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Sample records for film boiling heat

  1. Transition boiling heat transfer and the film transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramilison, J. M.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The Berenson (1960) flat-plate transition-boiling experiment has been recreated with a reduced thermal resistance in the heater, and an improved access to those portions of the transition boiling regime that have a steep negative slope. Tests have been made in Freon-113, acetone, benzene, and n-pentane boiling on horizontal flat copper heaters that have been mirror-polished, 'roughened', or teflon-coated. The resulting data reproduce and clarify certain features observed by Berenson: the modest surface finish dependence of boiling burnout, and the influence of surface chemistry on both the minimum heat flux and the mode of transition boiling, for example. A rational scheme of correlation yields a prediction of the heat flux in what Witte and Lienhard (1982) previously identified as the 'film-transition boiling' region. It is also shown how to calculate the heat flux at the boundary between the pure-film, and the film-transition, boiling regimes, as a function of the advancing contact angle.

  2. Film Boiling Heat Transfer Properties of Liquid Hydrogen in Natural Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Y.; Shirai, Y.; Shiotsu, M.; Matsuzawa, T.; Yoneda, K.; Shigeta, H.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Naruo, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Inatani, Y.

    Film boiling heat transfer properties of LH2 for various pressures and subcooling conditions were measured by applying electric current to give an exponential heat input to a PtCo wire with a diameter of 1.2 mm submerged in LH2. The heated wire was set to be horizontal to the ground. The heat transfer coefficient in the film boiling region was higher for higher pressure and higher subcooling. The experimental results are compared with the equation of pool film boiling heat transfer. It is confirmed that the pool film boiling heat transfer coefficients in LH2 can be expressed by this equation.

  3. Enhanced heat transfer is dependent on thickness of graphene films: the heat dissipation during boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Jin Man; Kim, Taejoo; Park, Su Cheong; Kim, Ji Min; Park, Youngjae; Yu, Dong In; Hwang, Kyoung Won; Jo, Hangjin; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Hyungdae; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2014-09-01

    Boiling heat transfer (BHT) is a particularly efficient heat transport method because of the latent heat associated with the process. However, the efficiency of BHT decreases significantly with increasing wall temperature when the critical heat flux (CHF) is reached. Graphene has received much recent research attention for applications in thermal engineering due to its large thermal conductivity. In this study, graphene films of various thicknesses were deposited on a heated surface, and enhancements of BHT and CHF were investigated via pool-boiling experiments. In contrast to the well-known surface effects, including improved wettability and liquid spreading due to micron- and nanometer-scale structures, nanometer-scale folded edges of graphene films provided a clue of BHT improvement and only the thermal conductivity of the graphene layer could explain the dependence of the CHF on the thickness. The large thermal conductivity of the graphene films inhibited the formation of hot spots, thereby increasing the CHF. Finally, the provided empirical model could be suitable for prediction of CHF.

  4. Lookup Tables for Predicting CHF and Film-Boiling Heat Transfer: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Groeneveld, D.C.; Leung, L.K. H.; Guo, Y.; Vasic, A.; El Nakla, M.; Peng, S.W.; Yang, J.; Cheng, S.C.

    2005-10-15

    Lookup tables (LUTs) have been used widely for the prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) and film-boiling heat transfer for water-cooled tubes. LUTs are basically normalized data banks. They eliminate the need to choose between the many different CHF and film-boiling heat transfer prediction methods available.The LUTs have many advantages; e.g., (a) they are simple to use, (b) there is no iteration required, (c) they have a wide range of applications, (d) they may be applied to nonaqueous fluids using fluid-to-fluid modeling relationships, and (e) they are based on a very large database. Concerns associated with the use of LUTs include (a) there are fluctuations in the value of the CHF or film-boiling heat transfer coefficient (HTC) with pressure, mass flux, and quality, (b) there are large variations in the CHF or the film-boiling HTC between the adjacent table entries, and (c) there is a lack or scarcity of data at certain flow conditions.Work on the LUTs is continuing. This will resolve the aforementioned concerns and improve the LUT prediction capability. This work concentrates on better smoothing of the LUT entries, increasing the database, and improving models at conditions where data are sparse or absent.

  5. Film boiling heat transfer from a wire to upward flow of liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Horie, Y.; Shigeta, H.; Higa, D.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Nonaka, S.; Naruo, Y.; Inatani, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Film boiling heat transfer coefficients in liquid hydrogen were measured for the heater surface superheats to 300 K under pressures from 0.4 to 1.1 MPa, liquid subcoolings to 11 K and flow velocities to 8 m/s. Two test wires were both 1.2 mm in diameter, 120 mm and 200 mm in lengths and were made of PtCo alloy. The test wires were located on the center of 8 mm and 5 mm diameter conduits of FRP (Fiber Reinforced Plastics). Furthermore film boiling heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen were measured only for the 200 mm long wire. The film boiling heat transfer coefficients are higher for higher pressure, higher subcooling, and higher flow velocity. The experimental data were compared with a conventional equation for forced flow film boiling in a wide channel. The data for the 8 mm diameter conduit were about 1.7 times and those for the 5 mm conduit were about 1.9 times higher than the predicted values by the equation. A new equation was presented modifying the conventional equation based on the liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen data. The experimental data were expressed well by the equation.

  6. Physics of microstructures enhancement of thin film evaporation heat transfer in microchannels flow boiling.

    PubMed

    Bigham, Sajjad; Fazeli, Abdolreza; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2017-03-17

    Performance enhancement of the two-phase flow boiling heat transfer process in microchannels through implementation of surface micro- and nanostructures has gained substantial interest in recent years. However, the reported results range widely from a decline to improvements in performance depending on the test conditions and fluid properties, without a consensus on the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior. This gap in knowledge stems from a lack of understanding of the physics of surface structures interactions with microscale heat and mass transfer events involved in the microchannel flow boiling process. Here, using a novel measurement technique, the heat and mass transfer process is analyzed within surface structures with unprecedented detail. The local heat flux and dryout time scale are measured as the liquid wicks through surface structures and evaporates. The physics governing heat transfer enhancement on textured surfaces is explained by a deterministic model that involves three key parameters: the drying time scale of the liquid film wicking into the surface structures (τd), the heating length scale of the liquid film (δH) and the area fraction of the evaporating liquid film (Ar). It is shown that the model accurately predicts the optimum spacing between surface structures (i.e. pillars fabricated on the microchannel wall) in boiling of two fluids FC-72 and water with fundamentally different wicking characteristics.

  7. Physics of microstructures enhancement of thin film evaporation heat transfer in microchannels flow boiling

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Sajjad; Fazeli, Abdolreza; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Performance enhancement of the two-phase flow boiling heat transfer process in microchannels through implementation of surface micro- and nanostructures has gained substantial interest in recent years. However, the reported results range widely from a decline to improvements in performance depending on the test conditions and fluid properties, without a consensus on the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior. This gap in knowledge stems from a lack of understanding of the physics of surface structures interactions with microscale heat and mass transfer events involved in the microchannel flow boiling process. Here, using a novel measurement technique, the heat and mass transfer process is analyzed within surface structures with unprecedented detail. The local heat flux and dryout time scale are measured as the liquid wicks through surface structures and evaporates. The physics governing heat transfer enhancement on textured surfaces is explained by a deterministic model that involves three key parameters: the drying time scale of the liquid film wicking into the surface structures (τd), the heating length scale of the liquid film (δH) and the area fraction of the evaporating liquid film (Ar). It is shown that the model accurately predicts the optimum spacing between surface structures (i.e. pillars fabricated on the microchannel wall) in boiling of two fluids FC-72 and water with fundamentally different wicking characteristics. PMID:28303952

  8. Physics of microstructures enhancement of thin film evaporation heat transfer in microchannels flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigham, Sajjad; Fazeli, Abdolreza; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2017-03-01

    Performance enhancement of the two-phase flow boiling heat transfer process in microchannels through implementation of surface micro- and nanostructures has gained substantial interest in recent years. However, the reported results range widely from a decline to improvements in performance depending on the test conditions and fluid properties, without a consensus on the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior. This gap in knowledge stems from a lack of understanding of the physics of surface structures interactions with microscale heat and mass transfer events involved in the microchannel flow boiling process. Here, using a novel measurement technique, the heat and mass transfer process is analyzed within surface structures with unprecedented detail. The local heat flux and dryout time scale are measured as the liquid wicks through surface structures and evaporates. The physics governing heat transfer enhancement on textured surfaces is explained by a deterministic model that involves three key parameters: the drying time scale of the liquid film wicking into the surface structures (τd), the heating length scale of the liquid film (δH) and the area fraction of the evaporating liquid film (Ar). It is shown that the model accurately predicts the optimum spacing between surface structures (i.e. pillars fabricated on the microchannel wall) in boiling of two fluids FC-72 and water with fundamentally different wicking characteristics.

  9. Boiling Heat Transfer to Halogenated Hydrocarbon Refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Suguru; Fujita, Yasunobu

    The current state of knowledge on heat transfer to boiling refrigerants (halogenated hydrocarbons) in a pool and flowing inside a horizontal tube is reviewed with an emphasis on information relevant to the design of refrigerant evaporators, and some recommendations are made for future research. The review covers two-phase flow pattern, heat transfer characteristics, correlation of heat transfer coefficient, influence of oil, heat transfer augmentation, boiling from tube-bundle, influence of return bend, burnout heat flux, film boiling, dryout and post-dryout heat transfer.

  10. Film Boiling Heat Transfer from a Round Wire to Liquid Hydrogen Flowing Upward in a Concentric Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Oura, Y.; Horie, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Naruo, Y.; Inatani, Y.

    Hydrogen film boiling heat transfer coefficients were measured for the heater surface superheats up to 400 K under pressures from 400 to 1100 kPa, liquid subcoolings from 0 to 11 K and flow velocities up to 7 m/s. The test wire used was 1.2 mm in diameter and 120 mm in length made of PtCo (0.5 wt.%) alloy, which was located at the center of 8 mm diameter conduit made of FRP (Fiber Reinforced Plastics). The heat transfer coefficients were higher for higher pressure, higher subcooling and higher flow velocity. The heat transfer coefficients were about 1.6 times higher than those predicted by Shiotsu-Hama equation for forced flow film boiling in a wide channel. Discussions were made on the mechanism of difference between them.

  11. Heat transfer partitioning model of film boiling of particle cluster in a liquid pool: implementation in a CFD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Pallab S.; Ghosh, Koushik; Manna, Nirmal K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work an effective heat transfer partitioning model of three phase (particles, liquid and vapour) flow and thermal interaction have been developed by a multi-fluid approach under film boiling condition. The in-house multiphase flow code is based on finite volume method of discretization and SIMPLE-based pressure correction algorithm. From consideration of mass, momentum and energy balance across the liquid-vapour interface, the vapour bubble generated from the vapour film have been modeled and incorporated in the code. Different interaction terms between each phase are incorporated depending upon the flow regime. The code is validated with in-house and available experimental results. Finally the effect of relevant parameters on void generation under film boiling condition of particles is estimated.

  12. The development of a non-equilibrium dispersed flow film boiling heat transfer modeling package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meholic, Michael J.

    The dispersed flow film boiling (DFFB) heat transfer regime is important to several applications including cryogenics, rocket engines, steam generators, and in the safety analysis of nuclear reactors. Most notably, DFFB is responsible for the heat transfer during the blowdown and reflood portions of the postulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). Such analyses require the accurate predictions of the heat transfer resulting from the non-equilibrium conditions present in DFFB. A total of six, interrelated heat transfer paths need to be modeled accurately in order to quantify DFFB heat transfer. Within the nuclear industry, transient safety analysis codes, such as COBRA-TF, are used to ensure the safety of the reactor under various transient and accident scenarios. An extensive literature review of DFFB heat transfer highlighted a number of correlative, phenomenological, and mechanistic models. The Forslund-Rohsenow model is most commonly implemented throughout the nuclear industry. However, several of the models suggested by Forslund and Rohsenow to model DFFB phenomena are either inapplicable for nuclear reactors or do not provide an accurate physical representation of the true situation. Deficiencies among other DFFB heat transfer models in their applicability to nuclear reactors or in their computational expenses motivated the development of a mechanistically based DFFB model which accounted for each heat transfer mechanism explicitly. The heat transfer resulting from dispersed droplets contacting the heated wall in DFFB was often neglected in previous models. In this work, a first-principles approach was implemented to quantify the heat transfer attributed to direct contact. Lagrangian droplet trajectory calculations incorporating realistic radial vapor velocity and temperature profiles were performed to determine if droplets could contact the heated wall based upon the local conditions. These calculations were performed over a droplet size spectrum accounting

  13. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. Diffusion from the upper surface of the drop appears as a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  14. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. For these data, diffusion from the upper surface of the drop is a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic features and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; ...

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic featuresmore » and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.« less

  17. Influence of Pressure on Stable Film Boiling of Subcooled Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabirov, A. R.; Yagov, V. V.; Kaban'kov, O. N.; Leksin, M. A.; Kanin, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Film boiling of subcooled liquids is an integral part of the hardening process. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying film boiling is important for modeling processes in atomic power engineering and cryogenic technology. Stationary processes of film boiling of subcooled liquids under conditions of their free motion near cylindrical heaters, just as subcooled liquid turbulent flow past high-temperature surfaces, represent quite a different type of process. In cooling metal spheres heated to a high temperature by a subcooled water, a special regime of film boiling is observed (microbubble boiling) distinguished by high intensity of heat transfer. Such a regime has not been revealed up to now for nonaqueous liquids. The paper presents new experimental data on heat transfer regimes in cooling nickel spheres in subcooled isopropanol and perfluorohexane at pressures of up to 1 MPa. It has been established that stable film boiling is the main regime of heat transfer that accounts for the larger part of the total time of cooling. The regimes of highly intensive film boiling heat transfer were not observed in the entire range of operational parameters even in the case of extreme subcoolings of liquid below their saturation temperature (to 170 K). The intensity of heat transfer in stable film boiling increases noticeably with subcooling of a chilling liquid.

  18. Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation presents the science background and ground based results that form the basis of the Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment. This is an ISS experiment that is manifested for 2021. Objective: Characterize the effects of gravity on the interaction of electric and flow fields in the presence of phase change specifically pertaining to: a) The effects of microgravity on the electrically generated two-phase flow. b) The effects of microgravity on electrically driven liquid film boiling (includes extreme heat fluxes). Electro-wetting of the boiling section will repel the bubbles away from the heated surface in microgravity environment. Relevance/Impact: Provides phenomenological foundation for the development of electric field based two-phase thermal management systems leveraging EHD, permitting optimization of heat transfer surface area to volume ratios as well as achievement of high heat transfer coefficients thus resulting in system mass and volume savings. EHD replaces buoyancy or flow driven bubble removal from heated surface. Development Approach: Conduct preliminary experiments in low gravity and ground-based facilities to refine technique and obtain preliminary data for model development. ISS environment required to characterize electro-wetting effect on nucleate boiling and CHF in the absence of gravity. Will operate in the FIR - designed for autonomous operation.

  19. Boiling heat transfer characteristics of liquid xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, T.

    2002-05-01

    Liquid xenon is one of the excellent media for high-energy particle calorimeter. In order to detect a scintillation light effectively, a large number of photo-multipliers (PMTs) will be immersed in liquid xenon. Many chip-resistors equipped with the PMTs dissipate heat into liquid and possibly generate thermal turbulence, such as bubbles, convection flow under a certain operating condition. There is, however, no heat transfer curve (q-ΔT curve) in the literature. Boiling heat transfer characteristics of liquid xenon were measured at a saturated pressure of 0.1 MPa for the first time by using a small pulse tube refrigerator. The heat transfer surface is a thin platinum wire of 0.1 mm diameter and 25 mm long. The measured results were in good agreement with the calculated values both in natural convection and nucleate boiling condition. The film boiling state was difficult to obtain due to its poor reproducibility, and only one data was obtained. The relationship between the heat flux q and temperature difference ΔT was in good agreement with the Morgan's empirical equation in the natural convection region, and with the Kutateladze's equation in the nucleate boiling region.

  20. Film Boiling on Downward Quenching Hemisphere of Varying Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Chan S. Kim; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-04-01

    Film boiling heat transfer coefficients for a downward-facing hemispherical surface are measured from the quenching tests in DELTA (Downward-boiling Experimental Laminar Transition Apparatus). Two test sections are made of copper to maintain low Biot numbers. The outer diameters of the hemispheres are 120 mm and 294 mm, respectively. The thickness of all the test sections is 30 mm. The effect of diameter on film boiling heat transfer is quantified utilizing results obtained from the test sections. The measured data are compared with the numerical predictions from laminar film boiling analysis. The measured heat transfer coefficients are found to be greater than those predicted by the conventional laminar flow theory on account of the interfacial wavy motion incurred by the Helmholtz instability. Incorporation of the wavy motion model considerably improves the agreement between the experimental and numerical results in terms of heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the interfacial wavy motion and the quenching process are visualized through a digital camera.

  1. Heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity flow boiling.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Haruhiko

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to clarify the mechanisms of heat transfer and dryout phenomena in flow boiling under microgravity conditions. Liquid-vapor behavior in annular flow, encountered in the moderate quality region, has extreme significance for practical application in space. To clarify the gravity effect on the heat transfer observed for an upward flow in a tube, the research described here started from the measurement of pressure drop for binary gas-liquid mixture under various gravity conditions. The shear stress acting on the surface of the annular liquid film was correlated by an empirical method. Gravity effects on the heat transfer due to two-phase forced convection were investigated by the analysis of velocity and temperature profiles in the film. The results reproduce well the trends of heat transfer coefficients varying with the gravity level, quality, and mass velocity. Dryout phenomena in the moderate quality region were observed in detail by the introduction of a transparent heated tube. At heat fluxes just lower and higher than CHF value, a transition of the heat transfer coefficient was calculated from oscillating wall temperature, where a series of opposing heat transfer trends--the enhancement due to the quenching of dried areas or evaporation from thin liquid films and the deterioration due to the extension of dry patches--were observed between the passage of disturbance waves. The CHF condition that resulted from the insufficient decrease of wall temperature in the period of enhanced heat transfer was overcome by a temperature increase in the deterioration period. No clear effect of gravity on the mechanisms of dryout was observed within the range of experiments.

  2. Pool Boiling Heat Transfer on structured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addy, J.; Olbricht, M.; Müller, B.; Luke, A.

    2016-09-01

    The development in the process and energy sector shows the importance of efficient utilization of available resources to improve thermal devices. To achieve this goal, all thermal components have to be optimized continuously. Various applications of multi-phase heat and mass transfer have to be improved. Therefore, the heat transfer and the influence of surface roughness in nucleate boiling with the working fluid propane is experimentally investigated on structured mild steel tubes, because only few data are available in the literature. The mild steel tube is sandblasted to obtain different surface roughness. The measurements are carried out over wide ranges of heat flux and pressure. The experimental results are compared with correlations from literature and the effect of surface roughness on the heat transfer is discussed. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing surface roughness, heat flux and reduced pressure at nucleate pool boiling.

  3. Transport Phenomena in Thin Rotating Liquid Films Including: Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, Amir

    2005-01-01

    In this grant, experimental, numerical and analytical studies of heat transfer in a thin liquid film flowing over a rotating disk have been conducted. Heat transfer coefficients were measured experimentally in a rotating disk heat transfer apparatus where the disk was heated from below with electrical resistance heaters. The heat transfer measurements were supplemented by experimental characterization of the liquid film thickness using a novel laser based technique. The heat transfer measurements show that the disk rotation plays an important role on enhancement of heat transfer primarily through the thinning of the liquid film. Experiments covered both momentum and rotation dominated regimes of the flow and heat transfer in this apparatus. Heat transfer measurements have been extended to include evaporation and nucleate boiling and these experiments are continuing in our laboratory. Empirical correlations have also been developed to provide useful information for design of compact high efficiency heat transfer devices. The experimental work has been supplemented by numerical and analytical analyses of the same problem. Both numerical and analytical results have been found to agree reasonably well with the experimental results on liquid film thickness and heat transfer Coefficients/Nusselt numbers. The numerical simulations include the free surface liquid film flow and heat transfer under disk rotation including the conjugate effects. The analytical analysis utilizes an integral boundary layer approach from which

  4. Extended hydrodynamic theory of the peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linehard, J. H.; Dhir, V. K.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of the extreme pool boiling heat fluxes is expanded to embrace a variety of problems that have not previously been analyzed. These problems include the prediction of the peak heat flux on a variety of finite heaters, the influence of viscosity on the Taylor and Helmoltz instability mechanisms with application to film boiling and to the peak heat flux in viscous liquids, the formalization of the analogy between high-current-density electrolysis and boiling, and the description of boiling in the low-gravity limit. The predictions are verified with a large number of new data.

  5. A heat transfer model for slug flow boiling within microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnini, Mirco; Thome, John

    2016-11-01

    We propose a novel physics-based model for the fluid mechanics and heat transfer associated with slug flow boiling in horizontal circular microchannels, to update the widely used three-zone model for the design of multi-microchannel evaporators. The flow is modelled as the cyclic passage of a liquid slug, an elongated bubble which traps a thin liquid film against the channel wall, and a dry vapor plug. The capillary flow theory, extended to incorporate evaporation effects, is applied to estimate the bubble velocity along the channel. A liquid film thickness prediction method considering bubble proximity effects, which may limit the radial extension of the film, is included. Theoretical heat transfer models accounting for the thermal inertia of the liquid film and for the recirculating flow within the liquid slug are utilized. The heat transfer model is compared to experimental data taken from three independent studies: 833 slug flow boiling data points covering R134a, R245fa and R236fa and channel diameters from 0.4 mm to 1 mm. The new model predicts more than 80% of the database to within +/- 30 % and it represents an important step toward a complete physics-based modelling of bubble dynamics and heat transfer within microchannels under evaporating flow conditions.

  6. Critical heat flux and dynamics of boiling in nanofluids at stepwise heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, M. I.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper results of an experimental study on critical heat flux and dynamics of boiling crisis onset in nanofluids at stepwise heat generation are presented. Freon R21 with three types of nanoparticles - SiO2, Cu and Al2O3 was used as test fluid. Critical heat fluxes and temperatures of boiling initiation were obtained. It was shown that the addition of nanoparticles increased CHF at stepwise heat generation by up to 21%. Under conditions of the experiment transition to film boiling occurred via evaporation fronts. Data on propagation velocity and structure of evaporation fronts were obtained; the spectral analysis of fluctuations of the evaporation front interface was carried out. The characteristic frequencies and amplitudes of interface fluctuations were determined depending on the velocity of evaporation front propagation. It was shown that the addition of nano-sized particles significantly affects development of interface instability and increases the front velocity.

  7. Early-Evaporation of Microlayer for Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Singh, Dhirendra P; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-10-06

    For over five decades, enhancement in pool boiling heat transfer has been achieved by altering the surface wetting, wickability, roughness, nucleation site density and providing separate liquid/vapor pathways. In this work, a new enhancement mechanism based on the early-evaporation of the microlayer is discovered and validated. The microlayer is a thin liquid film present at the base of a vapor bubble. Presence of micro-ridges on the silicon-dioxide surface partitions the microlayer and disconnects it from bulk liquid causing it to evaporate sooner, thus leading to increase in bubble growth rate, heat transfer, departure frequency and critical heat flux (CHF). Compared to a plain surface, ~120% enhancement in CHF is obtained with only ~18% increase in surface area. A CHF enhancement map is developed based on ridge height and spacing, resulting in three regions of full, partial and no enhancement. The new mechanism is validated by comparing the growth rate of a laser created vapor bubble on ridge-structured surface and plain surface, and the corresponding prediction of CHF enhancement is found to be in good agreement with experimental boiling data. This discovery opens up a new field of CHF enhancement and can be coupled with existing techniques to further push the limits of boiling heat transfer.

  8. Local heat transfer for subcooled flow boiling with water

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.D.; Meng, X. )

    1992-12-01

    In this paper, local heat transfer coefficients are predicted for turbulent water subcooled flow boiling through uniformly heated circular tubes. Correlations by Petukhov and by Shah are modified slightly. however, the correlation suggested by Kandlikar is improved significantly by requiring that it approach more accurate limits near the onset of fully developed boiling and the onset of nucleate boiling for subcooled flow. Excellent agreement is obtained with data corresponding to conditions of high inlet subcooling (183[degrees]C), high mass velocity (4.4 to 31.5 Mg/m[sup 2][center dot]s), and a large ratio of the axial coordinate to the diameter (95.5). The exit subcooling varies from 53.0 to 81.5[degrees]C. For smaller ratios ([lt]50.0), the accuracy decreases. In all cases, the local film temperature is the characteristic temperature. When the associated critical heat flux (CHF) data are examined in a Stanton number-Peclet number space, St [lt] 0.0065 and Pe [gt] 10[sup 5] in all cases. Comparisons with the Saha-Zuber criterion for bubble detachment show that moderately subcooled and high-velocity flows re characterized by a multiboundary layer phenomenon that includes an attached bubble layer. These results show that the bubble layer's existence can now be documented for a wide variety of fluids and conditions without flow visualizations.

  9. A review on boiling heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest of late in nanofluid boiling and its use in heat transfer enhancement. This article covers recent advances in the last decade by researchers in both pool boiling and convective boiling applications, with nanofluids as the working fluid. The available data in the literature is reviewed in terms of enhancements, and degradations in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux. Conflicting data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Several researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux enhancement. PMID:21711794

  10. A review on boiling heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jacqueline; Brutin, David; Tadrist, Lounes

    2011-04-04

    There has been increasing interest of late in nanofluid boiling and its use in heat transfer enhancement. This article covers recent advances in the last decade by researchers in both pool boiling and convective boiling applications, with nanofluids as the working fluid. The available data in the literature is reviewed in terms of enhancements, and degradations in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux. Conflicting data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Several researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux enhancement.

  11. A molecular dynamics study of phobic/philic nano-patterning on pool boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Ricardo; Guo, Zhixiong

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the pool boiling heat transfer of a liquid argon thin film on a flat, horizontal copper wall structured with vertical nanoscale pillars. The efficacy of phobic/philic nano-patterning for enhancing boiling heat transfer was scrutinized. Both nucleate and explosive boiling modes were considered. An error analysis demonstrated that the typical 2.5σ cutoff in MD simulations could under-predict heat flux by about 8.7 %, and 6σ cutoff was chosen here in order to maintain high accuracy. A new coordination number criterion was also introduced to better quantify evaporation characteristics. Results indicate that the argon-phobic/philic patterning tends to either have no effect, or decrease overall boiling heat flux, while the argon-philic nano-pillar/argon-philic wall shows the best heat transfer performance.

  12. Pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Lallemand, M.

    1993-10-01

    Heat transfer between a wall and a stagnant boiling liquid is reviewed in this paper. The effect of different parameters on the boiling curve is pointed out on the basis of experimental data from the literature. Augmentation of heat transfer by enhanced surfaces is described briefly. The available correlations for prediction of heat transfer coefficients are given for the entire boiling curve, i.e., nucleate, transitional, and film boiling, and critical points. These correlations are useful for the design and operation of various heat-exchange systems.

  13. Explosive Boiling at Very Low Heat Fluxes: A Microgravity Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents experimental observations of explosive boiling from a large (relative to bubble sizes) flat heating surface at very low heat fluxes in microgravity. The explosive boiling is characterized as either a rapid growth of vapor mass over the entire heating surface due to the flashing of superheated liquid or a violent boiling spread following the appearance of single bubbles on the heating surface. Pool boiling data with saturated Freon 113 was obtained in the microgravity environment of the space shuttle. The unique features of the experimental results are the sustainability of high liquid superheat for long periods and the occurrence of explosive boiling at low heat fluxes (0.2 to 1.2 kW/sq m). For a heat flux of 1.0 kW/sq m a wall superheat of 17.9 degrees C was attained in ten minutes of heating. This was followed by an explosive boiling accompanied with a pressure spike and a violent bulk liquid motion. However, at this heat flux the vapor blanketing the heating surface could not be sustained. Stable nucleate boiling continued following the explosive boiling.

  14. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe

  15. Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1994-12-01

    Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows was studied experimentally and theoretically with an emphasis on establishing the film boiling heat transfer closure law, which is useful in the analysis of nuclear reactor core melt accidents. Systematic experimentation of film boiling on spheres in single-phase water flows was carried out to investigate the effects of liquid subcooling (from 0 to 40{degrees}C), liquid velocity (from 0 to 2 m/s), sphere superheat (from 200 to 900{degrees}C), sphere diameter (from 6 to 19 mm), and sphere material (stainless steel and brass) on film boiling heat transfer. Based on the experimental data a general film boiling heat transfer correlation is developed. Utilizing a two-phase laminar boundary-layer model for the unseparated front film region and a turbulent eddy model for the separated rear region, a theoretical model was developed to predict the film boiling heat transfer in all single-phase regimes. The film boiling from a sphere in two-phase flows was investigated both in upward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.2 to 0.65, water velocity from 0.6 to 3.2 m/s, and steam velocity from 3.0 to 9.0 m/s) and in downward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.7 to 0.95, water velocity from 1.9 to 6.5 m/s, and steam velocity from 1.1 to 9.0 m/s). The saturated single-phase heat transfer correlation was found to be applicable to the two-phase film boiling data by making use of the actual water velocity (water phase velocity), and an adjustment factor of (1-{alpha}){sup 1/4} (with {alpha} being the void fraction) for downward flow case only. Slight adjustments of the Reynolds number exponents in the correlation provided an even better interpretation of the two-phase data. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to address the influences of multisphere structure on the film boiling heat transfer in single- and two-phase flows.

  16. Heat Transfer Performances of Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2000-01-01

    Nucleate boiling, especially near the critical heat flux (CHF), can provide excellent economy along with high efficiency of heat transfer. However, the performance of nucleate boiling may deteriorate in a reduced gravity environment and the nucleate boiling usually has a potentially dangerous characteristic in CHF regime. That is, any slight overload can result in burnout of the boiling surface because the heat transfer will suddenly move into the film-boiling regime. Therefore, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer becomes more important in reduced gravity environments. Enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux can be reached using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface. Thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix, which is independent of gravity, will play an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. Experimental studies were performed on nucleate pool boiling of pentane on cooper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composite surfaces with various fiber volume concentrations for heat fluxes up to 35 W per square centimeter. It is revealed that a significant enhancement in boiling heat transfer performance on the composite surfaces is achieved, due to the presence of micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix. The onset of nucleate boiling (the isolated bubble regime) occurs at wall superheat of about 10 C for the Cu-Gr surface and 15 C for the Al-Gr surface, much lower than their respective pure metal surfaces. Transition from an isolated bubble regime to a coalesced bubble regime in boiling occurs at a superheat of

  17. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance. PMID:23506445

  18. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehade, Ali Ahmad; Gualous, Hasna Louahlia; Le Masson, Stephane; Fardoun, Farouk; Besq, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance.

  19. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Ali Ahmad; Gualous, Hasna Louahlia; Le Masson, Stephane; Fardoun, Farouk; Besq, Anthony

    2013-03-18

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance.

  20. Subcooled Boiling Near a Heated Wall

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Trabold; C.C. Maneri; P.F. Vassallo; D.M. Considine

    2000-10-27

    Experimental measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency, and velocity are obtained in subcooled R-134a flowing over a heated flat plate near an unheated wall and compared to analytical predictions. The measurements were obtained for a fixed system pressure and mass flow rate (P = 2.4 MPa and w = 106 kg/hr) at various inlet liquid temperatures. During the experiments, electrical power was applied at a constant rate to one side of the test section. The local void fraction data, acquired with a hot-film anemometer probe, showed the existence of a significant peak near the heated wall and a smaller secondary peak near the unheated wall for the larger inlet subcoolings. Local vapor velocity data, taken with the hot-film probe and a laser Doppler velocimeter, showed broad maxima near the centerline between the heated and unheated plates. Significant temperature gradients near the heated wall were observed for large inlet subcooling. Bubble size data, inferred from measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency and vapor velocity, when combined with the measured bubble chord length distributions illustrate the transition from pure three dimensional spherical to two-dimensional planar bubble flow, the latter being initiated when the bubbles fill the gap between the plates. These various two-phase flow measurements were used for development of a multidimensional, four-field calculational method; comparisons of the data to the calculations show reasonable agreement.

  1. Partial Nucleate Pool Boiling at Low Heat Flux: Preliminary Ground Test for SOBER-SJ10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke; Li, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Li, Hui-Xiong; Li, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Focusing on partial nucleate pool boiling at low heat flux, SOBER-SJ10, one of 27 experiments of the program SJ-10, has been proposed to study local convection and heat transfer around an isolated growing vapor bubble during nucleate pool boiling on a well characterized flat surface in microgravity. An integrated micro heater has been developed. By using a local pulse overheating method in the experimental mode of single bubble boiling, a bubble nucleus can be excited with accurate spatial and temporal positioning on the top-side of a quartz glass substrate with a thickness of 2 mm and an effective heating area of 4.5 mm in diameter, and then grows under an approximate constant heat input provided by the main heater on the back-side of the substrate. Ten thin film micro-RTDs are used for local temperature measurements on the heating surface underneath the growing bubble. Normal pool boiling experiments can also be carried out with step-by-step increase of heating voltage. A series of ground test of the flight module of SOBER-SJ10 have been conducted. Good agreement of the measured data of single phase natural convection with the common-used empirical correlation warrants reasonable confidence in the data. It is found that the values of the incipience superheat of pool boiling at different subcooling are consistent with each others, verifying that the influence of subcooling on boiling incipience can be neglected. Pool boiling curves are also obtained, which shows great influence of subcooling on heat transfer of partial nucleate pool boiling, particularly in lower heat flux.

  2. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  3. Numerical investigation of boiling heat transfer on the shell-side of spiral wound heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhi-Yong; Wang, He; Cai, Wei-Hua; Jiang, Yi-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to numerically study boiling heat transfer on the shell-side of spiral wound heat exchanger (SWHE). The physical model for the shell-side of SWHE is established and the volume of fluid (VOF) method is used in the calculation. For propane and ethane, there are thirty cases to be simulated . Through the comparison with experimental data, the cause which leads to the simulation distortion is found, and the satisfied results of calculation are finally achieved. The simulation results show that the VOF model can be adopted well to those calculations whose inlet quality are lower than 0.1 kg/kg, and the calculation deviations are generally within ±20 %. In falling film flow, the heat transfer performance for the shell-side of SWHE is primarily influenced by Reynolds number. The visualization of simulation results displays that the boiling bubbles have three flow directions, besides flowing down with liquid phase, one portion of bubbles flows reversely up, and another portion is blocked at axial gaps of coils where the heat transfer is reduced. The studies of boiling on the shell-side of SWHE not only reveal the characteristics of heat transfer, but also point out the improvement direction of SWHE.

  4. Mathematical and experimental modeling of nucleate boiling heat transfer in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Ciro

    model is useful to identify and classify all the parameters that could have an effect on stability and the transition to film boiling such as the circulation, a parameter identified in previous studies, and the autocorrelation. The circulation was generalized in this study. The results of the mathematical model are consistent with the temperature fluctuations as obtained from the experiment. The results indicate that the assumptions made for the mathematical model are sufficient to capture the essential features of discrete nucleate boiling heat transfer.

  5. ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 7. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test series 3. 07. 9 - steady-state film boiling in upflow

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

    1982-05-01

    Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test series 3.07.9 was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water Reactor (ORNL-PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on September 11, September 18, and October 1, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test series 3.07.9 was designed to provide steady-state film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. This report presents the reduced instrument responses for THTF test series 3.07.9. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

  6. Effect of boiling surface vibration on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alangar, Sathyabhama

    2017-01-01

    Experimental investigation of effect of forced vertical surface vibration on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of saturated water at atmospheric pressure is presented in this paper. Vertical vibration was induced externally to the circular copper test surface on which boiling took place, using a vibration exciter. Frequency was varied in the range 0-25 Hz and amplitude of vibration was varied in the range 0-5 mm. Boiling takes place at much lower superheats for the same heat flux, slope of boiling curve decreases remarkably, when the surface is given external excitation. High frequency and high amplitude oscillations lead to more intensive heat transfer. There are some combinations of frequency and vibration amplitude, which cause up to two times increase in heat transfer coefficients.

  7. High heat flux transport by microbubble emission boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Koichi

    2007-10-01

    In highly subcooled flow boiling, coalescing bubbles on the heating surface collapse to many microbubbles in the beginning of transition boiling and the heat flux increases higher than the ordinary critical heat flux. This phenomenon is called Microbubble Emission Boiling, MEB. It is generated in subcooled flow boiling and the maximum heat flux reaches about 1 kW/cm2(10 MW/m2) at liquid subcooling of 40 K and liquid velocity of 0.5 m/s for a small heating surface of 10 mm×10 mm which is placed at the bottom surface of horizontal rectangular channel. The high pressure in the channel is observed at collapse of the coalescing bubbles and it is closely related the size of coalescing bubbles. Periodic pressure waves are observed in MEB and the heat flux increases linearly in proportion to the pressure frequency. The frequency is considered the frequency of liquid-solid exchange on the heating surface. For the large sized heating surface of 50 mm length×20 mm width, the maximum heat flux obtained is 500 W/cm2 (5 MW/m2) at liquid subcooling of 40 K and liquid velocity of 0.5 m/s. This is considerably higher heat flux than the conventional cooling limit in power electronics. It is difficult to remove the high heat flux by MEB for a longer heating surface than 50 mm by single channel type. A model of advanced cooling device is introduced for power electronics by subcooled flow boiling with impinging jets. Themaxumum cooling heat flux is 500 W/cm2 (5 MW/m2). Microbubble emission boiling is useful for a high heat flux transport technology in future power electronics used in a fuel-cell power plant and a space facility.

  8. Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Studied Under Reduced-Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling is known to be a very efficient mode of heat transfer, and as such, it is employed in component cooling and in various energy-conversion systems. In space, boiling heat transfer may be used in thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, and on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life-support fluids. Recent interest in the exploration of Mars and other planets and in the concept of in situ resource utilization on the Martian and Lunar surfaces highlights the need to understand how gravity levels varying from the Earth's gravity to microgravity (1g = or > g/g(sub e) = or > 10(exp -6)g) affect boiling heat transfer. Because of the complex nature of the boiling process, no generalized prediction or procedure has been developed to describe the boiling heat transfer coefficient, particularly at reduced gravity levels. Recently, Professor Vijay K. Dhir of the University of California at Los Angeles proposed a novel building-block approach to investigate the boiling phenomena in low-gravity to microgravity environments. This approach experimentally investigates the complete process of bubble inception, growth, and departure for single bubbles formed at a well-defined and controllable nucleation site. Principal investigator Professor Vijay K. Dhir, with support from researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, is performing a series of pool boiling experiments in the low-gravity environments of the KC 135 microgravity aircraft s parabolic flight to investigate the inception, growth, departure, and merger of bubbles from single- and multiple-nucleation sites as a function of the wall superheat and the liquid subcooling. Silicon wafers with single and multiple cavities of known characteristics are being used as test surfaces. Water and PF5060 (an inert liquid) were chosen as test liquids so that the role of surface wettability and the magnitude of the effect of interfacial tension on boiling in reduced

  9. Theoretical and experimental study of inverted annular film boiling and regime transition during reflood transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Lokanath

    The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is a design basis accident for light water reactors that usually determines the limits on core power. During a LOCA, film boiling is the dominant mode of heat transfer prior to the quenching of the fuel rods. The study of film boiling is important because this mode of heat transfer determines if the core can be safely cooled. One important film boiling regime is the so-called Inverted Annular Film Boiling (IAFB) regime which is characterized by a liquid core downstream of the quench front enveloped by a vapor film separating it from the fuel rod. Much research have been conducted for IAFB, but these studies have been limited to steady state experiments in single tubes. In the present work, subcooled and saturated IAFB are investigated using high temperature reflood data from the experiments carried out in the Rod Bundle Heat Transfer (RBHT) test facility. Parametric effects of system parameters including the pressure, inlet subcooling, and flooding rate on the heat transfer are investigated. The heat transfer behavior during transition to Inverted Slug Film Boiling (ISFB) regime is studied and is found to be different than that reported in previous studies. The effects of spacer grids on heat transfer in the IAFB and ISFB regimes are also presented. Currently design basis accidents are evaluated with codes in which heat transfer and wall drag must be calculated with local flow parameters. The existing models for heat transfer are applicable up to a void fraction of 0.6, i.e. in the IAFB regime and there is no heat transfer correlation for ISFB. A new semi-empirical heat transfer model is developed covering the IAFB and ISFB regimes which is valid for a void fraction up to 90% using the local flow variables. The mean absolute percentage error in predicting the RBHT data is 11% and root mean square error is 15%. This new semi-empirical model is found to compare well with the reflood data of FLECHT-SEASET experiments as well as data

  10. Boiling phenomenon due to quasi-steadily and rapidly increasing heat inputs in LN 2 and LHe I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, A.; Shiotsu, M.; Hata, K.

    Dynamic boiling processes, including the transition from a single-phase non-boiling regime to film boiling caused by exponentially increasing heat inputs, Q 0e t/τ for a wide range of periods and pressures on horizontal wires in LN 2 and LHe I were investigated. The main problem is that there are no active cavities on the wire surfaces for initial boiling in the liquids. The heat transfer processes due to increasing heat inputs with increasing rates ranging from quasi-steady to rapidly increasing ones in LN 2 were classified into three types for the pressures. The dynamic boiling processes in LHe I due to rapidly increasing heat inputs at the pressures tested here correspond to Type 3 processes including semi-direct transitions in LN 2 at pressures higher than about 1 MPa. The lower limit temperatures of boiling initiation on the wire surfaces for initial boiling in liquids at pressures due to quasi-steadily increasing heat inputs are clearly lower than the homogeneous spontaneous nucleation temperatures corresponding to these pressures. Liquid superheat close to the solid surface in LHe I was evaluated from the value of the wire surface temperature, taking off the temperature drop due to Kapitza resistance. The initial boiling temperatures due to quasi-steady heat inputs at pressures in saturated LN 2 and LHe I agreed with the values derived from the theoretical model based on the heterogeneous spontaneous nucleation in flooded cavities on the solid surface.

  11. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  12. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  13. Heat Transfer in Boiling Dilute Emulsion with Strong Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburg, Eric Thomas

    Little attention has been given to the boiling of emulsions compared to that of boiling in pure liquids. The advantages of using emulsions as a heat transfer agent were first discovered in the 1970s and several interesting features have since been studied by few researchers. Early research focuses primarily on pool and flow boiling and looks to determine a mechanism by which the boiling process occurs. This thesis looks at the boiling of dilute emulsions in fluids with strong buoyant forces. The boiling of dilute emulsions presents many favorable characteristics that make it an ideal agent for heat transfer. High heat flux electronics, such as those seen in avionics equipment, produce high heat fluxes of 100 W/cm2 or more, but must be maintained at low temperatures. So far, research on single phase convection and flow boiling in small diameter channels have yet to provide an adequate solution. Emulsions allow the engineer to tailor the solution to the specific problem. The fluid can be customized to retain the high thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the continuous phase while enhancing the heat transfer coefficient through boiling of the dispersed phase component. Heat transfer experiments were carried out with FC-72 in water emulsions. FC-72 has a saturation temperature of 56 °C, far below that of water. The parameters were varied as follows: 0% ≤ epsilon ≤ 1% and 1.82 x 1012 ≤ RaH ≤ 4.42 x 1012. Surface temperatures along the heated surface reached temperature that were 20 °C in excess of the dispersed phase saturation temperature. An increase of ˜20% was seen in the average Nusselt numbers at the highest Rayleigh numbers. Holography was used to obtain images of individual and multiple FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface. The droplet diameters ranged from 0.5 mm to 1.3 mm. The Magnus effect was observed when larger individual droplets were injected into the boundary layer, causing the droplets to be pushed

  14. Boils

    MedlinePlus

    A boil may begin as tender, pinkish-red, and swollen, on a firm area of the skin. Over time, it will feel like a water-filled balloon or cyst . Pain gets worse as it fills with pus and dead tissue. Pain lessens when the boil drains. A boil ...

  15. Boiling heat transfer and droplet spreading of nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Murshed, S M Sohel; de Castro, C A Nieto

    2013-11-01

    Nanofluids- a new class of heat transfer fluids have recently been a very attractive area of research due to their fascinating thermophysical properties and numerous potential benefits and applications in many important fields. However, there are many controversies and inconsistencies in reported arguments and experimental results on various thermal characteristics such as effective thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient and boiling heat transfer rate of nanofluids. As of today, researchers have mostly focused on anomalous thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Although investigations on boiling and droplet spreading are very important for practical application of nanofluids as advanced coolants, considerably fewer efforts have been made on these thermal features of nanofluids. In this paper, recent research and development in boiling heat transfer and droplet spreading of nanofluids are reviewed together with summarizing most related patents on nanofluids published in literature. Review reveals that despite some inconsistent results nanofluids exhibit significantly higher boiling heat transfer performance compared to their base fluids and show great promises to be used as advanced heat transfer fluids in numerous applications. However, there is a clear lack of in-depth understanding of heat transport mechanisms during phase change of nanofluids. It is also found that the nanofluids related patents are limited and among them most of the patents are based on thermal conductivity enhancement and synthesising processes of specific type of nanofluids.

  16. Liquid jet impingement heat transfer with or without boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. F.; Gan, Y. P.; Tian, Y. C.; Lei, D. H.; Gomi, T.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the important studies in the area of impingement heat transfer with or without phase change, with emphasis on the research conducted at Beijing Polytechnic University mainly with circular jets. Heat transfer characteristics of single phase jets are discussed in detail. Comment is presented on boiling heat transfer of impinging jets for steady and transient states. Some special cooling configurations of two-phase jets are also introduced.

  17. A high-fidelity approach towards heat transfer prediction of pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Miad; Alahyari, Abbas; Radcliff, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    A novel numerical approach is developed to simulate the multiscale problem of pool-boiling phase change with an unprecedented fidelity and cost. The particular focus is to predict the heat transfer coefficient of pool-boiling regime and its transition to critical heat flux on surfaces of arbitrary shape and roughness distribution. The large-scale of the phase change and bubble dynamics is addressed through employing off-the-shelf methods for interface tracking and interphase mass and energy transfer. The small-scale of the microlayer which forms at early stage of bubble nucleation is resolved through asymptotic approximation of the thin-film theory which provides a closed-form solution for the distribution of the micro-layer and its influence on the evaporation process. In addition, the surface roughness and its role in bubble nucleation and growth is represented based on thermodynamics of nucleation process which allows the simulation of pool boiling on any surface with known roughness and enhancement characteristics. The numerical model is validated for dynamics and hydrothermal characteristics of a single nucleated bubble on a flat surface against available literature data. In addition, the model's prediction of pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient is verified against reputable correlations for various roughness distributions and different surface alignment. Finally, the model is employed to demonstrate pool-boiling phenomenon on enhanced structures with reentrance cavities and to explore the effect of enhancement features on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of these surfaces.

  18. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-11-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. In earth gravity, buoyancy is an important parameter that affects boiling heat transfer through the rate at which bubbles are removed from the surface. A simple model describing the bubble departure size based on a quasistatic force balance between buoyancy and surface tension is given by the Fritz I relation: Bo1/2 = 0.0208 theta where Bo is the ratio between buoyancy and surface tension forces. For small, rapidly growing bubbles, inertia associated with the induced liquid motion can also cause bubble departure. In microgravity, the magnitude of effects related to natural convection and buoyancy are small and physical mechanisms normally masked by natural convection in earth gravity such as Marangoni convection can substantially influence the boiling and vapor bubble dynamics. CHF (critical heat transfer) is also substantially affected by microgravity. In 1 g environments, Bo has been used as a correlating parameter for CHF. Zuber's CHF model for an infinite horizontal surface assumes that vapor columns formed by the merger of bubbles become unstable due to a Helmholtz instability blocking the supply of liquid to the surface. The jets are spaced lambdaD apart, where lambdaD = 2pi square root of 3[(sigma)/(g(rhol - rhov]1/2 = 2pi square root of 3 L Bo-1/2 = square root of 3 lambdac and is the wavelength that amplifies most rapidly

  19. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. In earth gravity, buoyancy is an important parameter that affects boiling heat transfer through the rate at which bubbles are removed from the surface. A simple model describing the bubble departure size based on a quasistatic force balance between buoyancy and surface tension is given by the Fritz [I] relation: Bo(exp 1/2) = 0.0208 theta where Bo is the ratio between buoyancy and surface tension forces. For small, rapidly growing bubbles, inertia associated with the induced liquid motion can also cause bubble departure. In microgravity, the magnitude of effects related to natural convection and buoyancy are small and physical mechanisms normally masked by natural convection in earth gravity such as Marangoni convection can substantially influence the boiling and vapor bubble dynamics. CHF (critical heat transfer) is also substantially affected by microgravity. In 1 g environments, Bo has been used as a correlating parameter for CHF. Zuber's CHF model for an infinite horizontal surface assumes that vapor columns formed by the merger of bubbles become unstable due to a Helmholtz instability blocking the supply of liquid to the surface. The jets are spaced lambda(sub D) apart, where lambda(sub D) = 2pi square root of 3[(sigma)/(g(rho(sub l) - rho(sub v)](exp 1/2) = 2pi square root of 3 L Bo(exp -1/2) = square root of 3 lambda(sub c

  20. In situ technique for measuring heat transfer from a power transistor to a boiling liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, C. L.; Witte, L. C.

    1994-05-01

    A technique for in situ measurement of temperature and heat flux in boiling heat transfer from electronic chips is described. The method was used to obtain accurate partial boiling curves for jet impingement and pool boiling in R-113. While the characteristics of the heat transfer behavior agree with previous data, the data in general lie below data obtained with specialized test chips.

  1. Forced Convection Boiling and Critical Heat Flux of Ethanol in Electrically Heated Tube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Linne, Diane L.; Rousar, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Electrically heated tube tests were conducted to characterize the critical heat flux (transition from nucleate to film boiling) of subcritical ethanol flowing at conditions relevant to the design of a regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chamber. The coolant was SDA-3C alcohol (95% ethyl alcohol, 5% isopropyl alcohol by weight), and tests were conducted over the following ranges of conditions: pressure from 144 to 703 psia, flow velocities from 9.7 to 77 ft/s, coolant subcooling from 33 to 362 F, and critical heat fluxes up to 8.7 BTU/in(exp 2)/sec. For the data taken near 200 psia, critical heat flux was correlated as a function of the product of velocity and fluid subcooling to within +/- 20%. For data taken at higher pressures, an additional pressure term is needed to correlate the critical heat flux. It was also shown that at the higher test pressures and/or flow rates, exceeding the critical heat flux did not result in wall burnout. This result may significantly increase the engine heat flux design envelope for higher pressure conditions.

  2. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima. PMID:26346098

  3. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2015-09-08

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima.

  4. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-09-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima.

  5. Experimental study of multi-scale heat transfer characteristics at pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyukov, V.; Surtaev, A.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the results of the experimental investigation of local and integral characteristics of heat transfer at liquid pool boiling. Saturated ethanol and water were used as the working fluids. Thin, resistively heated indium-tin oxide films deposited onto the sapphire substrates were used as the heaters. The synchronized measurements of the heater surface temperature field and dynamics of vapor bubbles were performed by high-speed infrared thermography with the frame rate of 1000 fps and resolution of up to 0.13 μm/px and high-speed video recording. In this paper new data on major local boiling characteristics, such as nucleation site density, dynamics of vapor bubbles, temporal characteristics and nucleation frequency at different heat fluxes and superheating and their comparison with correlations are presented.

  6. Bubble dynamics and heat transfer for pool boiling on hydrophilic, superhydrophobic and biphilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodori, E.; Palma, T.; Valente, T.; Moita, A. S.; Moreira, A. L. N.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a detailed analysis of bubble dynamics to describe pool boiling heat transfer in extreme wetting scenarios (superhydrophobic vs hydrophilic). A mechanistic approach, based on extensive post-processing allows quantifying the relative advantage of the superhydrophobic surfaces to endorse the onset of boiling at very low superheats (1-2K) vs their worse heat transfer performance associated to the swift formation of an insulating vapour film. Based on this analysis, a simple biphilic surface is created. The results suggest that for high heat fluxes, bubble dynamics is dominated by the emission of very small bubbles, which seems to affect the interaction mechanisms, precluding the emission of the large bubbles from the surface, thus compromising the good performance of the biphilic surfaces.

