG, proposed by Heiles & Troland, and assuming that the CNM filaments are confined by magnetic pressure, we estimate a thickness of 0.09 pc. Correspondingly, the median volume density is in the range 14 ≲ n ≲ 47 cm-3. The authors thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for support under grant numbers KE757/11-1, KE757/7-3, KE757/7-2, KE757/7-1, and BE4823/1-1.

  2. Viscoelastic properties of semiflexible filamentous bacteriophage fd.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, F G; Hinner, B; Sackmann, E; Tang, J X

    2000-10-01

    The cytoskeletal protein filament F-actin has been treated in a number of recent studies as a model physical system for semiflexible filaments. In this work, we studied the viscoelastic properties of entangled solutions of the filamentous bacteriophage fd as an alternative to F-actin with similar physical parameters. We present both microrheometric and macrorheometric measurements of the viscoelastic storage and loss moduli, G'(f ) and G"(f ), respectively, in a frequency range 0.01filament networks. For the dynamic viscosity at the low shear rate limit, a concentration dependence of eta(0) approximately c(2.6) was found. Finally, a linear scaling of the terminal relaxation time with concentration, tau(d) approximately c, was observed. PMID:11089110

  3. Formation of magnetic filaments: A kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pedrero, F.; Tirado-Miranda, M.; Schmitt, A.; Callejas-Fernández, J.

    2007-07-01

    In order to form magnetic filaments or chains, aqueous suspensions of superparamagnetic colloidal particles were aggregated under the action of an external magnetic field in the presence of different amounts of an indifferent 1:1 electrolyte (KBr). This allowed the influence of the anisotropic magnetic and isotropic electrostatic interactions on the aggregation behavior of these electric double-layered magnetic particles to be studied. Dynamic light scattering was used for monitoring the average diffusion coefficient of the magnetic filaments formed. Hydrodynamic equations were employed for obtaining the average chain lengths from the experimental mean diffusion coefficients. The results show that, for the same exposure time to the magnetic field, the average filament size is monotonously related to the amount of electrolyte added. The chain growth behavior was found to follow a power law with a similar exponent for all electrolyte concentrations used in this work. The time evolution of the average filament size can be rescaled such that all the curves collapse on a single master curve. Since the electrolyte added does not have any effect on the scaling behavior, the mechanism of aggregation seems to be completely controlled by the dipolar interaction. However, electrolyte addition not only controls the range of the total interaction between the particles, but also enhances the growth rate of the aggregation process. Taking into account the anisotropic character of these aggregation processes we propose a kernel that depends explicitly on the range of the dipolar interaction. The corresponding solutions of the Smoluchowski equation combined with theoretical models for the diffusion and light scattering by rigid rods reproduce the measured time evolution of the average perpendicular aggregate diffusion coefficient quite satisfactorily.

  4. Formation of magnetic filaments: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pedrero, F; Tirado-Miranda, M; Schmitt, A; Callejas-Fernández, J

    2007-07-01

    In order to form magnetic filaments or chains, aqueous suspensions of superparamagnetic colloidal particles were aggregated under the action of an external magnetic field in the presence of different amounts of an indifferent 1:1 electrolyte (KBr). This allowed the influence of the anisotropic magnetic and isotropic electrostatic interactions on the aggregation behavior of these electric double-layered magnetic particles to be studied. Dynamic light scattering was used for monitoring the average diffusion coefficient of the magnetic filaments formed. Hydrodynamic equations were employed for obtaining the average chain lengths from the experimental mean diffusion coefficients. The results show that, for the same exposure time to the magnetic field, the average filament size is monotonously related to the amount of electrolyte added. The chain growth behavior was found to follow a power law with a similar exponent for all electrolyte concentrations used in this work. The time evolution of the average filament size can be rescaled such that all the curves collapse on a single master curve. Since the electrolyte added does not have any effect on the scaling behavior, the mechanism of aggregation seems to be completely controlled by the dipolar interaction. However, electrolyte addition not only controls the range of the total interaction between the particles, but also enhances the growth rate of the aggregation process. Taking into account the anisotropic character of these aggregation processes we propose a kernel that depends explicitly on the range of the dipolar interaction. The corresponding solutions of the Smoluchowski equation combined with theoretical models for the diffusion and light scattering by rigid rods reproduce the measured time evolution of the average perpendicular aggregate diffusion coefficient quite satisfactorily.

  5. Filamentation instability in a quantum magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2008-02-15

    The filamentation instability occurring when a nonrelativistic electron beam passes through a quantum magnetized plasma is investigated by means of a cold quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is proved that the instability can be completely suppressed by quantum effects if and only if a finite magnetic field is present. A dimensionless parameter is identified that measures the strength of quantum effects. Strong quantum effects allow for a much smaller magnetic field to suppress the instability than in the classical regime.

  6. Flexible magnetic filaments as micromechanical sensors.

    PubMed

    Goubault, C; Jop, P; Fermigier, M; Baudry, J; Bertrand, E; Bibette, J

    2003-12-31

    We propose a new micromechanical approach to probe bending rigidity at molecular scale. Long flexible filaments made of magnetic colloids and linkers are shown to adopt under magnetic field a hairpin configuration. Measuring the hairpin curvature as a function of the field intensity and the linker length from diffracted light allows us to deduce the linker bending rigidity kappa. The technique is presented for two types of linkers: a spontaneously adsorbing polymer and a grafted biomolecular.

  7. Impact damage in filament wound composite bottles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Alton L.

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly, composite materials are being used in advanced structural applications because of the significant weight savings they offer when compared to more traditional engineering materials. The higher cost of composites must be offset by the increased performance that results from reduced structural weight if these new materials are to be used effectively. At present, there is considerable interest in fabricating solid rocket motor cases out of composite materials, and capitalizing on the reduced structural weight to increase rocket performance. However, one of the difficulties that arises when composite materials are used is that composites can develop significant amounts of internal damage during low velocity impacts. Such low velocity impacts may be encountered in routine handling of a structural component like a rocket motor case. The ability to assess the reduction in structural integrity of composite motor cases that experience accidental impacts is essential if composite rocket motor cases are to be certified for manned flight. While experimental studies of the post-impact performance of filament wound composite motor cases haven been proven performed (2,3), scaling impact data from small specimens to full scale structures has proven difficult. If such a scaling methodology is to be achieved, an increased understanding of the damage processes which influence residual strength is required. The study described herein was part of an ongoing investigation of damage development and reduction of tensile strength in filament wound composites subjected to low velocity impacts. The present study, which focused on documenting the damage that develops in filament wound composites as a result of such impacts, included two distinct tasks. The first task was to experimentally assess impact damage in small, filament wound pressure bottles using x-ray radiography. The second task was to study the feasibility of using digital image processing techniques to assist in

  8. Origin and Evolution of Filament-Prominence Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Petrus C.; Zwaan, Cornelis

    2001-09-01

    We present a ``head-to-tail'' linkage model for the formation, evolution, and eruption of solar filaments. The magnetic field structure of our model is based on the observation that filaments form exclusively in filament channels with no apparent magnetic connections above the polarity inversion line. The formation of a filament in this configuration is driven by flux convergence and cancellation, which produces looplike filament segments with a half-turn. Filament segments of like chirality may connect and form long quiescent filaments. Such filaments are stabilized through footpoint anchoring until further cancellation at the footpoints causes their eruption. The eruption restores the original filament channel so that filament formation may resume immediately. We then demonstrate that the combined workings of Hale's polarity law, Joy's law, and differential rotation introduce a strong hemispheric preference in the chirality of filaments formed poleward of the sunspot belt, which is in agreement with observations. We analyze the magnetic fine structure of filaments formed through our model and find consistency with the observed hemispheric preference for barb orientation and a simple explanation for barb formation. Finally, we consider the flux tubes retracted below the surface in the process of filament formation. We show that every cancellation event that generates a filament obeying the hemispheric chirality preference injects a flux tube below the surface with a poloidal field opposite that of the ongoing cycle. We suggest that this pattern of submergence of flux represents the specific mechanism for the reversal of the poloidal flux in a Babcock-Leighton-Durney-type model for the solar dynamo.

  9. Hot filament CVD of boron nitride films

    DOEpatents

    Rye, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    Using a hot filament (.apprxeq.1400.degree. C.) to activate borazine (B.sub.3 N.sub.3 H.sub.6) molecules for subsequent reaction with a direct line-of-sight substrate, transparent boron ntiride films as thick as 25,000 angstroms are grown for a substrate temperature as low as 100.degree. C. The minimum temperature is determined by radiative heating from the adjacent hot filament. The low temperature BN films show no indication of crystallinity with X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) show the films to have a B:N ratio of 0.97:1 with no other XPS detectable impurities above the 0.5% level. Both Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are characteristic of h-BN with small amounts of hydrogen detected as N-H and B-H bands in the IR spectrum. An important feature of this method is the separation and localization of the thermal activation step at the hot filament from the surface reaction and film growth steps at the substrate surface. This allows both higher temperature thermal activation and lower temperature film growth.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Elisabeth E; Janmey, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Purified intermediate filament (IF) proteins can be reassembled in vitro to produce polymers closely resembling those found in cells, and these filaments form viscoelastic gels. The cross-links holding IFs together in the network include specific bonds between polypeptides extending from the filament surface and ionic interactions mediated by divalent cations. IF networks exhibit striking nonlinear elasticity with stiffness, as quantified by shear modulus, increasing an order of magnitude as the networks are deformed to large strains resembling those that soft tissues undergo in vivo. Individual IFs can be stretched to more than two or three times their resting length without breaking. At least 10 different rheometric methods have been used to quantify the viscoelasticity of IF networks over a wide range of timescales and strain magnitudes. The mechanical roles of different classes of cytoplasmic IFs on mesenchymal and epithelial cells in culture have also been studied by an even wider range of microrheological methods. These studies have documented the effects on cell mechanics when IFs are genetically or pharmacologically disrupted or when normal or mutant IF proteins are exogenously expressed in cells. Consistent with in vitro rheology, the mechanical role of IFs is more apparent as cells are subjected to larger and more frequent deformations.

