Science.gov

Sample records for film chemical sensors

  1. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOEpatents

    Prelas, Mark A.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Viswanath, Dabir; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  2. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  3. Thin-film chemical sensors based on electron tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.; Leduc, H. G.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanisms underlying a novel chemical sensor based on electron tunneling in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions were studied. Chemical sensors based on electron tunneling were shown to be sensitive to a variety of substances that include iodine, mercury, bismuth, ethylenedibromide, and ethylenedichloride. A sensitivity of 13 parts per billion of iodine dissolved in hexane was demonstrated. The physical mechanisms involved in the chemical sensitivity of these devices were determined to be the chemical alteration of the surface electronic structure of the top metal electrode in the MIM structure. In addition, electroreflectance spectroscopy (ERS) was studied as a complementary surface-sensitive technique. ERS was shown to be sensitive to both iodine and mercury. Electrolyte electroreflectance and solid-state MIM electroreflectance revealed qualitatively the same chemical response. A modified thin-film structure was also studied in which a chemically active layer was introduced at the top Metal-Insulator interface of the MIM devices. Cobalt phthalocyanine was used for the chemically active layer in this study. Devices modified in this way were shown to be sensitive to iodine and nitrogen dioxide. The chemical sensitivity of the modified structure was due to conductance changes in the active layer.

  4. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  5. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  6. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

  7. Selected area chemical vapor deposition of thin films for conductometric microelectronic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majoo, Sanjeev

    Recent advances in microelectronics and silicon processing have been exploited to fabricate miniaturized chemical sensors. Although the capability of chemical sensing technology has grown steadily, it has been outpaced by the increasing demands for more reliable, inexpensive, and selective sensors. The diversity of applications requires the deployment of different sensing materials that have rich interfacial chemistry. However, several promising sensor materials are often incompatible with silicon micromachining and their deposition requires complicated masking steps. The new approach described here is to first micromachine a generic, instrumented, conductometric, microelectronic sensor platform that is fully functional except for the front-end sensing element. This generic platform contains a thin dielectric membrane, an integrated boron-doped silicon heater, and conductance electrodes. The membrane has low thermal mass and excellent thermal isolation. A proprietary selected-area chemical vapor deposition (SACVD) process in a cold-wall reactor at low pressures was then used to achieve maskless, self-lithographic deposition of thin films. The temperature-programmable integrated microheater initiates localized thermal decomposition/reaction of suitable CVD precursors confined to a small heated area (500 mum in diameter), and this creates the active sensing element. Platinum and titania (TiOsb2) films were deposited from pyrolysis of organometallic precursors, tetrakistrifluorophosphine platinum Pt(PFsb3)sb4 and titanium tetraisopropoxide Ti(OCH(CHsb3)sb2rbrack sb4, respectively. Deposition of gold metal films from chlorotriethylphosphine gold (Csb2Hsb5)sb3PAuCl precursor was also attempted but without success. The conductance electrodes permit in situ monitoring of film growth. The as-deposited films were characterized in situ by conductance measurements and optical microscopy and ex situ by electron microscopy and spectroscopy methods. Devices equipped with

  8. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  9. Alcohol vapor sensing by cadmium-doped zinc oxide thick films based chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargar, R. A.; Arora, M.; Chackrabarti, S.; Ahmad, S.; Kumar, J.; Hafiz, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles were derived by simple chemical co-precipitation route using zinc acetate dihydrate and cadmium acetate dihydrate as precursor materials. The thick films were casted from chemical co-precipitation route prepared nanoparticles by economic facile screen printing method. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the film were characterized relevant to alcohol vapor sensing application by powder XRD, SEM, UV-VIS and DC conductivity techniques. The response and sensitivity of alcohol (ethanol) vapor sensor are obtained from the recovery curves at optimum working temperature range from 20∘C to 50∘C. The result shows that maximum sensitivity of the sensor is observed at 25∘C operating temperature. On varying alcohol vapor concentration, minor variation in resistance has been observed. The sensing mechanism of sensor has been described in terms of physical adsorption and chemical absorption of alcohol vapors on cadmium-doped zinc oxide film surface and inside film lattice network through weak hydrogen bonding, respectively.

  10. Chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section.

  11. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  12. Characteristics and Mechanisms in Ion-Conducting Polymer Films as Chemical Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES,ROBERT C.; YELTON,WILLIAM G.; PFEIFER,KENT B.; PATEL,SANJAY V.

    2000-07-12

    Solid Polymer Electrolytes (SPE) are widely used in batteries and fuel cells because of the high ionic conductivity that can be achieved at room temperature. The ions are usually Li or protons, although other ions can be shown to conduct in these polymer films. There has been very little published work on SPE films used as chemical sensors. The authors have found that thin films of polymers like polyethylene oxide (PEO) are very sensitive to low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as common solvents. Evidence of a new sensing mechanism involving the percolation of ions through narrow channels of amorphous polymer is presented. They present impedance spectroscopy of PEO films in the frequency range 0.0001 Hz to 1 MHz for different concentrations of VOCs and relative humidity. They find that the measurement frequency is important for distinguishing ionic conductivity from the double layer capacitance and the parasitic capacitance.

  13. Chemically modified graphene films for high-performance optical NO2 sensors.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fei; Zhang, Shan; Yang, Yong; Jiang, Wenshuai; Liu, Zhibo; Zhu, Siwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2016-08-01

    Various graphene-based gas sensors that operate based on the electrical properties of graphene have been developed for accurate detection of gas components. However, electronic graphene-based gas sensors are unsafe under explosive atmospheres and sensitive to electromagnetic interference. Here, a novel optical graphene-based gas sensor for NO2 detection is established based on surface chemical modification of high-temperature-reduced graphene oxide (h-rGO) films with sulfo groups. Sulfo group-modified h-rGO (S-h-rGO) films with a thickness of several nanometers exhibit excellent performance in NO2 detection at room temperature and atmospheric pressure based on the polarization absorption effect of graphene. Initial slope analysis of the S-h-rGO sensor indicates that it has a limit of detection of 0.28 ppm and a response time of 300 s for NO2 gas sensing. Furthermore, the S-h-rGO sensor also possesses the advantages of good linearity, reversibility, selectivity, non-contact operation, low cost and safety. This novel optical gas sensor has the potential to serve as a general platform for the selective detection of a variety of gases with high performance. PMID:27265308

  14. Nanostructured zinc oxide films synthesized by successive chemical solution deposition for gas sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lupan, O. Chow, L.; Shishiyanu, S.; Monaico, E.; Shishiyanu, T.; Sontea, V.; Roldan Cuenya, B.; Naitabdi, A.; Park, S.; Schulte, A.

    2009-01-08

    Nanostructured ZnO thin films have been deposited using a successive chemical solution deposition method. The structural, morphological, electrical and sensing properties of the films were studied for different concentrations of Al-dopant and were analyzed as a function of rapid photothermal processing temperatures. The films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Electrical and gas sensitivity measurements were conducted as well. The average grain size is 240 and 224 A for undoped ZnO and Al-doped ZnO films, respectively. We demonstrate that rapid photothermal processing is an efficient method for improving the quality of nanostructured ZnO films. Nanostructured ZnO films doped with Al showed a higher sensitivity to carbon dioxide than undoped ZnO films. The correlations between material compositions, microstructures of the films and the properties of the gas sensors are discussed.

  15. Effect of film thickness on localized surface plasmon enhanced chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassu, Aschalew; Farley, Carlton; Sharma, Anup; Kim, Wonkyu; Guo, Junpeng

    2014-05-01

    A highly-sensitive, reliable, simple and inexpensive chemical detection and identification platform is demonstrated. The sensing technique is based on localized surface plasmon enhanced Raman scattering measurements from gold-coated highly-ordered symmetric nanoporous ceramic membranes fabricated from anodic aluminum oxide. To investigate the effects of the thickness of the sputter-coated gold films on the sensitivity of sensor, and optimize the performance of the substrates, the geometry of the nanopores and the film thicknesses are varied in the range of 30 nm to 120 nm. To characterize the sensing technique and the detection limits, surface enhanced Raman scatterings of low concentrations of a standard chemical adsorbed on the gold coated substrates are collected and analyzed. The morphology of the proposed substrates is characterized by atomic force microscopy and the optical properties including transmittance, reflectance and absorbance of each substrate are also investigated.

  16. Smart chemical sensors using ZnO semiconducting thin films for freshness detection of foods and beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanto, Hidehito; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Dougami, Naganori; Habara, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kusano, Eiji; Kinbara, Akira; Douguchi, Yoshiteru

    1998-07-01

    The sensitivity of the chemical sensor, based on the resistance change of Al2O3-doped and SnO2-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al and ZnO:SnO2) thin film, is studied for exposure to various gases. It is found that the ZnO:Al and ZnO:Sn thin film chemical sensor has a high sensitivity and excellent selectivity for amine (TMA and DMA) gas and ethanol gas, respectively. The ZnO:Al (5.0 wt%) thin film chemical sensor which exhibit a high sensitivity for exposure to odors from rotten sea foods, such as salmon, sea bream, oyster, squid and sardine, responds to the freshness change of these sea foods. The ZnO:SnO2 (78 wt%) thin film chemical sensor which exhibit a high sensitivity for exposure to aroma from alcohols, such as wine, Japanese sake, and whisky, responds to the freshness change of these alcohols.

  17. Nanoparticles for suppression of dewetting of thin polymer films for use in chemical sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Mackay, Michael E.; Holmes, Melissa A.

    2004-08-01

    Addition of fullerenes (C60 or buckyballs) to a linear polymer has been found to eliminate dewetting when a thin (?50 nm) film is exposed to solvent vapor. Based on neutron reflectivity measurements, it is found that the fullerenes form a coherent layer approximately 2 nm thick at the substrate--polymer film interface during the spin-coating process. The thickness and relative fullerene concentration (?29 vol%) is not altered during solvent vapor annealing and it is thought this layer forms a solid-like buffer shielding the adverse van der Waals forces promoted by the underlying substrate. Several polymer films produced by spin- or spray-coating were tested on both silicon wafers and live surface acoustic wave sensors demonstrating fullerenes stabilize many different polymer types, prepared by different procedures and on various surfaces. Further, the fullerenes drastically improve sensor performance since dewetted films produce a sensor that is effectively inoperable.

  18. Zeolite thin film-coated fiber sensors based on Fabry-Perot interferometer for detection of chemical vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiangping; Zhao, Chunliu; Shi, Feifei; Kang, Juan

    2015-06-01

    A novel zeolite-coated fiber sensors for detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on the Fabry-Perot interferometer was proposed and demonstrated. The sensor comprised a polycrystalline silicalite thin film grown up on the cleaved end face of a standard single-mode fiber. The inline Fabry-Perot cavity was composed by the end face of the single-mode fiber and the thin film. The sensor device operated by measuring the interference signal, which was a function of the amount of chemical vapor adsorption in its crystalline micro porous structure. Experimental results showed that the proposed VOC sensor worked well and the sensitivities were 2.78×10-3 dB/ppm when the concentration ranged from 350 ppm to 2100 ppm and 1.23×10-3 dB/ppm when the concentration ranged from 2100 ppm to 5250 ppm.

  19. Optical nitrite sensor based on chemical modification of a polymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh, A.; Daghighi, S.

    2005-06-01

    A new, low-cost nitrite sensor was developed by immobilizing a direct indicator dye in an optical sensing film for food and environmental monitoring. This sensor was fabricated by binding gallocyanine to a cellulose acetate film that had previously been subjected to an exhaustive base hydrolysis. The membrane has good durability (>6 months) and a short response time (<7 s). Nitrite can be determined for the range 0.008-1.50 μg/ml with 3 δ detection limits of 1 ng/ml. The method is easy to perform and uses acetylcellulose as a carrier. The reagents used for activating the cellulose support are inexpensive, non-toxic and widely available.

  20. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  1. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  2. Diamonds are a spectroscopist's best friend: thin-film diamond mid-infrared waveguides for advanced chemical sensors/biosensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Karlsson, Mikael; Forsberg, Pontus; Sieger, Markus; Nikolajeff, Fredrik; Österlund, Lars; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-08-19

    The first combination of mid-infrared (MIR) tunable quantum cascade lasers (tQCLs) with thin-film diamond strip waveguides (DSWGs) suitable for advanced chemical sensing/biosensing is demonstrated. The sensing system is composed of thin diamond films grown on surface-passivated Si wafers via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and microstructured using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching, serving as photonic waveguides for radiation emitted by a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser (tQCL) in the spectral regime of 5.78-6.35 μm (1570-1730 cm(-1)). The characterization of the free-standing diamond waveguides reveals excellent transmission properties across a broad MIR band. As a proof of concept, the detection of acetone in D2O via evanescent field absorption is demonstrated achieving a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 200 pL, which indicates a significant sensitivity improvement compared to conventional MIR slab/strip waveguides reported to date. Providing characteristic absorption features within the tuning range of the tQCL, studies using anisaldehyde as an analyte further corroborate the potential of tQCL-DSWG-based chemical sensors/biosensors.

  3. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  4. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Poli, Andrea A.; Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  5. Thin film temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Thin film surface temperature sensors were developed. The sensors were made of platinum-platinum/10 percent rhodium thermocouples with associated thin film-to-lead wire connections and sputtered on aluminum oxide coated simulated turbine blades for testing. Tests included exposure to vibration, low velocity hydrocarbon hot gas flow to 1250 K, and furnace calibrations. Thermal electromotive force was typically two percent below standard type S thermocouples. Mean time to failure was 42 hours at a hot gas flow temperature of 1250 K and an average of 15 cycles to room temperature. Failures were mainly due to separation of the platinum thin film from the aluminum oxide surface. Several techniques to improve the adhesion of the platinum are discussed.

  6. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Fleming, Pamela H.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  7. Wearable Optical Chemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra

    Wearable sensors can be used to provide valuable information about the wearer's health and/or monitor the wearer's surroundings, identify safety concerns and detect threats, during the wearer's daily routine within his or her natural environment. The "sensor on a textile", an integrated sensor capable of analyzing data, would enable early many forms of detection. Moreover, a sensor connected with a smart delivery system could simultaneously provide comfort and monitoring (for safety and/or health), non-invasive measurements, no laboratory sampling, continuous monitoring during the daily activity of the person, and possible multi-parameter analysis and monitoring. However, in order for the technology to be accessible, it must remain innocuous and impose a minimal intrusion on the daily activities of the wearer. Therefore, such wearable technologies should be soft, flexible, and washable in order to meet the expectations of normal clothing. Optical chemical sensors (OCSs) could be used as wearable technology since they can be embedded into textile structures by using conventional dyeing, printing processes and coatings, while fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) as well as nanofiber sensors (NFSs) can be incorporated by weaving, knitting or laminating. The interest in small, robust and sensitive sensors that can be embedded into textile structures is increasing and the research activity on this topic is an important issue.

  8. Chemical Gated Field Effect Transistor by Hybrid Integration of One-Dimensional Silicon Nanowire and Two-Dimensional Tin Oxide Thin Film for Low Power Gas Sensor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Rim, Taiuk; Baek, Chang-Ki; Meyyappan, M

    2015-09-30

    Gas sensors based on metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor with the polysilicon gate replaced by a gas sensitive thin film have been around for over 50 years. These are not suitable for the emerging mobile and wearable sensor platforms due to operating voltages and powers far exceeding the supply capability of batteries. Here we present a novel approach to decouple the chemically sensitive region from the conducting channel for reducing the drive voltage and increasing reliability. This chemically gated field effect transistor uses silicon nanowire for the current conduction channel with a tin oxide film on top of the nanowire serving as the gas sensitive medium. The potential change induced by the molecular adsorption and desorption allows the electrically floating tin oxide film to gate the silicon channel. As the device is designed to be normally off, the power is consumed only during the gas sensing event. This feature is attractive for the battery operated sensor and wearable electronics. In addition, the decoupling of the chemical reaction and the current conduction regions allows the gas sensitive material to be free from electrical stress, thus increasing reliability. The device shows excellent gas sensitivity to the tested analytes relative to conventional metal oxide transistors and resistive sensors.

  9. Chemical Gated Field Effect Transistor by Hybrid Integration of One-Dimensional Silicon Nanowire and Two-Dimensional Tin Oxide Thin Film for Low Power Gas Sensor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Rim, Taiuk; Baek, Chang-Ki; Meyyappan, M

    2015-09-30

    Gas sensors based on metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor with the polysilicon gate replaced by a gas sensitive thin film have been around for over 50 years. These are not suitable for the emerging mobile and wearable sensor platforms due to operating voltages and powers far exceeding the supply capability of batteries. Here we present a novel approach to decouple the chemically sensitive region from the conducting channel for reducing the drive voltage and increasing reliability. This chemically gated field effect transistor uses silicon nanowire for the current conduction channel with a tin oxide film on top of the nanowire serving as the gas sensitive medium. The potential change induced by the molecular adsorption and desorption allows the electrically floating tin oxide film to gate the silicon channel. As the device is designed to be normally off, the power is consumed only during the gas sensing event. This feature is attractive for the battery operated sensor and wearable electronics. In addition, the decoupling of the chemical reaction and the current conduction regions allows the gas sensitive material to be free from electrical stress, thus increasing reliability. The device shows excellent gas sensitivity to the tested analytes relative to conventional metal oxide transistors and resistive sensors. PMID:26381613

  10. Porous polymer film calcium ion chemical sensor and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Porter, Marc D.; Chau, Lai-Kwan

    1991-02-12

    A method of measuring calcium ions is disclosed wherein a calcium sensitive reagent, calcichrome, is immobilized on a porour polymer film. The reaction of the calcium sensitive reagent to the Ca(II) is then measured and concentration determined as a function of the reaction.

  11. Porous polymer film calcium ion chemical sensor and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Porter, M.D.; Chau, L.K.

    1991-02-12

    A method of measuring calcium ions is disclosed wherein a calcium sensitive reagent, calcichrome, is immobilized on a porous polymer film. The reaction of the calcium sensitive reagent to the Ca(II) is then measured and concentration determined as a function of the reaction. 1 figure.

  12. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  13. Comparative study of ZnO nanorods and thin films for chemical and biosensing applications and the development of ZnO nanorods based potentiometric strontium ion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khun, K.; Ibupoto, Z. H.; Chey, C. O.; Lu, Jun.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the comparative study of ZnO nanorods and ZnO thin films were performed regarding the chemical and biosensing properties and also ZnO nanorods based strontium ion sensor is proposed. ZnO nanorods were grown on gold coated glass substrates by the hydrothermal growth method and the ZnO thin films were deposited by electro deposition technique. ZnO nanorods and thin films were characterised by field emission electron microscopy [FESEM] and X-ray diffraction [XRD] techniques and this study has shown that the grown nanostructures are highly dense, uniform and exhibited good crystal quality. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy [TEM] was used to investigate the quality of ZnO thin film and we observed that ZnO thin film was comprised of nano clusters. ZnO nanorods and thin films were functionalised with selective strontium ionophore salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone [ST] membrane, galactose oxidase, and lactate oxidase for the detection of strontium ion, galactose and L-lactic acid, respectively. The electrochemical response of both ZnO nanorods and thin films sensor devices was measured by using the potentiometric method. The strontium ion sensor has exhibited good characteristics with a sensitivity of 28.65 ± 0.52 mV/decade, for a wide range of concentrations from 1.00 × 10-6 to 5.00 × 10-2 M, selectivity, reproducibility, stability and fast response time of 10.00 s. The proposed strontium ion sensor was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of strontium ion versus ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid [EDTA]. This comparative study has shown that ZnO nanorods possessed better performance with high sensitivity and low limit of detection due to high surface area to volume ratio as compared to the flat surface of ZnO thin films.

  14. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  15. Effect of RF power and annealing on chemical bonding and morphology of a-CN{sub x} thin films as humidity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, N. F. H; Hussain, N. S. Mohamed; Awang, R.; Ritikos, R.; Kamal, S. A. A.

    2013-11-27

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films were deposited using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) technique. A set of a-CN{sub x} thin films were prepared using pure methane (CH{sub 4}) gas diluted with nitrogen (N{sub 2}) gas. The rf power was varied at 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 W. These films were then annealed at 400 °C in a quartz tube furnace in argon (Ar) gas. The effects of rf power and thermal annealing on the chemical bonding and morphology of these samples were studied. Surface profilometer was used to measure film thickness. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) measurements were used to determine their chemical bonding and morphology respectively. The deposition rate of the films increased constantly with increasing rf power up to 80W, before decreasing with further increase in rf power. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) studies showed a systematic change in the spectra and revealed three main peaks included C-N, C=N, C=C and C≡N triple bond. C=N and C≡N bonds decreased with increased C-N bonds after thermal annealing process. The FESEM images showed that the structure is porous for as-deposited and covered by granule-like grain structure after thermal annealing process was done. The resistance of the a-CN{sub x} thin film changed from 23.765 kΩ to 5.845 kΩ in the relative humidity range of 5 to 92 % and the film shows a good response and repeatability as a humidity sensing materials. This work showed that rf power and thermal annealing has significant effects on the chemical bonding and surface morphology of the a-CN{sub x} films and but yield films which are potential candidate as humidity sensor device.

  16. Chemical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  17. Small-Area, Resistive Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Sensors Using Metal-Polymer Hybrid Film Based on Oxidative Chemical Vapor Deposition (oCVD).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Hou, Sichao; Goktas, Hilal; Kovacik, Peter; Yaul, Frank; Paidimarri, Arun; Ickes, Nathan; Chandrakasan, Anantha; Gleason, Karen

    2015-08-01

    We report a novel room temperature methanol sensor comprised of gold nanoparticles covalently attached to the surface of conducting copolymer films. The copolymer films are synthesized by oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD), allowing substrate-independent deposition, good polymer conductivity and stability. Two different oCVD copolymers are examined: poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-co-thiophene-3-aceticacid)[poly(EDOT-co-TAA)] and poly(3,4-ehylenedioxythiophene-co-thiophene-3-ethanol)[poly(EDOT-co-3-TE)]. Covalent attachment of gold nanoparticles to the functional groups of the oCVD films results in a hybrid system with efficient sensing response to methanol. The response of the poly(EDOT-co-TAA)/Au devices is found to be superior to that of the other copolymer, confirming the importance of the linker molecules (4-aminothiophenol) in the sensing behavior. Selectivity of the sensor to methanol over n-pentane, acetone, and toluene is demonstrated. Direct fabrication on a printed circuit board (PCB) is achieved, resulting in an improved electrical contact of the organic resistor to the metal circuitry and thus enhanced sensing properties. The simplicity and low fabrication cost of the resistive element, mild working temperature, together with its compatibility with PCB substrates pave the way for its straightforward integration into electronic devices, such as wireless sensor networks. PMID:26176840

  18. [The recent development of fiber-optic chemical sensor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wei, Jian-ping; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Li-wei; Yang, Xue-feng

    2014-08-01

    The present article provides a brief review of recent research on fiber-optic chemical sensor technology and the future development trends. Especially, fiber-optic pH chemical sensor, fiber-optic ion chemicl sensor, and fiber-optic gas chemical sensor are introduced respectively. Sensing film preparation methods such as chemical bonding method and sol-gel method were briefly reviewed. The emergence of new type fiber-microstructured optical fiber opened up a new development direction for fiber-optic chemical sensor. Because of its large inner surface area, flexible design of structure, having internal sensing places in fibers, it has rapidly become an important development direction and research focus of the fiber-optic chemical sensors. The fiber-optic chemical sensor derived from microstructured optical fiber is also discussed in detail. Finally, we look to the future of the fiber-optic chemical sensor.

  19. Development of a thin film solid state gaseous HCl sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The selection of materials to develop a thin film HCl sensor is discussed. Data were primarily concerned with chemical and physical properties of the film and with electrical properties which exhibit and enhance electrical response when HCl is absorbed on the film surface. Techniques investigated for enhancing electrical response include changing conditions for growing films, adding impurities to the film, changing ambient light intensity, and altering the ambient temperature of the sensing element.

  20. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  1. Chemical gas sensor array dataset.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Huerta, Ramón

    2015-06-01

    To address drift in chemical sensing, an extensive dataset was collected over a period of three years. An array of 16 metal-oxide gas sensors was exposed to six different volatile organic compounds at different concentration levels under tightly-controlled operating conditions. Moreover, the generated dataset is suitable to tackle a variety of challenges in chemical sensing such as sensor drift, sensor failure or system calibration. The data is related to "Chemical gas sensor drift compensation using classifier ensembles", by Vergara et al. [1], and "On the calibration of sensor arrays for pattern recognition using the minimal number of experiments", by Rodriguez-Lujan et al. [2] The dataset can be accessed publicly at the UCI repository upon citation of: http://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/datasets/Gas+Sensor+Array+Drift+Dataset+at+Different+Concentrations.

  2. Micromachined chemical sensor with integrated microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Sniegowski, J.; Koehler, D.; Ricco, T.; Martin, S.; McWhorter, P.

    1992-12-31

    With today`s continued emphasis on environmental safety and health issues, a resurgence of interest has developed in the area of chemical sensors. These sensors would typically be used to monitor contamination hazards such as underground storage tanks or to assess previous contamination at waste disposal sites. Human exposure to chemical hazards can also be monitored. Additionally, these sensors can be used as part of a manufacturing process control loop. One type of sensor suitable for gas phase monitoring of chemicals is the quartz resonator or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor. In this type of sensor, a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator is coated with a film that interacts with the chemical species of interest. Changes in the mass and elasticity of this film are reflected as changes in the resonant properties of the device. Therefore, the presence of the species of interest can be detected by monitoring the frequency of an oscillator based on the resonance of the quartz. These QCM sensors compete with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices as a means for monitoring gas phase species. SAW devices are typically more sensitive to small amounts of a species, but the instrumentation associated with a SAW device is an order of magnitude more expensive than the instrumentation associated with a TSM wave resonator since the SAW devices operate in the 100`s of MHz frequency regime while quartz resonators operate in the 5--25 MHz regime. We are working to improve the sensitivity of the QCM sensor by increasing the frequency of the device to 25 MHz (compared to the typical 5 MHz crystal) and by increasing the frequency stability of the system to an ultimate goal of 0.1 Hz. The 25 MHz QCM has already been achieved and once the stability goal is achieved, the QCM will have the same sensitivity as a SAW device.

  3. Micromachined chemical sensor with integrated microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Sniegowski, J.; Koehler, D.; Ricco, T.; Martin, S.; McWhorter, P.

    1992-01-01

    With today's continued emphasis on environmental safety and health issues, a resurgence of interest has developed in the area of chemical sensors. These sensors would typically be used to monitor contamination hazards such as underground storage tanks or to assess previous contamination at waste disposal sites. Human exposure to chemical hazards can also be monitored. Additionally, these sensors can be used as part of a manufacturing process control loop. One type of sensor suitable for gas phase monitoring of chemicals is the quartz resonator or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor. In this type of sensor, a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator is coated with a film that interacts with the chemical species of interest. Changes in the mass and elasticity of this film are reflected as changes in the resonant properties of the device. Therefore, the presence of the species of interest can be detected by monitoring the frequency of an oscillator based on the resonance of the quartz. These QCM sensors compete with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices as a means for monitoring gas phase species. SAW devices are typically more sensitive to small amounts of a species, but the instrumentation associated with a SAW device is an order of magnitude more expensive than the instrumentation associated with a TSM wave resonator since the SAW devices operate in the 100's of MHz frequency regime while quartz resonators operate in the 5--25 MHz regime. We are working to improve the sensitivity of the QCM sensor by increasing the frequency of the device to 25 MHz (compared to the typical 5 MHz crystal) and by increasing the frequency stability of the system to an ultimate goal of 0.1 Hz. The 25 MHz QCM has already been achieved and once the stability goal is achieved, the QCM will have the same sensitivity as a SAW device.

  4. Chemical sensors for space applications.

    PubMed

    Bonting, S L

    1992-01-01

    There will be a great need for a wide variety of chemical analyses, both for biomedical experimentation and for the monitoring of water and air recycling processes on Space Station Freedom and later long-term space missions. The infrequent logistics flights of the Space Shuttle will necessitate onboard analysis. Chemical sensors offer several advantages over conventional analysis onboard a spacecraft. They require less crew time, space, and power. A chemical sensor consists of a selector which selectively interacts with the analyte present in a mixture of substances, and a transducer which produces an electric signal in response to the interaction of analyte and selector. The transducer signal thus provides a quantitative and selective measurement of the analyte. Types and requirements for chemical sensors to be used in biomedical experimentation and monitoring of water recycling during long-term space missions are discussed. With chemical sensors, a wide variety of analytes can be determined selectively without separation steps. In principle, chemical sensors can provide (near) real-time monitoring of many important analytes. In some cases they can even provide continuous monitoring of such analytes. The sensors, and even the ancillary instruments, are small compared to conventional analytical instruments. Their power consumption is low. Sensor measurements do not require extensive sample treatment before analysis. In most cases a sensor can simply be inserted in, or be attached to, the organism; or be placed in the water flowing through the water recycling system. Since the sensor signal can usually be provided in digitized form, rapid transmission to the ground is possible. The use of sensors thus provides an efficient use of the scarce resources of crew time, pressurized volume, and power.

  5. Photopolymerization-based fabrication of chemical sensing films

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Xiaoguang; Swanson, Basil I.; Du, Xian-Xian

    2003-12-30

    A photopolymerization method is disclosed for attaching a chemical microsensor film to an oxide surface including the steps of pretreating the oxide surface to form a functionalized surface, coating the functionalized surface with a prepolymer solution, and polymerizing the prepolymer solution with ultraviolet light to form the chemical microsensor film. The method also allows the formation of molecular imprinted films by photopolymerization. Formation of multilayer sensing films and patterned films is allowed by the use of photomasking techniques to allow patterning of multiple regions of a selected sensing film, or creating a sensor surface containing several films designed to detect different compounds.

  6. Flush Mounting Of Thin-Film Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Technique developed for mounting thin-film sensors flush with surfaces like aerodynamic surfaces of aircraft, which often have compound curvatures. Sensor mounted in recess by use of vacuum pad and materials selected for specific application. Technique involves use of materials tailored to thermal properties of substrate in which sensor mounted. Together with customized materials, enables flush mounting of thin-film sensors in most situations in which recesses for sensors provided. Useful in both aircraft and automotive industries.

  7. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  8. Thin-film spectroscopic sensor

    DOEpatents

    Burgess, Jr., Lloyd W.; Goldman, Don S.

    1992-01-01

    There is disclosed an integrated spectrometer for chemical analysis by evanescent electromagnetic radiation absorption in a reaction volume. The spectrometer comprises a noninteractive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device. There is further disclosed a chemical sensor to determine the pressure and concentration of a chemical species in a mixture comprising an interactive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device.

  9. A remotely interrogatable sensor for chemical monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoyanov, P. G.; Doherty, S. A.; Grimes, C. A.; Seitz, W. R.

    1998-01-01

    A new type of continuously operating, in-situ, remotely monitored sensor is presented. The sensor is comprised of a thin film array of magnetostatically coupled, magnetically soft ferromagnetic thin film structures, adhered to or encased within a thin polymer layer. The polymer is made so that it swells or shrinks in response to the chemical analyte of interest, which in this case is pH. As the polymer swells or shrinks, the magnetostatic coupling between the magnetic elements changes, resulting in changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the sensor. Placed within a sinusoidal magnetic field the magnetization vector of the coupled sensor elements periodically reverses directions, generating magnetic flux that can be remotely detected as a series of voltage spikes in appropriately placed pickup coils. one preliminary sensor design consists of four triangles, initially spaced approximately 50 micrometers apart, arranged to form a 12 mm x 12 mm square with the triangle tips centered at a common origin. Our preliminary work has focused on monitoring of pH using a lightly crosslinked pH sensitive polymer layer of hydroxyethylmethacrylate and 2-(dimethylamino) ethylmethacrylate. As the polymer swells or shrinks the magnetostatic coupling between the triangles changes, resulting in measurable changes in the amplitude of the detected voltage spirits.

  10. A remotely interrogatable sensor for chemical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, P G; Doherty, S A; Grimes, C A; Seitz, W R

    1998-07-01

    A new type of continuously operating, in-situ, remotely monitored sensor is presented. The sensor is comprised of a thin film array of magnetostatically coupled, magnetically soft ferromagnetic thin film structures, adhered to or encased within a thin polymer layer. The polymer is made so that it swells or shrinks in response to the chemical analyte of interest, which in this case is pH. As the polymer swells or shrinks, the magnetostatic coupling between the magnetic elements changes, resulting in changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the sensor. Placed within a sinusoidal magnetic field the magnetization vector of the coupled sensor elements periodically reverses directions, generating magnetic flux that can be remotely detected as a series of voltage spikes in appropriately placed pickup coils. one preliminary sensor design consists of four triangles, initially spaced approximately 50 micrometers apart, arranged to form a 12 mm x 12 mm square with the triangle tips centered at a common origin. Our preliminary work has focused on monitoring of pH using a lightly crosslinked pH sensitive polymer layer of hydroxyethylmethacrylate and 2-(dimethylamino) ethylmethacrylate. As the polymer swells or shrinks the magnetostatic coupling between the triangles changes, resulting in measurable changes in the amplitude of the detected voltage spirits. PMID:11543123

  11. Flexible thin film magnetoimpedance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Fernández, E.; Svalov, A.; Burgoa Beitia, A.; García-Arribas, A.; Larrañaga, A.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetically soft thin film deposited onto polymer substrates is an attractive option for flexible electronics including magnetoimpedance (MI) applications. MI FeNi/Ti based thin film sensitive elements were designed and prepared using the sputtering technique by deposition onto rigid and flexible substrates at different deposition rates. Their structure, magnetic properties and MI were comparatively analyzed. The main structural features were sufficiently accurately reproduced in the case of deposition onto cyclo olefine polymer substrates compared to glass substrates for the same conditions. Although for the best condition (28 nm/min rate) of the deposition onto polymer a significant reduction of the MI field sensitivity was found satisfactory for sensor applications sensitivity: 45%/Oe was obtained for a frequency of 60 MHz.

  12. Chemical sensor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A chemical sensing apparatus and method for the detection of sub parts-per-trillion concentrations of molecules in a sample by optimizing electron utilization in the formation of negative ions is provided. A variety of media may be sampled including air, seawater, dry sediment, or undersea sediment. An electrostatic mirror is used to reduce the kinetic energy of an electron beam to zero or near-zero kinetic energy.

  13. Miniature Chemical Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew C. R. Pipino

    2004-12-13

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

  14. Thin-film microelectronic wearable body sensors.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    This review of various applications of well-established thin-film processing techniques to wearable body sensors gives examples of work done in the author's laboratory over many years. Sensors for the vital signs of body temperature, electrocardiogram, heart rate, breathing pattern and breathing rate are presented along with other applications. Thin-film based sensors have the advantage of small size, high surface area to mass ratio, flexibility, capability for batch production, and compatibility with other microelectronic technologies.

  15. Prospecting for toxic gases with gold film sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, K.A.

    1988-12-01

    This paper reports on a gold film sensor that detects such toxic chemicals as mercury in quantities of parts per million or parts per billion. The gold films, many times thinner than a human hair, are the key to the sensor, because gold - an inert, stable, fairly unreactive: element - is unaffected by interferences from aromatic hydrocarbons (sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide) or water vapor. These gold film sensors are used for mercury detection in such places as hospitals, laboratories and sites where batteries, caustic soda, thermometers, fluorescent lights or photographic equipment are manufactured. The sensor also detects hydrogen sulfide, an application developed in 1982 for the control of odor and corrosion in paper and pulp mills, sewage treatment plants, oil refineries, and smelters.

  16. Chemical sensors based on micromachined transducers with integrated piezoresistive readout.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Leach, Andrew; Morris, William G; Gamage, Sisira Kankanam

    2006-08-15

    We demonstrate an approach for the development of chemical sensors utilizing silicon micromachined physical transducers with integrated piezoresistive readout. Originally, these transducers were developed and optimized as sensitive accelerometers for automotive applications. However, by applying a chemically responsive layer onto the transducer, we convert these transducers into chemical sensors. These transducers are attractive for chemical sensing applications for several key reasons. First, the required sensitivity of the chemical sensor can be achieved by choosing the right spring constant of the transducer. Second, the integrated piezoresistive readout of the transducer is already optimized and is very straightforward, providing a desired reproducibility in measurements, while not requiring bulky equipment. Third, chemically responsive film deposition is simple due to the ease of access to the transducer's surface. Fourth, such transducers are already available for another (automotive) application, making these sensors very cost-effective. The applicability of this approach is illustrated by the fabrication of highly sensitive CO2 sensors. To study hysteresis effects, we selected high CO2 concentrations (10-100% CO2) to provide the worst-case scenario for the sensor operation. These sensors demonstrate a hysteresis-free performance over the concentration range from 10 to 100% vol CO2, have detection limits of 160-370 ppm of CO2, and exhibit a relatively rapid response time, T(90) = 45 s. Importantly, we demonstrate a simple method for cancellation of vibration effects when these physical transducers, initially developed as accelerometers, are applied as chemical sensors. PMID:16906705

  17. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  18. Thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine: Structure and sensor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyamer, Darya D.; Sukhikh, Aleksandr S.; Krasnov, Pavel O.; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Morozova, Natalya B.; Basova, Tamara V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, thin films of tetrafluorosubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPcF4) were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition and their structure was studied using UV-vis, polarization dependent Raman spectroscopy, XRD and atomic force microscopy. Quantum chemical calculations (DFT) have been employed in order to determine the detailed assignment of the bands in the CoPcF4 IR and Raman spectra. The electrical sensor response of CoPcF4 films to ammonia vapours was investigated and compared with that of unsubstituted cobalt phthalocyanine films. In order to explain the difference in sensitivity of the unsubstituted and fluorinated phthalocyanines to ammonia, the nature and properties of chemical binding between CoPc derivatives and NH3 were described by quantum-chemical calculations utilizing DFT method. The effect of post-deposition annealing on surface morphology and gas sensing properties of CoPcF4 films was also studied.

  19. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for High Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Laster, Kimala L.

    2008-01-01

    The need for sensors to operate in harsh environments is illustrated by the need for measurements in the turbine engine hot section. The degradation and damage that develops over time in hot section components can lead to catastrophic failure. At present, the degradation processes that occur in the harsh hot section environment are poorly characterized, which hinders development of more durable components, and since it is so difficult to model turbine blade temperatures, strains, etc, actual measurements are needed. The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in harsh environments. The effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines is described, first in the fan and compressor modules, and then in the hot section. The near-term goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. A thorough literature search was conducted for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges chemically and physically compatible with the NASA GRCs microfabrication procedures and substrate materials. Test results are given for tantalum, titanium and zirconium-based nitride and oxynitride ceramic films.

  20. Thin film porous membranes for catalytic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Boyle, T.J.; Gardner, T.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reports on new and surprising experimental data for catalytic film gas sensing resistors coated with nanoporous sol-gel films to impart selectivity and durability to the sensor structure. This work is the result of attempts to build selectivity and reactivity to the surface of a sensor by modifying it with a series of sol-gel layers. The initial sol-gel SiO{sub 2} layer applied to the sensor surprisingly showed enhanced O{sub 2} interaction with H{sub 2} and reduced susceptibility to poisons such as H{sub 2}S.

  1. Micro-sensor thin-film anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); McGinley, Catherine B. (Inventor); Spina, Eric F. (Inventor); Stephens, Ralph M. (Inventor); Hopson, Jr., Purnell (Inventor); Cruz, Vincent B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device for measuring turbulence in high-speed flows is provided which includes a micro-sensor thin-film probe. The probe is formed from a single crystal of aluminum oxide having a 14.degree. half-wedge shaped portion. The tip of the half-wedge is rounded and has a thin-film sensor attached along the stagnation line. The bottom surface of the half-wedge is tilted upward to relieve shock induced disturbances created by the curved tip of the half-wedge. The sensor is applied using a microphotolithography technique.