  7. Transient Pool Boiling Critical Heat Flux of FC-72 Under Saturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fitri, Sutopo P.; Katsuya Fukuda; Qiusheng Liu; Jongdoc Park

    2006-07-01

    In this study, the steady-state and transient critical heat fluxes (CHFs) in pool boiling were measured on 1.0 mm diameter horizontal cylinders of gold and platinum heaters under saturated conditions due to transient heat inputs, Q{sub 0}exp(t/t), in a pool of Fluorinert FC-72. Heaters were heated by electric current with the periods, t, ranged from 10 ms to 20 s, and the pressures ranged from atmospheric up to around 1.2 MPa. The steady-state CHFs measured are dependent on pressure and almost agree with the values obtained by Kutateladze's correlation based on hydrodynamic instability (HI) model. It was considered that the boiling inception and the direct transition during the steady-state period occur by the pre-pressure of {approx}1.2 MPa. The trend of typical transient CHFs were clearly divided into the first, second, and third groups for long, short, and intermediate periods, respectively. The direct transition processes to film boiling without nucleate boiling for the short periods obtained from both heaters were confirmed due to the heterogeneous spontaneous nucleation (HSN) in flooded cavities on the cylinder surface. The empirical correlations to express each of corresponding CHFs measured on both heaters for the short periods are presented in this paper. (authors)

  8. Boiling Heat Transfer in Confined Space.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    the problem the following assumptions were made: Cl) The problem is steady state with constant properties for the fluid. (2) The flow is laminar in...T7ax - 1 62 (11) Heat Transfer: Considering the constant properties and neglecting the viscous dissipation, the energy equation of the laminar flow in...evaluated from the assumed local quality and fluid properties using I.J equation (6). Using an assumed local friction factor f , the local pressure gradient

  9. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahamudur Rahman, Md; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches. PMID:26281890

  10. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahamudur; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-08-18

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches.

  11. Pool film boiling experiments on a wire in low gravity: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, P; Grassi, W; Trentavizi, F

    2002-10-01

    This paper reports preliminary results for pool film boiling on a wire immersed in almost saturated FC72 recently obtained during an experimental campaign performed in low gravity on the European Space Agency Zero-G airplane, (reduced gravity level 10(-2)). This is part of a long-term research program on the effect of gravitational and electric forces on boiling. The reported data set refers to experiments performed under the following conditions: (1) Earth gravity without electric field, (2) Earth gravity with electric field, (3) low gravity without electric field, and (4) low gravity with electric field. Although a decrease of gravity causes a heat transfer degradation, the electric field markedly improves heat exchange. This improvement is so effective that, beyond a certain field value, the heat flux is no longer sensitive to gravity. Two main film boiling regimes have been identified, both in normal and in low gravity: one is affected by the electric field and the other is practically insensitive to the field influence.

  12. Numerical and experimental investigation of subcooled film boiling on a horizontal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    Analytical study of 3-D Taylor instability in cylindrical polar coordinates were performed. The predictions for wavenumber, based on this analysis, were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for subcooled film boiling. Numerical simulations of non-linear Taylor instability were performed to determine: the effect of heater thermo-physical properties on saturated film boiling, and the effect of subcooling on film boiling using static and dynamic models. The computations were restricted to 2-D incompressible and laminar flow which were described in axisymmetric coordinates. The finite volume method was used to simultaneously solve the equations governing conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the vapor and liquid phase. The governing equations were discretized by employing coordinate transformation, numerical grid generation and contravariant velocity vectors. Second order projection method for decoupling velocity from pressure was used to solve the governing equations. Results show that the heater material properties have a significant effect on the heater local temperature distribution resulting in the formation of "cold spot". The intensity of the cold spots are of the order of 10°C. The time period for vapor bubble "pinch-off" obtained from the calculations agree with experimental results and are found to be dependent on the heater material properties. The static model employed to study effects of subcooling in film boiling show that the degree of subcooling is a more important factor than the height of the vapor bulge. The dynamic model was used to obtain the flow patterns and isotherm distribution in the liquid and vapor phase. The wall heat transfer was predicted to increase with increase in subcooling while the contribution to vapor generation was found to decrease. Experimental validation of numerical predictions were performed by high speed photography, 2-D Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) in the liquid phase and thermal measurements

  13. Multiphysics modeling of two-phase film boiling within porous corrosion deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Miaomiao; Short, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Porous corrosion deposits on nuclear fuel cladding, known as CRUD, can cause multiple operational problems in light water reactors (LWRs). CRUD can cause accelerated corrosion of the fuel cladding, increase radiation fields and hence greater exposure risk to plant workers once activated, and induce a downward axial power shift causing an imbalance in core power distribution. In order to facilitate a better understanding of CRUD's effects, such as localized high cladding surface temperatures related to accelerated corrosion rates, we describe an improved, fully-coupled, multiphysics model to simulate heat transfer, chemical reactions and transport, and two-phase fluid flow within these deposits. Our new model features a reformed assumption of 2D, two-phase film boiling within the CRUD, correcting earlier models' assumptions of single-phase coolant flow with wick boiling under high heat fluxes. This model helps to better explain observed experimental values of the effective CRUD thermal conductivity. Finally, we propose a more complete set of boiling regimes, or a more detailed mechanism, to explain recent CRUD deposition experiments by suggesting the new concept of double dryout specifically in thick porous media with boiling chimneys.

  14. Multiphysics modeling of two-phase film boiling within porous corrosion deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Miaomiao Short, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Porous corrosion deposits on nuclear fuel cladding, known as CRUD, can cause multiple operational problems in light water reactors (LWRs). CRUD can cause accelerated corrosion of the fuel cladding, increase radiation fields and hence greater exposure risk to plant workers once activated, and induce a downward axial power shift causing an imbalance in core power distribution. In order to facilitate a better understanding of CRUD's effects, such as localized high cladding surface temperatures related to accelerated corrosion rates, we describe an improved, fully-coupled, multiphysics model to simulate heat transfer, chemical reactions and transport, and two-phase fluid flow within these deposits. Our new model features a reformed assumption of 2D, two-phase film boiling within the CRUD, correcting earlier models' assumptions of single-phase coolant flow with wick boiling under high heat fluxes. This model helps to better explain observed experimental values of the effective CRUD thermal conductivity. Finally, we propose a more complete set of boiling regimes, or a more detailed mechanism, to explain recent CRUD deposition experiments by suggesting the new concept of double dryout specifically in thick porous media with boiling chimneys. - Highlights: • A two-phase model of CRUD's effects on fuel cladding is developed and improved. • This model eliminates the formerly erroneous assumption of wick boiling. • Higher fuel cladding temperatures are predicted when accounting for two-phase flow. • Double-peaks in thermal conductivity vs. heat flux in experiments are explained. • A “double dryout” mechanism in CRUD is proposed based on the model and experiments.

  15. Parametric study of boiling heat transfer in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B.; Jones, B.G.; Pan, C.

    1996-04-01

    Detailed numerical modeling and parametric variation studies were conducted on boiling heat transfer processes in porous deposits with emphasis on applications associated with light water nuclear power reactor systems. The processes of boiling heat transfer in the porous corrosion deposits typically involve phase changes in finite volumetric regions in the porous media. The study examined such processes in two porous media configurations, without chimneys (homogeneous porous structures) and with chimneys (heterogeneous porous structures). A 1-D model and a 2-D model were developed to simulate two-phase flows with phase changes, without dry-out, inside the porous media for both structural configurations. For closure of the governing equations, an empirical correlation of the evaporation rate for phase changes inside the porous media was introduced. In addition, numerical algorithms were developed to solve the coupled nonlinear equations of mass, momentum, energy, capillary pressure, and evaporation rate. The distributions of temperature, thermodynamic saturation, liquid pressure, vapor pressure, liquid velocity, and vapor velocity were predicted. Furthermore, the effects of heat flux, system pressure, porosity, particle diameter, chimney population density, chimney radius, and crud thickness on the all superheat, critical heat flux, and minimum saturation were examined. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the available experimental results.

  16. Entropy generation analysis for film boiling: A simple model of quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Ali; Lakzian, Esmail

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, quenching in high-temperature materials processing is modeled as a superheated isothermal flat plate. In these phenomena, a liquid flows over the highly superheated surfaces for cooling. So the surface and the liquid are separated by the vapor layer that is formed because of the liquid which is in contact with the superheated surface. This is named forced film boiling. As an objective, the distribution of the entropy generation in the laminar forced film boiling is obtained by similarity solution for the first time in the quenching processes. The PDE governing differential equations of the laminar film boiling including continuity, momentum, and energy are reduced to ODE ones, and a dimensionless equation for entropy generation inside the liquid boundary and vapor layer is obtained. Then the ODEs are solved by applying the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method with a shooting procedure. Moreover, the Bejan number is used as a design criterion parameter for a qualitative study about the rate of cooling and the effects of plate speed are studied in the quenching processes. It is observed that for high speed of the plate the rate of cooling (heat transfer) is more.

  17. Boiling heat transfer in a small horizontal rectangular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.N.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; France, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Compact heat exchangers have traditionally found wide application in the transportation industry, where they are used as evaporators and condensers in vapor compression cycles for air conditioning and refrigeration. Such heat exchangers possess numerous attractive features including high thermal effectiveness, small size, low weight, design flexibility, and pure counterflow, and they can accommodate multiple streams. Today, there is a widespread interest in expanding the range of application of compact heat exchangers to include phase-change heat transfer in the process industries, among others. An overall objective of this effort is to provide the basis for establishing design technology in this area. In the present study, small channel flow boiling heat transfer was extended to a rectangular channel (4.06 {times} 1.70 mm) using refrigerant 12 (R-12). As with the circular tube studies, the flow channel wall was electrically heated providing a constant heat flux. Tests were performed over a quality range of 0.15 to 0.80, and large ranges of mass fluxes (50 to 400 kg/m{sup 2}s) and heat flux (4 to 34 kW/m{sup 2}). Heat transfer was measured and results are compared with correlation predictions.

  18. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Jakubowska, Blanka; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  19. Experimental study of nucleate boiling heat transfer under low gravity conditions using TLCs for high resolution temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Enno; Sodtke, Christof; Schweizer, Nils; Stephan, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Heat transfer in nucleate boiling is strongly influenced by a very small circular area in the vicinity of the three phase contact line where a thin liquid film approaches the heated wall. This area is characterised by high evaporation rates which trigger a local temperature drop in the wall. The wall temperature drop can be computed using an existing nucleate boiling model. To verify the complex model and the underlying assumptions, an experiment was designed with an artificial nucleation site in a thin electrically heated wall featuring a two-dimensional, high resolution temperature measurement technique using unencapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals and a high speed colour camera. The shape of the bubble is observed simultaneously with a second high speed camera. Experiments were conducted in a low gravity environment of a parabolic flight, causing larger bubble departure diameters than in normal gravity environments. Thus, it was possible to measure the evolution of the predicted temperature drop in a transient boiling process.

  20. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling and thin-film evaporation on enhanced silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Shailesh

    The present work consists of two major studies. The first study investigates the effects of surface energy or wettability on nucleate pool boiling and the second study investigates the thin-film evaporative cooling for near junction thermal management. For the first study, effects of surface energy or wettability on critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer (BHT) of smooth heated surfaces was studied in saturated pool boiling of water at 1 atm. For this purpose hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces were created on one side of 1cm x 1cm double-side polished silicon substrates. A resistive heating layer was applied on the opposite side of each substrate. The surface energies of the created surfaces were characterized by measuring the static contact angles of water sessile drops. To provide a wide range of surface energies, surfaces were made of Teflon (hydrophobic), bare silicon (hydrophilic) and aluminum oxide (most hydrophilic). The measured contact angles on these surfaces were ˜108, ˜57 and ˜13 degrees respectively. The results of pool boiling tests on these surfaces clearly illustrate the connection between surface energy and CHF. CHF was shown to linearly decrease with contact angle increase, from ˜125 W/cm2 on aluminum oxide (most hydrophilic) to nearly one tenth of this value on Teflon (hydrophobic). The most hydrophilic surface also produced increasingly better BHT than plain silicon and Teflon as heat flux increased. However, below ˜5 W/cm2 the hydrophobic surface demonstrated better heat transfer due to earlier onset of nucleate boiling, reducing surface superheats by up to ˜5 degrees relative to the other two surfaces. Above ˜5 W/cm2 the BHT of the hydrophobic surface rapidly deteriorated as superheat increased towards the value at CHF. To further understand the effect of surface energy on pool boiling performance, the growth and departure of bubbles from single nucleating sites on each surface were analyzed from high-speed video recordings

  1. Boiling heat transfer of nanofluids--special emphasis on critical heat flux.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Joong; Kim, Hyungdae

    2013-11-01

    As innovative nanotechnology-based heat-transfer media, nanofluids have evoked considerable interest among researchers owing to their improved thermal properties as well as their extendable applications to various high-power thermal systems. This paper presents a comprehensive review of recent research developments and patents pertaining to nanofluid boiling heat transfer. Nanofluids definitely offer a wide range of potential improvements in boiling heat-transfer performance. However, experimental data available from different studies are currently beset by numerous contradictions, suggesting that the fundamental mechanisms of nanofluid boiling heat transfer are not yet well understood. Consequently application of these technologies has been limited in some aspects. Only a small number of patents related to nanofluid boiling heat transfer have thus far been reported in the literature. Based on the present review, future technological development and research requirements in this area are outlined in line with technical challenges. To utilize nanofluid boiling heat-transfer technologies for practical applications, more systematic and fundamental studies are required to understand the physical mechanisms involved.

  2. Cryogenic two-phase flow during chilldown: Flow transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jelliffe Kevin

    The recent interest in space exploration has placed a renewed focus on rocket propulsion technology. Cryogenic propellants are the preferred fuel for rocket propulsion since they are more energetic and environmentally friendly compared with other storable fuels. Voracious evaporation occurs while transferring these fluids through a pipeline that is initially in thermal equilibrium with the environment. This phenomenon is referred to as line chilldown. Large temperature differences, rapid transients, pressure fluctuations and the transition from the film boiling to the nucleate boiling regime characterize the chilldown process. Although the existence of the chilldown phenomenon has been known for decades, the process is not well understood. Attempts have been made to model the chilldown process; however the results have been fair at best. A major shortcoming of these models is the use of correlations that were developed for steady, non-cryogenic flows. The development of reliable correlations for cryogenic chilldown has been hindered by the lack of experimental data. An experimental facility was constructed that allows the flow structure, the temperature history and the pressure history to be recorded during the line chilldown process. The temperature history is then utilized in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction procedure that was developed, which allows the unsteady heat transfer coefficient on the interior of the pipe wall to be extracted. This database is used to evaluate present predictive models and correlations for flow regime transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is found that by calibrating the transition between the stratified-wavy and the intermittent/annular regimes of the Taitel and Dukler flow regime map, satisfactory predictions are obtained. It is also found that by utilizing a simple model that includes the effect of flow structure and incorporating the enhancement provided by the local heat flux, significant improvement in the

  3. Multi-scale Control and Enhancement of Reactor Boiling Heat Flux by Reagents and Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, R M; Athavale, A; Kalaikadal, D S; Deodhar, A; Verma, U

    2011-09-02

    The phenomenological characterization of the use of non-invasive and passive techniques to enhance the boiling heat transfer in water has been carried out in this extended study. It provides fundamental enhanced heat transfer data for nucleate boiling and discusses the associated physics with the aim of addressing future and next-generation reactor thermal-hydraulic management. It essentially addresses the hypothesis that in phase-change processes during boiling, the primary mechanisms can be related to the liquid-vapor interfacial tension and surface wetting at the solidliquid interface. These interfacial characteristics can be significantly altered and decoupled by introducing small quantities of additives in water, such as surface-active polymers, surfactants, and nanoparticles. The changes are fundamentally caused at a molecular-scale by the relative bulk molecular dynamics and adsorption-desorption of the additive at the liquid-vapor interface, and its physisorption and electrokinetics at the liquid-solid interface. At the micro-scale, the transient transport mechanisms at the solid-liquid-vapor interface during nucleation and bubblegrowth can be attributed to thin-film spreading, surface-micro-cavity activation, and micro-layer evaporation. Furthermore at the macro-scale, the heat transport is in turn governed by the bubble growth and distribution, macro-layer heat transfer, bubble dynamics (bubble coalescence, collapse, break-up, and translation), and liquid rheology. Some of these behaviors and processes are measured and characterized in this study, the outcomes of which advance the concomitant fundamental physics, as well as provide insights for developing control strategies for the molecular-scale manipulation of interfacial tension and surface wetting in boiling by means of polymeric reagents, surfactants, and other soluble surface-active additives.

  4. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S.

    1995-12-31

    A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

  5. Critical heat flux of subcooled flow boiling with water for high heat flux application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1993-11-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in water is thought to be advantageous in removing high heat load of more than 10 MW/m2. Characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, are very important for the design of cooling systems. In this paper, studies on subcooled flow boiling CHF, which have been conducted by the authors, are reported. Experiments were conducted using direct current heating of stainless steel tube. For uniform heating conditions, CHF increment in small diameter tubes (1 - 3 mm inside diameter) and the CHF characteristics in tubes with internal twisted tapes were investigated, and also the existing CHF correlations for ordinary tubes (more than 3 mm inside diameter) were evaluated. For peripherally non-uniform heating conditions using the tube, whose wall thickness was partly reduced, the CHF for swirl flow was higher than the CHF under uniform heating conditions with an increase of the non-uniformity factor.

  6. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 2: Friction pressure drop lessening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. Two heated sections with different internal diameter (10 and 6 mm) were tested. The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were registered. The post-CHF regime was studied watching simultaneously the evolution of boiling crisis onset along the test section and the evolution of pressure drop and mass flow rate. A significant lessening of friction was observed simultaneous to the development of the post-CHF regime, accompanied by a mass flow rate increase, which lets suppose that the vapor film in the film boiling regime acts as a lubricant. A model was created based on this idea and on heat transfer considerations. The predictions by this model are satisfactory for the low quality post-CHF regime.

  7. Microscale boiling heat transfer in a micro-timescale at high heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinliang; Gan, Yunhua; Zhang, Dacheng; Li, Xiuhan

    2005-02-01

    Microscale boiling heat transfer experiments were performed using acetone as the working fluid in ten parallel silicon microchannels with hydraulic diameters of 155.4 µm. An infrared radiator image system is used for the chip temperature measurements, while an optical system combining a microscope and a high-speed camera is used for transient flow pattern identification. By covering the present data range it is found that all microchannels repeat the transient flow patterns in a timescale of milliseconds while the fluid pressures/temperatures are stable. A full cycle can be subdivided into three substages: liquid refilling stage, bubble nucleation, growth and coalescence stage, and transient annular flow stage. Correspondingly four flow patterns are identified. Paired or triplet bubbles are observed to be nucleated and grow up simultaneously in, or very close to, the channel corners at the same cross section. The nucleated bubbles experience several milliseconds of growth until coalescence takes place. Then a single liquid plug is separated into two parts, which are pushed out of the flow field view in less than 1 ms. In the transient annular flow stage, the liquid films that are drawn into the corners of the channel become less and less versus time. Once a partially or fully dried-out state is reached, all the microchannels are refilled with fresh liquid and a new cycle begins. The probabilities of each flow pattern occurring and the liquid refilling follow the statistical principle well. The measured chip temperatures are not uniform across the whole heating area, attributed to the uneven liquid refilling probabilities for different channels and the uneven possibilities that are immersed in the liquid for different heating regions. The chip temperatures display spatial variation behavior in the majority of the heating area, due to the liquid and vapor alternatively passing through the microchannels. To the authors' knowledge, some of the above experimental

  8. Viscous hydrodynamic instability theory of the peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.

    1972-01-01

    Liquid viscosity was included in the Bellman-Pennington theory of the Taylor wave in a liquid vapor interface. Predictions of the most susceptible wavelength, and of the wave frequency, were made as a function of a liquid viscosity parameter and the Bond number. The stability of a gas jet in a viscous liquid was studied and the result is used to predict the peak heat flux on large horizontal heaters. Experimental measurements of the dominant Taylor wave and its growth rate were made during the film boiling of cyclohexanol on cylindrical heaters. The results bear out the predictions quite well. The thickness of the vapor blanket surrounding a cylindrical heater was measured and a correlation suggested. The effect of large fluxes of vapor volume on the dominant wavelength was also noted. Theoretical results of the peak heat flux are compared with the experimental data, and the effect of finite geometry of flat plate heaters on the peak heat flux is also discussed.

  9. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels.

  10. Experimental analysis of nanofluid pool boiling heat transfer in copper bead packed porous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Ji

    2017-03-01

    Coupling the nanofluid as working fluid and the copper beads packed porous structure on heating surface were employed to enhance the pool boiling heat transfer by changing the fluid properties with the adjunction of nanoparticles in liquid and altering the heating surface with a bead porous layer. Due to the higher thermal conductivity, the copper beads served as an extended heating surface and the boiling nucleation sites rose, but the flow resistance increased. The CuO-water and SiO2-water nanofluids as well as the pure water were respectively employed as working fluids in the pool boiling experiments. Comparing with the base fluid of water, the higher thermal conductivity and lower surface tension occur in the nanofluids and those favor the boiling heat transfer, but the higher viscosity and density of nanofluids serve as deteriorative factors. So, the concentration region of the nanofluids should be chosen properly. The maximum relative error between the collected experimental data of the pure water on a flat surface and the theoretical prediction of pool boiling using the Rohsenow correlation was less than 12 %. The comparisons of the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics were also conducted between the pure water and the nanofluids respectively on the horizontal flat surface and on the heating surface packed with a copper bead porous layer. Besides, the boiling bubble generation, integration and departure have a great affect on the pool boiling and were recorded with a camera in the bead stacked porous structures at different heat flux.

  11. Visualization study of nucleate pool boiling of liquid nitrogen with quasi-steady heat input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaobin; Chen, Jianye; Xiong, Wei; Jin, Tao

    2015-12-01

    A visualization experimental device has been built to investigate the bubble behaviors in the nucleate pool boiling of cryogenic fluids at atmospheric pressure. The general morphologies of the bubbles are analyzed based on the captured films using a high-speed camera. The bubble behaviors leaving the wall at different heat flux can be divided into three regimes (low heat flux regime, fully developed nucleate boiling regime and intermediate regime) according to the availability of bubble parameters. In the low heat flux regime, the bubble is discrete and the interactive effects are ignorable. In the fully developed nucleate boiling regime close to CHF, the bubbles depart in the form of bubble cluster with a neck. In the intermediate regime, the interactive effect between the bubbles is significant and the bubbles follow a random pattern neither discretely nor as cluster neck. The information about the bubble departure diameter, the detachment frequency and the number density of activated sites are specially investigated. These data are used to evaluate the existing semi-empirical correlations widely applied to either the room-temperature or cryogenic fluids. It is found that the Kim's correlation for the departure diameter predicts a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results in the isolated bubble regime. For the predictions of the detachment frequency, the correlation by Katto and Yokoya is recommended after comparison. The relation between the diameter and frequency can also be well determined by the correlation proposed by Mcfadden et al. The number density of active sites for liquid nitrogen still can be considered to be linearly proportional to ΔTm as it is for water, except that the exponent absolute m is much smaller.

  12. Improving heat transfer with pool boiling by covering of heating surface with metallic spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, M.; Djuric, M.; Zavargo, Z.; Novakovic, M. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, boiling heat transfer (BHT) is investigated experimentally. Smooth copper walls were covered with single sphere layer and corresponding temperature difference and heat flux were measured. The results were compared with published data for several types of heating surfaces. Comparative analysis shows that surfaces covered with spheres have characteristics as good as the other systems, if not better. There are many ways to enhance boiling heat transfer. One of them is to cover the heating surface with a layer of solid particles, which either remain on the surface during the process or circulate through the boiling liquid, generating a porous two-component, three-phase system. Particles are made of various materials (glass, alumosilicate, corundum, sand, mullite some metals, etc.), which are shaped as spheres mostly, but sometimes are irregular bodies. Many different parameters were proposed to characterize the porous layer. The influence of particles can be expressed by introducing the effective thermal-physical properties of a complex medium. Also, if the working regime can be described as any kind of fluidization, then all quantities developed to be applied to this matter can be used in the case of heat fluidization.

  13. Pool boiling of distilled water over tube bundle with variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Abhilas; Mohanty, Rajiva Lochan; Das, Mihir Kumar

    2017-02-01

    The experimental investigation of saturated pool boiling heat transfer of distilled water over plain tube bundle, under uniform and varying heat flux condition along the height are presented in this article. Experiments are carried out under various heat flux configurations applied to rows of tube bundles and pitch distance to diameter ratios of 1.25, 1.6 and 1.95. The wall superheats and pool boiling heat transfer coefficients over individual rows are determined. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients for variable heat flux and uniform heat flux conditions are compared. The results indicate that the bundle effect is found to exist for uniform as well as variable heat flux under all operating conditions in the present investigation. The variable heat flux resulted in range of wall superheat being highest for decreasing heat flux from bottom to top and lowest for increasing heat flux from bottom to top.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube - Final CRADA Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenhua; Singh, Dileep; France, David M.

    2016-11-01

    Coolant subcooled boiling in the cylinder head regions of heavy-duty vehicle engines is unavoidable at high thermal loads due to high metal temperatures. However, theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of coolant subcooled flow boiling under these specific application conditions are generally lacking in the engineering literature. The objective of this project was to provide such much-needed information, including the coolant subcooled flow boiling characteristics and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients, through experimental investigations.

  15. Nonlinear aspects of high heat flux nucleate boiling heat transfer. Part 2, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes the results of a study aimed at understanding nonlinear aspects of the macrolayer-controlled heat transfer process associated with high heat flux nucleate boiling and the critical heat flux. Simulations of realistic heater surfaces have been carried out by detailed microscopic modeling of the surfaces. Individual nucleation sites are allowed to activate or deactivate depending on the thermal conditions that prevail at the site. The results indicate that significant spatial and temporal temperature variations can occur on the surface, and that thermal interactions among sites can result in some sites operating extremely intermittently. Surface-averaged temperatures show highly nonlinear behavior. This suggests the possibility of the system exhibiting chaotic behavior under appropriate experimental conditions. It is proposed that such nonlinear behavior is one of the reasons why mechanistic predictive capabilities for the boiling process have remained elusive.

  16. Atomistic modelling of evaporation and explosive boiling of thin film liquid argon over internally recessed nanostructured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to investigate evaporation and explosive boiling phenomena of thin film liquid argon on nanostructured solid surface with emphasis on the effect of solid-liquid interfacial wettability. The nanostructured surface considered herein consists of trapezoidal internal recesses of the solid platinum wall. The wetting conditions of the solid surface were assumed such that it covers both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic conditions and hence effect of interfacial wettability on resulting evaporation and boiling phenomena was the main focus of this study. The initial configuration of the simulation domain comprised of a three phase system (solid platinum, liquid argon and vapor argon) on which equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. After equilibrium of the three-phase system was established, the wall was set to different temperatures (130 K and 250 K for the case of evaporation and explosive boiling respectively) to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat flux normal to the solid surface was also calculated to illustrate the effectiveness of heat transfer for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces in cases of both nanostructured surface and flat surface. The results obtained show that both the wetting condition of the surface and the presence of internal recesses have significant effect on normal evaporation and explosive boiling of the thin liquid film. The heat transfer from solid to liquid in cases of surface with recesses are higher compared to flat surface without recesses. Also the surface with higher wettability (hydrophilic) provides more favorable conditions for boiling than the low-wetting surface (hydrophobic) and therefore, liquid argon responds quickly and shifts from liquid to vapor phase faster in

  17. Investigation of Minimum Film boiling Phenomena on Fuel Rods Under Blowdown Cooling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen M. Bajorek; Michael Gawron; Timothy Etzel; Lucas Peterson

    2003-06-30

    Blowdon cooling heat transfer is an important process that occurs early in a hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor. During blowdown, the flow through the hot assembly is a post-critical heat flux dispersed droplet flow. The heat transfer mechanisms that occur in blowdown cooling are complex and depend on droplet and heated surface interaction. In a safety analysis, it is of considerable importance to determine the thermal-hydraulic conditions leading to the minimum film boiling temperature, Tmin. A flow boiling rig for measurement of blowdown cooling heat transfer and quench phenomena on a nuclear fuel rod simulator was designed and constructed for operation at up to 12.4 MPa. The test section consisted of a concentric annulus, with a 9.5 mm OD nuclear fuel rod simulator at the center. The rod was contained within a 0.85 mm thick, 19 mm OD 316 stainless steel tube, forming the flow channel. Two types of rods were tested; one type was sheathed with Inconel 600 while the other was clad with Zircaloy-2. Water was injected into the test section at the top of the heated length through an injection header. This header was an annular sign that fit around the fuel rod simulator and within the stainless steel tube. Small spacers aligned the injection header and prevented contract with either the heater rod or the tube. A series of small diameter holes at the bottom of the header caused the formation of droplets that became entrained with the steam flow. The test section design was such that quench would take place on the rod, and not along the channel outer annulus.

  18. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  19. Near-critical fluid boiling: overheating and wetting films.

    PubMed

    Hegseth, J; Oprisan, A; Garrabos, Y; Lecoutre-Chabot, C; Nikolayev, V S; Beysens, D

    2008-08-01

    The heating of coexisting gas and liquid phases of pure fluid through its critical point makes the fluid extremely compressible, expandable, slows the diffusive transport, and decreases the contact angle to zero (perfect wetting by the liquid phase). We have performed experiments on near-critical fluids in a variable volume cell in the weightlessness of an orbiting space vehicle, to suppress buoyancy-driven flows and gravitational constraints on the liquid-gas interface. The high compressibility, high thermal expansion, and low thermal diffusivity lead to a pronounced adiabatic heating called the piston effect. We have directly visualized the near-critical fluid's boundary layer response to a volume quench when the external temperature is held constant. We have found that when the system's temperature T is increased at a constant rate past the critical temperature T(c), the interior of the fluid gains a higher temperature than the hot wall (overheating). This extends previous results in temperature quenching experiments in a similarly prepared system when the gas is clearly isolated from the wall. Large elliptical wetting film distortions are also seen during these ramps. By ray tracing through the elliptically shaped wetting film, we find very thick wetting film on the walls. This wetting film is at least one order of magnitude thicker than films that form in the Earth's gravity. The thick wetting film isolates the gas bubble from the wall allowing gas overheating to occur due to the difference in the piston effect response between gas and liquid. Remarkably, this overheating continues and actually increases when the fluid is ramped into the single-phase supercritical phase.

  20. Aspects of subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoff, S.G.

    1997-12-31

    Subcooled boiling boiling refers to boiling from a solid surface where the bulk liquid temperature is below the saturation temperature (subcooled). Two classes are considered: (1) nucleate boiling, where, for large subcoolings, individual bubbles grow and collapse while remaining attached to the solid wall, and (2) film boiling, where a continuous vapor film separates the solid from the bulk liquid. One mechanism by which subcooled nucleate boiling results in very large surface heat transfer coefficient is thought to be latent heat transport within the bubble, resulting from simultaneous evaporation from a thin residual liquid layer at the bubble base, and condensation at the polar bubble cap. Another is the increased liquid microconvection around the oscillating bubble. Two related problems have been attacked. One is the rupture of a thin liquid film subject to attractive and repulsive dispersion forces, leading to the formation of mesoscopic drops, which then coalesce and evaporate. Another is the liquid motion in the vicinity of an oscillating contact line, where the bubble wall is idealized as a wedge of constant angle sliding on the solid wall. The subcooled film boiling problem has been attacked by deriving a general long-range nonlinear evolution equation for the local thickness of the vapor layer. Linear and weakly-nonlinear stability results have been obtained. A number of other related problems have been attacked.

  1. The effect of heating direction on flow boiling heat transfer of R134a in micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingchen; Jia, Li; Dang, Chao; Peng, Qi

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents effects of heating directions on heat transfer performance of R134a flow boiling in micro- channel heat sink. The heat sink has 30 parallel rectangular channels with cross-sectional dimensions of 500μm width 500μm depth and 30mm length. The experimental operation condition ranges of the heat flux and the mass flux were 13.48 to 82.25 W/cm2 and 373.3 to 1244.4 kg/m2s respectively. The vapor quality ranged from 0.07 to 0.93. The heat transfer coefficients of top heating and bottom heating both were up to 25 kW/m2 K. Two dominate transfer mechanisms of nucleate boiling and convection boiling were observed according to boiling curves. The experimental results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 13.9% higher than top heating in low heat flux, while in high heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 9.9%.higher than the top heating, because bubbles were harder to divorce the heating wall. And a modified correlation was provided to predict heat transfer of top heating.

  2. Design, Construction, and Qualification of a Microscale Heater Array for Use in Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, T. D.; Kim, J.; Kalkur, T. S.

    1998-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer is an efficient means of heat transfer because a large amount of heat can be removed from a surface using a relatively small temperature difference between the surface and the bulk liquid. However, the mechanisms that govern boiling heat transfer are not well understood. Measurements of wall temperature and heat flux near the wall would add to the database of knowledge which is necessary to understand the mechanisms of nucleate boiling. A heater array has been developed which contains 96 heater elements within a 2.5 mm square area. The temperature of each heater element is held constant by an electronic control system similar to a hot-wire anemometer. The voltage that is being applied to each heater element can be measured and digitized using a high-speed A/D converter, and this digital information can be compiled into a series of heat-flux maps. Information for up to 10,000 heat flux maps can be obtained each second. The heater control system, the A/D system and the heater array construction are described in detail. Results are presented which show that this is an effective method of measuring the local heat flux during nucleate and transition boiling. Heat flux maps are obtained for pool boiling in FC-72 on a horizontal surface. Local heat flux variations are shown to be three to six times larger than variations in the spatially averaged heat flux.

  3. Experimental study of the boiling mechanism of a liquid film flowing on the surface of a rotating disc

    SciTech Connect

    Kolokotsa, D.; Yanniotis, S.

    2010-11-15

    The boiling mechanism of a liquid film formed on the surface of a smooth horizontal rotating disc was studied using de-ionised water at 2 l/min flow rate, boiling under vacuum at 40 C and 5-10 C wall superheat. Visualization experiments were carried out and video films were taken for rotational speeds from 0 to 1000 rpm. It was observed that nucleate flow boiling prevails in the case of 0 rpm (stationary disc). Nucleate boiling was also observed at 100 and 200 rpm with the number of bubbles and the diameter of the bubbles decreasing as the rotational speed was increasing. At 600 and 1000 rpm rotational speeds, vapor bubbles were not observed. The results of visual observation were in agreement with bubble growth analysis which showed that at heat flux values of 40 kW/m{sup 2}, conditions for bubble growth are favorable at low rotational speeds (<200 rpm) but are unfavorable at high rotational speeds (1000 rpm). (author)

  4. SIMULATION OF BOILING HEAT TRANSFER AROUND MICRO PIN-FIN HEAT EXCHANGER: PROGRESS AND CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, M.; Maha, A.; Singh, K. V.; Li, G.; and Pang, S.S.

    2006-07-01

    Boiling at microscales is a challenging problem for the computational models as well as the resources. During boiling, the formation and departure of vapor bubbles from the heated surface involves the physics from nano/micro level to the macro level. Therefore, a hierarchical methodology is needed to incorporate the nano/microscale physics with the macroscale system performance. Using micro-fabrication techniques, microstructures (micropin-fins) can be fabricated around the tubes in the heat exchanger of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) to increase the heat-exchanging efficiency and reduce the overall size of the heat-exchanger for the given heat transfer rates. Combined with high fidelity simulations of the thermal transport in the entire system, optimal design of microstructure patterns and layouts can be worked out pragmatically. Properly patterned microstructures on the pipe in the steam generation zone should create more nuclei for bubble to form and result in a reduced average bubble size and shorter retention time, i.e. the time for the vapor phase sticking on the pipe surface. The smaller average steam bubble size and shorter bubble retention time will enhance the overall thermal efficiency. As a preliminary step, a periodic arrangement of micropin-fins containing four in-line cylindrical fins was modeled. The governing equations for the mass, momentum and energy transport were solved in the fluid in a conjugate heat transfer mode. In the future, several studies will be conducted to simulate different geometric arrangements, different fin cross-sections, and realistic operating conditions including phase-change with boiling by adding complexities in simple steps.

  5. Transient boiling heat transfer in saturated liquid nitrogen and F113 at standard and zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oker, E.; Merte, H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Transient and steady state nucleate boiling in saturated LN2 and F113 at standard and near zero gravity conditions were investigated for the horizontal up, vertical and horizontal down orientations of the heating surface. Two distinct regimes of heat transfer mechanisms were observed during the interval from the step increase of power input to the onset of nucleate boiling: the conduction and convection dominated regimes. The time duration in each regime was considerably shorter with LN2 than with F113, and decreased as heat flux increased, as gravity was reduced, and as the orientation was changed from horizontal up to horizontal down. In transient boiling, boiling initiates at a single point following the step increase in power, and then spreads over the surface. The delay time for the inception of boiling at the first site, and the velocity of spread of boiling varies depending upon the heat flux, orientation, body force, surface roughness and liquid properties, and are a consequence of changes in boundary layer temperature levels associated with changes in natural convection. Following the step increase in power input, surface temperature overshoot and undershoot occur before the steady state boiling temperature level is established.

  6. Heat transfer with nucleate boiling of liquids under weak mass force field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirichenko, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    The motion is examined of a vapor bubble growing and rising from a flat horizontal heater in the ideal fluid approximation and taking drag into account. Estimates are given of bubble lifetime, bubble radius at detachment, bubble detachment frequency, and time for the bubble to attain a constant rate of rise. The relations obtained for the microcharacteristics of the boiling process are used to determine the coefficients of heat transfer in developed nucleate boiling. A new form of the equations for describing heat transfer in nucleate boiling in dimensionless parameters is proposed.

  7. Time and Space Resolved Heat Flux Measurements During Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work was to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleating bubbles on a constant heat flux surface using a microheater array with 100x 100 square microns resolution, then numerically determine the wall to liquid heat flux. This data was then correlated with high speed (greater than l000Hz) visual recordings of The bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that microlayer evaporation and contact line heat transfer are not major heat transfer mechanisms for bubble growth. The dominant heat transfer mechanism appears to be transient conduction into the liquid as the liquid rewets the wall during the bubble departure process.

  8. Pool boiling heat transfer of deionized and degassed water in packed-perforated copper beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Mao-Yu; Jang, Kuang-Jang; Ho, Ching-Yen

    2016-11-01

    Nucleate pool boiling with porous media made of perforated copper beads as the enhanced structure is conducted in saturated, deionized and degassed water. Data are taken at an atmospheric pressure (saturation temperature of 100 °C) and at heat fluxes from 4500 to 72,300 W/m2 while increasing the heat flux. The bead-packed structure is heated on the bottom. The layer of loose particles on the heated surface is free to move under the action of bulk liquid convection and vapor nucleation. The effects of the weight (number), size and layers of the free particles are experimentally explored using copper particles for different copper bead diameters which were 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm. The boiling enhancement is closely related to the particle weight, size and layers, and the heat flux applied. The results show that free particles are presented to have a distinct advantage in boiling heat transfer, resulting in an average increase in the heat transfer coefficient of 126 % relative to the flat plate without particles. In order to obtain insight into the fluid boiling phenomena, flow visualization is also made to observe the detailed fluid boiling characteristics of the copper particles present. The visualizations show that bubble nucleation preferentially occurs at the narrow corner cavities formed between the free particles and the heated surface.

  9. Bubble dynamics, two-phase flow, and boiling heat transfer in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1994-01-01

    The two-phase bubbly flow and boiling heat transfer in microgravity represents a substantial challenge to scientists and engineers and yet there is an urgent need to seek fundamental understanding in this area for future spacecraft design and space missions. At Washington State University, we have successfully designed, built and tested a 2.1 second drop tower with an innovation airbag deceleration system. Microgravity boiling experiments performed in our 0.6 second Drop Tower produced data flow visualizations that agree with published results and also provide some new understanding concerning flow boiling and microgravity bubble behavior. On the analytical and numerical work, the edge effects of finite divergent electrode plates on the forces experienced by bubbles were investigated. Boiling in a concentric cylinder microgravity and an electric field was numerically predicted. We also completed a feasibility study for microgravity boiling in an acoustic field.

  10. Saturated film boiling at various gravity levels under the influence of electrohydrodynamic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Vinod; Biswas, Gautam; Dalal, Amaresh

    2017-03-01

    The present work is focused on the analyses of the bubble growth and heat transfer characteristics in saturated film boiling at various levels of gravity. In addition to this, the occurrence of self-similarity in interface structures during the bubble growth is examined. The phenomenon of bubble growth is strongly influenced by the buoyant forces due to gravity and its dominant effect is found to be replaced by the electrohydrodynamic forces in reduced gravity conditions. The decrease in gravitational acceleration results in increasing the characteristic wavelength and time scale. The bubble volume and maximum height before pinch-off thus increase enormously as the gravity value is reduced. The bubble pinch-off velocity is found to be decreased significantly in the case of reduced gravity condition. Heat transfer rate deteriorates in reduced gravity conditions which can be recovered by the externally imposed electric field. The dominance of electric field on the heat transfer rate is found to be more in reduced gravity condition. However, as the value of imposed electric field is enhanced, the difference in the effect of increasing heat flux tends to reduce.

  11. Correlations of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-07-01

    Four types of steady-state boiling experiments were conducted to investigate the efficacy of two distinctly different heat transfer enhancement methods for external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions. One method involved the use of a thin vessel coating and the other involved the use of an enhanced insulation structure. By comparing the results obtained in the four types of experiments, the separate and integral effect of vessel coating and insulation structure were determined. Correlation equations were obtained for the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux. It was found that both enhancement methods were quite effective. Depending on the angular location, the local critical heat flux could be enhanced by 1.4 to 2.5 times using vessel coating alone whereas it could be enhanced by 1.8 to 3.0 times using an enhanced insulation structure alone. When both vessel coating and insulation structure were used simultaneously, the integral effect on the enhancement was found much less than the product of the two separate effects, indicating possible competing mechanisms (i.e., interference) between the two enhancement methods.

  12. Heating surface material’s effect on subcooled flow boiling heat transfer of R134a

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zou; Barclay G. Jones

    2012-11-01

    In this study, subcooled flow boiling of R134a on copper (Cu) and stainless steel (SS) heating surfaces was experimentally investigated from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. By utilizing a high-speed digital camera, bubble growth rate, bubble departure size, and nucleation site density, were able to be observed and analyzed from the microscopic point of view. Macroscopic characteristics of the subcooled flow boiling, such as heat transfer coefficient, were able to be measured as well. Experimental results showed that there are no obvious difference between the copper and the stainless surface with respect to bubble dynamics, such as contact angle, growth rate and departure size. On the contrary, the results clearly showed a trend that the copper surface had a better performance than the stainless steel surface in terms of heat transfer coefficient. It was also observed that wall heat fluxes on both surfaces were found highly correlated with nucleation site density, as bubble hydrodynamics are similar on these two surfaces. The difference between these two surfaces was concluded as results of different surface thermal conductivities.

  13. Investigation of the effect of wall materials and tube diameter by heat transfer from horizontal tubes to boiling liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, Matthias

    1987-09-01

    Heating surface materials like copper, brass, and stainless steel are studied for their heat transfer coefficient through tubes of 8 mm diameter. Refrigerants considered are R12, R113, R114, methane, and pentane. Heat transfer measurements are carried out in dependence on boiling pressure, liquid properties, bubble formation, and size and bubble deposit thickness on heat surfaces. Nucleate boiling is visualized and observed.

  14. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Masao; Furukawa, Masahiro; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    A theoretical prediction model of the boiling heat transfer coefficient in the subcooled region for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel is proposed. In the present heat transfer model, a heat flux is assumed to consist of both the forced convective and the boiling effect components. The forced convective component is evaluated from the empirical correlation of convective heat transfer coefficient for single-phase flow considering the effect of increase of liquid velocity due to net vapor generation. Empirical correlations for determining the heat flux due to the boiling effect and the quality at the onset point of net vapor generation are obtained from the data presented in the first report1). Agreement between the present theoretical prediction and the experimental data is satisfactorily good both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution.

  15. Enhancing flow boiling heat transfer in microchannels for thermal management with monolithically-integrated silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Wu, G S; Wang, W; Wang, Y D; Liu, Dong; Zhang, D C; Chen, Y F; Peterson, G P; Yang, Ronggui

    2012-07-11

    Thermal management has become a critical issue for high heat flux electronics and energy systems. Integrated two-phase microchannel liquid-cooling technology has been envisioned as a promising solution, but with great challenges in flow instability. In this work, silicon nanowires were synthesized in situ in parallel silicon microchannel arrays for the first time to suppress the flow instability and to augment flow boiling heat transfer. Significant enhancement in flow boiling heat transfer performance was demonstrated for the nanowire-coated microchannel heat sink, such as an early onset of nucleate boiling, a delayed onset of flow oscillation, suppressed oscillating amplitudes of temperature and pressure drop, and an increased heat transfer coefficient.

  16. Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Zhang, Hui; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    This study provides systematic method for reducing power consumption in reduced gravity systems by adopting minimum velocity required to provide adequate CHF and preclude detrimental effects of reduced gravity . This study proves it is possible to use existing 1 ge flow boiling and CHF correlations and models to design reduced gravity systems provided minimum velocity criteria are met

  17. Injection of Nucleate-Boiling Slug Flows into a Heat Exchange Chamber in Microgravity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    usefhl reaction medimn. Properties I FC-72 Apperu·ar1ce Clear, colorless Average Molecular Weight 338 Boiling Point (I atm) 56°C Pour Point -90°C...at n01mal boiling point ) 88J/g Liqtrid Density 1680kg/m3 Kinematic Viscosity 0.38 centistokes Absolute Viscosity 0.64 centipoise Liqtrid Specific...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0029 Injection of nucleate- boiling slug flows into a heat exchange chamber in microgravity Jaume

  18. Transient pool boiling heat transfer due to increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Sakurai, A.

    1995-09-01

    Understanding of transient boiling phenomenon caused by increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures is necessary to predict correctly a severe accident due to a power burst in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. Transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}, on a 1.2 mm diameter horizontal cylinder in a pool of saturated and subcooled water for exponential heat inputs, q{sub o}e{sup t/T}, with periods, {tau}, ranging from about 2 ms to 20 s at pressures from atmospheric up to 2063 kPa for water subcoolings from 0 to about 80 K were measured to obtain the extended data base to investigate the effect of high subcoolings on steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}. Two main mechanisms of q{sub max} exist depending on the exponential periods at low subcoolings. One is due to the time lag of the hydrodynamic instability which starts at steady-state maximum heat flux on fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), and the other is due to the heterogenous spontaneous nucleations (HSN) in flooded cavities which coexist with vapor bubbles growing up from active cavities. The shortest period corresponding to the maximum q{sub max} for long period range belonging to the former mechanism becomes longer and the q{sub max}mechanism for long period range shifts to that due the HSN on FDNB with the increase of subcooling and pressure. The longest period corresponding to the minimum q{sub max} for the short period range belonging to the latter mechanism becomes shorter with the increase in saturated pressure. On the contrary, the longest period becomes longer with the increase in subcooling at high pressures. Correlations for steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes were presented for a wide range of pressure and subcooling.

  19. Critical heat flux in pool boiling on a vertical heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monde, M.; Inoue, T.; Mitsutake, Y.

    Critical heat flux during pool boiling on a vertical heater of wire or plate has been measured employing water and R113. The experiment was made for a wire of 0.5 to 2 mm in diameter and for a plate of 5, 7 and 30 mm in width and from 20 to 300 mm in height. The pressure was 1 and 2 bar for water and 1, 2, 3 and 4 bar for R113. The experiment shows that for the case of both wire and plate of 5, 7 mm, a large coalesced bubble entirely surrounds the vertical heater and rises surrounding it, while for the case of w = 30 mm, a large bubble cannot surround and rises along its surface. The characteristic of CHF can be divided into two regimes depending on the flow condition when CHF takes place. Correlations are proposed for the CHF of the wire and the plate of w = 5, and 7 mm, yielding good accuracy. The CHF for the plate of w = 30 mm has a similar tendency to that in one side headed surface and can be predicted reasonably by existing correlation for one side heated surface. Zusammenfassung Der kritische Wärmefluß beim Behältersieden an einem vertikalen Heizkörper (Draht oder Platte) wurde mit den Versuchsmedien Wasser und R113 gemessen. Die Experimente bezogen sich auf Drähte von 0,5 bis 2 mm Durchmesser und Platten von 5, 7 und 30 mm Breite und 20 bis 300 mm Höhe. Die Drücke betrugen 1 und 2 bar bei Wasser und 1, 2, 3 und 4 bar bei R113. In den Experimenten zeigte sich bei Drähten und Platten mit 5 und 7 mm Breite eine große zusammengewachsene Blase, die, den Heizkörper vollständig umschließend, an diesem aufstieg. Bei der 30 mm breiten Platte vermochte die große Blase den Heizkörper nicht mehr zu umschließen sie stieg an dessen Oberfläche auf. Die Charakteristik des kritischen Wärmeflusses läßt sich in zwei Bereiche unterteilen, und zwar in Abhängigkeit von den Strömungsbedingungen, unter welchen er auftrat. Vorgeschlagene Berechnungsgleichungen für den kritischen Wärmefluß liefern bezüglich der Drähte und der Platten mit 5 und 7 mm Breite

  20. Flow-Boiling Critical Heat Flux Experiments Performed in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Mudawar, Issam

    2005-01-01

    Poor understanding of flow boiling in microgravity has recently emerged as a key obstacle to the development of many types of power generation and advanced life support systems intended for space exploration. The critical heat flux (CHF) is perhaps the most important thermal design parameter for boiling systems involving both heatflux-controlled devices and intense heat removal. Exceeding the CHF limit can lead to permanent damage, including physical burnout of the heat-dissipating device. The importance of the CHF limit creates an urgent need to develop predictive design tools to ensure both the safe and reliable operation of a two-phase thermal management system under the reduced-gravity (like that on the Moon and Mars) and microgravity environments of space. At present, very limited information is available on flow-boiling heat transfer and the CHF under these conditions.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University was motivated by previous studies indicating that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 when compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The influence of electric fields on bubble formation has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  2. Boiling Heat Transfer Measurements on Highly Conductive Surfaces Using Microscale Heater and Temperature Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Bae, S. W.; Whitten, M. W.; Mullen, J. D.; Quine, R. W.; Kalkur, T. S.

    1999-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to study boiling heat transfer on the microscale. The first system utilizes a 32 x 32 array of diodes to measure the local temperature fluctuations during boiling on a silicon wafer heated from below. The second system utilizes an array of 96 microscale heaters each maintained at constant surface temperature using electronic feedback loops. The power required to keep each heater at constant temperature is measured, enabling the local heat transfer coefficient to be determined. Both of these systems as well as some preliminary results are discussed.

  3. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    The heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling was tested using a high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, the rear furnace wall of which was composed of two different surfaces; i. e., plain and sprayed heated surfaces. These two surfaces were bisymmetrically set. Wall surface temperatures of both the fire and fluid sides were measured at three locations along the upward flow direction in each heated surface for determining the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. Nickel-chromium and alumina were employed as the spray materials. The test results show that the sprayed surface can yield a marked elevation in the heat transfer performance due to boiling on the plain surface. Therefore the level of heated surface temperature is largely reduced by means of the spraying surface treatment. This implies that the spraying would much improve a corrosive condition of the heated surface.

  4. Effect of ice contamination of liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. Experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation is presented. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  5. Effect of ice contamination on liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. This paper presents experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  6. Transition process leading to microbubble emission boiling on horizontal circular heated surface in subcooled pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ichiro; Ando, Jun; Horiuchi, Kazuna; Saiki, Takahito; Kaneko, Toshihiro

    2016-11-01

    Microbubble emission boiling (MEB) produces a higher heat flux than critical heat flux (CHF) and therefore has been investigated in terms of its heat transfer characteristics as well as the conditions under which MEB occurs. Its physical mechanism, however, is not yet clearly understood. We carried out a series of experiments to examine boiling on horizontal circular heated surfaces of 5 mm and of 10 mm in diameter, in a subcooled pool, paying close attention to the transition process to MEB. High-speed observation results show that, in the MEB regime, the growth, condensation, and collapse of the vapor bubbles occur within a very short time. In addition, a number of fine bubbles are emitted from the collapse of the vapor bubbles. By tracking these tiny bubbles, we clearly visualize that the collapse of the vapor bubbles drives the liquid near the bubbles towards the heated surface, such that the convection field around the vapor bubbles under MEB significantly differs from that under nucleate boiling. Moreover, the axial temperature gradient in a heated block (quasi-heat flux) indicates a clear difference between nucleate boiling and MEB. A combination of quasi-heat flux and the measurement of the behavior of the vapor bubbles allows us to discuss the transition to MEB. This work was financially supported by the 45th Research Grant in Natural Sciences from The Mitsubishi Foundation (2014 - 2015), and by Research Grant for Boiler and Pressurized Vessels from The Japan Boiler Association (2016).