  11. Mechanical properties of intermediate filament proteins

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Elisabeth E.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Purified intermediate filament proteins can be reassembled in vitro to produce polymers closely resembling those found in cells, and these filament form viscoelastic gels. The crosslinks holding IFs together in the network include specific bonds between polypeptides extending from the filament surface and ionic interactions mediated by divalent cations. IF networks exhibit striking non-linear elasticity with stiffness, as quantified by shear modulus, increasing an order of magnitude as the networks are deformed to large stains resembling those that soft tissues undergo in vivo. Individual Ifs can be stretched to more than 2 or 3 times their resting length without breaking. At least ten different rheometric methods have been used to quantify the viscoelasticity of IF networks over a wide range of timescales and strain magnitudes. The mechanical roles of different classes of IF on mesenchymal and epithelial cells in culture have also been studied by an even wider range of microrheological methods. These studies have documented the effects on cell mechanics when IFs are genetically or pharmacologically disrupted or when normal or mutant IF proteins are exogenously expressed in cells. Consistent with in vitro rheology, the mechanical role of IFs is more apparent as cells are subjected to larger and more frequent deformations. PMID:26795466

  12. Nanomechanical properties of desmin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Kiss, B; Karsai, A; Kellermayer, M S Z

    2006-08-01

    Desmin intermediate filaments play important role in the mechanical integrity and elasticity of muscle cells. The mechanisms of how desmin contributes to cellular mechanics are little understood. Here, we explored the nanomechanics of desmin by manipulating individual filaments with atomic force microscopy. In complex, hierarchical force responses we identified recurring features which likely correspond to distinct properties and structural transitions related to desmin's extensibility and elasticity. The most frequently observed feature is an initial unbinding transition that corresponds to the removal of approximately 45-nm-long coiled-coil dimers from the filament surface with 20-60 pN forces in usually two discrete steps. In tethers longer than 60 nm we most often observed force plateaus studded with bumps spaced approximately 16 nm apart, which are likely caused by a combination of protofilament unzipping, dimer-dimer sliding and coiled-coil-domain unfolding events. At high stresses and strains non-linear, entropic elasticity was dominant, and sometimes repetitive sawtooth force transitions were seen which might arise because of slippage within the desmin protofilament. A model is proposed in which mechanical yielding is caused by coiled-coil domain unfolding and dimer-dimer sliding/slippage, and strain hardening by the entropic elasticity of partially unfolded protofilaments. PMID:16714122

  13. Contraction dynamics of planar liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, Nicole; Sambath, Krishnaraj; Harris, Michael; Basaran, Osman

    2012-11-01

    Thin liquid sheets are ubiquitous in nature and urban landscapes, e.g. waterfalls, and industry, e.g. in various atomizers where sheets of liquid emanate from a nozzle or off a solid surface. These liquid sheets contract due to surface tension and may or may not break into smaller fragments depending on physical properties and flow conditions. The cross-section of a liquid sheet in a plane perpendicular to the main flow direction is a planar or 2D filament. Here, we study the contraction dynamics of an idealized 2D filament of an incompressible Newtonian fluid the initial shape of which is a rectangle terminated by two identical semi-circles. The dynamics are analyzed by solving the full 2D Navier-Stokes system and a1D, slender-jet approximation to it by a numerical technique based on the Galerkin finite element method. Simulation results are summarized by means of a phase diagram in the space of Reynolds number and initial filament aspect ratio. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the different modes of contraction and a critique of the capabilities and limitations of the 1D model.

  14. Inhibition of a Secreted Glutamic Peptidase Prevents Growth of the Fungus Talaromyces emersonii*

    PubMed Central

    O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Mahon, Cathal S.; Goetz, David H.; O'Malley, James M.; Gallagher, Denise M.; Zhou, Min; Murray, Patrick G.; Craik, Charles S.; Tuohy, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    The thermophilic filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii secretes a variety of hydrolytic enzymes that are of interest for processing of biomass into fuel. Many carbohydrases have been isolated and characterized from this fungus, but no studies had been performed on peptidases. In this study, two acid-acting endopeptidases were isolated and characterized from the culture filtrate of T. emersonii. One of these enzymes was identified as a member of the recently classified glutamic peptidase family and was subsequently named T. emersonii glutamic peptidase 1 (TGP1). The second enzyme was identified as an aspartyl peptidase (PEP1). TGP1 was cloned and sequenced and shown to exhibit 64 and 47% protein identity to peptidases from Aspergillus niger and Scytalidium lignocolum, respectively. Substrate profiling of 16 peptides determined that TGP1 has broad specificity with a preference for large residues in the P1 site, particularly Met, Gln, Phe, Lys, Glu, and small amino acids at P1′ such as Ala, Gly, Ser, or Thr. This enzyme efficiently cleaves an internally quenched fluorescent substrate containing the zymogen activation sequence (kcat/Km = 2 × 105 m-1 s-1). Maximum hydrolysis occurs at pH 3.4 and 50 °C. The reaction is strongly inhibited by a transition state peptide analog, TA1 (Ki = 1.5 nm), as well as a portion of the propeptide sequence, PT1 (Ki = 32 nm). Ex vivo studies show that hyphal extension of T. emersonii in complex media is unaffected by the aspartyl peptidase inhibitor pepstatin but is inhibited by TA1 and PT1. This study provides insight into the functional role of the glutamic peptidase TGP1 for growth of T. emersonii. PMID:18687686

  15. Extracellular ATP activates MAPK and ROS signaling during injury response in the fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Castellanos, Elizabeth; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo U.; Heil, Martin; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The response to mechanical damage is crucial for the survival of multicellular organisms, enabling their adaptation to hostile environments. Trichoderma atroviride, a filamentous fungus of great importance in the biological control of plant diseases, responds to mechanical damage by activating regenerative processes and asexual reproduction (conidiation). During this response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by the NADPH oxidase complex. To understand the underlying early signaling events, we evaluated molecules such as extracellular ATP (eATP) and Ca2+ that are known to trigger wound-induced responses in plants and animals. Concretely, we investigated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by eATP, Ca2+, and ROS. Indeed, application of exogenous ATP and Ca2+ triggered conidiation. Furthermore, eATP promoted the Nox1-dependent production of ROS and activated a MAPK pathway. Mutants in the MAPK-encoding genes tmk1 and tmk3 were affected in wound-induced conidiation, and phosphorylation of both Tmk1 and Tmk3 was triggered by eATP. We conclude that in this fungus, eATP acts as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP). Our data indicate the existence of an eATP receptor and suggest that in fungi, eATP triggers pathways that converge to regulate asexual reproduction genes that are required for injury-induced conidiation. By contrast, Ca2+ is more likely to act as a downstream second messenger. The early steps of mechanical damage response in T. atroviride share conserved elements with those known from plants and animals. PMID:25484887

  16. Preliminary joint X-ray and neutron protein crystallographic studies of endoxylanase II from the fungus Trichoderma longibrachiatum.

    PubMed

    Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Hanson, B Leif; Seaver, Sean; Fisher, S Zoë; Mustyakimov, Marat; Langan, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Room-temperature X-ray and neutron diffraction data were measured from a family 11 endoxylanase holoenzyme (XynII) originating from the filamentous fungus Trichoderma longibrachiatum to 1.55 Å resolution using a home source and to 1.80 Å resolution using the Protein Crystallography Station at LANSCE. Crystals of XynII, which is an important enzyme for biofuel production, were grown at pH 8.5 in order to examine the effect of basic conditions on the protonation-state distribution in the active site and throughout the protein molecule and to provide insights for rational engineering of catalytically improved XynII for industrial applications.

  17. Genome and physiology of the ascomycete filamentous fungus Xeromyces bisporus, the most xerophilic organism isolated to date.