  2. Thin films under chemical stress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The goal of work on this project has been develop a set of experimental tools to allow investigators interested in transport, binding, and segregation phenomena in composite thin film structures to study these phenomena in situ. Work to-date has focuses on combining novel spatially-directed optical excitation phenomena, e.g. waveguide eigenmodes in thin dielectric slabs, surface plasmon excitations at metal-dielectric interfaces, with standard spectroscopies to understand dynamic processes in thin films and at interfaces. There have been two main scientific thrusts in the work and an additional technical project. In one thrust we have sought to develop experimental tools which will allow us to understand the chemical and physical changes which take place when thin polymer films are placed under chemical stress. In principle this stress may occur because the film is being swelled by a penetrant entrained in solvent, because interfacial reactions are occurring at one or more boundaries within the film structure, or because some component of the film is responding to an external stimulus (e.g. pH, temperature, electric field, or radiation). However all work to-date has focused on obtaining a clearer understanding penetrant transport phenomena. The other thrust has addressed the kinetics of adsorption of model n-alkanoic acids from organic solvents. Both of these thrusts are important within the context of our long-term goal of understanding the behavior of composite structures, composed of thin organic polymer films interspersed with Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembled monolayers. In addition there has been a good deal of work to develop the local technical capability to fabricate grating couplers for optical waveguide excitation. This work, which is subsidiary to the main scientific goals of the project, has been successfully completed and will be detailed as well. 41 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Organic thin films based sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2006-03-01

    Organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, are particularly interesting because of its potential for various applications including thin film transistors (TFTs), electronic papers, radio frequency identification cards (RFIDs), and sensors. In this paper, we review recent progress in organic electronics with emphasis on their applications for sensing devices, and investigate the morphologies of pentacene films deposited on SiO II and Si surfaces at different substrate temperatures. Scanning electron microcopy (SEM) micrographs from a nominally 50nm-thick pentacene film on SiO II indicate that the grain sizes of pentacene film increase with an increase in substrate temperature. In addition, the grain size on clean silicon grown at a substrate temperature of 100 degrees C is markedly larger that on SiO II, ranging 10~20μm. Based on this morphological investigation on pentacene films, various types of organic sensors and devices with conjunction with interdigitated, gated and ungated structures are presented.

  4. Zinc oxide thin film acoustic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Ali Jasim; Salih, Wafaa Mahdi; Hassan, Marwa Abdul Muhsien; Nusseif, Asmaa Deiaa; Kadhum, Haider Abdullah; Mansour, Hazim Louis

    2013-12-16

    This paper reports the implementation of (750 nm) thickness of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film for the piezoelectric pressure sensors. The film was prepared and deposited employing the spray pyrolysis technique. XRD results show that the growth preferred orientation is the (002) plane. A polycrystalline thin film (close to mono crystallite like) was obtained. Depending on the Scanning Electron Microscopy photogram, the film homogeneity and thickness were shown. The resonance frequency measured (about 19 kHz) and the damping coefficient was calculated and its value was found to be about (2.5538), the thin film be haves as homogeneous for under and over damped. The thin film pressure sensing was approximately exponentially related with frequency, the thin film was observed to has a good response for mechanical stresses also it is a good material for the piezoelectric properties.

  5. Micro-machined thin film hydrogen gas sensor, and method of making and using the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiMeo, Jr., Frank (Inventor); Bhandari, Gautam (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor including a thin film sensor element formed, e.g., by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD), on a microhotplate structure. The thin film sensor element includes a film of a hydrogen-interactive metal film that reversibly interacts with hydrogen to provide a correspondingly altered response characteristic, such as optical transmissivity, electrical conductance, electrical resistance, electrical capacitance, magnetoresistance, photoconductivity, etc., relative to the response characteristic of the film in the absence of hydrogen. The hydrogen-interactive metal film may be overcoated with a thin film hydrogen-permeable barrier layer to protect the hydrogen-interactive film from deleterious interaction with non-hydrogen species. The hydrogen sensor of the invention may be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently configured as a hand-held apparatus.

  6. Fabrication of Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert A.

    1992-01-01

    Prototype thin film heat flux sensors have been constructed and tested. The sensors can be applied to propulsion system materials and components. The sensors can provide steady state and fast transient heat flux information. Fabrication of the sensor does not require any matching of the mounting surface. Heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surfaces of an insulation material. The sensor consists of an array of thermocouples on the upper and lower surfaces of a thin insulating layer. The thermocouples for the sensor are connected in a thermopile arrangement. A 100 thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on silicon wafers. The sensor produced an output voltage of 200-400 microvolts when exposed to a hot air heat gun. A 20 element thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on aluminum oxide sheet. Thermocouples are Pt-Pt/Rh with silicon dioxide as the insulating material. This sensor produced an output of 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a furnace operating at 1000 C. Work is also underway to put this type of heat flux sensor on metal surfaces.

  7. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  8. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  9. Recent Progress in Optical Chemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Hummad Habib; Mohammad, Abu Bakar bin; Akram, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Optical chemical sensors have promoted escalating interest in the determination of various pollutants in the environment, which are creating toxicity and may cause serious health problems. This review paper focuses particularly on the recent progress and developments in this field; the working principles and basic classes of optical chemical sensors have been briefly described. PMID:23443392

  10. Reducing the capacitance of piezoelectric film sensors.

    PubMed

    González, Martín G; Sorichetti, Patricio A; Santiago, Guillermo D

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel design for large area, wideband, polymer piezoelectric sensor with low capacitance. The large area allows better spatial resolution in applications such as photoacoustic tomography and the reduced capacitance eases the design of fast transimpedance amplifiers. The metalized piezoelectric polymer thin film is segmented into N sections, electrically connected in series. In this way, the total capacitance is reduced by a factor 1/N(2), whereas the mechanical response and the active area of the sensor are not modified. We show the construction details for a two-section sensor, together with the impedance spectroscopy and impulse response experimental results that validate the design.

  11. Reducing the capacitance of piezoelectric film sensors.

    PubMed

    González, Martín G; Sorichetti, Patricio A; Santiago, Guillermo D

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel design for large area, wideband, polymer piezoelectric sensor with low capacitance. The large area allows better spatial resolution in applications such as photoacoustic tomography and the reduced capacitance eases the design of fast transimpedance amplifiers. The metalized piezoelectric polymer thin film is segmented into N sections, electrically connected in series. In this way, the total capacitance is reduced by a factor 1/N(2), whereas the mechanical response and the active area of the sensor are not modified. We show the construction details for a two-section sensor, together with the impedance spectroscopy and impulse response experimental results that validate the design. PMID:27131698

  12. Reducing the capacitance of piezoelectric film sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Martín G.; Sorichetti, Patricio A.; Santiago, Guillermo D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel design for large area, wideband, polymer piezoelectric sensor with low capacitance. The large area allows better spatial resolution in applications such as photoacoustic tomography and the reduced capacitance eases the design of fast transimpedance amplifiers. The metalized piezoelectric polymer thin film is segmented into N sections, electrically connected in series. In this way, the total capacitance is reduced by a factor 1/N2, whereas the mechanical response and the active area of the sensor are not modified. We show the construction details for a two-section sensor, together with the impedance spectroscopy and impulse response experimental results that validate the design.

  13. Passive in-situ chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Jonathan S.; Ripley, Edward B.

    2012-02-14

    A chemical sensor for assessing a chemical of interest. In typical embodiments the chemical sensor includes a first thermocouple and second thermocouple. A reactive component is typically disposed proximal to the second thermal couple, and is selected to react with the chemical of interest and generate a temperature variation that may be detected by a comparison of a temperature sensed by the second thermocouple compared with a concurrent temperature detected by the first thermocouple. Further disclosed is a method for assessing a chemical of interest and a method for identifying a reaction temperature for a chemical of interest in a system.

  14. Optical sensors and multisensor arrays containing thin film electroluminescent devices

    DOEpatents

    Aylott, Jonathan W.; Chen-Esterlit, Zoe; Friedl, Jon H.; Kopelman, Raoul; Savvateev, Vadim N.; Shinar, Joseph

    2001-12-18

    Optical sensor, probe and array devices for detecting chemical biological, and physical analytes. The devices include an analyte-sensitive layer optically coupled to a thin film electroluminescent layer which activates the analyte-sensitive layer to provide an optical response. The optical response varies depending upon the presence of an analyte and is detected by a photodetector and analyzed to determine the properties of the analyte.

  15. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.

    2007-01-01

    The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in propulsion system applications. In order to have a more passive method of negating changes of resistance due to temperature, an effort is underway at NASA GRC to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines, specifically in the fan and compressor modules on blades. Other applications include on aircraft hot section structures and on thermal protection systems. The near-term interim goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials to test for viability and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. This goal was achieved by conducting a thorough literature search for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges chemically and physically compatible and selecting potential candidate materials for with NASA GRC's microfabrication procedures and substrates.

  16. Polymers for Chemical Sensors Using Hydrosilylation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Kaganove, Steven N.; Nelson, David A.

    2001-06-28

    Sorbent and functionalized polymers play a key role in a diverse set of fields, including chemical sensors, separation membranes, solid phase extraction techniques, and chromatography. Sorbent polymers are critical to a number of sensor array or "electronic nose" systems. The responses of the sensors in the array give rise to patterns that can be used to distinguish one compound from another, provided that a sufficiently diverse set of sensing materials is present in the array. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of several sensors, each with a different sensor coating, giving rise to variable responses to an analyte that appear as a pattern in bar graph format. Using hydrosilylation as the bond-forming reaction, we have developed a versatile and efficient approach to developing sorbent polymers with diverse interactive properties for sensor applications. Both the chemical and physical properties of these polymers are predictable and tunable by design.

  17. Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2005-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors; 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity; 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. This presentation discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  18. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  19. Vehicle exhaust gas chemical sensors using acoustic wave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Cernosek, R.W.; Small, J.H.; Sawyer, P.S.; Bigbie, J.R.; Anderson, M.T.

    1998-03-01

    Under Sandia`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, novel acoustic wave-based sensors were explored for detecting gaseous chemical species in vehicle exhaust streams. The need exists for on-line, real-time monitors to continuously analyze the toxic exhaust gases -- nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrocarbons (HC) -- for determining catalytic converter efficiency, documenting compliance to emission regulations, and optimizing engine performance through feedback control. In this project, the authors adapted existing acoustic wave chemical sensor technology to the high temperature environment and investigated new robust sensor materials for improving gas detection sensitivity and selectivity. This report describes one new sensor that has potential use as an exhaust stream residual hydrocarbon monitor. The sensor consists of a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator coated with a thin mesoporous silica layer ion-exchanged with palladium ions. When operated at temperatures above 300 C, the high surface area film catalyzes the combustion of the hydrocarbon vapors in the presence of oxygen. The sensor acts as a calorimeter as the exothermic reaction slightly increases the temperature, stressing the sensor surface, and producing a measurable deviation in the resonator frequency. Sensitivities as high as 0.44 (ppm-{Delta}f) and (ppm-gas) have been measured for propylene gas, with minimum detectable signals of < 50 ppm of propylene at 500 C.

  20. Fiber optic chemical sensors on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Grunthaner, F.J.; Lane, A.L.

    1993-12-31

    A fiber optic chemical sensing instrument is described that will measure the reactivity of the martian soil and atmosphere. The self- contained instrument monitors reflectivity changes in reactive thin films caused by chemical reactions with the martian soil or atmosphere. Data from over 200 separate thin-film-coated optical fibers are recorded simultaneously. This fiber optic sensing technology has many advantages for planetary exploration and monitoring applications on manned spacecraft, in addition to many practical terrestrial uses.

  1. Chemical sensors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1992-07-01

    The payload of the Space Station Freedom will include sensors for frequent monitoring of the water recycling process and for measuring the many biochemical parameters related to onboard experiments. This paper describes the sensor technologies and the types of transducers and selectors considered for these sensors. Particular attention is given to such aspects of monitoring of the water recycling process as the types of water use, the sources of water and their hazards, the sensor systems for monitoring, microbial monitoring, and monitoring toxic metals and organics. An approach for monitoring water recycling is suggested, which includes microbial testing with a potentiometric device (which should be in first line of tests), the use of an ion-selective electrode for inorganic ion determinations, and the use of optic fiber techniques for the determination of total organic carbon.

  2. Chemical sensors for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1992-01-01

    The payload of the Space Station Freedom will include sensors for frequent monitoring of the water recycling process and for measuring the many biochemical parameters related to onboard experiments. This paper describes the sensor technologies and the types of transducers and selectors considered for these sensors. Particular attention is given to such aspects of monitoring of the water recycling process as the types of water use, the sources of water and their hazards, the sensor systems for monitoring, microbial monitoring, and monitoring toxic metals and organics. An approach for monitoring water recycling is suggested, which includes microbial testing with a potentiometric device (which should be in first line of tests), the use of an ion-selective electrode for inorganic ion determinations, and the use of optic fiber techniques for the determination of total organic carbon.

  3. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for Harsh Environments: Identification of Candidate Thin Film Ceramics to Test for Viability for Static Strain Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in propulsion system applications. In order to have a more passive method of negating changes of resistance due to temperature, an effort is underway at NASA GRC to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines, specifically in the fan and compressor modules on blades. Other applications include on aircraft hot section structures and on thermal protection systems. The near-term interim goal of this research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials to test for viability and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. This goal was achieved by a thorough literature search for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges, reviewing potential candidate materials for chemical & physical compatibility with NASA GRC's microfabrication procedures and substrates.

  4. Enhanced chemical weapon warning via sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Michael; Pritchett, Daniel; Cothren, Brian; Schwaiger, James

    2011-05-01

    Torch Technologies Inc., is actively involved in chemical sensor networking and data fusion via multi-year efforts with Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The objective of these efforts is to develop innovative concepts and advanced algorithms that enhance our national Chemical Warfare (CW) test and warning capabilities via the fusion of traditional and non-traditional CW sensor data. Under Phase I, II, and III Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contracts with DPG, Torch developed the Advanced Chemical Release Evaluation System (ACRES) software to support non real-time CW sensor data fusion. Under Phase I and II SBIRs with DTRA in conjunction with the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Torch is using the DPG ACRES CW sensor data fuser as a framework from which to develop the Cloud state Estimation in a Networked Sensor Environment (CENSE) data fusion system. Torch is currently developing CENSE to implement and test innovative real-time sensor network based data fusion concepts using CW and non-CW ancillary sensor data to improve CW warning and detection in tactical scenarios.

  5. Magnetoelectric sensor excitations in hexaferrite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Saba; Rabinowitz, Jake; Izadkhah, Hessam; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Vittoria, Carmine

    2015-05-01

    We developed techniques for H- and E-field sensors utilizing single phase magnetoelectric (ME) hexaferrite thin films in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 10 MHz. The technique incorporating solenoid coils and multi-capacitors bank was developed to probe the physics and properties of ME hexaferrite film and explore ME effects for sensor detections and tunable device applications. For H-field sensing, we obtained sensitivity of 4 × 10-4 V/Gm and for E-field sensing the sensitivity was 10-3 Gm/V. Tunability of up to 6% was achieved for tunable inductor applications. The proposed fabrication designs lend themselves to significant (˜106) improvements in sensitivity and tunability.

  6. Developing Multilayer Thin Film Strain Sensors With High Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III

    2006-01-01

    A multilayer thin film strain sensor for large temperature range use is under development using a reactively-sputtered process. The sensor is capable of being fabricated in fine line widths utilizing the sacrificial-layer lift-off process that is used for micro-fabricated noble-metal sensors. Tantalum nitride films were optimized using reactive sputtering with an unbalanced magnetron source. A first approximation model of multilayer resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance was used to set the film thicknesses in the multilayer film sensor. Two multifunctional sensors were fabricated using multilayered films of tantalum nitride and palladium chromium, and tested for low temperature resistivity, TCR and strain response. The low temperature coefficient of resistance of the films will result in improved stability in thin film sensors for low to high temperature use.

  7. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  8. Note: Durability analysis of optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on Pd-Y alloy film.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng-cheng; Chen, You-ping; Zhang, Gang; Song, Han; Liu, Yi

    2016-02-01

    The Pd-Y alloy sensing film has an excellent property for hydrogen detection, but just for one month, the sensing film's property decreases seriously. To study the failure of the sensing film, the XPS spectra analysis was used to explore the chemical content of the Pd-Y alloy film, and analysis results demonstrate that the yttrium was oxidized. The paper presented that such an oxidized process was the potential reason of the failure of the sensing film. By understanding the reason of the failure of the sensing film better, we could improve the manufacturing process to enhance the property of hydrogen sensor. PMID:26931903

  9. Thermal luminescence spectroscopy chemical imaging sensor.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Buican, Tudor N; Roese, Erik S; Sutter, James; Samuels, Alan C

    2012-10-01

    The authors present a pseudo-active chemical imaging sensor model embodying irradiative transient heating, temperature nonequilibrium thermal luminescence spectroscopy, differential hyperspectral imaging, and artificial neural network technologies integrated together. We elaborate on various optimizations, simulations, and animations of the integrated sensor design and apply it to the terrestrial chemical contamination problem, where the interstitial contaminant compounds of detection interest (analytes) comprise liquid chemical warfare agents, their various derivative condensed phase compounds, and other material of a life-threatening nature. The sensor must measure and process a dynamic pattern of absorptive-emissive middle infrared molecular signature spectra of subject analytes to perform its chemical imaging and standoff detection functions successfully. PMID:23033092

  10. Nanoplasmonic sensor for chemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovine, R.; La Spada, L.; Vegni, L.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper plasmonic nanoparticles arranged in an array configuration for the detection of glycerol concentration in aqueous solution, are presented. Glycerol concentration measurement is crucial for several application fields, such as biomedical engineering, medicine and biofuels fabrication. The detection of glycerol presence in aqueous solution is not simple, due to the fact that its refractive index shows small changes when different concentrations are considered. For this purpose, an LSPR (Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance) sensor, based on near field interaction of non-spherical dielectric-filled metallic particles (nanoshell) deposited on a silica substrate, is proposed. In this configuration an enhancement of the LSPR phenomenon with high sensitivity performances and a uniform near electric field distribution are obtained. In this way a shift in the position of the sensor response is related to the different concentration of the material under test. Numerical results, performed by full-wave simulations, show that the sensor can be used for the recognition of glycerol and its concentration in a highly accurate and sensitive way.

  11. Graphene Chemical Sensor for Heliophysics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Mahmooda; Herrero, Fred; Khazanov, George

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms that offer a unique set of advantages as a chemical sensor due to a number of its inherent properties. Graphene has been explored as a gas sensor for a variety of gases, and molecular sensitivity has been demonstrated by measuring the change in electrical properties due to the adsorption of target species. In this paper, we discuss the development of an array of chemical sensors based on graphene and its relevance to plasma physics due to its sensitivity to radical species such as oxonium, hydron and the corresponding neutrals. We briefly discuss the great impact such sensors will have on a number of heliophysics applications such as ground-based manifestations of space weather.

  12. Chemical Sensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Mike J.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an overview of sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures. While nanostructures such as nanorods show significan t potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of s ignificant technical challenges remain. The major issues addressed in this work revolve around the ability to make workable sensors. This paper discusses efforts to address three technical barriers related t o the application of nanostructures into sensor systems: 1) Improving contact of the nanostructured materials with electrodes in a microse nsor structure; 2) Controling nanostructure crystallinity to allow co ntrol of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by using different nanostructured materials. It is concluded that while this work demonstrates useful tools for furt her development, these are just the beginning steps towards realizati on of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostr uctures.

  13. Chemical sensors technology development planning workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bastiaans, G.J.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Junk, G.A.

    1993-03-01

    The workshop participants were asked to: (1) Assess the current capabilities of chemical sensor technologies for addressing US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) needs; (2) Estimate potential near term (one to two years) and intermediate term (three to five years) capabilities for addressing those needs; and (3) Generate a ranked list of specific recommendations on what research and development (R&D) should be funded to provide the necessary capabilities. The needs were described in terms of two pervasive EM problems, the in situ determination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and selected metals in various matrices at DOE sites. The R&D recommendations were to be ranked according to the estimated likelihood that the product technology will be ready for application within the time frame it is needed and the estimated return on investment. The principal conclusions and recommendations of the workshop are as follows: Chemical sensors capable of in situ determinations can significantly reduce analytical costs; Chemical sensors have been developed for certain VOCs in gases and water but none are currently capable of in situ determination of VOCs in soils; The DOE need for in situ determination of metals in soils cannot be addressed with existing chemical sensors and the prospects for their availability in three to five years are uncertain; Adaptation, if necessary, and field application of laboratory analytical instruments and those few chemical sensors that are already in field testing is the best approach for the near term; The chemical sensor technology development plan should include balanced support for near- and intermediate-term efforts.

  14. Thin film hydrogen sensors: A materials processing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Raviprakash

    Hydrogen (H2) is consumed and produced in large quantities by chemical, petroleum, plastic, space and glass industries. Detection and quantitative estimation of H2 in a reliable and efficient manner is of great value in these applications, not only from a safety stand point but also economically beneficial. Hence the requirement for a simple but efficient hydrogen sensor. The simplest hydrogen sensors are based on monitoring changes in electrical properties of group VIII transition metals, especially palladium (Pd). Hydrogen adsorbs on Pd surface and diffuses into its bulk altering its electrical and optical properties. This variation is used to detect/estimate hydrogen in the ambience. However, at high hydrogen concentrations palladium undergoes a phase change. This causes an expansion of the lattice---a problem for fabricating reliable sensors using this metal. This problem was overcome by alloying palladium with nickel. Currently, sensors made from palladium alloy thin films (resistors and FET's) can detect/estimate hydrogen from ppm to 100% concentrations. However, these sensors are affected by the total gas pressure and other gases like carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO 2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S). This work, for most part deals with resistors (chemiresistors). Resistors estimate hydrogen by correlating the change in resistance to the hydrogen concentration. Magnetron sputtering enables the deposition of films of different compositions and morphology. In this work, Pd and Pd/Ni alloy thin films resistors were fabricated by sputtering. Morphology was seen to have a significant effect on the hydrogen sensing property of these films. In presence of CO the response of these sensors are extremely sluggish, however by employing SiO2 barrier layer the response was greatly improved. It was noted that despite the sluggish response, the signal from the chemiresistors did saturate to same level as seen in absence of CO from gas mixture; contrary to the earlier

  15. Uncoated microcantilevers as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.

    2001-01-01

    A method and device are provided for chemical sensing using cantilevers that do not use chemically deposited, chemically specific layers. This novel device utilizes the adsorption-induced variation in the surfaces states on a cantilever. The methodology involves exciting charge carriers into or out of the surface states with photons having increasing discrete levels of energy. The excitation energy is provided as discrete levels of photon energy by scanning the wavelength of an exciting source that is illuminating the cantilever surface. When the charge carriers are excited into or out of the surface states, the cantilever bending changes due to changes in surface stress. The amount of cantilever bending with respect to an identical cantilever as a function of excitation energy is used to determine the energy levels associated with adsorbates.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Based Chemical Sensors for Space and Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2009-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using photolithography and thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to nitrogen dioxide, acetone, benzene, nitrotoluene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing of carbon nanotubes in our sensor platform can be understood by intra- and inter-tube electron modulation in terms of charge transfer mechanisms. As a result of the charge transfer, the conductance of p-type or hole-richer SWNTs in air will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost. Additionally, a wireless capability of such a sensor chip can be used for networked mobile and fixed-site detection and warning systems for military bases, facilities and battlefield areas.

  17. Pd/CeO2/SiC Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Weijie; Collins, W. Eugene

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanostructured interfacial layers of CeO2 has been proposed to enhance the performances of Pd/SiC Schottky diodes used to sense hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures. If successful, this development could prove beneficial in numerous applications in which there are requirements to sense hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures: examples include monitoring of exhaust gases from engines and detecting fires. Sensitivity and thermal stability are major considerations affecting the development of high-temperature chemical sensors. In the case of a metal/SiC Schottky diode for a number of metals, the SiC becomes more chemically active in the presence of the thin metal film on the SiC surface at high temperature. This increase in chemical reactivity causes changes in chemical composition and structure of the metal/SiC interface. The practical effect of the changes is to alter the electronic and other properties of the device in such a manner as to degrade its performance as a chemical sensor. To delay or prevent these changes, it is necessary to limit operation to a temperature <450 C for these sensor structures. The present proposal to incorporate interfacial CeO2 films is based partly on the observation that nanostructured materials in general have potentially useful electrical properties, including an ability to enhance the transfer of electrons. In particular, nanostructured CeO2, that is CeO2 with nanosized grains, has shown promise for incorporation into hightemperature electronic devices. Nanostructured CeO2 films can be formed on SiC and have been shown to exhibit high thermal stability on SiC, characterized by the ability to withstand temperatures somewhat greater than 700 C for limited times. The exchanges of oxygen between CeO2 and SiC prevent the formation of carbon and other chemical species that are unfavorable for operation of a SiC-based Schottky diode as a chemical sensor. Consequently, it is anticipated that in a Pd

  18. Superconductive thin film makes convenient liquid helium level sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, H. H.

    1968-01-01

    Sensor consisting of superconductive film mounted on a dipstick measures the level of liquid helium in a Dewar flask. The sensor is made by depositing a thin film of niobium metal to a thickness of 2000 angstroms on a quartz substrate, which is then mounted on a graduated dipstick.

  19. Detecting insect infestation with poly3-hexylthiophenethin thin film sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerakoon, Kanchana; Li, Suiquing; Shu, Hungjen J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2009-05-01

    The financial losses and destruction of crops due to insect infestation in the United States are estimated by the USDA to exceed 20 billion dollars annually. Much of these losses could be avoided by having a sensor that could effectively identify the early stages of insect infestation. However, traditional detection methods are time consuming, require trained personnel, and are not sufficient for early detection. Several previous research studies showed that emitting organic volatile compounds is a defensive mechanism activated by some plant species after being attacked by herbivores and parasites. Corn, cotton, pine, Brussels sprouts when attacked by Beet army worm, spider mites, bark beetles and caterpillars respectively, emits different blends of plant volatiles including γ-terpinene, α-pinene, p-cymene, farnesene, limonene and cis-hexenyl acetate, with a concentration of about 50 ppm. Therefore, monitoring for these volatile compounds may enable on-site early detection of insect infestations. In this study, a chemical resistor sensor to detect plant volatiles was designed and fabricated. The sensor platform consists of micro electronically fabricated interdigitated electrodes. On to this platform, a poly3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) thin film was deposited, using a spin coater at 8000 rpm for 30 seconds. The sensor was tested and found to be sensitive to a variety of plant volatiles, including γ-terpinene, α-pinene, p-cymene, farnesene, limonene and cis-hexenyl acetate at room temperature. These vapors interacted with the P3HT film causing an increase in the resistance of the sensor by more than one order of magnitude

  20. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Liu, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical sensors often need to be specifically designed (or tailored) to operate in a given environment. It is often the case that a chemical sensor that meets the needs of one application will not function adequately in another application. The more demanding the environment and specialized the requirement, the greater the need to adapt exiting sensor technologies to meet these requirements or, as necessary, develop new sensor technologies. Aerospace (aeronautic and space) applications are particularly challenging since often these applications have specifications which have not previously been the emphasis of commercial suppliers. Further, the chemical sensing needs of aerospace applications have changed over the years to reflect the changing emphasis of society. Three chemical sensing applications of particular interest to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which illustrate these trends are launch vehicle leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire detection. Each of these applications reflects efforts ongoing throughout NASA. As described in NASA's "Three Pillars for Success", a document which outlines NASA's long term response to achieve the nation's priorities in aerospace transportation, agency wide objectives include: improving safety and decreasing the cost of space travel, significantly decreasing the amount of emissions produced by aeronautic engines, and improving the safety of commercial airline travel. As will be discussed below, chemical sensing in leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire detection will help enable the agency to meet these objectives. Each application has vastly different problems associated with the measurement of chemical species. Nonetheless, the development of a common base technology can address the measurement needs of a number of applications.

  1. Thin-film Sensors for Space Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Englund, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    SSME components such as the turbine blades of the high pressure fuel turbopump are subjected to rapid and extreme thermal transients that contribute to blade cracking and subsequent failure. The objective was to develop thin film sensors for SSME components. The technology established for aircraft gas turbine engines was adopted to the materials and environment encountered in the SSME. Specific goals are to expand the existing thin film sensor technology, to continue developing improved sensor processing techniques, and to test the durability of aircraft gas turbine engine technology in the SSME environment. A thin film sensor laboratory is being installed in a refurbished clean room, and new sputtering and photoresist exposure equipment is being acquired. Existing thin film thermocouple technology in an SSME environment are being tested. Various coatings and their insulating films are being investigated for use in sensor development.

  2. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  3. Photonic crystal fiber based chloride chemical sensors for corrosion monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Heming; Tao, Chuanyi; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of steel is one of the most important durability issues in reinforced concrete (RC) structures because aggressive ions such as chloride ions permeate concrete and corrode steel, consequently accelerating the destruction of structures, especially in marine environments. There are many practical methods for corrosion monitoring in RC structures, mostly focusing on electrochemical-based sensors for monitoring the chloride ion which is thought as one of the most important factors resulting in steel corrosion. In this work, we report a fiber-optic chloride chemical sensor based on long period gratings inscribed in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a chloride sensitive thin film. Numerical simulation is performed to determine the characteristics and resonance spectral response versus the refractive indices of the analyte solution flowing through into the holes in the PCF. The effective refractive index of the cladding mode of the LPGs changes with variations of the analyte solution concentration, resulting in a shift of the resonance wavelength, hence providing the sensor signal. This fiber-optic chemical sensor has a fast response, is easy to prepare and is not susceptible to electromagnetic environment, and can therefore be of use for structural health monitoring of RC structures subjected to such aggressive environments.

  4. Chemiluminescent chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.E.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Chemiluminescent, chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors are being investigated via the immobilization of 3-aminophthalhydrazide (luminol) within hydrogels and polymeric, sorbent coatings. The films are supported behind a teflon membrane and positioned in front of a photomultiplier tube, permitting the sensitive detection of numerous toxic vapors. Some selectivity has been tailored into these devices by careful selection of the polymer type, pH and metal catalyst incorporated within the film. The incorporation of luminol and Fe(3) within a polyvinylalcohol hydrogel gave a film with superior sensitivity toward NO{sub 2} (detection limit of 0.46 ppb and a response time on the order of seconds). The use of the hydrogel matrix helped eliminate humidity problems associated with other polymeric films. Other chemiluminescent thin films prepared have demonstrated the detection of ppb levels of SO{sub 2}(g) and hydrazine, N{sub 2}H{sub 4}(g). Recently, the authors have begun investigating the incorporation of a heated Pt filament into the inlet line as a pre-oxidative step prior to passage of the gas stream across the teflon membrane. This has permitted the sensitive detection of ppm levels of CCl{sub 4}(g), CHCl{sub 3}(g) and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(g).

  5. Plasmonics Based Harsh Environment Compatible Chemical Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Carpenter

    2012-01-15

    Au-YSZ, Au-TiO{sub 2} and Au-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite films have been investigated as a potential sensing element for high-temperature plasmonic sensing of H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} in an oxygen containing environment. The Au-YSZ and Au-TiO{sub 2} films were deposited using PVD methods, while the CeO{sub 2} thin film was deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and Au was implanted into the as-grown film at an elevated temperature followed by high temperature annealing to form well-defined Au nanoclusters. Each of the films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). For the gas sensing experiments, separate exposures to varying concentrations of H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} were performed at a temperature of 500°C in oxygen backgrounds of 5.0, 10, and ~21% O{sub 2}. Changes in the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption peak were monitored during gas exposures and are believed to be the result of oxidation-reduction processes that fill or create oxygen vacancies in the respective metal oxides. This process affects the LSPR peak position either by charge exchange with the Au nanoparticles or by changes in the dielectric constant surrounding the particles. Hyperspectral multivariate analysis was used to gauge the inherent selectivity of the film between the separate analytes. From principal component analysis (PCA), unique and identifiable responses were seen for each of the analytes. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was also used on the Au-CeO{sub 2} results and showed separation between analytes as well as trends in gas concentration. Results indicate that each of the films are is selective towards O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} in separate exposures. However, when the films were analyzed in a sensor array based experiment, ie simultaneous exposures to the target gases, PCA analysis of the combined response showed an even greater selective character towards the target gases. Combined

  6. Surface plasmon resonance based fibre optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-05-01

    A surface plasmon based fibre-optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine has been developed using a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film with embedded gold nanoparticles as the recognition element. The MIP was formed on the layer of gold thin film which was deposited on the surface of a fibre core. The sensing was based on swelling of the MIP film induced by analyte binding that shifted the resonance spectrum toward a shorter wavelength. The sensor exhibited a response to cocaine in the concentration range of 0 - 400 μM in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures. Selectivity for cocaine over other drugs has also been demonstrated.

  7. Effects of Temperature on Polymer/Carbon Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manfireda, Allison; Lara, Liana; Homer, Margie; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Kisor, Adam; Ryan, Margaret; Zhou, Hanying; Shevade, Abhijit; James, Lim; Manatt, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on the effects of temperature, polymer molecular weight, and carbon loading on the electrical resistances of polymer/carbon-black composite films. The experiment were performed in a continuing effort to develop such films as part of the JPL Electronic Nose (ENose), that would be used to detect, identify, and quantify parts-per-million (ppm) concentration levels of airborne chemicals in the space shuttle/space station environments. The polymers used in this study were three formulations of poly(ethylene oxide) [PEO] that had molecular weights of 20 kilodaltons, 600 kilodaltons, and 1 megadalton, respectively. The results of one set of experiments showed a correlation between the polymer molecular weight and the percolation threshold. In a second set of experiments, differences among the temperature dependences of resistance were observed for different carbon loadings; these differences could be explained by a change in the conduction mechanism. In a third set of experiments, the responses of six different polymer/carbon composite sensors to three analytes (water vapor, methanol, methane) were measured as a function of temperature (28 to 36 C). For a given concentration of each analyte, the response of each sensor decreased with increasing temperature, in a manner different from those of the other sensors.

  8. Virus Outbreaks in Chemical and Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inseong

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous bacteriophages have successfully been used to detect chemical and biological analytes with increased selectivity and sensitivity. The enhancement largely originates not only from the ability of viruses to provide a platform for the surface display of a wide range of biological ligands, but also from the geometric morphologies of the viruses that constitute biomimetic structures with larger surface area-to-volume ratio. This review will appraise the mechanism of multivalent display of the viruses that enables surface modification of virions either by chemical or biological methods. The accommodation of functionalized virions to various materials, including polymers, proteins, metals, nanoparticles, and electrodes for sensor applications will also be discussed. PMID:25068866

  9. Sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Dechang; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-07-05

    A sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes includes a microscale body having a first end and a second end and a surface between the ends for adsorbing a chemical analyte. The surface includes at least one conductive heating track for heating the chemical analyte and also a conductive response track, which is electrically isolated from the heating track, for producing a thermal response signal from the chemical analyte. The heating track is electrically connected with a voltage source and the response track is electrically connected with a signal recorder. The microscale body is restrained at the first end and the second end and is substantially isolated from its surroundings therebetween, thus having a bridge configuration.

  10. Micromechanical sensors for chemical and physical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Thundat, T.

    1995-06-01

    The advent of inexpensive, mass-produced microcantilevers promises to bring about a revolution in the field of chemical and physical sensor design. In this paper, a novel class of highly sensitive sensors are discussed that are based on commercially available microcantilevers, such as those used in atomic force microscopy. When coated with a sensitizing overlayer, these microcantilevers show significant changes in two independent analyte-induced signals, resonance frequency and static bending, as the result of exposure to various chemical and physical phenomena. Resonance frequency shift has the particular advantage of being relatively insensitive to interference from external factors such as thermal drift. Examples of micromechanical sensors based on this approach that are capable of detecting mercury vapor (with a sensitivity of 1.25 Hz/pg and linear correlation of 0.998), relative humidity (55 Hz/%R.H., correlation=0.999), or optical irradiation (10 Hz/nJ response) are discussed in detail, along with the effects of coatings on sensitivity, linearity, and reversibility of response. Further, extension of this tremendously flexible concept into a universal detection paradigm for chemical and physical phenomena is examined.

  11. Thin-Film Resistance Heat-Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film heat-flux sensors of a proposed type would offer advantages over currently available thin-film heat flux sensors. Like a currently available thin-film heat-flux sensor, a sensor according to the proposal would be based on measurement of voltages related to the temperatures of thin metal films on the hotter and colder faces of a layer of an electrically insulating and moderately thermally conductive material. The heat flux through such a device is proportional to the difference between the temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the layer. The advantages of the proposed sensors over the commercial ones would arise from the manner in which the temperature-related voltages would be generated and measured.

  12. Self-activated ultrahigh chemosensitivity of oxide thin film nanostructures for transparent sensors.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hi Gyu; Shim, Young-Soek; Kim, Do Hong; Jeong, Hu Young; Jeong, Myoungho; Jung, Joo Young; Han, Seung Min; Kim, Jong Kyu; Kim, Jin-Sang; Park, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Jong-Heun; Tuller, Harry L; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Jang, Ho Won

    2012-01-01

    One of the top design priorities for semiconductor chemical sensors is developing simple, low-cost, sensitive and reliable sensors to be built in handheld devices. However, the need to implement heating elements in sensor devices, and the resulting high power consumption, remains a major obstacle for the realization of miniaturized and integrated chemoresistive thin film sensors based on metal oxides. Here we demonstrate structurally simple but extremely efficient all oxide chemoresistive sensors with ~90% transmittance at visible wavelengths. Highly effective self-activation in anisotropically self-assembled nanocolumnar tungsten oxide thin films on glass substrate with indium-tin oxide electrodes enables ultrahigh response to nitrogen dioxide and volatile organic compounds with detection limits down to parts per trillion levels and power consumption less than 0.2 microwatts. Beyond the sensing performance, high transparency at visible wavelengths creates opportunities for their use in transparent electronic circuitry and optoelectronic devices with avenues for further functional convergence. PMID:22905319

  13. Self-activated ultrahigh chemosensitivity of oxide thin film nanostructures for transparent sensors

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hi Gyu; Shim, Young-Soek; Kim, Do Hong; Jeong, Hu Young; Jeong, Myoungho; Jung, Joo Young; Han, Seung Min; Kim, Jong Kyu; Kim, Jin-Sang; Park, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Jong-Heun; Tuller, Harry L.; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Jang, Ho Won

    2012-01-01

    One of the top design priorities for semiconductor chemical sensors is developing simple, low-cost, sensitive and reliable sensors to be built in handheld devices. However, the need to implement heating elements in sensor devices, and the resulting high power consumption, remains a major obstacle for the realization of miniaturized and integrated chemoresistive thin film sensors based on metal oxides. Here we demonstrate structurally simple but extremely efficient all oxide chemoresistive sensors with ~90% transmittance at visible wavelengths. Highly effective self-activation in anisotropically self-assembled nanocolumnar tungsten oxide thin films on glass substrate with indium-tin oxide electrodes enables ultrahigh response to nitrogen dioxide and volatile organic compounds with detection limits down to parts per trillion levels and power consumption less than 0.2 microwatts. Beyond the sensing performance, high transparency at visible wavelengths creates opportunities for their use in transparent electronic circuitry and optoelectronic devices with avenues for further functional convergence. PMID:22905319

  14. MEMS oscillating squeeze-film pressure sensor with optoelectronic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lalit; Reimann, Klaus; Goossens, Martijn J.; Besling, Willem F. A.; Dolleman, Robin J.; Pijnenburg, Remco H. W.; van der Avoort, Cas; Sarro, Lina P. M.; Steeneken, Peter G.

    2015-04-01

    This work reports on an oscillating pressure sensor that converts pressure into frequency using the squeeze-film effect. A new aspect is the laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) in the optoelectronic feedback loop that is used to bring the sensor element into sustained mechanical oscillation. A phase shifter and automatic gain control circuit stabilize the oscillation. The frequency stability of the pressure sensor is investigated by measuring its Allan deviation and is compared to the performance of a quartz oscillating pressure sensor. Finally, the pressure resolution of this oscillating sensor is compared to conventional pressure sensors.

  15. (Chemically vapor deposited diamond films)

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L. Jr.