  7. Freon R141b flow boiling in silicon microchannel heat sinks: experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tao; Yang, Zhaochu; Bi, Qincheng; Zhang, Yulong

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigations on Freon R141b flow boiling in rectangular microchannel heat sinks. The main aim is to provide an appropriate working fluid for microchannel flow boiling to meet the cooling demand of high power electronic devices. The microchannel heat sink used in this work contains 50 parallel channels, with a 60 × 200 ( W × H) μm cross-section. The flow boiling heat transfer experiments are performed with R141b over mass velocities ranging from 400 to 980 kg/(m2 s) and heat flux from 40 to 700 kW/m2, and the outlet pressure satisfying the atmospheric condition. The fluid flow-rate, fluid inlet/outlet temperature, wall temperature, and pressure drop are measured. The results indicate that the mean heat transfer coefficient of R141b flow boiling in present microchannel heat sinks depends heavily on mass velocity and heat flux and can be predicted by Kandlikar’s correlation (Heat Transf Eng 25(3):86 93, 2004). The two-phase pressure drop keeps increasing as mass velocity and exit vapor quality rise.

  8. Influence of Quantum Turbulence on the Processes of Heat Transfer and Boiling in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondaurova, Luiza; Efimov, Victor; Tsoi, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate that in a wide range of heat fluxes the dynamics of heat transfer in superfluid helium is determined by the existence of remanent quantized vortices. The vortex density dynamics determines the rise of temperature near the heater and the boiling-up of superfluid helium. It permits to understand the results of the experiments of several groups.

  9. Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Earth and Low Gravity: Boundary Condition and Heater Aspect Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2004-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. Recently, time and space resolved heat transfer data were obtained in both earth and low gravity environments using an array of microheaters varying in size between 100 microns to 700 microns. These heaters were operated in both constant temperature as well as constant heat flux mode. Heat transfer under nucleating bubbles in earth gravity were directly measured using a microheater array with 100 m resolution operated in constant temperature mode with low and high subcooled bulk liquid along with images from below and from the side. The individual bubble departure diameter and energy transfer were larger with low subcooling but the departure frequency increased at high subcooling, resulting in higher overall heat transfer. The bubble growth for both subcoolings was primarily due to energy transfer from the superheated liquid layer relatively little was due to wall heat transfer during the bubble growth process. Oscillating bubbles and sliding bubbles were also observed in highly subcooled boiling. Transient conduction and/or microconvection was the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the above cases. A transient conduction model was developed and compared with the experimental data with good agreement. Data was also obtained with the heater array operated in a constant heat flux mode and measuring the temperature distribution across

  10. Bubble Dynamics, Two-Phase Flow, and Boiling Heat Transfer in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1998-01-01

    This report contains two independent sections. Part one is titled "Terrestrial and Microgravity Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical heat flux phenomenon in an acoustic standing wave." Terrestrial and microgravity pool boiling heat transfer experiments were performed in the presence of a standing acoustic wave from a platinum wire resistance heater using degassed FC-72 Fluorinert liquid. The sound wave was created by driving a half wavelength resonator at a frequency of 10.15 kHz. Microgravity conditions were created using the 2.1 second drop tower on the campus of Washington State University. Burnout of the heater wire, often encountered with heat flux controlled systems, was avoided by using a constant temperature controller to regulate the heater wire temperature. The amplitude of the acoustic standing wave was increased from 28 kPa to over 70 kPa and these pressure measurements were made using a hydrophone fabricated with a small piezoelectric ceramic. Cavitation incurred during experiments at higher acoustic amplitudes contributed to the vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. The heater wire was positioned at three different locations within the acoustic field: the acoustic node, antinode, and halfway between these locations. Complete boiling curves are presented to show how the applied acoustic field enhanced boiling heat transfer and increased critical heat flux in microgravity and terrestrial environments. Video images provide information on the interaction between the vapor bubbles and the acoustic field. Part two is titled, "Design and qualification of a microscale heater array for use in boiling heat transfer." This part is summarized herein. Boiling heat transfer is an efficient means of heat transfer because a large amount of heat can be removed from a surface using a relatively small temperature difference between the surface and the bulk liquid. However, the mechanisms that govern boiling heat transfer are not well understood. Measurements of

  11. Boiling heat transfer enhancement of nanofluids on a smooth surface with agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xin; Qi, Baojin; Wei, Jinjia; Li, Wei; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Yonghai

    2016-12-01

    The pool boiling heat transfer performance on a smooth silicon chip surface with agitation was experimentally investigated in this study. The nanofluids (Ag/alcohol) of 0.02 % volume concentration and ethyl alcohol with purification over 99.9 % were the two contrast working fluids. For each group, subcoolings of 40, 50 and 60 K were conducted under atmospheric pressure. To enhance the heat transfer performance, an agitating device was fixed above the top of the chip. The experimental results indicated that nanofluids could enhance the heat transfer performance especially in the nucleate boiling region. The heat transfer coefficient was significantly increased with nanofluids, while the critical heat flux (CHF) was nearly not changed. In the agitation Reynolds number of 20,300, the heat transfer performance of nanofluids was significantly enhanced in the convection region, and the CHF was increased by more than 25 % for all groups. This boiling phenomenon was observed for both nanofluids and alcohol groups. Meanwhile, the boiling curves of different liquid subcoolings in the nucleate region were quite similar to each other under agitation.

  12. Approaching the limits of two-phase boiling heat transfer: High heat flux and low superheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palko, J. W.; Zhang, C.; Wilbur, J. D.; Dusseault, T. J.; Asheghi, M.; Goodson, K. E.; Santiago, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate capillary fed porous copper structures capable of dissipating over 1200 W cm-2 in boiling with water as the working fluid. Demonstrated superheats for this structure are dramatically lower than those previously reported at these high heat fluxes and are extremely insensitive to heat input. We show superheats of less than 10 K at maximum dissipation and varying less than 5 K over input heat flux ranges of 1000 W cm-2. Fabrication of the porous copper layers using electrodeposition around a sacrificial template allows fine control of both microstructure and bulk geometry, producing structures less than 40 μm thick with active region lateral dimensions of 2 mm × 0.3 mm. The active region is volumetrically Joule heated by passing an electric current through the porous copper bulk material. We analyze the heat transfer performance of the structures and suggest a strong influence of pore size on superheat. We compare performance of the current structure to existing wick structures.

  13. Enhancement of pool boiling heat transfer to lithium bromide aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Masuo; Furukawa, Masahiro; Suyama, Takayuki; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    1995-04-01

    An experimental study on enhancement of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer by placing a sponge metal, which had a three-dimensional mesh structure like sponge, close to a plain smooth heat transfer surface was conducted to improve the heat transfer performance of the high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heaters. Boiling curves of water and lithium bromide aqueous solution of mass concentration of 55 to 58% at the atmospheric pressure were presented. Heat transfer characteristics were improved by two to three times both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution when the sponge metal was attached with an appropriate clearance. Three kinds of sponge metals were tested for lithium bromide aqueous solution under a reduced pressure (24 kPa). The sponge metal #6, which had the finest mesh among the three sponge metals, brought about excellent results at lower heat fluxes, but it caused deterioration of heat transfer at higher heat fluxes. For the wide range of heat flux (5 x 10(exp 4) approximately 2 x 10(exp 5) W/m(exp 2), it was found that the sponge metal #4 with the middle fineness was the most suitable and the optimal clearance was in the range of 0.1 approximately 0.5 mm. The employment of sponge metals for enhancing boiling heat transfer is practically excellent, since no special manufacturing is required to mount them on the heated surface.

  14. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kaji, Masuo; Suyama, Takayuki; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    An experimental study on enhancement of nucleate pool boiling heat tranfer by placing a sponge metal close to a plain heated surface was conducted in order to improve the heat transfer performance of the high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. The sponge metal has three dimensional porous mesh framework like sponge. Boiling curves of water under the atmospheric pressure were compared with those of lithium bromide aqueous solution of mass concentration 55 to 58%. Heat transfer characteristics were improved by 2 to3 times both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution when the sponge metal was placed on the heated surface with and without cleareance. Three kinds of sponge metals were used for lithium bromide aqueous solution under the reduced pressure (24 kPa). At lower heat fluxes,#6 sponge metal which has the finest mesh and the lowest porosity shows excellent results. At high heat fluxes, however,it causes deterioration of heat transfer. Over the wide range of heat fluxes,# 4 sponge metal was found to be most suitable and the optimal clearence was determined as 0.5 mm. The sponge metal is of good practical use as a device to enhance the boiling, since no special manufacturing is required for placing it on the heated surface.

  15. An experimental investigation of critical heat flux performance of hypervapotron in subcooled boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peipei

    The successful use of subcooled flow boiling for high heat flux components requires that the critical heat flux (CHF), i.e., a fast reduction in the boiling heat transfer, must be avoided. Among the many techniques available to enhance CHF, particular attention has been focused on the hypervapotron concept. In this study, the CHF characteristics of the hypervapotron were experimentally investigated using a simulant fluid, R134a, which has been found to be an effective modeling fluid to simulate CHF in water-cooled environments. An experimental and modeling study of the subcooled boiling heat transfer on plain surface and hypervapotron has been conduced. A test facility was designed and constructed to perform required boiling heat transfer experiments. A high speed visualization system was utilized to give details of bubble formation and departure and of nucleation site density. Surface measurements of various specimens were performed to investigate the relationship between nucleation sites and surface microstructure. Full characterization of the hypervapotron effect as a function of fluid thermal hydraulic conditions was accomplished. A non-dimensional CHF correlation for smooth rectangular channels and the hypervapotron channel was developed and compared with experimental data in this work. In addition, a hot-spot model was developed to give predictions of critical heat flux on both plain and hypervapotron surfaces. It was developed on observations of bubble formation, departure and coalescence, and on the confirmation of nucleation structure on the heating surface. Finally, a numerical code was successfully developed to give CHF predictions for hypervapotron configurations. The simulation indicates that the better performance of CHF in hypervapotron configurations is a result of high conductivity material with augmented heating surfaces in subcooled boiling environment. Different fin dimensions were also tested numerically to compare the experimental results, and

  16. A Review of Boiling Heat Transfer Processes at High Heat Flux

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    liquid metals) which can lead to explosive boiling (known as bumping) that can lead to structural damage to hardware. 3 Transition boiling occurs between...to initiate boiling, in some cases having an explosive transition that can cause structural damage to hardware. A thorough understanding of boiling...graphical correlations for the pressure drops encountered in their experiments. About the same time, Staub and Walmet (Ref. 173) identified the two regions

  17. Development, implementation and assessment of specific, two-fluid closure laws for inverted-annular film-boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Cachard, F. de

    1995-09-01

    Inverted-Annular Film-Boiling (IAFB) is one of the post-burnout heat transfer modes taking place during the reflooding phase of the loss-of-coolant accident, when the liquid at the quench front is subcooled. Under IAFB conditions, a continuous, liquid core is separated from the wall by a superheated vapour film. the heat transfer rate in IAFB is influenced by the flooding rate, liquid subcooling, pressure, and the wall geometry and temperature. These influences can be accounted by a two-fluid model with physically sound closure laws for mass, momentum and heat transfers between the wall, the vapour film, the vapour-liquid interface, and the liquid core. Such closure laws have been developed and adjusted using IAFB-relevant experimental results, including heat flux, wall temperature and void fraction data. The model is extensively assessed against data from three independent sources. A total of 46 experiments have been analyzed. The overall predictions are good. The IAFB-specific closure laws proposed have also intrinsic value, and may be used in other two-fluid models. They should allow to improve the description of post-dryout, low quality heat transfer by the safety codes.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1996-01-01

    Boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer since high heat flux levels are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences. The high heat transfer coefficients associated with boiling have made the use of these processes increasingly attractive to aerospace engineering. Applications of this type include compact evaporators in the thermal control of aircraft avionics and spacecraft environments, heat pipes, and use of boiling to cool electronic equipment. In spite of its efficiency, cooling based on liquid-vapor phase change processes has not yet found wide application in aerospace engineering due to specific problems associated with the low gravity environment. After a heated surface has reached the superheat required for the initiation of nucleate boiling, bubbles will start forming at nucleation sites along the solid interface by evaporation of the liquid. Bubbles in contact with the wall will continue growing by this mechanism until they detach. In terrestrial conditions, bubble detachment is determined by the competition between body forces (e.g. buoyancy) and surface tension forces that act to anchor the bubble along the three phase contact line. For a given body force potential and a balance of tensions along the three phase contact line, bubbles must reach a critical size before the body force can cause them to detach from the wall. In a low gravity environment the critical bubble size for detachment is much larger than under terrestrial conditions, since buoyancy is a less effective means of bubble removal. Active techniques of heat transfer enhancement in single phase and phase change processes by utilizing electric fields have been the subject of intensive research during recent years. The field of electrohydrodynamics (EHD) deals with the interactions between electric fields, flow fields and temperature fields. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 as

  19. Heat transfer performance of engine coolants under sub-cooled boiling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmick, S.; Branchi, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Gollin, M.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to evaluate the heat transfer performance of two engine cooling fluid mixtures, propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water. These tests were performed under conditions closely simulating normal engine operation. For both mixtures, results were obtained over a range of heat transfer regimes from single phase convection to saturated flow boiling. Tests showed that propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water have very similar heat transfer performances. Performance is defined as the steady state wall temperature maintained for a given surface heat flux and test section inlet velocity. For the lowest velocity tested, the test section experienced saturated boiling over approximately one-half of its heated length. The experimental results were also compared to analytical predictions based upon the Chen correlation. At higher fluxes, the analytical methods under-predicted the test section wall temperature.

  20. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    Heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling in high temperature generator was experimentally studied using an actual absorption chiller/heater. Measurements were made at six locations, three different levels on a couple of laterally separated lines, for the fluid rising along the rear wall of the high temperature generator furnace. Fluids tested were water and lithium bromide aqueous solution. System pressures were maintained at 96 and 24 kPa, and firing rates were changed from 100 to 40 % of the full load of the machine. Through the experiments, thermodynamic states of both of the fluids were in subcooled region at the lower and middle locations and in saturated region at the upper location. It can be suggested that saturated boiling occurs at comparatively narrow area, located at the upper zone of heat transfer surface of the generator, while forced convective heat transfer and subcooled boiling appear at the remaining broad area. Enhancement of heat transfer due to saturated boiling was not pronounced for lithium bromide aqueous solution than for water.

  1. Critical Heat Flux in Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Yang, Wen-Jei; Chao, David F.; Chao, David F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A study is conducted on high heat-flux pool boiling of pentane on micro-configured composite surfaces. The boiling surfaces are copper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composites with a fiber volume concentration of 50%. The micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix contribute to a substantial enhancement in boiling heat-transfer performance. Correlation equations are obtained for both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes, utilizing a mathematical model based on a metal-graphite, two-tier configuration with the aid of experimental data. A new model to predict the critical heat flux (CHF) on the composites is proposed to explain the fundamental aspects of the boiling phenomena. Three different factors affecting the CHF are considered in the model. Two of them are expected to become the main agents driving vapor volume detachment under microgravity conditions, using the metal-graphite composite surfaces as the heating surface and using liquids with an unusual Marangoni effect as the working fluid.

  2. What Is the Boiling Point and Heat of Vaporization of Sulfuric Acid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, R. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the values presented in various handbooks for the boiling point and heat of vaporization of sulfuric acid, noting discrepencies. Analyzes various approaches to data presentation, discussing the data on sulfuric acid in light of the Trouton constant. Points out the need for a more critical use of tables. (JM)

  3. Flash boiling from carbon foams for high-heat-flux transient cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engerer, J. D.; Fisher, T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Flash boiling of a liquid pool results in an event characterized by rapid phase change and, as a result, high rates of expansion and cooling. Because of the potential advantages of such characteristics for convective heat transfer, flash boiling is considered here for the purpose of cooling transient heat loads. The event has the positive characteristics mentioned as well as rapid response (˜10 ms) and high initial rates of phase change, and then quickly decays to a steady-state regime analogous to pool boiling. The performance of the cooling mechanism is evaluated using an objective function derived from the effect of temperature on the efficiency of optical transmission in a diode-pumped solid-state laser. Statistical surrogate models based on the experimental results are used to predict optimal run conditions. Experiments using these predicted parameters show that flash boiling can maintain device temperature to within ±6.1 °C through a pulsed 5 s heat flux of 68 W cm-2 and to within ±1.4 °C for a heat flux of 39 W cm-2.

  4. Investigation of change in surface morphology of heated surfaces upon pool boiling of magnetic fluids under magnetic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaeian, Mostafa; Yildizhan, Melike-Mercan; Coşkun, Ömer; Ozkalay, Ebrar; Tekşen, Yiğit; Gulgun, Mehmet Ali; Funda Yagci Acar, Havva; Koşar, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nanofluids are becoming a significant candidate for new generation coolants to be used in industrial applications. In order to reduce clustering and sedimentation of nanoparticles and improve the heat transfer performance simultaneously, magnetic fluids prepared with magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles dispersed in water, which were placed in a pool and were exposed to varying magnetic fields to actuate nanoparticles in the system. The effect of magnetic actuation on boiling heat transfer characteristics and on the surface morphology of the pool was examined. An average enhancement of 29% in boiling heat transfer was achieved via magnetic actuation with rather low magnetic field (magnetic flux densities up to 11 mT) densities. Furthermore, it was observed that magnetic actuation significantly prevented the deposition and sedimentation of the nanoparticles in the pool. Otherwise, significant destabilization of nanoparticles causing aggregation and heavy sedimentation was present as a result of the performed surface analysis. Even though magnetic actuation reduced the sedimentation on the macroscale, the deposition of a thick and porous film occurred onto the pool floor, increasing the surface roughness.

  5. The heat-pipe resembling action of boiling bubbles in endovenous laser ablation.

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Cees W M; van den Bos, Renate R; van Ruijven, Peter W M; Nijsten, Tamar; Neumann, H A Martino; van Gemert, Martin J C

    2010-11-01

    Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) produces boiling bubbles emerging from pores within the hot fiber tip and traveling over a distal length of about 20 mm before condensing. This evaporation-condensation mechanism makes the vein act like a heat pipe, where very efficient heat transport maintains a constant temperature, the saturation temperature of 100 degrees C, over the volume where these non-condensing bubbles exist. During EVLA the above-mentioned observations indicate that a venous cylindrical volume with a length of about 20 mm is kept at 100 degrees C. Pullback velocities of a few mm/s then cause at least the upper part of the treated vein wall to remain close to 100 degrees C for a time sufficient to cause irreversible injury. In conclusion, we propose that the mechanism of action of boiling bubbles during EVLA is an efficient heat-pipe resembling way of heating of the vein wall.

  6. Review of the influence of nanoparticles on thermal conductivity, nucleate pool boiling and critical heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshirsagar, Jagdeep M.; Shrivastava, Ramakant

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluids, the fluid suspensions of nonmaterials, have shown many interesting properties and the unique features offer unprecedented potential for many applications. Research on nanofluids has progressed rapidly since its enhanced thermal conductivity was first noted, about a decade ago, though much debate and inconsistency have been reported. Insufficient understanding of the formulation, mechanism of nanofluids further limits their applications [1-34]. Inconsistent data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers [35-43] have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Some researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux augmentation. In the review, the future developments of these technologies are discussed. In order to be able to put the nanofluid heat transfer technologies into practice, fundamental of these studies are greatly needed to comprehend the physical mechanisms.

  7. Modeling of convective subcooled boiling in microtubes for high heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Myron A.; Stetson, James D., IV

    1993-02-01

    Cooling systems for very compact electronic components and computer chips are being miniaturized to meet the need for smaller overall packaging. One of the important present directions has been to use laminar flow in very small channels with hydraulic diameters in the sub-millimeter range to get high heat transfer coefficients with low pressure drops. It has been speculated that there might be some advantage to having convective subcooled boiling (SCB) occur in the micro-channels. As a first step in the evaluation of the utility of subcooled boiling in these micro-channels, a model has been developed for subcooled boiling in sub-millimeter diameter microtubes subject to uniform heat flux. This model builds on a previously well-validated computer code for convective subcooled boiling in tubes down to 1.57 mm inner diameter. The basic features of the new microtube model are described and some predictions using this model for 0.3 mm and 0.1 mm microtubes subject to a high heat flux of 10 MW/m2 are given.

  8. Fundamental Study of Local Heat Transfer in Forced Convective Boiling of Ammonia on Vertical Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hun; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    In the present study, the fundamental experiments that investigate characteristics of local heat transfer in forced convective boiling on vertical flat plate with 2-mm channel height are taken to realize plate type compact evaporator for OTEC or STEC. The experiments are performed with ammonia as the working fluid. The experiments are also carried out with the following test conditions; saturated pressure = 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 MPa, mass flux = 7.5, 10, 15 kg/(m2•s), heat flux = 15, 20, 25 kW/m2 and inlet quality = 0.1 ~ 0.4 [-]. The result shows that the wall superheated temperature of forced convective boiling is lower than that of pool boiling. And the heat transfer coefficient increases with an increase in quality and the decrease in the local heat flux and saturated pressure for prescribed experimental conditions. However, local heat transfer coefficients are not affected by mass fluxes in the prescribed experimental conditions. An empirical correlation that can predict the local heat transfer coefficient on vertical flat plate within experimental conditions is also proposed.

  9. Enhancement of critical heat flux in nucleate boiling of nanofluids: a state-of-art review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nanofluids (suspensions of nanometer-sized particles in base fluids) have recently been shown to have nucleate boiling critical heat flux (CHF) far superior to that of the pure base fluid. Over the past decade, numerous experimental and analytical studies on the nucleate boiling CHF of nanofluids have been conducted. The purpose of this article is to provide an exhaustive review of these studies. The characteristics of CHF enhancement in nanofluids are systemically presented according to the effects of the primary boiling parameters. Research efforts to identify the effects of nanoparticles underlying irregular enhancement phenomena of CHF in nanofluids are then presented. Also, attempts to explain the physical mechanism based on available CHF theories are described. Finally, future research needs are identified. PMID:21711949

  10. Enhancement of critical heat flux in nucleate boiling of nanofluids: a state-of-art review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungdae

    2011-06-09

    Nanofluids (suspensions of nanometer-sized particles in base fluids) have recently been shown to have nucleate boiling critical heat flux (CHF) far superior to that of the pure base fluid. Over the past decade, numerous experimental and analytical studies on the nucleate boiling CHF of nanofluids have been conducted. The purpose of this article is to provide an exhaustive review of these studies. The characteristics of CHF enhancement in nanofluids are systemically presented according to the effects of the primary boiling parameters. Research efforts to identify the effects of nanoparticles underlying irregular enhancement phenomena of CHF in nanofluids are then presented. Also, attempts to explain the physical mechanism based on available CHF theories are described. Finally, future research needs are identified.

  11. Saturated flow boiling heat transfer correlation for carbon dioxide for horizontal smooth tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, Oguz Emrah; Asker, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Literature comprises fewer studies about flow boiling modelling of refrigerants for in tube flows. In addition, researches on two phase flow heat transfer are based on the mathematical models which were derived in a very limited operational condition and correlated for their own measurements. In this study, a new flow boiling model including the superposed effects of nucleate and convective boiling mechanisms is proposed through the minimization of the cumulative error between the proposed mathematical model and actual data by means of artificial cooperative search algorithm and applied to the database of R-744 (carbon dioxide), available from different studies in the literature. Predictions obtained from the proposed model have been compared with those of retained from the literature correlations developed for flow boiling in tubes. The comparison results indicate that the new model outperforms the literature correlations in terms of prediction accuracy. Results of the comparisons reveal that the proposed flow boiling mathematical model has a mean absolute relative error of 14.6% and predicts 76.7% of the experimental data within ±20.0%.

  12. Experimental investigation and mechanism of critical heat flux enhancement in pool boiling heat transfer with nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamatchi, R.; Venkatachalapathy, S.; Nithya, C.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is synthesized from graphite using modified Hummer and chemical reduction methods. Various characterizations techniques are carried out to study the in-plane crystallite size, number of layers, presence of functional groups and surface morphology. Different concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, and 0.3 g/l of rGO/water nanofluids are prepared by dispersing the flakes in DI water. The colloidal stability of 0.3 g/l concentration is measured after 5 days using Zetasizer and found to be stable. The rGO/water nanofluids are then used to study the effect on the enhancement of critical heat flux (CHF) in pool boiling heat transfer. Results indicate an enhancement in CHF ranging from 145 to 245 % for the tested concentrations. The mechanisms of CHF enhancement are analyzed based on surface wettability, surface roughness, and porous layer thickness. The macrolayer dryout model sufficiently supports the mechanism of CHF enhancement of thin wire with rGO deposits, which is not reported yet.

  13. Numerical thermal analysis of water's boiling heat transfer based on a turbulent jet impingement on heated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toghraie, D.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a numerical method for simulation of flow boiling through subcooled jet on a hot surface with 800 °C has been presented. Volume fraction (VOF) has been used to simulate boiling heat transfer and investigation of the quench phenomena through fluid jet on a hot horizontal surface. Simulation has been done in a fixed Tsub=55 °C, Re=5000 to Re=50,000 and also in different Tsub =Tsat -Tf between 10 °C and 95 °C. The effect of fluid jet velocity and subcooled temperature on the rewetting temperature, wet zone propagation, cooling rate and maximum heat flux has been investigated. The results of this study show that by increasing the velocity of fluid jet of water, convective heat transfer coefficient at stagnation point increases. More ever, by decreasing the temperature of the fluid jet, convective heat transfer coefficient increases.

  14. An experimental investigation of flow boiling in an asymmetrically heated rectangular microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Cheol; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2006-08-15

    By using unique experimental techniques and carefully constructed experimental apparatus, the characteristics of flow boiling of water in microscale were investigated using a single horizontal rectangular microchannel. A polydimethylsiloxane rectangular microchannel (D{sub h}=103.5 and 133{mu}m) was fabricated by using the replica molding technique, a kind of soft lithography. A piecewise serpentine platinum microheater array on a Pyrex substrate was fabricated with the surface micromachining MEMS technique. Real time flow visualization of the phase change phenomena inside the microchannel was performed using a high speed CCD camera with microscope. The experimental local boiling heat transfer coefficients were studied, and single bubble inception, growth, and departure, as well as elongated bubble behavior were analyzed to elucidate the microscale heat transfer mechanisms. Tests were performed for mass fluxes of 77.5, 154.9, and 309.8kg/m{sup 2}s and heat fluxes of 180-500kW/m{sup 2}. The effects of mass flux, heat flux, and vapor qualities on flow boiling heat transfer in a microchannel were studied. (author)

  15. Numerical experiments on evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid argon film on aluminum nanostructure substrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Zhang, Haiyan; Tian, Conghui; Meng, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid film are of great significant fundamental importance for both science and engineering applications. The evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid film absorbed on an aluminum nanostructure solid wall are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The simulated system consists of three regions: liquid argon, vapor argon, and an aluminum substrate decorated with nanostructures of different heights. Those simulations begin with an initial configuration for the complex liquid-vapor-solid system, followed by an equilibrating system at 90 K, and conclude with two different jump temperatures, including 150 and 310 K which are far beyond the critical temperature. The space and time dependences of temperature, pressure, density number, and net evaporation rate are monitored to investigate the phase transition process on a flat surface with and without nanostructures. The simulation results reveal that the nanostructures are of great help to raise the heat transfer efficiency and that evaporation rate increases with the nanostructures' height in a certain range.

  16. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  17. Characterization of Convective Boiling in Branching Channel Heat Sinks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-06

    gas-liquid flows and compared with existing void fraction correlations and regime maps, respectively. Two methods for assessing void fraction were...basis, where regional is defined as a field of view within a single branch of the fractal-like branching heat sink. An epi-fluorescent U.PIV method ...was used to determine time-averaged local liquid phase velocities. The gas phase velocities in gas-liquid flows were determined using a tracking method

  18. Enhanced boiling performance of a nanoporous copper surface by electrodeposition and heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiao; Lu, Long-Sheng; Sun, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Biao

    2017-03-01

    A nanoporous structure was fabricated on the surface of a copper block by electrodeposition and heat treatment compound technology. The influence of the heat treatment parameters on the binding force of a structure was analyzed, and a platform was set up to test the pool boiling heat transfer performance. By observing the SEM morphology, the effect of electrodeposition parameters on the formation of nanoporous structure was determined, and the heat transfer coefficient and wall superheat between different surfaces were compared. At the same time, by means of visualization, the bubble behavior of a smooth surface and a nanoporous surface under different heat fluxes was studied. The results show that the surface structure of nanoporous copper prepared by electrodeposition and heat treatment can improve the bonding strength by 77 %, decrease the wall superheat by 45 %, and increase the heat transfer coefficient by 80 %.

  19. Characteristic of Local Boiling Heat Transfer of Ammonia / Water Binary Mixture on the Plate Type Evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Akiyama, Hirokuni; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) are expected to be the next generation energy production systems. Both systems use a plate type evaporator, and ammonia or ammonia/water mixture as a working fluid. It is important to clarify heat transfer characteristic for designing efficient power generation systems. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients and visualization were performed for ammonia /water mixture (z = 0.9) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5 - 15 kg/m2s), heat flux (15 - 23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7 - 0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of vapor quality and mass flux, and decrease with an increase of heat flux, and the influence of the flow pattern on the local heat transfer coefficient is observed.

  20. Saturated pool-boiling heat transfer of toluene-solvent magnetic fluid on a horizontal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Minoru; Inoue, Akiro; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo; Ohkawa, Riichiro . Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors)

    1994-07-01

    Saturated pool-boiling heat transfer of a toluene-solvent magnetic fluid containing magnetite particles of 0--36.5 wt% was investigated on a horizontal surface in a vertical magnetic field at pressures of 0.021--0.061 MPa. In the absence of a magnetic field gradient, the heat transfer was enhanced significantly using a magnetic fluid with dilute magnetite particles, while it was reduced for the case of dense particles. As the magnetic field gradient was increased up to 3.9 [times] 10[sup 5] A/m[sup 2], the heat transfer of the dense magnetic fluid was enhanced significantly in the heat flux region, although it slowly began to show a reduced heat-transfer curve again at a certain transition heat flux. The transition heat flux increased as the magnetic field gradient became larger, the magnetic concentration, lower, and the pressure, higher.

  1. Nano-inspired fluidic interactivity for boiling heat transfer: impact and criteria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Seok; Choi, Geehong; Shin, Sangwoo; Gemming, Thomas; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of boiling heat transfer, the most powerful energy-transferring technology, will lead to milestones in the development of high-efficiency, next-generation energy systems. Perceiving nano-inspired interface functionalities from their rough morphologies, we demonstrate interface-induced liquid refreshing is essential to improve heat transfer by intrinsically avoiding Leidenfrost phenomenon. High liquid accessibility of hemi-wicking and catalytic nucleation, triggered by the morphological and hydrodynamic peculiarities of nano-inspired interfaces, contribute to the critical heat flux (CHF) and the heat transfer coefficient (HTC). Our experiments show CHF is a function of universal hydrodynamic characteristics involving interfacial liquid accessibility and HTC is improved with a higher probability of smaller nuclei with less superheat. Considering the interface-induced and bulk liquid accessibility at boiling, we discuss functionalizing the interactivity between an interface and a counteracting fluid seeking to create a novel interface, a so-called smart interface, for a breakthrough in boiling and its pragmatic application in energy systems. PMID:27708341

  2. Nano-inspired fluidic interactivity for boiling heat transfer: impact and criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Beom Seok; Choi, Geehong; Shin, Sangwoo; Gemming, Thomas; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2016-10-01

    The enhancement of boiling heat transfer, the most powerful energy-transferring technology, will lead to milestones in the development of high-efficiency, next-generation energy systems. Perceiving nano-inspired interface functionalities from their rough morphologies, we demonstrate interface-induced liquid refreshing is essential to improve heat transfer by intrinsically avoiding Leidenfrost phenomenon. High liquid accessibility of hemi-wicking and catalytic nucleation, triggered by the morphological and hydrodynamic peculiarities of nano-inspired interfaces, contribute to the critical heat flux (CHF) and the heat transfer coefficient (HTC). Our experiments show CHF is a function of universal hydrodynamic characteristics involving interfacial liquid accessibility and HTC is improved with a higher probability of smaller nuclei with less superheat. Considering the interface-induced and bulk liquid accessibility at boiling, we discuss functionalizing the interactivity between an interface and a counteracting fluid seeking to create a novel interface, a so-called smart interface, for a breakthrough in boiling and its pragmatic application in energy systems.

  3. Nano-inspired fluidic interactivity for boiling heat transfer: impact and criteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Seok; Choi, Geehong; Shin, Sangwoo; Gemming, Thomas; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2016-10-06

    The enhancement of boiling heat transfer, the most powerful energy-transferring technology, will lead to milestones in the development of high-efficiency, next-generation energy systems. Perceiving nano-inspired interface functionalities from their rough morphologies, we demonstrate interface-induced liquid refreshing is essential to improve heat transfer by intrinsically avoiding Leidenfrost phenomenon. High liquid accessibility of hemi-wicking and catalytic nucleation, triggered by the morphological and hydrodynamic peculiarities of nano-inspired interfaces, contribute to the critical heat flux (CHF) and the heat transfer coefficient (HTC). Our experiments show CHF is a function of universal hydrodynamic characteristics involving interfacial liquid accessibility and HTC is improved with a higher probability of smaller nuclei with less superheat. Considering the interface-induced and bulk liquid accessibility at boiling, we discuss functionalizing the interactivity between an interface and a counteracting fluid seeking to create a novel interface, a so-called smart interface, for a breakthrough in boiling and its pragmatic application in energy systems.

  4. Study of Critical Heat Flux Mechanism in Flow Boiling Using Bubble Crowding Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Nariai, Hideki; Inasaka, Fujio

    Critical heat flux (CHF) of Subcooled Flow Boiling with water in a tube was investigated from the viewpoint of mechanistic models. The Weisman-Pei bubble crowding model was selected to predict CHF in a short tube and in a tube with an internal twisted tape under nonuniform heating conditions, Based on the results of bubble behavior observation and preliminary analysis. The original Weisman-Pei model was modified in order to explain the physical phenomena of CHF. The modified model predicted well CHF in a smooth tube including the very short tube and the tube with an internal twisted tape under uniform and nonuniform heating conditions.

  5. Heat and momentum transfer model studies applicable to once-through, forced convection potassium boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    A number of heat transfer and fluid flow mechanisms that control once-through, forced convection potassium boiling are studied analytically. The topics discussed are: (1) flow through tubes containing helical wire inserts, (2) motion of droplets entrained in vapor flow, (3) liquid phase distribution in boilers, (4) temperature distributions in boiler tube walls, (5) mechanisms of heat transfer regime change, and (6) heat transfer in boiler tubes. Whenever possible, comparisons of predicted and actual performances are made. The model work presented aids in the prediction of operating characteristics of actual boilers.

  6. Thermal performance of a prototype plate heat exchanger with minichannels under boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajs, J.; Mikielewicz, D.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.

    2016-09-01

    To solve the problem and to meet the requirements of customers in the field of high heat fluxes transfer in compact units, a new design of plate heat exchanger with minichannels (minichannels PHE) was proposed. The aim was to construct a compact heat exchanger of high effectiveness for the purpose of household cogeneration ORC system. In this paper the experimental analysis of an assembled prototype of such compact heat exchanger was described. The attention was paid to its thermal performance and the heat transfer coefficients under the boiling conditions. Water and ethanol were chosen as working fluids. The maximal value of transferred heat flux was about 84 kW/m2, while of the overall heat transfer coefficient was about 4000 W/(m2K). Estimated values of heat transfer coefficient on the ethanol (boiling) side reached the level of 7500 W/(m2K). The results are promising in the light of future applications, for example in cogeneration ORC systems, however further systematic investigations are necessary.

  7. A phenomenological model for boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux in tubes containing twisted tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisman, J.; Yang, J. Y.; Usman, S.

    1994-01-01

    New critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer data were obtained in the subcooled and low quality regions using refrigerant 113. These data were obtained in a 0.61 cm round tube containing a twisted tape having a twist ratio of 6.25. The new CHF data, plus water data from the literature, were compared to a modified version of the CHF predictive model based on bubble crowding and coalescence in the bubbly layer (Weisman and Pei, (1983), Weisman and Illeslamlou, (1988)). Reasonably good predictions were obtained within the range of the model. It was also found that the Yang and Weisman (1991) extension of the CHF model to boiling heat transfer held for swirling flow.

  8. Experimental investigation of direct contact three phase boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, W.D.

    1981-01-01

    The system which was studied in the present work consisted of one liquid undergoing vaporization by contact with a hotter immiscible liquid. The liquids and vapor were contacted in a counterflow spray column with only differential increases in vapor quality. Experiments yielded vertical temperature profiles, flow rates of the phases, liquid holdups, pressure drops, and a characterization of flow patterns. A micro-computer was utilized for measuring temperatures in the column at the rate of 1500 to 1600 times per second at several depths. Analysis of the experimental data indicate that the maximum temperature difference between the phases is 0.5F/sup 0/, and that a temperature crossover occurs at the lower end of the column. The heat transfer fluid undergoes flash vaporization at its inlet at the top of the column, and much of its sensible heat is tranferred to the dispersed phase near the top of the column. Temperature profiles along the length of the boiler are nearly flat, and very little heat transfer occurs in the lower part of the boiler. A chemical method was developed for measuring effective interfacial area in a direct contact boiler. The theoretical basis of the method is discussed, and physico-chemical data necessary for application of the technique are reported. Water solubility of methyl salicylate was measured as a function of temperature, and the second order reaction rate coefficient for saponification of methyl salicylate by sodium hydroxide was determined from sodium hydroxide concentration versus time data and a computer model of a well-mixed semibatch reactor. The activation energy for the reaction was found to be 9.58 kilocalories per gram mole.

  9. Development of a high-performance boiling heat exchanger by improved liquid supply to narrow channels.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Haruhiko; Ohno, Toshiyuki; Hioki, Fumiaki; Shinmoto, Yasuhisa

    2004-11-01

    A two-phase flow loop is a promising method for application to thermal management systems for large-scale space platforms handling large amounts of energy. Boiling heat transfer reduces the size and weight of cold plates. The transportation of latent heat reduces the mass flow rate of working fluid and pump power. To develop compact heat exchangers for the removal of waste heat from electronic devices with high heat generation density, experiments on a method to increase the critical heat flux for a narrow heated channel between parallel heated and unheated plates were conducted. Fine grooves are machined on the heating surface in a transverse direction to the flow and liquid is supplied underneath flattened bubbles by the capillary pressure difference from auxiliary liquid channels separated by porous metal plates from the main heated channel. The critical heat flux values for the present heated channel structure are more than twice those for a flat surface at gap sizes 2 mm and 0.7 mm. The validity of the present structure with auxiliary liquid channels is confirmed by experiments in which the liquid supply to the grooves is interrupted. The increment in the critical heat flux compared to those for a flat surface takes a maximum value at a certain flow rate of liquid supply to the heated channel. The increment is expected to become larger when the length of the heated channel is increased and/or the gravity level is reduced.

  10. Spatial and temporal variation of the surface temperature and heat flux for saturated pool nucleate boiling at lower heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, C.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.

    1993-10-01

    The spatial and temporal variations of local surface temperature and heat flux for saturated pool nucleate boiling are investigated parametrically using a numerical model. The numerical model consisted of solving the three-dimensional transient heat conduction equation within the heater subjected to nucleate boiling over its upper surface. The surface topography model to distribute the cavities over the boiling surface used a Monte Carlo scheme. All cavities were assumed to be conical in shape. The cavity radii are obtained using an exponential probability density function with a known mean value. Local surface temperatures showed significant spatial and temporal variations, depending upon the surface topography and the heater material and thickness. However, the surface-averaged temperature showed practically no temporal variation. The temporal variations in local temperatures caused the surface-averaged heat flux to vary significantly. The temporal variations in the surface-averaged heat flux were similar for smooth and rough and thick and thin copper and nickel plates. Results indicated that the use of a classical energy balance equation to evaluate the surface heat flux must consider the spatial variation of the temperature. Results also showed that any thermocouple embedded beneath the surface of the heater does not follow the temporal variations at the surface.

  11. Tissue Erosion Using Shock Wave Heating and Millisecond Boiling in HIFU Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canney, Michael S.; Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Ha Hwang, Joo; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2010-03-01

    A wide variety of treatment protocols have been employed in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, and the resulting bioeffects observed include both mechanical as well as thermal effects. In recent studies, there has been significant interest in generating purely mechanical damage using protocols with short, microsecond pulses. Tissue erosion effects have been attained by operating HIFU sources using short pulses of 10-20 cycles, low duty cycles (<1%), and pulse average intensities of greater than 20 kW/cm2. The goal of this work was to use a modified pulsing protocol, consisting of longer, millisecond-long pulses of ultrasound and to demonstrate that heating and rapid millisecond boiling from shock wave formation can be harnessed to induce controlled mechanical destruction of soft tissue. Experiments were performed in excised bovine liver and heart tissue using a 2-MHz transducer. Boiling activity was monitored during exposures using a high voltage probe in parallel with the HIFU source. In situ acoustic fields and heating rates were determined for exposures using a novel derating approach for nonlinear HIFU fields. Several different exposure protocols were used and included varying the duty cycle, pulse length, and power to the source. After exposures, the tissue was sectioned, and the gross lesion morphology was observed. Different types of lesions were induced in experiments that ranged from purely thermal to purely mechanical depending on the pulsing protocol used. Therefore, shock wave heating and millisecond boiling may be an effective method for reliably generating significant tissue erosion effects.

  12. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  13. Detection of sub-cooled boiling heat transfer regimes up to critical heat flux by an accelerometric equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, G.P.; Dell`Orco, G.; Gaspari, G.P.

    1994-12-31

    The design of the Plasma Facing Components of the Fusion Reactor NET/ITER is at present addressing the highest requirement in the field of the heat transfer thermal hydraulics. In particular, the structure inside the toroidal plasma chamber more critically heated is represented by the Divertor structure, placed behind the X-point of the poloidal magnetic field. The more promising heat transfer technique, among the possible using water as coolant, is based on the subcooled boiling and thermal hydraulics in the fully developed regime, with the highest heat transfer coefficient, but avoiding the reaching of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and its consequent dangerous Burn Out. To this aim an experimental activity was launched in order to optimize the material, the physical parameters and the structure geometry. This activity is framed within the collaboration between the NET Team, ENEA and SIET Labs. This paper presents the development of an experimental system for the detection of the subcooled boiling phenomenon covering the whole heat transfer regimes, on externally heated cylindrical channels, from the single phase up to the Critical Heat Flux, on the base of the recording, by using quartz accelerometers, of the bubble implosion noises.

  14. Boiling Heat-Transfer Processes and Their Application in the Cooling of High Heat Flux Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    large for very smooth surfaces or highly wettable fluids (e.g., refrigerants or liquid metals) which can lead to explosive boiling (known as bumping) that...of the high wettability of liquid metals, high superheats are normally required to initiate boiling, in some cases having an explosive transition that...About the same time, Staub and Walmet (Ref. 175) identified the two regions before and after the point of significant vapor generation (SNVG) where the

  15. Experimental investigation on the boiling heat transfer of nanofluids on a flat plate in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Ali; Reza Salimpour, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the pool boiling heat transfer of Fe3O4 -deionized (DI) water as a magnetic nanofluid has been experimentally analyzed in the atmospheric pressure. The applied nanofluid within this research has been synthesized through a single step to retain a high stability. The repeatability and precision of the testing device with deionized water show a good agreement with the equations introduced in previous studies. Parametric studies on magnetic field, surface roughness, and magnetic nanofluid concentration are performed to reveal various aspects of the boiling heat transfer. In order to study the surface roughness, two surfaces with high average roughness (480nm) and low average roughness (7.3nm) were used. The obtained results indicate that the boiling heat transfer on the rough surface increases when raising the nanofluid concentration up to 0.1% volume concentration. In addition, it is observed that there is an optimum 0.1% volume concentration for the nanofluid which makes the boiling heat transfer coefficient increase up to 43%. Moreover, the heat transfer of a nanofluid with volume concentration of 0.1% is greater for the rough surface compared with the smooth one. The results of the experiments indicate that adding nanoparticles would not necessarily increase the boiling heat transfer coefficient. In fact, the surface roughness and the magnetic field gradient on the boiling surface were the main factors that could affect the boiling heat transfer coefficient significantly. The simultaneous analysis of magnetic field, surface roughness, and nanofluid concentration reveals that the boiling heat transfer coefficient of the magnetic nanofluid with 0.1% volume concentration in the presence of a magnetic field on the rough surface is higher than on the smooth surface. Our findings show that this increase is associated to the increase of nucleation sites concentration and bubble formation sites for the rough surface.

  16. Experimental study on flow boiling heat transfer of LNG in a vertical smooth tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-10-01

    An experimental apparatus is set up in this work to study the upward flow boiling heat transfer characteristics of LNG (liquefied natural gas) in vertical smooth tubes with inner diameters of 8 mm and 14 mm. The experiments were performed at various inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa. The results were obtained over the mass flux range from 16 to 200 kg m-2 s-1 and heat fluxes ranging from 8.0 to 32 kW m-2. The influences of quality, heat flux and mass flux, tube diameter on the heat transfer characteristic are examined and discussed. The comparisons of the experimental heat transfer coefficients with the predicted values from the existing correlations are analyzed. The correlation by Zou et al. [16] shows the best accuracy with the RMS deviation of 31.7% in comparison with the experimental data.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1999-01-01

    In boiling high heat fluxes are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences, which make its use increasingly attractive in aerospace applications. The objective of the research is to develop ways to overcome specific problems associated with boiling in the low gravity environment by substituting the buoyancy force with the electric force to enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50, as compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. The goal of our research is to experimentally explore the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions, by visualizing the temperature distributions in the vicinity of the heated surface and around the bubble during boiling using real-time holographic interferometry (HI) combined with high-speed cinematography. In the first phase of the project the influence of the electric field on a single bubble is investigated. Pool boiling is simulated by injecting a single bubble through a nozzle into the subcooled liquid or into the thermal boundary layer developed along the flat heater surface. Since the exact location of bubble formation is known, the optical equipment can be aligned and focused accurately, which is an essential requirement for precision measurements of bubble shape, size and deformation, as well as the visualization of temperature fields by HI. The size of the bubble and the frequency of bubble departure can be controlled by suitable selection of nozzle diameter and mass flow rate of vapor. In this approach effects due to the presence of the electric field can be separated from effects caused by the temperature gradients in the thermal boundary layer. The influence of the thermal boundary layer can be investigated after activating the heater at a later stage of the research. For the visualization experiments a

  18. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kaji, Masao; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    To improve the thermal performance of high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, heat transfer characteristics of flow boiling of lithium bromide aqueous solution in the subcooled region were experimentally investigated. Experiments were made for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel (5 mm × 20 mm cross section) with one side wall heated. Boiling onset quality of lithium bromide aqueous solution is greater than that of water. The heat transfer coefficient of lithium bromide aqueous solution is about a half of that of water under the same experimental conditions of inlet velocity and heat flux. The experimental data of heat transfer coefficient for water are compared with the empirical correlation of Thom et al.11) and a fairly good agreement is obtained. The predictive calculations by the method of Sekoguchi et al.12) are compared with the data for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution. Agreement between them is good for water, while the results for lithium bromide aqueous solution are not satisfactory.

  19. Method of making heat transfer tube with improved outside surface for nucleate boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.L.; Campbell, B.J.

    1988-03-08

    This patent describes a process for making a heat transfer tube with an improved outside surface for nucleate boiling comprising the steps of finning the tube to produce helical fins thereon, forming transverse grooves around the periphery of each fin, and progressively compressing the tips of the grooved fins to cause them to become flattened and of a width in an axial direction which is slightly less than their pitch, thereby defining a narrow opening between fins which is communication with a rather large cavity defined by the sides of adjacent fins in the region under the flattened fin tips. The improvement is described wherein the tips are variably compressed so that the width of the narrow openings adjacent fins is varied so as to produce a range of opening widths which is both larger and smaller than the optimum minimum pore size for nucleate boiling of a particular fluid under a particular set of operating conditions.

  20. A genetic algorithm-based optimization model for pool boiling heat transfer on horizontal rod heaters at isolated bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Fazel, S. Ali

    2017-03-01

    A new optimized model which can predict the heat transfer in the nucleate boiling at isolated bubble regime is proposed for pool boiling on a horizontal rod heater. This model is developed based on the results of direct observations of the physical boiling phenomena. Boiling heat flux, wall temperature, bubble departing diameter, bubble generation frequency and bubble nucleation site density have been experimentally measured. Water and ethanol have been used as two different boiling fluids. Heating surface was made by several metals and various degrees of roughness. The mentioned model considers various mechanisms such as latent heat transfer due to micro-layer evaporation, transient conduction due to thermal boundary layer reformation, natural convection, heat transfer due to the sliding bubbles and bubble super-heating. The fractional contributions of individual mentioned heat transfer mechanisms have been calculated by genetic algorithm. The results show that at wall temperature difference more that about 3 K, bubble sliding transient conduction, non-sliding transient conduction, micro-layer evaporation, natural convection, radial forced convection and bubble super-heating have higher to lower fractional contributions respectively. The performance of the new optimized model has been verified by comparison of the existing experimental data.

  1. Investigation on the boiling heat transfer characteristics of R404A and R134a under stratified flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, P.; Raja, B.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental investigation on the flow boiling heat transfer characteristics of R404A and R134a for low mass flux and heat flux conditions in a smooth horizontal tube is reported. Refrigerant saturation temperatures -15, -10, -5 and 0 °C were considered for the flow boiling conditions. The influence of the mass flux, heat flux and saturation temperature on the heat transfer coefficients of R404A and R134a are discussed in detail. The predominant flow pattern for the tested conditions is confirmed to be the stratified-wavy flow. The study revealed that the heat transfer coefficient is a strong function of the heat flux, throughout the flow boiling process, and the nucleate boiling contribution is much higher for R404A compared to that of R134a. The heat transfer characteristic of R404A is compared with that of R134a, to understand their relative performance in low temperature appliances. A modified correlation for the flow boiling heat transfer coefficient of R404A is developed to fit the experimental results of R404A.

  2. Some investigations on the enhancement of boiling heat transfer from planer surface embedded with continuous open tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Das, A.K.; Das, P.K.; Saha, P.

    2010-11-15

    Boiling heat transfer from a flat surface can be enhanced if continuous open tunnel type structures are embedded in it. Further, improvement of boiling heat transfer from such surfaces has been tried by two separate avenues. At first, inclined tunnels are embedded over the solid surface and an effort is made to optimize the tunnel inclination for boiling heat transfer. Surfaces are manufactured in house with four different inclinations of the tunnels with or without a reentrant circular pocket at the end of the tunnel. Experiments conducted in the nucleate boiling regime showed that 45 deg inclination of the tunnels for both with and without base geometry provides the highest heat transfer coefficient. Next, active fluid rotation was imposed to enhance the heat transfer from tunnel type surfaces with and without the base geometry. Rotational speed imparted by mechanical stirrer was varied over a wide range. It was observed that fluid rotation enhances the heat transfer coefficient only up to a certain value of stirrer speed. Rotational speed values, beyond this limit, reduce the boiling heat transfer severely. A comparison shows that embedding continuous tunnel turns out to be a better option for the increase of heat transfer coefficient compared to the imposition of fluid rotation. But the behavior of inclined tunnels under the action of fluid rotation is yet to be established and can be treated as a future scope of the work. (author)

  3. Film boiling of magnetic nanofluids (MNFs) over a vertical plate in presence of a uniform variable-directional magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvandi, Amir

    2016-05-01

    External magnetic fields are able to tune the thermophysical properties of magnetic nanofluids (MNFs) and control the flow and heat transfer rate. Orientation and intensity of the external magnetic field would influence the thermal conductivity of MNFs and makes it anisotropic. The motivation behind this study is the need to examine the effects of anisotropic behavior of thermal conductivity on flow field and heat transfer characteristics at film boiling of MNFs over a vertical plate in the presence of a uniform variable-directional magnetic field. The modified Buongiorno model is employed for modeling the nanofluids to observe the effects of nanoparticle migration. The results have been obtained for different parameters, including Brownian motion to thermophoretic diffusion NBT, saturation nanoparticle concentration ϕsat, Hartmann number Ha, magnetic field angle α, and normal temperature difference γ = (Tw -Tsat) /Tw . A closed form expression for the distribution of nanoparticle volume fraction has been obtained and the effects of pertinent parameters on heat transfer rate have been investigated. It has been shown that the heat transfer rate is improved further when an external magnetic field exerts in the direction of the temperature gradient.

  4. CHF multiplier of subcooled flow boiling for non-uniform heating conditions in swirl tube

    SciTech Connect

    Inasaka, F.; Nariai, H.