    PubMed

    Leong, Su-Lin L; Lantz, Henrik; Pettersson, Olga V; Frisvad, Jens C; Thrane, Ulf; Heipieper, Hermann J; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Grabherr, Manfred; Pettersson, Mats; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Schnürer, Johan

    2015-02-01

    Xeromyces bisporus can grow on sugary substrates down to 0.61, an extremely low water activity. Its genome size is approximately 22 Mb. Gene clusters encoding for secondary metabolites were conspicuously absent; secondary metabolites were not detected experimentally. Thus, in its 'dry' but nutrient-rich environment, X. bisporus appears to have relinquished abilities for combative interactions. Elements to sense/signal osmotic stress, e.g. HogA pathway, were present in X. bisporus. However, transcriptomes at optimal (∼ 0.89) versus low aw (0.68) revealed differential expression of only a few stress-related genes; among these, certain (not all) steps for glycerol synthesis were upregulated. Xeromyces bisporus increased glycerol production during hypo- and hyper-osmotic stress, and much of its wet weight comprised water and rinsable solutes; leaked solutes may form a protective slime. Xeromyces bisporus and other food-borne moulds increased membrane fatty acid saturation as water activity decreased. Such modifications did not appear to be transcriptionally regulated in X. bisporus; however, genes modulating sterols, phospholipids and the cell wall were differentially expressed. Xeromyces bisporus was previously proposed to be a 'chaophile', preferring solutes that disorder biomolecular structures. Both X. bisporus and the closely related xerophile, Xerochrysium xerophilum, with low membrane unsaturation indices, could represent a phylogenetic cluster of 'chaophiles'. PMID:25142400

  18. Bioconversion of waste office paper to gluconic acid in a turbine blade reactor by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuko; Park, Enock Y; Okuda, Naoyuki

    2006-05-01

    Gluconic acid production was investigated using an enzymatic hydrolysate of waste office automation paper in a culture of Aspergillus niger. In repeated batch cultures using flasks, saccharified solution medium (SM) did not show any inhibitory effects on gluconic acid production compared to glucose medium (GM). The average gluconic acid yields were 92% (SM) and 80% (GM). In repeated batch cultures using SM in a turbine blade reactor (TBR), the gluconic acid yields were 60% (SM) and 67% (GM) with 80-100 g/l of gluconic acid. When pure oxygen was supplied the production rate increased to four times higher than when supplying air. Remarkable differences in the morphology of A. niger and dry cell weight between SM and GM were observed. The difference in morphology may have caused a reduction of oxygen transfer, resulting in a decrease in gluconic acid production rate in SM.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus westerdijkiae Reveals the Putative Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Ochratoxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabortti, Alolika; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a common mycotoxin that contaminates food and agricultural products. Sequencing of the complete genome of Aspergillus westerdijkiae, a major producer of OTA, reveals more than 50 biosynthetic gene clusters, including a putative OTA biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes a dozen of enzymes, transporters, and regulatory proteins. PMID:27635003

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus westerdijkiae Reveals the Putative Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Chakrabortti, Alolika; Li, Jinming; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a common mycotoxin that contaminates food and agricultural products. Sequencing of the complete genome of Aspergillus westerdijkiae, a major producer of OTA, reveals more than 50 biosynthetic gene clusters, including a putative OTA biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes a dozen of enzymes, transporters, and regulatory proteins. PMID:27635003

  1. Characterization of a mutant strain of a filamentous fungus Cladosporium phlei for the mass production of the secondary metabolite phleichrome.

    PubMed

    Yi, Min-Hee; Kim, Jung-Ae; Kim, Jung-Mi; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Beom-Tae; Park, Seung-Moon; Yang, Moon-Sik; Hwang, Ki-Jun; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2011-08-01

    UV-mutagenesis was performed to obtain mutant strains that demonstrate altered production of phleichrome, a secondary metabolite of Cladosporium phlei. Among fifty mutants selected, based on the increased area and intensity of the purple pigment surrounding the colonies, the strain M0035 showed the highest production of phleichrome, more than seven fold over wild type. Plate cultures of the M0035 strain resulted in a total of 592 mg phleichrome consisting of 146 mg and 446 mg from the mycelia and agar media, respectively. The M0035 strain displayed a growth rate and a mycelial mass comparable to the parental strain but had significantly reduced asexual sporulation.

  2. A septin from the filamentous fungus A. nidulans induces atypical pseudohyphae in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Septins were first discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae where they form a scaffold that organizes the bud site and are a component of the morphogenesis checkpoint that coordinates budding with mitosis. Five of the seven S. cerevisiae septins (Cdc3, Cdc10, Cdc11, Cdc12 and Shs1) colocalize as a rin...

  3. Filamentous structures in skeletal muscle: anchors for the subsarcolemmal space.

    PubMed

    Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Soenggono, Arifin; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, intermediate filaments and actin filaments provide structural support to the myofibrils and the sarcolemma. For many years, it was poorly understood from ultrastructural observations that how these filamentous structures were kept anchored. The present study was conducted to determine the architecture of filamentous anchoring structures in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils. The diaphragms (Dp) of adult wild type and mdx mice (mdx is a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy) were subjected to tension applied perpendicular to the long axis of the muscle fibers, with or without treatment with 1% Triton X-100 or 0.03% saponin. These experiments were conducted to confirm the presence and integrity of the filamentous anchoring structures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these structures provide firm transverse connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. Most of the filamentous structures appeared to be inserted into subsarcolemmal densities, forming anchoring connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. In some cases, actin filaments were found to run longitudinally in the subsarcolemmal space to connect to the sarcolemma or in some cases to connect to the intermyofibrils as elongated thin filaments. These filamentous anchoring structures were less common in the mdx Dp. Our data suggest that the transverse and longitudinal filamentous structures form an anchoring system in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils.

  4. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition.

  5. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. PMID:26240174

  6. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  7. Microtubule-dependent transport and dynamics of vimentin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Hookway, Caroline; Ding, Liya; Davidson, Michael W; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Danuser, Gaudenz; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-05-01

    We studied two aspects of vimentin intermediate filament dynamics-transport of filaments and subunit exchange. We observed transport of long filaments in the periphery of cells using live-cell structured illumination microscopy. We studied filament transport elsewhere in cells using a photoconvertible-vimentin probe and total internal reflection microscopy. We found that filaments were rapidly transported along linear tracks in both anterograde and retrograde directions. Filament transport was microtubule dependent but independent of microtubule polymerization and/or an interaction with the plus end-binding protein APC. We also studied subunit exchange in filaments by long-term imaging after photoconversion. We found that converted vimentin remained in small clusters along the length of filaments rather than redistributing uniformly throughout the network, even in cells that divided after photoconversion. These data show that vimentin filaments do not depolymerize into individual subunits; they recompose by severing and reannealing. Together these results show that vimentin filaments are very dynamic and that their transport is required for network maintenance.

  8. Disruption of the keratin filament network during epithelial cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, E B; Goodman, S L; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of keratin filaments during cell division was examined in a wide range of epithelial lines from several species. Almost half of them show keratin disruption as described previously: by immunofluorescence, filaments are replaced during mitosis by a 'speckled' pattern of discrete cytoplasmic dots. In the electron microscope these ' speckles ' are seen as granules around the cell periphery, just below the actin cortical mesh, with no detectable 10 nm filament structure inside them and no keratin filament bundles in the rest of the cytoplasm. A time course of the filament reorganization was constructed from double immunofluorescence data; filaments are disrupted in prophase, and the filament network is intact again by cytokinesis. The phenomenon is restricted to cells rich in keratin filaments, such as keratinocytes; it is unrelated to the co-existence of vimentin in many of these cells, and vimentin is generally maintained as filaments while the keratin is restructured. Some resistance to the effect may be conferred by an extended cycle time. Filament reorganization takes place within minutes, so that a reversible mechanism seems more likely than one involving de novo protein synthesis, at this metabolically quiet stage of the cell cycle. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6202508

  9. The Cape Ghir filament system in August 2009 (NW Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangrà, Pablo; Troupin, Charles; Barreiro-González, Beatriz; Desmond Barton, Eric; Orbi, Abdellatif; Arístegui, Javier

    2015-06-01

    In the framework of the Canaries-Iberian marine ecosystem Exchanges (CAIBEX) experiment, an interdisciplinary high-resolution survey was conducted in the NW African region of Cape Ghir (30°38'N) during August 2009. The anatomy of a major filament is investigated on scales down to the submesoscale using in situ and remotely sensed data. The filament may be viewed as a system composed of three intimately connected structures: a small, shallow, and cold filament embedded within a larger, deeper, and cool filament and an intrathermocline anticyclonic eddy (ITE). The cold filament, which stretches 110 km offshore, is a shallow feature 60 m deep and 25 km wide, identified by minimal surface temperatures and rich in chlorophyll a. This structure comprises two asymmetrical submesoscale (˜18 km) fronts with jets flowing in opposite directions. The cold filament is embedded near the equatorward boundary of a much broader region of approximately 120 km width and 150 m depth that forms the cool filament and stretches at least 200 km offshore. This cool region, partly resulting from the influence of cold filament, is limited by two asymmetrical mesoscale (˜50 km) frontal boundaries. At the ITE, located north of the cold filament, we observe evidence of downwelling as indicated by a relatively high concentration of particles extending from the surface to more than 200 m depth. We hypothesize that this ITE may act as a sink of carbon and thus the filament system may serve dual roles of offshore carbon export and carbon sink.