    1990-09-22

    The NATO-ASI on Diamond and Diamond-Like Films and Coatings'' was an opportunity for us to learn the latest research results from ongoing programs in the leading laboratories of the world and relate them to our work. Specific examples are given in the comprehensive report which follows. The meeting format provided an ideal environment to meet and interact with our international counterparts. It is clear that our studies are well regarded, and that we have established an excellent reputation in a short time. New opportunities for collaboration were identified. A panel discussion at the end of the meeting addressed the needs and opportunities in the synthesis of CVD diamond. The key scientific needs are those related to modeling the nucleation and growth processes and to elucidation of the critical roles of atomic hydrogen and the mechanisms of carbon addition to the growing surfaces. The development and more extensive use of in situ diagnostics for both surface and gas phases are important to solving these issues. The more immediate practical questions concern the identification of the growth-rate-limiting steps, the relation of growth parameters to the resulting film structure, and the dependence of properties on structure.

  16. Chemically active organically doped sol-gel materials: enzymatic sensors, chemical sensors, and photoactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avnir, David; Braun, S.; Lev, Ovadia; Ottolenghi, M.

    1992-12-01

    Organically-doped porous sol-gel matrices of optical grade have evolved in recent years into a wide class of materials with diverse applications. We review recent progress made in our laboratories in three domains of applications: the trapping of enzymes with the consequent design of (e.g. glucose) sensors; the development of chemical sensors; and the design of photoactive material for (solar) light energy conversion.

  17. Platinum thin film resistors as accurate and stable temperature sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement characteristics of thin-Pt-film temperature sensors fabricated using advanced methods are discussed. The limitations of wound-wire Pt temperature sensors and the history of Pt-film development are outlined, and the commonly used film-deposition, structuring, and trimming methods are presented in a table. The development of a family of sputtered film resistors is described in detail and illustrated with photographs of the different types. The most commonly used tolerances are reported as + or - 0.3 C + 0.5 percent of the temperature measured.

  18. Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Manfreda, Allison; Mansour, Kamjou; Lin, Ying; Ksendzov, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Chemical sensors based on optical ring resonators are undergoing development. A ring resonator according to this concept is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, is a made of a polymer that (1) has an index of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core and (2) absorbs chemicals from the surrounding air. The index of refraction of the polymer changes with the concentration of absorbed chemical( s). The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong evanescent-wave coupling between the outer polymer layer and the electromagnetic field propagating along the waveguide core. By virtue of this coupling, the chemically induced change in index of refraction of the polymer causes a measurable shift in the resonance peaks of the ring. In a prototype that has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of this sensor concept, the ring resonator is a dielectric optical waveguide laid out along a closed path resembling a racetrack (see Figure 1). The prototype was fabricated on a silicon substrate by use of standard techniques of thermal oxidation, chemical vapor deposition, photolithography, etching, and spin coating. The prototype resonator waveguide features an inner cladding of SiO2, a core of SixNy, and a chemical-sensing outer cladding of ethyl cellulose. In addition to the ring Chemical sensors based on optical ring resonators are undergoing development. A ring resonator according to this concept is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, is a made of a polymer that (1) has an index of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core and (2) absorbs chemicals from the surrounding air. The index of refraction of the polymer changes with the concentration of absorbed chemical( s). The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong

  19. Calibration-free optical chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for taking absorbance-based chemical measurements are described. In a specific embodiment, an indicator-based pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) sensor displays sensor-to-sensor reproducibility and measurement stability. These qualities are achieved by: 1) renewing the sensing solution, 2) allowing the sensing solution to reach equilibrium with the analyte, and 3) calculating the response from a ratio of the indicator solution absorbances which are determined relative to a blank solution. Careful solution preparation, wavelength calibration, and stray light rejection also contribute to this calibration-free system. Three pCO2 sensors were calibrated and each had response curves which were essentially identical within the uncertainty of the calibration. Long-term laboratory and field studies showed the response had no drift over extended periods (months). The theoretical response, determined from thermodynamic characterization of the indicator solution, also predicted the observed calibration-free performance.

  20. Hyperspectral monitoring of chemically sensitive plant sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Danielle A.

    Current events clearly demonstrate that chemical and biological threats against the public are very real. Automated detection of chemical threats is a necessary component of a system that provides early warning of an attack. Plant biologists are currently developing genetically engineered plants that de-green in the presence of explosives (i.e. TNT) in their environment. The objectives of this thesis are to study the spectral reflectance phenomenology of the plant sensors and to propose requirements for an operational monitoring system using spectral imaging technology. Hyperspectral data were collected under laboratory conditions to determine the key spectral regions in the reflectance spectra associated with the de-greening phenomenon. The collected reflectance spectra were then entered into simulated imagery created using the Rochester Institute of Technology's Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model. System performance was studied as a function of pixel size, radiometric noise, spectral waveband dependence and spectral resolution. It was found that a framing array sensor with 40nm wide bands centered at 645 nm, 690 nm, 875 nm, a ground sample distance of 11cm or smaller, and an signal to noise ratio of 250 or better would be sufficient for monitoring bio-sensors deployed under conditions similar to those simulated for this work.

  1. Micro- and Nanostructured Metal Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alim, M. A.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications warrant the development of chemical sensors which operate in a variety of environments. This technical memorandum incorporates various kinds of chemical sensors and ways to improve their performance. The results of exploratory investigation of the binary composite polycrystalline thick-films such as SnO2-WO3, SnO2-In2O3, SnO2-ZnO for the detection of volatile organic compound (isopropanol) are reported. A short review of the present status of the new types of nanostructured sensors such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanotube, etc. based on metal oxides is presented.

  2. Chemical, biochemical, and environmental fiber sensors III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 4, 5, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Various papers on chemical, biochemical, and environmental fiber sensors are presented. Individual topics addressed include: fiber optic pressure sensor for combustion monitoring and control, viologen-based fiber optic oxygen sensors, renewable-reagent fiber optic sensor for ocean pCO2, transition metal complexes as indicators for a fiber optic oxygen sensor, fiber optic pH measurements using azo indicators, simple reversible fiber optic chemical sensors using solvatochromic dyes, totally integrated optical measuring sensors, integrated optic biosensor for environmental monitoring, radiation dosimetry using planar waveguide sensors, optical and piezoelectric analysis of polymer films for chemical sensor characterization, source polarization effects in an optical fiber fluorosensor, lens-type refractometer for on-line chemical analysis, fiber optic hydrocarbon sensor system, chemical sensors for environmental monitoring, optical fibers for liquid-crystal sensing and logic devices, suitability of single-mode fluoride fibers for evanescent-wave sensing, integrated modules for fiber optic sensors, optoelectronic sensors based on narrowband A3B5 alloys, fiber Bragg grating chemical sensor.

  3. Laser-based Sensors for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2010-05-10

    Stand-off detection of hazardous materials ensures that the responder is located at a safe distance from the suspected source. Remote detection and identification of hazardous materials can be accomplished using a highly sensitive and portable device, at significant distances downwind from the source or the threat. Optical sensing methods, in particular infrared absorption spectroscopy combined with quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), are highly suited for the detection of chemical substances since they enable rapid detection and are amenable for autonomous operation in a compact and rugged package. This talk will discuss the sensor systems developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and will discuss the progress to reduce the size and power while maintaining sensitivity to enable stand-off detection of multiple chemicals.

  4. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Chemical Gas Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Arunpama B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional thermal conductivity gauges (e.g. Pirani gauges) lend themselves to applications such as leak detectors, or in gas chromatographs for identifying various gas species. However, these conventional gauges are physically large, operate at high power, and have a slow response time. A single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT)-based chemical sensing gauge relies on differences in thermal conductance of the respective gases surrounding the CNT as it is voltage-biased, as a means for chemical identification. Such a sensor provides benefits of significantly reduced size and compactness, fast response time, low-power operation, and inexpensive manufacturing since it can be batch-fabricated using Si integrated-circuit (IC) process technology.

  5. Electro-chemical sensors, sensor arrays and circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Howard E.; Kong, Hoyoul

    2014-07-08

    An electro-chemical sensor includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and a semiconductor channel in electrical contact with the first and second electrodes. The semiconductor channel includes a trapping material. The trapping material reduces an ability of the semiconductor channel to conduct a current of charge carriers by trapping at least some of the charge carriers to localized regions within the semiconductor channel. The semiconductor channel includes at least a portion configured to be exposed to an analyte to be detected, and the trapping material, when exposed to the analyte, interacts with the analyte so as to at least partially restore the ability of the semiconductor channel to conduct the current of charge carriers.

  6. High sensitive formaldehyde graphene gas sensor modified by atomic layer deposition zinc oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haichuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Keke; Xie, Haifen; Zhao, Xiaojing; Liu, Feng

    2014-07-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with various thicknesses were fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition on Chemical Vapor Deposition grown graphene films and their response to formaldehyde has been investigated. It was found that 0.5 nm ZnO films modified graphene sensors showed high response to formaldehyde with the resistance change up to 52% at the concentration of 9 parts-per-million (ppm) at room temperature. Meanwhile, the detection limit could reach 180 parts-per-billion (ppb) and fast response of 36 s was also obtained. The high sensitivity could be attributed to the combining effect from the highly reactive, top mounted ZnO thin films, and high conductive graphene base network. The dependence of ZnO films surface morphology and its sensitivity on the ZnO films thickness was also investigated.

  7. High sensitive formaldehyde graphene gas sensor modified by atomic layer deposition zinc oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Haichuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaojing; Liu, Feng; Wang, Keke; Xie, Haifen

    2014-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with various thicknesses were fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition on Chemical Vapor Deposition grown graphene films and their response to formaldehyde has been investigated. It was found that 0.5 nm ZnO films modified graphene sensors showed high response to formaldehyde with the resistance change up to 52% at the concentration of 9 parts-per-million (ppm) at room temperature. Meanwhile, the detection limit could reach 180 parts-per-billion (ppb) and fast response of 36 s was also obtained. The high sensitivity could be attributed to the combining effect from the highly reactive, top mounted ZnO thin films, and high conductive graphene base network. The dependence of ZnO films surface morphology and its sensitivity on the ZnO films thickness was also investigated.

  8. Thin Film Ceramic Strain Sensor Development for Harsh Environments: Interim Report on Identification of Candidate Thin Film Ceramics to Test for Viability for Static Strain Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in propulsion system applications. In order to have a more passive method of negating changes of resistance due to temperature, an effort is underway at NASA Glenn to develop high temperature thin film ceramic static strain gauges for application in turbine engines, specifically in the fan and compressor modules on blades. Other applications can be on aircraft hot section structures and on thermal protection systems. The near-term interim goal of the research effort was to identify candidate thin film ceramic sensor materials to test for viability and provide a list of possible thin film ceramic sensor materials and corresponding properties to test for viability. This goal was achieved by a thorough literature search for ceramics that have the potential for application as high temperature thin film strain gauges, reviewing potential candidate materials for chemical and physical compatibility with our microfabrication procedures and substrates.

  9. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  10. Method of Forming Micro-Sensor Thin-Film Anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); McGinley, Catherine B. (Inventor); Spina, Eric F. (Inventor); Stephens, Ralph M. (Inventor); Hopson, Purnell, Jr. (Inventor); Cruz, Vincent B. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A device for measuring turbulence in high-speed flows is provided which includes a micro- sensor thin-film probe. The probe is formed from a single crystal of aluminum oxide having a 14 deg half-wedge shaped portion. The tip of the half-wedge is rounded and has a thin-film sensor attached along the stagnation line. The bottom surface of the half-wedge is tilted upward to relieve shock induced disturbances created by the curved tip of the half-wedge. The sensor is applied using a microphotolithography technique.

  11. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-12-01

    Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

  12. Development of GaN-based micro chemical sensor nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-ah; Prokopuk, Nicholas; George, Thomas; Moon, Jeong S.

    2005-01-01

    Sensors based on III-N technology are gaining significant interest due to their potential for monolithic integration of RF transceivers and light sources and the capability of high temperature operations. We are developing a GaN-based micro chemical sensor node for remote detection of chemical toxins, and present electrical responses of AlGaN/GaN HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) sensors to chemical toxins as well as other common gases.

  13. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chonglin; Nash, Patrick; Ma, Chunrui; Enriquez, Erik; Wang, Haibing; Xu, Xing; Bao, Shangyong; Collins, Gregory

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+d} (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  14. Thermal energy harvesting plasmonic based chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Karker, Nicholas; Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash; Carpenter, Michael A

    2014-10-28

    Detection of gases such as H2, CO, and NO2 at 500 °C or greater requires materials with thermal stability and reliability. One of the major barriers toward integration of plasmonic-based chemical sensors is the requirement of multiple components such as light sources and spectrometers. In this work, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting sensing paradigm with PCA analysis offers a novel path toward simplification and integration of plasmonic-based sensing methods. PMID:25280004

  15. Tin Oxide Microheater for Chemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharesi, Mohsen; Ansari, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    Tin oxide is the main material utilized for the fabrication of chemical sensing pellets which operate at elevated temperatures. The heating is commonly carried out with ruthenium dioxide resistors. Here, a tin oxide-based microheater is developed for microsensor applications. These microheaters are fabricated on 0.5 mm thick alumina substrates using spray pyrolysis technique. The optimum SnO2 heaters have a sheet resistivity in the 40-70 Ω/a range. Ohmic Ag/SnO2 contacts are formed by silver paste printing followed by an appropriate thermal annealing, which provide connections to the external circuitry. Durability tests are carried out on several samples; the long-term performance of the fabricated devices is satisfactory. The method allows the elimination of the expensive ruthenium dioxide from the structure of generic gas sensors.

  16. Cellulose Nanofibril Film as a Piezoelectric Sensor Material.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Satu; Siponkoski, Tuomo; Sarlin, Essi; Mettänen, Marja; Vuoriluoto, Maija; Pammo, Arno; Juuti, Jari; Rojas, Orlando J; Franssila, Sami; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2016-06-22

    Self-standing films (45 μm thick) of native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were synthesized and characterized for their piezoelectric response. The surface and the microstructure of the films were evaluated with image-based analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The measured dielectric properties of the films at 1 kHz and 9.97 GHz indicated a relative permittivity of 3.47 and 3.38 and loss tangent tan δ of 0.011 and 0.071, respectively. The films were used as functional sensing layers in piezoelectric sensors with corresponding sensitivities of 4.7-6.4 pC/N in ambient conditions. This piezoelectric response is expected to increase remarkably upon film polarization resulting from the alignment of the cellulose crystalline regions in the film. The CNF sensor characteristics were compared with those of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as reference piezoelectric polymer. Overall, the results suggest that CNF is a suitable precursor material for disposable piezoelectric sensors, actuators, or energy generators with potential applications in the fields of electronics, sensors, and biomedical diagnostics.

  17. Cellulose Nanofibril Film as a Piezoelectric Sensor Material.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Satu; Siponkoski, Tuomo; Sarlin, Essi; Mettänen, Marja; Vuoriluoto, Maija; Pammo, Arno; Juuti, Jari; Rojas, Orlando J; Franssila, Sami; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2016-06-22

    Self-standing films (45 μm thick) of native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were synthesized and characterized for their piezoelectric response. The surface and the microstructure of the films were evaluated with image-based analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The measured dielectric properties of the films at 1 kHz and 9.97 GHz indicated a relative permittivity of 3.47 and 3.38 and loss tangent tan δ of 0.011 and 0.071, respectively. The films were used as functional sensing layers in piezoelectric sensors with corresponding sensitivities of 4.7-6.4 pC/N in ambient conditions. This piezoelectric response is expected to increase remarkably upon film polarization resulting from the alignment of the cellulose crystalline regions in the film. The CNF sensor characteristics were compared with those of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as reference piezoelectric polymer. Overall, the results suggest that CNF is a suitable precursor material for disposable piezoelectric sensors, actuators, or energy generators with potential applications in the fields of electronics, sensors, and biomedical diagnostics. PMID:27232271

  18. A Micro-Fabricated Force Sensor Using an All Thin Film Piezoelectric Active Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junwoo; Choi, Wook; Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Lee, Sang-Myung; Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Jinseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The ability to measure pressure and force is essential in biomedical applications such as minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and palpation for detecting cancer cysts. Here, we report a force sensor for measuring a shear and normal force by combining an arrayed piezoelectric sensors layer with a precut glass top plate connected by four stress concentrating legs. We designed and fabricated a thin film piezoelectric force sensor and proposed an enhanced sensing tool to be used for analyzing gentle touches without the external voltage source used in FET sensors. Both the linear sensor response from 3 kPa to 30 kPa and the exact signal responses from the moving direction illustrate the strong feasibility of the described thin film miniaturized piezoelectric force sensor. PMID:25429407

  19. Chemical imaging sensor and laser beacon.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H

    2003-05-20

    Design and functional aspects of PANSPEC, a panoramic-imaging chemical vapor sensor (PANSPEC is an abbreviation for infrared panoramic-viewing spectroradiometer), were advanced and its optical system reoptimized accordingly. The PANSPEC model unites camera and fused solid-state interferometer and photopolarimeter subsystems. The camera is an eye of the open atmosphere that collects, collimates, and images ambient infrared radiance from a panoramic field of view (FOV). The passive interferometer rapidly measures an infrared-absorbing (or infrared-emitting) chemical cloud traversing the FOV by means of molecular vibrational spectroscopy. The active photopolarimeter system provides a laser beam beacon. This beam carries identification (feature spectra measured by the interferometer) and heading (detector pixels disclosing these feature spectra) information on the hazardous cloud through a binary encryption of Mueller matrix elements. Interferometer and photopolarimeter share a common configuration of photoelastic modulation optics. PANSPEC was optimized for minimum aberrations and maximum resolution of image. The optimized design was evaluated for tolerances in the shaping and mounting of the optical system, stray light, and ghost images at the focal plane given a modulation transfer function metric.

  20. Development of an endoscopic tactile sensor using PVDF films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Takeshi; Sone, Mikiko; Tanahashi, Yoshikatsu; Chonan, Seiji; Tanaka, Mami

    2007-12-01

    In this work, a prototype Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) tactile sensor for endoscopic application has been developed. The sensor aims to measure hardness, which is one of the information of tactile perceptions, of biomedical tissue. This sensor is composed of two PVDF films, a silicone cylindrical column, and an aluminum cylinder. And the classification of hardness is concerned with the ratio of these PVDF outputs. In this paper, two sensors are fabricated using two silicone cylindrical columns with different Young's modulus. The performance evaluation of each sensor is conducted using 6 silicone rubbers as measuring object. The experimental results correspond with the simplified theoretical analysis and the proposed sensor can distinguish a difference of elastic property.

  1. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Safety and Emission Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L.-Y.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical sensor technology is being developed for leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire safety applications. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Using these technologies, sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  2. Graphene Electronic Device Based Biosensors and Chemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan

    Two-dimensional layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, are emerging as an exciting material system for a new generation of atomically thin electronic devices. With their ultrahigh surface to volume ratio and excellent electrical properties, 2D-layered materials hold the promise for the construction of a generation of chemical and biological sensors with unprecedented sensitivity. In my PhD thesis, I mainly focus on graphene based electronic biosensors and chemical sensors. In the first part of my thesis, I demonstrated the fabrication of graphene nanomesh (GNM), which is a graphene thin film with a periodic array of holes punctuated in it. The periodic holes introduce long periphery active edges that provide a high density of functional groups (e.g. carboxylic groups) to allow for covalent grafting of specific receptor molecules for chemical and biosensor applications. After covalently functionalizing the GNM with glucose oxidase, I managed to make a novel electronic sensor which can detect glucose as well as pH change. In the following part of my thesis I demonstrate the fabrication of graphene-hemin conjugate for nitric oxide detection. The non-covalent functionalization through pi-pi stacking interaction allows reliable immobilization of hemin molecules on graphene without damaging the graphene lattice to ensure the highly sensitive and specific detection of nitric oxide. The graphene-hemin nitric oxide sensor is capable of real-time monitoring of nitric oxide concentrations, which is of central importance for probing the diverse roles of nitric oxide in neurotransmission, cardiovascular systems, and immune responses. Our studies demonstrate that the graphene-hemin sensors can respond rapidly to nitric oxide in physiological environments with sub-nanomolar sensitivity. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that the graphene-hemin sensors can be used for the detection of nitric oxide released from macrophage cells and endothelial cells, demonstrating their

  3. Spectroelectrochemical sensors: new polymer films for improved sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Laura K.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Heineman, William R.

    2014-10-01

    The selectivity of an optical sensor can be improved by combining optical detection with electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the target analyte to change its spectral properties. The changing signal can distinguish the analyte from interferences with similar spectral properties that would otherwise interfere. The analyte is detected by measuring the intensity of the electrochemically modulated signal. In one form this spectroelectrochemical sensor consists of an optically transparent electrode (OTE) coated with a film that preconcentrates the target analyte. The OTE functions as an optical waveguide for attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy, which detects the analyte by absorption. Sensitivity relies in part on a large change in molar absorptivity between the two oxidation states used for electrochemical modulation of the optical signal. A critical part of the sensor is the ion selective film. It should preconcentrate the analyte and exclude some interferences. At the same time the film must not interfere with the electrochemistry or the optical detection. Therefore, since the debut of the sensor's concept one major focus of our group has been developing appropriate films for different analytes. Here we report the development of a series of quaternized poly(vinylpyridine)-co-styrene (QPVP-co-S) anion exchange films for use in spectroelectrochemical sensors to enable sensitive detection of target anionic analytes in complex samples. The films were either 10% or 20% styrene and were prepared with varying degrees of quaternized pyridine groups, up to 70%. Films were characterized with respect to thickness with spectroscopic ellipsometry, degree of quaternization with FTIR, and electrochemically and spectroelectrochemically using the anions ferrocyanide and pertechnetate.

  4. Chemical sensing system using plasma polymer films and pattern recognition algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.; Sugimoto, I.; Kuwano, H.

    1994-05-01

    A chemical sensing system using a sensor array with sensitive but durable plasma polymer films is developed. Plasma polymer films have unsaturated bonds and radical sites which cause several unique characteristics. These films contain high concentrations of unsaturated bonds and radical sites, which act as interactive sites. These sites, scattered throughout an inert fluorocarbon framework, are believed to induce specific interactions with small molecules through pi and spin interactions. We have tried to apply our knowledge of these interactions to molecular recognition. For sensing small molecules, these films are deposited on both sides of an AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with a resonant frequency of 9 MHz by radio-frequency (RF) sputtering of polymers such as polychlorotrifluoroethylene. The QCM is connected to an oscillator circuit and its resonant shift is proportional to the mass of the adsorbed molecules. The affinity of plasma polymer films can be shifted by changing sputtering conditions such as the target materials, temperature, or RF power. The chemical sensing system studied here uses a sensor array having modified films with various sensitivities. Because the sensor films have an affinity for several kinds of gases, a pattern recognition algorithm is needed to discern unique gas information from sensors that have overlapping selectivities. The equilibrium mass of adsorbed gas and a time constant are first extracted from the time-dependent sensor outputs, which show that the adsorption process resembles Langmuir adsorption, and then the parameters are mapped to a classification space and used for classification. The addition of a time constant increases the selectivity of our sensor system for single-gas analysis and mixture analysis. 12 refs.

  5. A film pressure sensor based on optical fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhichun; Deng, Gang; Dai, Yongbo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of pressure is essential for the design and flying controlling of aircraft. In order to measure the surface pressures of the aircraft, the common pressure tube method and Pressure sensitive paint measurement method have their own disadvantages, and are not applicable to all aircraft structures and real time pressure monitoring. In this paper, a novel thin film pressure sensor based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) is proposed, using FBG measuring the tangential strain of the disk sensing film. Theoretical circle strain of the disk sensing film of the pressure sensor under pressure and temperature variation are analyzed, and the linear relationship between FBG center wavelength shift and pressure, temperature variation is gotten. The pressure and temperature calibration experiments prove the theoretical analysis. But the calibration sensing parameters are small than the calculating ones, which is caused by the constraint of optical fibre to the thin sensing film.

  6. Magnetoelastic sensor for characterizing properties of thin-film/coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachas, Leonidas G. (Inventor); Barrett, Gary (Inventor); Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Kouzoudis, Dimitris (Inventor); Schmidt, Stefan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for determining elasticity characteristics of a thin-film layer. The apparatus comprises a sensor element having a base magnetostrictive element at least one surface of which is at least partially coated with the thin-film layer. The thin-film layer may be of a variety of materials (having a synthetic and/or bio-component) in a state or form capable of being deposited, manually or otherwise, on the base element surface, such as by way of eye-dropper, melting, dripping, brushing, sputtering, spraying, etching, evaporation, dip-coating, laminating, etc. Among suitable thin-film layers for the sensor element of the invention are fluent bio-substances, thin-film deposits used in manufacturing processes, polymeric coatings, paint, an adhesive, and so on. A receiver, preferably remotely located, is used to measure a plurality of values for magneto-elastic emission intensity of the sensor element in either characterization: (a) the measure of the plurality of values is used to identify a magneto-elastic resonant frequency value for the sensor element; and (b) the measure of the plurality of successive values is done at a preselected magneto-elastic frequency.

  7. Flexible piezoelectric pressure sensors using oriented aluminum nitride thin films prepared on polyethylene terephthalate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Morito; Morofuji, Yukari; Kamohara, Toshihiro; Nishikubo, Keiko; Tsubai, Masayoshi; Fukuda, Osamu; Ueno, Naohiro

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated the high sensitive piezoelectric response of c-axis oriented aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films prepared on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. The AlN films were deposited using a radio frequency magnetron sputtering method at temperatures close to room temperature. The c axes of the AlN films were perpendicularly oriented to the PET film surfaces. The sensor consisting of the AlN and PET films is flexible like PET films and the electrical charge is linearly proportional to the stress within a wide range from 0to8.5MPa. The sensor can respond to the frequencies from 0.3 to over 100Hz and measures a clear human pulse wave form by holding the sensor between thumb and middle finger. The resolution of the pulse wave form is comparable to a sphygmomanometer at stress levels of 10kPa. We think that the origin of the high performance of the sensor is the deflection effect, the thin thickness and high elastic modulus of the AlN layer, and the thin thickness and low elastic modulus of the PET film.

  8. A novel wearable electronic nose for healthcare based on flexible printed chemical sensor array.

    PubMed

    Lorwongtragool, Panida; Sowade, Enrico; Watthanawisuth, Natthapol; Baumann, Reinhard R; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2014-10-22

    A novel wearable electronic nose for armpit odor analysis is proposed by using a low-cost chemical sensor array integrated in a ZigBee wireless communication system. We report the development of a carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer sensor array based on inkjet printing technology. With this technique both composite-like layer and actual composite film of CNTs/polymer were prepared as sensing layers for the chemical sensor array. The sensor array can response to a variety of complex odors and is installed in a prototype of wearable e-nose for monitoring the axillary odor released from human body. The wearable e-nose allows the classification of different armpit odors and the amount of the volatiles released as a function of level of skin hygiene upon different activities.

  9. A Novel Wearable Electronic Nose for Healthcare Based on Flexible Printed Chemical Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Lorwongtragool, Panida; Sowade, Enrico; Watthanawisuth, Natthapol; Baumann, Reinhard R.; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2014-01-01

    A novel wearable electronic nose for armpit odor analysis is proposed by using a low-cost chemical sensor array integrated in a ZigBee wireless communication system. We report the development of a carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer sensor array based on inkjet printing technology. With this technique both composite-like layer and actual composite film of CNTs/polymer were prepared as sensing layers for the chemical sensor array. The sensor array can response to a variety of complex odors and is installed in a prototype of wearable e-nose for monitoring the axillary odor released from human body. The wearable e-nose allows the classification of different armpit odors and the amount of the volatiles released as a function of level of skin hygiene upon different activities. PMID:25340447

  10. Analyzing Responses of Chemical Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Hanying

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing a third-generation electronic nose (ENose) capable of continuous monitoring of the International Space Station s cabin atmosphere for specific, harmful airborne contaminants. Previous generations of the ENose have been described in prior NASA Tech Briefs issues. Sensor selection is critical in both (prefabrication) sensor material selection and (post-fabrication) data analysis of the ENose, which detects several analytes that are difficult to detect, or that are at very low concentration ranges. Existing sensor selection approaches usually include limited statistical measures, where selectivity is more important but reliability and sensitivity are not of concern. When reliability and sensitivity can be major limiting factors in detecting target compounds reliably, the existing approach is not able to provide meaningful selection that will actually improve data analysis results. The approach and software reported here consider more statistical measures (factors) than existing approaches for a similar purpose. The result is a more balanced and robust sensor selection from a less than ideal sensor array. The software offers quick, flexible, optimal sensor selection and weighting for a variety of purposes without a time-consuming, iterative search by performing sensor calibrations to a known linear or nonlinear model, evaluating the individual sensor s statistics, scoring the individual sensor s overall performance, finding the best sensor array size to maximize class separation, finding optimal weights for the remaining sensor array, estimating limits of detection for the target compounds, evaluating fingerprint distance between group pairs, and finding the best event-detecting sensors.

  11. Distributed thin film sensor array for damage detection and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Austin; Laflamme, Simon; Ubertini, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The authors have developed a capacitive-based thin film sensor for monitoring strain on mesosurfaces. Arranged in a network configuration, the sensing system is analogous to a biological skin, where local strain can be monitored over a global area. The measurement principle is based on a measurable change in capacitance provoked by strain. In the case of bidirectional in-plane strain, the sensor output contains the additive measurement of both principal strain components. In this paper, we present an algorithm for retrieving unidirectional strain from the bidirectional measurements of the capacitive-based thin film sensor when place in a hybrid dense sensor network with state-of-the-art unidirectional strain sensors. The algorithm leverages the advantages of a hybrid dense network for application of the thin film sensor to reconstruct the surface strain maps. A bidirectional shape function is assumed, and it is differentiated to obtain expressions for planar strain. A least squares estimator (LSE) is used to reconstruct the planar strain map from the networks measurements, after the system's boundary conditions have been enforced in the model. The coefficients obtained by the LSE can be used to reconstruct the estimated strain map. Results from numerical simulations and experimental investigations show good performance of the algorithm.

  12. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.

    1998-01-01

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiberoptic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences.

  13. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.

    1998-07-21

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

  14. Oxidation of Hydrocarbons on the Surface of Tin Dioxide Chemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Teterycz, Helena; Halek, Patryk; Wiśniewski, Kamil; Halek, Grzegorz; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Polowczyk, Izabela

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of our investigation on the effect of the molecular structure of organic vapors on the characteristics of resistive chemical gas sensors. The sensors were based on tin dioxide and prepared by means of thick film technology. The electrical and catalytic examinations showed that the abstraction of two hydrogen atoms from the organic molecule and formation of a water in result of reaction with a chemisorbed oxygen ion, determine the rate of oxidation reactions, and thus the sensor performance. The rate of the process depends on the order of carbon atoms and Lewis acidity of the molecule. Therefore, any modification of the surface centers of a sensor material, modifies not only the sensor sensitivity, but also its selectivity. PMID:22163855

  15. Method of forming multi-element thin hot film sensors on polyimide film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopson, Jr., Purnell (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention comprises a method of forming a multi-element, thin hot film sensor on a polyimide film. The sensor is formed by first cleaning one surface of the polyimide. Then, under a continuous vacuum, the surface is simultaneously cleaned by ion bombardment while nickel is deposited by evaporation. The ion beam cleaning is discontinued and copper is then deposited to an initial thickness by evaporation without a break in the vacuum. The vacuum is then removed and a final thickness of copper is deposited by plating. Sensor patterns are then defined in the nickel and copper layers using conventional photolithography and etching techniques.

  16. Flush mounting of thin film sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1991-05-01

    Flush mounting of a sensor on a surface is provided by first forming a recessed area on the surface. Next an adhesive bonding mixture is introduced into the recessed area. The adhesive bonding mixture is chosen to provide thermal expansion matching with the surface surrounding the recessed area. A strip of high performance polymeric tape is provided, with the sensor attached to the underside thereof, and the tape is positioned over the recessed area so that it acts as a carrier of the sensor. A shim having flexibility so that it will conform to the surface surrounding the recessed area is placed over the tape, and a vacuum pad is placed over the shim. The area above the surface is then evacuated while holding the sensor flush with the surface during curing of the adhesive bonding mixture. After such curing, the pad, shim, and tape are removed from the sensor, electrical connections for the sensor are provided, after which the remaining space in the recessed area is filled with a polymeric foam.

  17. Flush mounting of thin film sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1992-09-01

    Flush mounting of a sensor on a surface is provided by first forming a recessed area on the surface. Next, an adhesive bonding mixture is introduced into the recessed area. The adhesive bonding mixture is chosen to provide thermal expansion matching with the surface surrounding the recessed area. A strip of high performance polymeric tape is provided, with the sensor attached to the underside thereof, and the tape is positioned over the recessed area so that it acts as a carrier of the sensor. A shim having flexibility so that it will conform to the surface surrounding the recessed area is placed over the tape, and a vacuum pad is placed over the shim. The area above the surface is then evacuated while holding the sensor flush with the surface during curing of the adhesive bonding mixture. After such curing, the pad, shim, and tape are removed from the sensor, electrical connections for the sensor are provided, after which the remaining space in the recessed area is filled with a polymeric foam.

  18. Flexible carbon nanotube films for high performance strain sensors.

    PubMed

    Kanoun, Olfa; Müller, Christian; Benchirouf, Abderahmane; Sanli, Abdulkadir; Dinh, Trong Nghia; Al-Hamry, Ammar; Bu, Lei; Gerlach, Carina; Bouhamed, Ayda

    2014-01-01

    Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors. PMID:24915183

  19. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kanoun, Olfa; Müller, Christian; Benchirouf, Abderahmane; Sanli, Abdulkadir; Dinh, Trong Nghia; Al-Hamry, Ammar; Bu, Lei; Gerlach, Carina; Bouhamed, Ayda

    2014-01-01

    Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors. PMID:24915183

  20. Photometer for monitoring the thickness of inkjet printed films for organic electronic and sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Jisun; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Whitten, James E.

    2010-03-01

    Inkjet printed organic thin films are being used for a variety of electronic and sensor applications with advantages that include ease of fabrication and reproducibility. Construction and use of a low-cost photometer based on a light-emitting diode (LED) light source and a photodiode detector are described. The photometer attaches to the exit of the printer with the transparent substrate onto which the film is printed passing between the LED and photodiode. By measuring the output voltage of the detector, the transmittance and absorbance of the inkjet printed film can be calculated in real-time. Since absorbance is linearly proportional to thickness in the Beer-Lambert regime, the thickness of the film may be monitored and controlled by varying the number of passes through the printer. Use of the photometer is demonstrated for inkjet printed films of monolayer-protected colloidal gold nanoparticles that function as chemical vapor sensors. The photometer may find applications in both research and quality control related to the manufacture of organic electronic devices and sensors and enables "feedback-controlled" inkjet printing.

  1. Differentiation of vapor mixture with chemical sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulki; Jung, Youngmo; Moon, Hi Gyu; Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Bum Ju; Lim, Chaehyun; Choi, Jaebin; Seo, Minah; Kim, Jae Hun; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Sang Kyung; Kang, Chong Yun; Lee, Taikjin; Lee, Seok

    2015-07-01

    Arrays of partially selective chemical sensors have been the focus of extensive research over the past decades because of their potential for widespread application in ambient air monitoring, health and safety, and biomedical diagnostics. Especially, vapor sensor arrays based on functionalized nanomaterials have shown great promise with their high sensitivity by dimensionality and outstanding electronic properties. Here, we introduce experiments where individual vapors and mixtures of them are examined by different chemical sensor arrays. The collected data from those sensor arrays are further analyzed by a principal component analysis (PCA) and targeted vapors are recognized based on prepared database.

  2. Fiber-Optic Sensor Would Monitor Growth of Polymer Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beamesderfer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic sensor system would measure the increase in thickness of a film of parylene (a thermoplastic polymer made from para-xylene) during growth of the film in a vapor deposition process. By enabling real-time monitoring of film thickness, the system would make it possible to identify process conditions favorable for growth and to tailor the final thickness of the film with greater precision than is now possible. The heart of the sensor would be a pair of fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometers, depicted schematically in the figure. (In principle, a single such interferometer would suffice. The proposal calls for the use of two interferometers for protective redundancy and increased accuracy.) Each interferometer would include a light source, a fiber-optic coupler, and photodetectors in a control box outside the deposition chamber. A single-mode optical fiber for each interferometer would run from inside the control box to a fused-silica faceplate in a sensor head. The sensory tips of the optical fibers would be polished flush with the free surface of the faceplate. In preparation for use, the sensor head would be mounted with a hermetic seal in a feed-through port in the deposition chamber, such that free face of the faceplate and the sensory tips of the optical fibers would be exposed to the deposition environment. During operation, light would travel along each optical fiber from the control box to the sensor head. A small portion of the light would be reflected toward the control box from the end face of each fiber. Once growth of the parylene film started, a small portion of the light would also be reflected toward the control box from the outer surface of the film. In the control box, the two reflected portions of the light beam would interfere in one of the photodetectors. The difference between the phases of the interfering reflected portions of the light beam would vary in proportion to the increasing thickness of the film and the known

  3. Piezoelectric Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities that utilize piezoelectric film to familiarize students with fundamental principles of electricity. Describes classroom projects involving chemical sensors, microbalances, microphones, switches, infrared sensors, and power generation. (MDH)

  4. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautics and Space Applications III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L. Y.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, Z.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.; Hall, G.

    1999-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  5. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Chen, L. Y.; Neudeck, P. G.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Zhou, H. J.; Makel, D.; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Aeronautic and Space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of most interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring emission monitoring and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensor is based on progress two types of technology: 1) Micro-machining and micro-fabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this micro-fabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  6. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liong-Yu; Neudeck, Phil G.; Knight, Dale; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Zhou, H. J.; Makel, Darby; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  7. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor of Improved Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gus; Wrbanek, John; Blaha, Charles

    2002-01-01

    A new design for a thin film heat flux sensor is presented. It is easier to fabricate than previous designs, for a given heat flux has an order of magnitude larger signal, and is more easily scalable than previous designs. Transient and steady state data are also presented.

  8. Chemical Sensors Based on IR Spectroscopy and Surface-Modified Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Gabriel P.; Niemczyk, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Sol-gel processing techniques have been used to apply thin porous films to the surfaces of planar infrared (IR) waveguides to produce widely useful chemical sensors. The thin- film coating serves to diminish the concentration of water and increase the concentration of the analyte in the region probed by the evanescent IR wave. These porous films are composed of silica, and therefore, conventional silica surface modification techniques can be used to give the surface a specific functional character. The sol-gel film was surface-modified to make the film highly hydrophobic. These sensors were shown to be capable of detecting non-polar organic analytes, such as benzonitrile, in aqueous solution with detection limits in the ppb range. Further, these porous sol-gel structures allow the analytes to diffuse into and out of the films rapidly, thus reaching equilibrium in less than ten seconds. These sensors are unique because of the fact that their operation is based on the measurement of an IR absorption spectrum. Thus, these sensors are able to identify the analytes as well as measure concentration with high sensitivity. These developments have been documented in previous reports and publications. Recently, we have also targeted detection of the polar organic molecules acetone and isopropanol in aqueous solution. Polar organics are widely used in industrial and chemical processes, hence it is of interest to monitor their presence in effluents or decontamination process flows. Although large improvements in detection limits were expected with non-polar organic molecules in aqueous solutions using very hydrophobic porous sol-gel films on silicon attenuated total reflectance (Si ATR) waveguides, it was not as clear what the detection enhancements might be for polar organic molecules. This report describes the use of modified sol-gel-coated Si ATR sensors for trace detection and quantitation of small polar organic molecules in aqueous solutions. The detection of both acetone

  9. Evaluating Zeolite-Modified Sensors: towards a faster set of chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berna, A. Z.; Vergara, A.; Trincavelli, M.; Huerta, R.; Afonja, A.; Parkin, I. P.; Binions, R.; Trowell, S.

    2011-09-01

    The responses of zeolite-modified sensors, prepared by screen printing layers of chromium titanium oxide (CTO), were compared to unmodified tin oxide sensors using amplitude and transient responses. For transient responses we used a family of features, derived from the exponential moving average (EMA), to characterize chemo-resistive responses. All sensors were tested simultaneously against 20 individual volatile compounds from four chemical groups. The responses of the two types of sensors showed some independence. The zeolite-modified CTO sensors discriminated compounds better using either amplitude response or EMA features and CTO-modified sensors also responded three times faster.