    1994-12-31

    The high heat flux components of fusion reactors, such as divertor plates and beam dumps of neutral beam injectors, are estimated to be subjected to very high heat loads more than 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, is one of the most important problems in designing cooling systems. For practical applications in cooling systems, subcooled flow boiling in water combined with swirl-flow in tubes with internal twisted tape is thought to be the most superior for CHF characteristics in fusion reactor components, heat by irradiation comes in from one side of the wall, and cooling channel is then under circumferentially non-uniform heating condition. Authors have conducted the experiments on the CHF with internal twisted tapes under circumferentially non-uniform heating conditions and showed that when the intensity of non-uniformity increased, q{sub cH} (peak heat flux at burnout under nonuniform heating condition) in tube with internal twisted tape increased above the q{sub c,unif} (CHF under uniform heating condition), though the average qualities were the same for both cases. They also showed that this CHF enhancement was not seen in smooth tubes without tape under the same average qualities.

  5. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 1: Critical heat flux, boiling crisis onset and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. The same loop was used in two experiments with different heated section internal diameter (10 and 6 mm). The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were recorded. The values of critical heat flux (CHF) were found at different positions of the test section, and the post-CHF regime was studied. The predictions of CHF by existing correlations were good in the downstream portion of the section, however CHF anomalies have been observed near the entrance, in the low quality region. In resonance with this, the re-wetting of the surface has distinct hysteresis behavior in each of the two CHF regions. Furthermore, hydraulics effects of crisis, namely on friction, were studied (Part 2). This research is the starting point to future works addressing transients conducing to boiling crisis in helium natural circulation loops.

  6. The heat-pipe resembling action of boiling bubbles in endovenous laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, Renate R.; van Ruijven, Peter W. M.; Nijsten, Tamar; Neumann, H. A. Martino; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) produces boiling bubbles emerging from pores within the hot fiber tip and traveling over a distal length of about 20 mm before condensing. This evaporation-condensation mechanism makes the vein act like a heat pipe, where very efficient heat transport maintains a constant temperature, the saturation temperature of 100°C, over the volume where these non-condensing bubbles exist. During EVLA the above-mentioned observations indicate that a venous cylindrical volume with a length of about 20 mm is kept at 100°C. Pullback velocities of a few mm/s then cause at least the upper part of the treated vein wall to remain close to 100°C for a time sufficient to cause irreversible injury. In conclusion, we propose that the mechanism of action of boiling bubbles during EVLA is an efficient heat-pipe resembling way of heating of the vein wall. PMID:20644976

  7. Pool boiling with high heat flux enabled by a porous artery structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lizhan; Zhang, Lianpei; Lin, Guiping; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-06-01

    A porous artery structure utilizing the concept of "phase separation and modulation" is proposed to enhance the critical heat flux of pool boiling. A series of experiments were conducted on a range of test articles in which multiple rectangular arteries were machined directly into the top surface of a 10.0 mm diameter copper rod. The arteries were then covered by a 2.0 mm thickness microporous copper plate through silver brazing. The pool wall was fabricated from transparent Pyrex glass to allow a visualization study, and water was used as the working fluid. Experimental results confirmed that the porous artery structure provided individual flow paths for the liquid supply and vapor venting, and avoided the detrimental effects of the liquid/vapor counter flow. As a result, a maximum heat flux of 610 W/cm2 over a heating area of 0.78 cm2 was achieved with no indication of dryout, prior to reaching the heater design temperature limit. Following the experimental tests, the mechanisms responsible for the boiling critical heat flux and performance enhancement of the porous artery structure were analyzed.

  8. Subcooled Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Microgravity: Terrier-improved Orion Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Benton, John; Kucner, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A microscale heater array was used to study boiling in earth gravity and microgravity. The heater array consisted of 96 serpentine heaters on a quartz substrate. Each heater was 0.27 square millimeters. Electronic feedback loops kept each heater's temperature at a specified value. The University of Maryland constructed an experiment for the Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket that was delivered to NASA Wallops and flown. About 200 s of high quality microgravity and heat transfer data were obtained. The VCR malfunctioned, and no video was acquired. Subsequently, the test package was redesigned to fly on the KC-135 to obtain both data and video. The pressure was held at atmospheric pressure and the bulk temperature was about 20 C. The wall temperature was varied from 85 to 65 C. Results show that gravity has little effect on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble was surrounded by smaller bubbles, which eventually merged with the primary bubble. This bubble was formed by smaller bubbles coalescing, but had a constant size for a given superheat, indicating a balance between evaporation at the base and condensation on the cap. Most of the heaters under the bubble indicated low heat transfer, suggesting dryout at those heaters. High heat transfer occurred at the contact line surrounding the primary bubble. Marangoni convection formed a "jet" of fluid into the bulk fluid that forced the bubble onto the heater.

  9. Investigation of Body Force Effects on Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2002-01-01

    The bubble coalescence and interfacial instabilities that are important to modeling critical heat flux (CHF) in reduced-gravity systems can be sensitive to even minute body forces. Understanding these complex phenomena is vital to the design and safe implementation of two-phase thermal management loops proposed for space and planetary-based thermal systems. While reduced gravity conditions cannot be accurately simulated in 1g ground-based experiments, such experiments can help isolate the effects of the various forces (body force, surface tension force and inertia) which influence flow boiling CHF. In this project, the effects of the component of body force perpendicular to a heated wall were examined by conducting 1g flow boiling experiments at different orientations. FC-72 liquid was boiled along one wall of a transparent rectangular flow channel that permitted photographic study of the vapor-liquid interface at conditions approaching CHF. High-speed video imaging was employed to capture dominant CHF mechanisms. Six different CHF regimes were identified: Wavy Vapor Layer, Pool Boiling, Stratification, Vapor Counterflow, Vapor Stagnation, and Separated Concurrent Vapor Flow. CHF showed great sensitivity to orientation for flow velocities below 0.2 m/s, where very small CHF values where measured, especially with downflow and downward-facing heated wall orientations. High flow velocities dampened the effects of orientation considerably. Figure I shows representative images for the different CHF regimes. The Wavy Vapor Layer regime was dominant for all high velocities and most orientations, while all other regimes were encountered at low velocities, in the downflow and/or downward-facing heated wall orientations. The Interfacial Lift-off model was modified to predict the effects of orientation on CHF for the dominant Wavy Vapor Layer regime. The photographic study captured a fairly continuous wavy vapor layer travelling along the heated wall while permitting liquid

  10. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Control of Bubble Motion in Microgravity Using Electric Fields (BCOEL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle; Acquaviva, Tom; Coho, Bill; Grant, Nechelle; Nahra, Henry; Taylor, Al; Julian, Ed; Robinson, Dale; VanZandt, Dave

    2001-01-01

    The BCOEL project focuses on improving pool boiling heat transfer and bubble control in microgravity by exposing the fluid to electric fields. The electric fields induce a body force that can replace gravity in the low gravity environment, and enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. A better understanding of microgravity effects on boiling with and without electric fields is critical to the proper design of the phase-change-heat-removal equipment for use in spacebased applications. The microgravity experiments will focus on the visualization of bubble formation and shape during boiling. Heat fluxes on the boiling surface will be measured, and, together with the measured driving temperature differences, used to plot boiling curves for different electric field magnitudes. Bubble formation and boiling processes were found to be extremely sensitive to g-jitter. The duration of the experimental run is critical in order to achieve steady state in microgravity experiments. The International Space Station provides conditions suitable for such experiments. The experimental apparatus to be used in the study is described in the paper. The apparatus will be tested in the KC-135 first, and microgravity experiments will be conducted on board of the International Space Station using the Microgravity Science Glovebox as the experimental platform.

  11. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Control of Bubble Motion in Microgravity Using Electric Fields - BCOEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle; Acquaviva, Tom; Coho, Bill; Grant, Nechelle; Nahra, Henry; Sankaran, Subramanian; Taylor, Al; Julian, Ed; Robinson, Dale; VanZandt, Dave

    2001-01-01

    The BCOEL project focuses on improving pool boiling heat transfer and bubble control in microgravity by exposing the fluid to electric fields. The electric fields induce a body force that can replace gravity in the low gravity environment, and enhance bubble removal from thc heated surface. A better understanding of microgravity effects on boiling with and without electric fields is critical to the proper design of the phase-change-heat-removal equipment for use in space-based applications. The microgravity experiments will focus on the visualization of bubble formation and shape during boiling. Heat fluxes on the boiling surface will be measured, and, together with the measured driving temperature differences, used to plot boiling curvcs for different electric field magnitudes. Bubble formation and boiling processes were found to be extremely sensitive to g-jitter. The duration of the experimental run is critical in order to achieve steady state in microgravity experiments. The International Space Station provides conditions suitable for such experiments. The experimental appararus to be used in the study is described in the paper. The apparatus will be tested in the KC-135 first, and microgravity experiments will be conducted on board of the International Space Station using the Microgravity Science Glovebox as the experimental platform.

  12. Heat-shrinkable film improves adhesive bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, J. M.; Reed, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure is applied during adhesive bonding by wrapping parts in heat-shrinkable plastic film. Film eliminates need to vacuum bag or heat parts in expensive autoclave. With procedure, operators are trained quickly, and no special skills are required.

  13. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in heated coolant channels is an important heat transfer enhancement technique in the development of fusion reactor components, where high heat fluxes must be accommodated. As energy fluxes increase in magnitude, additional emphasis must be devoted to enhancing techniques such as sub cooling and enhanced surfaces. In addition to subcooling, other high heat flux alternatives such as high velocity helium and liquid metal cooling have been considered as serious contenders. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages [1], which must be weighed as to reliability and reduced cost of fusion reactor components. Previous studies [2] have set the stage for the present work, which will concentrate on fundamental thermal hydraulic issues associated with the h-international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Engineering Design Activity (EDA). This proposed work is intended to increase our understanding of high heat flux removal alternatives as well as our present capabilities by: (1) including single-side heating effects in models for local predictions of heat transfer and critical heat flux; (2) inspection of the US, Japanese, and other possible data sources for single-side heating, with the aim of exploring possible correlations for both CHF and local heat transfer; and (3) assessing the viability of various high heat flux removal techniques. The latter task includes: (a) sub-cooled water flow boiling with enhancements such as twisted tapes, and hypervapotrons, (b) high velocity helium cooling, and (c) other potential techniques such as liquid metal cooling. This assessment will increase our understanding of: (1) hypervapotron heat transfer via fins, flow recirculation, and flow oscillation, and (2) swirl flow. This progress report contains selective examples of ongoing work. Section II contains an extended abstract, which is part of and evolving technical paper on single-side f heating. Section III describes additional details

  14. Heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling in an annular mini gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Musiał, Tomasz; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to present the concept of mathematical models of heat transfer in flow boiling in an annular mini gap between the metal pipe with enhanced exterior surface and the external glass pipe. The one- and two-dimensional mathematical models were proposed to describe stationary heat transfer in the gap. A set of experimental data governed both the form of energy equations in cylindrical coordinates and the boundary conditions. The models were formulated to minimize the number of experimentally determined constants. Known temperature distributions in the enhanced surface and in the fluid helped to determine, from the Robin condition, the local heat transfer coefficients at the enhanced surface - fluid contact. The Trefftz method was used to find two-dimensional temperature distributions for the thermal conductive filler layer, enhanced surface and flowing fluid. The method of temperature calculation depended on whether the area of single-phase convection ended with boiling incipience in the gap or the two-phase flow region prevailed, with either fully developed bubbly flow or bubbly-slug flow. In the two-phase flow, the fluid temperature was calculated by Trefftz method. Trefftz functions for the Laplace equation and for the energy equation were used in the calculations.

  15. Analysis of Continuous Heat Exchangers for Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteign, B. P. M.; Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Plachta, D.; Christie, R.; Carlberg, E.

    2008-03-01

    Cryogenic boil-off reduction systems (CBRS) employing continuous heat exchangers in pressurized helium distributed cooling networks for active thermal control of large surfaces such as propellant tank walls and light-weight radiation shields have been studied for some time. Usually, very simple and intuitive relations are used to derive such quantities as the pressure drop across the network and the required flow rate for a given heat load. Here, detailed thermal-fluid and heat transfer relations for such systems are formulated and then studied term by term in order to determine the conditions under which various approximations to them may reasonably be made. It is found that in most applications of interest, use of the simplified relations is justifiable.

  16. Flow regimes and mechanistic modeling of critical heat flux under subcooled flow boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, Jean-Marie

    Thermal performance of heat flux controlled boiling heat exchangers are usually limited by the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) above which the heat transfer degrades quickly, possibly leading to heater overheating and destruction. In an effort to better understand the phenomena, a literature review of CHF experimental visualizations under subcooled flow boiling conditions was performed and systematically analyzed. Three major types of CHF flow regimes were identified (bubbly, vapor clot and slug flow regime) and a CHF flow regime map was developed, based on a dimensional analysis of the phenomena and available data. It was found that for similar geometric characteristics and pressure, a Weber number (We)/thermodynamic quality (x) map can be used to predict the CHF flow regime. Based on the experimental observations and the review of the available CHF mechanistic models under subcooled flow boiling conditions, hypothetical CHF mechanisms were selected for each CHF flow regime, all based on a concept of wall dry spot overheating, rewetting prevention and subsequent dry spot spreading. It is postulated that a high local wall superheat occurs locally in a dry area of the heated wall, due to a cyclical event inherent to the considered CHF two-phase flow regime, preventing rewetting (Leidenfrost effect). The selected modeling concept has the potential to span the CHF conditions from highly subcooled bubbly flow to early stage of annular flow. A numerical model using a two-dimensional transient thermal analysis of the heater undergoing nucleation was developed to mechanistically predict CHF in the case of a bubbly flow regime. In this type of CHF two-phase flow regime, the high local wall superheat occurs underneath a nucleating bubble at the time of bubble departure. The model simulates the spatial and temporal heater temperature variations during nucleation at the wall, accounting for the stochastic nature of the boiling phenomena. The model has also the potential to evaluate

  17. Influence of the heater material on the critical heat load at boiling of liquids on surfaces with different sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhina, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    Data on critical heat loads q cr for the saturated and unsaturated pool boiling of water and ethanol under atmospheric pressure are reported. It is found experimentally that the critical heat load does not necessarily coincide with the heat load causing burnout of the heater, which should be taken into account. The absolute values of q cr for the boiling of water and ethanol on copper surfaces 65, 80, 100, 120, and 200 μm in diameter; tungsten surface 100 μm in diameter; and nichrome surface 100 μm in diameter are obtained experimentally.

  18. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Forced Convective Boiling in Microchannels by Periodic Electrospun Nanofiber Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, Alexander; Freystein, Martin; Kolberg, Felix; Sinha-Ray, Sumit; Sahu, Rakesh; Spiegel, Lucas; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Stephan, Peter

    2015-03-01

    To enhance heat transfer in forced convective boiling the microchannel bottom was amended by a nano-texture - periodic rectangular mats of electrospun polymer nanofibers. The fibers were ~ 300-500 nm in diameter and the mat thicknesses were about 6-15 μm. The test fluid was FC-72 and the flow in microchannels contained trains of Taylor bubbles. The role of the nanofibers was to retain the warm microchannel bottom wet, to prevent dry-out and thus to enhance the heat removal rate. In the present experiments the time-average heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the nanofiber-coated domains were found to be 1.5-2 times higher than those at the uncoated ones. Accordingly, a significant decrease (by 5-8 K) in the superheat was observed at the same Re of 387 and power supply of 36.1 kW/m2. At a higher Re of 432 and lower power supply of 28.1 kW/m2 similar trends in the heat removal rate and surface superheat were found. The significant enhancement of the heat transfer results from the fact that nanofiber mats facilitate wetting of surface under passing Taylor bubbles, thus delaying formation of vapor flow at the channel bottom. The interstices of the nanofiber mat act as the nucleation sites facilitating formation of tiny bubbles, which eventually results in a higher heat removal rate from the surface at a reduced superheat.

  19. Oxidation of SnO to SnO{sub 2} thin films in boiling water at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nose, K. Suzuki, A. Y.; Oda, N.; Kamiko, M.; Mitsuda, Y.

    2014-03-03

    We demonstrated that SnO is oxidized to SnO{sub 2} in boiling water. (001)-oriented SnO thin films were pulsed-laser deposited onto a glass substrate. The Sn valence number changed from (II) to (IV) by keeping SnO films in boiling water at atmospheric pressure for 5 h. Optical transparency of the obtained SnO{sub 2} films was greater than 95% in the visible light range. The SnO{sub 2} films possessed an amorphous structure, and exhibited dielectric properties. Atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed granular structures and the existence of –OH groups, which may account for the diffusion of oxidants within the film.

  20. Comparison of pool boiling heat transfer for different tunnel-pore surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Complex experimental investigations of boiling heat transfer on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil were performed. Experimental data were discussed for three kinds of enhanced surfaces: tunnel structures (TS), narrow tunnel structures (NTS) and mini-fins with the copper wire net (NTS-L). The experiments were carried out with water, ethanol, R-123 and FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. The TS and NTS surfaces were manufactured out of perforated copper foil (hole diameters: 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 mm) sintered with the mini-fins, formed on the vertical side of the 5 and 10 mm high rectangular main fins and horizontal inter-fin surface. The NTS-L surfaces were formed by mini-fins of 0.5 and 1 mm height uniformly spaced on the base surface. The wire mesh with an aperture of 0.32, 0.4 and 0.5 mm sintered with the fin tips formed a system of connected perpendicular horizontal tunnels. The tunnel width was 0.6 - 1.0 - 1.5 mm and the depth was 0.5 or 1.0 mm. The effects of the Bond number and dimensionless parameters for three kinds of enhanced structures on heat transfer ratio at nucleate pool boiling were examined.

  1. Independent and collective roles of surface structures at different length scales on pool boiling heat transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Calvin H.; Rioux, Russell P.

    2016-01-01

    Spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces are synthesized to examine the individual role of contact angles in connecting lateral Rayleigh-Taylor wavelength to vertical Kevin-Helmholtz wavelength on hydrodynamic instability for the onset of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF). Solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces are sintered to investigate the individual role of pillar structure pitch at millimeter scale, named as module wavelength, on hydrodynamic instability at CHF. Last, spherical Cu nanocavities are coated on the porous Cu pillars to create a multiscale Cu structure, which is studied to examine the collective role and relative significance of contact angles and module wavelength on hydrodynamic instability at CHF, and the results indicate that module wavelength plays the dominant role on hydrodynamic instability at CHF when the height of surface structures is equal or above ¼ Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength. Pool boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) enhancements on spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces, solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces, and the integrated multiscale structure have been investigated, too. The experimental results reveal that the nanostructures and porous pillar structures can be combined together to achieve even higher enhancement of HTC than that of individual structures. PMID:27841322

  2. Independent and collective roles of surface structures at different length scales on pool boiling heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Calvin H; Rioux, Russell P

    2016-11-14

    Spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces are synthesized to examine the individual role of contact angles in connecting lateral Rayleigh-Taylor wavelength to vertical Kevin-Helmholtz wavelength on hydrodynamic instability for the onset of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF). Solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces are sintered to investigate the individual role of pillar structure pitch at millimeter scale, named as module wavelength, on hydrodynamic instability at CHF. Last, spherical Cu nanocavities are coated on the porous Cu pillars to create a multiscale Cu structure, which is studied to examine the collective role and relative significance of contact angles and module wavelength on hydrodynamic instability at CHF, and the results indicate that module wavelength plays the dominant role on hydrodynamic instability at CHF when the height of surface structures is equal or above ¼ Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength. Pool boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) enhancements on spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces, solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces, and the integrated multiscale structure have been investigated, too. The experimental results reveal that the nanostructures and porous pillar structures can be combined together to achieve even higher enhancement of HTC than that of individual structures.

  3. Independent and collective roles of surface structures at different length scales on pool boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Calvin H.; Rioux, Russell P.

    2016-11-01

    Spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces are synthesized to examine the individual role of contact angles in connecting lateral Rayleigh-Taylor wavelength to vertical Kevin-Helmholtz wavelength on hydrodynamic instability for the onset of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF). Solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces are sintered to investigate the individual role of pillar structure pitch at millimeter scale, named as module wavelength, on hydrodynamic instability at CHF. Last, spherical Cu nanocavities are coated on the porous Cu pillars to create a multiscale Cu structure, which is studied to examine the collective role and relative significance of contact angles and module wavelength on hydrodynamic instability at CHF, and the results indicate that module wavelength plays the dominant role on hydrodynamic instability at CHF when the height of surface structures is equal or above ¼ Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength. Pool boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) enhancements on spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces, solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces, and the integrated multiscale structure have been investigated, too. The experimental results reveal that the nanostructures and porous pillar structures can be combined together to achieve even higher enhancement of HTC than that of individual structures.

  4. Critical heat flux in forced convective boiling with a plane jet (Revised correlation for saturated condition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monde, M.; Wang, X.

    Critical heat flux (CHF) has been measured in saturated forced convective boiling with a wall jet on a rectangular heated surface of 40 and 80mm in length and 20mm in width. The jet velocity is varied from 3 to 15 m/s, and the system pressure is 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4MPa for R113. It is found that the existing correlation for saturation condition can be applied to the CHF at high and low ρl/ρg values (e.g. water and R22), but hardly to the CHF at medium ρl/ρg values (e.g. R113 at 0.2 and 0.4MPa). A revised correlation is proposed to predict most of the CHF data within an accuracy of +/-25%.

  5. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  6. Characteristic of local boiling heat transfer of ammonia and ammonia / water binary mixture on the plate type evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Power generation using small temperature difference such as ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) is expected to be the countermeasures against global warming problem. As ammonia and ammonia/water are used in evaporators for OTEC and DTEC as working fluids, the research of their local boiling heat transfer is important for improvement of the power generation efficiency. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients were performed for ammonia /water mixture ( z = 0.9-1) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5-15 kg/m2 s), heat flux (15-23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7-0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of mass flux and composition of ammonia, and decrease with an increase of heat flux.

  7. A Mini-channel Heat Exchanger System for Heating, Boiling, and Superheating Water by Radiant Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    heat flux should not be overlooked. T [°C] Temperature TC Thermocouple w [cm] Width of rectangular channel wc [cm] Center -to- center spacing of...smaller hydraulic diameters changes the flow dynamics and brings the bulk fluid in closer contact with the heat exchanger wall. The objective is a...prescribed or targeted heat rate is known. The available contact area is then used to specify the required heat flux of the cooling or heating

  8. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The prestart thermal conditioning of the hardware in LOX (liquid oxygen) systems involve heat transfer between LOX and metal where boiling plays a large role. Information is easily found on nucleate boiling, maximum heat flux, minimum heat flux and film boiling for common fluids like water. After looking at these standard correlations it was felt more data was needed for the cool down side transition boiling for the LN2 and LOX. In particular interest is the film boiling values, the temperature at which transition begins and the slope as peak heat flux is approached. The ultimate goal is an array of boiling heat transfer coefficient as a function of surface temperature which can be used in the chilldown model of the feed system, engine and bleed system for X-34. The first experiment consisted of an actual MC-1 LOX Impeller which had been machined backwards, that was instrumented with 17 surface thermocouples and submerged in liquid nitrogen. The thermocouples were installed on metal thicknesses varying from the thin inducer to the thick hub.

  9. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Driven Swirl Boiling Liquid/Gas Separator under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinuma, Ryoji; Nguyen, Ngoc; Dickes, Neil; Kurwitz, Richard C.; Best, Frederick R.

    2009-03-01

    Under reduced gravity conditions, conventional gravity-assisted steam generators do not function properly and shear-driven or swirl type of devices must be used. Once-through boilers with special inserts such as twisted-tapes or swirl devices and rotating boilers have been previously studied. The once-through boiler requires a liquid-vapor phase separator due to the inability to vaporize all liquid completely to avoid burn-out. These devices also encounter instabilities due to the sudden formation or collapse of vapor. The rotating boiler requires a large power input to operate and has less reliability due to moving parts and dynamic seals at high temperature. A liquid-driven vortex boiling separator is categorized as a shear-driven boiler, but creates centripetal-driven buoyancy forces to form a gas-liquid vortex by injecting liquid tangentially along the inner wall of the cylinder rather than rotating the body itself. The vortex boiling separator eliminates the disadvantages of devices mentioned above, having a low pressure drop, no moving parts and generating dry vapor at its outlet. Texas A&M University carried out a reduced gravity flight experiment on the NASA C-9 aircraft to investigate the heat transfer characteristics and performance based on similar devices developed at Texas A&M.

  10. Minimum film-boiling quench temperature increase by CuO porous-microstructure coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jun-young; Lee, Gi Cheol; Kaviany, Massoud; Park, Hyun Sun; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Increase in the minimum film-boiling quench temperature, TMFB, is achieved with microstructured CuO particles, and attributed to local cooling (fin effect) by the microstructure causing liquid-solid contact. A periodic structure is obtained using electrochemical deposition of 1 μm diameter particles on brass sphere diameter 15 mm forming unit-cell porous cones of average height L = 100 μm and base diameter D = 20 μm. Fin analysis predicts the cone tip cooling to the homogeneous nucleation temperature of water (˜330 °C), while the base temperature is at 600 °C. This causes liquid-solid contact during quenching, and analysis suggests the fin effective thermal conductivity ⟨k⟩ and fin characteristic length L2/D are key to this liquid-solid contact that influences TMFB.

  11. A 2D inverse problem of predicting boiling heat transfer in a long fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz

    2016-10-01

    A method for the determination of local values of the heat transfer coefficient on non-isothermal surfaces was analyzed on the example of a long smooth-surfaced fin made of aluminium. On the basis of the experimental data, two cases were taken into consideration: one-dimensional model for Bi < 0.1 and two-dimensional model for thicker elements. In the case when the drop in temperature over the thickness could be omitted, the rejected local values of heat fluxes were calculated from the integral of the equation describing temperature distribution on the fin. The corresponding boiling curve was plotted on the basis of temperature gradient distribution as a function of superheat. For thicker specimens, where Bi > 0.1, the problem was modelled using a 2-D heat conduction equation, for which the boundary conditions were posed on the surface observed with a thermovision camera. The ill-conditioned inverse problem was solved using a method of heat polynomials, which required validation.

  12. Microlayer during boiling in narrow slot channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diev, Mikhail D.; Leontiev, Alexander I.

    1997-01-01

    An international space station Alpha will have a two-phase thermal control system. Boiling of a liquid ammonia will be a process of heat collection in evaporative heat exchangers. Unfortunately, only little data is available for boiling heat transfer in microgravity. Geometries of boiling channels working good in normal gravity are not appropriate in microgravity, and special means should be worked out to avoid some undesired events. From this point of view, the narrow slot channels may be assumed as a promising geometry for microgravity operation. During boiling in narrow slots, the vapor bubbles are flattened between the channel walls. The vapor phase and the channel wall are separated by a thin liquid film which is known as a microlayer. The paper presents the experimental results compared to the theoretical analysis, the paper also shows the narrow slot channels as a perspective configuration for microgravity applications.

  13. Enhancement of Nucleate Boiling Heat Flux on Macro/Micro-Structured Surfaces Cooled by Multiple Impinging Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kugler, Scott Lee

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer from modified surfaces cooled by multiple in-line impinging circular jets is reported and found to agree with single jet results. A copper block is heated from the back by two electrical arcs, and cooled on the opposite side by three identical liquid jets of distilled water at subcoolings of 25 C 50 C and 77 C and Freon 113 at 24 C subcooling. Liquid flow rates are held constant at 5, 10, and 15 GPH for each of the three jets with jet velocities ranging from 1.4 m/s to 1 1.2 m/s and jet diameters from 0.95 mm to 2.2 mm. To increase the maximum heat flux (CHF) and heat removal rate, the boiling surface was modified by both macro and micro enhancements. Macro modification consists of machined radial grooves in the boiling surface arranged in an optimally designed pattern to allow better liquid distribution along the surface. These grooves also reduce splashing of liquid droplets, and provide 'channels' to sweep away bubbles. Micro modification was achieved by flame spraying metal powder on the boiling surface, creating a porous, sintered surface. With the addition of both micro and macro structured enhancements, maximum heat flux and nucleate boiling can be enhanced by more than 200%. Examination of each surface modification separately and together indicates that at lower superheats, the micro structure provides the enhanced heat transfer by providing more nucleation sites, while for higher superheats the macro structure allows better liquid distribution and bubble removal. A correlation is presented to account for liquid subcoolings and surface enhancements, in addition to the geometrical and fluid properties previously reported in the literature.

  14. Time and Space Resolved Wall Temperature Measurements during Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work is to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleate bubbles on a constant heat flux surface. This was performed using a microheater array with 100 micron resolution that allowed effectively simultaneous measurements of surface temperature while supplying a constant dissipative heat flux. This data is then correlated with high speed (> 1000Hz) visual recordings of the bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that a significant source of energy during bubble nucleation and initial growth is the superheated layer around the bubble. Bubble coalescence was not observed to decrease surface temperature as significantly as bubble departure from the surface. Since bubble departure is typically followed by a sharp increase in the heater surface temperature, it is surmised that the departing bubble effectively removes the superheated layer, allowing a high local heat transfer rate with the bulk fluid through transient conduction/micro-convection during rewetting.

  15. Immersion cooling of an array of heated elements by convective boiling of a subcooled binary liquid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillis, W. R.; Carey, V. P.

    1991-01-01

    Boiling data and the critical heat flux conditions are reported for both channel flow and jet impingement flow using varying concentrations of R-11 in R-113. An array of ten flush-mounted heated elements on one wall of a vertical passage were cooled by subcooled boiling. Data indicate that for this binary system the addition of R-11 to R-113 does not produce a significant change in critical heat flux. For channel flow boiling, the data indicate that addition of a small amount of a less volatile component slightly increases the critical heat flux, whereas addition of a small amount of more volatile component decreases it. The critical heat flux data were also found to agree well with critical heat flux correlations for pure fluids if the mole-weighted mean properties of the mixture were used to compute the critical heat flux from the pure fluid correlation. The significance of the findings of this study with regard to the use of binary mixtures of dielectric fluids for immersion cooling of electronic components is also discussed in this paper.

  16. Development of a surface array of microscale heaters to measure wall heat transfer underneath single bubbles in nucleate pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Kalkur, T.S.

    1995-12-31

    A novel array of microscale heaters has been developed to measure the heat transfer coefficient at many points underneath individual bubbles during boiling as a function of space and time. This heater array enables the local heat transfer from a surface during the bubble growth and departure process to be measured with very high temporal and spatial resolution, and should allow better understanding of the boiling heat transfer mechanisms by pinpointing when and where in the bubble departure cycle large amounts of wall heat transfer occur. Such information can provide much needed data regarding the important heat transfer mechanisms during the bubble departure cycle, and can serve as benchmarks to validate many of the analytical and numerical models used to simulate boiling. The current array has 148 heaters within a 3 mm diameter circle. Feedback loops similar to those used in hot-wire anemometry are used to keep each heater at a constant temperature, and the power required to do this is directly related to the heat transfer coefficient. A description of the heater performance and construction, the feedback loops, the computer control circuit, and the calibration rig are described.

  17. Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

  18. Enhancement of critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling of water by use of a volatile additive

    SciTech Connect

    Pabisz, R.A. Jr.; Bergles, A.E.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation considers the effect of a 1-pentanol additive in water on the critical heat flux (CHF) and pressure drop in forced subcooled boiling. A small quantity of 1-pentanol was added to distilled water with the objective of getting an approximate 2% by weight mixture, which had been found to give superior performance in previous studies of pool and flow boiling. Experiments were performed using stainless steel tubes with internal diameters of 4.4 and 6.1 mm. Tests were conducted with mass fluxes of 4,400 kg/m{sup 2}s, exit pressures of 9 bar, length-to-diameter ratios of 25, and exit subcoolings from 65 to 90 C. Test sections were heated directly by DC power, and critical heat flux data were inferred from test-section burnout. The alcohol concentration was periodically checked by draining off a sample and performing a Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scan on the mixture. At high subcoolings, the mixture exhibited an increase in the critical heat flux over that of pure water. However at low subcoolings there is a decrease in the critical heat flux. The increases in critical heat flux noted with the 1-pentanol mixture in this experiment were not as large as would be expected from saturated pool boiling results published by Van Stralen (1959). Pressure drop data for both the mixture and the pure water also were recorded. The 1-pentanol mixture, in general, exhibited larger pressure drops for the same conditions. Subcooled flow boiling has a wide array of commercial cooling applications, including blades in gas turbines, high power laser optics, plasma-facing components in fusion reactors, supercomputers, etc.

  19. Nucleate pool boiling heat transfer characteristics of TiO{sub 2}-water nanofluids at very low concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Suriyawong, Adirek; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-11-15

    A study of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of TiO{sub 2}-water nanofluids is experimentally conducted. Nanofluids with various concentrations of 0.00005, 0.0001, 0.0005, 0.005, and 0.01 vol.% are employed. Horizontal circular plates made from copper and aluminium with different roughness values of 0.2 and 4 {mu}m are used as heating surfaces. The experiments are performed to explore the effects of nanofluids concentration as well as heating surface material and roughness on nucleate pool boiling characteristics and the heat transfer coefficient under ambient pressure. The results show that based on the copper heated surface which is tested with a concentration of 0.0001 vol.%, higher nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient is obtained when compared with the base fluid. A 15% increase is obtained for the surface roughness of 0.2 {mu}m and a 4% increase is obtained for roughness of 4 {mu}m. For concentrations higher than 0.0001 vol.%, however, the higher the concentration, the lower the heat transfer coefficient. In the case of aluminium heated surface, the corresponding heat transfer coefficients are larger than for the copper surface by around 30% with a roughness of 0.2 {mu}m and around 27% with a roughness of 4 {mu}m. Moreover, the results also indicate that the heat transfer coefficient obtained based on a roughness of 4 {mu}m is higher than that for a roughness of 0.2 {mu}m by around 12% for aluminium and by around 13% for copper. (author)

  20. Subcooled freon-11 flow boiling in top-heated finned coolant channels with and without a twisted tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alvin; Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in top-heated finned horizontal tubes to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels. The objectives are to examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for circular coolant channels with spiral finned walls and/or spiral fins with a twisted tape, and improve the data reduction technique of a previous investigator. The working fluid is freon-11 with an inlet temperature of 22.2 C (approximately 21 C subcooling). The coolant channel's exit pressure and mass velocity are 0.19 M Pa (absolute) and 0.21 Mg/sq. ms, respectively. Two tube configurations were examined; i.e., tubes had either 6.52 (small pitch) or 4.0 (large pitch) fins/cm of the circumferential length (26 and 16 fins, respectively). The large pitch fins were also examined with a twisted tape insert. The inside nominal diameter of the copper channels at the root of the fins was 1.0 cm. The results show that by adding enhancement devices, boiling occurs almost simultaneously at all axial locations. The case of spiral fins with large pitch resulted in larger mean (circumferentially averaged) heat transfer coefficients, h sub m, at all axial locations. Finally, when twisted tape is added to the tube with large-pitched fins, the power required for the onset of boiling is reduced at all axial and circumferential locations.

  1. Subcooled freon-11 flow boiling in top-heated finned coolant channels with and without a twisted tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alvin; Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    An experimental study was conducted in top-heated finned horizontal tubes to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels. The objectives are to examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for circular coolant channels with spiral finned walls and/or spiral fins with a twisted tape, and improve the data reduction technique of a previous investigator. The working fluid is freon-11 with an inlet temperature of 22.2 C (approximately 21 C subcooling). The coolant channel's exit pressure and mass velocity are 0.19 M Pa (absolute) and 0.21 Mg/sq. ms, respectively. Two tube configurations were examined; i.e., tubes had either 6.52 (small pitch) or 4.0 (large pitch) fins/cm of the circumferential length (26 and 16 fins, respectively). The large pitch fins were also examined with a twisted tape insert. The inside nominal diameter of the copper channels at the root of the fins was 1.0 cm. The results show that by adding enhancement devices, boiling occurs almost simultaneously at all axial locations. The case of spiral fins with large pitch resulted in larger mean (circumferentially averaged) heat transfer coefficients, h sub m, at all axial locations. Finally, when twisted tape is added to the tube with large-pitched fins, the power required for the onset of boiling is reduced at all axial and circumferential locations.

  2. Effects of extrusion, boiling, autoclaving, and microwave heating on lupine allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Alvarez, Javier; Guillamón, Eva; Crespo, Jesús F; Cuadrado, Carmen; Burbano, Carmen; Rodríguez, Julia; Fernández, Consuelo; Muzquiz, Mercedes

    2005-02-23

    Lupine flour has been reported as a causative agent of allergic reactions. However, the allergenicity of lupine after thermal processing is not well-known. For this purpose, the allergenic characteristics of lupine seeds after boiling (up to 60 min), autoclaving (121 degrees C, 1.18 atm, up to 20 min and 138 degrees C, 2.56 atm, up to 30 min), microwave heating (30 min), and extrusion cooking were studied. The IgE-binding capacity was analyzed by IgE-immunoblotting and CAP inhibition using a serum pool from 23 patients with lupine-specific IgE. Skin testing was carried out in four patients. An important reduction in allergenicity after autoclaving at 138 degrees C for 20 min was observed. IgE antibodies from two individual sera recognized bands at 23 and 29 kDa in autoclaved samples at 138 degrees C for 20 min. Autoclaving for 30 min abolished the IgE binding to these two components. A previously undetected band at 70 kDa was recognized by an individual serum. Therefore, prolonged autoclaving might have an important effect on the allergenicity of lupine with the majority of patients lacking IgE reactivity to these processed samples.

  3. Numerical Analysis of Nucleate Boiling on High Heat-Flux and High Subcooling Condition for Reactivity Initiation Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, S.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2002-07-01

    This paper shows the numerical simulation study on the growth of the bubble in the transient pool boiling using MPS-MAFL method. The growth process of a bubble with the different initial radii is calculated in a high heat-flux and high subcooling condition expected in nuclear reactor core during RIA. The smaller initial radius is, the earlier the growth starts. The initial bubble radius has little effect on the growth initiation time and the bubble departure radius. (authors)

  4. Design study of plastic film heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyer, E. C.; Brownell, D. L.

    1986-02-01

    This report presents the results of an effort to develop and design a unique thermoplastic film heat exchanger for use in an industrial heat pump evaporator system and other energy recovery applications. The concept for the exchanger is that of individual heat exchange elements formed by two adjoining and freely hanging plastic films. Liquid flows downward in a regulated fashion between the films due to the balance of hydrostatic and frictional forces. The fluid stream on the outside of film may be a free-falling liquid film, a condensing gas, or a noncondensing gas. The flow and structural principles are similar to those embodied in an earlier heat exchange system developed for use in waste water treatment systems (Sanderson). The design allows for high heat transfer rates while working within the thermal and structural limitations of thermoplastic materials. The potential of this new heat exchanger design lies in the relatively low cost of plastic film and the high inherent corrosion and fouling resistance. This report addresses the selection of materials, the potential heat transf er performance, the mechanical design and operation of a unit applied in a low pressure steam recovery system, and the expected selling price in comparison to conventional metallic shell and tube heat exchangers.

  5. BOILING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  6. Bubble Dynamics, Two-Phase Flow, and Boiling Heat Transfer in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the research is to study the feasibility of employing an external force to replace the buoyancy force in order to maintain nucleate boiling in microgravity. We have found that a bulk velocity field, an electric field and an acoustic field could each play the role of the gravity field in microgravity. Nucleate boiling could be maintained by any one of the three external force fields in space.

  7. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  8. A fundamental study of nucleate pool boiling under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, and the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  9. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part II: Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    The predictive ability of the available state-of-the-art heat transfer correlations of refrigerant-oil mixture is evaluated with the present experiment data of small tubes with inside diameter of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm. Most of these correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer coefficient of 6.34 mm tube, but none of them can predict heat transfer coefficient of 2.50 mm tube satisfactorily. A new correlation of two-phase heat transfer multiplier with local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture is developed. This correlation approaches the actual physical mechanism of flow boiling heat transfer of refrigerant-oil mixture and can reflect the actual co-existing conditions of refrigerant and lubricant oil. More than 90% of the experiment data of both test tubes have less than {+-}20% deviation from the prediction values of the new correlations. (author)

  10. Pool boiling of enhanced heat transfer surfaces in refrigerant-oil mixtures and aqueous calcium sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Curcio, L.A.; Somerscales, E.F.

    1994-08-01

    Pool boiling data of structured surfaces in R113/3GS oil mixtures show a general decrease in heat transfer with oil concentration, degradation in performance of all surfaces at 10% oil, no change in enhancement of the structured surfaces over plain surface, and restoration of performance of the enhanced surfaces upon cleaning in denatured alcohol. Fouling data of structured surfaces in pool boiling of sat. aq. CaSO{sub 4} solution show that effects of fouling (wall superheat changes, deposit weight) are more pronounced at 80 kW/m{sup 2} than at 10 kW/m{sup 2} heat flux; precipitation fouling show an effect within the first 2 h exposure. High flux surfaces have lower deposition weight than other surfaces; thus the deposition rate may depend strongly on wall superheat. The numerous nucleation sites of the enhanced surfaces provide more turbulent motion near the boiling surface than for the plain surface; thus the removal rate should be greater for an enhanced surface, although no removal of a deposit was ever observed.

  11. Experimental studies of heat exchange for sodium boiling in the fuel assembly model: Safety substantiation of a promising fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khafizov, R. R.; Poplavskii, V. M.; Rachkov, V. I.; Sorokin, A. P.; Trufanov, A. A.; Ashurko, Yu. M.; Volkov, A. V.; Ivanov, E. F.; Privezentsev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the ULOF-type accident development in a fast reactor with sodium coolant performed using the COREMELT code indicates that sodium boiling in the active core takes place. The boiling is accompanied by oscillations of the technological parameters of the reactor installation; these oscillations can go on during several tens of seconds. In this case, it is possible that a stable regime of removal of heat from residual energy release is implemented. The model of the two-phase coolant flow applied in the code has an important effect on the numerical results; that is why this model needs experimental verification. For eliminating the development of an accident resulting in destruction of the active core elements, a structural solution is proposed; the essence of it is the application of the sodium void above the reactor active core. The experimental installation was developed and the heat exchange at sodium boiling in the model fuel assembly of the fast reactor in the regimes of natural and forced circulation in the presence of the sodium void and the top end shield was studied. It was demonstrated that, in the presence of the sodium void, it is possible to provide long-term cooling of the fuel assembly for a thermal flux density on the fuel element simulator surface of up to 140 and 170 kW/m2 in the natural and forced circulation modes, respectively. The obtained data are used for more precise determination of the numerical model of sodium boiling in the fuel assembly and verification of the COREMELT code.

  12. The freezing point depression of mammalian tissues after sudden heating in boiling distilled water.

    PubMed

    APPELBOOM, J W; BRODSKY, W A; TUTTLE, W S; DIAMOND, I

    1958-07-20

    The calculated freezing point depression of freshly excised boiled mammalian tissue is approximately the same as that of plasma. The boiling procedure was chosen to eliminate the influence of metabolism on the level of the freezing point depression. Problems created by the boiling, such as equilibrium between tissue and diluent, change in activity coefficient by dilution, and loss of CO(2) content, are discussed. A frozen crushed tissue homogenate is hypertonic to plasma. Boiling and dilution of such hypertonic homogenate exposed to room temperature for 5 to 15 minutes did not produce significant or unexplicable decreases in its osmotic activity. Moreover, freezing and crushing of a boiled diluted tissue did not produce any increase of the isoosmotic level of freezing point depression. It is possible to explain these data either with the hypothesis of hypertonic cell fluid or with that of isotonic cell fluid. In the case of an assumed isotonic cell fluid, data can be explained with one assumption, experimentally backed. In the case of an assumed hypertonic theory data can be explained only with the help of at least three ad hoc postulates. The data support the validity of the classical concept which holds that cell fluid is isotonic to extracellular fluid.

  13. Dynamical Behavior of Discrete Bubble and Heat Transfer of Nucleate Pool Boiling in Short-Term Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Fu

    2012-07-01

    Boiling in microgravity is an increasing significant subject of investigation. Motivation for the study comes not only from many potential space applications due to its high efficiency to transfer high heat flux with liquid-vapor phase change, but also from powerful platform of microgravity to reveal the mechanism of heat transfer underneath the phenomenon of boiling. In the present paper, the growth of a discrete bubble during nucleate pool boiling and heat transfer in short-term microgravity is studied experimentally utilizing the drop tower Beijing. A P-doped N-type square silicon chip with the dimensions of 10x10x0.5 mm ^{3} was used as the heater. Two 0.25-mm diameters copper wires for power supply was soldered to the side surfaces of the chip at the opposite ends. The normal resistant of the chip is 75 Ω. The chip was heated by using Joule effect. A D.C. power supply of constant current was used to input energy to the heater element. A 0.12-mm diameter, T-type thermocouple adhered on the centre of the backside of the chip was used for the measurement of wall temperature, while two other T-type thermocouples were used for the bulk liquid temperature. FC-72 was used as working fluid. The concentration of air was determined by using Henry law as 0.0046 moles gas/mole liquid. The pressure and the bulk liquid temperature in the boiling chamber were nominally 102.0 kPa and 12.0 °C, respectively. The shapes of the bubbles were recorded using a high speed camera at a speed of 250 fps with a shutter speed of 1/2000 s. Based on the image manipulation, the effective diameter of the discrete bubble is obtained. The experiments were conducted utilizing the drop tower Beijing, which can provide a short-term microgravity condition. The residual gravity of 10 ^{-2 ... -3} g _{0} can be maintained throughout the short duration of 3.6 s. To avoid the influence of natural convection in normal gravity environment, the heating switched on at the release of the drop capsule

  14. Forced convection and flow boiling with and without enhancement devices for top-side-heated horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Turknett, Jerry C.

    The effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly was studied. Studies are completed of the variations in the local (axial and circumferential) and mean heat transfer coefficients in horizontal, top-heated coolant channels with smooth walls and internal heat transfer enhancement devices. The working fluid is freon-11. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls; (2) examine the effect of channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel; and (3) develop and improved data reduction analysis. The case of the top-heated, horizontal flow channel with smooth wall (1.37 cm inside diameter, and 122 cm heated length) was completed. The data were reduced using a preliminary analysis based on the heated hydraulic diameter. Preliminary examination of the local heat transfer coefficient variations indicated that there are significant axial and circumferential variations. However, it appears that the circumferential variation is more significant than the axial ones. In some cases, the circumferential variations were as much as a factor of ten. The axial variations rarely exceeded a factor of three.

  15. Forced convection and flow boiling with and without enhancement devices for top-side-heated horizontal channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Turknett, Jerry C.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly was studied. Studies are completed of the variations in the local (axial and circumferential) and mean heat transfer coefficients in horizontal, top-heated coolant channels with smooth walls and internal heat transfer enhancement devices. The working fluid is freon-11. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls; (2) examine the effect of channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel; and (3) develop and improved data reduction analysis. The case of the top-heated, horizontal flow channel with smooth wall (1.37 cm inside diameter, and 122 cm heated length) was completed. The data were reduced using a preliminary analysis based on the heated hydraulic diameter. Preliminary examination of the local heat transfer coefficient variations indicated that there are significant axial and circumferential variations. However, it appears that the circumferential variation is more significant than the axial ones. In some cases, the circumferential variations were as much as a factor of ten. The axial variations rarely exceeded a factor of three.

  16. A Mechanistic Study of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Hasan, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    bubble along the surface. The numerical simulation has been carried out by solving under the condition of axisymmetry, the mass, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor and the liquid phases. In the model the contribution of micro-layer has been included and instantaneous shape of the evolving vapor-liquid interface is determined from the analysis. Consistent with the experimental results, it is found that effect of reduced gravity is to stretch the growth period and bubble diameter It is found that effect of reduced gravity is to stretch the growth period and bubble diameter at departure. The numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental data for both the departure diameters and the growth periods. In the study on dynamics of multiple bubbles, horizontal merger of 2,3 4,and 5 bubbles was observed. It is found that after merger of 2 and 3 bubbles the equivalent diameter of the detached bubble is smaller than that of a single bubble departing at the same gravity level. During and after bubble merger, liquid still fills the space between the vapor stems so as to form mushroom type bubbles. The experimental and numerical studies conducted so far have brought us a step closer to prediction of nucleate boiling heat fluxes under low gravity conditions. Preparations for a space flight are continuing.

  17. Enhanced pool boiling heat transfer on mini- and micro- structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The surfaces used for investigating nucleate pool boiling for four working fluids had mini- and micro-fins of variable configurations, cross-sections and pitches, restrained by perforated foil or mesh cloth with various pore/opening diameters. Unique enhanced structures on these surfaces formed a system of interconnected horizontal and vertical tunnels. Four structured surfaces were proposed, each being a system of subsurface tunnels connected to 10 and 5 mm fins or 1 and 0.5 mm mini-fins. Measurement results for boiling water, ethanol, Fluorinert FC-72 and R-123 from more than 60 samples constituted the database used to verify the proposed theoretical models. These models were based on the results from the visualization studies, including internal visualization allowing observation of bubble nucleation, growth and displacement inside the tunnels, and on the analysis of existing boiling models for mini- and micro-structures.

  18. Mechanistic model for the prediction of water-subcooled-flow-boiling critical heat flux at high liquid velocity and subcooling

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, G.P.; Cumo, M.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G.

    1996-07-01

    A new model is presented for the prediction of the critical heat flux (CHF) of subcooled flow boiling based on a liquid-sublayer dryout mechanism, i.e., the dryout of a thin, liquid layer beneath an intermittent vapor blanket due to the coalescence of small bubbles. The model focuses on the analysis of the CHF in subcooled flow boiling under conditions of very high mass flux and liquid subcooling, typical of fusion reactor thermal-hydraulic design, and is characterized by the absence of empirical constants always present in earlier models. Peripheral nonuniform heating and/or twisted-tape inserts are accounted for in the model, which was originally developed for uniform heating and straight flow. The simultaneous occurrence of the two events is also well predicted by the model. Although initially formulated for operating conditions typical of the thermal-hydraulic design of fusion reactor high-heat-flux components, the model is proven to be able to satisfactorily predict the CHF under more general conditions, provided local thermodynamic conditions of the bulk flow at the CHF are sufficiently far from the saturated state. 60 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Novel thin-film heat flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Zeller, Mary; Will, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    A new and simpler design for thin-film heat flux sensors for utilization in high heat flux environments is presented. The design of these sensors consists of a planar differential thermopile made up of a number of thermocouple pairs arranged in a circular array, two different thermal resistance layers deposited on the inside and outside junctions of the thermopile and a high emissivity coating. This design has shown good potential for measuring heat fluxes in severe environments of aerospace propulsion systems.

  20. Average boiling and condensation heat transfer coefficients of the zeotropic refrigerant mixture R22/R142b in a coaxial tube-in-tube heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.P.; Bukasa, J.M.; Kebonte, S.A.

    2000-02-01

    Average boiling and condensation heat transfer coefficients were determined experimentally for a coaxial tube-in-tube heat exchanger used in hot water heat pumps. During manufacturing, the heat exchanger geometry used for the experiments changed from round tubes to elliptical tubes as no spacers were used to keep the inner tube from touching the outer tube. The refrigerant used was two different mixtures of R22 with R142b in mass ratios of 80%/20% and 60%/40%. The results were compared to theoretical results for straight tubes. It was concluded that the theoretical modes do not predict the heat transfer coefficients very well in coaxial tube-in-tube heat exchangers where the annulus touches the inside of the outer tube.

  1. Below and above boiling point comparison of microwave irradiation and conductive heating for municipal sludge digestion under identical heating/cooling profiles.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Eskicioglu, C

    2015-01-01

    This research provides a comprehensive comparison between microwave (MW) and conductive heating (CH) sludge pretreatments under identical heating/cooling profiles at below and above boiling point temperatures. Previous comparison studies were constrained to an uncontrolled or a single heating rate due to lack of a CH equipment simulating MW under identical thermal profiles. In this research, a novel custom-built pressure-sealed vessel which could simulate MW pretreatment under identical heating/cooling profiles was used for CH pretreatment. No statistically significant difference was proven between MW and CH pretreatments in terms of sludge solubilization, anaerobic biogas yield and organics biodegradation rate (p-value>0.05), while statistically significant effects of temperature and heating rate were observed (p-value<0.05). These results explain the contradictory results of previous studies in which only the final temperature (not heating/cooling rates) was controlled.