  10. Microtubule-dependent transport and dynamics of vimentin intermediate filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hookway, Caroline; Ding, Liya; Davidson, Michael W.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    We studied two aspects of vimentin intermediate filament dynamics—transport of filaments and subunit exchange. We observed transport of long filaments in the periphery of cells using live-cell structured illumination microscopy. We studied filament transport elsewhere in cells using a photoconvertible-vimentin probe and total internal reflection microscopy. We found that filaments were rapidly transported along linear tracks in both anterograde and retrograde directions. Filament transport was microtubule dependent but independent of microtubule polymerization and/or an interaction with the plus end–binding protein APC. We also studied subunit exchange in filaments by long-term imaging after photoconversion. We found that converted vimentin remained in small clusters along the length of filaments rather than redistributing uniformly throughout the network, even in cells that divided after photoconversion. These data show that vimentin filaments do not depolymerize into individual subunits; they recompose by severing and reannealing. Together these results show that vimentin filaments are very dynamic and that their transport is required for network maintenance. PMID:25717187

  11. Geometry of flexible filament cohesion: better contact through twist?

    PubMed

    Cajamarca, Luis; Grason, Gregory M

    2014-11-01

    Cohesive interactions between filamentous molecules have broad implications for a range of biological and synthetic materials. While long-standing theoretical approaches have addressed the problem of inter-filament forces from the limit of infinitely rigid rods, the ability of flexible filaments to deform intra-filament shape in response to changes in inter-filament geometry has a profound affect on the nature of cohesive interactions. In this paper, we study two theoretical models of inter-filament cohesion in the opposite limit, in which filaments are sufficiently flexible to maintain cohesive contact along their contours, and address, in particular, the role played by helical-interfilament geometry in defining interactions. Specifically, we study models of featureless, tubular filaments interacting via: (1) pair-wise Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions between surface elements and (2) depletion-induced filament binding stabilized by electrostatic surface repulsion. Analysis of these models reveals a universal preference for cohesive filament interactions for non-zero helical skew, and further, that in the asymptotic limit of vanishing interaction range relative to filament diameter, the skew-dependence of cohesion approaches a geometrically defined limit described purely by the close-packing geometry of twisted tubular filaments. We further analyze non-universal features of the skew-dependence of cohesion at small-twist for both potentials, and argue that in the LJ model the pair-wise surface attraction generically destabilizes parallel filaments, while in the second model, pair-wise electrostatic repulsion in combination with non-pairwise additivity of depletion leads to a meta-stable parallel state.

  12. The plant pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici improves bacterial growth and triggers early gene regulations in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp.

    PubMed

    Barret, M; Frey-Klett, P; Boutin, M; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, A-Y; Martin, F; Guillot, L; Sarniguet, A

    2009-01-01

    In soil, some antagonistic rhizobacteria contribute to reduce root diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi. Direct modes of action of these bacteria have been largely explored; however, commensal interaction also takes place between these microorganisms and little is known about the influence of filamentous fungi on bacteria. An in vitro confrontation bioassay between the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) and the biocontrol bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp was set up to analyse bacterial transcriptional changes induced by the fungal mycelium at three time-points of the interaction before cell contact and up until contact. For this, a Pf29Arp shotgun DNA microarray was constructed. Specifity of Ggt effect was assessed in comparison with one of two other filamentous fungi, Laccaria bicolor and Magnaporthe grisea. During a commensal interaction, Ggt increased the growth rate of Pf29Arp. Before contact, Ggt induced bacterial genes involved in mycelium colonization. At contact, genes encoding protein of stress response and a patatin-like protein were up-regulated. Among all the bacterial genes identified, xseB was specifically up-regulated at contact by Ggt but down-regulated by the other fungi. Data showed that the bacterium sensed the presence of the fungus early, but the main gene alteration occurred during bacterial-fungal cell contact. PMID:19121038

  13. Dynamics of solar filaments. IV - Structure and mass flow of an active region filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmieder, B.; Malherbe, J. M.; Simon, G.; Poland, A. I.

    1985-01-01

    An active region filament near the center of the solar disk was observed on September 29-30, 1980, with the Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph of the Meudon solar tower and the UV Spectrograph and Polarimeter aboard the SMM satellite. H-alpha and C IV measurements are presently used to study brightness and material velocity in the 10,000 and 100,000 K temperature ranges, and photospheric magnetograms are used to investigate the underlying magnetic field. Attention is given to the constraints imposed on possible filament structures by observations, as well as the expected MHD relationships.

  14. Validity of using average diameter for determination of tensile strength and Weibull modulus of ceramic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Petry, M.D.; Mah, T.I.; Kerans, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    Strengths and Weibull moduli for alumina/yttrium aluminum garnet eutectic (AYE) filaments and for Si-C-O (Nicalon) filaments were calculated using measured and average filament diameters. The strengths agreed closely. Thus an average filament diameter could be used instead of the measured filament diameter in calculating strengths. The Weibull modulus obtained from an average filament diameter approximates the Weibull modulus obtained using the measured filament diameter.

  15. New Polyketides and New Benzoic Acid Derivatives from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081

    PubMed Central

    Prompanya, Chadaporn; Dethoup, Tida; Gales, Luís; Lee, Michael; Pereira, José A. C.; Silva, Artur M. S.; Pinto, Madalena M. M.; Kijjoa, Anake

    2016-01-01

    Two new pentaketides, including a new benzofuran-1-one derivative (1) and a new isochromen-1-one (5), and seven new benzoic acid derivatives, including two new benzopyran derivatives (2a, b), a new benzoxepine derivative (3), two new chromen-4-one derivatives (4b, 7) and two new benzofuran derivatives (6a, b), were isolated, together with the previously reported 2,3-dihydro-6-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (4a), from the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081. The structures of the new compounds were established based on 1D and 2D NMR spectral analysis, and in the case of compounds 1, 2a, 4b, 5, 6a and 7, the absolute configurations of their stereogenic carbons were determined by an X-ray crystallographic analysis. None of the isolated compounds were active in the tests for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as multidrug-resistant isolates from the environment (MIC > 256 μg/mL), antifungal activity against yeast (Candida albicans ATTC 10231), filamentous fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus ATTC 46645) and dermatophyte (Trichophyton rubrum FF5) (MIC > 512 µg/mL) and in vitro growth inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer) and A375-C5 (melanoma) cell lines (GI50 > 150 µM) by the protein binding dye SRB method. PMID:27438842

  16. Hydrophobin genes of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum, are differentially expressed and corresponding mutants are decreased in virulence.

    PubMed

    Sevim, Ali; Donzelli, Bruno G G; Wu, Dongliang; Demirbag, Zihni; Gibson, Donna M; Turgeon, B Gillian

    2012-04-01

    Hydrophobins are small, cysteine-rich, secreted proteins, ubiquitously produced by filamentous fungi that are speculated to function in fungal growth, cell surface properties, and development, although this has been rigorously tested for only a few species. Herein, we report identification of three hydrophobin genes from the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum, and functional characterization of strains lacking these genes. One gene (HYD1/ssgA) encodes a class I hydrophobin identified previously. Two new genes, HYD3 and HYD2, encode a class I and class II hydrophobin, respectively. To examine function, we deleted all three separately, from the M. brunneum strain KTU-60 genome, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Deletion strains were screened for alterations in developmental phenotypes including growth, sporulation, pigmentation, colony surface properties, and virulence to insects. All deletion strains were reduced in their ability to sporulate and showed alterations in wild-type pigmentation, but all retained wild-type hydrophobicity, except for one individual hyd3 mutant. Complementation with the wild-type HYD3 gene restored hydrophobicity. Each gene, present as a single copy in the genome, showed differential expression patterns dependent on the developmental stage of the fungus. When Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) larvae were treated with either conidia or blastospores of each hyd mutant, reductions in virulence and delayed mortality were observed as compared to WT. Together, these results suggest that hydrophobins are differentially expressed and may have distinct, but compensating roles, in conidiation, pigmentation, hydrophobicity, and virulence. PMID:22388867

  17. A new anaerobic fungus (Oontomyces anksri gen. nov., sp. nov.) from the digestive tract of the Indian camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Dagar, Sumit S; Kumar, Sanjay; Griffith, Gareth W; Edwards, Joan E; Callaghan, Tony M; Singh, Rameshwar; Nagpal, Ashok K; Puniya, Anil K

    2015-08-01

    Two cultures of anaerobic fungi were isolated from the forestomach of an Indian camel (Camelus dromedarius). Phylogenetic analysis using both the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large-subunit (LSU) regions of the rRNA locus demonstrated that these isolates were identical and formed a distinct clade within the anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota). Morphological examination showed that these fungi formed monocentric thalli with filamentous rhizoids and uniflagellate zoospores, broadly similar to members of the genus Piromyces. However, distinctive morphological features were observed, notably the pinching of the cytoplasm in the sporangiophore and the formation of intercalary rhizoidal swellings. Since genetic analyses demonstrated this fungus was only distantly related to Piromyces spp. and closer to the polycentric Anaeromyces clade, we have assigned it to a new genus and species Oontomyces anksri gen. nov., sp. nov. Interrogation of the GenBank database identified several closely related ITS sequences, which were all environmental sequences obtained from camels, raising the possibility that this fungus may be specific to camelids. PMID:26228561

  18. New Polyketides and New Benzoic Acid Derivatives from the Marine Sponge-Associated Fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081.

    PubMed

    Prompanya, Chadaporn; Dethoup, Tida; Gales, Luís; Lee, Michael; Pereira, José A C; Silva, Artur M S; Pinto, Madalena M M; Kijjoa, Anake

    2016-01-01

    Two new pentaketides, including a new benzofuran-1-one derivative (1) and a new isochromen-1-one (5), and seven new benzoic acid derivatives, including two new benzopyran derivatives (2a, b), a new benzoxepine derivative (3), two new chromen-4-one derivatives (4b, 7) and two new benzofuran derivatives (6a, b), were isolated, together with the previously reported 2,3-dihydro-6-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (4a), from the culture of the marine sponge-associated fungus Neosartorya quadricincta KUFA 0081. The structures of the new compounds were established based on 1D and 2D NMR spectral analysis, and in the case of compounds 1, 2a, 4b, 5, 6a and 7, the absolute configurations of their stereogenic carbons were determined by an X-ray crystallographic analysis. None of the isolated compounds were active in the tests for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as multidrug-resistant isolates from the environment (MIC > 256 μg/mL), antifungal activity against yeast (Candida albicans ATTC 10231), filamentous fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus ATTC 46645) and dermatophyte (Trichophyton rubrum FF5) (MIC > 512 µg/mL) and in vitro growth inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer) and A375-C5 (melanoma) cell lines (GI50 > 150 µM) by the protein binding dye SRB method. PMID:27438842

  19. The role of mites in insect-fungus associations.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, R W; Moser, J C

    2014-01-01

    The interactions among insects, mites, and fungi are diverse and complex but poorly understood in most cases. Associations among insects, mites, and fungi span an almost incomprehensible array of ecological interactions and evolutionary histories. Insects and mites often share habitats and resources and thus interact within communities. Many mites and insects rely on fungi for nutrients, and fungi benefit from them with regard to spore dispersal, habitat provision, or nutrient resources. Mites have important impacts on community dynamics, ecosystem processes, and biodiversity within many insect-fungus systems. Given that mites are understudied but highly abundant, they likely have bigger, more important, and more widespread impacts on communities than previously recognized. We describe mutualistic and antagonistic effects of mites on insect-fungus associations, explore the processes that underpin ecological and evolutionary patterns of these multipartite communities, review well-researched examples of the effects of mites on insect-fungus associations, and discuss approaches for studying mites within insect-fungus communities.