  10. Flexible PZT thin film tactile sensor for biomedical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hong-Jie; Tian, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Jong

    2013-04-25

    This paper presents the development of tactile sensors using the sol-gel process to deposit a PZT thin-film from 250 nm to 1 μm on a flexible stainless steel substrate. The PZT thin-film tactile sensor can be used to measure human pulses from several areas, including carotid, brachial, finger, ankle, radial artery, and the apical region. Flexible PZT tactile sensors can overcome the diverse topology of various human regions and sense the corresponding signals from human bodies. The measured arterial pulse waveform can be used to diagnose hypertension and cardiac failure in patients. The proposed sensors have several advantages, such as flexibility, reliability, high strain, low cost, simple fabrication, and low temperature processing. The PZT thin-film deposition process includes a pyrolysis process at 150 °C/500 °C for 10/5 min, followed by an annealing process at 650 °C for 10 min. Finally, the consistent pulse wave velocity (PWV) was demonstrated based on human pulse measurements from apical to radial, brachial to radial, and radial to ankle. It is characterized that the sensitivity of our PZT-based tactile sensor was approximately 0.798 mV/g.

  11. Advances in Thin Film Sensor Technologies for Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Martin, Lisa C.; Will, Herbert A.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced thin film sensor techniques that can provide accurate surface strain and temperature measurements are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. These sensors are needed to provide minimally intrusive characterization of advanced materials (such as ceramics and composites) and structures (such as components for Space Shuttle Main Engine, High Speed Civil Transport, Advanced Subsonic Transports and General Aviation Aircraft) in hostile, high-temperature environments and for validation of design codes. This paper presents two advanced thin film sensor technologies: strain gauges and thermocouples. These sensors are sputter deposited directly onto the test articles and are only a few micrometers thick; the surface of the test article is not structurally altered and there is minimal disturbance of the gas flow over the surface. The strain gauges are palladium-13% chromium based and the thermocouples are platinum-13% rhodium vs. platinum. The fabrication techniques of these thin film sensors in a class 1000 cleanroom at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. Their demonstration on a variety of engine materials, including superalloys, ceramics and advanced ceramic matrix composites, in several hostile, high-temperature test environments are discussed.

  12. Flexible PZT Thin Film Tactile Sensor for Biomedical Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hong-Jie; Tian, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Jong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development of tactile sensors using the sol-gel process to deposit a PZT thin-film from 250 nm to 1 μm on a flexible stainless steel substrate. The PZT thin-film tactile sensor can be used to measure human pulses from several areas, including carotid, brachial, finger, ankle, radial artery, and the apical region. Flexible PZT tactile sensors can overcome the diverse topology of various human regions and sense the corresponding signals from human bodies. The measured arterial pulse waveform can be used to diagnose hypertension and cardiac failure in patients. The proposed sensors have several advantages, such as flexibility, reliability, high strain, low cost, simple fabrication, and low temperature processing. The PZT thin-film deposition process includes a pyrolysis process at 150 °C/500 °C for 10/5 min, followed by an annealing process at 650 °C for 10 min. Finally, the consistent pulse wave velocity (PWV) was demonstrated based on human pulse measurements from apical to radial, brachial to radial, and radial to ankle. It is characterized that the sensitivity of our PZT-based tactile sensor was approximately 0.798 mV/g. PMID:23698262

  13. Flexible PZT thin film tactile sensor for biomedical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hong-Jie; Tian, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Jong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development of tactile sensors using the sol-gel process to deposit a PZT thin-film from 250 nm to 1 μm on a flexible stainless steel substrate. The PZT thin-film tactile sensor can be used to measure human pulses from several areas, including carotid, brachial, finger, ankle, radial artery, and the apical region. Flexible PZT tactile sensors can overcome the diverse topology of various human regions and sense the corresponding signals from human bodies. The measured arterial pulse waveform can be used to diagnose hypertension and cardiac failure in patients. The proposed sensors have several advantages, such as flexibility, reliability, high strain, low cost, simple fabrication, and low temperature processing. The PZT thin-film deposition process includes a pyrolysis process at 150 °C/500 °C for 10/5 min, followed by an annealing process at 650 °C for 10 min. Finally, the consistent pulse wave velocity (PWV) was demonstrated based on human pulse measurements from apical to radial, brachial to radial, and radial to ankle. It is characterized that the sensitivity of our PZT-based tactile sensor was approximately 0.798 mV/g. PMID:23698262

  14. Polymer materials as modified optical fiber cladding for chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianming

    An intrinsic fiber optic chemical sensor has been designed and developed by using a polymer material as a modified fiber cladding. The sensor is constructed by replacing a certain portion of the original cladding with a chemically sensitive material, specifically, polyaniline or polypyrrole. Both the light absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the polymers change upon the exposure to different chemical vapors. These changes induce the optical intensity modulation of the fiber optic sensor. Polyaniline or polypyrrole is coated as the modified cladding by either spin-cast or in-situ deposition method for sensing HCl, NH3, H 2O2, and H4N2 vapors. All sensors show rapid and strong response to the chemical vapors. Thus, these sensors demonstrate that polyaniline and polypyrrole are viable candidate materials for the detection of volatile toxic gases. Sensors exhibit better performance when correct parameters, such as modification area, in-situ deposition time, and spin-rate, are used in the cladding modification process. The reversibility of the sensor depends on the reaction between the modified cladding material and the chemical vapors. Polyaniline cladding has better reversibility than polypyrrole. The optimized sensor response and sensitivity can be achieved by selecting an incident light with suitable wavelength, power, and incident angle.

  15. Visual gas sensors based on dye thin films and resonant waveguide gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoine, L.; Schnieper, M.; Barranco, A.; Aparicio, F. J.

    2011-05-01

    A colorimetric sensor that provides a direct visual indication of chemical contamination was developed. The detection is based on the color change of the reflected light after exposure to a gas or a liquid. The sensor is a combination of a chemically sensitive dye layer and a subwavelength grating structure. To enhance the perception of color change, a reference area sealed under a non-contaminated atmosphere is used and placed next to the sensor. The color change is clearly visible by human eyes. The device is based on photonic resonant effects; the visible color is a direct reflection of some incoming light, therefore no additional supplies are needed. This makes it usable as a standalone disposable sensor. The dye thin film is deposited by Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on top of the subwavelength structure. The latter is made by combining a replication process of a Sol-Gel material and a thin film deposition. Lowcost fabrication and compatibility with environments where electricity cannot be used make this device very attractive for applications in hospitals, industries, with explosives and in traffic.

  16. High angular sensitivity thin film tin oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Davinder; Madaan, Divya; Sharma, V. K.; Kapoor, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present theoretical anlaysis of a thin film SnO2 (Tin Oxide) sensor for the measurement of variation in the refractive index of the bulk media. It is based on lossy mode resonance between the absorbing thin film lossy modes and the evanescent wave. Also the addition of low index dielectric matching layer between the prism and the lossy waveguiding layer future increase the angular sensitivity and produce an efficient refractive index sensor. The angular interrogation is done and obtained sensitivity is 110 degree/RIU. Theoretical analysis of the proposed sensor based on Fresnel reflection coefficients is presented. This enhanced sensitivity will further improve the monitoring of biomolecular interactions and the higher sensitivity of the proposed configurations makes it to be a much better option to be employed for biosensing applications.

  17. Transient hot-film sensor response in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Ortgies, K. R.; Gartenberg, E.

    1989-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed to determine the response of a hot-film sensor, mounted flush on the side wall of a shock tube, to unsteady flow behind a normal shock wave. The present experiments attempt to isolate the response of the anemometer due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface. The experiments, performed at low supersonic shock speeds in air, are described along with the data acquisition procedure. The change in convective heat transfer is deduced from the data and the results are compared with those from transient boundary layer theory and another set of experimental results. Finally, a transient local heat transfer coefficient is formulated for use as the forcing function in a hot-film sensor instrument model simulation.

  18. Zeolite thin film-coated spherical end-face fiber sensors for detection of trace organic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiangping; Zhao, Chun Liu; Yang, Jingyi; Chan, Chi Chiu

    2016-04-01

    A novel zeolite thin film-coated spherical end face fiber sensor for detection of trace organic vapors was experimentally demonstrated. The spherical end-face was fabricated by electrical arc discharge on the end face of a standard single-mode fiber. The proposed sensor comprise of the fiber's spherical end-face covered with a layer of zeolite thin film. The zeolite film and spherical end face constituted an arc-shaped inline Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity, which improves the interference performance. The trace chemical vapor concentration was measured by monitoring the shift of F-P interference wavelength which induced by the organic vapor molecular adsorption of the zeolite film. The proposed trace organic vapors sensor performed with the enhanced sensitivity 0.91 nm/ppm with the range from 0 to 70 ppm.

  19. Nanotechnologv Enabled Biological and Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an enabling technology that will impact almost all economic sectors: one of the most important and with great potential is the health/medical sector. - Nanomaterials for drug delivery - Early warning sensors - Implantable devices - Artificial parts with improved characteristics Carbon nanotubes and nanofibers show promise for use in sensor development, electrodes and other biomedical applications.

  20. Fluorescence measurements for chemical optical fiber sensor of cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazikowski, Adam; Kaczmarek, Emil

    2006-10-01

    Opto-chemical sensors are sensors of quantities (pH level, heavy metal ions concentration), detection of which can be performed optically. These sensors utilize various optical phenomena such as changes of fluorescence in the presence of a certain agent. Many substances available and interesting from the sensor point of view exhibit different properties in solution and after physical and/or chemical mounting on glass slide or optical fiber. Because of this it is necessary to investigate application possibilities of a certain substance in well defined metrological environment. In this paper we described system for measuring fluorescence of sensing materials. We proposed system utilizing emission and absorption spectra separation and phase-sensitive detection. As an example of such system a fluorescence sensor of cobalt was of our interest. We described sample preparation process and measured some properties of chosen chemical substances. Achieved results are the basis for further research.

  1. Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors Using Immobilized Bioreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, David R.; Luo, Shufang; Munkholm, Christiane

    1988-06-01

    Optrodes employing immobilized enzymes were developed using covalent attachment of sensor reagents. This development is an extension of the original application of this sensor technology in which a pH sensor was constructed with the pH sensitive dye fluorescein incorporated into a polymer covalently attached to the fiber tip. This sensor displayed significantly improved response times over previous fiber optic sensors because of reduced diffusion limitations. In addition, the signal intensities were greatly enhanced by the high concentration of fluorescent dye localized at the fiber tip. With the anticipation that these qualities would be preserved, a class of sensors based on the immobilization of biomolecules in the polymer matrix became the next goal. This paper will first describe a fiber optic probe prepared by immobilizing esterase in a crosslinked polyacrylamide matrix. The immobilized esterase converts the nonfluorescent fluoresceindiacetate into fluorescein. Both the steady state level and kinetic generation of fluorescence can be related to the concentration of fluoresceindiacetate. A fiber optic sensor for penicillin has been made by coimmobili zing penicillinase with a pH sensitive fluorescent dye. Penicillinase converts penicillin to penicilloic acid which produces a microenvironmental pH change in the dye-containing polymer matrix resulting in a concommitant change in fluorescence. The change in fluorescence is proportional to the concentration of penicillin and a 95% response is reached in 40-60 seconds. The sensor has a detection limit of 2.5 x 10-4 M. Another class of sensors using immobilized bioreceptors will be based on the principles of fluoroimmunoassay. This paper will discuss some basic principles and problems of 1) fluorescence quenching immunoassays, 2) fluorescence excitation transfer immunoassays, and 3) energy transfer immunoassays for digoxin. Both advantages and inherent problems for these sensor preparations will be addressed.

  2. Non-specific sensor arrays for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kevin; Minor, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Non-specific chemical sensor arrays have been the subject of considerable research efforts over the past thirty years with the idea that, by analogy to vertebrate olfaction, they are potentially capable of rendering complex chemical assessments with relatively modest logistical footprints. However, the actual implementation of such devices in challenging "real world" scenarios has arguably continued to fall short of these expectations. This work examines the inherent limitations of such devices for complex chemical sensing scenarios, placing them on a continuum between simple univariate sensors and complex multivariate analytical instrumentation and analyzing their utility in general-purpose chemical detection and accurate chemical sensing in the presence of unknown "unknowns." Results with simulated and acquired data sets are presented with discussion of the implications in development of chemical sensor arrays suitable for complex scenarios.

  3. CMOS-MEMS Chemiresistive and Chemicapacitive Chemical Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, Nathan S.

    Integrating chemical sensors with testing electronics is a powerful technique with the potential to lower power and cost and allow for lower system limits of detection. This thesis explores the possibility of creating an integrated sensor system intended to be embedded within respirator cartridges to notify the user that hazardous chemicals will soon leak into the face mask. For a chemical sensor designer, this application is particularly challenging due to the need for a very sensitive and cheap sensor that will be exposed to widely varying environmental conditions during use. An octanethiol-coated gold nanoparticle chemiresistor to detect industrial solvents is developed, focusing on characterizing the environmental stability and limits of detection of the sensor. Since the chemiresistor was found to be highly sensitive to water vapor, a series of highly sensitive humidity sensor topologies were developed, with sensitivities several times previous integrated capacitive humidity sensors achieved. Circuit techniques were then explored to reduce the humidity sensor limits of detection, including the analysis of noise, charge injection, jitter and clock feedthrough in a charge-based capacitance measurement (CBCM) circuit and the design of a low noise Colpitts LC oscillator. The characterization of high resistance gold nanoclusters for capacitive chemical sensing was also performed. In the final section, a preconcentrator, a heater element intended to release a brief concentrated pulse of analate, was developed and tested for the purposes of lowering the system limit of detection.

  4. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Two areas of particular interest are safety monitoring and emission monitoring. In safety monitoring, detection of low concentrations of hydrogen at potentially low temperatures is important while for emission monitoring the detection of nitrogen oxides, hydrogen, hydrocarbons and oxygen is of interest. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. (2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this general area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  5. Autonomous chemical and biological miniature wireless-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Bar-Giora

    2005-05-01

    The presentation discusses a new concept and a paradigm shift in biological, chemical and explosive sensor system design and deployment. From large, heavy, centralized and expensive systems to distributed wireless sensor networks utilizing miniature platforms (nodes) that are lightweight, low cost and wirelessly connected. These new systems are possible due to the emergence and convergence of new innovative radio, imaging, networking and sensor technologies. Miniature integrated radio-sensor networks, is a technology whose time has come. These network systems are based on large numbers of distributed low cost and short-range wireless platforms that sense and process their environment and communicate data thru a network to a command center. The recent emergence of chemical and explosive sensor technology based on silicon nanostructures, coupled with the fast evolution of low-cost CMOS imagers, low power DSP engines and integrated radio chips, has created an opportunity to realize the vision of autonomous wireless networks. These threat detection networks will perform sophisticated analysis at the sensor node and convey alarm information up the command chain. Sensor networks of this type are expected to revolutionize the ability to detect and locate biological, chemical, or explosive threats. The ability to distribute large numbers of low-cost sensors over large areas enables these devices to be close to the targeted threats and therefore improve detection efficiencies and enable rapid counter responses. These sensor networks will be used for homeland security, shipping container monitoring, and other applications such as laboratory medical analysis, drug discovery, automotive, environmental and/or in-vivo monitoring. Avaak"s system concept is to image a chromatic biological, chemical and/or explosive sensor utilizing a digital imager, analyze the images and distribute alarm or image data wirelessly through the network. All the imaging, processing and communications

  6. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Michael; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  7. Micro- and nano-structured metal oxides based chemical sensors: an overview.

    PubMed

    Batra, Ashok K; Chilvery, A K; Guggilla, Padmaja; Aggarwal, Mohan; Currie, James R

    2014-02-01

    This article examines various kinds of chemical sensors, their mechanism of operation and the ways to improve their performance. It reports the results of exploratory investigation of binary composite polycrystalline thick-films such as SnO2-WO3, SnO2-In2O3, and SnO2-ZnO for the detection of volatile organic compound (isopropanol) are reported. It also contains an overview on the status of the new types of metal oxide based nanostructured sensors, such as nano belts, nanorods, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanocomposites, etc.

  8. Turbine Blade Temperature Measurements Using Thin Film Temperature Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.; Claing, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    The development of thin film temperature sensors is discussed. The technology for sputtering 2 micron thin film platinum versus platinum 10 percent rhodium thermocouples on alumina forming coatings was improved and extended to applications on actual turbine blades. Good adherence was found to depend upon achieving a proper morphology of the alumina surface. Problems of adapting fabrication procedures to turbine blades were uncovered, and improvements were recommended. Testing at 1250 K at one atmosphere pressure was then extended to a higher Mach No. (0.5) in combustor flow for 60 hours and 71 thermal cycles. The mean time to failure was 47 hours accumulated during 1 hour exposures in the combustor. Calibration drift was about 0.1 percent per hour, attributable to oxidation of the rhodium in the thin films. An increase in film thickness and application of a protective overcoat are recommended to reduce drift in actual engine testing.

  9. Biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liping; Zou, Ling; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping; Wu, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Biological olfactory and taste systems are natural chemical sensing systems with unique performances for the detection of environmental chemical signals. With the advances in olfactory and taste transduction mechanisms, biomimetic chemical sensors have achieved significant progress due to their promising prospects and potential applications. Biomimetic chemical sensors exploit the unique capability of biological functional components for chemical sensing, which are often sourced from sensing units of biological olfactory or taste systems at the tissue level, cellular level, or molecular level. Specifically, at the cellular level, there are mainly two categories of cells have been employed for the development of biomimetic chemical sensors, which are natural cells and bioengineered cells, respectively. Natural cells are directly isolated from biological olfactory and taste systems, which are convenient to achieve. However, natural cells often suffer from the undefined sensing properties and limited amount of identical cells. On the other hand, bioengineered cells have shown decisive advantages to be applied in the development of biomimetic chemical sensors due to the powerful biotechnology for the reconstruction of the cell sensing properties. Here, we briefly summarized the most recent advances of biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells. The development challenges and future trends are discussed as well. PMID:25482234

  10. Development of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, W. H.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, fire detection, and environmental monitoring. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. However, due to issues of selectivity and cross-sensitivity, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. This paper discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, hydrazine, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  11. A Thin Film Multifunction Sensor for Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    The status of work at NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a minimally intrusive integrated sensor to provide realtime measurement of strain, heat flux and flow in high temperature environments is presented in this paper. The sensor can be beneficial as a single package to characterize multiple stress and strain modes simultaneously on materials and components during engine development and validation. A major technical challenge is to take existing individual gauge designs and modify them into one integrated thin film sensor. Ultimately, the goal is to develop the ability to deposit the sensors directly onto internal engine parts or on a small thin substrate that can be attached to engine components. Several prototype sensors constructed of platinum, platinum-rhodium alloy, and alumina on constant-strain alumina beams have been built and bench-tested. The technical challenges of the design. construction, and testing are discussed. Data from the preliminary testing of the sensor array is presented. The future direction for the sensor development is discussed as well.

  12. CCD imaging sensor with flashed backside metal film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A backside illuminated CCD imaging sensor for reading out image charges from wells of the array of pixels is significantly improved for blue, UV, far UV and low energy x-ray wavelengths (1-5000.ANG.) by so overthinning the backside as to place the depletion edge at the surface and depositing a thin transparent metal film of about 10.ANG. on a native-quality oxide film of less than about 30.ANG. grown on the thinned backside. The metal is selected to have a higher work function than that of the semiconductor to so bend the energy bands (at the interface of the semiconductor material and the oxide film) as to eliminate wells that would otherwise trap minority carriers. A bias voltage may be applied to extend the frontside depletion edge to the interface of the semiconductor material with the oxide film in the event there is not sufficient thinning. This metal film (flash gate), which improves and stabilizes the quantum efficiency of a CCD imaging sensor, will also improve the QE of any p-n junction photodetector.

  13. Producing CCD imaging sensor with flashed backside metal film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A backside illuminated CCD imaging sensor for reading out image charges from wells of the array of pixels is significantly improved for blue, UV, far UV and low energy x-ray wavelengths (1-5000.ANG.) by so overthinning the backside as to place the depletion edge at the surface and depositing a thin transparent metal film of about 10.ANG. on a native-quality oxide film of less than about 30.ANG. grown on the thinned backside. The metal is selected to have a higher work function than that of the semiconductor to so bend the energy bands (at the interface of the semiconductor material and the oxide film) as to eliminate wells that would otherwise trap minority carriers. A bias voltage may be applied to extend the frontside depletion edge to the interface of the semiconductor material with the oxide film in the event there is not sufficient thinning. This metal film (flash gate), which improves and stabilizes the quantum efficiency of a CCD imaging sensor, will also improve the QE of any p-n junction photodetector.

  14. Co-polymer films for sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Homer, Margie L. (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Pin S. (Inventor); Kisor, Adam (Inventor); Jewell, April D. (Inventor); Shevade, Abhijit V. (Inventor); Manatt, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Taylor, Charles (Inventor); Blanco, Mario (Inventor); Goddard, William A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Embodiments include a sensor comprising a co-polymer, the co-polymer comprising a first monomer and a second monomer. For some embodiments, the first monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridine, and the second monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridinium propylamine chloride. For some embodiments, the first monomer is polystyrene and the second monomer is poly-2-vinyl pyridinium propylamine chloride. For some embodiments, the first monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridine, and the second monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridinium benzylamine chloride. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  15. Co-polymer Films for Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Homer, Margie L. (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Pin S. (Inventor); Kisor, Adam (Inventor); Jewell, April D. (Inventor); Shevade, Abhijit V. (Inventor); Manatt, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Taylor, Charles (Inventor); Blanco, Mario (Inventor); Goddard, William A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Embodiments include a sensor comprising a co-polymer, the co-polymer comprising a first monomer and a second monomer. For some embodiments, the first monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridine, and the second monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridinium propylamine chloride. For some embodiments, the first monomer is polystyrene and the second monomer is poly-2-vinyl pyridinium propylamine chloride. For some embodiments, the first monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridine, and the second monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridinium benzylamine chloride. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  16. Nanoporous thin film platform for biophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alla, Suresh; Solanki, Rina; Mattley, Yvette D.; Dabhi, Harish; Shahriari, Mahmoud R.

    2009-02-01

    A Nanoporous glass matrix is developed to encapsulate molecular probes for monitoring important biological parameters such as DO. The hydrophobic nanoporous host matrix is designed and fabricated using room temperature sol gel technique. The doped sol gel is then coated on biocompatible self adhesive patches or directly coated on the biocontainers. We demonstrate the application of this technique in non-invasive monitoring DO as well as oxygen partial pressure in a closed fermentation process as well as in a cell culture plate during bacterial growth. Dynamic response of sensor, sensitivity and accuracy is also demonstrated in this paper.

  17. Optical chemical sensors for environmental control and system management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabacco, M. B.; Digiuseppe, T. G.

    Several fiber optic based chemical sensors have been developed for use in plant growth systems and enclosed life support systems. Optical chemical sensors offer several distinct advantages in terms of sensitivity, calibration stability, immunity to biofouling and electrical interference, and ease of multiplexing sensors for multipoint/multiparameter analysis. Also, the ability to locate fiber optic sensors in close proximity to plant roots or leaves should improve the measurement reliability by obviating the need for handling and transport which can compromise sample integrity. Polestar Technologies and GEO-CENTERS have developed and tested many types of optical chemical sensors which utilize novel glass and polymeric materials as the sensor substrate. Analytes are detected using immobilized colorimetric indication systems or molecular recognition elements. Typically transduction is via wavelength specific absorption changes with multiwavelength detection for drift compensation. Sensors have been developed for solution pH, NH_3, ethylene, CO_2, and dissolved metal ions. In addition, unique PC-compatible optoelectronic interfaces, as well as distributed measurement systems, so that integrated detection systems are now available. In this paper recent efforts to develop sensors for critical nutrient ions are presented.

  18. Nitrogen dioxide sensing properties of sprayed tungsten oxide thin film sensor: Effect of film thickness.

    PubMed

    Ganbavle, V V; Mohite, S V; Agawane, G L; Kim, J H; Rajpure, K Y

    2015-08-01

    We report a study on effect of film thickness on NO2 sensing properties of sprayed WO3 thin films. WO3 thin films varying in thicknesses are deposited onto the glass substrates by simple spray pyrolysis technique by varying the volume of spray solution.Thin film gas sensors are characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques to study their physical properties. Film having thickness 745nm has shown highest gas response of 97% with 12 and 412s response and recovery times, respectively towards 100ppm NO2 concentration. Gas response of 20% is observed towards 10ppm NO2 at 200°C operating temperature. Sensitivity of the optimal sensor is 0.83%/ppm when operating at 200°C with 10ppm lower detection limit. The response of the sensor is reproducible and WO3 films are highly selective towards NO2 in presence of mist of various interfering gases viz. H2S, NH3, LPG, CO and SO2. PMID:25898119

  19. Monolithic piezoelectric sensor (MPS) for sensing chemical, biochemical and physical measurands

    SciTech Connect

    Andle, J.C.; Lec, R.M.

    2000-03-07

    A piezoelectric sensor and assembly for measuring chemical, biochemical and physical measurands is disclosed. The piezoelectric sensor comprises a piezoelectric material, preferably a crystal, a common metal layer attached to the top surface of the piezoelectric crystal, and a pair of independent resonators placed in close proximity on the piezoelectric crystal such that an efficacious portion of acoustic energy couples between the resonators. The first independent resonator serves as an input port through which an input signal is converted into mechanical energy within the sensor and the second independent resonator serves an output port through which a filtered replica of the input signal is detected as an electrical signal. Both a time delay and an attenuation at a given frequency between the input signal and the filtered replica may be measured as a sensor output. The sensor may be integrated into an assembly with a series feedback oscillator and a radio frequency amplifier to process the desired sensor output. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, a selective film is disposed upon the grounded metal layer of the sensor and the resonators are encapsulated to isolate them from the measuring environment. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, more than two resonators are used in order to increase the resolution of the sensor.

  20. Monolithic piezoelectric sensor (MPS) for sensing chemical, biochemical and physical measurands

    DOEpatents

    Andle, Jeffrey C.; Lec, Ryszard M.

    2000-01-01

    A piezoelectric sensor and assembly for measuring chemical, biochemical and physical measurands is disclosed. The piezoelectric sensor comprises a piezoelectric material, preferably a crystal, a common metal layer attached to the top surface of the piezoelectric crystal, and a pair of independent resonators placed in close proximity on the piezoelectric crystal such that an efficacious portion of acoustic energy couples between the resonators. The first independent resonator serves as an input port through which an input signal is converted into mechanical energy within the sensor and the second independent resonator serves an output port through which a filtered replica of the input signal is detected as an electrical signal. Both a time delay and an attenuation at a given frequency between the input signal and the filtered replica may be measured as a sensor output. The sensor may be integrated into an assembly with a series feedback oscillator and a radio frequency amplifier to process the desired sensor output. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, a selective film is disposed upon the grounded metal layer of the sensor and the resonators are encapsulated to isolate them from the measuring environment. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, more than two resonators are used in order to increase the resolution of the sensor.

  1. Utilization of biosensors and chemical sensors for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonting, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    There will be a need for a wide array of chemical sensors for biomedical experimentation and for the monitoring of water and air recycling processes on Space Station Freedom. The infrequent logistics flights of the Space Shuttle will necessitate onboard analysis. The advantages of biosensors and chemical sensors over conventional analysis onboard spacecraft are manifold. They require less crew time, space, and power. Sample treatment is not needed. Real time or near-real time monitoring is possible, in some cases on a continuous basis. Sensor signals in digitized form can be transmitted to the ground. Types and requirements for chemical sensors to be used in biomedical experimentation and monitoring of water recycling during long-term space missions are discussed.

  2. Utilization of biosensors and chemical sensors for space applications.

    PubMed

    Bonting, S L

    1992-01-01

    There will be a need for a wide array of chemical sensors for biomedical experimentation and for the monitoring of water and air recycling processes on Space Station Freedom. The infrequent logistics flights of the Space Shuttle will necessitate onboard analysis. The advantages of biosensors and chemical sensors over conventional analysis onboard spacecraft are manifold. They require less crew time, space, and power. Sample treatment is not needed. Real time or near-real time monitoring is possible, in some cases on a continuous basis. Sensor signals in digitized form can be transmitted to the ground. Types and requirements for chemical sensors to be used in biomedical experimentation and monitoring of water recycling during long-term space missions are discussed.

  3. Sensors, Volume 3, Part II, Chemical and Biochemical Sensors Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göpel, Wolfgang; Jones, T. A.; Kleitz, Michel; Lundström, Ingemar; Seiyama, Tetsuro

    1997-06-01

    'Sensors' is the first self-contained series to deal with the whole area of sensors. It describes general aspects, technical and physical fundamentals, construction, function, applications and developments of the various types of sensors. This is the second of two volumes focusing on chemical and biochemical sensors. It includes a detailed description of biosensors which often make use of transducer properties of the basic sensors and usually have additional biological components. This volume provides a unique overview of the applications, the possibilities and limitations of sensors in comparison with conventional instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Specific facettes of applications are presented by specialists from different fields including environmental, biotechnological, medical, or chemical process control. This book is an indispensable reference work for both specialits and newcomers, researchers and developers.

  4. Performance and stress analysis of metal oxide films for CMOS-integrated gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Lado; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    The integration of gas sensor components into smart phones, tablets and wrist watches will revolutionize the environmental health and safety industry by providing individuals the ability to detect harmful chemicals and pollutants in the environment using always-on hand-held or wearable devices. Metal oxide gas sensors rely on changes in their electrical conductance due to the interaction of the oxide with a surrounding gas. These sensors have been extensively studied in the hopes that they will provide full gas sensing functionality with CMOS integrability. The performance of several metal oxide materials, such as tin oxide (SnO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), indium oxide (In2O3) and indium-tin-oxide (ITO), are studied for the detection of various harmful or toxic cases. Due to the need for these films to be heated to temperatures between 250°C and 550°C during operation in order to increase their sensing functionality, a considerable degradation of the film can result. The stress generation during thin film deposition and the thermo-mechanical stress that arises during post-deposition cooling is analyzed through simulations. A tin oxide thin film is deposited using the efficient and economical spray pyrolysis technique, which involves three steps: the atomization of the precursor solution, the transport of the aerosol droplets towards the wafer and the decomposition of the precursor at or near the substrate resulting in film growth. The details of this technique and a simulation methodology are presented. The dependence of the deposition technique on the sensor performance is also discussed. PMID:25815445

  5. Performance and Stress Analysis of Metal Oxide Films for CMOS-Integrated Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Lado; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    The integration of gas sensor components into smart phones, tablets and wrist watches will revolutionize the environmental health and safety industry by providing individuals the ability to detect harmful chemicals and pollutants in the environment using always-on hand-held or wearable devices. Metal oxide gas sensors rely on changes in their electrical conductance due to the interaction of the oxide with a surrounding gas. These sensors have been extensively studied in the hopes that they will provide full gas sensing functionality with CMOS integrability. The performance of several metal oxide materials, such as tin oxide (SnO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), indium oxide (In2O3) and indium-tin-oxide (ITO), are studied for the detection of various harmful or toxic cases. Due to the need for these films to be heated to temperatures between 250 °C and 550 °C during operation in order to increase their sensing functionality, a considerable degradation of the film can result. The stress generation during thin film deposition and the thermo-mechanical stress that arises during post-deposition cooling is analyzed through simulations. A tin oxide thin film is deposited using the efficient and economical spray pyrolysis technique, which involves three steps: the atomization of the precursor solution, the transport of the aerosol droplets towards the wafer and the decomposition of the precursor at or near the substrate resulting in film growth. The details of this technique and a simulation methodology are presented. The dependence of the deposition technique on the sensor performance is also discussed. PMID:25815445

  6. DC magnetron sputtered polyaniline-HCl thin films for chemical sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Menegazzo, Nicola; Boyne, Devon; Bui, Holt; Beebe, Thomas P; Booksh, Karl S

    2012-07-01

    Thin films of conducting polymers exhibit unique chemical and physical properties that render them integral parts in microelectronics, energy storage devices, and chemical sensors. Overall, polyaniline (PAni) doped in acidic media has shown metal-like electronic conductivity, though exact physical and chemical properties are dependent on the polymer structure and dopant type. Difficulties arising from poor processability render production of doped PAni thin films particularly challenging. In this contribution, DC magnetron sputtering, a physical vapor deposition technique, is applied to the preparation of conductive thin films of PAni doped with hydrochloric acid (PAni-HCl) in an effort to circumvent issues associated with conventional thin film preparation methods. Samples manufactured by the sputtering method are analyzed along with samples prepared by conventional drop-casting. Physical characterization (atomic force microscopy, AFM) confirm the presence of PAni-HCl and show that films exhibit a reduced roughness and potentially pinhole-free coverage of the substrate. Spectroscopic evidence (UV-vis, FT-IR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) suggests that structural changes and loss of conductivity, not uncommon during PAni processing, does occur during the preparation process. Finally, the applicability of sputtered films to gas-phase sensing of NH(3) was investigated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and compared to previous contributions. In summary, sputtered PAni-HCl films exhibit quantifiable, reversible behavior upon exposure to NH(3) with a calculated LOD (by method) approaching 0.4 ppm NH(3) in dry air.

  7. Method of Forming a Hot Film Sensor System on a Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Sang Q. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method of forming a hot film sensor directly on a model is provided. A polyimide solution is sprayed onto the model. The model so sprayed is then heated in air. The steps of spraying and heating are repeated until a polyimide film of desired thickness is achieved on the model. The model with the polyimide film thereon is then thoroughly dried in air. One or more hot film sensors and corresponding electrical conducting leads are then applied directly onto the polyimide film.

  8. Self-powered thin-film motion vector sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Qingshen; Xie, Yannan; Zhu, Guang; Han, Ray P. S.; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-08-01

    Harnessing random micromeso-scale ambient energy is not only clean and sustainable, but it also enables self-powered sensors and devices to be realized. Here we report a robust and self-powered kinematic vector sensor fabricated using highly pliable organic films that can be bent to spread over curved and uneven surfaces. The device derives its operational energy from a close-proximity triboelectrification of two surfaces: a polytetrafluoroethylene film coated with a two-column array of copper electrodes that constitutes the mover and a polyimide film with the top and bottom surfaces coated with a two-column aligned array of copper electrodes that comprises the stator. During relative reciprocations, the electrodes in the mover generate electric signals of +/-5 V to attain a peak power density of >=65 mW m-2 at a speed of 0.3 ms-1. From our 86,000 sliding motion tests of kinematic measurements, the sensor exhibits excellent stability, repeatability and strong signal durability.

  9. Self-powered thin-film motion vector sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Qingshen; Xie, Yannan; Zhu, Guang; Han, Ray P. S.; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing random micromeso-scale ambient energy is not only clean and sustainable, but it also enables self-powered sensors and devices to be realized. Here we report a robust and self-powered kinematic vector sensor fabricated using highly pliable organic films that can be bent to spread over curved and uneven surfaces. The device derives its operational energy from a close-proximity triboelectrification of two surfaces: a polytetrafluoroethylene film coated with a two-column array of copper electrodes that constitutes the mover and a polyimide film with the top and bottom surfaces coated with a two-column aligned array of copper electrodes that comprises the stator. During relative reciprocations, the electrodes in the mover generate electric signals of ±5 V to attain a peak power density of ≥65 mW m−2 at a speed of 0.3 ms−1. From our 86,000 sliding motion tests of kinematic measurements, the sensor exhibits excellent stability, repeatability and strong signal durability. PMID:26271603

  10. Diamond thin film temperature and heat-flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Yang, G. S.; Masood, A.; Fredricks, R.

    1995-01-01

    Diamond film temperature and heat-flux sensors are developed using a technology compatible with silicon integrated circuit processing. The technology involves diamond nucleation, patterning, doping, and metallization. Multi-sensor test chips were designed and fabricated to study the thermistor behavior. The minimum feature size (device width) for 1st and 2nd generation chips are 160 and 5 micron, respectively. The p-type diamond thermistors on the 1st generation test chip show temperature and response time ranges of 80-1270 K and 0.29-25 microseconds, respectively. An array of diamond thermistors, acting as heat flux sensors, was successfully fabricated on an oxidized Si rod with a diameter of 1 cm. Some problems were encountered in the patterning of the Pt/Ti ohmic contacts on the rod, due mainly to the surface roughness of the diamond film. The use of thermistors with a minimum width of 5 micron (to improve the spatial resolution of measurement) resulted in lithographic problems related to surface roughness of diamond films. We improved the mean surface roughness from 124 nm to 30 nm by using an ultra high nucleation density of 10(exp 11)/sq cm. To deposit thermistors with such small dimensions on a curved surface, a new 3-D diamond patterning technique is currently under development. This involves writing a diamond seed pattern directly on the curved surface by a computer-controlled nozzle.

  11. Chemical and Biological Sensors Based on Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng

    Organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) have been explored for sensing applications for several decades due to their many advantages like easy fabrication, low cost, flexibility, and biocompatibility. Among these OTFTs, organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) have attracted a great deal of interest in recent years since the devices can operate stably in aqueous environment with relatively low working voltages and are suitable for applications in chemical and biological sensing. In this thesis, ion-sensitive properties of OECTs based on poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) have been systematically studied. It was found that the gate electrode played an important role on the ion-sensitive properties of OECTs. For the devices with Ag/AgCl gate electrode, Nernstian relationships between the shift of gate voltage and the concentrations of cations were obtained. For the devices with Pt and Au gate electrodes, the ion sensitivities were higher than that given by Nernst equation, which could be attributed to the interface between the metal gate electrode and the electrolyte. Moreover, OECTs based on PEDOT:PSS were integrated into flexible microfluidic systems. Then a novel label-free DNA sensor was developed, in which single-stranded DNA probes were immobilized on the surface of Au gate electrode. These devices successfully detected complementary DNA targets at concentrations as low as 1 nM. The detection limit was also extended to 10 pM by pulse-enhanced hybridization process of DNA. OECTs based on PEDOT:PSS were also exploited as cell-based biosensors. Human esophageal squamous epithelial cancer cell lines (KYSE30) and fibroblast cell lines (HFFI) were successfully grown on the surface of PEDOT:PSS film. Then the devices were used for in-vitro monitoring cell activities when the living cells were treated by trypsin and an anti-cancer drug, retinoic acid. It was found that the devices were sensitive to the change of surface charge

  12. Development of metal oxide impregnated stilbite thick film ethanol sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabole, M. P.; Lakhane, M. A.; Choudhari, A. L.; Khairnar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of the sensing efficiency of Titanium oxide/ Stilbite and Copper oxide /Stilbite composites towards detection of hazardous pollutants like ethanol. Stilbite based composites are prepared by physically mixing zeolite with metal oxides namely TiO2 and CuO with weight ratios of 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25. The resulting sensor materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy techniques. Composite sensors are fabricated in the form of thick film by using screen printing technique. The effect of metal oxide concentration on various ethanol sensing parameters such as operating temperature, maximum uptake capacity and response/recovery time are investigated. The results indicate that metal oxide impregnated stilbite composites have great potential as low temperature ethanol sensor.

  13. Carbon Nanotube-Based Chemical Sensors.

    PubMed

    Meyyappan, M

    2016-04-27

    The need to sense gases and vapors arises in numerous scenarios in industrial, environmental, security and medical applications. Traditionally, this activity has utilized bulky instruments to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the constituents of the gas mixture. It is ideal to use sensors for this purpose since they are smaller in size and less expensive; however, their performance in the field must match that of established analytical instruments in order to gain acceptance. In this regard, nanomaterials as sensing media offer advantages in sensitivity, preparation of chip-based sensors and construction of electronic nose for selective detection of analytes of interest. This article provides a review of the use of carbon nanotubes in gas and vapor sensing. PMID:26959284

  14. (001) Oriented piezoelectric films prepared by chemical solution deposition on Ni foils

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Hong Goo Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2014-07-07

    Flexible metal foil substrates are useful in some microelectromechanical systems applications including wearable piezoelectric sensors or energy harvesters based on Pb(Zr,Ti)O₃ (PZT) thin films. Full utilization of the potential of piezoelectrics on metal foils requires control of the film crystallographic texture. In this study, (001) oriented PZT thin films were grown by chemical solution deposition (CSD) on Ni foil and Si substrates. Ni foils were passivated using HfO₂ grown by atomic layer deposition in order to suppress substrate oxidation during subsequent thermal treatment. To obtain the desired orientation of PZT film, strongly (100) oriented LaNiO₃ films were integrated by CSD on the HfO₂ coated substrates. A high level of (001) LaNiO₃ and PZT film orientation were confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns. Before poling, the low field dielectric permittivity and loss tangents of (001) oriented PZT films on Ni are near 780 and 0.04 at 1 kHz; the permittivity drops significantly on poling due to in-plane to out-of-plane domain switching. (001) oriented PZT film on Ni displayed a well-saturated hysteresis loop with a large remanent polarization ~36 μC/cm², while (100) oriented PZT on Si showed slanted P-E hysteresis loops with much lower remanent polarizations. The |e{sub 31,f}| piezoelectric coefficient was around 10.6 C/m² for hot-poled (001) oriented PZT film on Ni.