  2. Modeling and experiments for wall heat flux partitioning during subcooled flow boiling of water at low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Nilanjana

    Void fraction during subcooled flow boiling depends on the amount of vapor generated at the wall and condensation in the bulk. Partitioning of heat flux at the wall is required to determine the fraction of the energy that is utilized for vapor production. The wall heat flux models currently available in the literature were developed for high-pressure applications and have too much empiricism built into them. As such their deficiencies become pronounced when applied to low pressures (1--5 bar), which are of interest in passively cooled advanced reactors (e.g., AP 600). In this work a mechanistic model for nucleate boiling heat flux as a function of wall superheat has been developed. The premise of the proposed model is that the entire energy from the wall is first transferred to the superheated liquid layer adjacent to the wall, either by transient conduction or forced convection. A fraction of this energy is then utilized for vapor generation. Contribution of each of the heat transfer mechanism---forced convection, transient conduction, and vapor generation, has been quantified in terms of nucleation site densities, bubble departure and lift off diameters, bubble release frequency, flow parameters like velocity, inlet subcooling, wall superheat, and fluid and surface properties, including system pressures. In this work, the vapor generation component at the wall is computed independently and not as factors of other wall heat flux components as has been done in most past studies. To support the model development, subcooled flow boiling experiments were conducted at pressures of 1.03 to 3.2 bar for a wide range of mass fluxes (124 kg/m2s to 926 kg/m2s ), heat fluxes (2.5 W/cm2 to 113 W/cm2) and for contact angles varying from 30° to 90°. These experiments were conducted using a vertical Copper plate and a Zircalloy-4 nine-rod bundle. Experimental data were also utilized for developing empirical correlations for nucleation site density, bubble departure and lift off

  3. Computations of Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Jacqmin, David

    1999-01-01

    The absence (or reduction) of gravity, can lead to major changes in boiling heat transfer. On Earth, convection has a major effect on the heat distribution ahead of an evaporation front, and buoyancy determines the motion of the growing bubbles. In microgravity, convection and buoyancy are absent or greatly reduced and the dynamics of the growing vapor bubbles can change in a fundamental way. In particular, the lack of redistribution of heat can lead to a large superheat and explosive growth of bubbles once they form. While considerable efforts have been devoted to examining boiling experimentally, including the effect of microgravity, theoretical and computational work is limited to very simple models. In this project, the growth of boiling bubbles is studied by direct numerical simulations where the flow field is fully resolved and the effects of inertia, viscosity, surface deformation, heat conduction and convection, as well as the phase change, are fully accounted for. The proposed work is based on previously funded NASA work that allowed us to develop a two-dimensional numerical method for boiling flows and to demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate film boiling. While numerical simulations of multi-fluid flows have been advanced in a major way during the last five years, or so, similar capability for flows with phase change are still in their infancy. Although the feasibility of the proposed approach has been demonstrated, it has yet to be extended and applied to fully three-dimensional simulations. Here, a fully three-dimensional, parallel, grid adaptive code will be developed. The numerical method will be used to study nucleate boiling in microgravity, with particular emphasis on two aspects of the problem: 1) Examination of the growth of bubbles at a wall nucleation site and the instabilities of rapidly growing bubbles. Particular emphasis will be put on accurately capturing the thin wall layer left behind as a bubble expands along a wall, on

  4. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  5. Effect of latent heat in boiling water on the synthesis of gold nanoparticles of different sizes by using the Turkevich method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenchao; Zhang, Peina; Li, Yijing; Xia, Haibing; Wang, Dayang; Tao, Xutang

    2015-02-02

    The Turkevich method, involving the reduction of HAuCl4 with citrate in boiling water, allows the facile production of monodisperse, quasispherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Although, it is well-known that the size of the AuNPs obtained with the same recipe vary slightly (as little as approximately 4 nm), but noticeably, from one report to another, it has rarely been studied. The present work demonstrates that this size variation can be reconciled by the small, but noticeable, effect that the latent heat in boiling water has on the size of the AuNPs obtained by using the Turkevich method. The increase in latent heat during water boiling caused an approximately 3 nm reduction in the size of the as-prepared AuNPs; this reduction in size is mainly a result of accelerated nucleation driven by the extra heat. It was further demonstrated that, the heating temperature can be utilized as an additional measure to adjust the growth rate of AuNPs during the reduction of HAuCl4 with citrate in boiling water. Therefore, the latent heat of boiling solvents may provide one way to control nucleation and growth in the synthesis of monodisperse nanoparticles.

  6. Nanosecond laser texturing of uniformly and non-uniformly wettable micro structured metal surfaces for enhanced boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupančič, Matevž; Može, Matic; Gregorčič, Peter; Golobič, Iztok

    2017-03-01

    Microstructured uniformly and non-uniformly wettable surfaces were created on 25-μm-thin stainless steel foils by laser texturing using a marking nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) and utilizing various laser fluences and scan line separations. High-speed photography and high-speed IR thermography were used to investigate nucleate boiling heat transfer on the microstructured surfaces. The most pronounced results were obtained on a surface with non-uniform microstructure and non-uniform wettability. The obtained results show up to a 110% higher heat transfer coefficients and 20-40 times higher nucleation site densities compared to the untextured surface. We show that the number of active nucleation sites is significantly increased in the vicinity of microcavities that appeared in areas with the smallest (10 μm) scan line separation. Furthermore, this confirms the predictions of nucleation criteria and proves that straightforward, cost-effective nanosecond laser texturing allows the production of cavities with diameters of up to a few micrometers and surfaces with non-uniform wettability. Additionally, this opens up important possibilities for a more deterministic control over the complex boiling process.

  7. A low viscosity, low boiling point, clean solvent system for the rapid crystallisation of highly specular perovskite films

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Nakita K.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Wenger, Bernard; Klug, Matthew T.; Hörantner, Maximilian T.; Johnston, Michael B.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Moore, David T.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite-based photovoltaics have, in recent years, become poised to revolutionise the solar industry. While there have been many approaches taken to the deposition of this material, one-step spin-coating remains the simplest and most widely used method in research laboratories. Although spin-coating is not recognised as the ideal manufacturing methodology, it represents a starting point from which more scalable deposition methods, such as slot-dye coating or ink-jet printing can be developed. Here, we introduce a new, low-boiling point, low viscosity solvent system that enables rapid, room temperature crystallisation of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite films, without the use of strongly coordinating aprotic solvents. Through the use of this solvent, we produce dense, pinhole free films with uniform coverage, high specularity, and enhanced optoelectronic properties. We fabricate devices and achieve stabilised power conversion efficiencies of over 18% for films which have been annealed at 100 degrees C, and over 17% for films which have been dried under vacuum and have undergone no thermal processing. This deposition technique allows uniform coating on substrate areas of up to 125 cm2, showing tremendous promise for the fabrication of large area, high efficiency, solution processed devices, and represents a critical step towards industrial upscaling and large area printing of perovskite solar cells.

  8. Pool and flow boiling in variable and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As is well known, boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer in that high heat flux levels are possible with relatively small temperature differences. Its optimal application requires that the process be adequately understood. A measure of the understanding of any physical event lies in the ability to predict its behavior in terms of the relevant parameters. Despite many years of research the predictability of boiling is currently possible only for quite specialized circumstances, e.g., the critical heat flux and film boiling for the pool boiling case, and then only with special geometries. Variable gravity down to microgravity provides the opportunity to test this understanding, but possibly more important, by changing the dimensional and time scales involved permits more detailed observations of elements involved in the boiling process, and perhaps discloses phenomena heretofore unknown. The focus here is on nucleate boiling although, as will be demonstrated below, under but certain circumstances in microgravity it can take place concurrently with the dryout process. In the presence of earth gravity or forced convection effects, the latter process is usually referred to as film boiling. However, no vapor film as such forms with pool boiling in microgravity, only dryout. Initial results are presented here for pool boiling in microgravity, and were made possible at such an early date by the availability of the Get-Away-Specials (GAS). Also presented here are some results of ground testing of a flow loop for the study of low velocity boiling, eventually to take place also in microgravity. In the interim, variable buoyancy normal to the heater surface is achieved by rotation of the entire loop relative to earth gravity. Of course, this is at the expense of varying the buoyancy parallel to the heater surface. Two questions which must be resolved early in the study of flow boiling in microgravity are (1) the lower limits of liquid flow velocity where buoyancy

  9. The Influence of a Lower Heated Tube on Nucleate Pool Boiling from a Horizontal Tube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    AD-A256 833 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California (,-A So Ic THESIS TIlE INFLUENCE OF A LOWER IIEATED TUBE ON NUCLEATE POOL BOILING FROM A...HORIZONTAL TUBE by Lannic R. Lake June 1992 Thesis Advisor Paul J. Marto Co-Advisor Stephen B. Memory Approved for public rclcase; distribution is...day) 15 Page • nt Master’s Thesis From . To June 1992 16 Supplementary Notation The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do

  10. R1234yf vs. R134a Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Inside a 3.4 mm ID Microfin Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diani, A.; Mancin, S.; Rossetto, L.

    2014-11-01

    The refrigerant charge minimization as well as the use of eco-friendly fluids can be considered two of the most important targets for these applications to cope with the new environmental challenges. This paper compares the R1234yf and R134a flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop measurements inside a small microfin tube with internal diameter at the fin tip of 3.4 mm. This study is carried out in an experimental facility built at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale of the University of Padova especially designed to study both single and two phase heat transfer processes. The microfin tube is brazed inside a copper plate and electrically heated from the bottom. Several T -type thermocouples are inserted in the wall to measure the temperature distribution during the phase change process. In particular, the experimental measurements were carried out at constant saturation temperature of 30 °C, by varying the refrigerant mass velocity between 190 kg m-2 s-1 and 940 kg m-2 s-1, the vapour quality from 0.2 to 0.99, at different imposed heat fluxes. The two refrigerants are compared considering the values of the two-phase heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop.

  11. Three dimensional simulation of nucleate boiling heat and mass transfer in cooling passages of internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipour, R.; Baniamerian, Z.; Delauré, Y.

    2016-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of heat transfer and temperature distribution in vehicle engines is essential to have a good management of heat transfer performance in combustion engines. This may be achieved by numerical simulation of flow through the engine cooling passages; but the task becomes particularly challenging when boiling occurs. Neglecting two phase flow processes in the simulation would however result in significant inaccuracy in the predictions. In this study a three dimensional numerical model is proposed using Fluent 6.3 to simulate heat transfer of fluid flowing through channels of conventional size. Results of the present theoretical and numerical model are then compared with some empirical results. For high fluid flow velocities, departure between experimental and numerical results is about 9 %, while for lower velocity conditions, the model inaccuracy increases to 18 %. One of the outstanding capabilities of the present model, beside its ability to simulate two phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three dimensions, is the prediction of the location of bubble formation and condensation which can be a key issue in the evaluation of the engine performance and thermal stresses.

  12. The Effect of Coating Thickness and Roughness of Nucleate Pool Boiling Heat Transfer on Nanoparticle Coated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudev; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-04-01

    The influence of coating thickness and surface roughness on pool boiling heat transfer is experimentally studied over a range of surface roughness values with varied coating thickness with water at atmospheric pressure. Test surfaces used in this experiment are namely, untreated surface (Ra = 0.0899 µm), polished surface (Ra = 0.0493 µm), TiO2 nanoparticle coated surface with a roughness (Ra) ranging from 0.0338 to 0.289 µm. The surfaces were characterized with respect to contact angle, surface roughness and coating thickness. The contact angle, surface roughness and coating thickness were measured by sessile drop method, optical surface profiler and instrument thickness monitor respectively. Heat fluxes observed ranged from 52.63 to 144.73 W/cm2. Different trends were observed in the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) with respect to the surface roughness and coating thickness values on the same set of heat flux. The HTC was found to increase with increasing the roughness values for untreated and polish surface but nanoparticle coated surfaces displayed different trend in HTCs. The HTC was found to increase with increasing coating thickness with all wall superheat.

  13. Preliminary wall heat transfer measurements and visualization of bubble growth and departure: Saturated nucleate boiling of FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, S.W.; Kim, J.; Mullen, J.D.; Kim, M.H.

    1999-07-01

    A visualization study of single bubbles growing on a microscale heater array kept at nominally constant temperature was performed. The heater array consisted of 96 heaters each 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm in size. The heater temperatures were kept constant using electronic feedback loops similar to those used in hot-wire anemometry and the power required to do this was measured throughout the bubble departure cycle for each heater in the array. Preliminary data taken at a wall superheat of 29 C resulted in boiling in the isolated bubble regime on the surface. A snapshot of boiling on the surface is seen in Figure A-1. Three types of bubble behavior were observed. The bubbles nucleating in the upper left and lower left corners of the array did not appear to be influenced by bubbles that had departed previously, nor by other bubbles on the heater (Type I behavior). The bubbles nucleating from the single site towards the center of the array were influenced by the wake of the bubble that had departed previously (Type II behavior). The bubbles nucleating in the upper and lower right corners nucleated and grew on separate sites, then merged to form a single large bubble that departed the surface (Type III behavior). Large amounts of heat transfer were associated with three processes during the bubble departure cycle-bubble nucleation, shrinking of the dry spot before departure, and merging of bubbles. The heat transfer mechanisms seen are often not accounted for in many of the current models.

  14. Cryogenic Liquid Experiments in Orbit. Volume 2. Bubble Mechanics, Boiling Heat Transfer, and Propellant Tank Venting in a Zero-Gravity Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-12-01

    Thermophoresis Experimental Apparatus . . . 27 8 Bubble Thermophoresis Lighting and Viewing Schematic ....... ..................... .... 28 9 Bubble... Thermophoresis Experimental Apparatus (with- out bubble holder) ...... ................ ... 29 10 Bubble Force Experiment Bubble Insertion Technique (Expanded View...several interesting and important ef- fects in bubble behavior and boiling heat transfer. These ef- fects are discussed below. 2. Bubble Thermophoresis

  15. Electrocaloric devices based on thin-film heat switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Richard I.; Malloy, Kevin J.

    2009-09-01

    We describe a new approach to refrigeration, heat pumping, and electrical generation that allows one to exploit the attractive properties of thin films of electrocaloric materials. Layers of electrocaloric material coupled with thin-film heat switches can work as either refrigerators and heat pumps or electrical generators, depending on the phasing of the applied voltages and heat switching. With heat switches based on thin layers of liquid crystals, the efficiency of electrocaloric thin-film devices can be at least as high as that of current thermoelectric devices. Advanced heat switches that may use carbon nanotubes would enable thin-film refrigerators and generators to outperform conventional vapor-compression devices.

  16. Electrocaloric devices based on thini-film heat switches

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Malloy, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new approach to refrigeration and electrical generation that exploits the attractive properties of thin films of electrocaloric materials. Layers of electrocaloric material coupled with thin-film heat switches can work as either refrigerators or electrical generators, depending on the phasing of the applied voltages and heat switching. With heat switches based on thin layers of liquid crystals, the efficiency of these thin-film heat engines can be at least as high as that of current thermoelectric devices. Advanced heat switches would enable thin-film heat engines to outperform conventional vaporcompression devices.

  17. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    The Thermal Science Research Center (TSRC) at Prairie View A&M University is involved in an international fusion reactor technology development program aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. This report highlights: (1) Recent accomplishments and pinpoints thermal hydraulic problem areas of immediate concern to the development of plasma-facing components, and (2) Next generation thermal hydraulic problems which must be addressed to insure safety and reliability in component operation. More specifically, the near-term thermal hydraulic problem entails: (1) generating an appropriate data base to insure the development of single-side heat flux correlations, and (2) evaluating previously developed single-side/uniform heated transformations and correlations to determine which can be used to relate the vast two-phase heat transfer and critical heat flux (CHF) technical literature for uniformly heated flow channels to single-side heated channels.

  18. Fabrication of Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert A.

    1992-01-01

    Prototype thin film heat flux sensors have been constructed and tested. The sensors can be applied to propulsion system materials and components. The sensors can provide steady state and fast transient heat flux information. Fabrication of the sensor does not require any matching of the mounting surface. Heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surfaces of an insulation material. The sensor consists of an array of thermocouples on the upper and lower surfaces of a thin insulating layer. The thermocouples for the sensor are connected in a thermopile arrangement. A 100 thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on silicon wafers. The sensor produced an output voltage of 200-400 microvolts when exposed to a hot air heat gun. A 20 element thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on aluminum oxide sheet. Thermocouples are Pt-Pt/Rh with silicon dioxide as the insulating material. This sensor produced an output of 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a furnace operating at 1000 C. Work is also underway to put this type of heat flux sensor on metal surfaces.

  19. Liquid helium boil-off measurements of heat leakage from sinter-forged BSCCO current leads under DC and AC conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Y. S.; Niemann, R. C.; Hull, J. R.; Youngdahl, C. A.; Lanagan, M. T.; Nakade, M.; Hara, T.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid helium boil-off experiments are conducted to determine the heat leakage rate of a pair of BSCCO 2223 high-temperature superconductor current leads made by sinter forging. The experiments are carried out in both DC and AC conditions and with and without an intermediate heat intercept. Current ranges are from 0-500 A for DC tests and 0-1,000 A(sub rms) for AC tests. The leads are self-cooled. Results show that magnetic hysteresis (AC) losses for both the BSCCO leads and the low-temperature superconductor current jumper are small for the current range. It is shown that significant reduction in heat leakage rate (liquid helium boil-off rate) is realized by using the BSCCO superconductor leads. At 100 A, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is approximately 29% of that of the conventional copper lead. Further reduction in liquid helium boil-off rate can be achieved by using an intermediate heat intercept. For example, at 500 K, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is only 7% of that of the conventional copper lead when an intermediate heat intercept is used.

  20. Liquid helium boil-off measurements of heat leakage from sinter-forged BSCCO current leads under DC and AC conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Y.S.; Niemann, R.C.; Hull, J.R.; Youngdahl, C.A.; Lanagan, M.T.; Nakade, M.; Hara, T.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid helium boil-off experiments are conducted to determine the heat leakage rate of a pair of BSCCO 2223 high-temperature superconductor current leads made by sinter forging. The experiments are carried out in both DC and AC conditions and with and without an intermediate heat intercept. Current ranges are from 0-500 A for DC tests and 0-1,000 A{sub rms} for AC tests. The leads are self-cooled. Results show that magnetic hysteresis (AC) losses for both the BSCCO leads and the low-temperature superconductor current jumper are small for the current range. It is shown that significant reduction in heat leakage rate (liquid helium boil-off rate) is realized by using the BSCCO superconductor leads. At 100 A, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is approximately 29% of that of the conventional copper lead. Further reduction in liquid helium boil-off rate can be achieved by using an intermediate heat intercept. For example, at 500 K, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is only 7% of that of the conventional copper lead when an intermediate heat intercept is used.

  1. Subcooled forced convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Panian, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental heat-transfer data were obtained for the forced-convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113) in a vertical annular test annular test section. The 97 data points obtained covered heat transfer by forced convection, local boiling, and fully-developed boiling. Correlating methods were obtained which accurately predicted the heat flux as a function of wall superheat (boiling curve) over the range of parameters studied.

  2. Experimental study of stability and transients in a horizontally heated boiling helium thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Four, A.; Baudouy, B.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a liquid helium natural circulation loop with a 4 m long horizontal heated section. Wall temperatures on the heated section, mass flow rate and pressure drop were measured in steady and transient regimes. The stability of the loop has been studied and the power stability limits have been found. Also, different heating configurations were explored and their drawbacks and benefits were observed. The result is that the loop is stable only above a non-zero low power and below a certain upper power limit. The distance from the heating to the vertical riser affects the stability range. It has been found that instabilities at low power or transients following a low power step pulse can produce considerable temperature oscillations, potentially dangerous from the magnet protection point of view.

  3. Experimental investigation of certain internal condensing and boiling flows: Their sensitivity to pressure fluctuations and heat transfer enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivisalu, Michael Toomas

    . Shear/pressure driven condensing and boiling flow experiments are carried out in horizontal mm-scale channels with heat exchange through the bottom surface. The sides and top of the flow channel are insulated. The fluid is FC-72 from 3M Corporation.

  4. Convective boiling of ammonia and Freon 22 in plate heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, C. B.; Hillis, D. L.; Thomas, A.

    An Alfa-Laval plate heat exchanger, previously used as a small ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) evaporator, was refurbished and tested. Several series of tests were carried out with ammonia as the working fluid, followed by one with Freon 22. Configurations utilizing all high angle plates and all low angle plates, and alternate high and low angle plates, were tested to determine the optimum combination for OTEC applications. The effects of ammonia contaminated by water on the thermal performance of the heat exchanger were evaluated. The use of the Linde High-Flux Surface on the working-fluid side of a Transfer plate heat exchanger was investigated to determine its effect on performance.

  5. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-10-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer.

  6. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    For the past decade, efforts have been growing in the development of high heat flux (HHF) components for many applications, including fusion and fission reactor components, advanced electronic components, synchrotrons and optical components, and other advanced HHF engineering applications. From a thermal prospective, work in the fusion reactor development arena has been underway in a number of areas including: (1) Plasma thermal, and electro-magnetics, and particle transport, (2) Fusion material, rheology, development, and expansion and selection; (3) High heat flux removal; and (4) Energy production and efficiency.

  7. Molecular dynamics study on the effect of boundary heating rate on the phase change characteristics of thin film liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Morshed, A. K. M. Monjur; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    In this study, theoretical investigation of thin film liquid phase change phenomena under different boundary heating rates has been conducted with the help of molecular dynamics simulation. To do this, the case of argon boiling over a platinum surface has been considered. The study has been conducted to get a better understanding of the nano-scale physics of evaporation/boiling for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of boundary heating rate. The simulation domain consisted of liquid and vapor argon atoms placed over a platinum wall. Initially the whole system was brought to an equilibrium state at 90K with the help of equilibrium molecular dynamics and then the temperature of the bottom wall was increased to a higher temperature (250K/130K) over a finite heating period. Depending on the heating period, the boundary heating rate has been varied in the range of 1600×109 K/s to 8×109 K/s. The variations of argon region temperature, pressure, net evaporation number with respect to time under different boundary heating rates have been determined and discussed. The heat fluxes normal to platinum wall for different cases were also calculated and compared with theoretical upper limit of maximum possible heat transfer to elucidate the effect of boundary heating rate.

  8. Fabrication of thin film heat flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film heat-flux sensors have been constructed in the form of arrays of thermocouples on upper and lower surfaces of an insulating layer, so that flux values are proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surface of the insulation material. The sensor thermocouples are connected in thermopile arrangement, and the structure is patterned with photolithographic techniques. Both chromel-alumel and Pt-Pt/Rh thermocouples have been devised; the later produced 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a 1000 C furnace.

  9. Electrohydrodynamic Pool Boiling in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Stahl, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research is concerned with studying the effects of applied electric fields on pool boiling in a reduced-gravity environment. Experiments are conducted at the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec Drop tower using a drop rig constructed at UC Davis. In the experiments, a platinum wire is heated while immersed in saturated liquid refrigerants (FC-72 and FC-87), or water, causing vapor formation at the wire surface. Electric fields are applied between the wire surface and an outer screen electrode that surrounds the wire. Preliminary normal-gravity experiments with water have demonstrated that applied electric fields generated by the rig electronics can influence boiling characteristics. Reduced-gravity experiments will be performed in the summer of 1996. The experiments will provide fundamental data on electric field strengths required to disrupt film boiling (for various wire heat generation input rates) in reduced gravity for a cylindrical geometry. The experiments should also shed light on the roles of characteristic bubble generation times and charge relaxation times in determining the effects of electric fields on pool boiling. Normal-gravity comparison experiments will also be performed.

  10. A study of boiling heat transfer as applied to the cooling of ball bearings in the high pressure oxygen turbopump of the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Will

    1986-01-01

    Two sets of ball bearings support the main shaft within the High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). In operation, these bearings are cooled and lubricated with high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) flowing axially through the bearing assembly. Currently, modifications in the assembly design are being contemplated in order to enhance the lifetime of the bearings and to allow the HPOTP to operate under larger loads. An understanding of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer characteristics of the flowing LOX is necessary for the implementation of these design changes. The proposed computational model of the LOX fluid dynamics, in addition to dealing with a turbulent flow in a complex geometry, must address the complication associated with boiling and two-phase flow. The feasibility of and possible methods for modeling boiling heat transfer are considered. The theory of boiling as pertains to this particular problem is reviewed. Recommendations are given for experiments which would be necessary to establish validity for correlations needed to model boiling.

  11. Survey of Thermal-Fluids Evaluation and Confirmatory Experimental Validation Requirements of Accident Tolerant Cladding Concepts with Focus on Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Wysocki, Aaron J.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Ali, Amir; Liu, Maolong; Blandford, Edward

    2016-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is working closely with the nuclear industry to develop fuel and cladding candidates with potentially enhanced accident tolerance, also known as accident tolerant fuel (ATF). Thermal-fluids characteristics are a vital element of a holistic engineering evaluation of ATF concepts. One vital characteristic related to boiling heat transfer is the critical heat flux (CHF). CHF plays a vital role in determining safety margins during normal operation and also in the progression of potential transient or accident scenarios. This deliverable is a scoping survey of thermal-fluids evaluation and confirmatory experimental validation requirements of accident tolerant cladding concepts with a focus on boiling heat transfer characteristics. The key takeaway messages of this report are: 1. CHF prediction accuracy is important and the correlations may have significant uncertainty. 2. Surface conditions are important factors for CHF, primarily the wettability that is characterized by contact angle. Smaller contact angle indicates greater wettability, which increases the CHF. Surface roughness also impacts wettability. Results in the literature for pool boiling experiments indicate changes in CHF by up to 60% for several ATF cladding candidates. 3. The measured wettability of FeCrAl (i.e., contact angle and roughness) indicates that CHF should be investigated further through pool boiling and flow boiling experiments. 4. Initial measurements of static advancing contact angle and surface roughness indicate that FeCrAl is expected to have a higher CHF than Zircaloy. The measured contact angle of different FeCrAl alloy samples depends on oxide layer thickness and composition. The static advancing contact angle tends to decrease as the oxide layer thickness increases.

  12. Developing NanoFoil-Heated Thin-Film Thermal Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    NanoFoil-Heated Thin- Film Thermal Battery ..........................................6 3. Results and Discussion 8 3.1 Regulation of Skin ...Developing NanoFoil-Heated Thin- Film Thermal Battery by Michael S. Ding, Frank C. Krieger, and Jeffrey A. Swank ARL-TR-6664 September...TR-6664 September 2013 Developing NanoFoil-Heated Thin- Film Thermal Battery Michael S. Ding, Frank C. Krieger, and Jeffrey A. Swank

  13. Effects of Adding Nanoparticles on Boiling and Condensing Heat Transfer inside a horizontal round tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen; Sadoughi, Mohammadkazem; Shariatmadar, Hamed; Akhavan-Behabadi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-11-01

    An experimental investigation is performed on heat transfer evaluation of a nano-refrigerant flow during condensation and evaporation inside a horizontal round tube. Experiments are carried out for three working fluid types including: i) pure refrigerant (R600a); ii) refrigerant/lubricant (R600a/oil); and iii) nano-refrigerant: refrigerant/lubricant/nanoparticles (R600a/oil/CuO). Nanoparticles are added to the lubricant and their mixture is mixed with pure refrigerant. Therefore, nano-refrigerants (R600a/oil/CuO) are prepared by dispersing CuO nanoparticles with different fractions of 0.5%, 1% and 1.5% in the baseline mixture (R600a/oil). Effects of different factors including vapor quality, mass flux, and nanoparticles on the heat transfer coefficient are examined for both of condensation and evaporation flows, separately. The results shows that maximum heat transfer augmentation of 79% and 83% are achieved by using the refrigerant/lubricant/nanoparticles mixture, in comparison with the pure refrigerant case in condensation and evaporation, respectively which are occurred for nano-refrigerant with 1.5% mass fraction in both of them.

  14. Separate effects of surface roughness, wettability, and porosity on the boiling critical heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hanley, Harry; Coyle, Carolyn; Buongiorno, Jacopo; McKrell, Tom; Hu, Lin-Wen; Rubner, Michael; Cohen, Robert

    2013-07-01

    The separate effects of surface wettability, porosity, and roughness on the critical heat flux (CHF) of water were examined using engineered surfaces. Values explored were 0, 5, 10, and 15 μm for Rz (roughness), <5°, ˜75°, and >110° for static contact angle (wettability), and 0 and 50% for pore volume fraction. The porous hydrophilic surface enhanced CHF by 50%-60%, while the porous hydrophobic surface resulted in a reduction of CHF by 97%. Wettability had little effect on the smooth non-porous surface CHF. Surface roughness (Ra, Rq, Rz) had no effect on CHF within the limit of this database.

  15. A New Facility for Measurements of Three-Dimensional, Local Subcooled Flow Boiling Heat Flux and Related Critical Heat Flux for PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D. Sr.; Cofie, Penrose; Li Qingyuan; Ekhlassi, Ali A

    2002-01-15

    In the development of plasma-facing components for fusion reactors and high-heat-flux heat sinks (or components) for electronic applications, the components are usually subjected to a peripherally nonuniform heat flux. Even if the applied heat flux is uniform in the axial direction (which is unlikely), both intuition and recent investigations have clearly shown that both the local heat flux and the eventual critical heat flux (CHF) in this three-dimensional (3-D) case will differ significantly from similar quantities found in the voluminous body of data for uniformly heated flow channels. Although this latter case has been used in the past as an estimate for the former case, more study has become necessary to examine the 3-D temperature and heat flux distributions and related CHF. Work thus far has shown that the nonuniform peripheral heat flux condition enhances CHF in some cases.To avoid the excess costs associated with using electron or ion beams to produce the nonuniform heat flux, a new facility was developed that will allow 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements and two-dimensional, local subcooled flow boiling heat flux and related CHF measurements.The configurations under study for this work consist of (a) a nonuniformly heated cylinder-like test section with a circular coolant channel bored through the center and (b) a monoblock that is a square cross-section parallelepiped with a circular drilled flow channel along the channel centerline. The theoretical or ideal cylinder-like test section would be a circular cylinder with half (-90 to 90 deg) of its outside boundary subjected to a uniform heat flux and the remaining half insulated. For the monoblock, a uniform heat flux is applied to one of the outside surfaces, and the remaining surfaces are insulated. The outside diameter of the cylinder-like test section is 30.0 mm, and its length is 200.0 mm. The monoblock square is 30.0 mm long. The inside diameter of the flow channel for both types of test

  16. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterial thin films.

    PubMed

    Basu, Soumyadipta; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2014-03-01

    We investigate near-field radiative heat transfer between two thin films made of metamaterials. The impact of film thickness on magnetic and electric surface polaritons (ESPs) is analyzed. It is found that the strength as well as the location of magnetic resonance does not change with film thickness until the film behaves as semi-infinite for the dielectric function chosen in this study. When the film is thinner than vacuum gap, both electric and magnetic polaritons contribute evenly to near-field radiative heat transfer. At larger film thicknesses, ESPs dominate heat transfer due to excitation of a larger number of modes. Results obtained from this study will facilitate applications of metamaterials as thin-film coatings for energy systems.

  17. Boiling effect in liquid nitrogen directly cooled Yb³⁺:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Toshimitsu; Chosrowjan, Haik; Furuse, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Seiji; Kitamura, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Masayuki; Ishii, Shinya; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2016-02-20

    Liquid nitrogen (LN2) behavior on the surface of excited Yb(3+):YAG is investigated using fluorometry. From the time-resolved temperature variations and integrated fluorescence spectra intensity on this directly cooled Yb(3+):YAG surface, we observe a phase transition of LN2 from nucleate boiling to film boiling. As a result of this pool boiling, good beam quality should occur when the temperature and heat flux at an excited surface of Yb(3+):YAG are below 95 K and 15.8  W/cm2, respectively. That is, the LN2 should remain in a steady state of nucleate boiling to produce good beam quality using pool boiling.

  18. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  19. Effect of subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of water subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from a downward-facing curved surface. Experiments used three copper sections of the same diameter (50.8 mm) and surface radius (148 mm), but different thickness (12.8, 20 and 30 mm). Local and average pool boiling curves were obtained at saturation and 5 K, 10 K, and 14 K subcooling. Water subcooling increased the maximum heat flux, but decreased the corresponding wall superheat. The minimum film boiling heat flux and the corresponding wall superheat, however, increased with increased subcooling. The maximum and minimum film boiling heat fluxes were independent of wall thickness above 20 mm and Biot Number > 0.8, indicating that boiling curves for the 20 and 30 thick sections were representative of quasi steady-state, but not those for the 12.8 mm thick section. When compared with that for a flat surface section of the same thickness, the data for the 12.8 mm thick section showed significant increases in both the maximum heat flux (from 0.21 to 0.41 MW/m{sup 2}) and the minimum film boiling heat flux (from 2 to 13 kW/m{sup 2}) and about 11.5 K and 60 K increase in the corresponding wall superheats, respectively.

  20. The electroplated Pd-Co alloy film on 316 L stainless steel and the corrosion resistance in boiling acetic acid and formic acid mixture with stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sirui; Zuo, Yu; Tang, Yuming; Zhao, Xuhui

    2014-12-01

    Pd-Co alloy films were deposited on 316 L stainless steel by electroplating. Scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, weight loss test and polarization test were used to determine the properties of the Pd-Co alloy films. The Pd-Co films show fine grain size, low porosity and obviously high micro-hardness. The Co content in the film can be controlled in a large range from 21.9 at.% to 57.42 at.%. Pd is rich on the Pd-Co film surface, which is benefit to increase the corrosion resistance. In boiling 90% acetic acid plus 10% formic acid mixture with 0.005 M Br- under stirring, the Pd-Co plated stainless steel samples exhibit evidently better corrosion resistance in contrast to Pd plated samples. The good corrosion resistance of the Pd-Co alloy film is explained by the better compactness, the lower porosity, and the obviously higher micro-hardness of the alloy films, which increases the resistance to erosion and retards the development of micro-pores in the film.

  1. Condensation on Highly Superheated Surfaces: Unstable Thin Films in a Wickless Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Nguyen, Thao T. T.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C.; Chao, David F.; Sicker, Ronald J.

    2017-03-01

    A wickless heat pipe was operated on the International Space Station to provide a better understanding of how the microgravity environment might alter the physical and interfacial forces driving evaporation and condensation. Traditional heat pipes are divided into three zones: evaporation at the heated end, condensation at the cooled end, and intermediate or adiabatic in between. The microgravity experiments reported herein show that the situation may be dramatically more complicated. Beyond a threshold heat input, there was a transition from evaporation at the heated end to large-scale condensation, even as surface temperatures exceeded the boiling point by 160 K. The hotter the surface, the more vapor was condensed onto it. The condensation process at the heated end is initiated by thickness and temperature disturbances in the thin liquid film that wet the solid surface. Those disturbances effectively leave the vapor "superheated" in that region. Condensation is amplified and sustained by the high Marangoni stresses that exist near the heater and that drive liquid to cooler regions of the device.

  2. Condensation on Highly Superheated Surfaces: Unstable Thin Films in a Wickless Heat Pipe.

    PubMed

    Kundan, Akshay; Nguyen, Thao T T; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C; Chao, David F; Sicker, Ronald J

    2017-03-03

    A wickless heat pipe was operated on the International Space Station to provide a better understanding of how the microgravity environment might alter the physical and interfacial forces driving evaporation and condensation. Traditional heat pipes are divided into three zones: evaporation at the heated end, condensation at the cooled end, and intermediate or adiabatic in between. The microgravity experiments reported herein show that the situation may be dramatically more complicated. Beyond a threshold heat input, there was a transition from evaporation at the heated end to large-scale condensation, even as surface temperatures exceeded the boiling point by 160 K. The hotter the surface, the more vapor was condensed onto it. The condensation process at the heated end is initiated by thickness and temperature disturbances in the thin liquid film that wet the solid surface. Those disturbances effectively leave the vapor "superheated" in that region. Condensation is amplified and sustained by the high Marangoni stresses that exist near the heater and that drive liquid to cooler regions of the device.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling---Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktinol, Eduardo

    Due to the complex nature of the subprocesses involved in nucleate boiling, it has not been possible to develop comprehensive models or correlations despite decades of accumulated data and analysis. Complications such as the presence of dissolved gas in the liquid further confound attempts at modeling nucleate boiling. Moreover, existing empirical correlations may not be suitable for new applications, especially with regards to varying gravity level. More recently, numerical simulations of the boiling process have proven to be capable of reliably predicting bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer by showing excellent agreement with experimental data. However, most simulations decouple the solid substrate by assuming constant wall temperature. In the present study complete numerical simulations of the boiling process are performed---including conjugate transient conduction in the solid substrate and the effects of dissolved gas in the liquid at different levels of gravity. Finite difference schemes are used to discretize the governing equations in the liquid, vapor, and solid phases. The interface between liquid and vapor phases is tracked by a level set method. An iterative procedure is used at the interface between the solid and fluid phases. Near the three-phase contact line, temperatures in the solid are observed to fluctuate significantly over short periods. The results show good agreement with the data available in the literature. The results also show that waiting and growth periods can be related directly to wall superheat. The functional relationship between waiting period and wall superheat is found to agree well with empirical correlations reported in the literature. For the case of a single bubble in subcooled nucleate boiling, the presence of dissolved gas in the liquid is found to cause noncondensables to accumulate at the top of the bubble where most condensation occurs. This results in reduced local saturation temperature and condensation rates

  4. Film-Cooling Heat-Transfer Measurements Using Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: (1) The Transient Liquid-Crystal Heat-Transfer Technique; (2) 2-D Film-Cooling Heat-Transfer on an AlliedSignal Vane; and (3) Effects of Tab Vortex Generators on Surface Heat Transfer. Downstream of a Jet in Crossflow.

  5. Instability of flow of liquid film over a heated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Soo, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Fundamental concepts and basic equations of a flowing thin liquid film cooling a heated surfaced by its vaporization and the effect of dry patches were treated. Stable film flow prior to the appearance of dry patches on the heated surface is maintained by a balance of various forces due to surface tension, shear stress, heat and mass transfer, and gravity. Film splitting at a critical film thickness produces dry patches due to perturbation by waves on a perfect surface, and often by surface imperfection and uneven heating. This work is primarily motivated by the design of next-generation nuclear reactors, which employ many novel passive heat-removal systems via natural circulation. These systems are design to prevent damage to the reactor core and containment without action by the reactor operators during or after a design basis accident such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam-line break (MSLB) accident.

  6. Criticality in the slowed-down boiling crisis at zero gravity.

    PubMed

    Charignon, T; Lloveras, P; Chatain, D; Truskinovsky, L; Vives, E; Beysens, D; Nikolayev, V S

    2015-05-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. It occurs at a threshold value of the heat flux from the heater called CHF (critical heat flux). Usually, boiling crisis studies are hindered by the high CHF and short transition duration (below 1 ms). Here we report on experiments in hydrogen near its liquid-vapor critical point, in which the CHF is low and the dynamics slow enough to be resolved. As under such conditions the surface tension is very small, the experiments are carried out in the reduced gravity to preserve the conventional bubble geometry. Weightlessness is created artificially in two-phase hydrogen by compensating gravity with magnetic forces. We were able to reveal the fractal structure of the contour of the percolating cluster of the dry areas at the heater that precedes the boiling crisis. We provide a direct statistical analysis of dry spot areas that confirms the boiling crisis at zero gravity as a scale-free phenomenon. It was observed that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, saturated boiling CHF tends to zero (within the precision of our thermal control system) in zero gravity, which suggests that the boiling crisis may be observed at any heat flux provided the experiment lasts long enough.

  7. An Experimental Study of Boiling in Reduced and Zero Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usiskin, C. M.; Siegel, R.

    1961-01-01

    A pool boiling apparatus was mounted on a counterweighted platform which could be dropped a distance of nine feet. By varying the size of the counterweight, the effective gravity field on the equipment was adjusted between zero and unity. A study of boiling burnout in water indicated that a variation in the critical heat flux according to the one quarter power of gravity was reasonable. A consideration of the transient burnout process was necessary in order to properly interpret the data. A photographic study of nucleate boiling showed how the velocity of freely rising vapor bubbles decreased as gravity was reduced. The bubble diameters at the time of breakoff from the heated surface were found to vary inversely as gravity to the 1/3.5 power. Motion pictures were taken to illustrate both nucleate and film boiling in the low gravity range.

  8. Thin film heat flux sensors for accurate transient and unidirectional heat transfer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azerou, B.; Garnier, B.; Lahmar, J.

    2012-11-01

    Heat flux measurement is needed in many heat transfer studies. For the best unbiased heat flux sensors (HFS), the heat flux is obtained using temperature measurements at different locations and also an inverse heat conduction method (function specification...) in order to calculate the heat flux. Systematic errors can come from the uncertainty in the wire thermocouples locations and from errors in the knowledge of distances between two consecutive wire thermocouples. The main idea in this work is to use thin film thermoresistances deposited on a flexible thin polymer substrate instead of wire thermocouples welded on metallic sample. The interest of using thin film thermoresistances instead of wire thermocouples is a lower disturbance due to the smaller thickness of the thin film sensors (typically less than 1μm) and a much better knowledge of the distances between the different thin film thermoresistances which are precisely defined in the mask used for the metallic thin film pattern fabrication. In this paper, we present the fabrication of the new heat flux sensor with thin film thermoresistances, the study of the effect of the self heating (due to Joule effect in thermoresistances) and the performances of this new HFS with the comparison with classical HFS using wire thermocouples. For this study, a symmetric experimental setup is used with metallic samples equipped with an etched foil heater and both classical and new HFS. For several heating conditions, it appears that a better accuracy is always obtained with the new HFS using thin film thermoresistances.

  9. A high-fidelity approach towards simulation of pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdani, Miad; Radcliff, Thomas; Soteriou, Marios; Alahyari, Abbas A.

    2016-01-15

    A novel numerical approach is developed to simulate the multiscale problem of pool-boiling phase change. The particular focus is to develop a simulation technique that is capable of predicting the heat transfer and hydrodynamic characteristics of nucleate boiling and the transition to critical heat flux on surfaces of arbitrary shape and roughness distribution addressing a critical need to design enhanced boiling heat transfer surfaces. The macro-scale of the phase change and bubble dynamics is addressed through employing off-the-shelf Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods for interface tracking and interphase mass and energy transfer. The micro-scale of the microlayer, which forms at early stage of bubble nucleation near the wall, is resolved through asymptotic approximation of the thin-film theory which provides a closed-form solution for the distribution of the micro-layer and its influence on the evaporation process. In addition, the sub-grid surface roughness is represented stochastically through probabilistic density functions and its role in bubble nucleation and growth is then represented based on the thermodynamics of nucleation process. This combination of deterministic CFD, local approximation, and stochastic representation allows the simulation of pool boiling on any surface with known roughness and enhancement characteristics. The numerical model is validated for dynamics and hydrothermal characteristics of a single nucleated bubble on a flat surface against available literature data. In addition, the prediction of pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient is verified against experimental measurements as well as reputable correlations for various roughness distributions and different surface orientations. Finally, the model is employed to demonstrate pool-boiling phenomenon on enhanced structures with reentrance cavities and to explore the effect of enhancement feature design on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of these surfaces.

  10. A high-fidelity approach towards simulation of pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Miad; Radcliff, Thomas; Soteriou, Marios; Alahyari, Abbas A.

    2016-01-01

    A novel numerical approach is developed to simulate the multiscale problem of pool-boiling phase change. The particular focus is to develop a simulation technique that is capable of predicting the heat transfer and hydrodynamic characteristics of nucleate boiling and the transition to critical heat flux on surfaces of arbitrary shape and roughness distribution addressing a critical need to design enhanced boiling heat transfer surfaces. The macro-scale of the phase change and bubble dynamics is addressed through employing off-the-shelf Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods for interface tracking and interphase mass and energy transfer. The micro-scale of the microlayer, which forms at early stage of bubble nucleation near the wall, is resolved through asymptotic approximation of the thin-film theory which provides a closed-form solution for the distribution of the micro-layer and its influence on the evaporation process. In addition, the sub-grid surface roughness is represented stochastically through probabilistic density functions and its role in bubble nucleation and growth is then represented based on the thermodynamics of nucleation process. This combination of deterministic CFD, local approximation, and stochastic representation allows the simulation of pool boiling on any surface with known roughness and enhancement characteristics. The numerical model is validated for dynamics and hydrothermal characteristics of a single nucleated bubble on a flat surface against available literature data. In addition, the prediction of pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient is verified against experimental measurements as well as reputable correlations for various roughness distributions and different surface orientations. Finally, the model is employed to demonstrate pool-boiling phenomenon on enhanced structures with reentrance cavities and to explore the effect of enhancement feature design on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of these surfaces.

  11. Thin-Film Resistance Heat-Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film heat-flux sensors of a proposed type would offer advantages over currently available thin-film heat flux sensors. Like a currently available thin-film heat-flux sensor, a sensor according to the proposal would be based on measurement of voltages related to the temperatures of thin metal films on the hotter and colder faces of a layer of an electrically insulating and moderately thermally conductive material. The heat flux through such a device is proportional to the difference between the temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the layer. The advantages of the proposed sensors over the commercial ones would arise from the manner in which the temperature-related voltages would be generated and measured.

  12. Thermocapillary control of falling liquid films by substrate heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Alice; Gomes, Susana; Dallaston, Michael; Denner, Fabian; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the problem of controlling a falling liquid film by selective heating of the substrate supporting the flow. Such heating affects the film dynamics through Marangoni stresses, and will be chosen in response to real-time observations of the film height profile. We begin by developing a new low-dimensional (LD) model for the dynamics of a thin film subject to heating which varies in space and time. The model includes the effects of convection and diffusion, so that local heating applied briefly at the substrate can have a long-lasting and wide-ranging effect on the surface temperature. We demonstrate that our LD model is in good agreement with full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations and we use it to develop heating strategies which drive the film towards either a uniform state or into a desired non-uniform profile. We further develop a hierarchy of control strategies subject to realistic limitations, such as having influence over only a few localised heating strips, the ability to sense the height profile at a few fixed locations, and dealing with time delays and uncertainty in observation or application of heating. We test the robustness of our control strategies in closed- and open-domain simulations of the LD model and also in fully coupled NS calculations.

  13. Heat transfer and tear film dynamics over multiple blink cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Quan; Braun, R. J.; Driscoll, Tobin A.

    2014-07-01

    We consider model problems for the tear film over multiple blink cycles with heat transfer from the posterior side of the tear film. A nonlinear partial differential equation governs the film thickness on a moving domain in one space dimension and time. One end of the tear film moves in order to mimic blinking in the eye. The film thickness is coupled with the diffusion of heat from the posterior of the film, where the underlying cornea and aqueous humor are modeled as a rectangular domain. The domain of the tear film is located on one edge of the rectangle. The resulting problem is solved using the method of lines with a Chebyshev spectral method in space. Evaporation is included in the model, with end fluxes specified to compensate for the evaporation from the film. The numerical results reveal a similarity to quantitative in vivo observations of the film dynamics and measured ocular surface temperature. Periodicity in the film and temperature dynamics is explored with different flux conditions and end motions, and a transition between periodic and non-periodic solutions is analyzed.

  14. Flow and Heat Flux Behavior of Micro-bubble Jet Flows Observed in Thin, Twisted-Wire, Subcooled Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Troy R.; Ban, Heng

    2015-02-01

    Thin wire, subcooled boiling experiments were performed onboard an aircraft flying a parabolic trajectory to provide microgravity conditions for improved observation of jet flow phenomena and their behavior in the absence of buoyant forces. A new type of nucleation jet flow was observed in microgravity. This new micro-bubble jet flow is seen at medium to high heat fluxes and is characterized by a region of the wire that forms multiple jet columns which contain micro-bubbles. These columns flow together and penetrate tens of millimeters into the bulk fluid. Bubble behavior on the wire was observed to progress from a dominance of larger isolated bubbles on the wire to a dominance of micro-bubble jet flows on the wire as heat flux was increased. There was also a transient transition from a few large isolated bubbles to micro-bubble jet flow dominance for a set heat flux. A cross correlation calculation provided velocities of micro-bubbles in the flow, which were in the range of 4-14 mm/s. These velocities were used with convection correlations to show that fluid flows induced by jet flows are a significant contributor to the subcooled boiling heat transfer in microgravity, but are not the primary contributor. Additionally, a relative bubble area analysis approximates the direct contribution of these jet flows to the overall heat dissipation. These micro-bubble jet flows, which are only observed on thin wires (not flat surfaces), and the convection currents they induce, have the potential to allow for sustained fluid motion to occur in microgravity.

  15. Analysis of the Pressure Rise in a Partially Filled Liquid Tank in Microgravity with Low Wall Heat Flux and Simultaneous Boiling and Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments performed with Freon 113 in the space shuttle have shown that in a pro- cess of very slow heating, high liquid superheats can be sustained for a long period in microgravity. In a closed system explosive vaporization of superheated liquid resulted in pressure spikes of varying magnitudes. In this paper, we analyze the pressure rise in a partially lled closed tank in which a large vapor bubble (i.e., ullage) is initially present, and the liquid is subjected to a low wall heat ux. The liquid layer adjacent to the wall becomes superheated until the temperature for nucleation of the bubbles (or the incipience of boiling) is achieved. In the absence of the gravity-induced convection large quantities of superheated liquid can accumulate over time near the heated surface. Once the incipience temperature is attained, explosive boiling occurs and the vapor bubbles that are produced on the heater surface tend to quickly raise the tank pressure. The liquid-vapor saturation temperature increases as well. These two e ects tend to induce condensation of the large ullage bubble that is initially present, and tends to mitigate the tank pressure rise. As a result, the tank pressure is predicted to rise sharply, attain a maximum, and subsequently decay slowly. The predicted pressure rise is compared with experimental results obtained in the microgravity environments of the space shuttle for Freon 113. The analysis is appli- cable, in general to heating of liquid in closed containers in microgravity and to cryogenic fuel tanks, in particular where small heat leaks into the tank are unavoidable.

  16. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor of Improved Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gus; Wrbanek, John; Blaha, Charles

    2002-01-01

    A new design for a thin film heat flux sensor is presented. It is easier to fabricate than previous designs, for a given heat flux has an order of magnitude larger signal, and is more easily scalable than previous designs. Transient and steady state data are also presented.

  17. Evaporator film coefficients of grooved heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The heat transfer rate in the meniscus attachment region of a grooved heat pipe evaporator is studied theoretically. The analysis shows that the evaporation takes place mainly in the region where the liquid changes its shape sharply. However, comparisons with available heat transfer data indicate that the heat transfer rate in the meniscus varying region is substantially reduced probably due to groove wall surface roughness.

  18. Oscillate boiling from microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, S. Roberto; Nguyen, Dang Minh; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    We report about an intriguing boiling regime occurring for small heaters embedded on the boundary in subcooled water. The microheater is realized by focusing a continuous wave laser beam to about 10 μ m in diameter onto a 165-nm-thick layer of gold, which is submerged in water. After an initial vaporous explosion a single bubble oscillates continuously and repeatedly at several 100 kHz albeit with constant laser power input. The microbubble's oscillations are accompanied with bubble pinch-off, leading to a stream of gaseous bubbles in the subcooled water. The self-driven bubble oscillation is explained with a thermally kicked oscillator caused by surface attachment and by the nonspherical collapses. Additionally, Marangoni stresses induce a recirculating streaming flow which transports cold liquid towards the microheater, reducing diffusion of heat along the substrate and therefore stabilizing the phenomenon to many million cycles. We speculate that this oscillate boiling regime may overcome the heat transfer thresholds observed during the nucleate boiling crisis and offers a new pathway for heat transfer under microgravity conditions.

  19. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology: (1) Heat flux is one of a number of parameters, together with pressure, temperature, flow, etc. of interest to engine designers and fluid dynamists, (2) The measurement of heat flux is of interest in directly determining the cooling requirements of hot section blades and vanes, and (3)In addition, if the surface and gas temperatures are known, the measurement of heat flux provides a value for the convective heat transfer coefficient that can be compared with the value provided by CFD codes.

  20. Numerical Investigation of Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Michael; Tanguy, Sebastien; Colin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    In this work, boiling is numerically investigated, using two phase flow direct numerical simulation based on a level set / Ghost Fluid method. Nucleate boiling implies both thermal issue and multiphase dynamics issues at different scales and at different stages of bubble growth. As a result, the different phenomena are investigated separately, considering their nature and the scale at which they occur. First, boiling of a static bubble immersed in an overheated liquid is analysed. Numerical simulations have been performed at different Jakob numbers in the case of strong density discontinuity through the interface. The results show a good agreement on bubble radius evolution between the theoretical evolution and numerical simulation. After the validation of the code for the Scriven test case, interaction of a bubble with a wall is studied. A numerical method taking into account contact angle is evaluated by comparing simulations of the spreading of a liquid droplet impacting on a plate, with experimental data. Then the heat transfer near the contact line is investigated, and simulations of nucleate boiling are performed considering different contact angles values. Finally, the relevance of including a model to take into account the evaporation of the micro layer is discussed.