  20. An insect parasitoid carrying an ochratoxin producing fungus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Fernando E.; Posada, Francisco; Gianfagna, Thomas J.; Chaves, Fabio C.; Peterson, Stephen W.

    2006-06-01

    The insect parasitoid Prorops nasuta has been introduced from Africa to many coffee-producing countries in an attempt to control the coffee berry borer. In this paper, we report on the sequencing of the ITS LSU-rDNA and beta-tubulin loci used to identify a fungus isolated from the cuticle of a P. nasuta that emerged from coffee berries infected with the coffee berry borer. The sequences were compared with deposits in GenBank and the fungus was identified as Aspergillus westerdijkiae. The fungus tested positive for ochratoxin A production, with varying levels depending on the media in which it was grown. These results raise the possibility that an insect parasitoid might be disseminating an ochratoxin-producing fungus in coffee plantations.

  1. Microwave guiding in air along single femtosecond laser filament

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Yu; Alshershby, Mostafa; Qin Jiang; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-03-07

    Microwave guiding along single plasma filament generated through the propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses in air has been demonstrated over a distance of about 6.5 cm, corresponding to a microwave signal intensity enhancement of more than 3-fold over free space propagation. The current propagation distance along the fs laser filament is in agreement with the calculations and limited by the relatively high resistance of the single plasma filament. Using a single fs laser filament to channel microwave radiation considerably alleviate requirements to the power of fs laser pulses compared to the case of the circular filaments waveguide. In addition, it can be used as a simple and non-intrusive method to obtain the basic parameters of laser-generated plasma filament.

  2. A filament supported by different magnetic field configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Schmieder, B.; Démoulin, P.; Wiegelmann, T.; Aulanier, G.; Török, T.; Bommier, V.

    2011-08-01

    A nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation of vector magnetogram data obtained by THEMIS/MTR on 2005 May 27 suggests the simultaneous existence of different magnetic configurations within one active region filament: one part of the filament is supported by field line dips within a flux rope, while the other part is located in dips within an arcade structure. Although the axial field chirality (dextral) and the magnetic helicity (negative) are the same along the whole filament, the chiralities of the filament barbs at different sections are opposite, i.e., right-bearing in the flux rope part and left-bearing in the arcade part. This argues against past suggestions that different barb chiralities imply different signs of helicity of the underlying magnetic field. This new finding about the chirality of filaments will be useful to associate eruptive filaments and magnetic cloud using the helicity parameter in the Space Weather Science.

  3. A FILAMENT ERUPTION ON 2010 OCTOBER 21 FROM THREE VIEWPOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, Boris

    2013-08-10

    A filament eruption on 2010 October 21 observed from three different viewpoints by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and the Solar Dynamic Observatory is analyzed by also invoking data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Kanzelhoehe Solar Observatory. The position of the filament just before the eruption at the central meridian not far from the center of the solar disk was favorable for photospheric magnetic field measurements in the area below the filament. Because of this, we were able to calculate with high precision the distribution of the coronal potential magnetic field near the filament. We found that the filament began to erupt when it approached the height in the corona where the magnetic field decay index was greater than 1. We also determined that during the initial stage of the eruption the filament moved along the magnetic neutral surface.

  4. Filamentation Instability of Counterpropagating Charged Particle Beams: Statistical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, M. E.

    2008-10-15

    The filamentation instability (FI) driven by beams of counter-propagating electrons is examined with one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The 1D simulation reveals the saturation mechanism of the FI. The magnetic pressure gradient displaces the electrons. The resulting electrostatic field inhibits together with the magnetic field a further growth of the filaments by suppressing the electron motion. The FI evolves into a stationary equilibrium in 1D, which shows a statistical distribution of the filament sizes that resembles a Gumbel distribution. The 2D PIC simulation allows the filaments to move around each other and filaments carrying currents of equal polarity can merge. The time-evolution of the characteristic size of the filaments in the 2D simulation is measured. It increases linearly with the time.

  5. Adhesive micropatterns to study intermediate filament function in nuclear positioning.

    PubMed

    Dupin, Isabelle; Elric, Julien; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus is generally found near the cell center; however its position can vary in response to extracellular or intracellular signals, leading to a polarized intracellular organization. Nuclear movement is mediated by the cytoskeleton and its associated motors. While the role of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in nuclear positioning has been assessed in various systems, the contribution of intermediate filaments is less established due in part to the lack of tools to study intermediate filament functions. The methods described here use micropatterned substrates to impose reproducible cell shape and nucleus position. Intermediate filament organization can be perturbed using gene downregulation or upregulation; intermediate filaments can also be visualized using fluorescent intermediate filament proteins. This protocol is valuable for characterizing the role of intermediate filaments in a variety of live or fixed adherent cells.

  6. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  7. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  8. Concentration profiles in drying cylindrical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaputa, Klaus; Brenn, Günter; Meile, Walter

    2008-12-01

    We analyze theoretically the drying of cylindrical filaments. For modelling the mass transfer on the gas side of the liquid-gas interface of the shrinking circular cylindrical filament, we apply the model of Abramzon and Sirignano, which was originally developed for spherical geometry. As a consequence of mass transfer at constant Sherwood number, we obtain a d2-law for the shrinkage of the cylinder as in the case of the spherical geometry, which expresses that the cross-sectional area of the cylinder shrinks at a constant rate with time. For this situation, the diffusion equation for the liquid phase mixture components becomes separable upon transformation into similarity coordinates and is solved analytically to obtain the concentration profiles inside the filament as functions of time. The dependency of the profiles on the radial coordinate is determined by a series of Kummer’s functions. Applying this result, we study the evolution of the concentration profiles in the liquid phase with time as dependent on a parameter given as the ratio of rate of shrinkage of the cross-sectional area of the cylinder to liquid-phase diffusion coefficient, which was identified as relevant for the shape of the concentration profiles formed in the liquid during the drying process. As an example, we present computed results for the constant evaporation rate regime in the dry-spinning process of a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA)-water system. Comparison of our analytical results with full numerical solutions of the diffusion equation from the literature, achieved with concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient, reveals very good agreement.

  9. Numerical simulations of a filament in a flowing soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnell, D. J. J.; David, T.; Barton, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments concerning the properties of soap films have recently been carried out and these systems have been proposed as experimental versions of theoretical two-dimensional liquids. A silk filament introduced into a flowing soap film, was seen to demonstrate various stable modes, and these were, namely, a mode in which the filament oscillates and one in which the filament is stationary and aligns with the flow of the liquid. The system could be forced from the oscillatory mode into the non- oscillatory mode by varying the length of the filament. In this article we use numerical and computational techniques in order to simulate the strongly coupled behaviour of the filament and the fluid. Preliminary results are presented for the specific case in which the filament is seen to oscillate continuously for the duration of our simulation. We also find that the filament oscillations are strongly suppressed when we reduce the effective length of the filament. We believe that these results are reminiscent of the different oscillatory and non-oscillatory modes observed in experiment. The numerical solutions show that, in contrast to experiment, vortices are created at the leading edge of the filament and are preferentially grown in the curvature of the filament and are eventually released from the trailing edge of the filament. In a similar manner to oscillating hydrofoils, it seems that the oscillating filaments are in a minimal energy state, extracting sufficient energy from the fluid to oscillate. In comparing numerical and experimental results it is possible that the soap film does have an effect on the fluid flow especially in the boundary layer where surface tension forces are large.