  15. Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, Patrick James

    2011-12-01

    Membrane-based thermal sensor arrays were developed for the high-throughput analysis of the thermophysical properties of thin films. The continuous growth of integrated circuits and microelectromechanical systems, as well as the development of functional materials and the optimization of materials properties, have produced the need for instruments capable of fast materials screening and analysis at reduced length scales. Two instruments were developed based on a similar architecture, one to measure thermal transport properties and the other to perform calorimetry measurements. Both have the capability to accelerate the pace of materials development and understanding using combinatorial measurement methods. The shared architecture of the instruments consists of a silicon-based micromachined array of thermal sensors. Each sensor consists of a SiN X membrane and a W heating element that also serves as a temperature gauge. The array design allows the simultaneous creation of a library of thin film samples by various deposition techniques while systematically varying a parameter of interest across the device. The membrane-based sensors have little thermal mass making them extremely sensitive to changes in thermal energy. The nano-thermal transport array has an array of sensors optimized for sensitivity to heat loss. The heat loss is determined from the temperature response of the sensor to an applied current. An analytical model is used with a linear regression analysis to fit the thermal properties of the samples to the temperature response. The assumptions of the analytical model are validated with a finite element model. Measured thermal properties include specific heat, thermal effusivity, thermal conductivity, and emissivity. The technique is demonstrated by measuring the thermal transport properties of sputter deposited Cu multilayers with a total film thickness from 15 to 470 nm. The experimental results compare well to a theory based on electronic thermal

  16. Polyurea spin-coated thin films: Pyro- and piezoelectric properties and application to infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Koshiba, Yasuko; Misaki, Masahiro; Ishida, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the pyro- and piezoelectric properties of polyurea spin-coated films with thermal and chemical stability and their performance as infrared sensors. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 was measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer to be 23.5 pC/N. This coefficient increased with the poling electric field up to around 75 MV/m, suggesting that the polyurea dipole is aligned by applying an electric field greater than 75 MV/m. When a triangular thermal wave was applied, a square-wave pyroelectric current was observed and the pyroelectric coefficient measured to be 5.11 µC/(m2·K). The infrared sensor performance of the polyurea thin film was examined by measuring the voltage sensitivity to infrared irradiation. The obtained result of 70.4 V/W at 1 Hz is consistent with the results calculated from the measured pyroelectric coefficient. Our findings suggest that the performance of the sensor may be improved by increasing the pyroelectric coefficient of the polyurea films.

  17. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 µm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors. PMID:26437407

  18. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors.

    PubMed

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-09-30

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 μm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors.

  19. Disposable chemical sensors and biosensors made on cellulose paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo-Hyung; Mun, Seongcheol; Ko, Hyun-U.; Yun, Gyu-Young; Kim, Jaehwan

    2014-03-01

    Most sensors are based on ceramic or semiconducting substrates, which have no flexibility or biocompatibility. Polymer-based sensors have been the subject of much attention due to their ability to collect molecules on their sensing surface with flexibility. Beyond polymer-based sensors, the recent discovery of cellulose as a smart material paved the way to the use of cellulose paper as a potential candidate for mechanical as well as electronic applications such as actuators and sensors. Several different paper-based sensors have been investigated and suggested. In this paper, we review the potential of cellulose materials for paper-based application devices, and suggest their feasibility for chemical and biosensor applications.

  20. AZO thin film-based UV sensors: effects of RF power on the films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Nihan; Ceren Baskose, U.; Kinaci, Baris; Cakmak, Mehmet; Ozcelik, Suleyman

    2015-06-01

    Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films of thickness 150 nm were deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method under various RF powers in the range of 25-100 W. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the films were investigated by X-ray diffractometer, atomic force microscope, UV-Vis spectrometer and Hall effect measurement system. All the obtained films had a highly preferred orientation along [002] direction of the c-axis perpendicular to the flexible PET substrate and had a high-quality surface. The energy band gap ( E g) values of the films varied in the range of 3.30-3.43 eV. The minimum resistivity of 1.84 × 10-4 Ω cm was obtained at a 50 W RF power. The small changes in the RF power had a critical important role on the structural, optical and electrical properties of the sputtered AZO thin films on flexible PET substrate. In addition, UV sensing of the fabricated AZO thin film-based sensors was explored by using current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The sensors were sensitive in the UV region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  1. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  2. Conformal Thin Film Packaging for SiC Sensor Circuits in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Karnick, David A.; Ponchak, George E.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation sputtered silicon carbide annealed at 300 C for one hour is used as a conformal thin film package. A RF magnetron sputterer was used to deposit 500 nm silicon carbide films on gold metal structures on alumina wafers. To determine the reliability and resistance to immersion in harsh environments, samples were submerged in gold etchant for 24 hours, in BOE for 24 hours, and in an O2 plasma etch for one hour. The adhesion strength of the thin film was measured by a pull test before and after the chemical immersion, which indicated that the film has an adhesion strength better than 10(exp 8) N/m2; this is similar to the adhesion of the gold layer to the alumina wafer. MIM capacitors are used to determine the dielectric constant, which is dependent on the SiC anneal temperature. Finally, to demonstrate that the SiC, conformal, thin film may be used to package RF circuits and sensors, an LC resonator circuit was fabricated and tested with and without the conformal SiC thin film packaging. The results indicate that the SiC coating adds no appreciable degradation to the circuits RF performance. Index Terms Sputter, silicon carbide, MIM capacitors, LC resonators, gold etchants, BOE, O2 plasma

  3. Modeling thin-film piezoelectric polymer ultrasonic sensors.

    PubMed

    González, M G; Sorichetti, P A; Santiago, G D

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a model suitable to design and characterize broadband thin film sensors based on piezoelectric polymers. The aim is to describe adequately the sensor behavior, with a reasonable number of parameters and based on well-known physical equations. The mechanical variables are described by an acoustic transmission line. The electrical behavior is described by the quasi-static approximation, given the large difference between the velocities of propagation of the electrical and mechanical disturbances. The line parameters include the effects of the elastic and electrical properties of the material. The model was validated with measurements of a poly(vinylidene flouride) sensor designed for short-pulse detection. The model variables were calculated from the properties of the polymer at frequencies between 100 Hz and 30 MHz and at temperatures between 283 K and 313 K, a relevant range for applications in biology and medicine. The simulations agree very well with the experimental data, predicting satisfactorily the influence of temperature and the dielectric properties of the polymer on the behavior of the sensor. Conversely, the model allowed the calculation of the material dielectric properties from the measured response of the sensor, with good agreement with the published values.

  4. Modeling thin-film piezoelectric polymer ultrasonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. G.; Sorichetti, P. A.; Santiago, G. D.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a model suitable to design and characterize broadband thin film sensors based on piezoelectric polymers. The aim is to describe adequately the sensor behavior, with a reasonable number of parameters and based on well-known physical equations. The mechanical variables are described by an acoustic transmission line. The electrical behavior is described by the quasi-static approximation, given the large difference between the velocities of propagation of the electrical and mechanical disturbances. The line parameters include the effects of the elastic and electrical properties of the material. The model was validated with measurements of a poly(vinylidene flouride) sensor designed for short-pulse detection. The model variables were calculated from the properties of the polymer at frequencies between 100 Hz and 30 MHz and at temperatures between 283 K and 313 K, a relevant range for applications in biology and medicine. The simulations agree very well with the experimental data, predicting satisfactorily the influence of temperature and the dielectric properties of the polymer on the behavior of the sensor. Conversely, the model allowed the calculation of the material dielectric properties from the measured response of the sensor, with good agreement with the published values.

  5. Modeling thin-film piezoelectric polymer ultrasonic sensors.

    PubMed

    González, M G; Sorichetti, P A; Santiago, G D

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a model suitable to design and characterize broadband thin film sensors based on piezoelectric polymers. The aim is to describe adequately the sensor behavior, with a reasonable number of parameters and based on well-known physical equations. The mechanical variables are described by an acoustic transmission line. The electrical behavior is described by the quasi-static approximation, given the large difference between the velocities of propagation of the electrical and mechanical disturbances. The line parameters include the effects of the elastic and electrical properties of the material. The model was validated with measurements of a poly(vinylidene flouride) sensor designed for short-pulse detection. The model variables were calculated from the properties of the polymer at frequencies between 100 Hz and 30 MHz and at temperatures between 283 K and 313 K, a relevant range for applications in biology and medicine. The simulations agree very well with the experimental data, predicting satisfactorily the influence of temperature and the dielectric properties of the polymer on the behavior of the sensor. Conversely, the model allowed the calculation of the material dielectric properties from the measured response of the sensor, with good agreement with the published values. PMID:25430142

  6. Environmental monitoring of hydrocarbons: a chemical sensor perspective.

    PubMed

    Pejcic, Bobby; Eadington, Peter; Ross, Andrew

    2007-09-15

    Assessing the environmental impact of organic pollutants requires reliable analytical tools that can rapidly screen them with minimal sample handling. Chemical sensors are expected to play an increasing role in environmental monitoring, and recent technological advances are certain to facilitate the application of chemical sensing devices. The search for highly selective, sensitive, low cost, stable, and robust sensors for hydrocarbons is an area of interest that is reflected by many publications on this topic. This report surveys some of the work that has been undertaken using sensors to detect hydrocarbons in the gas and liquid phase. The analytical capabilities of various sensors are compared and discussed in terms of their selectivity, sensitivity, and detection limit. It was found that the sensitivity is highly dependent on the experimental conditions used in the preparation of the sensing surface. Many sensors display acceptable sensitivity under controlled laboratory conditions; however, very few are selective enough to distinguish among several hydrocarbons in complex mixtures. Selectivity is still a challenge that is hindering the widespread application of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of hydrocarbons and a number of strategies have been proposed to help overcome some of these problems.

  7. Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring Chemical Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Richard C.; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Timchalk, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript highlights research focused on the development of field-deployable analytical instruments based on EC detection. Background information and a general overview of EC detection methods and integrated use of nanomaterials in the development of these sensors are provided. New developments in EC sensors using various types of screen-printed electrodes, integrated nanomaterials, and immunoassays are discussed. Recent applications of EC sensors for assessing exposure to pesticides or detecting biomarkers of disease are highlighted to demonstrate the ability to monitor chemical metabolites, enzyme activity, or protein biomarkers of disease. In addition, future considerations and opportunities for advancing the use of EC platforms for dosimetric studies are covered.

  8. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

    1985-05-20

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulating means for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor means compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. 4 figs.

  9. Flexible pH sensors based on polysilicon thin film transistors and ZnO nanowalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiolo, L.; Mirabella, S.; Maita, F.; Alberti, A.; Minotti, A.; Strano, V.; Pecora, A.; Shacham-Diamand, Y.; Fortunato, G.

    2014-09-01

    A fully flexible pH sensor using nanoporous ZnO on extended gate thin film transistor (EGTFT) fabricated on polymeric substrate is demonstrated. The sensor adopts the Low Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon (LTPS) TFT technology for the active device, since it allows excellent electrical characteristics and good stability and opens the way towards the possibility of exploiting CMOS architectures in the future. The nanoporous ZnO sensitive film, consisting of very thin (20 nm) crystalline ZnO walls with a large surface-to-volume ratio, was chemically deposited at 90 °C, allowing simple process integration with conventional TFT micro-fabrication processes compatible with wide range of polymeric substrates. The pH sensor showed a near-ideal Nernstian response (˜59 mV/pH), indicating an ideality factor α ˜ 1 according to the conventional site binding model. The present results can pave the way to advanced flexible sensing systems, where sensors and local signal conditioning circuits will be integrated on the same flexible substrate.

  10. The Application of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing miniature chemical sensors for a variety of applications including fire detection, emissions monitoring, fuel leak detection, and environmental monitoring. Smart Lick and Stick sensor technology which integrates a sensor array, electronics, telemetry, and power into one microsystem are being developed. These microsystems require low power consumption for long-term aerospace applications. One approach to decreasing power consumption is the use of nanotechnology. Nanocrystalline tin oxide (SnO2) carbon monoxide (CO) sensors developed previously by this group have been successfully used for fire detection and emissions monitoring. This presentation will briefly review the overall NASA GRC chemical sensor program and discuss our further effort in nanotechnology applications. New carbon dioxide (CO2) sensing material using doped nanocrystalline SnO2 will be discussed. Nanocrystalline SnO2 coated solid electrolyte CO2 sensors and SnO2 nanorod and nanofiber hydrogen (H2) sensors operated at reduced or room temperatures will also be discussed.

  11. Physical characteristics of polyimide films for flexible sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wen-Yang; Fang, Te-Hua; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2008-08-01

    Physical characteristics of polyimide films, including optical, micro/nano mechanical, and thermophysical characteristics were investigated using a photometric, a nanoindentation, and a thermomechanical analyzer for applications in flexible sensors. Experimental results show that UV light cannot transmit into the polyimide films. The transmittances, with a maximum of about 86%, at VIS and near IR lights decrease with increasing PI film thicknesses. The mechanical characteristics were determined using tensile, bending moment, and nanoindentation testing. The stress-strain curve approximated bilinear characteristics, the load-unload bending moment exhibited hysteresis, and nanoindentation generated elastic energy dissipation in the loading-unloading region. Nanoindentation showed an almost uniform hardness and a reduced Young’s modulus of about 0.181±0.03 and 3.21±0.06 GPa, respectively, when the penetrating depth was more than about 2 μm. Thermophysical characteristics were greatly influenced on 8.3 and 25 μm specimens due to the higher relaxation of thin PI films. The thermal expansion remained steady when the thickness was over 50 μm. The results show that PI films have potential in flexible sensing and higher temperature fabrication.

  12. Low temperature deposition of silver sulfide thin films by AACVD for gas sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Syed Tajammul; Bakar, Shahzad Abu; Saima, BiBi; Muhammad, Bakhtiar

    2012-10-01

    Crack free Ag2S thin films were deposited on glass substrates by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) using [Ag(S2CN (C2H5)2)3]2 (1) as a precursor. Thin films were deposited from solution of methanol at 400 °C and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. SEM image of thin film showed well-defined and porous surface morphology with an average particle size of 0.3-0.5 μm. Optical band gaps energy of 1.33 eV was estimated for Ag2S thin film, by extrapolating the linear part of the Tauc plot recorded at room temperature. The gas sensing characteristics of the novel gas sensors based on Ag2S were investigated for the detection carbon monoxide. The effect of operating temperature and change in gas concentration on the performance of carbon monoxide were investigated. The sensing mechanism of sensor was discussed.

  13. Chemical mechanical polishing characteristics of ITO thin film prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang-Yeon; Choi, Gwon-Woo; Kim, Yong-Jae; Choi, Youn-Ok; Kim, Nam-Oh

    2012-02-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films have attracted intensive interest because of their unique properties of good conductivity, high optical transmittance over the visible region and easy patterning ability. ITO thin films have found many applications in anti-static coatings, thermal heaters, solar cells, flat panel displays (FPDs), liquid crystal displays (LCDs), electroluminescent devices, sensors and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). ITO thin films are generally fabricated by using various methods, such as spraying, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), evaporation, electron gun deposition, direct current electroplating, high frequency sputtering, and reactive sputtering. In this research, ITO films were grown on glass substrates by using a radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method. In order to achieve a high transmittance and a low resistivity, we examined the various film deposition conditions, such as substrate temperature, working pressure, annealing temperature, and deposition time. Next, in order to improve the surface quality of the ITO thin films, we performed a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) with different process parameters and compared the electrical and the optical properties of the polished ITO thin films. The best CMP conditions with a high removal rate, low nonuniformity, low resistivity and high transmittance were as follows: platen speed, head speed, polishing time, and slurry flow rate of 30 rpm, 30 rpm, 60 sec, and 60 ml/min, respectively.

  14. Magnetoelastic sensors in combination with nanometer-scale honeycombed thin film ceramic TiO2 for remote query measurement of humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Kouzoudis, D.; Dickey, E. C.; Qian, D.; Anderson, M. A.; Shahidain, R.; Lindsey, M.; Green, L.

    2000-01-01

    Ribbonlike magnetoelastic sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of an acoustic bell; in response to an externally applied magnetic field impulse the sensors emit magnetic flux with a characteristic resonant frequency. The magnetic flux can be detected external to the test area using a pick-up coil, enabling query remote monitoring of the sensor. The characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic sensor changes in response to mass loads. [L.D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1986). p. 100].Therefore, remote query chemical sensors can be fabricated by combining the magnetoelastic sensors with a mass changing, chemically responsive layer. In this work magnetoelastic sensors are coated with humidity-sensitive thin films of ceramic, nanodimensionally porous TiO2 to make remote query humidity sensors. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Sensitive And Selective Chemical Sensor With Nanostructured Surfaces.

    DOEpatents

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.

    2003-02-04

    A chemical sensor is provided which includes an optical resonator including a nanostructured surface comprising a plurality of nanoparticles bound to one or more surfaces of the resonator. The nanoparticles provide optical absorption and the sensor further comprises a detector for detecting the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment. In particular, a selective chemical interaction is provided which modifies the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment, and an analyte is detected based on the modified optical absorption. A light pulse is generated which enters the resonator to interrogate the modified optical absorption and the exiting light pulse is detected by the detector.

  16. Film Sensor Device Fabricated by a Piezoelectric Poly(L-lactic acid) Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masamichi; Kawamura, Hideki; Kageyama, Keisuke; Tajitsu, Yoshiro

    2012-09-01

    Synthetic piezoelectric polymer films produced from petroleum feedstock have long been used as thin-film sensors and actuators. However, the fossil fuel requirements for synthetic polymer production and carbon dioxide emission from its combustion have raised concern about the environmental impact of its continued use. Eco-friendly biomass polymers, such as poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), are made from plant-based (vegetable starch) plastics and, thus, have a much smaller carbon footprint. Additionally, PLLA does not exhibit pyroelectricity or unnecessary poling. This suggests the usefulness of PLLA films for the human-machine interface (HMI). As an example of a new HMI, we have produced a TV remote control using a PLLA film. The intuitive operation provided by this PLLA device suggests that it is useful for the elderly or handicapped.

  17. Optical Sensors Based on Single Arm Thin Film Waveguide Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, S. S.; Diggs, D.; Curley, M.; Adamovsky, Grigory (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Single-arm double-mode double-order optical waveguide interferometer utilizes interference between two propagating modes of different orders. Sensing effect results from the change in propagation conditions of the modes caused by the environment. The waveguide is made as an open asymmetric slab structure containing a dye-doped polymer film onto a fused quartz substrate. It is more sensitive to the change of environment than its conventional polarimetric analog using orthogonal modes (TE and TM) of the same order. The sensor still preserves the option of operating in polarimetric regime using a variety of mode combinations such as TE(sub 0)/TM(sub 0) (conventional), TE(sub 0)/TM(sub 1), TE(sub 1)/TM(sub 0), or TE(sub 1)/TM(sub 1) but can also work in nonpolarimetric regime using combinations TE(sub 0)/TM(sub 1) or TE(sub 0)/TM(sub 1). Utilization of different mode combinations simultaneously makes the device more versatile. Application of the sensor to gas sensing is based on doping polymer film with an organic indicator dye sensitive to a particular gas. Change of optical absorption spectrum of the dye caused by the gaseous pollutant results change of the reactive index of the dye-doped polymer film that can be detected by the sensor. As an indicator dyes, we utilize Bromocresol Purple doped into polymer poly(methyl) methacrylate, which shows a reversible growth of the absorption peak neat 600 nm after exposure to wet ammonia. We have built a breadboard prototype of the sensor with He-Ne laser as a light source and with a single mode fiber input and a multimode fiber output. The prototype showed sensitivity to temperature change of the order of 2 C per one full oscillation of the signal. The sensitivity of the sensor to the presence of wet ammonia is 200 ppm per one full oscillation of the signal. The further improvements include switching to a longer wavelength laser source (750-nm semiconductor laser), substitution of poly(methyl) methacrylate with hydrophilic

  18. The Enhanced Formaldehyde-Sensing Properties of P3HT-ZnO Hybrid Thin Film OTFT Sensor and Further Insight into Its Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Huiling; Li, Xian; Jiang, Yadong; Xie, Guangzhong; Du, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    A thin-film transistor (TFT) having an organic–inorganic hybrid thin film combines the advantage of TFT sensors and the enhanced sensing performance of hybrid materials. In this work, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)-zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles' hybrid thin film was fabricated by a spraying process as the active layer of TFT for the employment of a room temperature operated formaldehyde (HCHO) gas sensor. The effects of ZnO nanoparticles on morphological and compositional features, electronic and HCHO-sensing properties of P3HT-ZnO thin film were systematically investigated. The results showed that P3HT-ZnO hybrid thin film sensor exhibited considerable improvement of sensing response (more than two times) and reversibility compared to the pristine P3HT film sensor. An accumulation p-n heterojunction mechanism model was developed to understand the mechanism of enhanced sensing properties by incorporation of ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterizations were used to investigate the stability of the sensor in-depth, which reveals the performance deterioration was due to the changes of element composition and the chemical state of hybrid thin film surface induced by light and oxygen. Our study demonstrated that P3HT-ZnO hybrid thin film TFT sensor is beneficial in the advancement of novel room temperature HCHO sensing technology. PMID:25608214

  19. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor Development for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zhu, Dongming; Laster, Kimala L.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has an on-going effort for developing high temperature thin film sensors for advanced turbine engine components. Stable, high temperature thin film ceramic thermocouples have been demonstrated in the lab, and novel methods of fabricating sensors have been developed. To fabricate thin film heat flux sensors for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems, the rough and porous nature of the CMC system posed a significant challenge for patterning the fine features required. The status of the effort to develop thin film heat flux sensors specifically for use on silicon carbide (SiC) CMC systems with these new technologies is described.

  20. Dynamic high throughput screening of chemical libraries using acoustic-wave sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; May, Ralph J.

    2002-03-01

    We report a novel sensor-based high throughput screening (HTS) system for identification and quantitation of volatile substances in combinatorial chemical libraries. The measurement method employs a combination of a periodic introduction of a minute amount of a liquid sample into the HTS system, rapid evaporation of volatile components in the sample at room temperature, and dynamic measurement of a generated vapor pulse. These measurements are performed using an array of four 10 MHz acoustic-wave thickness-shear mode sensors coated with different chemically sensitive films. Developed HTS system is applied for screening of multiple samples such as those created in combinatorial chemical libraries of catalyst candidates in an industrially important arene oxidation process. The temporal modulation of the concentration of analyte vapors and measurement of both the temporal profile and the magnitude of the response improves sensor selectivity and makes possible robust identification and quantitation of arene oxidation components such as cresol and benzoquinone in multicomponent combinatorial mixtures with reduced number of sensors in the array. Different solvents such as water, acetonitrile, benzene, and toluene do not alter the response of sensors to analytes. Depending on the gas flow rate, quantitative measurements are performed 10-150 s after the sample introduction and provide significant throughput advantage over gas-chromatographic instruments. Determinations of mixtures of analytes in a variety of solvents are performed using multivariate locally weighted regression. This data analysis method provides the root mean squared error of prediction of less than 2 μg when measurements of cresol and benzoquinone amounts ranging from 0 to 50 μg are performed in 2 μL samples. This method of dynamic sensor-based measurements allows for instrument miniaturization and increases the usefulness of the instrument in space-limited applications. Upon operation of multiple

  1. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-08-01

    The authors discussed the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  2. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-12-31

    The authors discuss the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related ``signature`` chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the ``signature`` chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  3. Development of a Wireless and Passive SAW-Based Chemical Sensor for Organophosphorous Compound Detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang-Qian; Wang, Wen; Xue, Xu-Feng; Hu, Hao-Liang; Liu, Xin-Lu; Pan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A new wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based chemical sensor for organophosphorous compound (OC) detection is presented. A 434 MHz reflective delay line configuration composed by single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and three shorted reflectors was fabricated on YZ LiNbO₃ piezoelectric substrate as the sensor element. A thin fluoroalcoholpolysiloxane (SXFA) film acted as the sensitive interface deposited onto the SAW propagation path between the second and last reflectors of the SAW device. The first reflector was used for the temperature compensation utilizing the difference method. The adsorption between the SXFA and OC molecules modulates the SAW propagation, especially for the time delay of the SAW, hence, the phase shifts of the reflection peaks from the corresponding reflectors can be used to characterize the target OC. Prior to the sensor fabrication, the coupling of modes (COM) and perturbation theory were utilized to predict the SAW device performance and the gas adsorption. Referring to a frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW)-based reader unit, the developed SAW chemical sensor was wirelessly characterized in gas exposure experiments for dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) detection. Sensor performance parameters such as phase sensitivity, repeatability, linearity, and temperature compensation were evaluated experimentally. PMID:26633419

  4. Development of a Wireless and Passive SAW-Based Chemical Sensor for Organophosphorous Compound Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fang-Qian; Wang, Wen; Xue, Xu-Feng; Hu, Hao-Liang; Liu, Xin-Lu; Pan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A new wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based chemical sensor for organophosphorous compound (OC) detection is presented. A 434 MHz reflective delay line configuration composed by single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and three shorted reflectors was fabricated on YZ LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate as the sensor element. A thin fluoroalcoholpolysiloxane (SXFA) film acted as the sensitive interface deposited onto the SAW propagation path between the second and last reflectors of the SAW device. The first reflector was used for the temperature compensation utilizing the difference method. The adsorption between the SXFA and OC molecules modulates the SAW propagation, especially for the time delay of the SAW, hence, the phase shifts of the reflection peaks from the corresponding reflectors can be used to characterize the target OC. Prior to the sensor fabrication, the coupling of modes (COM) and perturbation theory were utilized to predict the SAW device performance and the gas adsorption. Referring to a frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW)-based reader unit, the developed SAW chemical sensor was wirelessly characterized in gas exposure experiments for dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) detection. Sensor performance parameters such as phase sensitivity, repeatability, linearity, and temperature compensation were evaluated experimentally. PMID:26633419

  5. Faraday Effect sensor redressed by Nd2Fe14B biasing magnetic film.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xinbing; Nguyen, Truong Giang; Qian, Bo; Jiang, Chunping; Ma, Lixin

    2012-01-16

    A Faraday Effect sensor with Nd(2)Fe(14)B biasing magnetic film was described. Ta/Nd(2)Fe(14)B/Ta films were grown by magnetron sputtering method. The magnetic domain in the sensor with the Nd(2)Fe(14)B biasing magnetic film can persist its distribution. The average linearity error of Faraday Effect sensor with biasing magnetic film decreased from 1.42% to 0.125% compared with non-biasing magnetic film, and the measurement range increased from 820 Oe to 900 Oe.

  6. Exploitation of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a remote chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    We have discussed recent experimental results using a resonance-Raman-based LIDAR system as a remote chemical sensor. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, which 6 orders-of-magnitude, can be as large as 4 to an increased sensing range for a given chemical concentration or lower detection limit for a given stand-off distance can be realized. The success discussed above can in part be traced back to the use of new state-of-the-art technologies which, only recently, have allowed the phenomenon of resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to be fully exploited as a remote chemical sensor platform. Since many chemicals have electronic transitions in the UV/IS, it is expected that many will have pronounced resonance enhancements.

  7. Novel integrated-optic chemical sensor for environmental monitoring and process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, John G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an inexpensive point sensor for chemical detection. The sensor is based on a novel integrated optic interferometer that provides a highly stable platform for measuring low concentrations of specific chemicals in gaseous or aqueous environments. Sensing is accomplished by monitoring refractive index changes in a thin-film surface coating, with specificity for a particular chemical achieved by using a surface coating that selectively interacts with that chemical. Multiple surface coatings can be used for simultaneous detection of several chemicals. This approach has a number of key advantages: (1) it is capable of quantifying concentrations down to at least the parts-per-billion level, yet has a broad dynamic range, (2) it is rapid response (chemicals), (5) it is compact (centimeter dimensions), (6) it requires minimal power (Chemicals investigated to date include ammonia, benzene, toluene, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen. Applications range from worksite and workforce monitoring to agricultural and industrial process control.

  8. Process development for waveguide chemical sensors with integrated polymeric sensitive layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amberkar, Raghu; Gao, Zhan; Park, Jongwon; Henthorn, David B.; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2008-02-01

    Due to the proper optical property and flexibility in the process development, an epoxy-based, high-aspect ratio photoresist SU-8 is now attracting attention in optical sensing applications. Manipulation of the surface properties of SU-8 waveguides is critical to attach functional films such as chemically-sensitive layers. We describe a new integration process to immobilize fluorescence molecules on SU-8 waveguide surface for application to intensity-based optical chemical sensors. We use two polymers for this application. Spin-on, hydrophobic, photopatternable silicone is a convenient material to contain fluorophore molecules and to pattern a photolithographically defined thin layer on the surface of SU-8. We use fumed silica powders as an additive to uniformly disperse the fluorophores in the silicone precursor. In general, additional processes are not critically required to promote the adhesion between the SU-8 and silicone. The other material is polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA). Recently we demonstrated a novel photografting method to modify the surface of SU-8 using a surface bound initiator to control its wettability. The activated surface is then coated with a monomer precursor solution. Polymerization follows when the sample is exposed to UV irradiation, resulting in a grafted PEGDA layer incorporating fluorophores within the hydrogel matrix. Since this method is based the UV-based photografting reaction, it is possible to grow off photolithographically defined hydrogel patterns on the waveguide structures. The resulting films will be viable integrated components in optical bioanalytical sensors. This is a promising technique for integrated chemical sensors both for planar type waveguide and vertical type waveguide chemical sensors.

  9. Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring Chemical Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Richard C.; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Timchalk, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    The coupling of dosimetry measurements and modeling represents a promising strategy for deciphering the relationship between chemical exposure and disease outcome. To support the development and implementation of biological monitoring programs, quantitative technologies for measuring xenobiotic exposure are needed. The development of portable nanotechnology-based electrochemical sensors has the potential to meet the needs for low cost, rapid, high-throughput and ultrasensitive detectors for biomonitoring an array of chemical markers. Highly selective electrochemical (EC) sensors capable of pM sensitivity, high-throughput and low sample requirements (<50uL) are discussed. These portable analytical systems have many advantages over currently available technologies, thus potentially representing the next-generation of biomonitoring analyzers. This manuscript highlights research focused on the development of field-deployable analytical instruments based on EC detection. Background information and a general overview of EC detection methods and integrated use of nanomaterials in the development of these sensors are provided. New developments in EC sensors using various types of screen-printed electrodes, integrated nanomaterials, and immunoassays are presented. Recent applications of EC sensors for assessing exposure to pesticides or detecting biomarkers of disease are highlighted to demonstrate the ability to monitor chemical metabolites, enzyme activity, or protein biomarkers of disease. In addition, future considerations and opportunities for advancing the use of EC platforms for dosimetric studies are discussed. PMID:19018275

  10. Nanotechnology-based electrochemical sensors for biomonitoring chemical exposures.

    PubMed

    Barry, Richard C; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Timchalk, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    The coupling of dosimetry measurements and modeling represents a promising strategy for deciphering the relationship between chemical exposure and disease outcome. To support the development and implementation of biological monitoring programs, quantitative technologies for measuring xenobiotic exposure are needed. The development of portable nanotechnology-based electrochemical (EC) sensors has the potential to meet the needs for low cost, rapid, high-throughput, and ultrasensitive detectors for biomonitoring an array of chemical markers. Highly selective EC sensors capable of pM sensitivity, high-throughput and low sample requirements (<50 microl) are discussed. These portable analytical systems have many advantages over currently available technologies, thus potentially representing the next generation of biomonitoring analyzers. This paper highlights research focused on the development of field-deployable analytical instruments based on EC detection. Background information and a general overview of EC detection methods and integrated use of nanomaterials in the development of these sensors are provided. New developments in EC sensors using various types of screen-printed electrodes, integrated nanomaterials, and immunoassays are presented. Recent applications of EC sensors for assessing exposure to pesticides or detecting biomarkers of disease are highlighted to demonstrate the ability to monitor chemical metabolites, enzyme activity, or protein biomarkers of disease. In addition, future considerations and opportunities for advancing the use of EC platforms for dosimetric studies are discussed.

  11. Near-field fiber optic chemical sensors and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weihong; Shi, Zhong-You; Thorsrud, Bjorn A.; Harris, C.; Kopelman, Raoul

    1994-03-01

    Near-field optics has been applied in the nanofabrication of subwavelength optical fiber chemical and biological sensors and their operation in chemical and biological analysis. A thousandfold miniaturization of immobilized optical fiber sensors has been achieved by a near- field photo-nanofabrication technique, which is based on nanofabricated optical fiber tips and near-field photopolymerization. This technique has been further developed by multistep near- field nanofabrication and multidye probe fabrication. Multistep nanofabrication can further miniaturize optical fiber sensors, while multidye fabrication results in multifunctional optic and excitonic probes with extremely small size. These probes emit multiwavelength photons or produce excitons of different energy levels, and may have multiple chemical or biological sensitivities. The nondestructive submicrometer sensor has demonstrated its ability to carry out static and dynamic determinations of pH in intact rat conceptuses of varying gestational ages. The ability of the sensors to measure pH changes, in real time, in the intact rat conceptus, demonstrates their potential applications for dynamic analysis in multicellular organisms and single cells. The near-field interaction of photons with matter is discussed.

  12. Chemical deposition and characterization of copper indium disulphide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, H. M.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2004-12-01

    A simple chemical deposition method was used to prepare copper indium disulphide thin films. The method is based on sequential immersion of substrate into different cationic and anionic precursor solutions and rinsing before every immersion with double distilled water. In the present investigation, CuInS 2 films have been deposited using chemical deposition method. These films were characterized for their structural, surface morphological, compositional and electrical properties by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), electrical resistivity and thermoemf measurement techniques.

  13. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology: (1) Heat flux is one of a number of parameters, together with pressure, temperature, flow, etc. of interest to engine designers and fluid dynamists, (2) The measurement of heat flux is of interest in directly determining the cooling requirements of hot section blades and vanes, and (3)In addition, if the surface and gas temperatures are known, the measurement of heat flux provides a value for the convective heat transfer coefficient that can be compared with the value provided by CFD codes.

  14. MEMS device for mass market gas and chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinkade, Brian R.; Daly, James T.; Johnson, Edward A.

    2000-08-01

    Gas and chemical sensors are used in many applications. Industrial health and safety monitors allow companies to meet OSHA requirements by detecting harmful levels of toxic or combustible gases. Vehicle emissions are tested during annual inspections. Blood alcohol breathalizers are used by law enforcement. Refrigerant leak detection ensures that the Earth's ozone layer is not being compromised. Industrial combustion emissions are also monitored to minimize pollution. Heating and ventilation systems watch for high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) to trigger an increase in fresh air exchange. Carbon monoxide detectors are used in homes to prevent poisoning from poor combustion ventilation. Anesthesia gases are monitored during a patients operation. The current economic reality is that two groups of gas sensor technologies are competing in two distinct existing market segments - affordable (less reliable) chemical reaction sensors for consumer markets and reliable (expensive) infrared (IR) spectroscopic sensors for industrial, laboratory, and medical instrumentation markets. Presently high volume mass-market applications are limited to CO detectros and on-board automotive emissions sensors. Due to reliability problems with electrochemical sensor-based CO detectors there is a hesitancy to apply these sensors in other high volume applications. Applications such as: natural gas leak detection, non-invasive blood glucose monitoring, home indoor air quality, personal/portable air quality monitors, home fire/burnt cooking detector, and home food spoilage detectors need a sensor that is a small, efficient, accurate, sensitive, reliable, and inexpensive. Connecting an array of these next generation gas sensors to wireless networks that are starting to proliferate today creates many other applications. Asthmatics could preview the air quality of their destinations as they venture out into the day. HVAC systems could determine if fresh air intake was actually better than the air

  15. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    An electronic nose (e-nose) is a biologically inspired device designed to mimic the operation of the olfactory system. The e-nose utilizes a chemical sensor array consisting of broadly responsive vapor sensors, whose combined response produces a unique pattern for a given compound or mixture. The sensor array is inspired by the biological function of the receptor neurons found in the human olfactory system, which are inherently cross-reactive and respond to many different compounds. The use of an e-nose is an attractive approach to predict unknown odors and is used in many fields for quantitative and qualitative analysis. If properly designed, an e-nose has the potential to adapt to new odors it was not originally designed for through laboratory training and algorithm updates. This would eliminate the lengthy and costly R&D costs associated with materiel and product development. Although e-nose technology has been around for over two decades, much research is still being undertaken in order to find new and more diverse types of sensors. Graphene is a single-layer, 2D material comprised of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, with extraordinary electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties due to its 2D, sp2-bonded structure. Graphene has much potential as a chemical sensing material due to its 2D structure, which provides a surface entirely exposed to its surrounding environment. In this configuration, every carbon atom in graphene is a surface atom, providing the greatest possible surface area per unit volume, so that electron transport is highly sensitive to adsorbed molecular species. Graphene has gained much attention since its discovery in 2004, but has not been realized in many commercial electronics. It has the potential to be a revolutionary material for use in chemical sensors due to its excellent conductivity, large surface area, low noise, and versatile surface for functionalization. In this work, graphene is incorporated into a

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgharkar, Narendra Shamkant

    We have studied the kinetics of copper chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for interconnect metallization using hydrogen (Hsb2) reduction of the Cu(hfac)sb2 (copper(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate) precursor. Steady-state deposition rates were measured using a hot-wall microbalance reactor. For base case conditions of 2 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C, a growth rate of 0.5 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 10 nm minsp{-1}) is observed. Reaction order experiments suggest that the deposition rate passes through a maximum at partial pressure of 2 Torr of Cu(hfac)sb2. The deposition rate has an overall half-order dependence on Hsb2 partial pressure. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expression is used to describe the observed kinetic dependencies on Cu(hfac)sb2, Hsb2, and H(hfac). Based on the rate expression a mechanism is proposed in which the overall rate is determined by the surface reaction of adsorbed Cu(hfac)sb2 and H species. Additionally, the role of alcohols in enhancing the deposition rate has been investigated. Addition of isopropanol results in a six fold enhancement to yield a deposition rate of 3.3 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}) at 5 Torr of isopropanol, 0.4 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C. Ethanol and methanol give lower enhancements of 1.75 and 1.1 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1}, respectively. A mechanism based on the ordering of the aqueous pKsba values of the alcohols is proposed to explain the observed results. Lastly, we have built a warm-wall Pedestal reactor apparatus to demonstrate copper CVD on TiN/Si substrates. The apparatus includes a liquid injection system for transport of isopropanol-diluted precursor solutions. At optimized conditions of precursor and substrate pre-treatments, we have deposited uniform films of copper on TiN/Si substrates at an average deposition rate of 3.0 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}).

  17. Fiber-optic chemical sensors for competitive binding fluoroimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Tromberg, B.J.; Sepaniak, M.J.; Vo-Dinh, T.; Griffin, G.D.

    1987-04-15

    This paper describes the development of a fiber-optic chemical sensor based on the principle of competitive-binding fluorescence immunoassay. Rabbit immunoglobin G (IgG) is covalently immobilized on the distal sensing tip of a quartz optical fiber. The sensor is exposed to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled and unlabeled anti-rabbit IgG. The 488-nm line of an argon-ion laser provides excitation of sensor-bound analyte. This results in fluorescence emission at the optical fiber's sensing tip. Sensor response is inversely proportional to the amount of unlabeled anti-IgG in the sample. Limits of detection (LOD) vary with incubation time, sample size, and measurement conditions. For 10-/sup +/L samples, typical LOD are 25 fmol of unlabeled antibody in a 20-min incubation period. These results indicate that each fiber-optic fluoroimmunosensor can be constructed to perform a single sensitive, rapid, low-volume immunoassay, in in situ or benchtop applications.