  1. Nucleation and Heat Transfer in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Eric Warner

    1993-01-01

    With the advent of the new high Tc superconductors as well as the increasing use of cryo-cooled conventional electronics, liquid nitrogen will be one of the preferred cryogens used to cool these materials. Consequently, a more thorough understanding of the heat transfer characteristics of liquid nitrogen is required. In these investigations the transient heating characteristics of liquid nitrogen to states of nucleate and film boiling under different liquid flow conditions are examined. Using a metal hot wire/plate technique, it is verified that there is a premature transition to film boiling in the transient case at power levels as much as 30 percent lower than under steady state nucleate boiling conditions. It is also shown that the premature transition can be reduced or eliminated depending on the flow velocity. The second part of this research analyses the nucleation (boiling) process from a dynamical systems point of view. By observing how the boiling system variables evolve and fluctuate over time, it is hoped that physical insight and predictive information can be gained. One goal is to discover some indicator or signature in the data that anticipates the transition from nucleate boiling to film boiling. Some of the important variables that make up the boiling system are the temperature of the heater and the heat flux through the heater surface into the liquid nitrogen. The result, gained by plotting the system's trajectory in the heat flux-temperature plane, is that on average the system follows a counterclockwise trajectory. A physical model is constructed that explains this behavior. Also, as the applied heater power approaches levels at which the transition to film is known to occur, the area per unit time swept out in the heat flux-temperature plane is seen to reach a maximum. This could be of practical interest as the threshold to film boiling can be anticipated and possibly prevented.

  2. Heat flux induced dryout and rewet in thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroes, Gustave; Fricker, Darren; Issacci, Farrokh; Catton, Ivan

    1990-01-01

    Heat flux induced dryout of thin liquid films on an inclined copper plate was studied. Rewet of the dried out area is also considered. The four fluids used to form the thin films exhibited very different dryout and rewet characteristics. The contact angle and hysteresis effects were found to be important, but they must be considered in context with other parameters. No single variable was found to independently determine the pattern of dryout and rewet.

  3. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  4. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  5. Heat, Light, and Videotapes: Experiments in Heat Conduction Using Liquid Crystal Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Michael E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents a range of experiments in heat conduction suitable for upper-level undergraduate laboratories that make use of heat sensitive liquid crystal film to measure temperature contours. Includes experiments mathematically described by Laplace's equation, experiments theoretically described by Poisson's equation, and experiments that involve…

  6. Nucleation of fcc Ta when heating thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mook, William M.; Carter, C. Barry

    2014-10-25

    Thin tantalum films have been studied during in-situ heating in a transmission electron microscope. Diffraction patterns from the as-deposited films were typical of amorphous materials. Crystalline grains were observed to form when the specimen was annealed in-situ at 450°C. Particular attention was addressed to the formation and growth of grains with the face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure. As a result, these observations are discussed in relation to prior work on the formation of fcc Ta by deformation and during thin film deposition.

  7. Heat flux sensor research and development: The cool film calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, A.; Dean, P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal was to meet the measurement requirement of the NASP program for a gauge capable of measuring heat flux into a 'typical' structure in a 'typical' hypersonic flight environment. A device is conceptually described that has fast response times and is small enough to fit in leading edge or cowl lip structures. The device relies heavily on thin film technology. The main conclusion is the description of the limitations of thin film technology both in the art of fabrication and in the assumption that thin films have the same material properties as the original bulk material. Three gauges were designed and fabricated. Thin film deposition processes were evaluated. The effect of different thin film materials on the performance and fabrication of the gauge was studied. The gauges were tested in an arcjet facility. Survivability and accuracy were determined under various hostile environment conditions.

  8. Thermal Analysis on Mono-Block Type Divertor Based on Subcooled Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux Data against Inlet Subcooling in Short Vertical Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Koichi; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Noda, Nobuaki

    The subcooled flow boiling critical heat fluxes (CHFs) and the heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) data for the tube length, L, of 49, 99 and 149 mm with 9-mm inner diameter were applied to thermal analysis on the Mono-block type divertor of LHD. Incident CHFs for the divertor with the cooling tube diameter, d, of 10 mm and the carbon armor outer diameter, D, of 26 and 33 mm were numerically analyzed based on the measured CHFs and HTCs at the inlet pressure of around 800 kPa. The numerical solutions were also compared with those for the Flat-plate type divertor, which were numerically analyzed for the divertor with the cooling tube diameter d=10 mm and the divertor width, w, ranging from 16 to 30 mm. It is confirmed that the ratio of the one-side heating CHF data, qcr,inc, to the uniform heating CHF data, qcr,sub, can be represented as the simple equation based on the numerical solutions. The values of the qcr,inc for L=50, 100 and 150 mm were estimated with various D/d and w/d at higher pressures.

  9. The Correlation of Coupled Heat and Mass Transfer Experimental Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Keyhani, M; Miller, W A

    1999-11-14

    Absorption chillers are gaining global acceptance as quality comfort cooling systems. These machines are the central chilling plants and the supply for cotnfort cooling for many large commercial buildings. Virtually all absorption chillers use lithium bromide (LiBr) and water as the absorption fluids. Water is the refrigerant. Research has shown LiBr to he one of the best absorption working fluids because it has a high affinity for water, releases water vapor at relatively low temperatures, and has a boiling point much higher than that of water. The heart of the chiller is the absorber, where a process of simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs as the refrigerant water vapor is absorbed into a falling film of aqueous LiBr. The more water vapor absorbed into the falling film, the larger the chiller's capacity for supporting comfort cooling. Improving the performance of the absorber leads directly to efficiency gains for the chiller. The design of an absorber is very empirical and requires experimental data. Yet design data and correlations are sparse in the open literature. The experimental data available to date have been derived at LiBr concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 0.60 mass fraction. No literature data are readily available for the design operating conditions of 0.62 and 0.64 mass fraction of LiBr and absorber pressures of 0.7 and 1.0 kPa.

  10. Heat Transfer Measurements for a Film Cooled Turbine Vane Cascade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    experimental results. We used a transient thermochromic liquid crystal technique to obtain steady state heat transfer data on the mid-span geometry of an... liquid crystal , film cooling, turbine vane 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Douglas R. Thurman a. REPORT U b...used a transient liquid crystal technique to obtain the heat transfer data. Mach number and Reynolds 2 number nearly match real engine

  11. Taking a fresh look at boiling heat transfer on the road to improved nuclear economics and efficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Pointer, William David; Baglietto, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Here, in the effort to reinvigorate innovation in the way we design, build, and operate the nuclear power generating stations of today and tomorrow, nothing can be taken for granted. Not even the seemingly familiar physics of boiling water. The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, or CASL, is focused on the deployment of advanced modeling and simulation capabilities to enable the nuclear industry to reduce uncertainties in the prediction of multi-physics phenomena and continue to improve the performance of today’s Light Water Reactors and their fuel. An important part of the CASL mission is the developmentmore » of a next generation thermal hydraulics simulation capability, integrating the history of engineering models based on experimental experience with the computing technology of the future.« less

  12. Taking a fresh look at boiling heat transfer on the road to improved nuclear economics and efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pointer, William David; Baglietto, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Here, in the effort to reinvigorate innovation in the way we design, build, and operate the nuclear power generating stations of today and tomorrow, nothing can be taken for granted. Not even the seemingly familiar physics of boiling water. The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, or CASL, is focused on the deployment of advanced modeling and simulation capabilities to enable the nuclear industry to reduce uncertainties in the prediction of multi-physics phenomena and continue to improve the performance of today’s Light Water Reactors and their fuel. An important part of the CASL mission is the development of a next generation thermal hydraulics simulation capability, integrating the history of engineering models based on experimental experience with the computing technology of the future.

  13. Heat flux measurements on ceramics with thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Anderson, Robert C.; Liebert, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods were devised to measure heat flux through a thick ceramic using thin film thermocouples. The thermocouples were deposited on the front and back face of a flat ceramic substrate. The heat flux was applied to the front surface of the ceramic using an arc lamp Heat Flux Calibration Facility. Silicon nitride and mullite ceramics were used; two thicknesses of each material was tested, with ceramic temperatures to 1500 C. Heat flux ranged from 0.05-2.5 MW/m2(sup 2). One method for heat flux determination used an approximation technique to calculate instantaneous values of heat flux vs time; the other method used an extrapolation technique to determine the steady state heat flux from a record of transient data. Neither method measures heat flux in real time but the techniques may easily be adapted for quasi-real time measurement. In cases where a significant portion of the transient heat flux data is available, the calculated transient heat flux is seen to approach the extrapolated steady state heat flux value as expected.

  14. Regeneration of pyrolyzed photoresist film by heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andrew J; Downard, Alison J

    2011-03-15

    A simple, time-, and cost-effective procedure is described for regenerating film-modified or deactivated pyrolyzed photoresist film (PPF) surfaces. Heating for 30 min at 545 ± 25 °C in argon at a flow rate of 1 L min(-1) removes covalently bound thin organic films, attached via electrografting from aryldiazonium salt solutions. The heat-treated surfaces exhibit improved electrochemical characteristics compared to those prior to modification and can be reused for solution-based electrochemical measurements and for electrografting. The same treatment reactivates PPF electrodes that have been deactivated by exposure to adsorbates from air or solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and water contact angle measurements establish that the regeneration procedure does not lead to significant changes in oxygen content, roughness, or hydrophobicity of PPF surfaces. XPS measurements also confirm the complete removal of covalently attached organic films after heat treatment but reveal a specific interaction between grafted nitrophenyl films and PPF which results in a small amount of N incorporation in the surface.

  15. Heat Transfer Measurements for a Film Cooled Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsatte, Philip E.; Heidmann, James D.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a large scale film cooled turbine vane cascade. The objective was to investigate heat transfer on a commercial high pressure first stage turbine vane at near engine Mach and Reynolds number conditions. Additionally blowing ratios and coolant density were also matched. Numerical computations were made with the Glenn-HT code of the same geometry and compared with the experimental results. A transient thermochromic liquid crystal technique was used to obtain steady state heat transfer data on the mid-span geometry of an instrumented vane with 12 rows of circular and shaped film cooling holes. A mixture of SF6 and Argon gases was used for film coolant to match the coolant-to-gas density ratio of a real engine. The exit Mach number and Reynolds number were 0.725 and 2.7 million respectively. Trends from the experimental heat transfer data matched well with the computational prediction, particularly for the film cooled case.

  16. Microlayer Topology And Bubble Growth In Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawurek, H. H.; Macgregor, H. G.; Bodenheimer, J. S.

    1987-09-01

    During nucleate boiling thin liquid films (nicrolayers) form beneath the base of bubbles and evaporate into the bubble interiors. A technique is presented which permits the simultaneous determination of microlayer topology and the contribution of microlayer evaporation to bubble growth. Isolated-bubble boiling takes place on an electrically heated, transparent tin-oxide coating deposited on a glass plate, the latter forming the floor of a vessel. With coherent Claser) illumination from beneath, the microlayers reflect fringe patterns similar to Newton's rings. Owing to the rapid evaporation of the layers (the process is completed within milliseconds) the fringes are in rapid motion and are recorded by eine photography at some 4 000 frames per second and exposure times of 50 μs. The resulting interferograms provide details of microlayer shape and thickness versus time, and thus evaporation rate. Simultaneously, and on the same film, bubble profiles (and thus volumes) are obtained under white light illumination. The two bubble images are manipulated by mirrors and lenses so as to appear side by side on the same frame of film, the fringes magnified and the profiles reduced. Sample results for methanol boiling at a pressure of 58.5 kPa and with the liquid bulk at saturation temperature, are presented. Under such conditions microlayer evaporation accounts for 37 per cent of the total bubble volume at detachment.

  17. Enhancement of critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling of water in tubes with a twisted tape and with a helically coiled wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kabata, Y.; Nakajima, R.; Shioda, K.

    1996-08-01

    This paper reports results of an experimental investigation for critical heat flux (CHF) up to 30 MW/m{sup 2} in subcooled flow boiling of water in tubes with a twisted tape and with a helically coiled wire. Experiments were carried out using uniformly heated horizontal tubes with inner diameters of 8 and 12 mm, and with a heated length of 50 mm. Although the CHF of tubes with and without the twisted tape depends on velocity and exit subcooling of water, no observable influence of the tube diameter is detected. As for the CHF enhancement ratio of the tubes with the tape, it is at least 40% higher than the case without the tape, and increases as the exit water subcooling decreases. In the case of the helically coiled wire, the CHF increases as the wire diameter becomes larger and as the coil pitch smaller. The increase of the CHF by the coil, which is the wire diameter of 1.0 mm and the coil pitch of 12 mm, is higher than that by the twisted tape. The CHF model for the smooth tube developed by Celata et al. was applied to the swirl tube by modifying for the calculation of the friction factor, and the radial temperature and velocity distribution in the liquid. Prediction using the modified Celata model accounts for almost all available experimental data for the swirl tube within {+-}25%. This study is relevant for the development of fusion reactors.

  18. Optimization of UA of heat exchangers and BOG compressor exit pressure of LNG boil-off gas reliquefaction system using exergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochunni, Sarun Kumar; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2015-12-01

    Boil-off gas (BOG) generation and its handling are important issues in Liquefied natural gas (LNG) value chain because of economic, environment and safety reasons. Several variants of reliquefaction systems of BOG have been proposed by researchers. Thermodynamic analyses help to configure them and size their components for improving performance. In this paper, exergy analysis of reliquefaction system based on nitrogen-driven reverse Brayton cycle is carried out through simulation using Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a process simulator and the effects of heat exchanger size with and without related pressure drop and BOG compressor exit pressure are evaluated. Nondimensionalization of parameters with respect to the BOG load allows one to scale up or down the design. The process heat exchanger (PHX) requires much higher surface area than that of BOG condenser and it helps to reduce the quantity of methane vented out to atmosphere. As pressure drop destroys exergy, optimum UA of PHX decreases for highest system performance if pressure drop is taken into account. Again, for fixed sizes of heat exchangers, as there is a range of discharge pressures of BOG compressor at which the loss of methane in vent minimizes, the designer should consider choosing the pressure at lower value.

  19. Experimental investigation on the phenomena around the onset nucleate boiling during the impacting of a droplet on the hot surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrakusuma, Windy H.; Deendarlianto, Kamal, Samsul; Indarto, Nuriyadi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Onset of nucleate boiling of a droplet when impacted onto hot surface was investigated. Three kinds of surfaces, normal stainless steel (NSS), stainless steel with TiO2 coating (UVN), and stainless steel with TiO2 coating and radiated by ultraviolet ray were employed to examine the effect of wettability. The droplet size was 2.4 mm diameter, and dropped under different We number. The image is generated by high speed camera with the frame speed of 1000 fps. The boiling conditions are identified as natural convection, nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, transition, and film boiling. In the present report, the discussion will be focused on the beginning of nucleate boiling on the droplet. Nucleate boiling occurs when bubbles are generated. These bubbles are probably caused by nucleation on the impurities within the liquid rather than at nucleation sites on the heated surface because the bubbles appear to be in the bulk of the liquid instead of at the liquid-solid interface. In addition, the smaller the contact angle, the fastest the boiling.

  20. Microlayer formation characteristics in pool isolated bubble boiling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuki, Tomohide; Nakabeppu, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of microlayer formation characteristics is important for developing a reliable nucleate boiling heat transfer model based on accurate physical mechanisms. Although formation mechanisms of the thin liquid film in two-phase flow of confined spaces, such as micro-tubes and closely positioned parallel plates, have been thoroughly studied, microlayer formation mechanisms of pool boiling have been sparsely studied. In a previous study (Yabuki and Nakabeppu in Int J Heat Mass Transf 76:286-297, 2014; Int J Heat Mass Transf 100:851-860, 2016), the spatial distribution of initial microlayer thickness under pool boiling bubbles was calculated by transient heat conduction analysis using the local wall temperature measured with a MEMS sensor. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of microlayer formation in pool boiling were investigated using the relationship between derived initial microlayer thickness and microlayer formation velocity determined by transient local heat flux data. The trend of microlayer thickness was found to change depending on the thickness of the velocity boundary layer outside the bubble foot. When the boundary layer thickness was thin, the initial microlayer thickness was determined by the boundary layer thickness, and the initial microlayer thickness proportionally increased with increasing boundary layer thickness. On the other hand, when the boundary layer was thick, the initial microlayer thickness decreased with increasing boundary layer thickness. In this thick boundary layer region, the momentum balance in the dynamic meniscus region became important, in addition to the boundary layer thickness, and the microlayer thickness, made dimensionless using boundary layer thickness, correlated with the Bond number.

  1. Boiling of the interface between two immiscible liquids below the bulk boiling temperatures of both components.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Goldobin, Denis S

    2014-11-01

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becoming heated above its bulk boiling point. On the contrary, we address the case where both liquids remain below their bulk boiling points. In this paper we construct the theoretical description of the boiling process and discuss the actualisation of the case we consider for real systems.

  2. Design and test of a compact optics system for the pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Laubenthal, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The experiment described seeks to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. The vehicle for accomplishing this is an investigation, including tests to be conducted in microgravity and coupled with appropriate analyses, of the heat transfer and vapor bubble dynamics associated with nucleation, bubble growth/collapse and subsequent motion, considering the interrelations between buoyancy, momentum and surface tension which will govern the motion of the vapor and surrounding liquid, as a function of the heating rate at the heat transfer surface and the temperature level and distribution in the bulk liquid. The experiment is designed to be contained within the confines of a Get-Away-Special Canister (GAS Can) installed in the bay of the space shuttle. When the shuttle reaches orbit, the experiment will be turned on and testing will proceed automatically. In the proposed Pool Boiling Experiment a pool of liquid, initially at a precisely defined pressure and temperature, will be subjected to a step imposed heat flux from a semitransparent thin-film heater forming part of one wall of the container such that boiling is initiated and maintained for a defined period of time at a constant pressure level. Transient measurements of the heater surface and fluid temperatures near the surface will be made, noting especially the conditions at the onset of boiling, along with motion photography of the boiling process in two simultaneous views, from beneath the heating surface and from the side. The conduct of the experiment and the data acquisition will be completely automated and self-contained. For the initial flight, a total of nine tests are proposed, with three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling. The design process used in the development and check-out of the compact photographic/optics system for the Pool Boiling Experiment is documented.

  3. Two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop of LNG during saturated flow boiling in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-12-01

    Two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop of LNG (liquefied natural gas) have been measured in a horizontal smooth tube with an inner diameter of 8 mm. The experiments were conducted at inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa with a heat flux of 8-36 kW m-2, and mass flux of 49.2-201.8 kg m-2 s-1. The effect of vapor quality, inlet pressure, heat flux and mass flux on the heat transfer characteristic are discussed. The comparisons of the experimental data with the predicted value by existing correlations are analyzed. Zou et al. (2010) correlation shows the best accuracy with 24.1% RMS deviation among them. Moreover four frictional pressure drop methods are also chosen to compare with the experimental database.

  4. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  5. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many Earthbound applications, such as steam-generation power plants, petroleum, and other chemical plants. Also, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  6. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Five Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    1997-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many earthbound applications in steamgeneration power plants, petroleum plants, and other chemical plants. In addition, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  7. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  8. Single-bubble dynamics in pool boiling of one-component fluids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2014-06-01

    We numerically investigate the pool boiling of one-component fluids with a focus on the effects of surface wettability on the single-bubble dynamics. We employed the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], a diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor flows involving liquid-vapor transition in nonuniform temperature fields. We first perform simulations for bubbles on homogeneous surfaces. We find that an increase in either the contact angle or the surface superheating can enhance the bubble spreading over the heating surface and increase the bubble departure diameter as well and therefore facilitate the transition into film boiling. We then examine the dynamics of bubbles on patterned surfaces, which incorporate the advantages of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The central hydrophobic region increases the thermodynamic probability of bubble nucleation while the surrounding hydrophilic region hinders the continuous bubble spreading by pinning the contact line at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic intersection. This leads to a small bubble departure diameter and therefore prevents the transition from nucleate boiling into film boiling. With the bubble nucleation probability increased and the bubble departure facilitated, the efficiency of heat transfer on such patterned surfaces is highly enhanced, as observed experimentally [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 57, 733 (2013)]. In addition, the stick-slip motion of contact line on patterned surfaces is demonstrated in one-component fluids, with the effect weakened by surface superheating.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Boiling Multiphase Flows: State-of-the-Art, Modeling, Algorithmic and Computer Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Nourgaliev R.; Knoll D.; Mousseau V.; Berry R.

    2007-04-01

    The state-of-the-art for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of boiling multiphase flows is reviewed, focussing on potential of available computational techniques, the level of current success for their applications to model several basic flow regimes (film, pool-nucleate and wall-nucleate boiling -- FB, PNB and WNB, respectively). Then, we discuss multiphysics and multiscale nature of practical boiling flows in LWR reactors, requiring high-fidelity treatment of interfacial dynamics, phase-change, hydrodynamics, compressibility, heat transfer, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry of liquid/vapor and fluid/solid-wall interfaces. Finally, we outline the framework for the {\\sf Fervent} code, being developed at INL for DNS of reactor-relevant boiling multiphase flows, with the purpose of gaining insight into the physics of multiphase flow regimes, and generating a basis for effective-field modeling in terms of its formulation and closure laws.

  10. Modelling heat conduction in polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride films.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-08-19

    We conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) films. To this aim, we constructed large atomistic models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets with random and uniform grain configuration. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, we investigated the influence of the average grain size on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline h-BN films at various temperatures. Using the EMD results, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Our multiscale investigations not only provide a general viewpoint regarding the heat conduction in h-BN films but also propose that polycrystalline h-BN sheets present high thermal conductivity comparable to monocrystalline sheets.

  11. Modelling heat conduction in polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride films

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-01-01

    We conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) films. To this aim, we constructed large atomistic models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets with random and uniform grain configuration. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, we investigated the influence of the average grain size on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline h-BN films at various temperatures. Using the EMD results, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Our multiscale investigations not only provide a general viewpoint regarding the heat conduction in h-BN films but also propose that polycrystalline h-BN sheets present high thermal conductivity comparable to monocrystalline sheets. PMID:26286820

  12. Boiling Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Michael C.

    2002-01-01

    The author recounts his experiences he helped to investigate the accident which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. The focus was on how he used novel approaches to investigate heat transfer in the shuttle's hydrogen tank, after an expert he sought for advice proved unhelpful.

  13. A Study of Nucleate Boiling with Forced Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    purposes. In addition, it is desirable to reduce the number of variables as much as possible in a fundamental study. These considerations dictated the use of a flat heater surface, which is rectangular in shape, 1.91 cm by 3.81 cm (0.75 x 1.5 inches), consisting either of a 400 Angstrom thick semi-transparent gold film sputtered on a quartz substrate which serves simultaneously as a heater and a resistance thermometer, or a copper substrate of the same size. The heater substrate is a disc which can be rotated so that the heated length in the flow direction can be changed from 1.91 to 3.81 cm (0.75 to 1.5 inches). The fluid is R-113, and the velocities can be varied between 0.5 cm/s and 60 cm/s. For a sufficiently low velocity the CHF can be modeled reasonably well at various orientations by the correlation for pool boiling corrected for the influence of bulk liquid subcooling, multiplied by the square root of q, the angle relative to horizontal. This arises from equating buoyancy and drag forces in the inverted positions where the vapor bubbles are held against the heater surface as they slide. A distortion of the measurements relative to pool boiling occurs as the flow velocity increases. In modeling this effect at different levels of subcooling it appeared appropriate to estimate the volumetric rate of vapor generation, using measurements of bubble frequency (or residence time), void fraction and average bubble boundary layer thickness. These were determined with the use of a platinum hot wire probe 0.025 mm in diameter by 1.3 mm long, applying a constant current to distinguish between contact with liquid or vapor. Two-dimensional spatial variations are obtained with a special mechanism to resolve displacements in increments of 0.025 mm. From such measurements it was determined that the fraction of the surface heat transfer resulting in evaporation varies inversely with the subcooling correction factor for the CHF. The measured inverse bubble residence time is normalized

  14. Effect of High Hydrostatic Pressure Combined with Moderate Heat to Inactivate Pressure-Resistant Bacteria in Water-Boiled Salted Duck.

    PubMed

    Ye, Keping; Feng, Yulin; Wang, Kai; Bai, Yun; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of high hydrostatic pressure combined with moderate heat to inactivate pressure-resistant bacteria in water-boiled salted duck meat (WBSDM), and to establish suitable procedures to improve the quality of WBSDM. The conditions (300 MPa/60 °C, 400 MPa/60 °C, and 500 MPa/50 °C) effectively inactivated the pressure-resistant bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus warneri) in WBSDM. Although more pressure-resistant than S. warneri, the above treatment conditions inactivated B. cereus more than 10(7) CFU/mL in buffer, and more than 10(6) CFU/g in WBSDM, and did not cause any changes in color, texture, or moisture content of products. The interaction between pressure and temperature is a more significant factor than only pressure in inactivating both B. cereus and S. warneri, the treatment of WBSDM at 400 MPa/ 60 °C/ 10 min is the most practical condition for postprocess of WBSDM after cooking.

  15. Momentum effects in steady nucleate pool boiling during microgravity.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman

    2004-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments were conducted in microgravity on five space shuttle flights, using a flat plate heater consisting of a semitransparent thin gold film deposited on a quartz substrate that also acted as a resistance thermometer. The test fluid was R-113, and the vapor bubble behavior at the heater surface was photographed from beneath as well as from the side. Each flight consisted of a matrix of three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling. In 26 of the total of 45 experiments conditions of steady-state pool boiling were achieved under certain combinations of heat flux and liquid subcooling. In many of the 26 cases, it was observed from the 16-mm movie films that a large vapor bubble formed, remaining slightly removed from the heater surface, and that subsequent vapor bubbles nucleate and grow on the heater surface. Coalescence occurs upon making contact with the large bubble, which thus acts as a vapor reservoir. Recently, measurements of the frequencies and sizes of the small vapor bubbles as they coalesced with the large bubble permitted computation of the associated momentum transfer. The transient forces obtained are presented here. Where these arise from the conversion of the surface energy in the small vapor bubble to kinetic energy acting away from the solid heater surface, they counter the Marangoni convection due to the temperature gradients normal to the heater surface. This Marangoni convection would otherwise impel the large vapor bubble toward the heater surface and result in dryout and unsteady heat transfer.

  16. Conceptual design for spacelab pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J. H.; Peck, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A pool boiling heat transfer experiment to be incorporated with a larger two-phase flow experiment on Spacelab was designed to confirm (or alter) the results of earth-normal gravity experiments which indicate that the hydrodynamic peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes vanish at very low gravity. Twelve small sealed test cells containing water, methanol or Freon 113 and cylindrical heaters of various sizes are to be built. Each cell will be subjected to one or more 45 sec tests in which the surface heat flux on the heaters is increased linearly until the surface temperature reaches a limiting value of 500 C. The entire boiling process will be photographed in slow-motion. Boiling curves will be constructed from thermocouple and electric input data, for comparison with the motion picture records. The conduct of the experiment will require no more than a few hours of operator time.

  17. Acoustic field interaction with a boiling system under terrestrial gravity and microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sitter, J S; Snyder, T J; Chung, J N; Marston, P L

    1998-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments from a platinum wire heater in FC-72 liquid were conducted under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, both with and without the presence of a high-intensity acoustic standing wave within the fluid. The purpose of this research was to study the interaction between an acoustic field and a pool boiling system in normal gravity and microgravity. The absence of buoyancy in microgravity complicates the process of boiling. The acoustic force on a vapor bubble generated from a heated wire in a standing wave was shown to be able to play the role of buoyancy in microgravity. The microgravity environment was achieved with 0.6 and 2.1-s drop towers. The sound was transmitted through the fluid medium by means of a half wavelength sonic transducer driven at 10.18 kHz. At high enough acoustic pressure amplitudes cavitation and streaming began playing an important role in vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. Several different fixed heat fluxes were chosen for the microgravity experiment and the effects of acoustics on the surface temperature of the heater were recorded and the vapor bubble movement was filmed. Video images of the pool boiling processes and heat transfer data are presented.

  18. Kinetics-based phase change approach for VOF method applied to boiling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifani, Paolo; Geurts, Bernard; Kuerten, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of boiling flows are performed to better understand the interaction of boiling phenomena with turbulence. The multiphase flow is simulated by solving a single set of equations for the whole flow field according to the one-fluid formulation, using a VOF interface capturing method. Interface terms, related to surface tension, interphase mass transfer and latent heat, are added at the phase boundary. The mass transfer rate across the interface is derived from kinetic theory and subsequently coupled with the continuum representation of the flow field. The numerical model was implemented in OpenFOAM and validated against 3 cases: evaporation of a spherical uniformly heated droplet, growth of a spherical bubble in a superheated liquid and two dimensional film boiling. The computational model will be used to investigate the change in turbulence intensity in a fully developed channel flow due to interaction with boiling heat and mass transfer. In particular, we will focus on the influence of the vapor bubble volume fraction on enhancing heat and mass transfer. Furthermore, we will investigate kinetic energy spectra in order to identify the dynamics associated with the wakes of vapor bubbles. Department of Applied Mathematics, 7500 AE Enschede, NL.

  19. Diamond thin film temperature and heat-flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Yang, G. S.; Masood, A.; Fredricks, R.

    1995-01-01

    Diamond film temperature and heat-flux sensors are developed using a technology compatible with silicon integrated circuit processing. The technology involves diamond nucleation, patterning, doping, and metallization. Multi-sensor test chips were designed and fabricated to study the thermistor behavior. The minimum feature size (device width) for 1st and 2nd generation chips are 160 and 5 micron, respectively. The p-type diamond thermistors on the 1st generation test chip show temperature and response time ranges of 80-1270 K and 0.29-25 microseconds, respectively. An array of diamond thermistors, acting as heat flux sensors, was successfully fabricated on an oxidized Si rod with a diameter of 1 cm. Some problems were encountered in the patterning of the Pt/Ti ohmic contacts on the rod, due mainly to the surface roughness of the diamond film. The use of thermistors with a minimum width of 5 micron (to improve the spatial resolution of measurement) resulted in lithographic problems related to surface roughness of diamond films. We improved the mean surface roughness from 124 nm to 30 nm by using an ultra high nucleation density of 10(exp 11)/sq cm. To deposit thermistors with such small dimensions on a curved surface, a new 3-D diamond patterning technique is currently under development. This involves writing a diamond seed pattern directly on the curved surface by a computer-controlled nozzle.

  20. Two-phase structure above hot surfaces in jet impingement boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanic, L.; Auracher, H.; Ziegler, F.

    2009-05-01

    Jet impingement boiling is very efficient in cooling of hot surfaces as a part of the impinging liquid evaporates. Several studies have been carried out to measure and correlate the heat transfer to impinging jets as a function of global parameters such as jet subcooling, jet velocity, nozzle size and distance to the surface, etc. If physically based mechanistic models are to be developed, studies on the fundamentals of two-phase dynamics near the hot surface are required. In the present study the vapor-liquid structures underneath a subcooled (20 K) planar (1 mm × 9 mm) water jet, impinging the heated plate vertically with a velocity of 0.4 m/s, were analyzed by means of a miniaturized optical probe. It has a tip diameter of app. 1.5 μm and is moved toward the plate by a micrometer device. The temperature controlled experimental technique enabled steady-state experiments in all boiling regimes. The optical probe data provides information about the void fraction, the contact frequencies and the distribution of the vapor and liquid contact times as a function of the distance to the surface. The measured contact frequencies range from 40 Hz at the onset of nucleate boiling to nearly 20,000 Hz at the end of the transition boiling regime. Due to condensation in the subcooled jet vapor disappears at a distance to the surface of app. 1.2 mm in nucleate boiling. This vapor layer becomes smaller with increasing wall superheat. In film boiling a vapor film thickness of 8 ± 2 μm was found.

  1. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  2. Stability and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Condensing Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Pedersen, P. C.; Allen, J. S.; Shear, M. A.; Chen, Z. Q.; Alexandrou, A. N.

    2002-11-01

    The overall objective of this research is to investigate the fundamental physics of film condensation in reduced gravity. The condensation of vapor on a cool surface is important in many engineering problems,including spacecraft thermal control and also the behavior of condensate films that may form on the interior surfaces of spacecraft. To examine the effects of body force on condensing films, two different geometries have been tested in the laboratory: (1) a stabilizing gravitational body force (+1g, or condensing surface facing 'upwards') and (2) de-stabilizing gravitational body force (-1g, or 'downwards'). For each geometry, different fluid configurations are employed to help isolate the fluid mechanical and thermal mechanisms operative in condensing films. The fluid configurations are (a) a condensing film, and (b) a non-condensing film with film growth by mass addition by through the plate surface. Condensation experiments are conducted in a test cell containing a cooled copper or brass plate with an exposed diameter of 12.7 cm. The metal surface is polished to allow for double-pass shadowgraph imaging, and the test surface is instrumented with imbedded heat transfer gauges and thermocouples. Representative shadowgraph images of a condensing, unstable (-1g) n-pentane film are shown. The interfacial disturbances associated with the de-stabilizing body force leading to droplet formation and break-off can be clearly seen. The heat transfer coefficient associated with the condensing film is shown. The heat transfer coefficient is seen to initially decrease, consistent with the increased thermal resistance due to layer growth. For sufficiently long time, a steady value of heat transfer is observed, accompanied by continuous droplet formation and break-off. The non-condensing cell consists of a stack of thin stainless steel disks 10 cm in diameter mounted in a brass enclosure. The disks are perforated with a regular pattern of 361 holes each 0.25 mm in diameter

  3. Stability and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Condensing Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Pedersen, P. C.; Allen, J. S.; Shear, M. A.; Chen, Z. Q.; Alexandrou, A. N.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to investigate the fundamental physics of film condensation in reduced gravity. The condensation of vapor on a cool surface is important in many engineering problems,including spacecraft thermal control and also the behavior of condensate films that may form on the interior surfaces of spacecraft. To examine the effects of body force on condensing films, two different geometries have been tested in the laboratory: (1) a stabilizing gravitational body force (+1g, or condensing surface facing 'upwards') and (2) de-stabilizing gravitational body force (-1g, or 'downwards'). For each geometry, different fluid configurations are employed to help isolate the fluid mechanical and thermal mechanisms operative in condensing films. The fluid configurations are (a) a condensing film, and (b) a non-condensing film with film growth by mass addition by through the plate surface. Condensation experiments are conducted in a test cell containing a cooled copper or brass plate with an exposed diameter of 12.7 cm. The metal surface is polished to allow for double-pass shadowgraph imaging, and the test surface is instrumented with imbedded heat transfer gauges and thermocouples. Representative shadowgraph images of a condensing, unstable (-1g) n-pentane film are shown. The interfacial disturbances associated with the de-stabilizing body force leading to droplet formation and break-off can be clearly seen. The heat transfer coefficient associated with the condensing film is shown. The heat transfer coefficient is seen to initially decrease, consistent with the increased thermal resistance due to layer growth. For sufficiently long time, a steady value of heat transfer is observed, accompanied by continuous droplet formation and break-off. The non-condensing cell consists of a stack of thin stainless steel disks 10 cm in diameter mounted in a brass enclosure. The disks are perforated with a regular pattern of 361 holes each 0.25 mm in diameter

  4. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1999-01-01

    A multi-block, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute heat transfer coefficient on the blade, hub and shroud for a rotating high-pressure turbine blade with 172 film-cooling holes in eight rows. Film cooling effectiveness is also computed on the adiabatic blade. Wilcox's k-omega model is used for modeling the turbulence. Of the eight rows of holes, three are staggered on the shower-head with compound-angled holes. With so many holes on the blade it was somewhat of a challenge to get a good quality grid on and around the blade and in the tip clearance region. The final multi-block grid consists of 4784 elementary blocks which were merged into 276 super blocks. The viscous grid has over 2.2 million cells. Each hole exit, in its true oval shape, has 80 cells within it so that coolant velocity, temperature, k and omega distributions can be specified at these hole exits. It is found that for the given parameters, heat transfer coefficient on the cooled, isothermal blade is highest in the leading edge region and in the tip region. Also, the effectiveness over the cooled, adiabatic blade is the lowest in these regions. Results for an uncooled blade are also shown, providing a direct comparison with those for the cooled blade. Also, the heat transfer coefficient is much higher on the shroud as compared to that on the hub for both the cooled and the uncooled cases.

  5. Enhanced Boiling on Micro-Configured Composite Surfaces Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chai, An-Ti

    1999-01-01

    In order to accommodate the growing thermal management needs of future space platforms, several two-phase active thermal control systems (ATCSs) have evolved and were included in the designs of space stations. Compared to the pumped single-phase liquid loops used in the conventional Space Transportation System and Spacelab, ATCSs offer significant benefits that may be realized by adopting a two-phase fluid-loop system. Alternately, dynamic power systems (DPSs), based on the Rankine cycle, seem inevitably to be required to supply the electrical power requirements of expanding space activities. Boiling heat transfer is one of the key technologies for both ATCSs and DPSs. Nucleate boiling near critical heat flux (CHF) can transport very large thermal loads with much smaller device size and much lower pumping power. However, boiling performance deteriorates in a reduced gravity environment and operation in the CHF regime is precarious because any slight overload will cause the heat transfer to suddenly move to the film boiling regime, which in turn, will result in burnout of the heat transfer surfaces. New materials, such as micro-configured metal-graphite composites, can provide a solution for boiling enhancement. It has been shown experimentally that this type of material manifests outstanding boiling heat transfer performance and their CHF is also extended to higher values. Due to the high thermal conductivity of graphite fiber (up to 1,200 W/m-K in the fiber direction), the composite surfaces are non-isothermal during the boiling process. The composite surfaces are believed to have a much wider safe operating region (a more uniform boiling curve in the CHF regime) because non-isothermal surfaces have been found to be less sensitive to variations of wall superheat in the CHF regime. The thermocapillary forces formed by the temperature difference between the fiber tips and the metal matrix play a more important role than the buoyancy in the bubble detachment, for the

  6. Critical heat-flux characteristics of R-113 boiling two-phase flow in twisted-tape-inserted tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangryoul; Inoue, Akira; Takahashi, Minoru

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents experimental data on the critical heat flux (CHF) in twisted-tape-inserted tubes over a wide quality range of {minus}0.25 to 0.8. The influences of quality, twist ratio, mass velocity, and clearance between the twisted tape and tube inner wall on CHF were investigated. In the subcooled region, it was observed, using an infrared thermoviewer, that CHF was initiated locally at the wall near the twisted tape. Consequently, twisted tape insertion with small tape-well clearance decreased CHF to below the value of the empty tubes at a low flow rate. This decrease was found to be avoidable by adjusting the clearance. In the net quality region, CHF of the twisted-tape-inserted tubes increased with increasing flow rate contrary to the case of the empty tubes. However, CHF in the net quality region was also decreased by insertion of twisted tapes with high twist ratio (loosely twisted tapes) at a very low flow rate.

  7. Effects of heat treatment on chitosan nanocomposite film reinforced with nanocrystalline cellulose and tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Rubentheren, V; Ward, Thomas A; Chee, Ching Yern; Nair, Praveena; Salami, Erfan; Fearday, Christopher

    2016-04-20

    This article presents an analysis of the influence of heat treatment on chitosan nanocomposite film. A series of samples comprising: pure chitosan film, chitosan film embedded with nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), chitosan film crosslinked with tannic acid and chitosan film with a blend of NCC and tannic acid were heat treated using a convection oven. Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction test (XRD) shows the changes in chemical interaction of the heat treated films. The heat treated films show significant improvements in moisture absorption. Tensile strength and Young's Modulus were increased up to 7MPa and 259MPa, respectively when the samples were subjected to heat treatment. For the NCC particles, a transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to inspect the structural properties of cellulose particle in suspension form.

  8. Experimental investigation into effects of ultrasonic vibration on pool boiling heat transfer performance of horizontal low-finned U-tube in TiO2/R141b nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tong-Bou; Wang, Zi-Long

    2016-11-01

    An experimental investigation was performed into the pool boiling heat transfer performance of a low-finned U-tube immersed in TiO2/R141b nanofluid with four different nanoparticle loadings (0, 0.0001, 0.001, and 0.01 vol%). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry results revealed that some of the TiO2 nanoparticles adhered to the heated surface during boiling, and therefore increased the thermal resistance. The heat transfer performance of the nanofluids with particle loadings of 0.0001, 0.001 and 0.01 vol% was thus found to be reduced by around 10, 20 and 50 %, respectively, compared to that of pure R141b refrigerant. Accordingly, an ultrasonic vibration crusher was used to inhibit the formation of the TiO2 nano-sorption layer on the U-tube surface. The ultrasonic vibration suppressed the deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles and improved the heat transfer performance of the nanofluids as a result. Of the four working fluids, the nanofluid with a particle loading of 0.0001 vol% yielded the optimal heat transfer performance (i.e., a heat transfer coefficient around 30 % higher than that of pure R141b refrigerant.)

  9. Heat Transfer due to Film Condensation on Vertical Fluted Tubes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    report is authorized. This report was prepared by: L Vijay K . Garg P. J. Mr" Adjlmct Professor of Chairrmn, Department of Mechanical Engineering...7AD-AiW47 258 HEAT TRNSFER’DUE TO FILM CONDENSATION ON VERTICAL i/iFLUTED TUBES(U) NAVAL POSTGRA UATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA U R V K GARG ET AL. JUL 84...J. Marto, Code 69Mx 5 Department of Mechanical Engineering Naval. Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 939143 5. Professor V. K . Garg 3 Department of

  10. Thin-Film Thermocouple Technology Demonstrated for Reliable Heat Transfer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Exploratory work is in progress to apply thin-film thermocouples to localized heat transfer measurements on turbine engine vanes and blades. The emerging thin-film thermocouple technology shows great potential to improve the accuracy of local heat transfer measurements. To verify and master the experimental methodology of thin-film thermocouples, the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted a proof-of-concept experiment in a controlled environment before applying the thin-film sensors to turbine tests.

  11. Critical heat flux in locally heated liquid film moving under the action of gas flow in a mini-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, E. M.; Zaitsev, D. V.; Orlik, E. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2016-10-01

    Thin and ultra thin liquid films driven by a forced gas/vapor flow (stratified or annular flows), i.e. shear-driven liquid films in a narrow channel, is one of the promising candidate for the thermal management of advanced semiconductor devices with high local heat release. In experiments performed in this paper with locally heated shear-driven liquid films of water the effect of various conditions, such as flow rates of liquid and gas and channel height, on critical heat flux (CHF) was investigated. In experiments the record value of CHF as high as 540 W/cm2 has been achieved. The heat spreading into the substrate and the heat loses into the atmosphere in total don't exceed 30% at heat fluxes higher than 200 W/cm2. Comparison of shear-driven liquid films and gravity-driven liquid films showed that CHF in shear-driven films up to 10 times higher than in gravity-driven liquid films. Thus, prospect of using shear- driven films of water in modern cooling systems of semiconductor devices was confirmed.

  12. Thermohydrodynamics of boiling in a van der Waals fluid.

    PubMed

    Laurila, T; Carlson, A; Do-Quang, M; Ala-Nissila, T; Amberg, G

    2012-02-01

    We present a modeling approach that enables numerical simulations of a boiling Van der Waals fluid based on the diffuse interface description. A boundary condition is implemented that allows in and out flux of mass at constant external pressure. In addition, a boundary condition for controlled wetting properties of the boiling surface is also proposed. We present isothermal verification cases for each element of our modeling approach. By using these two boundary conditions we are able to numerically access a system that contains the essential physics of the boiling process at microscopic scales. Evolution of bubbles under film boiling and nucleate boiling conditions are observed by varying boiling surface wettability. We observe flow patters around the three-phase contact line where the phase change is greatest. For a hydrophilic boiling surface, a complex flow pattern consistent with vapor recoil theory is observed.

  13. Leading edge film cooling effects on turbine blade heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of spanwise pitch of shower-head holes and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled turbine vane. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. It is found that with the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio fixed, reducing P, the spanwise pitch for shower-head holes, from 7.5 d to 3.0 d, where d is the hole diameter, increases the average effectiveness considerably over the blade surface. However, when P/d= 7.5, increasing the coolant mass flow increases the effectiveness on the pressure surface but reduces it on the suction surface due to coolant jet lift-off. For P/d = 4.5 or 3.0, such an anomaly does not occur within the range of coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios analyzed. In all cases, adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are highly three-dimensional.

  14. Glass transitions in nanoscale heated volumes of thin polystyrene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Alex G.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2010-12-01

    Glass transitions in confined polystyrene films on a silicon substrate were studied using atomic force microscopy incorporating a thermal tip. Three-dimensional spatial nanoconfinements were achieved by controlling size and boundary conditions of small heated volumes of polymer nanostrands drawn from the polymer surface with the thermal tip, using appropriate loads and temperatures at the tip-polymer contact. Finite element analysis was performed to model mechanical contact and thermal transport, including the effects of contact radius, film thickness, and load on temperature and pressure distributions in the confined volume at the contact. The glass transition temperature (Tg) was measured by observing the softening of polymers with increasing temperature. The measured surface Tg exhibited a strong size dependence, while the subsurface Tg increased with decreasing the distance to the substrate. A large increase in the surface Tg was observed when the radius of contact was reduced below about 10 nm. The increase in the glass transition temperature at the surface was attributed to the presence of surface and line tension at the nanometer contact, while the enhanced Tg near the substrate was attributed to the pinning effects that reduces the mobility of the polymer molecules in the film over several hundreds of nanometers away from the polymer-substrate interface.

  15. The Plausibility of Boiling Geysers on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    A mechanism is suggested and modeled whereby there may be boiling geysers on Triton. The geysers would be of nitrogen considering that Voyager detected cryovolcanic activity, that solid nitrogen conducts heat much less than water ice, and that there is internal heat on Triton.

  16. Quantum Dot/Siloxane Composite Film Exceptionally Stable against Oxidation under Heat and Moisture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwea Yoon; Yoon, Da-Eun; Jang, Junho; Lee, Daewon; Choi, Gwang-Mun; Chang, Joon Ha; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Doh C; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-12-21

    We report on the fabrication of a siloxane-encapsulated quantum dot (QD) film (QD-silox film), which exhibits stable emission intensity for over 1 month even at elevated temperature and humidity. QD-silox films are solidified via free radical addition reaction between oligosiloxane resin and ligand molecules on QDs. We prepare the QD-oligosiloxane resin by sol-gel condensation reaction of silane precursors with QDs blended in the precursor solution, forgoing ligand-exchange of QDs. The resulting QD-oligosiloxane resin remains optically clear after 40 days of storage, in contrast to other QD-containing resins which turn turbid and ultimately form sediments. QDs also disperse uniformly in the QD-silox film, whose photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) remains nearly unaltered under harsh conditions; for example, 85 °C/5% relative humidity (RH), 85 °C/85% RH, strongly acidic, and strongly basic environments for 40 days. The QD-silox film appears to remain equally emissive even after being immersed into boiling water (100 °C). Interestingly, the PL QY of the QD-silox film noticeably increases when the film is exposed to a moist environment, which opens a new, facile avenue to curing dimmed QD-containing films. Given its excellent stability, we envision that the QD-silox film is best suited in display applications, particularly as a PL-type down-conversion layer.

  17. Film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer with injection through holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the local film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer downstream of injection of air through discrete holes into a turbulent boundary layer of air on a flat plate is reported. Secondary air is injected through a single hole normal to the main flow and through both a single hole and a row of holes spaced at three diameter intervals with an injection angle of 35 deg to the main flow. Two values of the mainstream Reynolds number are used; the blowing rate is varied from 0.1 to 2.0. Photographs of a carbon dioxide-water fog injected into the main flow at an angle of 90 deg are also presented to show interaction between the jet and mainstream.

  18. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-01

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  19. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L. H.; Lim, C. W.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh

    2014-06-28

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  20. Laser-induced desorption of overlayer films off a heated metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiang; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2007-02-01

    The temperature-induced desorption of adsorbed overlayer films with thicknesses between 4 and 200 ML off a suddenly heated metal substrate is studied using molecular-dynamics simulation. We observe that the rapid heating vaporizes the surface-near part of the overlayer film. The initial heating-induced thermoelastic pressure and the vapor pressure in the vapor film drive the remaining film as a large relatively cold cluster away from the surface. In our simulations, the material present in the developing vapor film amounts to roughly 2 ML and is quite independent of the overlayer film thickness. For cluster thicknesses beyond 40 ML, the desorption time increases only little with film thickness, while the resulting cluster velocity decreases only slightly.

  1. Enhancements of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents two means for enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under microgravity conditions: using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface and dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols as the working fluid. In the former, thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix plays an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling-heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. In the latter cases, the surface tension-temperature gradient of the long-chain alcohol solutions turns positive as the temperature exceeds a certain value. Consequently, the Marangoni effect does not impede, but rather aids in bubble departure from the heating surface. This feature is most favorable in microgravity. As a result, the bubble size of departure is substantially reduced at higher frequencies. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. In addition, performance equations for nucleate boiling and critical heat flux in dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols are obtained.

  2. Analysis of boiling flat-plate collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Price, H.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.

    1986-05-01

    A detailed model for use with TRNSYS, capable of modelling a wide range of boiling collector types, was used to analyze boiling flat-plate collector systems. This model can account for a subcooled liquid entering the collector, heat losses in the vapor and the liquid return line, pressure drops due to friction in the collector and piping, and pressure drops due to the hydrostatic head of the fluid. The model has been used to determine the yearly performance of boiling flat-plate solar collector systems. A simplified approach was also developed which can be used with the f-Chart method to predict yearly performance of boiling flat-plate collector systems.

  3. Nucleate boiling in drag-reducing polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeun, G.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of experiment have been done to study the effects of polymer additives in nucleate boiling for plates and wires. Here, boiling on a flat surface is simulated by placing a flat unheated surface immediately underneath an electrically heated platinum wire. Saturated nucleate pool boiling curves were measured for water and solutions of six different polymers at various concentrations. For a bare wire and a simulated flat surface, the nucleate boiling curves are qualitatively similar. For equal heat fluxes, the temperature difference increases as the relative viscosity increases, although the temperature difference for the simulated flat surface is less than that for the bare wire. The observed changes in the nucleate boiling curves for polymer solutions are in qualitative agreement with those predicted using the Rohsenow correlation to account for change in the solution viscosity. These results show that for both wires and simulated flat surfaces, drag-reducing additives will reduce the heat transfer rate in nucleate boiling. Bubble dynamics on the heated wire and simulated flat surface were also measured using a high speed movie camera for water and Separan AP-30 at a relative viscosity of 1.16. The data were used to determine the relative contribution to the boiling heat flux of latent heat transport by bubbles, natural convection heat transfer, and enhanced convection heat transfer.

  4. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-26

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond timescale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ~1010 K/s for temperature increases of ~100 – 200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (~5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-mortem analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ~ ± 3% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ~ ± 5 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  5. Boiling on Microconfigured Composite Surfaces Enhanced

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer is one of the key technologies for the two-phase active thermal-control system used on space platforms, as well as for the dynamic power systems aboard the International Space Station. Because it is an effective heat transfer mode, boiling is integral to many space applications, such as heat exchangers and other cooling devices. Nucleate boiling near the critical heat flux (CHF) can transport very large thermal loads with a much smaller device and much lower pumping power than for single-phase heat exchangers. However, boiling performance sharply deteriorates in a reduced-gravity environment, and operation in the CHF regime is somewhat perilous because of the risk of burnout to the device surface. New materials called microconfigured metal-graphite composites can enhance boiling. The photomicrograph shows the microconfiguration (x3000) of the copper-graphite (Cu-Gr) surface as viewed by scanning electronic microscope. The graphite fiber tips appear as plateaus with rugged surfaces embedded in the copper matrix. It has been experimentally demonstrated that this type of material manifests excellent boiling heat transfer performance characteristics and an increased CHF. Nonisothermal surfaces were less sensitive to variations of wall superheat in the CHF regime. Because of the great difference in conductivity between the copper base and the graphite fiber, the composite surfaces have a nonisothermal surface characteristic and, therefore, will have a much larger "safe" operating region in the CHF regime. In addition, the thermocapillary forces induced by the temperature differences between the fiber tips and the metal matrix play an important role in bubble detachment, and may not be adversely affected in a reduced-gravity environment. All these factors indicate that microconfigured composites may improve the reliability and economy (dominant factors in all space applications) of various thermal components found on spacecraft during future

  6. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  7. Thinning and rupture of a thin liquid film on a heated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoff, S.G.; Davis, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this work continues to be the study of the dynamics, stability and rupture of thin liquid films, especially with heat and/or mass transfer. These films appear in many engineering processes, such as film coating, gas absorption, condensation, and especially cooling of hot surfaces. Surface waves may be detrimental, leading to film breakdown, with consequent equipment overheating, or beneficial, as when mass transfer coefficients are increased.