  10. Characterization of Osmotically Induced Filaments of Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Zachary L.; Chen, Bingming; Czuprynski, Charles J.; Wong, Amy C. L.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica forms aseptate filaments with multiple nucleoids when cultured in hyperosmotic conditions. These osmotic-induced filaments are viable and form single colonies on agar plates even though they contain multiple genomes and have the potential to divide into multiple daughter cells. Introducing filaments that are formed during osmotic stress into culture conditions without additional humectants results in the formation of septa and their division into individual cells, which could present challenges to retrospective analyses of infectious dose and risk assessments. We sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms of osmotic-induced filament formation. The concentration of proteins and chromosomal DNA in filaments and control cells was similar when standardized by biomass. Furthermore, penicillin-binding proteins in the membrane of salmonellae were active in vitro. The activity of penicillin-binding protein 2 was greater in filaments than in control cells, suggesting that it may have a role in osmotic-induced filament formation. Filaments contained more ATP than did control cells in standardized cell suspensions, though the levels of two F0F1-ATP synthase subunits were reduced. Furthermore, filaments could septate and divide within 8 h in 0.2× Luria-Bertani broth at 23°C, while nonfilamentous control cells did not replicate. Based upon the ability of filaments to septate and divide in this diluted broth, a method was developed to enumerate by plate count the number of individual, viable cells within a population of filaments. This method could aid in retrospective analyses of infectious dose of filamented salmonellae. PMID:22798362

  11. Observations of the Growth of an Active Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong

    2016-10-01

    We present observations of the growth of an active region filament caused by magnetic interactions among the filament and its adjacent superpenumbral filament (SF) and dark thread-like structures (T). Multistep reconnections are identified during the whole growing process. Magnetic flux convergence and cancellation occurring at the positive footpoint region of the filament is the first step reconnection, which resulted in the filament bifurcating into two sets of intertwined threads. One set anchored in situ, while the other set moved toward and interacted with the SF and part of T. This indicates the second step reconnection, which gave rise to the disappearance of the SF and the formation of a long thread-like structure that connects the far ends of the filament and T. The long thread-like structure further interacted with the T and then separated into two parts, representing the third step reconnection. Finally, another similar long thread-like structure, which intertwined with the fixed filament threads, appeared. H α observations show that this twisted structure is a longer sinistral filament. Based on the observed photospheric vector magnetograms, we performed a non-linear force-free field extrapolation to reconstruct the magnetic fields above the photosphere and found that the coronal magnetic field lines associated with the filament consists of two twisted flux ropes winding around each other. These results suggest that magnetic interactions among filaments and their adjacent SFs and T could lead to the growth of the filaments, and the filament is probably supported in a flux rope.

  12. Positioning and stretching of actin filaments by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigge, Christoph; Hinssen, Horst; Reiss, Günter; Herth, Simone

    2010-06-01

    The alignment of biological filaments on surfaces offers a high potential for controllable geometries in lab-on-a-chip-structures and micrototal analysis systems. Actin is a polar filamentous protein with a diameter of 7-8 nm that can be manipulated with strong electric fields. It is demonstrated that with the use of microelectrodes or nanoelectrodes and electric fields of 20 kV/m single actin filaments can be manipulated, stretched, and positioned between gold electrodes.

  13. Biological control of Ascaris suum eggs by Pochonia chlamydosporia fungus.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sebastião Rodrigo; de Araújo, Jackson Victor; Braga, Fábio Ribeiro; Araujo, Juliana Milani; Frassy, Luiza Neme; Ferreira, Aloízio Soares

    2011-12-01

    Ascaris suum is a gastrointestinal nematode parasite of swines. The aim of this study was to observe Pochonia chlamydosporia fungus on biological control of A. suum eggs after fungus passage through swines gastrointestinal tract. Eighteen pigs, previously dewormed, were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, treated with the fungus isolate VC4; group 2, treated with the fungus isolate VC1 and group 3 did not receive fungus (control). In the treated groups, each animal received a 9 g single dose of mycelium mass containing P. chlamydosporia (VC1 or VC4). Thereafter, animal fecal samples were collected at the following intervals: 8, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 h after treatment beginning and these were poured in Petri dishes containing 2% water-agar culture medium. Then, 1,000 A. suum eggs were poured into each dish and kept in an incubator at 26 °C and in the dark for 30 days. After this period, approximately 100 eggs were removed from each Petri dish and morphologically analyzed under light microscopy following the ovicidal activity parameters. The higher percentage observed for isolated VC4 eggs destruction was 57.5% (36 h) after fungus administration and for isolate VC1 this percentage was 45.8% (24 h and 72 h) (p > 0.01). P. chlamydosporia remained viable after passing through the gastrointestinal tract of swines, maintaining its ability of destroying A. suum eggs.

  14. Biological control of Ascaris suum eggs by Pochonia chlamydosporia fungus.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sebastião Rodrigo; de Araújo, Jackson Victor; Braga, Fábio Ribeiro; Araujo, Juliana Milani; Frassy, Luiza Neme; Ferreira, Aloízio Soares

    2011-12-01

    Ascaris suum is a gastrointestinal nematode parasite of swines. The aim of this study was to observe Pochonia chlamydosporia fungus on biological control of A. suum eggs after fungus passage through swines gastrointestinal tract. Eighteen pigs, previously dewormed, were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, treated with the fungus isolate VC4; group 2, treated with the fungus isolate VC1 and group 3 did not receive fungus (control). In the treated groups, each animal received a 9 g single dose of mycelium mass containing P. chlamydosporia (VC1 or VC4). Thereafter, animal fecal samples were collected at the following intervals: 8, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 h after treatment beginning and these were poured in Petri dishes containing 2% water-agar culture medium. Then, 1,000 A. suum eggs were poured into each dish and kept in an incubator at 26 °C and in the dark for 30 days. After this period, approximately 100 eggs were removed from each Petri dish and morphologically analyzed under light microscopy following the ovicidal activity parameters. The higher percentage observed for isolated VC4 eggs destruction was 57.5% (36 h) after fungus administration and for isolate VC1 this percentage was 45.8% (24 h and 72 h) (p > 0.01). P. chlamydosporia remained viable after passing through the gastrointestinal tract of swines, maintaining its ability of destroying A. suum eggs. PMID:21796329

  15. Folding of viscous sheets and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatiy, M.; Mahadevan, L.

    2000-12-01

    We consider the nonlinear folding behavior of a viscous filament or a sheet under the influence of an external force such as gravity. Everyday examples of this phenomenon are provided by the periodic folding of a sheet of honey as it impinges on toast, or the folding of a stream of shampoo as it falls on one's hand. To understand the evolution of a fold, we formulate and solve a free-boundary problem for the phenomenon, give scaling laws for the size of the folds and the frequency with which they are laid out, and verify these experimentally.

  16. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Protein Filament Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Cohen, Samuel I. A.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    We establish the Hamiltonian structure of the rate equations describing the formation of protein filaments. We then show that this formalism provides a unified view of the behavior of a range of biological self-assembling systems as diverse as actin, prions, and amyloidogenic polypeptides. We further demonstrate that the time-translation symmetry of the resulting Hamiltonian leads to previously unsuggested conservation laws that connect the number and mass concentrations of fibrils and allow linear growth phenomena to be equated with autocatalytic growth processes. We finally show how these results reveal simple rate laws that provide the basis for interpreting experimental data in terms of specific mechanisms controlling the proliferation of fibrils.

  17. Filament winding cylinders. I - Process model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    A model was developed which describes the filament winding process of composite cylinders. The model relates the significant process variables such as winding speed, fiber tension, and applied temperature to the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of the composite cylinder and the mandrel. Based on the model, a user friendly code was written which can be used to calculate (1) the temperature in the cylinder and the mandrel, (2) the degree of cure and viscosity in the cylinder, (3) the fiber tensions and fiber positions, (4) the stresses and strains in the cylinder and in the mandrel, and (5) the void diameters in the cylinder.

  18. The bacterial cytoskeleton: more than twisted filaments.

    PubMed

    Pilhofer, Martin; Jensen, Grant J

    2013-02-01

    Far from being simple 'bags' of enzymes, bacteria are richly endowed with ultrastructures that challenge and expand standard definitions of the cytoskeleton. Here we review rods, rings, twisted pairs, tubes, sheets, spirals, moving patches, meshes and composites, and suggest defining the term 'bacterial cytoskeleton' as all cytoplasmic protein filaments and their superstructures that move or scaffold (stabilize/position/recruit) other cellular materials. The evolution of each superstructure has been driven by specific functional requirements. As a result, while homologous proteins with different functions have evolved to form surprisingly divergent superstructures, those of unrelated proteins with similar functions have converged.

  19. The interaction energy of charged filaments in an electrolyte: Results for all filament spacings.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A

    2011-05-01

    Electrically charged long-chain macromolecules in an electrolyte can form an ordered lattice whose spacing is greater than their diameter. If entropic effects are neglected, these nematic structures can be predicted from a balance of Coulomb repulsion and van-der-Waals attraction forces. To enhance the utility of such theories, this paper extends existing results for the interaction between charged filaments, and gives approximate formulae for the screened Coulomb and van-der-Waals potentials over the whole range of their centre-to-centre spacing d. The repulsive Coulomb potential is proportional to exp(-λd)/λd for all spacings when the Debye screening length 1/λ is smaller than the sum of the filament radii. The attractive van-der-Waals potential is asymptotic to d⁻⁵ at large d. For smaller spacings, the potential is calculated by numerical integration and compared with published formulae: the series expansion of Brenner and McQuarrie converges too slowly, whereas the interpolation formula of Moisescu provides reasonable accuracy over the whole range of d. Combining these potentials shows that there is a finite range of charge densities for which a nematic crystal lattice is stable, but this conclusion ignores entropic effects associated with motile filaments. The role of electrostatic forces in aligning filaments and stabilizing a nematic liquid-crystal phase is discussed, in conjunction with other mechanisms such as motor proteins, crosslinkers or scaffolding structures. PMID:21295590