  18. DOE cooperative monitoring testbed for unattended chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollina, Richard J.; Baker, John

    1997-07-01

    The goal of the test bed project is to test portable, unattended chemical analysis instruments that will help verify the compliance of various international agreements on weapons of mass destruction. We report on the design of the test bed and present response curves for the first sensor deployed at the test bed. The architecture of the data- acquisition and display interface utilizes industry standards (LonWorks and CORBA), state-of-the-art developmental tools, advanced data visualization and display tools, and commercial government off-the-shelf software and hardware in order to have a flexible/modular infrastructure for integrating and testing both sensors and software applications for unattended remote monitoring systems. The HAZMAT Spill Center located at the Nevada Test Site will be described as well as the opportunities it offers for testing unattended chemical sensors.

  19. Dataset from chemical gas sensor array in turbulent wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Huerta, Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The dataset includes the acquired time series of a chemical detection platform exposed to different gas conditions in a turbulent wind tunnel. The chemo-sensory elements were sampling directly the environment. In contrast to traditional approaches that include measurement chambers, open sampling systems are sensitive to dispersion mechanisms of gaseous chemical analytes, namely diffusion, turbulence, and advection, making the identification and monitoring of chemical substances more challenging. The sensing platform included 72 metal-oxide gas sensors that were positioned at 6 different locations of the wind tunnel. At each location, 10 distinct chemical gases were released in the wind tunnel, the sensors were evaluated at 5 different operating temperatures, and 3 different wind speeds were generated in the wind tunnel to induce different levels of turbulence. Moreover, each configuration was repeated 20 times, yielding a dataset of 18,000 measurements. The dataset was collected over a period of 16 months. The data is related to "On the performance of gas sensor arrays in open sampling systems using Inhibitory Support Vector Machines", by Vergara et al.[1]. The dataset can be accessed publicly at the UCI repository upon citation of [1]: http://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/datasets/Gas+sensor+arrays+in+open+sampling+settings.

  20. Imaging sensor constellation for tomographic chemical cloud mapping.

    PubMed

    Cosofret, Bogdan R; Konno, Daisei; Faghfouri, Aram; Kindle, Harry S; Gittins, Christopher M; Finson, Michael L; Janov, Tracy E; Levreault, Mark J; Miyashiro, Rex K; Marinelli, William J

    2009-04-01

    A sensor constellation capable of determining the location and detailed concentration distribution of chemical warfare agent simulant clouds has been developed and demonstrated on government test ranges. The constellation is based on the use of standoff passive multispectral infrared imaging sensors to make column density measurements through the chemical cloud from two or more locations around its periphery. A computed tomography inversion method is employed to produce a 3D concentration profile of the cloud from the 2D line density measurements. We discuss the theoretical basis of the approach and present results of recent field experiments where controlled releases of chemical warfare agent simulants were simultaneously viewed by three chemical imaging sensors. Systematic investigations of the algorithm using synthetic data indicate that for complex functions, 3D reconstruction errors are less than 20% even in the case of a limited three-sensor measurement network. Field data results demonstrate the capability of the constellation to determine 3D concentration profiles that account for ~?86%? of the total known mass of material released.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological and chemical sensors for cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Elfriede

    2010-11-01

    The great challenge for sensor systems to be accepted as a relevant diagnostic and therapeutic tool for cancer detection is the ability to determine the presence of relevant biomarkers or biomarker patterns comparably to or even better than the traditional analytical systems. Biosensor and chemical sensor technologies are already used for several clinical applications such as blood glucose or blood gas measurements. However, up to now not many sensors have been developed for cancer-related tests because only a few of the biomarkers have shown clinical relevance and the performance of the sensor systems is not always satisfactory. New genomic and proteomic tools are used to detect new molecular signatures and identify which combinations of biomarkers may detect best the presence or risk of cancer or monitor cancer therapies. These molecular signatures include genetic and epigenetic signatures, changes in gene expressions, protein biomarker profiles and other metabolite profile changes. They provide new changes in using different sensor technologies for cancer detection especially when complex biomarker patterns have to be analyzed. To address requirements for this complex analysis, there have been recent efforts to develop sensor arrays and new solutions (e.g. lab on a chip) in which sampling, preparation, high-throughput analysis and reporting are integrated. The ability of parallelization, miniaturization and the degree of automation are the focus of new developments and will be supported by nanotechnology approaches. This review recaps some scientific considerations about cancer diagnosis and cancer-related biomarkers, relevant biosensor and chemical sensor technologies, their application as cancer sensors and consideration about future challenges.

  2. WO{sub 3} thin film based multiple sensor array for electronic nose application

    SciTech Connect

    Ramgir, Niranjan S. E-mail: deepakcct1991@gmail.com; Goyal, C. P.; Datta, N.; Kaur, M.; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.; Goyal, Deepak E-mail: deepakcct1991@gmail.com

    2015-06-24

    Multiple sensor array comprising 16 x 2 sensing elements were realized using RF sputtered WO{sub 3} thin films. The sensor films were modified with a thin layer of sensitizers namely Au, Ni, Cu, Al, Pd, Ti, Pt. The resulting sensor array were tested for their response towards different gases namely H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, NO and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH. The sensor response values measured from the response curves indicates that the sensor array generates a unique signature pattern (bar chart) for the gases. The sensor response values can be used to get both qualitative and quantitative information about the gas.

  3. Odour Detection Methods: Olfactometry and Chemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Brattoli, Magda; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; de Pinto, Valentina; Loiotile, Annamaria Demarinis; Lovascio, Sara; Penza, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of the odours issue arises from the sensory nature of smell. From the evolutionary point of view olfaction is one of the oldest senses, allowing for seeking food, recognizing danger or communication: human olfaction is a protective sense as it allows the detection of potential illnesses or infections by taking into account the odour pleasantness/unpleasantness. Odours are mixtures of light and small molecules that, coming in contact with various human sensory systems, also at very low concentrations in the inhaled air, are able to stimulate an anatomical response: the experienced perception is the odour. Odour assessment is a key point in some industrial production processes (i.e., food, beverages, etc.) and it is acquiring steady importance in unusual technological fields (i.e., indoor air quality); this issue mainly concerns the environmental impact of various industrial activities (i.e., tanneries, refineries, slaughterhouses, distilleries, civil and industrial wastewater treatment plants, landfills and composting plants) as sources of olfactory nuisances, the top air pollution complaint. Although the human olfactory system is still regarded as the most important and effective “analytical instrument” for odour evaluation, the demand for more objective analytical methods, along with the discovery of materials with chemo-electronic properties, has boosted the development of sensor-based machine olfaction potentially imitating the biological system. This review examines the state of the art of both human and instrumental sensing currently used for the detection of odours. The olfactometric techniques employing a panel of trained experts are discussed and the strong and weak points of odour assessment through human detection are highlighted. The main features and the working principles of modern electronic noses (E-Noses) are then described, focusing on their better performances for environmental analysis. Odour emission monitoring carried out

  4. Film processing investigation. [improved chemical mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The present operational chemical mixing system for the Photographic Technology Division is evaluated, and the limitations are defined in terms of meeting the present and programmed chemical supply and delivery requirements. A major redesign of the entire chemical mixing, storage, analysis, and supply system is recommended. Other requirements for immediate and future implementations are presented.

  5. Chemical and biological sensing with organic thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabeck, Jeffrey Todd

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) offer a great deal of promise for applications in chemical and biological sensing where there is a demand for small, portable, and inexpensive sensors. OTFTs have many advantages over other types of sensors, including low-cost fabrication, straightforward miniaturization, simple instrumentation, and inherent signal amplification. This dissertation examines two distinct types of OTFTs: organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on pentacene, and organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The bulk of the previous work on sensing with OFETs has focused on gas sensing, and this dissertation contributes to this body of work by briefly treating the large, reversible response of pentacene OFETs to humidity. However, there are many applications where the analyte of interest must be detected in an aqueous environment rather than a gaseous environment, and very little work has been done in this area for OFETs. Therefore, the integration of pentacene OFETs with microfluidics is treated in detail. Using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels to confine aqueous solutions over the active region of pentacene transistors, it is demonstrated that the current-voltage characteristics remain stable under aqueous flow with a decrease in mobility of ˜30% compared to its value when dry. The operation of PEDOT:PSS transistors is also treated in detail. It is demonstrated that their transistor behavior cannot be attributed solely to a field effect and that ion motion is key to the switching mechanism. It is also demonstrated that simple glucose sensors based on PEDOT:PSS OECTs are sensitive to low glucose concentrations below 1 mM, therefore showing promise for potential application in the field of noninvasive glucose monitoring for diabetic patients using saliva rather than blood samples. Furthermore, a novel microfluidic gating technique has been

  6. Evanescent wave absorption sensor based on tapered multimode fiber coated with monolayer graphene film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hengwei; Gao, Saisai; Chen, Peixi; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yang, Cheng; Huo, Yanyan; Yue, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    An evanescent wave absorption (EWA) sensor based on tapered multimode fiber (TMMF) coated with monolayer graphene film for the detection of double-stranded DNA (DS-DNA) is investigated in this work. The TMMF is a silica multimode fiber (nominally at 62.5 μm), which was tapered to symmetric taper with waist diameters of ~30 μm and total length of ~3 mm. Monolayer graphene film was grown on a copper foil via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology and transferred onto skinless tapered fiber core via dry transfer technology. All the components of the sensor are coupled together by fusion splicer in order to eliminate the external disturbance. DS-DNA is created by the assembly of two relatively complemented oligonucleotides. The measurements are obtained by using a spectrometer in the optical wavelength range of 400-900 nm. With the increase of DS-DNA concentration, the output light intensity (OPLI) arisen an obvious attenuation. Importantly, the absorbance (A) and the DS-DNA concentrations shown a reasonable linear variation in a wide range of 5-400 μM. Through a series of comparison, the accuracy of TMMF sensor with graphene (G-TMMF) is much better than that without graphene (TMMF), which can be attributed to the molecular enrichment of graphene by π-π stacking.

  7. Nanostructured conjugated polymers in chemical sensors: synthesis, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Correa, D S; Medeiros, E S; Oliveira, J E; Paterno, L G; Mattoso, Luiz C

    2014-09-01

    Conjugated polymers are organic materials endowed with a π-electron conjugation along the polymer backbone that present appealing electrical and optical properties for technological applications. By using conjugated polymeric materials in the nanoscale, such properties can be further enhanced. In addition, the use of nanostructured materials makes possible miniaturize devices at the micro/nano scale. The applications of conjugated nanostructured polymers include sensors, actuators, flexible displays, discrete electronic devices, and smart fabric, to name a few. In particular, the use of conjugated polymers in chemical and biological sensors is made feasible owning to their sensitivity to the physicochemical conditions of its surrounding environment, such as chemical composition, pH, dielectric constant, humidity or even temperature. Subtle changes in these conditions bring about variations on the electrical (resistivity and capacitance), optical (absorptivity, luminescence, etc.), and mechanical properties of the conjugated polymer, which can be precisely measured by different experimental methods and ultimately associated with a specific analyte and its concentration. The present review article highlights the main features of conjugated polymers that make them suitable for chemical sensors. An especial emphasis is given to nanostructured sensors systems, which present high sensitivity and selectivity, and find application in beverage and food quality control, pharmaceutical industries, medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and homeland security, and other applications as discussed throughout this review.

  8. Nanostructured conjugated polymers in chemical sensors: synthesis, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Correa, D S; Medeiros, E S; Oliveira, J E; Paterno, L G; Mattoso, Luiz C

    2014-09-01

    Conjugated polymers are organic materials endowed with a π-electron conjugation along the polymer backbone that present appealing electrical and optical properties for technological applications. By using conjugated polymeric materials in the nanoscale, such properties can be further enhanced. In addition, the use of nanostructured materials makes possible miniaturize devices at the micro/nano scale. The applications of conjugated nanostructured polymers include sensors, actuators, flexible displays, discrete electronic devices, and smart fabric, to name a few. In particular, the use of conjugated polymers in chemical and biological sensors is made feasible owning to their sensitivity to the physicochemical conditions of its surrounding environment, such as chemical composition, pH, dielectric constant, humidity or even temperature. Subtle changes in these conditions bring about variations on the electrical (resistivity and capacitance), optical (absorptivity, luminescence, etc.), and mechanical properties of the conjugated polymer, which can be precisely measured by different experimental methods and ultimately associated with a specific analyte and its concentration. The present review article highlights the main features of conjugated polymers that make them suitable for chemical sensors. An especial emphasis is given to nanostructured sensors systems, which present high sensitivity and selectivity, and find application in beverage and food quality control, pharmaceutical industries, medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and homeland security, and other applications as discussed throughout this review. PMID:25924296

  9. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Aerospace Fire Detection Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Fralick, Gustave; Thomas, Valarie; Makel, D.; Liu, C. C.; Ward, B.; Wu, Q. H.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of fires on-board commercial aircraft is extremely important for safety reasons. Although dependable fire detection equipment presently exists within the cabin, detection of fire within the cargo hold has been less reliable and susceptible to false alarms. A second, independent method of fire detection to complement the conventional smoke detection techniques, such as the measurement of chemical species indicative of a fire, will help reduce false alarms and improve aircraft safety. Although many chemical species are indicative of a fire, two species of particular interest are CO and CO2. This paper discusses microfabricated chemical sensor development tailored to meet the needs of fire safety applications. This development is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. The individual sensor being developed and their level of maturity will be presented.

  10. Recent Developments in Chemically Reactive Sensors for Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Mast, Dion J.; Baker, David L.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Propellant system leaks can pose a significant hazard in aerospace operations. For example, a leak in the hydrazine supply system of the shuttle auxiliary power unit (APU) has resulted in hydrazine ignition and fire in the aft compartment of the shuttle. Sensors indicating the location of a leak could provide valuable information required for operational decisions. WSTF has developed a small, single-use sensor for detection of propellant leaks. The sensor is composed of a thermistor bead coated with a substance which is chemically reactive with the propellant. The reactive thermistor is one of a pair of closely located thermistors, the other being a reference. On exposure to the propellant, the reactive coating responds exothermically to it and increases the temperature of the coated-thermistor by several degrees. The temperature rise is sensed by a resistive bridge circuit, and an alarm is registered by data acquisition software. The concept is general and has been applied to sensors for hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsym-dimethylhydrazine, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, and dinitrogen tetroxide. Responses of these sensors to humidity, propellant concentration, distance from the liquid leak, and ambient pressure levels arc presented. A multi-use sensor has also been developed for hydrazine based on its catalytic reactivity with noble metals.

  11. A MEMS Based Hybrid Preconcentrator/Chemiresistor Chemical Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES,ROBERT C.; PATEL,SANJAY V.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.

    2000-06-12

    A hybrid of a microfabricated planar preconcentrator and a four element chemiresistor array chip has been fabricated and the performance as a chemical sensor system has been demonstrated. The close proximity of the chemiresistor sensor to the preconcentrator absorbent layer allows for fast transfer of the preconcentrated molecules during the heating and resorption step. The hybrid can be used in a conventional flow sampling system for detection of low concentrations of analyte molecules or in a pumpless/valveless mode with a grooved lid to confine the desorption plume from the preconcentrator during heating.

  12. A fibre optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Hardwick, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    A fibre-optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine has been developed, based on a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescein moiety as the signalling group. The fluorescent MIP was formed and covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre. The sensor exhibited an increase in fluorescence intensity in response to cocaine in the concentration range of 0 - 500 μM in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures with good reproducibility over 24 h. Selectivity for cocaine over others drugs has also been demonstrated.

  13. CO responses of sensors based on cerium oxide thick films prepared from clustered spherical nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Izu, Noriya; Matsubara, Ichiro; Itoh, Toshio; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Shin, Woosuck

    2013-01-01

    Various types of CO sensors based on cerium oxide (ceria) have been reported recently. It has also been reported that the response speed of CO sensors fabricated from porous ceria thick films comprising nanoparticles is extremely high. However, the response value of such sensors is not suitably high. In this study, we investigated methods of improving the response values of CO sensors based on ceria and prepared gas sensors from core-shell ceria polymer hybrid nanoparticles. These hybrid nanoparticles have been reported to have a unique structure: The core consists of a cluster of ceria crystallites several nanometers in size. We compared the characteristics of the sensors based on thick films prepared from core-shell nanoparticles with those of sensors based on thick films prepared from conventionally used precipitated nanoparticles. The sensors prepared from the core-shell nanoparticles exhibited a resistance that was ten times greater than that of the sensors prepared from the precipitated nanoparticles. The response values of the gas sensors based on the core-shell nanoparticles also was higher than that of the sensors based on the precipitated nanoparticles. Finally, improvements in sensor response were also noticed after the addition of Au nanoparticles to the thick films used to fabricate the two types of sensors. PMID:23529123

  14. CO responses of sensors based on cerium oxide thick films prepared from clustered spherical nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Izu, Noriya; Matsubara, Ichiro; Itoh, Toshio; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Shin, Woosuck

    2013-03-08

    Various types of CO sensors based on cerium oxide (ceria) have been reported recently. It has also been reported that the response speed of CO sensors fabricated from porous ceria thick films comprising nanoparticles is extremely high. However, the response value of such sensors is not suitably high. In this study, we investigated methods of improving the response values of CO sensors based on ceria and prepared gas sensors from core-shell ceria polymer hybrid nanoparticles. These hybrid nanoparticles have been reported to have a unique structure: The core consists of a cluster of ceria crystallites several nanometers in size. We compared the characteristics of the sensors based on thick films prepared from core-shell nanoparticles with those of sensors based on thick films prepared from conventionally used precipitated nanoparticles. The sensors prepared from the core-shell nanoparticles exhibited a resistance that was ten times greater than that of the sensors prepared from the precipitated nanoparticles. The response values of the gas sensors based on the core-shell nanoparticles also was higher than that of the sensors based on the precipitated nanoparticles. Finally, improvements in sensor response were also noticed after the addition of Au nanoparticles to the thick films used to fabricate the two types of sensors.

  15. Flexible thin-film PVDF-TrFE based pressure sensor for smart catheter applications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tushar; Aroom, Kevin; Naik, Sahil; Gill, Brijesh; Zhang, John X J

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate the design of thin flexible pressure sensors based on piezoelectric PVDF-TrFE (polyvinyledenedifluoride-tetrafluoroethylene) co-polymer film, which can be integrated onto a catheter, where the compact inner lumen space limit the dimensions of the pressure sensors. Previously, we demonstrated that the thin-film sensors of one micrometer thickness were shown to have better performance compared to the thicker film with no additional electrical poling or mechanical stretching due to higher crystallinity. The pressure sensors can be mass producible using standard lithography process, with excellent control of film uniformity and thickness down to one micrometer. The fabricated pressure sensors were easily mountable on external surface of commercial catheters. Elaborate experiments were performed to demonstrate the applicability of PVDF sensors towards catheter based biomedical application. The resonant frequency of the PVDF sensor was found to be 6.34 MHz. The PVDF sensors can operate over a broad pressure range of 0-300 mmHg. The average sensitivity of the PVDF sensor was found to be four times higher (99 μV/mmHg) than commercial pressure sensor while the PVDF sensor (0.26 s) had fivefold shorter response time than commercial pressure sensor (1.30 s), making the PVDF sensors highly suitable for real-time pressure measurements using catheters. PMID:23519532

  16. Highly ordered nanowire arrays on plastic substrates for ultrasensitive flexible chemical sensors

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, Michael C.; Ahmad, Habib; Wang, Dunwei; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a robust method for integrating high-performance semiconductors on flexible plastics could enable exciting avenues in fundamental research and novel applications. One area of vital relevance is chemical and biological sensing, which if implemented on biocompatible substrates, could yield breakthroughs in implantable or wearable monitoring systems. Semiconducting nanowires (and nanotubes) are particularly sensitive chemical sensors because of their high surface-to-volume ratios. Here, we present a scalable and parallel process for transferring hundreds of pre-aligned silicon nanowires onto plastic to yield highly ordered films for low-power sensor chips. The nanowires are excellent field-effect transistors, and, as sensors, exhibit parts-per-billion sensitivity to NO2, a hazardous pollutant. We also use SiO2 surface chemistries to construct a ‘nano-electronic nose’ library, which can distinguish acetone and hexane vapours via distributed responses. The excellent sensing performance coupled with bendable plastic could open up opportunities in portable, wearable or even implantable sensors. PMID:17450146

  17. CSA doped polypyrrole-zinc oxide thin film sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chougule, M. A.; Jundale, D. M.; Raut, B. T.; Sen, Shashwati; Patil, V. B.

    2013-02-01

    The polypyrrole-zinc oxide (PPy-ZnO) hybrid sensor doped with different weight ratios of camphor sulphonic acid (CSA) were prepared by spin coating technique. These CSA doped PPy-ZnO hybrids were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) which proved the formation of polypyrrole, PPy-ZnO and the interaction between polypyrrole - ZnO (PPy-ZnO) hybrid with CSA doping. The gas sensing properties of the PPy-ZnO hybrid films doped with CSA have been studied for oxidizing (NO2) as well as reducing (H2S, NH3, CH4OH and CH3OH) gases at room temperature. We demonstrate that CSA doped PPy-ZnO hybrid films are highly selective to NO2 along with high-sensitivity at low concentration (80% to 100 ppm) and better stability, which suggested that the CSA doped PPy-ZnO hybrid films are potential candidate for NO2 detection at room temperature.

  18. Thick-film acoustic emission sensors for use in structurally integrated condition-monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Pickwell, Andrew J; Dorey, Robert A; Mba, David

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring the condition of complex engineering structures is an important aspect of modern engineering, eliminating unnecessary work and enabling planned maintenance, preventing failure. Acoustic emissions (AE) testing is one method of implementing continuous nondestructive structural health monitoring. A novel thick-film (17.6 μm) AE sensor is presented. Lead zirconate titanate thick films were fabricated using a powder/sol composite ink deposition technique and mechanically patterned to form a discrete thick-film piezoelectric AE sensor. The thick-film sensor was benchmarked against a commercial AE device and was found to exhibit comparable responses to simulated acoustic emissions.

  19. Measurement of quasiparticle transport in aluminum films using tungsten transition-edge sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, J. J. Shank, B.; Cabrera, B.; Moffatt, R.; Redl, P.; Young, B. A.; Tortorici, E. C.; Brink, P. L.; Cherry, M.; Tomada, A.; Kreikebaum, J. M.

    2014-10-20

    We report on experimental studies of phonon sensors which utilize quasiparticle diffusion in thin aluminum films connected to tungsten transition-edge-sensors (TESs) operated at 35 mK. We show that basic TES physics and a simple physical model of the overlap region between the W and Al films in our devices enables us to accurately reproduce the experimentally observed pulse shapes from x-rays absorbed in the Al films. We further estimate quasiparticle loss in Al films using a simple diffusion equation approach. These studies allow the design of phonon sensors with improved performance.

  20. Thin Film Physical Sensor Instrumentation Research and Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2006-01-01

    A range of thin film sensor technology has been demonstrated enabling measurement of multiple parameters either individually or in sensor arrays including temperature, strain, heat flux, and flow. Multiple techniques exist for refractory thin film fabrication, fabrication and integration on complex surfaces and multilayered thin film insulation. Leveraging expertise in thin films and high temperature materials, investigations for the applications of thin film ceramic sensors has begun. The current challenges of instrumentation technology are to further develop systems packaging and component testing of specialized sensors, further develop instrumentation techniques on complex surfaces, improve sensor durability, and to address needs for extreme temperature applications. The technology research and development ongoing at NASA Glenn for applications to future launch vehicles, space vehicles, and ground systems is outlined.

  1. Improved chemically amplified photoresist characterization using interdigitated electrode sensors: photoacid diffusivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Cody M.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2004-05-01

    The ability of interdigitated electrodes to serve as novel chemically amplified resist characterization tools has recently been demonstrated through their ability to measure the Dill C kinetic rate constant for photoacid generation. The work presented in this paper attempts to further extend the capabilities of the interdigitated electrode (IDE) sensors by investigating their potential use as a measurement tool for photoacid diffusion coefficients. Impedance spectroscopy of chemically amplified photoresist coated interdigitated electrodes is used to calculate the bulk ionic conductivity of the resist film. The ionic conductivity is subsequently utilized in the Nernst-Einstein equation to calculate the diffusion coefficient of the photoacid, assuming that it is the major charge carrying species in the film. A detailed description of the measurement and data analysis processes required to calculate the diffusion coefficient of triphenylsulfonium triflate in poly(p-hydroxystyrene) is provided. In addition, the effect of varying the relative humidity of the measurement environment upon the impedance data collected has been examined. It has been observed that the presence of water within the resist film, typically as a result of absorption of water from the humid ambient environment, dramatically changes the conductivity of the resist coated IDE. This change is apparently the result of changes in the proton conduction mechanism within the resist as a function of film water content. A discussion of several possible causes of this phenomena and its impact on the interpretation of the electrical data and the calculation and meaning of an acid diffusion coefficient are presented.

  2. Hydrogen gas sensor based on palladium and yttrium alloy ultrathin film.

    PubMed

    Yi, Liu; You-Ping, Chen; Han, Song; Gang, Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Compared with the other hydrogen sensors, optical fiber hydrogen sensors based on thin films exhibits inherent safety, small volume, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and distributed remote sensing capability, but slower response characteristics. To improve response and recovery rate of the sensors, a novel reflection-type optical fiber hydrogen gas sensor with a 10 nm palladium and yttrium alloy thin film is fabricated. The alloy thin film shows a good hydrogen sensing property for hydrogen-containing atmosphere and a complete restorability for dry air at room temperature. The variation in response value of the sensor linearly increases with increased natural logarithm of hydrogen concentration (ln[H(2)]). The shortest response time and recovery response time to 4% hydrogen are 6 and 8 s, respectively. The hydrogen sensors based on Pd(0.91)Y(0.09) alloy ultrathin film have potential applications in hydrogen detection and measurement.

  3. Hydrogen gas sensor based on palladium and yttrium alloy ultrathin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liu; You-ping, Chen; Han, Song; Gang, Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Compared with the other hydrogen sensors, optical fiber hydrogen sensors based on thin films exhibits inherent safety, small volume, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and distributed remote sensing capability, but slower response characteristics. To improve response and recovery rate of the sensors, a novel reflection-type optical fiber hydrogen gas sensor with a 10 nm palladium and yttrium alloy thin film is fabricated. The alloy thin film shows a good hydrogen sensing property for hydrogen-containing atmosphere and a complete restorability for dry air at room temperature. The variation in response value of the sensor linearly increases with increased natural logarithm of hydrogen concentration (ln[H2]). The shortest response time and recovery response time to 4% hydrogen are 6 and 8 s, respectively. The hydrogen sensors based on Pd0.91Y0.09 alloy ultrathin film have potential applications in hydrogen detection and measurement.

  4. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

    1991-09-10

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulator for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor which compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. In particular, the concentration of the component of interest is proportional to the amplitude of the modulated output signal, while the identifying activation output energy of the chemical interaction indicative of that component is proportional to a normalized parameter equal to the peak-to-peak amplitude divided by the height of the upper peaks above a base line signal level. 5 figures.

  5. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Otagawa, Takaaki

    1991-01-01

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulator for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor which compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. In particular, the concentration of the component of interest is proportional to the amplitude of the modulated output signal, while the identifying activation output energy of the chemical interaction indicative of that component is proportional to a normalized parameter equal to the peak-to-peak amplitude divided by the height of the upper peaks above a base line signal level.

  6. Nanohardness and chemical bonding of Boron Nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F

    1998-07-08

    Boron-nitride (BN) films are deposited by the reactive sputter deposition of fully dense, boron targets utilizing a planar magnetron source and an argon-nitrogen working gas mixture. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals distinguishing features of chemical bonding within the boron is photoabsorption cross-section. The hardness of the BN film surface is measured using nanoindentation. The sputter deposition conditions as well as the post-deposition treatments of annealing and nitrogen-ion implantation effect the chemical bonding and the film hardness. A model is proposed to quantify the film hardness using the relative peak intensities of the p*-resonances to the boron 1s spectra.

  7. The effects of two thick film deposition methods on tin dioxide gas sensor performance.

    PubMed

    Bakrania, Smitesh D; Wooldridge, Margaret S

    2009-01-01

    This work demonstrates the variability in performance between SnO(2) thick film gas sensors prepared using two types of film deposition methods. SnO(2) powders were deposited on sensor platforms with and without the use of binders. Three commonly utilized binder recipes were investigated, and a new binder-less deposition procedure was developed and characterized. The binder recipes yielded sensors with poor film uniformity and poor structural integrity, compared to the binder-less deposition method. Sensor performance at a fixed operating temperature of 330 °C for the different film deposition methods was evaluated by exposure to 500 ppm of the target gas carbon monoxide. A consequence of the poor film structure, large variability and poor signal properties were observed with the sensors fabricated using binders. Specifically, the sensors created using the binder recipes yielded sensor responses that varied widely (e.g., S = 5 - 20), often with hysteresis in the sensor signal. Repeatable and high quality performance was observed for the sensors prepared using the binder-less dispersion-drop method with good sensor response upon exposure to 500 ppm CO (S = 4.0) at an operating temperature of 330 °C, low standard deviation to the sensor response (±0.35) and no signal hysteresis.

  8. Polymer-based optical single-arm waveguide interferometer as a chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diggs, Darnell E.; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2000-11-01

    We report on a single-arm double-mode waveguide interferometer being used as a chemical sensor for detection of presence of ammonia and other pollutants in ambient air. The sensor is based on thin films of polymers such as poly(methyl methacrylate) and polymide doped with various indicator dyes such as bromocresol purple. These dye-doped polymer materials significantly increase their optical absorbance in the presence of the pollutants. The absorbance change is accompanied by the change of the refractive index of the materials in the region of optical transmittance. The change of the refractive index can be converted into a change of the light intensity in the single arm interferometer. The sensor employs interference between two propagating modes of the same polarization. Single-arm configuration makes it rigid but yet sensitive enough to detect concentrations of ammonia of the order of 10 ppm and less. The device also exhibits high sensitivity to ambient temperature change (of the order of 1 degree(s)C per 2(pi) -phase shift). We analyze effects of various factors such as polymer composition, light wavelength, ambient humidity and atmospheric pressure on the performance of the sensor. Various design and fabrication issues are also discussed. The problem of particular interest is coupling the sensor to the optical fiber transmission line, reduction of losses and sensitivity improvement.

  9. A low cost construction method for Graphene based resistive chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kona, Silpa; Harnett, Cindy K.

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is a 2D material with distinctive properties and a large surface area that can be exposed to surface adsorbates from a target gas, making it attractive as a sensing material. This enables studies on the interaction of gas molecules with the graphene surface and subsequent changes in its properties. Due to its high electron mobility at room temperature, graphene exhibits high sensitivity, making it a good candidate for environmental and industrial sensing applications. Several models of graphene based sensors have been put forth previously based on high-resolution lithographic techniques and for individual electrode attachment to the sensing film with e-beam lithography. These techniques can produce small numbers of devices that explore the limits of molecular scale sensing, but the methods are currently impractical for large scale production of low cost sensors. We present our graphene based sensor with the focus on designing small, cost effective and reliable sensors with high sensitivity towards the target gas, detailing the assembly of graphene/acrylic devices, their characterization and investigation of their performance as resistive chemical sensors using differential voltage measurements.

  10. Comparison of chemically and electrochemically synthesized polyaniline films

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, D.W.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J.

    1999-12-01

    The electrochemical growth of thick ({approximately}2 mm) emeraldine, polyaniline (PANI{sup E}) films from solutions containing 2 M HBF{sub 4} and 0.25 M aniline is demonstrated. Electrochemically and chemically prepared PANI{sup E} films, cast from formic acid solutions, are compared. The combination of electrochemical results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic data indicates that pure and homogeneous standard material can be reproducibly prepared electrochemically.

  11. Electrochemical behavior of chemically synthesized selenium thin film.

    PubMed

    Patil, A M; Kumbhar, V S; Chodankar, N R; Lokhande, A C; Lokhande, C D

    2016-05-01

    The facile and low cost simple chemical bath deposition (CBD) method is employed to synthesize red colored selenium thin films. These selenium films are characterized for structural, morphological, topographical and wettability studies. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed the crystalline nature of selenium thin film with hexagonal crystal structure. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study displays selenium nanoparticles ranging from 20 to 475 nm. A specific surface area of 30.5 m(2) g(-1) is observed for selenium nanoparticles. The selenium nanoparticles hold mesopores in the range of 1.39 nm, taking benefits of the good physicochemical stability and excellent porosity. Subsequently, the electrochemical properties of selenium thin films are deliberated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The selenium thin film shows specific capacitance (Cs) of 21.98 F g(-1) with 91% electrochemical stability. PMID:26896773

  12. Selective vapor detection of an integrated chemical sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youngmo; Kim, Young Jun; Choi, Jaebin; Lim, Chaehyun; Shin, Beom Ju; Moon, Hi Gyu; Lee, Taikjin; Kim, Jae Hun; Seo, Minah; Kang, Chong Yun; Jun, Seong Chan; Lee, Seok; Kim, Chulki

    2015-07-01

    Graphene is a promising material for vapor sensor applications because of its potential to be functionalized for specific chemical gases. In this work, we present a graphene gas sensor that uses single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules as its sensing agent. We investigate the characteristics of graphene field effect transistors (FETs) coated with different ssDNAs. The sensitivity and recovery rate for a specific gas are modified according to the differences in the DNA molecules' Guanine (G) and Cytosine (C) content. ssDNA-functionalized devices show a higher recovery rate compared to bare graphene devices. Pattern analysis of a 2-by-2 sensor array composed of graphene devices functionalized with different-sequence ssDNA enables identification of NH3, NO2, CO, SO2 using Principle Component Analysis (PCA).

  13. Evanescent-wave optical gas sensor with a porous thin-film coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicevic, N.; Maluckov, A.; Petrovic, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the analysis and numerical model of absorptive gas detection by an optical evanescent-wave sensor. We investigate the influence of sensor geometry and thin-film porosity on the attenuation of guided modes caused by their interaction with the gas. We show that film porosity is a critical parameter that should be carefully optimized for a chosen mode. These findings served as a basis for the design of an experimentally realizable sensor of carbon dioxide.

  14. Dust Sensor with Large Detection Area Using Polyimide Film and Piezoelectric Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Okudaira, O.; Kurosawa, K.; Okamoto, T.; Matsui, T.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the development of dust particles sensor in space with large area (1m × 1m scale). The sensor has just a thin film of polyimide attached with small tips of piezoelectric elements. We performed experiments to characterize the sensor.

  15. Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor Using a Thin-Film Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn

    1997-01-01

    A fiber-optic temperature sensor was developed that is rugged, compact, stable, and can be inexpensively fabricated. This thin-film interferometric temperature sensor was shown to be capable of providing a +/- 2 C accuracy over the range of -55 to 275 C, throughout a 5000 hr operating life. A temperature-sensitive thin-film Fabry-Perot interferometer can be deposited directly onto the end of a multimode optical fiber. This batch-fabricatable sensor can be manufactured at a much lower cost than can a presently available sensor, which requires the mechanical attachment of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to a fiber. The principal disadvantage of the thin-film sensor is its inherent instability, due to the low processing temperatures that must be used to prevent degradation of the optical fiber's buffer coating. The design of the stable thin-film temperature sensor considered the potential sources of both short and long term drifts. The temperature- sensitive Fabry-Perot interferometer was a silicon film with a thickness of approx. 2 microns. A laser-annealing process was developed which crystallized the silicon film without damaging the optical fiber. The silicon film was encapsulated with a thin layer of Si3N4 over coated with aluminum. Crystallization of the silicon and its encapsulation with a highly stable, impermeable thin-film structure were essential steps in producing a sensor with the required long-term stability.

  16. Significance of microstructure for a MOCVD-grown YSZ thin film gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrone, J.; Foster, C.; Bai, G.

    1996-11-01

    The authors report the fabrication and characterization of a low temperature (200--400 C) thin film gas sensor constructed from a MOCVD-grown yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer sandwiched between two platinum thin film electrodes. A reproducible gas-sensing response is produced by applying a cyclic voltage which generates voltammograms with gas-specific current peaks and shapes. Growth conditions are optimized for preparing YSZ films having dense microstructures, low leakage currents, and maximum ion conductivities. In particular, the effect of growth temperature on film morphology and texture is discussed and related to the electrical and gas-sensing properties of the thin film sensor device.

  17. The influence of hard-baking temperature applied for SU8 sensor layer on the sensitivity of capacitive chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klanjšek Gunde, Marta; Hauptman, Nina; Maček, Marijan; Kunaver, Matjaž

    2009-06-01

    SU8, the near-UV photosensitive epoxy-based polymer was used as a sensor layer in the capacitive chemical sensor, ready for integration with a generic double-metal CMOS technology. It was observed that the response of the sensor slowly increases with the temperature applied in hard-baking process as long as it remains below 300°C. At this temperature the response of the sensor abruptly increases and becomes almost threefold. It was shown that fully crosslinked structure of the sensor layer becomes opened and disordered when the sensor is hard-baked at temperatures between 300°C and 320°C, that is, still well below the degradation temperature of the polymer. These changes in chemical structure were analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The temperature-dependent changes of the sensor layer structure enable one to prepare a combination of capacitive chemical sensors with good discrimination between some volatile organic compounds.

  18. Chemical switch based reusable dual optoelectronic sensor for nitrite.

    PubMed

    Vishnuvardhan, V; Kala, R; Prasada Rao, T

    2008-08-01

    An optical sensor was developed for sensing of nitrite based on the monotonous decrease in absorbance of Rhodamine 6G at 525 nm (the absorbance maximum of dye) with increasing concentration of nitrite. This sensor also permits naked eye detection. Various parameters like concentrations of sulphuric acid and Rhodamine 6G, response time and stability were varied and optimal conditions are reported. Under these conditions, the developed sensor enables the determination of nitrite in the concentration range 0-12.18 micromol L(-1). The nitrite response is selective as 60-2.5x10(5) fold amounts of several anions and cations have no deleterious effect. The addition of nitrite to Rhodamine 6G dye causes hypsochromic shift from 525 to 385 nm while several other anions like I(-), SCN(-), ClO(4)(-), [HgI(4)](2-) and [Zn (SCN)(4)](2-) showed a bathochromatic shift from 525 to 575 nm. The sequential addition of nitrite and sulphamic to Rhodamine 6G in 0.75 mol L(-1) sulphuric acid solution results in switching of "ON" and "OFF" absorbance. The time elapse and concentration of sulphamic acid required for chemical switching was also established. Similar "ON" and "OFF" switching behaviour was observed in fluorescence studies also. This enabled the design and development of reusable chemical switch based dual optoelectronic sensor, for monitoring of traces of nitrite in environmental and food samples. The plausible mechanism for above switching behaviour is also proposed.

  19. Development of a fiber optic chemical sensor for detection of toxic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Lalitkumar

    Nerve agents are among the most potent of the chemical warfare agents being highly toxic in both liquid and gaseous form. In this thesis the development of a fiber optic chemical sensor for detection of organophosphorous nerve agent sarin precursor dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP) is presented. The optical fiber sensor developed is based on the modified cladding approach using conducting polymer polypyrrole as a chemo-chromic material. Polypyrrole is synthesized by chemical oxidation and characterized by FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy. To characterize the electrical and optical property changes that come about in polypyrrole upon exposure to DMMP, four probe technique, ellipsometry, thin film transmission are used. The polypyrrole coating is applied to un-cladded fiber core using two different coating techniques, i.e. in-situ deposition and monomer vapor phase deposition. Preliminary results show an intensity decrease of 2.1% when the sensing element is exposed to 134ppm of DMMP. Three different dopant anions, i.e. 1--5, Napthalene disulphonic acid, Anthraquenone sulphonic acid and Hydrochloric acid, are added to improve the sensor sensitivity. The developed device is tested for DMMP sensitivity optimizations in terms of substrate nature, Cu2+ dopant, waveguide geometry, and light source intensity. The sensitivity optimization has resulted in a 25.75% sensor response and a detection of 26ppm of DMMP concentration. Selectivity and environmental stability of the developed device is investigated. The mechanical property and adhesion investigated using the nanoindentation and ASTM D-4541 pull-off test method. The influence of these adhesion enhancements on the sensor response is investigated.