  8. Advances in shell side boiling of refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Ralph L.

    The design of shell and tube evaporators used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications is discussed. The heat exchanger geometry of interest involves evaporation or condensation on the shell side of a horizontal tube bundle. Enhanced heat transfer geometries are typically used for shell side evaporation and for forced convection to water on the tube side. Refrigerant boiling data and forced convection refrigerant boiling correlations are described. The refrigerants of interest include R-11, 12, 22, 123, and 134a. Thermal design methods for sizing of the evaporator and condenser are outlined. A computer model for prediction of the evaporator performance is described.

  9. Nucleate pool boiling of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, R.G.; Palen, J.W.; Thome, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Schlunder method can be correctly used to predict boiling heat transfer coefficient of multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures. The method was tested against experimental mixtures containing up to five components. The Stephan-Abdelsalam correlation can be used to calculate a ''pseudo-single component'' boiling heat transfer coefficient for a mixture using weighted properties. The effective temperature driving force term and the high mass flux correction term in the Schlunder formulation are empirically adjusted to improve the accuracy of prediction. Predictions of the Schlunder method are sensitive to the VLE calculations. The UNIFAC method is used in this study for reasons discussed in the paper.

  10. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer of thin films on inclined structured plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, Karsten; Yu, Hongyi; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Stephan, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Thin liquid films flowing down vertical and inclined plates are widely used in industrial applications, e.g. in falling film evaporators for concentrating of sugar solutions. Falling films exhibit very complex wavy patterns, which depend on various parameters. Using structured, in particular, grooved plates is a promising way to enhance the heat transfer rate in thin film evaporators. The influence of the plate topography on the wave motion is still not completely understood. In the present work the evolution of the water film thickness on smooth and structured (longitudinal and sinusoidal grooves and herringbone structures) plates has been experimentally investigated for different inclination angles, Reynolds numbers and at various distances from the inlet. A confocal chromatic sensoring technique was used to measure the film dynamics. Additionally, the temperature distribution at the heated wall has been measured with thermocouples and the liquid-gas interface has been observed with infrared thermography for different heat fluxes. The heat flux has been gradually increased until film rupture occurred. The effect of the wall topography on the film stability has been quantified. It has been found that the wall topography significantly affects the wave pattern, the heat transport and the film stability.

  11. A depletable micro-layer model for nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yohei; Niceno, Bojan

    2015-11-01

    A depletable micro-layer model has been developed for the simulation of nucleate pool boiling within the framework of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling using an interface-tracking method. A micro-layer model is required for the CFD simulation to take into account vaporization from the thin liquid film - called the micro-layer - existing beneath a growing vapor bubble on a hot surface. In our model, the thickness of the micro-layer is a variable defined at each discretized fluid cell adjacent to the heat-transfer surface; the layer decreases due to vaporization, and can finally disappear. Compared to existing micro-region models, most of them based on the concept of contact-line evaporation, as originally proposed by Stephan and Busse, and by Lay and Dhir, our model incorporates simplified modeling ideas, but can nonetheless predict the temperature field beneath the growing bubble accurately. The model proposed in this paper has been validated against measurements of pool boiling in water at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, the bubble principal dimensions and the temperature distribution over the heat-transfer surface are in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-10-01

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles `on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications.

  13. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants.

    PubMed

    Cho, H Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-10-21

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles 'on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications.

  14. An experimental investigation of liquid methane convection and boiling in rocket engine cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Abraham Gerardo

    In the past decades, interest in developing hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines for deep spaceflight missions has continued to grow. In particular, liquid methane (LCH4) has been of interest due to the weight efficiency, storage, and handling advantages it offers over several currently used propellants. Deep space exploration requires reusable, long life rocket engines. Due to the high temperatures reached during combustion, the life of an engine is significantly impacted by the cooling system's efficiency. Regenerative (regen) cooling is presented as a viable alternative to common cooling methods such as film and dump cooling since it provides improved engine efficiency. Due to limited availability of experimental sub-critical liquid methane cooling data for regen engine design, there has been an interest in studying the heat transfer characteristics of the propellant. For this reason, recent experimental studies at the Center for Space Exploration Technology Research (cSETR) at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) have focused on investigating the heat transfer characteristics of sub-critical CH4 flowing through sub-scale cooling channels. To conduct the experiments, the csETR developed a High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) where all the channels are heated using a conduction-based thermal concentrator. In this study, two smooth channels with cross sectional geometries of 1.8 mm x 4.1 mm and 3.2 mm x 3.2 mm were tested. In addition, three roughened channels all with a 3.2 mm x 3.2 mm square cross section were also tested. For the rectangular smooth channel, Reynolds numbers ranged between 68,000 and 131,000, while the Nusselt numbers were between 40 and 325. For the rough channels, Reynolds numbers ranged from 82,000 to 131,000, and Nusselt numbers were between 65 and 810. Sub-cooled film-boiling phenomena were confirmed for all the channels presented in this work. Film-boiling onset at Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was correlated to a Boiling Number (Bo) of

  15. The Experimental Analysis of Local Heat and Mass Transfer Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Keyhani, M.; Miller, W.A.

    1999-11-14

    In pure heat transfer, specifications of effectiveness, fluid properties, and flows enable calculation of the heat exchanger area. In the case of falling film absorption, a simultaneous heat and mass transfer governs the performance of the absorber. The exchange of mass across the liquid-vapor interface involves the generation of heat. The heat effects associated with the mass exchange increase the temperature, which affects the equilibrium state of the pressure and composition and in turn affects the mass. The falling film flow rate coupled to the physical properties of kinematic viscosity and surface tension govern the flow regime of a vertical falling film. Wavy-laminar, roll-wave laminar, and turbulent flows will develop convective contributions that can enhance the transfer of mass into the film. The combined interaction of all these factors makes the absorption process very difficult to analyze and predict. A study of simultaneous heat and mass transfer was therefore conduct ed on a vertical falling film absorber to better understand the mechanisms driving the heat and mass transfer processes. Falling films are characteristically unstable, and a wavy-laminar flow was observed during the experimental study. The wavy flow further complicates the problem; therefore, only limited information is known about the temperature and concentration profiles along the length of the absorber that describe the local heat and mass transfer rates.

  16. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor Development for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zhu, Dongming; Laster, Kimala L.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has an on-going effort for developing high temperature thin film sensors for advanced turbine engine components. Stable, high temperature thin film ceramic thermocouples have been demonstrated in the lab, and novel methods of fabricating sensors have been developed. To fabricate thin film heat flux sensors for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems, the rough and porous nature of the CMC system posed a significant challenge for patterning the fine features required. The status of the effort to develop thin film heat flux sensors specifically for use on silicon carbide (SiC) CMC systems with these new technologies is described.

  17. Thermal-hydraulic performance of convective boiling jet array impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, R.; De Brún, C.; Kempers, R.; Lupoi, R.; Robinson, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    Jet impingement boiling is investigated with regard to heat transfer and pressure drop performance using a novel laser sintered 3D printed jet impingement manifold design. Water was the working fluid at atmospheric pressure with inlet subcooling of 7oC. The convective boiling performance of the impinging jet system was investigated for a flat copper target surface for 2700≤Re≤5400. The results indicate that the heat transfer performance of the impinging jet is independent of Reynolds number for fully developed boiling. Also, the investigation of nozzle to plate spacing shows that low spacing delays the onset of nucleate boiling causing a superheat overshoot that is not observed with larger gaps. However, no sensitivity to the gap spacing was measured once boiling was fully developed. The assessment of the pressure drop performance showed that the design effectively transfers heat with low pumping power requirements. In particular, owing to the insensitivity of the heat transfer to flow rate during fully developed boiling, the coefficient of performance of jet impingement boiling in the fully developed boiling regime deteriorates with increased flow rate due to the increase in pumping power flux.

  18. Criteria for approximating certain microgravity flow boiling characteristics in Earth gravity.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman; Park, Jaeseok; Shultz, William W; Keller, Robert B

    2002-10-01

    The forces governing flow boiling, aside from system pressure, are buoyancy, liquid momentum, interfacial surface tensions, and liquid viscosity. Guidance for approximating certain aspects of the flow boiling process in microgravity can be obtained in Earth gravity research by the imposition of a liquid velocity parallel to a flat heater surface in the inverted position, horizontal, or nearly horizontal, by having buoyancy hold the heated liquid and vapor formed close to the heater surface. Bounds on the velocities of interest are obtained from several dimensionless numbers: a two-phase Richardson number, a two-phase Weber number, and a Bond number. For the fluid used in the experimental work here, liquid velocities in the range U = 5-10cm/sec are judged to be critical for changes in behavior of the flow boiling process. Experimental results are presented for flow boiling heat transfer, concentrating on orientations that provide the largest reductions in buoyancy parallel to the heater surface, varying +/-5 degrees from facing horizontal downward. Results are presented for velocity, orientation, and subcooling effects on nucleation, dryout, and heat transfer. Two different heater surfaces were used: a thin gold film on a polished quartz substrate, acting as a heater and resistance thermometer, and a gold-plated copper heater. Both transient and steady measurements of surface heat flux and superheat were made with the quartz heater; only steady measurements were possible with the copper heater. R-113 was the fluid used; the velocity varied over the interval 4-16cm/sec; bulk liquid subcooling varied over 2-20 degrees C; heat flux varied over 4-8W/cm(2).

  19. A Novel Role of Three Dimensional Graphene Foam to Prevent Heater Failure during Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Ji Min; Park, Chibeom; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyungdae; Kaviany, Massoud; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel boiling heat transfer (NBHT) in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) suspended in water (RGO colloid) near critical heat flux (CHF), which is traditionally the dangerous limitation of nucleate boiling heat transfer because of heater failure. When the heat flux reaches the maximum value (CHF) in RGO colloid pool boiling, the wall temperature increases gradually and slowly with an almost constant heat flux, contrary to the rapid wall temperature increase found during water pool boiling. The gained time by NBHT would provide the safer margin of the heat transfer and the amazing impact on the thermal system as the first report of graphene application. In addition, the CHF and boiling heat transfer performance also increase. This novel boiling phenomenon can effectively prevent heater failure because of the role played by the self-assembled three-dimensional foam-like graphene network (SFG). PMID:23743619

  20. A novel role of three dimensional graphene foam to prevent heater failure during boiling.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Ji Min; Park, Chibeom; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyungdae; Kaviany, Massoud; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel boiling heat transfer (NBHT) in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) suspended in water (RGO colloid) near critical heat flux (CHF), which is traditionally the dangerous limitation of nucleate boiling heat transfer because of heater failure. When the heat flux reaches the maximum value (CHF) in RGO colloid pool boiling, the wall temperature increases gradually and slowly with an almost constant heat flux, contrary to the rapid wall temperature increase found during water pool boiling. The gained time by NBHT would provide the safer margin of the heat transfer and the amazing impact on the thermal system as the first report of graphene application. In addition, the CHF and boiling heat transfer performance also increase. This novel boiling phenomenon can effectively prevent heater failure because of the role played by the self-assembled three-dimensional foam-like graphene network (SFG).

  1. Experimental Study of Vane Heat Transfer and Film Cooling at Elevated Levels of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Forrest E.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on the influence of high level turbulence on vane film cooling and the influence of film cooling on vane heat transfer. Three different cooling configurations were investigated which included one row of film cooling on both pressure and suction surfaces, two staggered rows of film cooling on both suction and pressure surfaces, and a shower-head cooling array. The turbulence had a strong influence on film cooling effectiveness, particularly on the pressure surface where local turbulence levels were the highest. For the single row of holes, the spanwise mixing quickly reduced centerline effectiveness levels while mixing in the normal direction was more gradual. The film cooling had a strong influence on the heat transfer in the laminar regions of the vane. The effect of film cooling on heat transfer was noticeable in the turbulent regions but augmentation ratios were significantly lower. In addition to heat transfer and film cooling, velocity profiles were taken downstream of the film cooling rows at three spanwise locations. These profile comparisons documented the strong spanwise mixing due to the high turbulence. Total pressure exit measurements were also documented for the three configurations.

  2. Water boiling inside carbon nanotubes: toward efficient drug release.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2011-07-26

    We show using molecular dynamics simulation that spatial confinement of water inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially increases its boiling temperature and that a small temperature growth above the boiling point dramatically raises the inside pressure. Capillary theory successfully predicts the boiling point elevation down to 2 nm, below which large deviations between the theory and atomistic simulation take place. Water behaves qualitatively different inside narrow CNTs, exhibiting transition into an unusual phase, where pressure is gas-like and grows linearly with temperature, while the diffusion constant is temperature-independent. Precise control over boiling by CNT diameter, together with the rapid growth of inside pressure above the boiling point, suggests a novel drug delivery protocol. Polar drug molecules are packaged inside CNTs; the latter are delivered into living tissues and heated by laser. Solvent boiling facilitates drug release.

  3. Thin film heat flux sensor for Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Herbert

    1991-05-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine environment stresses engine components to their design limits and beyond. The extremely high temperatures and rapid temperature cycling can easily cause parts to fail if they are not properly designed. Thin film heat flux sensors can provide heat loading information with almost no disturbance of gas flows or of the blade. These sensors can provide steady state and transient heat flux information. A thin film heat flux sensor is described which makes it easier to measure small temperature differences across very thin insulating layers.

  4. Odd-Boiled Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, Kenneth; Scheman, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    At a Shabbat lunch in Madrid not long ago, the conversation turned to the question of boiling eggs. One of the guests mentioned that a Dutch rabbi he knew had heard that in order to make it more likely that boiled eggs be kosher, you should add an egg to the pot if the number you began with was even. According to the laws of Kashruth, Jews may not…

  5. Prototype thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor for a ceramic-insulated diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Barrows, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    A platinum versus platinum-13 percent rhodium thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor was devised and tested in the harsh, high-temperature environment of a ceramic-insulated, low-heat-rejection diesel engine. The sensor probe assembly was developed to provide experimental validation of heat transfer and thermal analysis methodologies applicable to the insulated diesel engine concept. The thin-film thermocouple configuration was chosen to approximate an uninterrupted chamber surface and provide a 1-D heat-flux path through the probe body. The engine test was conducted by Purdue University for Integral Technologies, Inc., under a DOE-funded contract managed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The thin-film sensor performed reliably during 6 to 10 hr of repeated engine runs at indicated mean surface temperatures up to 950 K. However, the sensor suffered partial loss of adhesion in the thin-film thermocouple junction area following maximum cyclic temperature excursions to greater than 1150 K.

  6. Influence of Heat Treatment Conditions on the Properties of Vanadium Oxide Thin Films for Thermochromic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donguk; Kwon, Samyoung; Park, Young; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Nam, Sang-Hun; Joo, Yang Tae; Kim, Minha; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2016-05-01

    In present work, the effects of the heat treatment on the structural, optical, and thermochromic properties of vanadium oxide films were investigated. Vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films were deposited on glass substrate by reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering from a vanadium metal target in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen gas. Various heat treatment conditions were applied in order to evaluate their influence on the crystal phases formed, surface morphology, and optical properties. The films were characterized by an X-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to investigate the crystal structure and identify the phase change as post-annealing temperature of 500-600 degrees C for 5 minutes. Surface conditions of the obtained VO2(M) films were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the semiconductor-metal transition (SMT) characteristics of the VO2 films were evaluate by optical spectrophotometry in the UV-VIS-NIR, controlling temperature of the films.

  7. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ˜1010 K/s for temperature increases of ˜100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (˜5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ˜±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ˜±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  8. Vacuum Hold-Down System for Heat-Treating Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    In improved furnace concept for heat-treating thin films, vacuum ports in vacuum plate(s) hold films connected together in zones so vacuum applied separately to each zone. Allows material being held to shrink or expand while still being held in place. Unclamped zones expand or contract , relieving local stresses so entire sheet accommades thermally induced changes without cracking. Applications include manufacture of thin semiconductor films for solar cells and of membranes for electrolytic production of oxygen.

  9. The effect of heat treatment on the resistivity of polycrystalline silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The resistivity of doped polycrystalline silicon films has been studied as a function of post deposition heat treatments in an oxidizing atmosphere. It was found that a short oxidation cycle may produce a resistivity increase as large as three orders of magnitude in the polycrystalline films. The extent of change was dependent on the initial resistivity and the films' doping level and was independent of the total oxidation time.

  10. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical channel in evaporating a heated falling glycols liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nait Alla, Abderrahman; Feddaoui, M'barek; Meftah, Hicham

    2015-12-01

    The interactive effects of heat and mass transfer in the evaporation of ethylene and propylene glycol flowing as falling films on vertical channel was investigated. The liquid film falls along a left plate which is externally subjected to a uniform heat flux while the right plate is the dry wall and is kept thermally insulated. The model solves the coupled governing equations in both phases together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by Tridiagonal Matrix Algorithm. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied glycols and water in the same conditions is made. The results indicate that water evaporates in more intense way in comparison to glycols and the increase of gas flow rate tends to improve slightly the evaporation.

  11. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  12. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  13. New technique for the fabrication of miniature thin film heat flux gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Matthew; Chana, Kam; Povey, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    This paper details the improvements made to the design and fabrication of thin-film heat flux gauges at Oxford. These improvements have been driven by the desire to improve measurement accuracy and resolution in short duration wind-tunnel experiments. A thin-film heat flux gauge (TFHFG) measures heat flux by recording the temperature history of thin film resistive temperature sensors sputtered onto an insulating substrate. The heat flux can then be calculated using Fourier’s law of heat conduction. A new fabrication process utilising technology from the manufacture of flexible printed circuit boards is outlined, which enables the production of significantly smaller and more robust gauges than those previously used.

  14. Analysis of a heat transfer device for measuring film coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medrow, R. A.; Johnson, R. L.; Loomis, W. R.; Wedeven, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A heat transfer device consisting of a heated rotating cylinder in a bath was analyzed for its effectiveness to determine heat transfer coefficient of fluids. A time dependent analysis shows that the performance is insensitive to the value of heat transfer coefficient with the given rig configuration.

  15. The boiling point of stratospheric aerosols.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A photoelectric particle counter was used for the measurement of aerosol boiling points. The operational principle involves raising the temperature of the aerosol by vigorously heating a portion of the intake tube. At or above the boiling point, the particles disintegrate rather quickly, and a noticeable effect on the size distribution and concentration is observed. Stratospheric aerosols appear to have the same volatility as a solution of 75% sulfuric acid. Chemical analysis of the aerosols indicates that there are other substances present, but that the sulfate radical is apparently the major constituent.

  16. Experimental Study on Thermal-Hydraulics During Start-Up in the Natural Circulation Boiling Water Reactor Concept: Effects of System Pressure and Increasing Heat Flux on the Geysering and Density Wave Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Hadid Subki, M.; Masanori Aritomi; Noriyuki Watanabe; Chaiwat Muncharoen

    2002-07-01

    The feasibility study in thermal-hydraulics for the future light water reactor concept is carried out. One of the essential studies is the two-phase flow instability during start-up in the natural circulation boiling water reactor (BWR) concept. It is anticipated that the occurrence of the two-phase flow instabilities during start-up significantly affects the feasibility concept, since it would cause the complexity in raising and maneuvering the power output. The purpose of the current study is to experimentally investigate the driving mechanism of the geysering and density wave oscillation in the natural circulation loop, induced by a range of system operating pressure and increasing heat flux in vertical parallel channels. The pressure range of atmospheric up to about 4 bars, and the input heat flux range of 0 up to 577 kW/m{sup 2} are applied in these experiments. An experimental apparatus of twin boiling upflow channels to simulate natural circulation flow loop has been designed, constructed and operated. The natural circulation in the loop occurs due to the density difference between two-phase region in the channels and the single-phase liquid in the downcomer. The objective of the study is to propose a rational start-up procedure in which the geysering and density wave oscillation can be prevented during startup, according to its system pressure and heat flux. Previous studies have clarified that three (3) kinds of thermo-hydraulics instabilities may occur during start-up in the natural circulation BWR depending on its procedure and reactor configuration, which are (1) geysering induced by condensation, (2) natural circulation induced by hydrostatic head fluctuation in steam separator, and (3) density wave oscillation. (authors)

  17. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, David W.; Guzik, Monica C.

    2014-03-01

    A computational model of the cryogenic boil-off reduction system being developed by NASA as part of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer technology maturation project has been applied to a range of propellant storage tanks sizes for high-performing in-space cryogenic propulsion applications. This effort focuses on the scaling of multi-layer insulation (MLI), cryocoolers, broad area cooling shields, radiators, solar arrays, and tanks for liquid hydrogen propellant storage tanks ranging from 2 to 10 m in diameter. Component scaling equations were incorporated into the Cryogenic Analysis Tool, a spreadsheet-based tool used to perform system-level parametric studies. The primary addition to the evolution of this updated tool is the integration of a scaling method for reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocoolers, as well as the development and inclusion of Self-Supporting Multi-Layer Insulation. Mass, power, and sizing relationships are traded parametrically to establish the appropriate loiter period beyond which this boil-off reduction system application reduces mass. The projected benefit compares passive thermal control to active thermal control, where active thermal control is evaluated for reduced boil-off with a 90 K shield, zero boil-off with a single heat interception stage at the tank wall, and zero boil-off with a second interception stage at a 90 K shield. Parametric studies show a benefit over passive storage at loiter durations under one month, in addition to showing a benefit for two-stage zero boil-off in terms of reducing power and mass as compared to single stage zero boil-off. Furthermore, active cooling reduces the effect of varied multi-layer insulation performance, which, historically, has been shown to be significant.

  18. Numerical simulation of bubble departure in subcooled pool boiling based on non-empirical boiling and condensation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ose, Y.; Kunugi, T.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, in order to clarify the heat transfer characteristics of the subcooled boiling phenomena and to discuss on their mechanism, a non-empirical boiling and condensation model for numerical simulation has been adopted. This model consists of an improved phase-change model and a consideration of a relaxation time based on the quasithermal equilibrium hypothesis. The transient three-dimensional numerical simulations based on the MARS (Multiinterface Advection and Reconstruction Solver) with the non-empirical boiling and condensation model have been conducted for an isolated boiling bubble behavior in a subcooled pool. The subcooled bubble behaviors, such as the growth process of the nucleate bubble on the heating surface, the condensation process and the extinction behaviors after departing from the heating surface were investigated, respectively. In this paper, the bubble departing behavior from the heating surface was discussed in detail. The overall numerical results showed in very good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Evaluation of engine coolants under flow boiling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Stinson, C.; Gollin, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to evaluate the heat transfer performance of two engine coolant mixtures, propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water. In each mixture, the concentration was 50-50 by volume. Performance in this situation is defined as the ability to maintain a lower surface temperature for a given flux. The heat transfer regimes considered covered the range from single phase forced convection through saturated flow boiling. Results show that both coolants perform satisfactorily. However, in single phase convection, ethylene-glycol/water is slightly more effective. Conversely, for sub-cooled nucleate boiling and saturated boiling, propylene-glycol/water results in slightly lower metal temperatures.

  20. Pool Boiling with Non-condensable Gas in Microgravity: Results of a Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannengieser, Olivier; Colin, Catherine; Bergez, Wladimir

    2010-09-01

    Pool boiling experiments in microgravity have been performed in the Sounding Rocket Maser 11. A heated plate of 1 cm 2 was located at the bottom of a small cylindrical tank partly filled with a refrigerant Novec HFE7000 pressurized with Nitrogen. Experiments were performed at different reservoir pressures and wall heat fluxes. The wall heat flux and wall temperature were simultaneously measured during the experiment and the behavior of the bubbles on the heater was filmed with a video camera through the transparent wall of the reservoir. The presence of Nitrogen dissolved inside the liquid led to a strong Marangoni convection around the bubble. The effect of Marangoni convection and evaporation on the wall heat transfer is analyzed in function of the relative values of the wall temperature and saturation temperature.

  1. Effect of nanostructure on rapid boiling of water on a hot copper plate: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ting; Mao, Yijin; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Yuwen; Yuan, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the effects of nanostructure on rapid boiling of water that is suddenly heated by a hot copper plate. The results show that the nanostructure has significant effects on energy transfer from solid copper plate to liquid water and phase change process from liquid water to vapor. The liquid water on the solid surface rapidly boil after contacting with an extremely hot copper plate and consequently a cluster of liquid water moves upward during phase change. The temperature of the water film when it separates from solid surface and its final temperature when the system is at equilibrium strongly depend on the size of the nanostructure. These temperatures increase with increasing size of nanostructure. Furthermore, a non-vaporized molecular layer is formed on the surface of the copper plate even continuous heat flux is passing into water domain through the plate.

  2. A model for fluid flow during saturated boiling on a horizontal cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kheyrandish, K.; Dalton, C.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    A model has been developed to represent the vapor removal pattern in the vicinity of a cylinder during nucleate flow boiling across a horizontal cylinder. The model is based on a potential flow representation of the liquid and vapor regions and an estimate of the losses that should occur in the flow. Correlation of the losses shows a weak dependence on the Weber number and a slightly stronger dependence on the saturated liquid-to-vapor density ratio. The vapor jet thickness, which is crucial to the prediction of the burnout heat flux, and the shape of the vapor film are predicted. Both are verified by qualitative experimental observations.

  3. Computations of Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, G.; Jacqmin, Dave

    2000-01-01

    The absence (or reduction) of gravity, can lead to major changes in boiling heat transfer. On Earth, convection has a major effect on the heat distribution ahead of an evaporation front, and buoyancy determines the motion of the growing bubbles. In microgravity, convection and buoyancy are absent or greatly reduced and the dynamics of the growing vapor bubbles can change in a fundamental way. In particular, the lack of redistribution of heat can lead to a large superheat and explosive growth of bubbles once they form. While considerable efforts have been devoted to examining boiling experimentally, including the effect of microgravity, theoretical and computational work have been limited. Here, the growth of boiling bubbles is studied by direct numerical simulations where the flow field is fully resolved and the effects of inertia, viscosity, surface deformation, heat conduction and convection, as well as the phase change, are fully accounted for. Boiling involves both fluid flow and heat transfer and thus requires the solution of the Navier-Stokes and the energy equations. The numerical method is based on writing one set of governing transport equations which is valid in both the liquid and vapor phases. This local, single-field formulation incorporates the effect of the interface in the governing equations as source terms acting only at the interface. These sources account for surface tension and latent heat in the equations for conservation of momentum and energy as well as mass transfer across the interface due to phase change. The single-field formulation naturally incorporates the correct mass, momentum and energy balances across the interface. Integration of the conservation equations across the interface directly yields the jump conditions derived in the local instant formulation for two-phase systems. In the numerical implementation, the conservation equations for the whole computational domain (both vapor and liquid) are solved using a stationary grid and

  4. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu{sup +3}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  5. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  6. Plastic film heat exchanger development project field test at Prime Tanning Company, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, G.B.; Guyer, E.C.; Brownell, D.L.; Yankee Scientific, Inc., Natick, MA )

    1989-08-25

    This report presents the results of the design, construction, and test of a plastic film heat exchanger for recovering heat from the liquid effluent waste stream from an animal hide tanning operation. This work is the third phase of a program to evaluate the use of plastic film heat exchangers for energy recovery from low temperature industrial commercial waste streams and processes. The effluent stream from a tanning operation is a corrosive liquid containing pieces of leather, animal fats, and various particulates. The test results from the field unit tests over a period of about five months demonstrated that the plastic films would handle this difficult waste stream satisfactorily, the plastic film would wet satisfactorily and could easily be cleaned of deposits by water sprays, and could achieve values close to the expected thermal heat transfer performance. Although there are practical equipment problems to solve to successfully handle large quantities of a high solids content waste stream such as tannery effluent, the plastic film heat exchanger elements will successfully work in this environment. The plastic films will perform even better for clean corrosive waste streams. 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  8. Development of oxidised and heat-moisture treated potato starch film.

    PubMed

    Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa; Pinto, Vânia Zanella; Klein, Bruna; El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Elias, Moacir Cardoso; Prentice-Hernández, Carlos; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of sodium hypochlorite oxidation and a heat-moisture treatment of potato starch on the physicochemical, pasting and textural properties of potato starches in addition to the water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of potato starch films produced from these starches. The carbonyl contents, carboxyl contents, swelling power, solubility, pasting properties and gel texture of the native, oxidised and heat-moisture treated (HMT) starches were evaluated. The films made of native, oxidised and HMT starches were characterised by thickness, water solubility, colour, opacity, mechanical properties and WVP. The oxidised and HMT starches had lower viscosity and swelling power compared to the native starch. The films produced from oxidised potato starch had decreased solubility, elongation and WVP values in addition to increased tensile strength compared to the native starch films. The HMT starch increased the tensile strength and WVP of the starch films compared to the native starch.

  9. Deuterium retention in tungsten films after different heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Jacob, W.; Elgeti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten films deposited by magnetron sputtering on polycrystalline tungsten substrates were used as a model system to study the influence of the film microstructure on deuterium retention behavior. Different microstructures were produced by annealing the films up to recrystallization temperature and the corresponding structural changes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning. The influence of the induced structural changes on D retention was investigated by both nuclear reaction analysis and temperature-programmed desorption. D concentration in the investigated W films is higher than in polycrystalline bulk tungsten by a factor of 3. D retention in the films decreases as a function of annealing temperature. After annealing at 2000 K, FIB cross-section images reveal that cavities appeared at the grain boundaries within the film and at the initial interface between the W film and W substrate. This new microstructure strongly affects the D depth profile and leads to the increase of D retention. Although a further increase of the holding time at 2000 K or an increase of the annealing temperature to 2150 K lead to the reduction of the retained D amount, the D concentration in the recrystallized W films cannot be reduced to a level as low as that of bulk W recrystallized at 2000 K for 30 min.

  10. A correlation for nucleate flow boiling in small channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.N. |; Wambsganss, M.W.; Chyu, M.C.; France, D.M.

    1997-08-01

    Compact heat exchangers are becoming more attractive for applications in which energy conservation, space saving, and cost are important considerations. Applications exist in the process industries where phase-change heat transfer realizes more compact designs and improved performance compared to single-phase heat transfer. However, there have been only a few studies in the literature reporting on phase-change heat transfer and two-phase flow in compact heat exchangers, and validated design correlations are lacking. Recent data from experiments on flow boiling of refrigerants in small channels have led researchers to conclude that nucleation is the dominant heat transfer mechanism over a broad range of heat flux and wall superheats. Local heat transfer coefficients and overall two-phase pressure drops were measured for three different refrigerants with circular and non-circular channels in a range of pressures. This data base supports the nucleate boiling mechanism, and it was used to develop a new correlation for heat transfer in nucleate flow boiling. The correlation is based on the Rohsenow boiling model, introducing a confinement number defined by Kew and Cornwell. The new correlation predicts the experimental data for nucleate flow boiling of three refrigerants within {+-}15%.

  11. Heating process and damage threshold analysis of Au film coated on Cu substrate for femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tingfeng; Guo, Jin; Shao, Junfeng; Sun, Tao; Chen, Anmin; Liu, Hang; Ding, Dajun

    2012-07-01

    The heating processes of a two-layer film assembly of Au padded with Cu irradiated by femtosecond laser pulse are studied using a two-temperature model. It is found that the chosen substantially influence the energy transport, and consequently the temperature variation, and thermal equilibrium time. At the same laser fluence, the different thickness of gold film leads to a change of gold surface temperature. By choosing the thickness of the gold layer in the two-layer film assemblies, the damage threshold of the gold film can be maximized. The results can be used to optimize the damage threshold of gold coating optical components.

  12. Flexible thermoelectric generator with efficient vertical to lateral heat path films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, T.; Suzuki, T.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a flexible thermoelectric generator (TEG) with heat path films, which efficiently convert vertical temperature difference (ΔT) into lateral ΔT for thermocouple (TC). The heat path film consists of copper-filled-vias with low thermal resistance and polymer films with high thermal resistance. They were made in two fabrication steps. The first used a flexible printed circuit board with high density copper-filled-vias, while the second saw the deposition of thin film TCs. The combination offers flexibility of application due to its thinness, mass production potential, and low energy heat loss in the device. We demonstrated 54 TCs cm‑2 in a 25 cm2 flexible TEG using Bi2Te3- and Nickel-based TCs respectively. The experimental data were in good accordance with a model which was calculated using the finite element method. The prototype flexible TEGs indicated that the proposed structure converted 84% heat flow from vertical into lateral ΔT in each TC, which was two times higher than the non-heat path film. They produced voltage of 11 mV/K/cm2 and power output of 0.1 µW/K/cm2 respectively. These flexible TEGs are ideally suited for harvesting from waste heat emitted from objects with large wavy areas because of their low weight, low cost and high efficiency conversion with flexibility.

  13. Heat Transfer and Convective Structure of Evaporating Films under Pressure-Modulated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Juan Carlos

    This work examines the fluid mechanical and heat transfer characteristics of evaporating films under cyclical superheat conditions. This research was motivated by the need to further understand the instability drivers in films undergoing unsteady and cyclical evaporation. The superheat was controlled modulating the system pressure. An isolated test cell allowed the films to evaporate into their own vapor without non-condensable present. A non-intrusive thickness measurement technique was used to yield dynamic heat flux measurements. A double pass schlieren system was employed to capture convective structures. System temperature and pressure measurements completed the diagnostics. The primary conclusions are briefly summarized as follows: • The evolution of thermal profile within evaporating films has a strong impact on the development of convective structure and heat transfer. In some cases convective structure appears within the film under pressure-modulated conditions even when the evaporation intervals are sufficiently short that conduction is expected to be the only heat transfer mode within the film. • Convective structure appears to persist in many cases even after evaporation is stopped. • Stopping the evaporation for short time intervals appears to have a negligible effect on the temperature profile in the film based on the subsequent evaporation behavior. • Complex, multi-wavelength convective structure behavior can be induced through cyclical superheating of the films. • A modest gain in short-term heat flux is achievable under some pressure-modulated conditions. • Surface instabilities of quasi-steady evaporating films do not lead to an increase in the evaporation rate. • Reduced gravity tests were seriously compromised by unsteady g-levels and g-jitter.

  14. Radiolysis of boiling water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Yamashita, Shinichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Hiroishi, Daisuke; Lertnaisat, Phantira; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2016-06-01

    γ-radiolysis of boiling water has been investigated. The G-value of H2 evolution was found to be very sensitive to the purity of water. In high-purity water, both H2 and O2 gases were formed in the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1; a negligible amount of H2O2 remained in the liquid phase. The G-values of H2 and O2 gas evolution depend on the dose rate: lower dose rates produce larger yields. To clarify the importance of the interface between liquid and gas phase for gas evolution, the gas evolution under Ar gas bubbling was measured. A large amount of H2 was detected, similar to the radiolysis of boiling water. The evolution of gas was enhanced in a 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution. Deterministic chemical kinetics simulation elucidated the mechanism of radiolysis in boiling water.

  15. Multiwalled carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite films as high performance flexible electric heating elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jing; Jeong, Young Gyu

    2014-08-04

    High performance elastomeric electric heating elements were prepared by incorporating various contents of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix by using an efficient solution-casting and curing technique. The pristine MWCNTs were identified to be uniformly dispersed in the PDMS matrix and the electrical percolation of MWCNTs was evaluated to be at ∼0.27 wt. %, where the electrical resistivity of the MWCNT/PDMS composite films dropped remarkably. Accordingly, the composite films with higher MWCNT contents above 0.3 wt. % exhibit excellent electric heating performance in terms of temperature response rapidity and electric energy efficiency at constant applied voltages. In addition, the composite films, which were thermally stable up to 250 °C, showed excellent heating-cooling cyclic performance, which was associated with operational stability in actual electric heating applications.

  16. Thermal analysis of thin multi-layer metal films during femtosecond laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, A.; Tunc, M.; Camdali, Ü.

    2010-12-01

    Multi-layer metals films are widely used in modern engineering applications such as gold-coated metal mirrors used in high power laser systems. A transient heat flux model is derived to analyze multi-layer metal films under laser heating. The two separate system composed of electrons and the lattice is considered to take into account the electron-lattice interaction. The present model predicted the effects of underlying chromium's thermal properties on temperature rise of the top gold layer. The effects of two adjacent and different metals with different electron-lattice coupling factors are analyzed for the heating mechanism of different lattices. The derived transient model combined with the two different conservation equations for the lattice and electrons are applied for the ultra short-pulse laser heating of a multi-layer film composed of gold and chromium.

  17. Stability of a volatile liquid film spreading along a heterogeneously-heated substrate.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Naveen; Davis, Jeffrey M

    2011-03-01

    The dynamics and stability of a thin, viscous film of volatile liquid flowing under the influence of gravity over a non-uniformly heated substrate are investigated using lubrication theory. Attention is focused on the regime in which evaporation balances the flow due to gravity. The film terminates above the heater at an apparent contact line, with a microscopically thin precursor film adsorbed due to the disjoining pressure. The film develops a weak thermocapillary ridge due to the Marangoni stress at the upstream edge of the heated region. As for spreading films, a more significant ridge is formed near the apparent contact line. For weak Marangoni effects, the film evolves to a steady profile. For stronger Marangoni effects, the film evolves to a time-periodic state. Results of a linear stability analysis reveal that the steady film is unstable to transverse perturbations above a critical value of the Marangoni parameter, leading to finger formation at the contact line. The streamwise extent of the fingers is limited by evaporation. The time-periodic profiles are always unstable, leading to the formation of periodically-oscillating fingers. For rectangular heaters, the film profiles after instability onset are consistent with images from published experimental studies.

  18. Waves on the surface of a boiling liquid at various medium stratifications

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkevich, O. A.

    2015-08-15

    The stability of relatively small perturbations of the stationary state consisting of a plane liquid layer and a vapor film is studied when no liquid evaporation or vapor condensation occurs in the stationary state. In this case, heat from a hot to cold wall is removed through a vapor–liquid layer via heat conduction. The boundary conditions that take into account liquid evaporation (appearance of a mass flux) at the vapor–liquid phase surface and the temperature dependence of the saturation pressure are derived. Dispersion equations are obtained. The wave processes for the stable (light vapor under a liquid layer) and unstable stratifications of the phases at rest and during their relative motion are studied. The deformation of the phase boundary results in liquid evaporation, changes in the boiling temperature and the saturation pressure, and generation of weakly damped low-amplitude waves of a new type. These waves ensure the stability of a vapor film under a liquid layer at rest or a liquid layer moving at a constant velocity in the gravity field. The velocities of these waves are much higher than the gravity wave velocities. The critical heat flows and wavelengths at which wave boiling regimes at normal pressure can exist are determined, and the calculated and experimental data are compared.

  19. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Boiling—a process that has powered industries since the steam age—is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles ‘on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications. PMID:26486275

  20. Contribution of heat transfer to turbine blades and vanes for high temperature industrial gas turbines. Part 1: Film cooling.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, K; Aoki, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper deals with the contribution of heat transfer to increase the turbine inlet temperature of industrial gas turbines in order to attain efficient and environmentally benign engines. High efficiency film cooling, in the form of shaped film cooling and full coverage film cooling, is one of the most important cooling technologies. Corresponding heat transfer tests to optimize the film cooling effectiveness are shown and discussed in this first part of the contribution.

  1. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). In addition to macroscopic parameters like the average heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux [CHF] value, more fundamental parameters such as the bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density [NSD] were directly measured for a thin, resistively heated, indium-tin-oxide surface deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Consistent with other nanofluid studies, the nanoparticles caused deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer (by as much as 50%) and an increase in the CHF (by as much as 100%). The bubble departure frequency and NSD were found to be lower in nanofluids compared with water for the same wall superheat. Furthermore, it was found that a porous layer of nanoparticles built up on the heater surface during nucleate boiling, which improved surface wettability compared with the water-boiled surfaces. Using the prevalent nucleate boiling models, it was possible to correlate this improved surface wettability to the experimentally observed reductions in the bubble departure frequency, NSD, and ultimately to the deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the CHF enhancement. PMID:21711754

  2. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Craig; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-Wen; McKrell, Thomas

    2011-03-16

    Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). In addition to macroscopic parameters like the average heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux [CHF] value, more fundamental parameters such as the bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density [NSD] were directly measured for a thin, resistively heated, indium-tin-oxide surface deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Consistent with other nanofluid studies, the nanoparticles caused deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer (by as much as 50%) and an increase in the CHF (by as much as 100%). The bubble departure frequency and NSD were found to be lower in nanofluids compared with water for the same wall superheat. Furthermore, it was found that a porous layer of nanoparticles built up on the heater surface during nucleate boiling, which improved surface wettability compared with the water-boiled surfaces. Using the prevalent nucleate boiling models, it was possible to correlate this improved surface wettability to the experimentally observed reductions in the bubble departure frequency, NSD, and ultimately to the deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the CHF enhancement.

  3. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  4. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-11-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  5. Physicochemical Characterization of a Heat Treated Calcium Alginate Dry Film Prepared with Chicken Stock.

    PubMed

    Báez, Germán D; Piccirilli, Gisela N; Ballerini, Griselda A; Frattini, Agustín; Busti, Pablo A; Verdini, Roxana A; Delorenzi, Néstor J

    2017-04-01

    Solid sodium alginate was dissolved into chicken stock in order to give a final alginate concentration of 0.9 percent (w/v). Calcium ions present in chicken stock were enough to induce ionic gelation. After drying, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thickness and mechanical properties of films obtained were determined. Calcium alginate-chicken stock films were heated at 130 °C for different times between 0 and 15 min. Mechanical and optical studies, differential scanning calorimetry, visual aspect and scanning electron microscopy were carried out to describe physicochemical properties of heat treated films. Heating developed a maroon ochre color and increased the brittleness (crispness) of the films related to the intensity of the treatment. Differential scanning thermometry and study on appearance of the films suggested that Maillard reactions may be responsible for the observed changes. Maillard reactions mainly occurred between reducing sugar monomers and free amino groups of gelatin peptides present in the chicken stock, and between alginate and gelatin peptides to a lesser extent. In addition, the plasticizing effect of fat added with chicken stock was also studied. These studies suggest a potential use of heat treated chicken stock films as a substitute of roasted chicken skin.

  6. Heat transfer performance of metal fiber sintered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, T.; Takazawa, H.; Mizuki, M.

    1983-03-01

    Boiling heat transfer performance on stainless steel metal fiber sintered surfaces is experimentally investigated with Freon 11 (R11) as the working fluid. The boiling heat transfer coefficient for the optimum surface structure gives a tenfold improvement over a smooth surface. The nondimensional specific parameter including all design parameters is introduced to explain the trend of the performance of various kinds of metal fiber sintered surfaces. Moreover, the metal fiber sintered surface clad with titanium film is suggested to be appropriate to an evaporator for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system.

  7. Acoustic study of a linear low-density polyethylene film after modification of the crystalline structure by heating.

    PubMed

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2014-02-01

    We report on a hybrid microscopy technique that enables us to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film together with an optical microscope image of the corresponding area. Linear low-density polyethylene films are heated to various temperatures and examined by the technique. Density of the film is increased by heating and its sound velocity is decreased compared with a film without heating. Also, spherulites can clearly be seen in the optical microscope image, supporting the thermal shrinkage of the film which can be detected by the present technique.

  8. Thin Films Protect Electronics from Heat and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    While Anne St. Clair worked on high performance polyimides at Langley Research Center, she noticed that some of the films were nearly colorless. The polyimides became known as LaRC-CP1 and LaRC-CP2, and were licensed by NeXolve Corporation, based in Huntsville, Alabama. Today, NeXolve provides polyimide film products to commercial customers for spacecraft, telescopes, and circuit boards.

  9. Influence of the wettability on the boiling onset.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, B; Rioboo, R; Marengo, M; Gosselin, E; De Coninck, J

    2012-01-17

    Experimental investigation of pool boiling is conducted in stationary conditions over very smooth bronze surfaces covered by a very thin layer of gold presenting various surface treatments to isolate the role of wettability. We show that even with surfaces presenting mean roughness amplitudes below 10 nm the role of surface topography is of importance. The study shows also that wettability alone can trigger the boiling and that the boiling position on the surface can be controlled by chemical grafting using for instance alkanethiol. Moreover, boiling curves, that is, heat flux versus the surface superheat (which is the difference between the solid surface temperature and the liquid saturation temperature), are recorded and enabled to quantify, for this case, the significant reduction of the superheat at the onset of incipient boiling due to wettability.

  10. Marangoni Effects on Near-Bubble Microscale Transport During Boiling of Binary Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    V. Carey; Sun, C.; Carey, V. P.

    2000-01-01

    In earlier investigations, Marangoni effects were observed to be the dominant mechanism of boiling transport in 2-propanol/water mixtures under reduced gravity conditions. In this investigation we have examined the mechanisms of binary mixture boiling by exploring the transport near a single bubble generated in a binary mixture between a heated surface and cold surface. The temperature field created in the liquid around the bubble produces vaporization over the portion of its interface near the heated surface and condensation over portions of its interface near the cold surface. Experiments were conducted using different mixtures of water and 2-propanol under 1g conditions and under reduced gravity conditions aboard the KC135 aircraft. Since 2-propanol is more volatile than water, there is a lower concentration of 2-propanol near the hot surface and a higher concentration of 2-propanol near the cold plate relative to the bulk quantity. This difference in interface concentration gives rise to strong Marangoni effects that move liquid toward the hot plate in the near bubble region for 2-propanol and water mixtures. In the experiments in this study, the pressure of the test system was maintained at about 5 kPa to achieve the full spectrum of boiling behavior (nucleate boiling, critical heat flux and film boiling) at low temperature and heat flux levels. Heat transfer data and visual documentation of the bubble shape were extracted from the experimental results. In the 1-g experiments at moderate to high heat flux levels, the bubble was observed to grow into a mushroom shape with a larger top portion near the cold plate due to the buoyancy effect. The shape of the bubble was somewhat affected by the cold plate subcooling and the superheat of the heated surface. At low superheat levels for the heated surface, several active nucleation sites were observed, and the vapor stems from them merged to form a larger bubble. The generation rate of vapor is moderate in this

  11. Mechanistic modeling of CHF in forced-convection subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Podowski, M.Z.; Alajbegovic, A.; Kurul, N.; Drew, D.A.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Because of the complexity of phenomena governing boiling heat transfer, the approach to solve practical problems has traditionally been based on experimental correlations rather than mechanistic models. The recent progress in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), combined with improved experimental techniques in two-phase flow and heat transfer, makes the use of rigorous physically-based models a realistic alternative to the current simplistic phenomenological approach. The objective of this paper is to present a new CFD model for critical heat flux (CHF) in low quality (in particular, in subcooled boiling) forced-convection flows in heated channels.

  12. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  13. Prediction of critical heat flux in water-cooled plasma facing components using computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, James H.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Several commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes now have the capability to analyze Eulerian two-phase flow using the Rohsenow nucleate boiling model. Analysis of boiling due to one-sided heating in plasma facing components (pfcs) is now receiving attention during the design of water-cooled first wall panels for ITER that may encounter heat fluxes as high as 5 MW/m2. Empirical thermalhydraulic design correlations developed for long fission reactor channels are not reliable when applied to pfcs because fully developed flow conditions seldom exist. Star-CCM+ is one of the commercial CFD codes that can model two-phase flows. Like others, it implements the RPI model for nucleate boiling, but it also seamlessly transitions to a volume-of-fluid model for film boiling. By benchmarking the results of our 3d models against recent experiments on critical heat flux for both smooth rectangular channels and hypervapotrons, we determined the six unique input parameters that accurately characterize the boiling physics for ITER flow conditions under a wide range of absorbed heat flux. We can now exploit this capability to predict the onset of critical heat flux in these components. In addition, the results clearly illustrate the production and transport of vapor and its effect on heat transfer in pfcs from nucleate boiling through transition to film boiling. This article describes the boiling physics implemented in CCM+ and compares the computational results to the benchmark experiments carried out independently in the United States and Russia. Temperature distributions agreed to within 10 C for a wide range of heat fluxes from 3 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and flow velocities from 1 m/s to 10 m/s in these devices. Although the analysis is incapable of capturing the stochastic nature of critical heat flux (i.e., time and location may depend on a local materials defect or turbulence phenomenon), it is highly reliable in determining the heat flux where boiling instabilities begin

  14. Analysis of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in a Falling Film Using Volume of Fluid Method

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnoi, A.K.; Chandraker, D.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2006-07-01

    This paper deals with the applicability of VOF method for interface tracking with heat transfer and validation of the VOF approach using experimental data. A vertical channel flow problem in which the liquid is falling inside a vertical channel along one of the walls from the top is analysed and liquid--air interface is tracked. In the same problem analysis of heat transfer from the wall has been incorporated. This approach has a potential to predict liquid film thickness in a heated tube/subchannel which will lead to the evaluation of critical power (power corresponding to critical heat flux). (authors)

  15. The effects of heat treatments on the transport properties of Cu/x/S thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmurcik, L.; Allen, L.; Serway, R. A.

    1982-12-01

    The resistivity and Hall effect of Cu(x)S (x = 1.995-2) thin films, which are used in the CdS/Cu(x)S solar cell currently investigated as an alternate source of electrical energy, has been measured as a function of temperature and heat treatment time. It is found that initial heat treatments cause copper in grain boundaries to diffuse irreversibly into the bulk. Further heating in hydrogen causes the resistivity to increase and the charge density and the mobility to decrease as surface oxides break up and free copper diffuses into the copper sulfide. Heating in oxygen reverses this process.

  16. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterials coated with silicon carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Soumyadipta Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2015-01-19

    In this letter, we study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metamaterial substrates coated with silicon carbide (SiC) thin films. It is known that metamaterials can enhance the near-field heat transfer over ordinary materials due to excitation of magnetic plasmons associated with s polarization, while strong surface phonon polariton exists for SiC. By careful tuning of the optical properties of metamaterial, it is possible to excite electrical and magnetic resonances for the metamaterial and surface phonon polaritons for SiC at different spectral regions, resulting in the enhanced heat transfer. The effect of the SiC film thickness at different vacuum gaps is investigated. Results obtained from this study will be beneficial for application of thin film coatings for energy harvesting.

  17. An experimental study of heat transfer and film cooling on low aspect ratio turbine nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, K.; Matsuura, M.; Aoki, S.; Sato, T.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of the three-dimensional flow field on the heat transfer and the film cooling on the endwall, suction and pressure surface of an airfoil were studied using a low speed, fully annular, low aspect h/c = 0.5 vane cascade. The predominant effects that the horseshoe vortex, secondary flow, and nozzle wake increases in the heat transfer and decreases in the film cooling on the suction vane surface and the endwall were clearly demonstrated. In addition, it was demonstrated that secondary flow has little effect on the pressure surface. Pertinent flow visualization of the flow passage was also carried out for better understanding of these complex phenomena. Heat transfer and film cooling on the fully annular vane passage surface is discussed.

  18. Implantable polymer/metal thin film structures for the localized treatment of cancer by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Theriault, Christian; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an implantable polymer/metal alloy thin film structure for localized post-operative treatment of breast cancer. A combination of experiments and models is used to study the temperature changes due to Joule heating by patterned metallic thin films embedded in poly-dimethylsiloxane. The heat conduction within the device and the surrounding normal/cancerous breast tissue is modeled with three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The FEM simulations are used to explore the potential effects of device geometry and Joule heating on the temperature distribution and lesion (thermal dose). The FEM model is validated using a gel model that mimics biological media. The predictions are also compared to prior results from in vitro studies and relevant in vivo studies in the literature. The implications of the results are discussed for the potential application of polymer/metal thin film structures in hyperthermic treatment of cancer.

  19. Electrohydrodynamics of boiling on microstructured surfaces for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccone, Giacomo; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Bucci, Matteo; Buongiorno, Jacopo; di Marco, Paolo; Mit-Nuclear Science; Engineering Team; University Of Pisa-Destec Dept. Team

    2016-11-01

    Surface wettability is a major parameter in boiling heat transfer. It affects the departure of bubbles from the boiling surface and consequently determines the maximum heat flux transferrable in safe conditions, known as critical heat flux (CHF). Surface wettability can be enhanced through passive techniques, including micro-engineered surfaces and coatings, or through active techniques, e.g. by applying a tunable electric field (electrowetting) that modifies the bubble shape in such a way as to drive bubble detachment. The latter technique is particularly interesting for space applications, where the electric field is used to create a body force that compensates for the absence of gravity. The present work is focused on boiling heat transfer on surfaces whose wettability has been modified by passive and active techniques. We have built a pool boiling apparatus composed of a micro-structured heater acting as boiling surface and an axisymmetric electrode High-speed optical and infrared imaging have been used to investigate the dynamics of boiling phenomena. The aims of this project are twofold: to achieve a superior understanding of wetting phenomena, and to improve the efficiency of cooling devices for space applications.