  20. Bundling of actin filaments by elongation factor 1 alpha inhibits polymerization at filament ends

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) is an abundant protein that binds aminoacyl-tRNA and ribosomes in a GTP-dependent manner. EF1 alpha also interacts with the cytoskeleton by binding and bundling actin filaments and microtubules. In this report, the effect of purified EF1 alpha on actin polymerization and depolymerization is examined. At molar ratios present in the cytosol, EF1 alpha significantly blocks both polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments and increases the final extent of actin polymer, while at high molar ratios to actin, EF1 alpha nucleates actin polymerization. Although EF1 alpha binds actin monomer, this monomer-binding activity does not explain the effects of EF1 alpha on actin polymerization at physiological molar ratios. The mechanism for the inhibition of polymerization is related to the actin-bundling activity of EF1 alpha. Both ends of the actin filament are inhibited for polymerization and both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are affected by pH within the same physiological range; at high pH both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are reduced. Additionally, it is seen that the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to EF1 alpha releases EF1 alpha's inhibiting effect on actin polymerization. These data demonstrate that EF1 alpha can alter the assembly of F-actin, a filamentous scaffold on which non- membrane-associated protein translation may be occurring in vivo. PMID:8947553

  1. The interaction energy of charged filaments in an electrolyte: Results for all filament spacings.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A

    2011-05-01

    Electrically charged long-chain macromolecules in an electrolyte can form an ordered lattice whose spacing is greater than their diameter. If entropic effects are neglected, these nematic structures can be predicted from a balance of Coulomb repulsion and van-der-Waals attraction forces. To enhance the utility of such theories, this paper extends existing results for the interaction between charged filaments, and gives approximate formulae for the screened Coulomb and van-der-Waals potentials over the whole range of their centre-to-centre spacing d. The repulsive Coulomb potential is proportional to exp(-λd)/λd for all spacings when the Debye screening length 1/λ is smaller than the sum of the filament radii. The attractive van-der-Waals potential is asymptotic to d⁻⁵ at large d. For smaller spacings, the potential is calculated by numerical integration and compared with published formulae: the series expansion of Brenner and McQuarrie converges too slowly, whereas the interpolation formula of Moisescu provides reasonable accuracy over the whole range of d. Combining these potentials shows that there is a finite range of charge densities for which a nematic crystal lattice is stable, but this conclusion ignores entropic effects associated with motile filaments. The role of electrostatic forces in aligning filaments and stabilizing a nematic liquid-crystal phase is discussed, in conjunction with other mechanisms such as motor proteins, crosslinkers or scaffolding structures.

  2. Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-01-15

    We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

  3. The two types of flare associated filament eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1986-01-01

    Using years of high resolution solar footage obtained at Big Bear Solar Observatory flare associated filament eruptions were studied. In addition to the classical type eruption consisting of expansion and breakup, evidence was found of another type where a layer is shed from the filament and erupts while the inversion line filament below (or, what is left of it) remains in place. Both types of eruptions are presented. It is hoped that the new evidence will shed new light on the understanding of the role of filaments in flares.

  4. Actin filament organization in the fish keratocyte lamellipodium

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    From recent studies of locomoting fish keratocytes it was proposed that the dynamic turnover of actin filaments takes place by a nucleation- release mechanism, which predicts the existence of short (less than 0.5 microns) filaments throughout the lamellipodium (Theriot, J. A., and T. J. Mitchison. 1991. Nature (Lond.). 352:126-131). We have tested this model by investigating the structure of whole mount keratocyte cytoskeletons in the electron microscope and phalloidin-labeled cells, after various fixations, in the light microscope. Micrographs of negatively stained keratocyte cytoskeletons produced by Triton extraction showed that the actin filaments of the lamellipodium are organized to a first approximation in a two-dimensional orthogonal network with the filaments subtending an angle of around 45 degrees to the cell front. Actin filament fringes grown onto the front edge of keratocyte cytoskeletons by the addition of exogenous actin showed a uniform polarity when decorated with myosin subfragment-1, consistent with the fast growing ends of the actin filaments abutting the anterior edge. A steady drop in filament density was observed from the mid- region of the lamellipodium to the perinuclear zone and in images of the more posterior regions of lower filament density many of the actin filaments could be seen to be at least several microns in length. Quantitative analysis of the intensity distribution of fluorescent phalloidin staining across the lamellipodium revealed that the gradient of filament density as well as the absolute content of F-actin was dependent on the fixation method. In cells first fixed and then extracted with Triton, a steep gradient of phalloidin staining was observed from the front to the rear of the lamellipodium. With the protocol required to obtain the electron microscope images, namely Triton extraction followed by fixation, phalloidin staining was, significantly and preferentially reduced in the anterior part of the lamellipodium. This

  5. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  6. Controlling multiple filaments by relativistic optical vortex beams in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, L. B.; Huang, T. W.; Xiao, K. D.; Wu, G. Z.; Yang, S. L.; Li, R.; Yang, Y. C.; Long, T. Y.; Zhang, H.; Wu, S. Z.; Qiao, B.; Ruan, S. C.; Zhou, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    Filamentation dynamics of relativistic optical vortex beams (OVBs) propagating in underdense plasma is investigated. It is shown that OVBs with finite orbital angular momentum (OAM) exhibit much more robust propagation behavior than the standard Gaussian beam. In fact, the growth rate of the azimuthal modulational instability decreases rapidly with increase of the OVB topological charge. Thus, relativistic OVBs can maintain their profiles for significantly longer distances in an underdense plasma before filamentation occurs. It is also found that an OVB would then break up into regular filament patterns due to conservation of the OAM, in contrast to a Gaussian laser beam, which in general experiences random filamentation.

  7. Interaction of Two Filament Channels of Different Chiralities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Filippov, Boris; Schmieder, Brigitte; Magara, Tetsuya; moon, Young-Jae; Uddin, Wahab

    2016-07-01

    We present observations of the interactions between the two filament channels of different chiralities and associated dynamics that occurred during 2014 April 18-20. While two flux ropes of different helicity with parallel axial magnetic fields can only undergo a bounce interaction when they are brought together, the observations at first glance show that the heated plasma is moving from one filament channel to the other. The SDO/AIA 171 Å observations and the potential-field source-surface magnetic field extrapolation reveal the presence of a fan-spine magnetic configuration over the filament channels with a null point located above them. Three different events of filament activations, partial eruptions, and associated filament channel interactions have been observed. The activation initiated in one filament channel seems to propagate along the neighboring filament channel. We believe that the activation and partial eruption of the filaments brings the field lines of flux ropes containing them closer to the null point and triggers the magnetic reconnection between them and the fan-spine magnetic configuration. As a result, the hot plasma moves along the outer spine line toward the remote point. Utilizing the present observations, for the first time we have discussed how two different-chirality filament channels can interact and show interrelation.

  8. Defects on semiflexible filaments: Kinks and twist kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nam-Kyung; Johner, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Due to local interactions with ligands or to global constraints, semiflexible filaments can exhibit localized defects. We focus on filaments laying flat on a surface. The two lowest order singularities are addressed: discontinuities of the orientation, which are called kink, and discontinuities of the curvature. The latter are called twist kinks in flattened helical filaments where they can form spontaneously. We calculate the partition functions for a given defect fugacity and discuss some often measured quantities like the correlation of the orientation along the filament.

  9. Microwave diagnostics of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Papeer, J.; Ehrlich, Y.; Zigler, A.; Mitchell, C.; Penano, J.; Sprangle, P.

    2011-10-03

    We present a simple non-intrusive experimental method allowing a complete single shot temporal measurement of laser produced plasma filament conductivity. The method is based on filament interaction with low intensity microwave radiation in a rectangular waveguide. The suggested diagnostics allow a complete single shot temporal analysis of filament plasma decay with resolution better than 0.3 ns and high spatial resolution along the filament. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations, and an initial electron density of 7 x 10{sup 16 }cm{sup -3} and decay time of 3 ns are obtained.

  10. Modeling Vertical Plasma Flows in Solar Filament Barbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Speeds of observed flows in quiescent solar filaments are typically much less than the local Alfvén speed. This is why the flows in filament barbs can be modeled by perturbing a local magnetostatic solution describing the balance between the Lorentz force, gravity, and gas pressure in a barb. Similarly, large-scale filament flows can be treated as adiabatically slow deformations of a force-free magnetic equilibrium that describes the global structure of a filament. This approach reconciles current theoretical models with the puzzling observational result that some of the flows appear to be neither aligned with the magnetic field nor controlled by gravity.

  11. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  12. The interaction of a magnetohydrodynamical shock with a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a dense, filamentary cloud. We investigate the effects of various filament lengths and orientations on the interaction using different orientations of the magnetic field, and vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the filament χ, and the plasma beta, in order to determine their effect on the evolution and lifetime of the filament. We find that in a parallel magnetic field filaments have longer lifetimes if they are orientated more `broadside' to the shock front, and that an increase in χ hastens the destruction of the cloud, in terms of the modified cloud-crushing time-scale, tcs. The combination of a mild shock and a perpendicular or oblique field provides the best condition for extending the life of the filament, with some filaments able to survive almost indefinitely since they are cocooned by the magnetic field. A high value for χ does not initiate large turbulent instabilities in either the perpendicular or oblique field cases but rather draws the filament out into long tendrils which may eventually fragment. In addition, flux ropes are only formed in parallel magnetic fields. The length of the filament is, however, not as important for the evolution and destruction of a filament.

  13. Degradation of the Intermediate Filament Family by Gigaxonin.

    PubMed

    Bomont, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament turnover is a highly dynamic process required to maintain tissue integrity and is implicated in degenerative and regenerative processes. Despite these essential roles, little is known about the mechanisms that cause the degradation of intermediate filaments. Nevertheless, the last decade has seen the emergence of the ubiquitin proteasome system, in particular E3 ubiquitin ligases, as important regulators. Here, we will focus on the first identified factor controlling the degradation of the entire intermediate filament family, the gigaxonin-E3 ligase. We will present the scientific achievements and the methodologies to study gigaxonin and its crucial role in intermediate filament turnover.