  20. Enhanced Sensitivity of Gas Sensor Based on Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Thin-Film Transistors for Disease Diagnosis and Environment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Marco R; Izquierdo, José E E; Braga, Guilherme S; Dirani, Ely A T; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A; Rodríguez, Estrella F G; Fonseca, Fernando J

    2015-01-01

    Electronic devices based on organic thin-film transistors (OTFT) have the potential to supply the demand for portable and low-cost gadgets, mainly as sensors for in situ disease diagnosis and environment monitoring. For that reason, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the active layer in the widely-used bottom-gate/bottom-contact OTFT structure was deposited over highly-doped silicon substrates covered with thermally-grown oxide to detect vapor-phase compounds. A ten-fold organochloride and ammonia sensitivity compared to bare sensors corroborated the application of this semiconducting polymer in sensors. Furthermore, P3HT TFTs presented approximately three-order higher normalized sensitivity than any chemical sensor addressed herein. The results demonstrate that while TFTs respond linearly at the lowest concentration values herein, chemical sensors present such an operating regime mostly above 2000 ppm. Simultaneous alteration of charge carrier mobility and threshold voltage is responsible for pushing the detection limit down to units of ppm of ammonia, as well as tens of ppm of alcohol or ketones. Nevertheless, P3HT transistors and chemical sensors could compose an electronic nose operated at room temperature for a wide range concentration evaluation (1-10,000 ppm) of gaseous analytes. Targeted analytes include not only biomarkers for diseases, such as uremia, cirrhosis, lung cancer and diabetes, but also gases for environment monitoring in food, cosmetic and microelectronics industries.

  1. Enhanced Sensitivity of Gas Sensor Based on Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Thin-Film Transistors for Disease Diagnosis and Environment Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Marco R.; Izquierdo, José E. E.; Braga, Guilherme S.; Dirani, Ely A. T.; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A.; Rodríguez, Estrella F. G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic devices based on organic thin-film transistors (OTFT) have the potential to supply the demand for portable and low-cost gadgets, mainly as sensors for in situ disease diagnosis and environment monitoring. For that reason, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the active layer in the widely-used bottom-gate/bottom-contact OTFT structure was deposited over highly-doped silicon substrates covered with thermally-grown oxide to detect vapor-phase compounds. A ten-fold organochloride and ammonia sensitivity compared to bare sensors corroborated the application of this semiconducting polymer in sensors. Furthermore, P3HT TFTs presented approximately three-order higher normalized sensitivity than any chemical sensor addressed herein. The results demonstrate that while TFTs respond linearly at the lowest concentration values herein, chemical sensors present such an operating regime mostly above 2000 ppm. Simultaneous alteration of charge carrier mobility and threshold voltage is responsible for pushing the detection limit down to units of ppm of ammonia, as well as tens of ppm of alcohol or ketones. Nevertheless, P3HT transistors and chemical sensors could compose an electronic nose operated at room temperature for a wide range concentration evaluation (1–10,000 ppm) of gaseous analytes. Targeted analytes include not only biomarkers for diseases, such as uremia, cirrhosis, lung cancer and diabetes, but also gases for environment monitoring in food, cosmetic and microelectronics industries. PMID:25912354

  2. Enhanced Sensitivity of Gas Sensor Based on Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Thin-Film Transistors for Disease Diagnosis and Environment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Marco R; Izquierdo, José E E; Braga, Guilherme S; Dirani, Ely A T; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A; Rodríguez, Estrella F G; Fonseca, Fernando J

    2015-01-01

    Electronic devices based on organic thin-film transistors (OTFT) have the potential to supply the demand for portable and low-cost gadgets, mainly as sensors for in situ disease diagnosis and environment monitoring. For that reason, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the active layer in the widely-used bottom-gate/bottom-contact OTFT structure was deposited over highly-doped silicon substrates covered with thermally-grown oxide to detect vapor-phase compounds. A ten-fold organochloride and ammonia sensitivity compared to bare sensors corroborated the application of this semiconducting polymer in sensors. Furthermore, P3HT TFTs presented approximately three-order higher normalized sensitivity than any chemical sensor addressed herein. The results demonstrate that while TFTs respond linearly at the lowest concentration values herein, chemical sensors present such an operating regime mostly above 2000 ppm. Simultaneous alteration of charge carrier mobility and threshold voltage is responsible for pushing the detection limit down to units of ppm of ammonia, as well as tens of ppm of alcohol or ketones. Nevertheless, P3HT transistors and chemical sensors could compose an electronic nose operated at room temperature for a wide range concentration evaluation (1-10,000 ppm) of gaseous analytes. Targeted analytes include not only biomarkers for diseases, such as uremia, cirrhosis, lung cancer and diabetes, but also gases for environment monitoring in food, cosmetic and microelectronics industries. PMID:25912354

  3. Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy on Operating Surface Acoustic Wave Chemical Sensors During Exposure to Gas-Phase Analytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Hill, M.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.; Thomas, R.C.

    1999-01-11

    We have developed instrumentation to enable the combination of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor measurements with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopic measurements to understand the response of the SAW sensors with respect to the interfacial chemistry of surface-confined sensing films interacting with gas-phase analytes. Specifically, the instrumentation and software was developed to perform in-situ Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their chemically modified surfaces with analytes. By probing the surface with IR spectroscopy during gas exposure, it is possible to understand in unprecedented detail the interaction processes between the sorptive SAW coatings and the gaseous analyte molecules. In this report, we provide details of this measurement system, and also demonstrate the utility of these combined measurements by characterizing the SAW and FTIR-ERS responses of organic thin-film sensor coatings interacting with gas-phase analytes.

  4. Dual SAW sensor technique for determining mass and modulus changes in thin silicate films during gas adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, S.L.; Hietala, V.M.; Brinker, C.J.

    2000-01-10

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors, which are sensitive to a variety of surface changes, have been widely used for chemical and physical sensing. The ability to control or compensate for the many surface forces has been instrumental in collecting valid data. In cases where it is not possible to neglect certain effects, such as frequency drift with temperature, methods such as the dual sensor technique have been utilized. This paper describes a novel use of a dual sensor technique, using two sensor materials, Quartz and GaAs, to separate out the contributions of mass and modulus of the frequency change during gas adsorption experiments. The large modulus change in the film calculated using this technique, and predicted by the Gassmann equation, provide a greater understanding of the challenges of SAW sensing.

  5. Label-Free Optical Ring Resonator Bio/Chemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongying; Suter, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xudong

    Optical micro-ring resonator sensors are an emerging category of label-free optical sensors for bio/chemical sensing that have recently been under intensive investigation. Researchers of this technology have been motivated by a tremendous breadth of different applications, including medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, homeland security, and food quality control, which require sensitive analytical tools. Ring resonator sensors use total internal reflection to support circulating optical resonances called whispering gallery modes (WGMs). The WGMs have an evanescent field of several hundred nanometers into the surrounding medium, and can therefore detect the refractive index change induced when the analyte binds to the resonator surface. Despite the small physical size of a resonator, the circulating nature of the WGM creates extremely long effective lengths, greatly increasing light-matter interaction and improving its sensing performance. Moreover, only small sample volume is needed for detection because the sensors can be fabricated in sizes well below 100 μm. The small footprint allows integration of those ring resonator sensors onto lab-on-a-chip types of devices for multiplexed detection.

  6. New Polymer Coatings for Chemically Selective Mass Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, S. C.; Wright, Cassandra; Cobb, J.; McCalla, T.; Revelle, R.; Morris, V. R.; Pollack, S. K.

    1997-01-01

    There is a current need to develop sensitive and chemically specific sensors for the detection of nitric acid for in-situ measurements in the atmosphere. Polymer coatings have been synthesized and tested for their sensitivity and selectivity to nitric acid. A primary requirement for these polymers is detectability down to the parts per trillion range. The results of studies using these polymers as coatings for quartz crystal microbalances (QCM) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices will be presented.

  7. Rapid, facile microwave-assisted synthesis of xanthan gum grafted polyaniline for chemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sadanand; Ramontja, James

    2016-08-01

    Grafting method, through microwave radiation procedure is extremely productive in terms of time consumption, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness. In this study, conductive and thermally stable composite (mwXG-g-PANi) was synthesized by grafting of aniline (ANi) on to xanthan gum (XG) using catalytic weight of initiator, ammonium peroxydisulfate in the process of microwave irradiation in an aqueous medium. The synthesis of mwXG-g-PANi were confirm by FTIR, XRD, TGA, and SEM. The influence of altering the microwave power, exposure time of microwave, concentration of monomer and the amount of initiator of graft polymerization were studied over the grafting parameters, for example, grafting percentage (%G) and grafting efficiency (%E). The maximum %G and %E achieved was 172 and 74.13 respectively. The outcome demonstrates that the microwave irradiation strategy can increase the reaction rate by 72 times over the conventional method. Electrical conductivity of XG and mwXG-g-PANi composite film was performed. The fabricated grafted sample film were then examined for the chemical sensor. The mwXG-g-PANi, effectively integrated and handled, are NH3 sensitive and exhibit a rapid sensing in presence of NH3 vapor. Chemiresistive NH3 sensors with superior room temperature sensing performance were produced with sensor response of 905 at 1ppb and 90% recovery within few second. PMID:27118045

  8. Hierarchical Thin Film Architectures for Enhanced Sensor Performance: Liquid Crystal-Mediated Electrochemical Synthesis of Nanostructured Imprinted Polymer Films for the Selective Recognition of Bupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nawaz, Hazrat; Ndizeye, Natacha; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured bupivacaine-selective molecularly imprinted 3-aminophenylboronic acid-p-phenylenediamine co-polymer (MIP) films have been prepared on gold-coated quartz (Au/quartz) resonators by electrochemical synthesis under cyclic voltammetric conditions in a liquid crystalline (LC) medium (triton X-100/water). Films prepared in water and in the absence of template were used for control studies. Infrared spectroscopic studies demonstrated comparable chemical compositions for LC and control polymer films. SEM studies revealed that the topologies of the molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared in the LC medium (LC-MIP) exhibit discernible 40 nm thick nano-fiber structures, quite unlike the polymers prepared in the absence of the LC-phase. The sensitivity of the LC-MIP in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was 67.6 ± 4.9 Hz/mM under flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions, which was ≈250% higher than for the sensor prepared using the aqueous medium. Detection was possible at 100 nM (30 ng/mL), and discrimination of bupivacaine from closely related structural analogs was readily achieved as reflected in the corresponding stability constants of the MIP-analyte complexes. The facile fabrication and significant enhancement in sensor sensitivity together highlight the potential of this LC-based imprinting strategy for fabrication of polymeric materials with hierarchical architectures, in particular for use in surface-dependent application areas, e.g., biomaterials or sensing. PMID:25587412

  9. Hierarchical thin film architectures for enhanced sensor performance: liquid crystal-mediated electrochemical synthesis of nanostructured imprinted polymer films for the selective recognition of bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nawaz, Hazrat; Ndizeye, Natacha; Nicholls, Ian A

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured bupivacaine-selective molecularly imprinted 3-aminophenylboronic acid-p-phenylenediamine co-polymer (MIP) films have been prepared on gold-coated quartz (Au/quartz) resonators by electrochemical synthesis under cyclic voltammetric conditions in a liquid crystalline (LC) medium (triton X-100/water). Films prepared in water and in the absence of template were used for control studies. Infrared spectroscopic studies demonstrated comparable chemical compositions for LC and control polymer films. SEM studies revealed that the topologies of the molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared in the LC medium (LC-MIP) exhibit discernible 40 nm thick nano-fiber structures, quite unlike the polymers prepared in the absence of the LC-phase. The sensitivity of the LC-MIP in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was 67.6 ± 4.9 Hz/mM under flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions, which was ≈250% higher than for the sensor prepared using the aqueous medium. Detection was possible at 100 nM (30 ng/mL), and discrimination of bupivacaine from closely related structural analogs was readily achieved as reflected in the corresponding stability constants of the MIP-analyte complexes. The facile fabrication and significant enhancement in sensor sensitivity together highlight the potential of this LC-based imprinting strategy for fabrication of polymeric materials with hierarchical architectures, in particular for use in surface-dependent application areas, e.g., biomaterials or sensing. PMID:25587412

  10. Wireless Chemical Sensor and Sensing Method for Use Therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant Douglas (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A wireless chemical sensor includes an electrical conductor and a material separated therefrom by an electric insulator. The electrical conductor is an unconnected open-circuit shaped for storage of an electric field and a magnetic field. In the presence of a time-varying magnetic field, the first electrical conductor resonates to generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses. The material is positioned at a location lying within at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses so-generated. The material changes in electrical conductivity in the presence of a chemical-of-interest.

  11. Wireless Chemical Sensor and Sensing Method for Use Therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A wireless chemical sensor includes an electrical conductor and a material separated therefrom by an electric insulator. The electrical conductor is an unconnected open-circuit shaped for storage of an electric field and a magnetic field. In the presence of a time-varying magnetic field, the first electrical conductor resonates to generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses. The material is positioned at a location lying within at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses so-generated. The material changes in electrical conductivity in the presence of a chemical-of-interest.

  12. Inkjet printed LED based pH chemical sensor for gas sensing.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Martina; Shepherd, Roderick; Wallace, Gordon G; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-10-12

    Predictable behaviour is a critical factor when developing a sensor for potential deployment within a wireless sensor network (WSN). The work presented here details the fabrication and performance of an optical chemical sensor for gaseous acetic acid analysis, which was constructed using inkjet printed deposition of a colorimetric chemical sensor. The chemical sensor comprised a pH indicator dye (bromophenol blue), phase transfer salt tetrahexylammonium bromide and polymer ethyl cellulose dissolved in 1-butanol. A paired emitter-detector diode (PEDD) optical detector was employed to monitor responses of the colorimetric chemical sensor as it exhibits good sensitivity, low power consumption, is low cost, accurate and has excellent signal-to-noise ratios. The chemical sensor formulation was printed directly onto the surface of the emitter LED, and the resulting chemical sensors characterised with respect to their layer thickness, response time and recovery time. The fabrication reproducibility of inkjet printed chemical sensors in comparison to drop casted chemical sensors was investigated. Colorimetric chemical sensors produced by inkjet printing, exhibited an improved reproducibility for the detection of gaseous acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 5.5% in comparison to 68.0% calculated for drop casted sensors (n=10). The stability of the chemical sensor was also investigated through both intra and inter-day studies.

  13. Photonic multilayer sensors from photo-crosslinkable polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappelli, Maria; Hayward, Ryan C.

    2012-02-01

    Photo-crosslinkable copolymers containing pendent benzophenone (BP) groups provide a convenient means to fabricate multilayer polymer films. We describe the preparation of alternating multilayers of photo-crosslinkable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), a water-swellable, temperature sensitive polymer, and poly(para-methylstyrene) (PpMS), a non-swellable polymer, by sequential spin-coating and photo-crosslinking. This route provides well-defined layered structures with minimal interfacial broadening between layers and uniformity of thickness from layer to layer as determined by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (d-SIMS). Appropriate choices of layer thicknesses yield 1-D photonic gel sensors. The reflectance peak is shifted through the visible spectrum upon swelling or de-swelling of the PNIPAM layers in water, providing an accessible means for colorimetric temperature sensing.

  14. High performance surface inspection method for thin-film sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Volkmar; Larndorfer, Stefan; Moser, Bernhard

    2007-02-01

    Thin-film sensors for use in automotive or aeronautic applications must conform to very high quality standards. Due to defects that cannot be addressed by conventional electronic measurements, an accurate optical inspection is imperative to ensure long-term quality aspects of the produced thin-film sensor. In this particular case, resolutions of 1 μm per pixel are necessary to meet the required high quality standards. Furthermore, it has to be guaranteed that defects are detected robustly with high reliability. In this paper, a new method is proposed that solves the problem of handling local deformations due to production variabilities without having to use computational intensive local image registration operations. The main idea of this method is based on a combination of efficient morphological preprocessing and a multi-step comparison strategy based on logical implication. The main advantage of this approach is that the neighborhood operations that care for the robustness of the image comparison can be computed in advance and stored in a modified reference image. By virtue of this approach, no further neighborhood operations have to be carried out on the acquired test image during inspection time. A systematic, experimental study shows that this method is superior to existing approaches concerning reliability, robustness, and computational efficiency. As a result, the requirements of high-resolution inspection and high-performance throughput while accounting for local deformations are met very well by the implemented inspection system. The work is substantiated with theoretical arguments and a comprehensive analysis of the obtained performance and practical usability in the above-mentioned, challenging industrial environment.

  15. Micro-Machined Thin Film Sensor Arrays For The Detection Of H2, Containing Gases, And Method Of Making And Using The Same.

    DOEpatents

    DiMeo, Jr., Frank; Baum, Thomas H.

    2003-07-22

    The present invention provides a hydrogen sensor including a thin film sensor element formed by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD), on a micro-hotplate structure. The thin film sensor element includes a film of a hydrogen-interactive metal film that reversibly interacts with hydrogen to provide a correspondingly altered response characteristic, such as optical transmissivity, electrical conductance, electrical resistance, electrical capacitance, magneto resistance, photoconductivity, etc., relative to the response characteristic of the film in the absence of hydrogen. The hydrogen-interactive metal film may be overcoated with a thin film hydrogen-permeable barrier layer to protect the hydrogen-interactive film from deleterious interaction with non-hydrogen species. The hydrogen permeable barrier may comprise species to scavenge oxygen and other like species. The hydrogen sensor of the invention may be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently configured as a hand-held apparatus.

  16. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-coated microbeam MEMS sensor for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Li, Lily; Hiller, Tobias; Turner, Kimberly L.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, microcantilever-based technology has emerged as a viable sensing platform due to its many advantages such as small size, high sensitivity, and low cost. However, microcantilevers lack the inherent ability to selectively identify hazardous chemicals (e.g., explosives, chemical warfare agents). The key to overcoming this challenge is to functionalize the top surface of the microcantilever with a receptor material (e.g., a polymer coating) so that selective binding between the cantilever and analyte of interest takes place. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) can be utilized as artificial recognition elements for target chemical analytes of interest. Molecular imprinting involves arranging polymerizable functional monomers around a template molecule followed by polymerization and template removal. The selectivity for the target analyte is based on the spatial orientation of the binding site and covalent or noncovalent interactions between the functional monomer and the analyte. In this work, thin films of sol-gel-derived xerogels molecularly imprinted for TNT and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a chemical warfare agent stimulant, have demonstrated selectivity and stability in combination with a fixed-fixed beam microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based gas sensor. The sensor was characterized by parametric bifurcation noise-based tracking.

  17. In Situ Sensors for the Chemical Industry- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, J D; Knittel, Trevor

    2006-06-30

    minimized their applicability in the chemical industry. In order to take advantage of the promise of this technology a number of technology advances were required, within price limits for market acceptance. This project significantly advanced the state of TDL technology for application in chemical industry applications. With these advances a commercially available product now exists that has already achieved market success and is installed in critical applications. The ability to make fast, sensitive and accurate measurements inside the chemical processes is now delivering improved process control, energy efficiency and emissions control within the U.S. Chemical Industry. Despite the success we enjoyed for the laser-based sensors, there were significant technical barriers for the solid-state sensors. With exception of a generic close-coupled extractive housing and electronics interface, there were significant issues with all of the solid-state sensor devices we sought to develop and test. Ultimately, these issues were roadblocks that prevented further development and testing. The fundamental limitations of available sensor materials that we identified, formulated and tested were overwhelming. This situation forced our team to cancel these portions of the project and focus our resources on laser-based sensor techniques. The barriers of material compatibility, sensitivity, speed of response, chemical interferences, etc. are surmountable in the field of solid-state sensors. Inability to address any single one of these attributes will prevent wide-implementation into this market. This situation is plainly evident by the lack of such devices in the online analyzer market (for petrochemicals).

  18. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult.

  19. Selective hydrogen gas sensor using CuFe2O4 nanoparticle based thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haija, Mohammad Abu; Ayesh, Ahmad I.; Ahmed, Sadiqa; Katsiotis, Marios S.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen gas sensors based on CuFe2O4 nanoparticle thin films are presented in this work. Each gas sensor was prepared by depositing CuFe2O4 thin film on a glass substrate by dc sputtering inside a high vacuum chamber. Argon inert gas was used to sputter the material from a composite sputtering target. Interdigitated metal electrodes were deposited on top of the thin films by thermal evaporation and shadow masking. The produced sensors were tested against hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and ethylene gases where they were found to be selective for hydrogen. The sensitivity of the produced sensors was maximum for hydrogen gas at 50 °C. In addition, the produced sensors exhibit linear response signal for hydrogen gas with concentrations up to 5%. Those sensors have potential to be used for industrial applications because of their low power requirement, functionality at low temperatures, and low production cost.

  20. Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, J.W. Jr.

    1991-07-23

    A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken. 5 figures.

  1. Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Jr., John W.

    1991-01-01

    A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken.

  2. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  3. High Sensitivity, Low Power Nano Sensors and Devices for Chemical Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Powell, Dan; Getty, Stephanie; Lu, Yi-Jiang

    2004-01-01

    The chemical sensor market has been projected to grow to better than $40 billion dollars worldwide within the next 10 years. Some of the primary motivations to develop nanostructured chemical sensors are monitoring and control of environmental pollution; improved diagnostics for consumption; improvement in measurement precision and accuracy; and improved detection limits for Homeland security, battlefield environments, and process and quality control of industrial applications. In each of these applications, there is demand for sensitivity, selectivity and stability of environmental and biohazard detection and capture beyond what is currently commercially available. Nanotechnology offers the ability to work at the molecular level, atom by atom, to create large structures with fundamentally new molecular organization. It is essentially concerned with materials, devices, and systems whose structures and components exhibit novel and significantly improved physical, chemical and biological properties, phenomena, and process control due to their nanoscale size. One such nanotechnology-enabled chemical sensor has been developed at NASA Ames leveraging nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxide nanobelts or nanowires, as a sensing medium bridging a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) realized through a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The DE fingers are fabricated on a silicon substrate using standard photolithography and thin film metallization techniques. It is noteworthy that the fabrication techniques employed are not confined to the silicon substrate. Through spin casting and careful substrate selection (i.e. clothing, glass, polymer, etc.), additional degrees of freedom can be exploited to enhance sensitivity or to conform to unique applications. Both in-situ growth of nanostructured materials and casting of nanostructured dispersions were used to produce analogous chemical sensing devices.

  4. Transduction mechanism of acoustic-wave based chemical and biochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucklum, Ralf; Hauptmann, Peter

    2003-11-01

    Acoustic-wave-based sensors are commonly known as mass-sensitive devices. However, acoustic chemical and biochemical sensors also face so-called non-gravimetric effects, especially if they work in a liquid environment. The one-dimensional transmission-line model (TLM) is a powerful tool, which considers the influence of geometric and material properties on the sensor transduction mechanism, most importantly the influence of viscoelastic phenomena. This paper demonstrates the concept of modelling acoustic microsensors on quartz crystal resonators. Particular attention is paid to special cases which allow for simplifications or specific solutions of the TLM, like the acoustic load concept (ALC), the BVD model or the Sauerbrey equation. Deviations from the one-dimensional assumption of the TLM are suspected to significantly contribute to the acoustic sensor response in biosystems. We therefore introduce a generalization of the ALC to get access to two- or three-dimensional effects, which are up to now not considered in the TLM. As examples, signatures of interfacial phenomena or non-uniform films are discussed.

  5. Intelligent Chemical Sensor Systems for In-space Safety Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Neudeck, P. G.; Makel, D. B.; Ward, B.; Liu, C. C.

    2006-01-01

    Future in-space and lunar operations will require significantly improved monitoring and Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) throughout the mission. In particular, the monitoring of chemical species is an important component of an overall monitoring system for space vehicles and operations. For example, in leak monitoring of propulsion systems during launch, inspace, and on lunar surfaces, detection of low concentrations of hydrogen and other fuels is important to avoid explosive conditions that could harm personnel and damage the vehicle. Dependable vehicle operation also depends on the timely and accurate measurement of these leaks. Thus, the development of a sensor array to determine the concentration of fuels such as hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or hydrazine as well as oxygen is necessary. Work has been on-going to develop an integrated smart leak detection system based on miniaturized sensors to detect hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or hydrazine, and oxygen. The approach is to implement Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensors incorporated with signal conditioning electronics, power, data storage, and telemetry enabling intelligent systems. The final sensor system will be self-contained with a surface area comparable to a postage stamp. This paper discusses the development of this "Lick and Stick" leak detection system and it s application to In-Space Transportation and other Exploration applications.

  6. A rod-shaped vibro touch sensor using PZT thin film.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Morita, T; Kurosawa, M K; Higuchi, T

    1999-01-01

    We have fabricated a probe sensor. This sensor is for high precision coordinate measuring machines, surface roughness measuring tools, or scanning probe microscopes (SPM). This sensor consists of a rod vibrating in the axial direction. The longitudinal vibration was excited and also detected by PZT thin film. The PZT thin film was fabricated by a hydrothermal method. The hydrothermal method uses the reaction process in hot and high pressure aqueous solutions. We made a 27.8-mm long sensor. Its resonance frequency was 116 kHz. The sensitivity and resolution were evaluated by experiments. We succeeded in oscillating the rod and detecting the contact.

  7. Thin film transistors gas sensors based on reduced graphene oxide poly(3-hexylthiophene) bilayer film for nitrogen dioxide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tao; Xie, Guangzhong; Zhou, Yong; Huang, Junlong; Wu, Mei; Jiang, Yadong; Tai, Huiling

    2014-10-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) bilayer films were firstly utilized as active layers in OTFT gas sensors for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) detection. The OTFT with RGO/P3HT bilayer film exhibited the typical transistor characteristics and better gas sensing properties at room temperature. The electrical parameters of OTFTs based on pure P3HT film and RGO/P3HT bilayer film were calculated. The threshold voltage of OTFT was positively shifted due to the high concentration carriers in RGO. The sensing properties of the sensor with RGO/P3HT bilayer film were also investigated. Moreover, the sensing mechanism was analyzed as well.

  8. The status of chemical sensors for hot-dip galvanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    1996-09-01

    Alloying elements are added to the zinc used in the hot-dip galvanization of sheet steel to control the properties and appearance of the resulting coating. For example, aluminum is added to improve the corrosion resistance and adherence of the coating. Other additions, such as antimony, are added to control the grain size and, thus, the appearance of the coating. The concentrations of these alloying elements may change during the process, either deliberately according to product specifications or due to factors such as preferential oxidation. These changes may require replenishment of a depleted alloying element or adjustments in other processing parameters to maintain optimal efficiency. Intelligent adjustments require knowledge of the alloy composition, which requires inline measurement of the concentrations of alloying elements. This article presents recent developments in chemical sensors for use in hot-dip galvanization. In particular, electrochemical sensors for measuring the concentrations of aluminum and antimony in molten zinc are reviewed.

  9. Performance of Nano-Submicron-Stripe Pd Thin-Film Temperature Sensors.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaoye; Xu, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenhai; Yang, Fan; Xu, Shengyong

    2016-12-01

    Dozens of small dual-beam thin-film temperature sensors with a total width down to 430 nm were fabricated and tested. The sensors were all made from 90-nm-thick Pd thin films, where the width of the narrow stripes was 70-100 nm and that of the wide ones was 210-800 nm. Two different calibration methods showed consistent and repeatable sensitivities of 0.7-1.2 μV/K for the sensors, confirming that the sensitivity mainly depended on the width configuration of each sensor. By integrating arrays of such sensors on a practical testing platform using hybrid e-beam lithography and photolithography techniques, we demonstrated that these sensors were capable of detecting a weak surface temperature difference of 0.1-0.2 K at microscale, and they could be scaled up as built-in temperature sensors in many practical devices.

  10. Performance of Nano-Submicron-Stripe Pd Thin-Film Temperature Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Xiaoye; Xu, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenhai; Yang, Fan; Xu, Shengyong

    2016-07-01

    Dozens of small dual-beam thin-film temperature sensors with a total width down to 430 nm were fabricated and tested. The sensors were all made from 90-nm-thick Pd thin films, where the width of the narrow stripes was 70-100 nm and that of the wide ones was 210-800 nm. Two different calibration methods showed consistent and repeatable sensitivities of 0.7-1.2 μV/K for the sensors, confirming that the sensitivity mainly depended on the width configuration of each sensor. By integrating arrays of such sensors on a practical testing platform using hybrid e-beam lithography and photolithography techniques, we demonstrated that these sensors were capable of detecting a weak surface temperature difference of 0.1-0.2 K at microscale, and they could be scaled up as built-in temperature sensors in many practical devices.

  11. Structure and chemical properties of molybdenum oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, C. V.; Atuchin, V. V.; Pokrovsky, L. D.; Becker, U.; Julien, C. M.

    2007-07-15

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) exhibits interesting structural, chemical, electrical, and optical properties, which are dependent on the growth conditions and the fabrication technique. In the present work, MoO{sub 3} films were produced by pulsed-laser deposition and dc magnetron sputtering under varying conditions of growth temperature (T{sub s}) and oxygen pressure (pO{sub 2}). The effect of growth conditions on the structure and chemical properties of MoO{sub 3} films was examined using x-ray diffraction, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopic measurements. The analyses indicate that the microstructure of Mo oxide films is sensitive to T{sub s} and pO{sub 2}. The growth conditions were optimized to produce stoichiometric and highly textured polycrystalline MoO{sub 3} films. A comparison of the microstructure of MoO{sub 3} films grown using pulsed-laser deposition and sputtering methods is also presented.

  12. Chemical, Biological, and Explosive Sensors for Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kyle, Manuel Manard, Stephan Weeks

    2009-01-31

    Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) is developing handheld chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) detection systems and sensor motes for wireless networked field operations. The CBE sensors are capable of detecting and identifying multiple targeted toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and high-explosive vapor components. The CBE devices are based on differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) coupled with fast gas chromatography (GC) or mass spectrometry. The systems all include the concepts of: 1. Direct air/particulate “smart” sampling 2. Selective, continuous real-time (~1 sec) alert monitoring using DMS 3. Highly selective, rapid dual technology separation/verification analysis The biosensor technology is based on Raman aerosol particle flow cytometry for target detection and identification. Monitoring and identifying trace level chemical vapors directly from ambient air will allow First Responders to quickly adapt situational response strategies and personal protective equipment needs to the specific response scenario being encountered. First Responders require great confidence in the measurements and ability of a given system to detect CBE below threshold levels without interferences. The concept of determining the background matrix in near real-time to allow subsequent automated field-programmable method selection and cueing of high-value assets in a wide range of environs will be presented. This provides CBE information for decisions prior to First Responders entering the response site or sending a portable mobile unit for a remote site survey of the hazards. The focus is on real-time information needed by those responsible for emergency response and national security.

  13. An economic approach to fabricate photo sensor based on nanostructured ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huse, Nanasaheb; Upadhye, Deepak; Sharma, Ramphal

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructural ZnO Thin Films have been synthesized by simple and economic Chemical Bath Deposition technique onto glass substrate with bath temperature at 60°C for 1 hour. Structural, Optical, Electrical and topographical properties of the prepared Thin Films were investigated by GIXRD, I-V Measurement System, UV-Visible Spectrophotometer and AFM respectively. Calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the standard JCPDS card (36-1451) values, exhibits Hexagonal Wurtzite crystal structure. I-V Measurement curve has shown ohmic nature in dark condition and responds to light illumination which reveals Photo sensor properties. After illumination of 60W light, decrease in resistance was observed from 110.9 KΩ to 104.4 KΩ. The change in current and calculated Photo sensitivity was found to be 3.51 µA and 6.3% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 3.24 eV. AFM images revealed uniform deposition over entire glass substrate with 32.27 nm average roughness of the film.

  14. Conformal self-assembled thin films for optical pH sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topasna, Daniela M.; Topasna, Gregory A.; Liu, Minghanbo; Tseng, Ching-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Simple, reliable, lightweight, and inexpensive thin films based sensors are still in intense development and high demand in many applications such as biomedical, industrial, environmental, military, and consumer products. One important class of sensors is the optical pH sensor. In addition, conformal thin film based sensors extend the range of application for pH optical sensors. We present the results on the fabrication and characterization of optical pH sensing coatings made through ionic self-assembled technique. These thin films are based on the combination of a polyelectrolyte and water-soluble organic dye molecule Direct Yellow 4. A series of films was fabricated and characterized in order to determine the optimized parameters of the polymer and of the organic dye solutions. The optical pH responses of these films were also studied. The transparent films were immersed in solutions at various temperature and pH values. The films are stable when immersed in solutions with pH below 9.0 and temperatures below 90 °C and they maintain their performance after longer immersion times. We also demonstrate the functionality of these coatings as conformal films.

  15. Design and characterization of integrated-optic-based chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beregovskii, Iouri

    A novel line of integrated-optic-based chemical sensors was developed. The sensors are based on modification of the optical cavity of a single-mode semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser. A sensitive layer changes its refractive index in presence of a specific chemical, thus changing the effective refractive index of the section and the optical length of the cavity. This results in laser frequency shift measured either directly or by heterodyne detection using a reference laser as the second source. It is shown that DBR-laser-based sensors can achieve in principle a much higher sensitivity than passive sensors, such as Mach- Zehnder interferometers, due to the narrow linewidth of DBR lasers. The theory of DBR-laser-based sensors is described. It allows optimizing the sensitive section length and field confinement in the sensitive layer for the lowest detection limit. The optimum parameters depend on cavity losses and absorption of the sensitive material. Numerical modeling shows a wide acceptable range of sensitive section parameters for low-loss materials, while for higher-loss materials this range becomes much narrower. Narrow-linewidth DBR lasers are required for high sensitivity. In this respect, sol-gel waveguides with and without Bragg grating were incorporated in the DBR laser scheme. Single-mode operation of DBR lasers with sol-gel waveguide gratings was demonstrated for the first time, with 34-dB side mode suppression and a short-term linewidth of 150 to 500 kHz. A 3-section configuration with sol-gel waveguides and fiber grating showed 28-dB side mode suppression and a short-term linewidth of 600 kHz. Chemical sensing was performed with fiber grating, sol- gel waveguide grating, and 3-section DBR lasers. The first two types showed frequency shift of over 130 MHz in the presence of acetone vapors, and reversibility within experimental errors. The 3-section scheme showed significant dispersion of response and lack of reversibility due to

  16. Chemical and Magnetic Order in Vapor-Deposited Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Peter Wiliam

    1995-01-01

    A stochastic Monte Carlo model of vapor deposition and growth of a crystalline, binary, A_3 B metallic alloy with a negative energy of mixing has been developed which incorporates deposition and surface diffusion in a physically correct manner and allows the simulation of deposition rates that are experimentally realizable. The effects of deposition rate and growth temperature on the development of short range order (SRO) in vapor-deposited films have been examined using this model. SRO in the simulated films increases with growth temperature up to the point at which the temperature corresponds to the energy of mixing, but we see no corresponding development of anisotropic SRO (preferential ordering of A-B pairs along the growth direction). Epitaxial (100) and (111) CoPt_3 films have been deposited over a range of growth temperatures from -50^circ C to 800^circC. Curie temperature (T_{rm c}) and saturation magnetization are dramatically enhanced in those films grown near 400^circ C over the values expected for the chemically homogeneous alloy. Magnetization data indicates that the high T _{rm c} films are inhomogeneous. These phenomena are interpreted as evidence of a previously unobserved magnetically driven miscibility gap in the Co-Pt phase diagram. Films grown near 400^circ C exhibit large uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy that cannot be accounted for by strain. The observed anisotropy coincides with the chemical phase separation and it seems likely that these two phenomena are related. Long range order (LRO) in the as-deposited films peaks at a growth temperature of 630^circC and then decreases with decreasing growth temperature. The decrease in LRO is either due to kinetic frustration or to competition from magnetically induced Co clustering. Theoretical phase diagrams based on the appropriate Blume-Emery-Griffiths Hamiltonian suggest the latter.

  17. Optical Characterization Of Chemically Deposited Nanostructured CdS Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Y. C.; Kansal, Archana

    2009-06-01

    Newly modified hot chemical deposition method was used to grow Cadmium sulfide films. Substrates were kept at relatively higher temperature than the bath using local heating. The bath was consisting of aqueous solutions of Cadmium chloride, Thiourea and complexed by TEA. The Ph of the bath was maintained around 8-10 by adding ammonia solution. The soda lime glass slides were used as substrates. Good thick films were obtained few minutes. Air annealing was used to study the effect of heat treatment on quality of the films. All films were analyzed using optical spectrophotometer. The step like nature in transmission spectra and band gap curves could be due to discrete energy levels, which exist in nanomaterials. Blue shift is observed in samples. Band gap shift from higher value to lower value suggest that films are either of thickness of few nanometer range and/or grain size is of the nanometer range. This paper includes details about new modified dipping technique and optical, structural studies of these films.

  18. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  19. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  20. Nanoparticle-GFP "chemical nose" sensor for cancer cell identification.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Daniel F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based sensor arrays have been used to distinguish a wide range of bio-related molecules through pattern recognition. This "chemical nose" approach uses nanoparticles as receptors to selectively identify the analytes, while a transducer reports the binding through a readable signal (fluorescence). Here we describe a procedure that uses functionalized gold nanoparticles as receptors and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as the transducer to identify and differentiate cell state (normal, cancerous, and metastatic), an important tool in early diagnosis and treatment of tumors.

  1. Nanowire sensors and arrays for chemical/biomolecule detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Ramanathan, K.; Bangar, M. A.; Chen, W.; Mulchandan, A.; Myung, N. V.

    2005-01-01

    We report electrochemical growth of single nanowire based sensors using e-beam patterned electrolyte channels, potentially enabling the controlled fabrication of individually addressable high density arrays. The electrodeposition technique results in nanowires with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. Using this technique, we have fabricated single palladium nanowires with diameters ranging between 75 nm and 300 nm and conducting polymer nanowires (polypyrrole and polyaniline) with diameters between 100 nm and 200 nm. Using these single nanowires, we have successfully demonstrated gas sensing with Pd nanowires and pH sensing with polypirrole nanowires.

  2. Prototype thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor for a ceramic-insulated diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Barrows, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    A platinum versus platinum-13 percent rhodium thin-film thermocouple/heat-flux sensor was devised and tested in the harsh, high-temperature environment of a ceramic-insulated, low-heat-rejection diesel engine. The sensor probe assembly was developed to provide experimental validation of heat transfer and thermal analysis methodologies applicable to the insulated diesel engine concept. The thin-film thermocouple configuration was chosen to approximate an uninterrupted chamber surface and provide a 1-D heat-flux path through the probe body. The engine test was conducted by Purdue University for Integral Technologies, Inc., under a DOE-funded contract managed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The thin-film sensor performed reliably during 6 to 10 hr of repeated engine runs at indicated mean surface temperatures up to 950 K. However, the sensor suffered partial loss of adhesion in the thin-film thermocouple junction area following maximum cyclic temperature excursions to greater than 1150 K.

  3. Modified chemical deposition and physico-chemical properties of copper(I) selenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, H. M.; Lokhande, C. D.; Amalnerkar, D. P.; Seth, T.

    2003-04-01

    Semiconducting stoichiometric copper(I) selenide (Cu 2Se) thin films were deposited onto glass substrate using a modified chemical method. The deposition conditions such as concentration and pH of cation and anionic precursor solutions, immersion and rinsing times and number of immersions, etc. were optimized for Cu 2Se films. The characterization of Cu 2Se films was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), optical absorption/transmittance, electrical resistivity and thermoemf measurement techniques. The XRD shows the formation of copper(I) selenide with monoclinic crystal structure. Absorbance of the Cu 2Se thin film is found to be high (10 4 cm -1) with optical band gap of 2.35 eV. The electrical resistivity is of the order of 10 -1 Ω cm. Film exhibits p-type electrical conductivity.