  20. Continuous Carbon Nanotube-Based Fibers and Films for Applications Requiring Enhanced Heat Dissipation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Mikhalchan, Anastasiia; Tran, Thang Q; Jewell, Daniel; Duong, Hai M; Marconnet, Amy M

    2016-07-13

    The production of continuous carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers and films has paved the way to leverage the superior properties of individual carbon nanotubes for novel macroscale applications such as electronic cables and multifunctional composites. In this manuscript, we synthesize fibers and films from CNT aerogels that are continuously grown by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) and measure thermal conductivity and natural convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber and film. To probe the mechanisms of heat transfer, we develop a new, robust, steady-state thermal characterization technique that enables measurement of the intrinsic fiber thermal conductivity and the convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber to the surrounding air. The thermal conductivity of the as-prepared fiber ranges from 4.7 ± 0.3 to 28.0 ± 2.4 W m(-1) K(-1) and depends on fiber volume fraction and diameter. A simple nitric acid treatment increases the thermal conductivity by as much as a factor of ∼3 for the fibers and ∼6.7 for the thin films. These acid-treated CNT materials demonstrate specific thermal conductivities significantly higher than common metals with the same absolute thermal conductivity, which means they are comparatively lightweight, thermally conductive fibers and films. Beyond thermal conductivity, the acid treatment enhances electrical conductivity by a factor of ∼2.3. Further, the measured convective heat transfer coefficients range from 25 to 200 W m(-2) K(-1) for all fibers, which is higher than expected for macroscale materials and demonstrates the impact of the nanoscale CNT features on convective heat losses from the fibers. The measured thermal and electrical performance demonstrates the promise for using these fibers and films in macroscale applications requiring effective heat dissipation.

  1. The effect of entrance radius and film injection on wall heating in scramjet nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, N. R.; Northam, G. B.; Capriotti, D. P.; Stouffer, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed with a scramjet combustor and nozzle model to determine the effect of nozzle radii on relaminarization, and the effectiveness of film injection in reducing wall heat flux. The nozzle model was installed downstream of a swept-ramp scramjet combustor model, operated at Mach 2.7 with vitiated air, simulating Mach 6-7 flight enthalpies. Results from tests conducted with three nozzle radii, varying in curvature from a sharp Prandtl-Meyer expansion to a radius of two scramjet combustor exit heights, showed little or no effect on the downstream wall heat flux, which is not in agreement with both subsonic and supersonic relaminarization correlations in the available literature. In contrast, film injection upstream of all three radii produced reductions of 70 percent in the entire nozzle model heating rate, for the nominal film-to-free stream pressure matched condition. Results from film injection, with and without pressure gradient, but without wall curvature, show that the gradients appear to stabilize the film, with the resulting reductions in wall heat transfer rates apparent far downstream of the point of injection.

  2. Characteristics of heat flow in optical fiber devices that use integrated thin-film heaters.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J A; Kuo, P; Ahuja, A; Eggleton, B J; Jackman, R J

    2000-10-01

    We describe the analysis of heat flow in a type of tunable optical fiber grating that uses thin-film resistive heaters microfabricated on the surface of the fiber. The high rate of heat loss from these microstructures and the relatively low thermal diffusivity of the glass yield unusual thermal properties. Approximate one-dimensional analytical calculations capture important aspects of the thermal characteristics of these systems. Comparison with experimental results that we obtained from devices with established designs validates certain features of the computations. This modeling also establishes the suitability of integrated thin-film heaters for several new types of tunable fiber grating devices.

  3. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm3) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiOx, or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H2 gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000°C were achieved even in 200 Torr H2. We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  4. Silver Nanowire Transparent Conductive Films with High Uniformity Fabricated via a Dynamic Heating Method.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yonggao; Chen, Chao; Jia, Dan; Li, Shuxin; Ji, Shulin; Ye, Changhui

    2016-04-20

    The uniformity of the sheet resistance of transparent conductive films is one of the most important quality factors for touch panel applications. However, the uniformity of silver nanowire transparent conductive films is far inferior to that of indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). Herein, we report a dynamic heating method using infrared light to achieve silver nanowire transparent conductive films with high uniformity. This method can overcome the coffee ring effect during the drying process and suppress the aggregation of silver nanowires in the film. A nonuniformity factor of the sheet resistance of the as-prepared silver nanowire transparent conductive films could be as low as 6.7% at an average sheet resistance of 35 Ω/sq and a light transmittance of 95% (at 550 nm), comparable to that of high-quality ITO film in the market. In addition, a mechanical study shows that the sheet resistance of the films has little change after 5000 bending cycles, and the film could be used in touch panels for human-machine interactive input. The highly uniform and mechanically stable silver nanowire transparent conductive films meet the requirement for many significant applications and could play a key role in the display market in a near future.

  5. Study on critical heat flux enhancement in flow boiling of SiC nano-fluids under low pressure and low flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kang, S.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Lee, D. W.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is the thermal limit of a phenomenon in which a phase change occurs during heating (such as bubbles forming on a metal surface used to heat water), which suddenly decreases the heat transfer efficiency, thus causing localized overheating of the heating surface. The enhancement of CHF can increase the safety margins and allow operation at higher heat fluxes; thus, it can increase the economy. A very interesting characteristics of nano-fluids is their ability to significantly enhance the CHF. nano-fluids are nano-technology-based colloidal dispersions engineered through stable suspending of nanoparticles. All experiments were performed in round tubes with an inner diameter of 0.01041 m and a length of 0.5 m under low pressure and low flow (LPLF) conditions at a fixed inlet temperature using water, 0.01 vol. % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water and SiC/water nano-fluids. It was found that the CHF of the nano-fluids was enhanced and the CHF of the SiC/water nano-fluid was more enhanced than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nano-fluid. (authors)

  6. Application of Thin-Film Thermocouples to Localized Heat Transfer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bruckner, R. J.; Smith, F. A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes a proof-of-concept experiment on thin-film thermocouples used for localized heat transfer measurements applicable to experiments on hot parts of turbine engines. The paper has three main parts. The first part describes the thin-film sensors and manufacturing procedures. Attention is paid to connections between thin-film thermocouples and lead wires, which has been a source of problems in the past. The second part addresses the test arrangement and facility used for the heat transfer measurements modeling the conditions for upcoming warm turbine tests at NASA LeRC. The paper stresses the advantages of a modular approach to the test rig design. Finally, we present the results of bulk and local heat flow rate measurements, as well as overall heat transfer coefficients obtained from measurements in a narrow passage with an aspect ratio of 11.8. The comparison of bulk and local heat flow rates confirms applicability of thin-film thermocouples to upcoming warm turbine tests.

  7. Cooling Enhancement by Drop Impact and Pool Boiling on Nano-textured Surfaces Under Normal Gravity Conditions and at Zero and Increased Gravity in Parabolic Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, Alexander; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Jun, Seongchul

    2014-03-01

    The earth experiments with drop impact onto metal-plated electrospun nanofiber mats encompass a single drop, or drop trains or jets impacts. The results on drop cooling and pool boiling on nano-textured surface were obtained during the parabolic flights supported by NASA and ESA. Pool boiling on nano-textured surfaces was studied for ethanol and water as working fluids. The nano-textured surfaces were copper platelets covered with copper-plated electrospun nanofibers. The results revealed that the heat flux in boiling on the nano-textured surfaces was about 3-8 times higher than that on the bare copper. This stems from the fact that nano-textured surfaces promote bubble growth by increasing the average temperature of fluid surrounding growing bubbles. Nano-textured surfaces facilitated bubble growth rate and increase bubble detachment frequency. On the other hand, the critical heat flux (CHF) on the nano-textured surfaces was found to be very close to its counterpart on the bare copper surfaces. However, the heat flux on the nano-textured surfaces in transition boiling was significantly higher than on the bare copper ones, since the presence of nanofibers prevented bubble merging and delayed formation of vapor film.

  8. New Cu(GeNx) film in barrierless metallization for LED heat dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chon-Hsin

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we explore new Cu(Ge) and Cu(GeNx) films for LED heat dissipation. The films are Cu-alloy seed layers, fabricated by co-sputtering Cu and Ge in an Ar or N2 atmosphere on either Ta/Al2O3 or polyimide substrates. The Cu alloy films are then annealed at 600 and 730 °C, respectively, for 1 h without notable Cu oxide formation at the Cu-Ta/Al2O3 interface. No Cu oxide is formed at the Cu-polyimide interface either after annealing the films at 310 °C for 1 h. The film formed atop an Al2O3 substrate contains a trace amount of GeNx and is thermally stable up to 730 °C, and the film formed atop a polyimide substrate is thermally stable up to 310 °C, both exhibiting a low resistivity and a high thermal conductivity. Such a thermal feature makes the Cu(GeNx) film a good candidate material in barrierless metallization for many industrial applications, such as LED heat sinks.

  9. Reduced Boil-Off System Sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Plachta, David W.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is currently developing cryogenic propellant storage and transfer systems for future space exploration and scientific discovery missions by addressing the need to raise the technology readiness level of cryogenic fluid management technologies. Cryogenic propellants are baselined in many propulsion systems due to their inherently high specific impulse; however, their low boiling points can cause substantial boil-off losses over time. Recent efforts such as the Reduced Boil-off Testing and the Active Thermal Control Scaling Study provide important information on the benefit of an active cooling system applied to LH2 propellant storage. Findings show that zero-boil off technologies can reduce overall mass in LH2 storage systems when low Earth orbit loiter periods extend beyond two months. A significant part of this mass reduction is realized by integrating two stages of cooling: a 20 K stage to intercept heat at the tank surface, and a 90 K stage to reduce the heat entering the less efficient 20 K stage. A missing element in previous studies, which is addressed in this paper, is the development of a direct method for sizing the 90 K cooling stage. Such a method requires calculation of the heat entering both the 90 K and 20 K stages as compared to the overall system masses, and is reliant upon the temperature distribution, performance, and unique design characteristics of the system in question. By utilizing the known conductance of a system without active thermal control, the heat being intercepted by a 90 K stage can be calculated to find the resultant lift and mass of each active thermal control stage. Integral to this is the thermal conductance of the cooling straps and the broad area cooling shield, key parts of the 90 K stage. Additionally, a trade study is performed to show the ability of the 90 K cooling stage to reduce the lift on the 20 K cryocooler stage, which is considerably less developed and efficient than 90 K cryocoolers.

  10. Prediction of heat transfer to a thin liquid film in plane and radially spreading flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.; Swanson, T. D.

    1990-01-01

    The energy equation is incorporated in the solution algorithm of Rahman et al. (1990) to compute the heat transfer to a thin film in the presence or absence of gravity. For a plane flow under zero gravity, it is found that, for both isothermal and uniformly heated walls, the heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases downstream, with Nu-asterisk (the Nusselt number in terms of film height) remaining approximately constant except for regions very close to the entrance. In the case of radial flow under zero gravity, Nu-asterisk is found to decrease monotonically when the plane is uniformly heated. Two different flow regimes are identified in the presence of gravity for both plane and radial flows. The results of the study may be applicable to the design of space-based cooling systems.

  11. High temperature thermocouple and heat flux gauge using a unique thin film-hardware hot juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Holanda, R.; Hippensteele, S. A.; Andracchio, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    A special thin film-hardware material thermocouple (TC) and heat flux gauge concept for a reasonably high temperature and high flux flat plate heat transfer experiment was fabricated and tested to gauge temperatures of 911 K. This concept was developed for minimal disturbance of boundary layer temperature and flow over the plates and minimal disturbance of heat flux through the plates. Comparison of special heat flux gauge Stanton number output at steady-state conditions with benchmark literature data was good and agreement was within a calculated uncertainty of the measurement system. Also, good agreement of special TC and standard TC outputs was obtained and the results are encouraging. Oxidation of thin film thermoelements was a primary failure mode after about 5 of operation.

  12. Convective Heat Transfer with and without Film Cooling in High Temperature, Fuel Rich and Lean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Nathan J.

    Modern turbine engines require high turbine inlet temperatures and pressures to maximize thermal efficiency. Increasing the turbine inlet temperature drives higher heat loads on the turbine surfaces. In addition, increasing pressure ratio increases the turbine coolant temperature such that the ability to remove heat decreases. As a result, highly effective external film cooling is required to reduce the heat transfer to turbine surfaces. Testing of film cooling on engine hardware at engine temperatures and pressures can be exceedingly difficult and expensive. Thus, modern studies of film cooling are often performed at near ambient conditions. However, these studies are missing an important aspect in their characterization of film cooling effectiveness. Namely, they do not model effect of thermal property variations that occur within the boundary and film cooling layers at engine conditions. Also, turbine surfaces can experience significant radiative heat transfer that is not trivial to estimate analytically. The present research first computationally examines the effect of large temperature variations on a turbulent boundary layer. Subsequently, a method to model the effect of large temperature variations within a turbulent boundary layer in an environment coupled with significant radiative heat transfer is proposed and experimentally validated. Next, a method to scale turbine cooling from ambient to engine conditions via non-dimensional matching is developed computationally and the experimentally validated at combustion temperatures. Increasing engine efficiency and thrust to weight ratio demands have driven increased combustor fuel-air ratios. Increased fuel-air ratios increase the possibility of unburned fuel species entering the turbine. Alternatively, advanced ultra-compact combustor designs have been proposed to decrease combustor length, increase thrust, or generate power for directed energy weapons. However, the ultra-compact combustor design requires a

  13. RELAP5/MOD3 subcooled boiling model assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Devkin, A.S.; Podosenov, A.S.

    1998-05-01

    This report presents the assessment of the RELAP5/Mod3 (5m5 version) code subcooled boiling process model which is based on a variety of experiments. The accuracy of the model is confirmed for a wide range of regime parameters for the case of uniform heating along the channel. The condensation rate is rather underpredicted, which may lead to considerable errors in void fraction behavior prediction in subcooled boiling regimes for nonuniformly or unheated channels.

  14. 1995 national heat transfer conference: Proceedings. Volume 6: Basic aspects of two phase flow and heat transfer; HTD-Volume 308

    SciTech Connect

    Dhir, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    The papers in this volume cover a wide range of topics including contact angles dependence of thin film evaporations, liquid spreading on hard surfaces, jet impingement cooling, nucleate boiling, condensation on ordinary and enhanced surfaces, and on two phase flow and heat transfer. Separate abstracts were prepared for all 14 papers.

  15. Cryogenic Propellant Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Carlberg, E.; Feller, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Lunar missions under consideration would benefit from incorporation of high specific impulse propellants such as LH2 and LO2, even with their accompanying boil-off losses necessary to maintain a steady tank pressure. This paper addresses a cryogenic propellant boil-off reduction system to minimize or eliminate boil-off. Concepts to do so were considered under the In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Project. Specific to that was an investigation of cryocooler integration concepts for relatively large depot sized propellant tanks. One concept proved promising—it served to efficiently move heat to the cryocooler even over long distances via a compressed helium loop. The analyses and designs for this were incorporated into NASA Glenn Research Center's Cryogenic Analysis Tool. That design approach is explained and shown herein. Analysis shows that, when compared to passive only cryogenic storage, the boil-off reduction system begins to reduce system mass if durations are as low as 40 days for LH2, and 14 days for LO2. In addition, a method of cooling LH2 tanks is presented that precludes development issues associated with LH2 temperature cryocoolers.

  16. Critical heat flux for water boiling in channels. Modern state, typical regularities, unsolved problems, and ways for solving them (a review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, V. P.

    2015-02-01

    Some general matters concerned with description of burnout in channels are outlined. Data obtained from experimental investigations on critical heat fluxes (CHF) in different channels, CHF data banks, the main determining parameters, CHF basic dependences, and a system of correction functions are discussed. Two methods for estimating the CHF description errors are analyzed. The influence of operating parameters, transverse sizes of channels, and conditions at their inlet are analyzed. The effects of heat-transfer surface shape and heat supply arrangement are considered for concentric annular channels. The notions of a thermal boundary layer and an elementary thermal cell during burnout in channels with an intricate cross section are defined. New notions for describing CHF in rod assemblies are introduced: bundle effect, thermal misalignment, assembly-section-averaged and local parameters (for an elementary cell), cell-wise CHF analysis in bundles, and standard and nonstandard cells. Possible influence of wall thermophysical properties on CHF in dense assemblies and other effects are considered. Thermal interaction of nonequivalent cells and the effect of heat supply arrangement over the cell perimeter are analyzed. Special attention is paid to description of the effect the heat release nonuniformity along the channels has on CHF. Objectives to be pursued by studies of CHF in channels of different cross-section shapes are formulated.

  17. Steady-State and Frequency Response of a Thin-Film Heat Flux Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Bhatt, Hemanshu D.; Cho, Chistopher S.

    1997-01-01

    A new and simpler design of thin-film heat flux gauge has been developed for use In high-heat-flux environments. Heat flux gauges of the same design were fabricated on three different substrates and tested. The heat flux gauge comprises a thermopile and a thermocouple junction, which measures the surface temperature. The thermopile has 40 pairs of S-type thermocouples and is covered by two thermal resistance layers. Calibration and testing of these gauges were first carried out in an arc-lamp calibration facility. Sensitivity of the gauge was discussed in terms of the relative conductivity and surface temperature. The heat flux calculated from the gauge output was In good agreement with the precalibrated standard sensor. The steady-state and the transient response characteristics of the heat flux gauge were also investigated using a carbon dioxide pulse laser as a heat source. The dynamic frequency response was evaluated in terms of the nondimensional amplitude ratio with respect to the frequency spectrum of a chopped laser bcam. The frequency response of the gauge was determined to be about 3 kHz. The temperature profiles in the thin-film heat flux gauge were obtained numerically in steady-state conditions using FLUENT and compared with the experimental results.

  18. Boiling crisis controlled by capillary pumping and viscous friction: Liquid penetration length and dry spot diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungdae; Ahn, Ho Seon; Kwak, Ho Jae; Kim, Moo Hwan; Kim, Dong Eok

    2016-12-01

    A boiling crisis, or critical heat flux (CHF), is a condition that determines the upper bound on removable thermal energy at a boiling surface. In such situations, the liquid cannot wet the surface because a vapor film completely covers it. CHF is enhanced on micro-structured surfaces when under boiling conditions. CHF values were measured for surfaces with rectangular microchannel geometries of various channel widths, (10-30 μm) and generally increased in value as channel widths decreased. However, the CHF value for the 5-μm channel-width surface was found to be lower than the wider channel-width surfaces. This observation contradicts models based on vapor recoil and classical instability mechanisms. Hence, we present a fluid-dynamics model that considers capillary pumping and viscous friction. With a focus on the spatial distribution of the liquid penetration region and the local dry spot under a large vapor bubble, this model can accurately predict the CHF variation associated with different channel widths.

  19. Microscale measurement of wall-temperature distribution at a single vapor bubble for evaluation of a nucleate boiling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Peter; Höhmann, Christoph; Kern, Jürgen

    2002-01-01

    An experiment is designed for evaluation of an existing nucleate boiling model. An essential aspect of the model is the description of heat and mass transfer in a tiny thin film area where the vapor bubble is attached to the wall. A considerable amount of the total heat transferred from the heater flows through this ``micro region.'' The high local heat flux in the micro region leads to a local cooling. The associated wall temperature drop underneath this area is calculated with the nucleate boiling model and measured with an optical method using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC). In the first ground experiment a thin liquid film evaporator was built with a thin electrically heated wall featuring two-dimensional, high-resolution temperature measurement by TLCs. The measured temperature distribution corresponds to the calculated one. The second experimental setup for l-g and reduced gravity conditions is designed to establish a stationary bubble of appropriate size to enable optical observation of the circular temperature drop. A qualitative evaluation of the model seems to be possible with this experiment. .

  20. Photothermally Activated Pyroelectric Polymer Films for Harvesting of Solar Heat with a Hybrid Energy Cell Structure.

    PubMed

    Park, Teahoon; Na, Jongbeom; Kim, Byeonggwan; Kim, Younghoon; Shin, Haijin; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2015-12-22

    Photothermal effects in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)s (PEDOTs) were explored for pyroelectric conversion. A poled ferroelectric film was coated on both sides with PEDOT via solution casting polymerization of EDOT, to give highly conductive and effective photothermal thin films of PEDOT. The PEDOT films not only provided heat source upon light exposure but worked as electrodes for the output energy from the pyroelectric layer in an energy harvester hybridized with a thermoelectric layer. Compared to a bare thermoelectric system under NIR irradiation, the photothermal-pyro-thermoelectric device showed more than 6 times higher thermoelectric output with the additional pyroelectric output. The photothermally driven pyroelectric harvesting film provided a very fast electric output with a high voltage output (Vout) of 15 V. The pyroelectric effect was significant due to the transparent and high photothermal PEDOT film, which could also work as an electrode. A hybrid energy harvester was assembled to enhance photoconversion efficiency (PCE) of a solar cell with a thermoelectric device operated by the photothermally generated heat. The PCE was increased more than 20% under sunlight irradiation (AM 1.5G) utilizing the transmitted light through the photovoltaic cell as a heat source that was converted into pyroelectric and thermoelectric output simultaneously from the high photothermal PEDOT electrodes. Overall, this work provides a dynamic and static hybrid energy cell to harvest solar energy in full spectral range and thermal energy, to allow solar powered switching of an electrochromic display.

  1. The effect of substrate wettability on the breakdown of a locally heated fluid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, D. V.; Kirichenko, D. P.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of the equilibrium contact angle of wetting on the dynamics of the dry patch propagation and on the critical heat flux upon the breakdown of a water film that is heated locally from the substrate side is studied experimentally. The equilibrium contact angle is varied from 27° ± 6° to 74° ± 9° (with no changes in the thermophysical properties of the system) through the use of different types of surface grinding. The studies are performed for three flow modes: (a) a fluid film that freely flows down along a substrate with an inclination of 5° to the horizon, (b) a film that moves along a horizontal substrate under the influence of hydrostatic pressure, and (c) a static film on a horizontal substrate. It is found that the substrate wettability has a significant effect on the dry patch propagation rate and its final size in all these cases, but has almost no effect on the threshold heat flux at which the breakdown of a film occurs.

  2. Accelerated Amidization of Branched Poly(ethylenimine)/Poly(acrylic acid) Multilayer Films by Microwave Heating.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kehua; Gu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Huan; Qiang, Zhe; Vogt, Bryan D; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-09-13

    Chemical cross-linking of layer-by-layer assembled films promotes mechanical stability and robustness in a wide variety of environments, which can be a challenge for polyelectrolyte multilayers in saline environments or for multilayers made from weak polyelectrolytes in environments with extreme pHs. Heating branched poly(ethylenimine)/poly(acrylic acid) (BPEI/PAA) multilayers at sufficiently high temperatures drives amidization and dehydration to covalently cross-link the film, but this reaction is rather slow, typically requiring heating for hours for appreciable cross-linking to occur. Here, a more than one order of magnitude increase in the amidization kinetics is realized through microwave heating of BPEI/PAA multilayers on indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass substrates. The cross-linking reaction is tracked using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry to monitor the development of the cross-linking products. For thick films (∼1500 nm), gradients in cross-link density can be readily identified by infrared ellipsometry. Such gradients in cross-link density are driven by the temperature gradient developed by the localized heating of ITO by microwaves. This significant acceleration of reactions using microwaves to generate a well-defined cross-link network as well as being a simple method for developing graded materials should open new applications for these polymer films and coatings.

  3. The variation of heat transfer coefficient, adiabatic effectiveness and aerodynamic loss with film cooling hole shape.

    PubMed

    Sargison, J E; Guo, S M; Oldfield, M L; Rawlinson, A J

    2001-05-01

    The heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic effectiveness of cylindrical, fan shaped holes and a slot are presented for the region zero to 50 diameters downstream of the holes. Narrow-band liquid crystals were used on a heated flat plate with heated air coolant. These parameters have been measured in a steady state, low speed facility at engine representative Reynolds number based on hole diameter and pressure difference ratio (ideal momentum flux ratio). The aerodynamic loss due to each of the film cooling geometries has been measured using a traverse of the boundary layer far downstream of the film cooling holes. Compared to the cylindrical holes, the fan shaped hole case showed an improvement in the uniformity of cooling downstream of the holes and in the level of laterally averaged film cooling effectiveness. The fan effectiveness approached the slot level and both the fan and cylindrical hole cases show lower heat transfer coefficients than the slot and non film cooled cases based on the laterally averaged results. The drawback to the fan shaped hole was that the aerodynamic loss was significantly higher than both the slot and cylindrical hole values due to inefficient diffusion in the hole exit expansion.

  4. Convective Heat Transfer with and without Film Cooling in High Temperature, Fuel Rich and Lean Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    variations that occur within the boundary and film cooling layers at engine conditions. Also, turbine sur- faces can experience significant radiative heat...variations on a turbulent boundary layer . Subsequently, a method to model the effect of large temperature variations within a turbulent boundary layer in an...Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 5.4 Variation of the Boundary Layer with Temperature Ratio

  5. Nanofluids for power engineering: Emergency cooling of overheated heat transfer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, B. I.; Moraru, V. N.; Sidorenko, S. V.; Komysh, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of emergency cooling of an overheated heat transfer surface using nanofluids in the case of a boiling crisis is explored by means of synchronous recording of changes of main heat transfer parameters of boiling water over time. Two nanofluids are tested, which are derived from a mixture of natural aluminosilicates (AlSi-7) and titanium dioxide (NF-8). It is found that the introduction of a small portions of nanofluid into a boiling coolant (distilled water) in a state of film boiling ( t heater > 500°C) can dramatically decrease the heat transfer surface temperature to 130-150°C, which corresponds to a transition to a safe nucleate boiling regime without affecting the specific heat flux. The fact that this regime is kept for a long time at a specific heat load exceeding the critical heat flux for water and t heater = 125-130°C is particularly important. This makes it possible to prevent a potential accident emergency (heater burnout and failure of the heat exchanger) and to ensure the smooth operation of the equipment.

  6. Heat capacity measurements of atoms and molecules adsorbed on evaporated metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations of the properties of absorbed monolayers have received great experimental and theoretical attention recently, both because of the importance of surface processes in practical applications such as catalysis, and the importance of such systems to the understanding of the fundamentals of thermodynamics in two dimensions. We have adapted the composite bolometer technology to the construction of microcalorimeters. For these calorimeters, the adsorption substrate is an evaporated film deposited on one surface of an optically polished sapphire wafer. This approach has allowed us to make the first measurements of the heat capacity of submonolayer films of /sup 4/He adsorbed on metallic films. In contrast to measurements of /sup 4/He adsorbed on all other insulating substrates, we have shown that /sup 4/He on silver films occupies a two-dimensional gas phase over a broad range of coverages and temperatures. Our apparatus has been used to study the heat capacity of Indium flakes. CO multilayers, /sup 4/He adsorbed on sapphire and on Ag films and H/sub 2/ adsorbed on Ag films. The results are compared with appropriate theories. 68 refs., 19 figs.

  7. Prediction of heat transfer to a thin liquid film in plane and radially spreading flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W.L. ); Swanson, T.D. )

    1990-08-01

    The numerical solution of a thin film flow is difficult since the free surface geometry changes along the path of the flow, is unknown ahead of time, and cannot be fitted in a regular Cartesian or cylindrical coordinate system. Therefore, most theoretical studies in this area were related to the development of approximate analytical models (Faghri and Seban, 1981; Chaudhury, 1964). The finite-difference solution was attempted only for a falling film (Faghri and Payvar, 1979) where the film thickness could be approximated to be uniform. Recently, Rahman et al. (1990a) have developed a finite-difference solution method applicable for the fluid mechanics of thin film flows under zero and normal gravity. A body-fitted coordinate system was used where the free surface was approximated by a curve and iterated for the best possible solution. The present study is intended to incorporate the energy equation in the solution algorithm of Rahman et al. (1990a) to compute the heat transfer to a thin film in the presence or absence of gravity. In addition to the enhancement of the knowledge of thin film heat transfer, the results of the present study may be directly applicable to the design of space-based cooling systems.

  8. Heat and Mass Transfer in a Falling Film Evaporator with Aqueous Lithium Bromide Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbricht, M.; Addy, J.; Luke, A.

    2016-09-01

    Horizontal tube bundles are often used as falling film evaporators in absorption chillers, especially for systems working at low pressure as H2O/LiBr. Experimental investigations are carried out in a falling film evaporator consisting of a horizontal tube bundle with eighty horizontal tubes installed in an absorption chiller because of a lack of consistent data for heat and mass transfer in the literature. The heat and mass transfer mechanisms and the flow pattern in the falling film are analysed and compared with correlations from literature. The deviations of the experimental data from those of the correlations are within a tolerance of 30%. These deviations may be explained by a change of the flow pattern at a lower Reynolds number than compared to the literature.

  9. Laser irradiation of carbon nanotube films: Effects and heat dissipation probed by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mialichi, J. R.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Iikawa, F.; Verissimo, C.; Moshkalev, S. A.

    2013-07-14

    We investigate the thermal properties of thin films formed by single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes submitted to laser irradiation using Raman scattering as a probe of both the tube morphology and the local temperature. The nanotubes were submitted to heating/cooling cycles attaining high laser intensities ({approx}1.4 MW/cm{sup 2}) under vacuum and in the presence of an atmosphere, with and without oxygen. We investigate the heat diffusion of the irradiated nanotubes to their surroundings and the effect of laser annealing on their properties. The presence of oxygen during laser irradiation gives rise to an irreversible increase of the Raman efficiency of the carbon nanotubes and to a remarkable increase of the thermal conductivity of multi-walled films. The second effect can be applied to design thermal conductive channels in devices based on carbon nanotube films using laser beams.

  10. Heat and mass transfer in nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, M.; Khan, Z. H.; Lopez, R. J.; Khan, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    The heat and mass transport of a nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet has been investigated. This is the first paper on nanofluid thin film flow caused by unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model. The model used for the nanofluid film incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The self-similar non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved using Maple's built-in BVP solver. The results for pure fluid are found to be in good agreement with the literature. Present analysis shows that free surface temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction increase with both unsteadiness and magnetic parameters. The results reveal that effect of both nanofluid parameters and viscous dissipation is to reduce the heat transfer rate.

  11. Effect of Oxidation on Localized Heat Generation and Dielectric Breakdown of Low-Density Polyethylene Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurimoto, Takao; Nagao, Masayuki; Kosaki, Masamitsu

    1995-12-01

    The effect of oxidation on localized heat generation and dielectric breakdown in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film was studied by thermography. In the non-McKeown-type epoxy-free electrode system, localized heat generation of LDPE film leading to dielectric breakdown increased and breakdown strength decreased upon oxidation. In the McKeown-type specimen, however, the breakdown strength of oxidized LDPE film is higher than that of an unoxidized one. It is considered that enhancement of the thermal process is a major factor of breakdown in the epoxy-free electrode system and that homo-space charge and/or electron scattering effect is dominant in the McKeown type specimen.

  12. The Role of Heat Transfer during Reactive-Ion Etching of Polymer Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-07

    necessary and identify by block numb r ) - ,. •~~ ~ - r - e A ,: "I j _ - , -, ., I " jO " A study of the kinetics of 02i andArieactive-ion etching (RE) of...organic polymer films and an analysis of substrate heat transfer was carried out. Radiative heat transfer played a signifiu.ant role in determining the...absolutely no effect on etch rates of cross-linking polymers. To confirm the role of radiative heat transfer during RIE, the underside of a silicon

  13. [Selective Heating of Membrane-forming Holes in Teflon Film Exposed to Decimeter Waves].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Fesenko, E E; Fesenko, E E

    2015-01-01

    Calculations of heating of membrane-forming holes in Teflon film exposed to decimeter waves were performed. The dependence of the temperature increment in holes on the geometry of holes, electrolyte concentration, and decimeter wave frequency was studied. The kinetics of heating depending on the hole diameter was also obtained. It was concluded that the observed in the experiment effects of the decimeter wave on bilayer lipid membranes resulted from the elevated concentration of decimeter electromagnetic waves in membrane-forming hole that led to selective heating of electrolyte in hole and bilayer lipid membranes.

  14. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  15. Design Model for the Heat Transfer in a Short Straight Tube Boiler.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    in vertical upflow for Re򒾐. Water properties are evaluated at the film tempera- ture; Prw, at the wall temperature. The work done by Sieder and...Boiling and Condensation, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1972. 16. Sieder , E.N., and Tate, C.E., Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of Liquids in Tubes, Inc

  16. An Experimental Study of a Radially Arranged Thin Film Heat Flux Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Christoper S. K.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Bhatt, Hemanshu D.

    1997-01-01

    A new thin-film heat-flux gauge was designed and fabricated on three different substrate materials. Forty pairs of Pt-Pt/10% Rh thermocouple junctions were deposited in a circular pattern on the same plane of the substrate. Over the thermocouples, 5 and 10 micron thick thermal resistance layers were deposited to create a temperature gradient across those layers. Calibration and testing of these gauges were carried out in an arc-lamp calibration facility. The heat flux calculated from the gauge output is in good agreement with the value obtained from the pre-calibrated standard sensor. A CO2 laser was also used to test the steady-state and dynamic responses of the heat-flux gauge. During the steady-state test, the time constant for the heating period was 30 s. The frequency response of the heat-flux gauge was measured in the frequency domain using a CO2 laser and a chopper. The responses from an infrared detector and the heat-flux gauge were measured simultaneously and compared. It was found that the thin-film heat-flux gauge has a dynamic frequency response of 3 kHz.

  17. Experiments on Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film Flowing Over a Rotating Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Ozar, B.; Cetegen, B. M.; Faghri, A.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of heat transfer into a thin liquid film on a rotating heated disk is described. Deionized water was introduced at the center of a heated. horizontal disk with a constant film thickness and uniform radial velocity. Radial distribution of the disk surface temperatures was measured using a thermocouple/slip ring arrangement. Experiments were performed for a range of liquid flow rates between 3.01pm and 15.01pm. The angular speed of the disk was varied from 0 rpm to 500 rpm. The local heat transfer coefficient was determined based on the heat flux supplied to the disk and the temperature difference between the measured disk surface temperature and the liquid entrance temperature onto the disk. The local heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase with increasing flow rate as well as increasing angular velocity of the disk. Effect of rotation on heat transfer was largest for the lower liquid flow rates with the effect gradually decreasing with increasing liquid flow rates. Semi-empirical correlations are presented in this study for the local and average Nusselt numbers.

  18. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to the high specific impulse that can be achieved using engines suitable for moving 10's to 100's of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several days. The losses can be greatly reduced by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and by the integration of self-supporting multi-layer insulation. The active thermal control technology under development is the integration of the reverse turbo- Brayton cycle cryocooler to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling network of tubes coupled to a shield in the tank insulation and to the tank wall itself. Also, the self-supporting insulation technology was utilized under the shield to obtain needed tank applied LH2 performance. These elements were recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a series of three tests, two that reduced LH2 boil-off and one to eliminate LO2 boil-off. This test series was conducted in a vacuum chamber that replicated the vacuum of space and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. The test results show that LH2 boil-off was reduced 60% by the cryocooler system operating at 90K and that robust LO2 zero boil-off storage, including full tank pressure control was achieved.

  19. Durable polyorganosiloxane superhydrophobic films with a hierarchical structure by sol-gel and heat treatment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenlin; Fang, Shuying; Wang, Chaosheng; Wang, Huaping; Ji, Chengchang

    2016-12-01

    For a surface to be superhydrophobic a combination of surface roughness and low surface energy is required. In this study, polyorganosiloxane superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated using a sol-gel and heat treatment process followed by coating with a nanosilica (SiO2) sol and organosiloxane 1, 1, 1, 3, 5, 5, 5-heptamethyl-3-[2-(trimethoxysilyl)ethyl]-trisiloxane (β-HPEOs). The nano-structure was superimposed using self-assembled, surface-modified silica nanoparticles, forming two-dimensional hierarchical structures. The water contact angle (WCA) of polyorganosiloxane superhydrophobic surface was 143.7 ± 0.6°, which was further increased to 156.7 ± 1.1° with water angle hysteresis of 2.5 ± 0.6° by superimposing nanoparticles using a heat treatment process. An analytical characterization of the surface revealed that the nano-silica and polyorganosiloxane formed a micro/nano structure on the films and the wetting behaviour of the films changed from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic. The WCA of these films were 143.7 ± 0.6° and at heat treatment temperatures of less than 400 °C, the WCA increased from 144.5 ± 0.7° to 156.7 ± 1.1°. The prepared superhydrophobic films were stable even after heat treatment at 430 °C for 30 min and their superhydrophobicity was durable for more than 120 days. The effects of heat treatment process on the surface chemistry structure, wettability and morphology of the polyorganosiloxane superhydrophobic films were investigated in detail. The results indicated that the stability of the chemical structure was required to yield a thermally-stable superhydrophobic surface.

  20. Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Study of Direct Immersion Cooling of a 3X3 Array of Vertically Orientated Electronic Components in a Dielectric Liquid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    73 v APPENDIX B. SAMPLE CALCULATIONS ............................. 81 A. DETERMINATION OF INPUT POWER OF CHIP...produced by the Melcor corporation and were utilized to remove the heat from the condenser. The cooling devices were normally operated at 2.0 volts and 0.4...DETERMINATION OF INPUT POWER OF CHIP For this sample calculation, the power drop across chip 2 was determined: Powerl- Voltl*Volt2/Resistl where Voltl and

  1. Thinning and rupture of a thin liquid film on a heated surface. Progress report, September 15, 1992--September 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoff, S.G.; Davis, S.H.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this work continues to be the study of the dynamics, stability and rupture of thin liquid films, especially with heat and/or mass transfer. These films appear in many engineering processes, such as film coating, gas absorption, condensation, and especially cooling of hot surfaces. Surface waves may be detrimental, leading to film breakdown, with consequent equipment overheating, or beneficial, as when mass transfer coefficients are increased.

  2. Heat Transfer Issues in Thin-Film Thermal Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Mamadou Y.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University has been working closely with scientists and engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center to develop accurate analytical and numerical models suitable for designing next generation thin-film thermal radiation detectors for earth radiation budget measurement applications. The current study provides an analytical model of the notional thermal radiation detector that takes into account thermal transport phenomena, such as the contact resistance between the layers of the detector, and is suitable for use in parameter estimation. It was found that the responsivity of the detector can increase significantly due to the presence of contact resistance between the layers of the detector. Also presented is the effect of doping the thermal impedance layer of the detector with conducting particles in order to electrically link the two junctions of the detector. It was found that the responsivity and the time response of the doped detector decrease significantly in this case. The corresponding decrease of the electrical resistance of the doped thermal impedance layer is not sufficient to significantly improve the electrical performance of the detector. Finally, the "roughness effect" is shown to be unable to explain the decrease in the thermal conductivity often reported for thin-film layers.

  3. Heat Transfer Prediction of Film Cooling in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchi, Riccardo; Salvadori, Simone; Martelli, Francesco

    2008-09-01

    Considering the modern high pressure stages of gas turbines, the flow over the suction side of the blades can be affected by the presence of shock impingement and boundary layer separation. Furthermore, it should be pointed out that the combustor exit temperature reaches values which are close to the allowable material limit. Then, a cooling system based on the film cooling approach should be designed to prevent failure. The interaction between the ejected coolant and the shock impingement must be studied to achieve a higher efficiency of the cooling system. The proposed approach is based on the numerical evaluation of a film cooled test section experimentally studied at the University of Karlsruhe. The testing rig consists in a converging-diverging nozzle that accelerates the flow up to sonic conditions while an oblique shock is generated at the nozzle exit section. Three cases have been studied, changing the cooling holes position with respect to the shock impingement over the cooled surface. The obtained results are presented and compared with the experimental data. The used solver is the in-house CFD 3D code HybFlow, developed at the University of Florence. This study has been carried out in the frame of the EU funded TATEF2 project.

  4. Specific heat measurement set-up for quench condensed thin superconducting films.

    PubMed

    Poran, Shachaf; Molina-Ruiz, Manel; Gérardin, Anne; Frydman, Aviad; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    We present a set-up designed for the measurement of specific heat of very thin or ultra-thin quench condensed superconducting films. In an ultra-high vacuum chamber, materials of interest can be thermally evaporated directly on a silicon membrane regulated in temperature from 1.4 K to 10 K. On this membrane, a heater and a thermometer are lithographically fabricated, allowing the measurement of heat capacity of the quench condensed layers. This apparatus permits the simultaneous thermal and electrical characterization of successively deposited layers in situ without exposing the deposited materials to room temperature or atmospheric conditions, both being irreversibly harmful to the samples. This system can be used to study specific heat signatures of phase transitions through the superconductor to insulator transition of quench condensed films.

  5. The Impact of Heat Release in Turbine Film Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    AFIT/GAE/ENY/08-J02 Abstract The Ultra Compact Combustor is a design that integrates a turbine vane into the combustor flow path. Because...of the high fuel-to-air ratio and short combustor flow path, a significant potential exists for unburned fuel to enter the turbine. Using...contemporary turbine cooling vane designs, the injection of oxygen-rich turbine cooling air into a combustor flow containing unburned fuel could result in heat

  6. Surface cooling of scramjet engine inlets using heat pipe, transpiration, and film cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Modlin, J.M.; Colwell, G.T. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta )

    1992-09-01

    This article reports the results of applying a finite-difference-based computational technique to the problem of predicting the transient thermal behavior of a scramjet engine inlet exposed to a typical hypersonic flight aerodynamic surface heating environment, including type IV shock interference heating. The leading-edge cooling model utilized incorporates liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling. Results include transient structural temperature distributions, aerodynamic heat inputs, and surface coolant distributions. It seems that these cooling techniques may be used to hold maximum skin temperatures to near acceptable values during the severe aerodynamic and type IV shock interference heating effects expected on the leading edge of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle scramjet engine. 15 refs.

  7. Turbine Vane External Heat Transfer. Volume 1: Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Surface Heat Transfer Distributions with Leading Edge Showerhead Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, E. R.; Wilson, M. D.; Hylton, L. D.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes was summarized. A two dimensional linear cascade (previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils) was used to examine the effect of leading edge shower head film cooling on downstream heat transfer. The data were used to develop and evaluate analytical models. Modifications to the two dimensional boundary layer model are described. The results were used to formulate and test an effective viscosity model capable of predicting heat transfer phenomena downstream of the leading edge film cooling array on both the suction and pressure surfaces, with and without mass injection.

  8. How Does Water Boil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Insight into the boiling of water is obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The process is initiated by the spontaneous formation of small vacuum cavities in liquid water. By themselves, these defects are very short lived. If, however, several cavities occur at close distances, they are likely to merge into larger vacuum holes. At the liquid-vapor interfaces, single or small groups of water molecules tend to leave the liquid surface. Once the system is propagated beyond the transition state, these evaporation events outnumber the competing reintegration into the hydrogen-bonded network.

  9. Thin Film Conductive Coatings for Surface Heating and Decontamination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    area 9 - dimensionless surface coverage ( oo) Subscripts 0 - upper sur ace 1 - substrate material ( plexi - glass ) 2 -. heater m terial (Indium-Tin Oxide...ke 54 C* " C* THIS PROGRAM SOLVES FOR THE DIFFUSION OF HEAT AND CONTAMINANT S C VAPOR WITHIN A SOLID-SUBSTRATE ( PLEXI - GLASS ) WITH AN EMBEDDED C... PLEXI -. GLASS "Ups S - SOLUBILITY PARAMETER APPENOIX 55 , . * , 55 C*THE GIVEN INPU.IT DATA ISo PRINTEDc OUT. HERE ’NW~’ REFERS C* TO THE OUTPUT

  10. Low temperature catalytic oxidative aging of LDPE films in response to heat excitation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xuegang; Zhang, Sizhao; Ding, Feng; Lin, Xiaoyan

    2015-09-14

    The waste treatment of polymer materials is often conducted using the photocatalytic technique; however, complete decomposition is frequently inhibited owing to several shortcomings such as low quantum yield and the requirement of ultraviolet irradiation. Herein, we report a strategy to implement moderate management of polymeric films via thermocatalytic oxidative route, which is responsive to heat stimulus. Diverse LDPE-matrix films together with as-prepared thermal catalysts (TCs) or initiators were synthesized to further investigate heat-dependent-catalytic degradation effects. After artificial ageing, structural textures of the as-synthesized films could be chemically deteriorated, followed by a huge increase in surface roughness values, and appreciable loss was also found in the average molecular weights and mechanical parameters. We found an emergent phenomenon in which crystallization closely resembled two-dimensional (2D) growth, which displayed rod-like or disc-type crystal shapes. New chemical groups generated on film surfaces were monitored, and led to a higher limiting oxygen index because of strong catalytic oxidation, thus demonstrating the success of catalytic oxidative ageing by heat actuation. The underlying mechanism responsible for thermocatalytic oxidative pattern is also discussed. Accordingly, these findings may have important implications for better understanding the development of polymeric-matrix waste disposal.

  11. Unsteady High Turbulence Effects on Turbine Blade Film Cooling Heat Transfer Performance Using a Transient Liquid Crystal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Ekkad, S. V.; Du, H.; Teng, S.

    2000-01-01

    Unsteady wake effect, with and without trailing edge ejection, on detailed heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness distributions is presented for a downstream film-cooled gas turbine blade. Tests were performed on a five-blade linear cascade at an exit Reynolds number of 5.3 x 10(exp 5). Upstream unsteady wakes were simulated using a spoke-wheel type wake generator. Coolant blowing ratio was varied from 0.4 to 1.2; air and CO2 were used as coolants to simulate different density ratios. Surface heat transfer and film effectiveness distributions were obtained using a transient liquid crystal technique; coolant temperature profiles were determined with a cold wire technique. Results show that Nusselt numbers for a film cooled blade are much higher compared to a blade without film injection. Unsteady wake slightly enhances Nusselt numbers but significantly reduces film effectiveness versus no wake cases. Nusselt numbers increase only slic,htly but film cooling, effectiveness increases significantly with increasing, blowing ratio. Higher density coolant (CO2) provides higher effectiveness at higher blowing ratios (M = 1.2) whereas lower density coolant (Air) provides higher 0 effectiveness at lower blowing ratios (M = 0.8). Trailing edge ejection generally has more effect on film effectiveness than on the heat transfer, typically reducing film effectiveness and enhancing heat transfer. Similar data is also presented for a film cooled cylindrical leading edge model.

  12. Red shift for CdTe nanoparticle thin films and suspensions during heating.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S; Gardner, H C; Bertoni, C; Gallardo, D E; Gaponik, N; Eychmüller, A

    2008-05-01

    The work that we have conducted shows that temperature affects the wavelength of light emitted from CdTe nanoparticle clusters that are in a suspension or deposited into thin films via a layer-by-layer process. Compared with the stock suspension, the films show an initial photoluminescent shift, of circa 6-8 nm to the red, when the particles are deposited. A shift of circa 6-8 nm is also seen when the suspensions are first heated to 85 degrees C from room temperature (20 degrees C) having been stored in a fridge at 5 degrees C. This shift is non-recoverable. With continual cycling from room temperature to 85 degrees C the suspensions show a slight tendency for the emission to move increasingly to the red; whereas the films show no such tendency. In both cases, the range in emission is ca 10 nm from the room temperature state to 80 degrees C. The intensity of the emission from the film drops abruptly (ca 50% reduction) after one cycle of heating; in the suspension there is an initial increase (ca 3-5% increase) in intensity before it decays. We see that the shift towards the red has been attributed to energy transfer or a rearrangement of the packing of the particles in the thin films. After conducting analysis of the films using scanning probe microscopy we have determined that a change in the morphology is responsible for the permanent shift in emission wavelength associated with prolonged heating. The influence of traps has not been ruled out, but the morphological change in the samples is very large and is likely to be the dominating mechanism affecting change for the red shift at room temperature.

  13. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes results from experiments performed to help understand certain aspects of the MC-1 engine prestart thermal conditioning procedure. The procedure was constrained by the fact that the engine must chill long enough to get quality LOX at the LOX pump inlet but must be short enough to prevent freezing of RP-1 in the fuel pump. A chill test of an MC-1 LOX impeller was performed in LN2 to obtain data on film boiling, transition boiling and impeller temperature histories. The transition boiling data was important to the chill time so a subsequent experiment was performed chilling simple steel plates in LOX to obtain similar data for LOX. To address the fuel freezing concern, two experiments were performed. First, fuel was frozen in a tray and its physical characteristics were observed and temperatures of the fuel were measured. The result was physical characteristics as a function of temperature. Second was an attempt to measure the frozen thickness of RP-1 on a cold wall submerged in warm RP-1 and to develop a method for calculating that thickness for other conditions.

  14. Heat transport in polymer thin films for micro/nano-manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ming-Tsung

    The rapid growth in micro/nanotechnology has opened a great opportunity for polymer thin films and polymer nanocomposites. Thermal management or thermal effects in those applications need to be carefully examined. For example, the local heating in electron-beam lithography, emersion lithography, and scanning near field optical lithography may cause the degradation of photoresists and reduce the resolution. The development of many organic electronics, polymer micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices, and polymer nanocomposites may require the knowledge of heat transport in micro/nano-sized polymers. Thermolithography, a novel lithography, uses controlled localized heating to transfer patterns and requires the thermal conductivity data to control. It is of considerable scientific and technological interests for study heat transport in polymer thin films. Unlike bulk polymers that can be measured using commercially available instruments, polymer thin films are difficult to measure. In this manuscript, we develop the measurement techniques suitable for measuring thermal conductivity of polymer thin films and polymer nanocomposites. Using a microfabricated membrane-based device, we study the heat conduction in photoresists at difference process stages. This data is used in our thermolithography study, where we use microheater to study the kinetic of crosslinking reaction of photoresist. The feasibility of thermolithography and potential three dimensional micro/nano-fabrication is presented. The uniqueness of thermolithography is also demonstrated by patterning amorphous fluoropolymers. A modified hot-wire technique is used to measure the thermal conductivity of graphite nanoplatelet (GNP) reinforced nanocomposites, one of the promising candidates for multifunctional materials. Thermal interface resistance in GNP nanocomposites is investigated, which shows a strong effect on energy transport in the nanocomposites and can be diminished through surface treatment.

  15. Boiling Fluids Behave Quite Differently in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    The boiling process is really different in space, since the vapor phase of a boiling liquid does not rise via buoyancy. Spacecraft and Earth-based systems use boiling to efficiently remove large am...

  16. Hysteresis of boiling for different tunnel-pore surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of boiling hysteresis on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil is proposed. Hysteresis is an adverse phenomenon, preventing high heat flux systems from thermal stabilization, characterized by a boiling curve variation at an increase and decrease of heat flux density. Experimental data were discussed for three kinds of enhanced surfaces: tunnel structures (TS), narrow tunnel structures (NTS) and mini-fins covered with the copper wire net (NTS-L). The experiments were carried out with water, R-123 and FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. A detailed analysis of the measurement results identified several cases of type I, II and III for TS, NTS and NTS-L surfaces.

  17. Full-coverage film cooling. I - Comparison of heat transfer data for three injection angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, M. E.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were carried out at Stanford between 1971 and 1977 to study the heat transfer characteristics of full-coverage film cooled surfaces with three geometries; normal-, 30 deg slant-, and 30 deg x 45 deg compound-angled injection. A flat full-coverage section and downstream recovery section comprised the heat transfer system. The experimental objectives were to determine, for each geometry, the effects on surface heat flux of injection blowing ratio, injection temperature ratio, and upstream initial conditions. Spanwise-averaged Stanton numbers were measured for blowing ratios from 0 to 1.3, and for two values of injection temperature at each blowing ratio. The heat transfer coefficient was defined on the basis of a mainstream-to-wall temperature difference. Initial momentum and enthalpy thickness Reynolds numbers were varied from 500 to about 3000.

  18. A study of heat transfer in the surface layer of metal during the impingement of a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldin, A. V.; Platonov, N. I.

    2008-03-01

    We propose a model of heat transfer that takes place when a sheet of metal heated to a high temperature is cooled by a jet. The model takes into account transition and film boiling of liquid, as well as convective and radiant heat transfer in air medium. Examples are given illustrating how the temperature field of a movable metal sheet cooled by a system of jets is calculated.

  19. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  20. Evaporation for Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in a Falling Film Heater under Reduced Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Akira; Ide, Tetsuo; Yukino, Keiji

    Experiments on evaporation for water and lithium bromide (LiBr) aqueous solution were made in a externally heated wetted-wall column under reduced pressures. For water, evaporation rate increased slightly as feed rate decreased. The heat transfer coefficients of falling film agreed with those for filmwise condensation. For LiBr solution, evaporation rate decreased and outlet temperature of LiBr solution increased as feed rate decreased. The equations of continuity, diffusion and energy which assume that only water moves to the surface and LiBr doesn't move through falling film of LiBr solution were solved numerically. Calculated values of evaporation rate and outlet temperature of solution agreed with experimental results. The results of this work were compared with pool boiling data reported previously, and it was shown that falling film heater is superior to pool boiling heater concerning heat transfer.