  14. Properties of cosmological filaments extracted from Eulerian simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheller, C.; Vazza, F.; Favre, J.; Brüggen, M.

    2015-10-01

    Using a new parallel algorithm implemented within the VisIt framework, we analysed large cosmological grid simulations to study the properties of baryons in filaments. The procedure allows us to build large catalogues with up to ˜3 × 104 filaments per simulated volume and to investigate the properties of cosmic filaments for very large volumes at high resolution (up to 3003 Mpc3 simulated with 20483 cells). We determined scaling relations for the mass, volume, length and temperature of filaments and compared them to those of galaxy clusters. The longest filaments have a total length of about 200 Mpc with a mass of several 1015 M⊙. We also investigated the effects of different gas physics. Radiative cooling significantly modifies the thermal properties of the warm-hot-intergalactic medium of filaments, mainly by lowering their mean temperature via line cooling. On the other hand, powerful feedback from active galactic nuclei in surrounding haloes can heat up the gas in filaments. The impact of shock-accelerated cosmic rays from diffusive shock acceleration on filaments is small and the ratio between cosmic ray and gas pressure within filaments is of the order of ˜10-20 per cent.

  15. Iron competition in fungus-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    López-Berges, Manuel S.; Turrà, David; Capilla, Javier; Schafferer, Lukas; Matthijs, Sandra; Jöchl, Christoph; Cornelis, Pierre; Guarro, Josep; Haas, Hubertus; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Soilborne fungal pathogens are highly persistent and provoke important crop losses. During saprophytic and infectious stages in the soil, these organisms face situations of nutrient limitation and lack of essential elements, such as iron. We investigated the role of the bZIP transcription factor HapX as a central regulator of iron homeostasis and virulence in the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. This root-infecting plant pathogen attacks more than hundred different crops and is an emerging human opportunistic invader. Although iron uptake remains unaffected in a strain lacking HapX, de-repression of genes implicated in iron-consuming processes such as respiration, amino acid metabolism, TCA cycle and heme biosynthesis lead to severely impaired growth under iron-limiting conditions. HapX is required for full virulence of F. oxysporum in tomato plants and essential for infection in immunodepressed mice. Virulence attenuation of the ΔhapX strain on tomato plants is more pronounced by co-inoculation of roots with the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440, but not with a mutant deficient in siderophores production. These results demonstrate that HapX is required for iron competition of F. oxysporum in the tomato rhizosphere and establish a conserved role for HapX-mediated iron homeostasis in fungal infection of plants and mammals. PMID:23299422

  16. Malaria mosquitoes attracted by fatal fungus.

    PubMed

    George, Justin; Jenkins, Nina E; Blanford, Simon; Thomas, Matthew B; Baker, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Insect-killing fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are being evaluated as possible active ingredients for use in novel biopesticides against mosquito vectors that transmit malaria. Fungal pathogens infect through contact and so applications of spores to surfaces such as walls, nets, or other resting sites provide possible routes to infect mosquitoes in and around domestic dwellings. However, some insects can detect and actively avoid fungal spores to reduce infection risk. If true for mosquitoes, such behavior could render the biopesticide approach ineffective. Here we find that the spores of B. bassiana are highly attractive to females of Anopheles stephensi, a major anopheline mosquito vector of human malaria in Asia. We further find that An. stephensi females are preferentially attracted to dead and dying caterpillars infected with B. bassiana, landing on them and subsequently becoming infected with the fungus. Females are also preferentially attracted to cloth sprayed with oil-formulated B. bassiana spores, with 95% of the attracted females becoming infected after a one-minute visit on the cloth. This is the first report of an insect being attracted to a lethal fungal pathogen. The exact mechanisms involved in this behavior remain unclear. Nonetheless, our results indicate that biopesticidal formulations comprising B. bassiana spores will be conducive to attraction and on-source visitation by malaria vectors. PMID:23658757

  17. The role of the symbiotic fungus in the digestive metabolism of two species of fungus-growing ants.

    PubMed

    D'Ettorre, P; Mora, P; Dibangou, V; Rouland, C; Errard, C

    2002-02-01

    Leaf-cutting ants live in an obligatory symbiosis with a fungus which they grow on fresh leaves harvested by workers. This study attempts to clarify the respective role of ants and fungus in the degradation of plant material, in order to highlight the evolutionary basis of this mutualistic association. The symbiotic system of two ant species, Acromyrmex subterraneus subterraneus and Acromyrmex crassispinus, was investigated. To identify the digestive carbohydrases, a total of 19 specific and synthetic plant material substrates were tested on workers from different castes (major and minor), larvae and fungus. Extracts of A. subterraneus and A. crassispinus workers showed high enzymatic activity particularly on starch, maltose, sucrose and alpha-1,4 glucoside. Larvae degraded starch, sucrose, maltose but also laminarin, and all the detected activities were higher than those found for workers. The symbiotic fungus of A. subterraneus was mostly active on laminarin, xylan and cellulose, while the symbiotic fungus of A. crassispinus was mostly active on laminarin, starch, maltose and sucrose. The enzymatic activities of ants and fungus belonging to the same symbiotic system tended not to overlap, suggesting that the association is highly evolved and of an ancient origin.

  18. Virulence determinants of the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus protect against soil amoeba predation.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Falk; Novohradská, Silvia; Mattern, Derek J; Forberger, Tilmann; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Westermann, Martin; Winckler, Thomas; Brakhage, Axel A

    2015-08-01

    Filamentous fungi represent classical examples for environmentally acquired human pathogens whose major virulence mechanisms are likely to have emerged long before the appearance of innate immune systems. In natural habitats, amoeba predation could impose a major selection pressure towards the acquisition of virulence attributes. To test this hypothesis, we exploited the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum to study its interaction with Aspergillus fumigatus, two abundant soil inhabitants for which we found co-occurrence in various sites. Fungal conidia were efficiently taken up by D. discoideum, but ingestion was higher when conidia were devoid of the green fungal spore pigment dihydroxynaphtalene melanin, in line with earlier results obtained for immune cells. Conidia were able to survive phagocytic processing, and intracellular germination was initiated only after several hours of co-incubation which eventually led to a lethal disruption of the host cell. Besides phagocytic interactions, both amoeba and fungus secreted cross inhibitory factors which suppressed fungal growth or induced amoeba aggregation with subsequent cell lysis, respectively. On the fungal side, we identified gliotoxin as the major fungal factor killing Dictyostelium, supporting the idea that major virulence attributes, such as escape from phagocytosis and the secretion of mycotoxins are beneficial to escape from environmental predators.

  19. Complex regulation of secondary metabolism controlling pathogenicity in the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Shinya; Kurata, Mariko; Harimoto, Yoshiaki; Hatta, Rieko; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Tsuge, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    The filamentous fungus Alternaria alternata includes seven pathogenic variants (pathotypes), which produce different host-selective toxins and cause disease on different plants. The Japanese pear, strawberry and tangerine pathotypes produce AK-toxin, AF-toxin and ACT-toxin, respectively, which have a common structural moiety, 9,10-epoxy-8-hydroxy-9-methyl-decatrienoic acid (EDA). Here, we identified a new gene, AKT7 (AK-toxin biosynthetic gene 7), from the Japanese pear pathotype, which encodes a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and functions to limit AK-toxin production. AKT7 homologs were found in the strawberry pathotype, but not the tangerine pathotype. However, the strawberry pathotype homolog appeared to include a premature stop codon. Although the Japanese pear pathotype strain has multiple copies of AKT7, a single-copy disruption resulted in mutants with increased production of AK-toxin and EDA. AKT7 overexpression in the three pathotypes caused marked reductions of toxin and EDA production, suggesting that Akt7 catalyzes a side reaction of EDA or its precursor. AKT7 overexpression caused reduced virulence in these pathotypes. We also found that AKT7 transcripts predominantly include misspliced mRNAs, which have premature stop codons. Our observations suggest that the AK-toxin production required for full virulence is regulated in a complex way by the copy number and intron information content of AKT7.

  20. Molecular characterization of genes encoding cytosolic Hsp70s in the zygomycete fungus Rhizopus nigricans

    PubMed Central

    Černila, Boštjan; Črešnar, Bronislava; Breskvar, Katja

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that some stressors, including steroid hormones 21-OH progesterone and testosterone, stimulate the accumulation of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) population in the zygomycete filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans. In this study we report the cloning of 3 R nigricans hsp70 genes (Rnhsp70-1, Rnhsp70-2, and Rnhsp70-3) encoding cytosolic Hsp70s. With a Southern blot experiment under high stringency conditions we did not detect any additional highly homologous copies of the cytosolic hsp70 genes in the R nigricans genome. Sequence analyses showed that all 3 genes contain introns within the open reading frame. The dynamics of the R nigricans molecular response to progesterone, 21-OH progesterone, and testosterone, as well as to heat shock, copper ions, hydrogen peroxide, and ethanol was studied by temporal analysis of Rnhsp70-1 and Rnhsp70-2 mRNA accumulation. Northern blot experiments revealed that the Rnhsp70-2 transcript level is not affected by testosterone, whereas mRNA levels of both genes are rapidly increased with all the other stressors studied. Moreover, the decrease of transcript levels is notably delayed in ethanol stress, and a difference is observed between the profiles of Rnhsp70-1 and Rnhsp70-2 transcripts during heat stress. PMID:15115284