  4. CMOS Alcohol Sensor Employing ZnO Nanowire Sensing Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, S.; Ali, S. Z.; Guha, P. K.; Hiralal, P.; Unalan, H. E.; Dalal, S. H.; Covington, J. A.; Milne, W. I.; Gardner, J. W.; Udrea, F.

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on the utilization of zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) on a silicon on insulator (SOI) CMOS micro-hotplate for use as an alcohol sensor. The device was designed in Cadence and fabricated in a 1.0 μm SOI CMOS process at XFAB (Germany). The basic resistive gas sensor comprises of a metal micro-heater (made of aluminum) embedded in an ultra-thin membrane. Gold plated aluminum electrodes, formed of the top metal, are used for contacting with the sensing material. This design allows high operating temperatures with low power consumption. The membrane was formed by using deep reactive ion etching. ZnO NWs were grown on SOI CMOS substrates by a simple and low-cost hydrothermal method. A few nanometer of ZnO seed layer was first sputtered on the chips, using a metal mask, and then the chips were dipped in a zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetramine solution at 90° C to grow ZnO NWs. The chemical sensitivity of the on-chip NWs were studied in the presence of ethanol (C2H5OH) vapour (with 10% relative humidity) at two different temperatures: 200 and 250° C (the corresponding power consumptions are only 18 and 22 mW). The concentrations of ethanol vapour were varied from 175-1484 ppm (pers per million) and the maximum response was observed 40% (change in resistance in %) at 786 ppm at 250° C. These preliminary measurements showed that the on-chip deposited ZnO NWs could be a promising material for a CMOS based ethanol sensor.

  5. Thin-film sensors with small structure size on flat and curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaljohann, F.; Hagedorn, D.; Buß, A.; Kumme, R.; Löffler, F.

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a fabrication technology for thin-film sensors on metallic substrates with flat and curved surfaces. Physical vapour deposition by means of a magnetron sputtering system is used to deposit an insulating layer and a following functional layer. This layer is structured by distinct photolithographic steps utilizing a self-developed spray coating technique, four-axis robotics with micrometer precision and a UV laser with a spot size below 10 μm. This highly flexible technique allows a rapid change of design to produce various sensor layouts in a short time. Besides the fabrication technology, we present two realized applications for thin-film sensor technology in this paper. First, a tool wear sensor for rotating cutting tools, directly detecting the flank-wear land width, and second, sputtered resistance strain gauges for force measurement. Measurement results showing the potential of thin-film sensors are given briefly.

  6. Novel Thin Film Sensor Technology for Turbine Engine Hot Section Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2007-01-01

    Degradation and damage that develops over time in hot section components can lead to catastrophic failure of the turbine section of aircraft engines. A range of thin film sensor technology has been demonstrated enabling on-component measurement of multiple parameters either individually or in sensor arrays including temperature, strain, heat flux, and flow. Conductive ceramics are beginning to be investigated as new materials for use as thin film sensors in the hot section, leveraging expertise in thin films and high temperature materials. The current challenges are to develop new sensor and insulation materials capable of withstanding the extreme hot section environment, and to develop techniques for applying sensors onto complex high temperature structures for aging studies of hot propulsion materials. The technology research and development ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center for applications to future aircraft, launch vehicles, space vehicles, and ground systems is outlined.

  7. [Reducing nutrients loss by plastic film covering chemical fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Chen, Huo-jun; Wei, Ze-bin; Wu, Qi-tang; Zeng, Shu-cai

    2010-03-01

    With the low utilization rate of fertilizers by crop and the growing amount of fertilizer usage,the agricultural non-point source pollution in China is becoming more and more serious. The field experiments planting corns were conducted, in which the applied chemical fertilizers were recovered with plastic film to realize the separation of fertilizers from rain water. In the experiments, the influences of different fertilizing treatments on the growing and production of sweet corn were observed. The fertilizer utilization rate and the nutrient contents in surface run-off water with and without the film covering were also determined. Results showed that, with only 70% of the normal amount of fertilizers,the sweet corn could already get high yield under the experimental soil conditions. Soil analysis after corn crops showed that the amounts of available N, P and K in the soil increased obviously with the film-covering, and the decreasing order was: 100% fertilizers with film-covering > 70% fertilizers with film-covering > 100% fertilizers, 70% fertilizers > no fertilizer. The average utilization coefficients of fertilizers by the crop were 42%-87%, 0%-3%, 5%-15% respectively for N, P and K. It was higher with film-covering than that without covering, especially for the high fertilization treatment. Analysis of water samples collected for eight run-off events showed that, without film-covering, N, P and K average concentrations in the runoff waters with fertilizations were 27.72, 2.70 and 7.07 mg x L(-1), respectively. And they were reduced respectively by 39.54%, 28.05%, 43.74% with the film-covering. This can give significant benefits to the decrease of agricultural non-point source pollution and water eutrophication. PMID:20358842

  8. [Reducing nutrients loss by plastic film covering chemical fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Chen, Huo-jun; Wei, Ze-bin; Wu, Qi-tang; Zeng, Shu-cai

    2010-03-01

    With the low utilization rate of fertilizers by crop and the growing amount of fertilizer usage,the agricultural non-point source pollution in China is becoming more and more serious. The field experiments planting corns were conducted, in which the applied chemical fertilizers were recovered with plastic film to realize the separation of fertilizers from rain water. In the experiments, the influences of different fertilizing treatments on the growing and production of sweet corn were observed. The fertilizer utilization rate and the nutrient contents in surface run-off water with and without the film covering were also determined. Results showed that, with only 70% of the normal amount of fertilizers,the sweet corn could already get high yield under the experimental soil conditions. Soil analysis after corn crops showed that the amounts of available N, P and K in the soil increased obviously with the film-covering, and the decreasing order was: 100% fertilizers with film-covering > 70% fertilizers with film-covering > 100% fertilizers, 70% fertilizers > no fertilizer. The average utilization coefficients of fertilizers by the crop were 42%-87%, 0%-3%, 5%-15% respectively for N, P and K. It was higher with film-covering than that without covering, especially for the high fertilization treatment. Analysis of water samples collected for eight run-off events showed that, without film-covering, N, P and K average concentrations in the runoff waters with fertilizations were 27.72, 2.70 and 7.07 mg x L(-1), respectively. And they were reduced respectively by 39.54%, 28.05%, 43.74% with the film-covering. This can give significant benefits to the decrease of agricultural non-point source pollution and water eutrophication.

  9. Nanocrystalline Pd:NiFe2O4 thin films: A selective ethanol gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pratibha; Godbole, R. V.; Bhagwat, Sunita

    2016-10-01

    In this work, Pd:NiFe2O4 thin films were investigated for the detection of reducing gases. These films were fabricated using spray pyrolysis technique and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) to confirm the crystal structure. The surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Magnetization measurements were carried out using SQUID VSM, which shows ferrimagnetic behavior of the samples. These thin film sensors were tested against methanol, ethanol, hydrogen sulfide and liquid petroleum gas, where they were found to be more selective to ethanol. The fabricated thin film sensors exhibited linear response signal for all the gases with concentrations up to 5 w/o Pd. Reduction in optimum operating temperature and enhancement in response was also observed. Pd:NiFe2O4 thin films exhibited faster response and recovery characteristic. These sensors have potential for industrial applications because of their long-term stability, low power requirement and low production cost.

  10. Thick-film MEMS thermoelectric sensor fabricated using a thermally assisted lift-off process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yuan; Cai, Haogang; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a thick-film microelectromechanical systems thermoelectric sensor fabricated by a low-temperature thermally assisted lift-off process. During the process, thick metal or semiconductor films experience controlled breakup due to thermal reflow of the underlying lithographically defined photoresist patterns, thereby facilitating the sacrificial removal of the photoresist. This enables rapid and reliable patterning of thick films that can otherwise be difficult to achieve by conventional processes. Experimental results with a sensor consisting of a 60-junction thick-film antimony-bismuth thermopile demonstrate an electric conductivity of 5.44×106 S/m and a Seebeck coefficient of 114 μV/K per junction, which are comparable to those obtained from bulk materials. Thus, the thick-film sensor can potentially allow low-noise, high-efficiency thermoelectric measurements.

  11. High-resolution chemical sensor for unattended underwater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adornato, Lori; Kaltenbacher, Eric A.; Byrne, Robert H.; Liu, Xuewu; Easley, Regina

    2008-10-01

    Autonomous underwater sensors are the best solution for continuous detection of chemical species in aquatic systems. The Spectrophotometric Elemental Analysis System (SEAS), an in situ instrument that incorporates both fluorescence and colorimetric techniques, provides high-resolution time-series measurements of a wide variety of analytes. The use of Teflon AF2400 long-pathlength optical cells allows for sub-parts-per-billion detection limits. User-defined sampling frequencies up to 1 Hz facilitate measurements of chemical concentrations on highly resolved temporal and spatial scales. Due to its modular construction, SEAS can be adapted for operation in littoral or open ocean regions. We present a high-level overview of the instrument's design along with data from moored deployments and deep water casts.

  12. Very Large Chemical Sensor Array for Mimicking Biological Olfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccherelli, R.; Zampetti, E.; Pantalei, S.; Bernabei, M.; Persaud, K. C.

    2009-05-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORN) in the mammalian olfactory system, transduce molecular properties of the odorants into electrical signals and project these into the olfactory bulb (OB). In the biological system several millions of receptor neurons of a few hundred types create redundancy and the massive convergence of the ORNs to the OB, is thought to enhance the sensitivity and selectivity of the system. To explore this concept, the NEUROCHEM project will build a polymeric chemical sensor array consisting of 216 (65536) sensors with tens of different types. To interface such a large sensor array, a topological array configuration with n rows and m columns, has been adopted, to reduce the total wiring connections to n+m. A method of addressing a single element in the array in isolation of the rest of the network has been developed. Over the array ten different conductive polymers with different sensing characteristics will be deposited by means of electrodeposition and inkjet printing. A smaller prototype of 64 elements has been investigated and the results are here reported and discussed.

  13. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T.; Gelperin, Alan; Staii, Cristian

    2011-07-12

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  14. Chemical vapour deposition of zeolitic imidazolate framework thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassen, Ivo; Styles, Mark; Grenci, Gianluca; Gorp, Hans Van; Vanderlinden, Willem; Feyter, Steven De; Falcaro, Paolo; Vos, Dirk De; Vereecken, Philippe; Ameloot, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Integrating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in microelectronics has disruptive potential because of the unique properties of these microporous crystalline materials. Suitable film deposition methods are crucial to leverage MOFs in this field. Conventional solvent-based procedures, typically adapted from powder preparation routes, are incompatible with nanofabrication because of corrosion and contamination risks. We demonstrate a chemical vapour deposition process (MOF-CVD) that enables high-quality films of ZIF-8, a prototypical MOF material, with a uniform and controlled thickness, even on high-aspect-ratio features. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MOF-CVD enables previously inaccessible routes such as lift-off patterning and depositing MOF films on fragile features. The compatibility of MOF-CVD with existing infrastructure, both in research and production facilities, will greatly facilitate MOF integration in microelectronics. MOF-CVD is the first vapour-phase deposition method for any type of microporous crystalline network solid and marks a milestone in processing such materials.

  15. Modified chemical route for deposition of molybdenum disulphide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Akshay N. Sartale, S. D.

    2014-04-24

    Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using a modified chemical route. Sodium molybdate and sodium sulphide were used as precursors for molybdenum and sulphur respectively. The route involves formation of tetrathiomolybdate ions (MoS{sub 4}{sup 2−}) and further reduction by sodium borohydride to form MoS{sub 2}. The deposition was performed at room temperature. The deposited films were annealed in argon atmosphere at 1073 K for 1 hour to improve its crystallinity. The deposited films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy for optical studies and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for structure determination.

  16. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Joel S.; Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I.

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  17. An objective protocol for comparing the noise performance of silver halide film and digital sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Frédéric; Guichard, Frédéric; Hornung, Hervé; Tessière, Régis

    2012-01-01

    Digital sensors have obviously invaded the photography mass market. However, some photographers with very high expectancy still use silver halide film. Are they only nostalgic reluctant to technology or is there more than meets the eye? The answer is not so easy if we remark that, at the end of the golden age, films were actually scanned before development. Nowadays film users have adopted digital technology and scan their film to take advantage from digital processing afterwards. Therefore, it is legitimate to evaluate silver halide film "with a digital eye", with the assumption that processing can be applied as for a digital camera. The article will describe in details the operations we need to consider the film as a RAW digital sensor. In particular, we have to account for the film characteristic curve, the autocorrelation of the noise (related to film grain) and the sampling of the digital sensor (related to Bayer filter array). We also describe the protocol that was set, from shooting to scanning. We then present and interpret the results of sensor response, signal to noise ratio and dynamic range.

  18. Room temperature ammonia sensor based on copper nanoparticle intercalated polyaniline nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, U. V.; Ramgir, Niranjan S.; Karmakar, N.; Bhogale, A.; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of copper nanoparticles intercalated-polyaniline nanocomposites (NC) have been deposited at room temperatures by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of different concentrations of Cu nanoparticles. The response characteristics of the NC thin films toward different gases namely NH3, CO, CO2, NO and CH4 were examined at room temperature. Both pure polyaniline (PANI) and NC films exhibited a selective response toward NH3. Incorporation of Cu nanoparticles resulted in an improvement of the sensors response and response kinetics. The response and the recovery times of composite film toward 50 ppm of NH3 were 7 and 160 s, respectively. Additionally, the NC sensor film could reversibly detect as low as 1 ppm of NH3 concentrations. The enhanced response of NC films toward NH3 is attributed to the deprotonation and reprotonation processes as also supported by Raman investigations.

  19. Semiconductor and ceramic nanoparticle films deposited by chemical bath deposition.

    PubMed

    Hodes, Gary

    2007-06-14

    Chemical bath deposition (CBD) has been used to deposit films of metal sulfides, selenides and oxides, together with some miscellaneous compounds, beginning nearly 140 years ago. While it is a well-known technique in a few specific areas (notably photoconductive lead salt detectors, photoelectrodes and more recently, thin film solar cells), it is by and large an under-appreciated technique. The more recent interest in all things 'nano' has provided a boost for CBD: since it is a low temperature, solution (almost always aqueous) technique, crystal size is often very small. This is evidenced by the existence of size quantization commonly found in CBD semiconductor films. The intention of this review is to provide readers, many of whom may not even be aware of the CBD technique, with an overview of how the technique has been used to fabricate nanocrystalline semiconductor (this terminology also includes oxides often classified as ceramics) films and some properties of these films. The review begins, after a short introduction, with a general description of the CBD method, designed to give the reader a basic knowledge of the technique. The rest of the review then focuses on nanocrystalline (or, in the few cases of amorphous deposits, nanoparticle) films. The various factors which determine crystal size are first discussed. This is followed by some of the many examples of size quantization observed in the films. Since CBD films are usually porous, surface effects can be very important, and various surface-dependent properties (light emission and surface states) as well as surface modification, are treated: (although some properties, like emission, can be strongly dependent on both surface and 'bulk'). Because of the fact that many CBD films have been made specifically for use as photoelectrodes in photoelectrochemical cells, there is next a chapter on this topic with a few examples of such photoelectrodes. Film structure and morphology follows with examples of

  20. Direct Growth of Graphene Films on 3D Grating Structural Quartz Substrates for High-Performance Pressure-Sensitive Sensors.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuefen; Sun, Tai; Yang, Jun; Yu, Leyong; Wei, Dacheng; Fang, Liang; Lu, Bin; Du, Chunlei; Wei, Dapeng

    2016-07-01

    Conformal graphene films have directly been synthesized on the surface of grating microstructured quartz substrates by a simple chemical vapor deposition process. The wonderful conformality and relatively high quality of the as-prepared graphene on the three-dimensional substrate have been verified by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectra. This conformal graphene film possesses excellent electrical and optical properties with a sheet resistance of <2000 Ω·sq(-1) and a transmittance of >80% (at 550 nm), which can be attached with a flat graphene film on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate, and then could work as a pressure-sensitive sensor. This device possesses a high-pressure sensitivity of -6.524 kPa(-1) in a low-pressure range of 0-200 Pa. Meanwhile, this pressure-sensitive sensor exhibits super-reliability (≥5000 cycles) and an ultrafast response time (≤4 ms). Owing to these features, this pressure-sensitive sensor based on 3D conformal graphene is adequately introduced to test wind pressure, expressing higher accuracy and a lower background noise level than a market anemometer. PMID:27269362

  1. A strategy for fabricating nanoporous gold films through chemical dealloying of electrochemically deposited Au-Sn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yantong; Ke, Xi; Yu, Changchun; Liu, Shaofang; Zhao, Jie; Cui, Guofeng; Higgins, Drew; Chen, Zhongwei; Li, Qing; Wu, Gang

    2014-11-01

    We report a novel strategy for the fabrication of nanoporous gold (NPG) films. The fabrication process involves the electrodeposition of a gold-tin alloy, followed by subsequent chemical dealloying of tin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show a bicontinuous nanoporous structure formed on the substrates after chemical dealloying. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis indicates that there are no impurities in the Au-Sn alloy film with an average composition of 58 at. % Au and 42 at. % Sn. After dealloying, only gold remains in the NPG film indicating the effectiveness of this technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that the as-prepared Au-Sn alloy film is composed of two phases (Au5Sn and AuSn), while the NPG film is composed of a single phase (Au). We demonstrate that this approach enables the fabrication of NPG films, either freestanding or supported on various conductive substrates such as copper foil, stainless steel sheet and nickel foam. The resulting NPG electrode exhibits enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward both H2O2 reduction and methanol oxidation compared to the polished Au disc electrode. Our strategy provides a general method to fabricate high quality NPG films on conductive substrates, which will broaden the application potential of NPG or NPG-based materials in various fields such as catalysis, optics and sensor technology.

  2. Thin film heat flux sensor for Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine environment stresses engine components to their design limits and beyond. The extremely high temperatures and rapid temperature cycling can easily cause parts to fail if they are not properly designed. Thin film heat flux sensors can provide heat loading information with almost no disturbance of gas flows or of the blade. These sensors can provide steady state and transient heat flux information. A thin film heat flux sensor is described which makes it easier to measure small temperature differences across very thin insulating layers.

  3. Modified chemical deposition and physico-chemical properties of copper sulphide (Cu 2S) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, H. M.; Desai, J. D.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2002-12-01

    Semiconducting stoichiometric copper sulphide (Cu 2S) thin films were deposited using modified chemical deposition method. The preparative conditions such as concentration, pH of cationic and anionic precursors, adsorption, reaction and rinsing time durations, complextant, etc. were optimized to get stoichiometric Cu 2S thin films. The structural, surface morphological, compositional, optical and electrical characterization were carried out with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), optical absorbance/transmittance, electrical resistivity and thermoemf studies. The films were found to be nanocrystalline. Absorbance of the film was high (10 4 cm -1) with optical band gap of 2.35 eV. The electrical resistivity was of the order of 10 -2 Ω cm with p-type electrical conductivity.

  4. High-performance flexible hydrogen sensor made of WS2 nanosheet–Pd nanoparticle composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuru, Cihan; Choi, Duyoung; Kargar, Alireza; Liu, Chin Hung; Yavuz, Serdar; Choi, Chulmin; Jin, Sungho; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2016-05-01

    We report a flexible hydrogen sensor, composed of WS2 nanosheet–Pd nanoparticle composite film, fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate. The sensor offers the advantages of light-weight, mechanical durability, room temperature operation, and high sensitivity. The WS2–Pd composite film exhibits sensitivity (R 1/R 2, the ratio of the initial resistance to final resistance of the sensor) of 7.8 to 50 000 ppm hydrogen. Moreover, the WS2–Pd composite film distinctly outperforms the graphene–Pd composite, whose sensitivity is only 1.14. Furthermore, the ease of fabrication holds great potential for scalable and low-cost manufacturing of hydrogen sensors.

  5. High-performance flexible hydrogen sensor made of WS₂ nanosheet-Pd nanoparticle composite film.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Cihan; Choi, Duyoung; Kargar, Alireza; Liu, Chin Hung; Yavuz, Serdar; Choi, Chulmin; Jin, Sungho; Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2016-05-13

    We report a flexible hydrogen sensor, composed of WS2 nanosheet-Pd nanoparticle composite film, fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate. The sensor offers the advantages of light-weight, mechanical durability, room temperature operation, and high sensitivity. The WS2-Pd composite film exhibits sensitivity (R 1/R 2, the ratio of the initial resistance to final resistance of the sensor) of 7.8 to 50,000 ppm hydrogen. Moreover, the WS2-Pd composite film distinctly outperforms the graphene-Pd composite, whose sensitivity is only 1.14. Furthermore, the ease of fabrication holds great potential for scalable and low-cost manufacturing of hydrogen sensors. PMID:27040653

  6. A sensitive film structure improvement of reduced graphene oxide based resistive gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Xie, GuangZhong; Xie, Tao; Yuan, Huan; Tai, HuiLing; Jiang, YaDong; Chen, Zhi

    2014-07-01

    This study was focused on how to improve the gas sensing properties of resistive gas sensors based on reduced graphene oxide. Sol-airbrush technology was utilized to prepare reduced graphene oxide films using porous zinc oxide films as supporting materials mainly for carbon dioxide sensing applications. The proposed film structure improved the sensitivity and the response/recovery speed of the sensors compared to those of the conventional ones and alleviated the restrictions of sensors' performance to the film thickness. In addition, the fabrication technology is relatively simple and has potential for mass production in industry. The improvement in the sensitivity and the response/recovery speed is helpful for fast detection of toxic gases or vapors in environmental and industrial applications.

  7. Thermal conductivity measurement of few layer graphene film by a micropipette sensor with laser point heating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J. Y.; Lee, K. M.; Shrestha, R.; Horne, K.; Das, S.; Choi, W.; Kim, M.; Choi, T. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We report a thermal characterization method for a large-scale free-standing chemical vapor deposited few layer graphene (FLG), in which a micropipette temperature sensor with an inbuilt laser point heating source was used. The technique is unique as it exhibits in general the characteristic features of high accuracy measurement of thermal conductivity of free-standing ultrathin films. Using the micropipette sensor we successfully implemented the characterization technique to show high thermal transport behavior in free-standing graphene. For accurate and successful measurement of thermal conductivity, FLG grown on Ni was transferred to a polycarbonate (PC) membrane with holes (average diameter of 100 μm) in order to isolate the graphene film from heat spreading through the bottom of the film by the laser point heating. The thermal conductivity of FLG by this method was measured at 2868 ± 932 W/m °C. The large uncertainty of 32% in thermal conductivity measurement is mainly due to the non-uniform (∼30% deviation) thickness of the film.

  8. Two-dimensional photonic crystal chemical and biomolecular sensors.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongyu; Smith, Natasha L; Zhang, Jian-Tao; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-01-01

    We review recent progress in the development of two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal (PC) materials for chemical and biological sensing applications. Self-assembly methods were developed in our laboratory to fabricate 2-D particle array monolayers on mercury and water surfaces. These hexagonal arrays strongly forward Bragg diffract light to report on their array spacings. By embedding these 2-D arrays onto responsive hydrogel surfaces, 2-D PC sensing materials can be fabricated. The 2-D PC sensors utilize responsive polymer hydrogels that are chemically functionalized to show volume phase transitions in selective response to particular chemical species. Novel hydrogels were also developed in our laboratory by cross-linking proteins while preserving their native structures to maintain their selective binding affinities. The volume phase transitions swell or shrink the hydrogels, which alter their 2-D array spacings, and shift their diffraction wavelengths. These shifts can be visually detected or spectrally measured. These 2-D PC sensing materials have been used for the detection of many analytes, such as pH, surfactants, metal ions, proteins, anionic drugs, and ammonia. We are exploring the use of organogels that use low vapor pressure ionic liquids as their mobile phases for sensing atmospheric analytes. PMID:25867803

  9. Polyvinylidene fluoride film sensors in collocated feedback structural control: application for suppressing impact-induced disturbances.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chien-Ching; Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Pan, Shan-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films are light, flexible, and have high piezoelectricity. Because of these advantages, they have been widely used as sensors in applications such as underwater investigation, nondestructive damage detection, robotics, and active vibration suppression. PVDF sensors are especially preferred over conventional strain gauges in active vibration control because the PVDF sensors are easy to cut into different sizes or shapes as piezoelectric actuators and they can then be placed as collocated pairs. In this work, to focus on demonstrating the dynamic sensing performance of the PVDF film sensor, we revisit the active vibration control problem of a cantilever beam using a collocated lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuator/PVDF film sensor pair. Before applying active vibration control, the measurement characteristics of the PVDF film sensor are studied by simultaneous comparison with a strain gauge. The loading effect of the piezoelectric actuator on the cantilever beam is also investigated in this paper. Finally, four simple, robust active vibration controllers are employed with the collocated PZT/PVDF pair to suppress vibration of the cantilever beam subjected to impact loadings. The four controllers are the velocity feedback controller, the integral resonant controller (IRC), the resonant controller, and the positive position feedback (PPF) controller. Suppression of impact disturbances is especially suitable for the purpose of demonstrating the dynamic sensing performance of the PVDF sensor. The experimental results also provide suggestions for choosing between the previously mentioned controllers, which have been proven to be effective in suppressing impact-induced vibrations.

  10. Polyvinylidene fluoride film sensors in collocated feedback structural control: application for suppressing impact-induced disturbances.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chien-Ching; Chuang, Kuo-Chih; Pan, Shan-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films are light, flexible, and have high piezoelectricity. Because of these advantages, they have been widely used as sensors in applications such as underwater investigation, nondestructive damage detection, robotics, and active vibration suppression. PVDF sensors are especially preferred over conventional strain gauges in active vibration control because the PVDF sensors are easy to cut into different sizes or shapes as piezoelectric actuators and they can then be placed as collocated pairs. In this work, to focus on demonstrating the dynamic sensing performance of the PVDF film sensor, we revisit the active vibration control problem of a cantilever beam using a collocated lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuator/PVDF film sensor pair. Before applying active vibration control, the measurement characteristics of the PVDF film sensor are studied by simultaneous comparison with a strain gauge. The loading effect of the piezoelectric actuator on the cantilever beam is also investigated in this paper. Finally, four simple, robust active vibration controllers are employed with the collocated PZT/PVDF pair to suppress vibration of the cantilever beam subjected to impact loadings. The four controllers are the velocity feedback controller, the integral resonant controller (IRC), the resonant controller, and the positive position feedback (PPF) controller. Suppression of impact disturbances is especially suitable for the purpose of demonstrating the dynamic sensing performance of the PVDF sensor. The experimental results also provide suggestions for choosing between the previously mentioned controllers, which have been proven to be effective in suppressing impact-induced vibrations. PMID:23443690

  11. Sol-Gel Thin Films for Plasmonic Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic gas sensors are optical sensors that use localized surface plasmons or extended surface plasmons as transducing platform. Surface plasmons are very sensitive to dielectric variations of the environment or to electron exchange, and these effects have been exploited for the realization of sensitive gas sensors. In this paper, we review our research work of the last few years on the synthesis and the gas sensing properties of sol-gel based nanomaterials for plasmonic sensors. PMID:26184216

  12. Teflon films for chemically-inert microfluidic valves and pumps.

    PubMed

    Grover, William H; von Muhlen, Marcio G; Manalis, Scott R

    2008-06-01

    We present a simple method for fabricating chemically-inert Teflon microfluidic valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. These structures are modeled after monolithic membrane valves and pumps that utilize a featureless polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane bonded between two etched glass wafers. The limited chemical compatibility of PDMS has necessitated research into alternative materials for microfluidic devices. Previous work has shown that spin-coated amorphous fluoropolymers and Teflon-fluoropolymer laminates can be fabricated and substituted for PDMS in monolithic membrane valves and pumps for space flight applications. However, the complex process for fabricating these spin-coated Teflon films and laminates may preclude their use in many research and manufacturing contexts. As an alternative, we show that commercially-available fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) Teflon films can be used to fabricate chemically-inert monolithic membrane valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. The FEP Teflon valves and pumps presented here are simple to fabricate, function similarly to their PDMS counterparts, maintain their performance over extended use, and are resistant to virtually all chemicals. These structures should facilitate lab-on-a-chip research involving a vast array of chemistries that are incompatible with native PDMS microfluidic devices. PMID:18497911

  13. Broad Band Intra-Cavity Total Reflection Chemical Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.

    1998-11-10

    A broadband, ultrahigh-sensitivity chemical sensor is provided that allows etection through utilization of a small, extremely low-loss, monolithic optical cavity. The cavity is fabricated from highly transparent optical material in the shape of a regular polygon with one or more convex facets to form a stable resonator for ray trajectories sustained by total internal reflection. Optical radiation enters and exits the monolithic cavity by photon tunneling in which two totally reflecting surfaces are brought into close proximity. In the presence of absorbing material, the loss per pass is increased since the evanescent waves that exist exterior to the cavity at points where the circulating pulse is totally reflected, are absorbed. The decay rate of an injected pulse is determined by coupling out an infinitesimal fraction of the pulse to produce an intensity-versus-time decay curve. Since the change in the decay rate resulting from absorption is inversely proportional to the magnitude of absorption, a quantitative sensor of concentration or absorption cross-section with 1 part-per-million/pass or better sensitivity is obtained. The broadband nature of total internal reflection permits a single device to be used over a broad wavelength range. The absorption spectrum of the surrounding medium can thereby be obtained as a measurement of inverse decay time as a function of wavelength.

  14. FEASIBILITY OF A STACK INTEGRATED SOFC OPTICAL CHEMICAL SENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2004-03-30

    The work performed during the UCR Innovative Concepts phase I program was designed to demonstrate the chemical sensing capabilities of nano-cermet SPR bands at solid oxide fuel cell operating conditions. Key to this proposal is that the materials choice used a YSZ ceramic matrix which upon successful demonstration of this concept, will allow integration directly onto the SOFC stack. Under the Innovative Concepts Program the University at Albany Institute for Materials (UAIM)/UAlbany School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering synthesized, analyzed and tested Pa, and Au doped YSZ nano-cermets as a function of operating temperature and target gas exposure (hydrogen, carbon monoxide and 1-dodecanethiol). During the aforementioned testing procedure the optical characteristics of the nano-cermets were monitored to determine the sensor selectivity and sensitivity.

  15. Electrical and chemical sensors for biological cell research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edell, D. J.; McNeil, V. M.; Curley, M. G.; Wolfe, J. H.

    Electrical and chemical microsensors for biological cell research allow for the continuous study of biological systems under normal physiological conditions. Two sensor technologies which take most advantage of microfabrication technology are discussed. One is being developed for monitoring the environment of cancer cells during radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia treatment. Of current interest is the measurement of temperature and interstitial free oxygen concentration distributions in cancer tissues prior to and during various treatments. The second technology discussed is being developed for monitoring the extracellular ionic currents from electrogenic cells in culture. The ability to build integrated circuits over large areas of a silicon wafer which can impedance transform the signals and multiplex a large array of contacts is being used.

  16. Chemical solution growth of ferroelectric oxide thin films and nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin; Bastani, Yaser; Bernal, Ashley

    2014-04-01

    Chemical solution deposition (CSD) provides a low-cost, versatile approach for processing of thin and ultrathin ferroelectric films, as well as short and high aspect ratio ferroelectric nanostructures. This review discusses the state of the art in the processing of ferroelectric oxide thin films and nanostructures by CSD, with special emphasis on nucleation and growth phenomena. The effects of choice of precursor solution, substrate and bottom electrode stack, and thermal treatment conditions on the nucleation and growth are examined. Furthermore, methods to control ferroelectric thin film's microstructure, including phase content, texture, grain size and chemical homogeneity, are reviewed. Lastly, current CSD-based methods for processing of ferroelectric oxide nanostructures are presented with special consideration of the structural development, as well as advantages and shortcomings associated with each method. Lead zirconate-titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (PZT), and barium titanate, BaTiO3 (BT), are used throughout the discussion, as specific examples for CSD processing of perovskite ferroelectrics.

  17. Chemical solution growth of ferroelectric oxide thin films and nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin; Bastani, Yaser; Bernal, Ashley

    2014-04-01

    Chemical solution deposition (CSD) provides a low-cost, versatile approach for processing of thin and ultrathin ferroelectric films, as well as short and high aspect ratio ferroelectric nanostructures. This review discusses the state of the art in the processing of ferroelectric oxide thin films and nanostructures by CSD, with special emphasis on nucleation and growth phenomena. The effects of choice of precursor solution, substrate and bottom electrode stack, and thermal treatment conditions on the nucleation and growth are examined. Furthermore, methods to control ferroelectric thin film's microstructure, including phase content, texture, grain size and chemical homogeneity, are reviewed. Lastly, current CSD-based methods for processing of ferroelectric oxide nanostructures are presented with special consideration of the structural development, as well as advantages and shortcomings associated with each method. Lead zirconate-titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (PZT), and barium titanate, BaTiO3 (BT), are used throughout the discussion, as specific examples for CSD processing of perovskite ferroelectrics. PMID:24121276

  18. Chemically Deposited Thin-Film Solar Cell Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R.; Junek, W.; Gorse, J.; Thompson, T.; Harris, J.; Hehemann, D.; Hepp, A.; Rybicki, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have been working on the development of thin film photovoltaic solar cell materials that can be produced entirely by wet chemical methods on low-cost flexible substrates. P-type copper indium diselenide (CIS) absorber layers have been deposited via electrochemical deposition. Similar techniques have also allowed us to incorporate both Ga and S into the CIS structure, in order to increase its optical bandgap. The ability to deposit similar absorber layers with a variety of bandgaps is essential to our efforts to develop a multi-junction thin-film solar cell. Chemical bath deposition methods were used to deposit a cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layers on our CIS-based absorber layers. Window contacts were made to these CdS/CIS junctions by the electrodeposition of zinc oxide (ZnO). Structural and elemental determinations of the individual ZnO, CdS and CIS-based films via transmission spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy will be presented. The electrical characterization of the resulting devices will be discussed.

  19. Optimized chemical vapor deposition of borophosphosilicate glass films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, W.; Kurylo, W. A.; Tino, C. J.

    1985-06-01

    The optimization of atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) to produce glass films with few particle containments is discussed. The tests that were conducted in order to determine the optimum deposition temperature and proper oxygen/hydride ratio are explained. A decrease in deposition temperature and an increase in the oxygen/hydride ratio maximized the APCVD reaction. The techniques used to analyze the composition of BPSG after densification are described; the tests revealed that the elemental composition of BPSG was not altered by APCVD. An explanation of the film profiling technique used to determine the stability of BPSG films during processing is provided; BPSG films remain stable if they are densified or fused prior to the application of wet treatments. A comparison of conventional tube-furnace heating with rapid isothermal heating for fusion flow of BPSG is presented; fusion tapering by rapid heating was attained in 30 seconds at 175 C versus 30 minutes for tube heating.

  20. A novel nanometric DNA thin film as a sensor for alpha radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Byeonghoon; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Joshirao, Pranav; Kim, Jang Ah; Vyas, Chirag; Manchanda, Vijay; Kim, Taesung; Park, Sung Ha

    2013-06-01

    The unexpected nuclear accidents have provided a challenge for scientists and engineers to develop sensitive detectors, especially for alpha radiation. Due to the high linear energy transfer value, sensors designed to detect such radiation require placement in close proximity to the radiation source. Here we report the morphological changes and optical responses of artificially designed DNA thin films in response to exposure to alpha radiation as observed by an atomic force microscope, a Raman and a reflectance spectroscopes. In addition, we discuss the feasibility of a DNA thin film as a radiation sensing material. The effect of alpha radiation exposure on the DNA thin film was evaluated as a function of distance from an 241Am source and exposure time. Significant reflected intensity changes of the exposed DNA thin film suggest that a thin film made of biomolecules can be one of promising candidates for the development of online radiation sensors.

  1. A novel nanometric DNA thin film as a sensor for alpha radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Byeonghoon; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Joshirao, Pranav; Kim, Jang Ah; Vyas, Chirag; Manchanda, Vijay; Kim, Taesung; Park, Sung Ha

    2013-01-01

    The unexpected nuclear accidents have provided a challenge for scientists and engineers to develop sensitive detectors, especially for alpha radiation. Due to the high linear energy transfer value, sensors designed to detect such radiation require placement in close proximity to the radiation source. Here we report the morphological changes and optical responses of artificially designed DNA thin films in response to exposure to alpha radiation as observed by an atomic force microscope, a Raman and a reflectance spectroscopes. In addition, we discuss the feasibility of a DNA thin film as a radiation sensing material. The effect of alpha radiation exposure on the DNA thin film was evaluated as a function of distance from an 241Am source and exposure time. Significant reflected intensity changes of the exposed DNA thin film suggest that a thin film made of biomolecules can be one of promising candidates for the development of online radiation sensors. PMID:23792924

  2. Film loss-free cleaning chemicals for EUV mask lifetime elongation developed through combinatorial chemical screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyuck; Kim, Jinsu; Lowe, Jeff; Dattilo, Davide; Koh, Soowan; Choi, Jun Yeol; Dietze, Uwe; Shoki, Tsutomu; Kim, Byung Gook; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2015-10-01

    EUV masks include many different layers of various materials rarely used in optical masks, and each layer of material has a particular role in enhancing the performance of EUV lithography. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how the mask quality and patterning performance can change during mask fabrication, EUV exposure, maintenance cleaning, shipping, or storage. SPM (Sulfuric acid peroxide mixture) which has been extensively used for acid cleaning of photomask and wafer has serious drawback for EUV mask cleaning. It shows severe film loss of tantalum-based absorber layers and limited removal efficiency of EUV-generated carbon contaminants on EUV mask surface. Here, we introduce such novel cleaning chemicals developed for EUV mask as almost film loss free for various layers of the mask and superior carbon removal performance. Combinatorial chemical screening methods allowed us to screen several hundred combinations of various chemistries and additives under several different process conditions of temperature and time, eventually leading to development of the best chemistry selections for EUV mask cleaning. Recently, there have been many activities for the development of EUV pellicle, driven by ASML and core EUV scanner customer companies. It is still important to obtain film-loss free cleaning chemicals because cleaning cycle of EUV mask should be much faster than that of optic mask mainly due to EUV pellicle lifetime. More frequent cleaning, combined with the adoption of new materials for EUV masks, necessitates that mask manufacturers closely examine the performance change of EUV masks during cleaning process. We have investigated EUV mask quality changes and film losses during 50 cleaning cycles using new chemicals as well as particle and carbon contaminant removal characteristics. We have observed that the performance of new chemicals developed is superior to current SPM or relevant cleaning chemicals for EUV mask cleaning and EUV mask lifetime elongation.

  3. Effective Young's Modulus Measurement of Thin Film Using Micromechanical Cantilever Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Akiko N.; Toda, Masaya; Miyake, Koji; Förch, Renate; Berger, Rüdiger

    2013-11-01

    Determination of mechanical properties of thin films, such as the Young's modulus, is of fundamental importance when the films are used for coating or for materials of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). We show a simple method to calculate the effective Young's modulus of thin films by comparing lateral and vertical expansions. The stress of the film due to expansion in the lateral direction was measured using micromechanical cantilever sensor (MCS) techniques which allow for a calculation of the lateral expansion ratio of the film. The vertical expansion was measured using ellipsometry, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other film thickness meters. There is no limitation by the method for a measurement of Young's modulus, even if soft and thin polymer film. We detected the influence of humidity on effective Young's modulus of a polymer material by the method, as an example.

  4. Passive Chemiresistor Sensor Based on Iron (II) Phthalocyanine Thin Films for Monitoring of Nitrogen Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, John Hungjen

    In this dissertation, an alternate, new approach was investigated to produce a nonreversible, passive, iron (II) phthalocyanine (FePc) thin film sensor that does not require continuous power for operation. The sensor was manufactured using standard microelectronics fabrication procedures, with emphasis on low cost and sensor consistency. The sensor substrate consists of a gold interdigitated electrode pattern deposited on an oxidized silicon or quartz wafer. The FePc thin film is then vacuum sublimed over the interdigitated electrodes to form the finalized sensor. Different thicknesses and morphologies of FePc thin films were fabricated. Once sensor fabrication was accomplished, the general response, temperature dependence, concentration dependence, specificity, and longevity of FePc thin film sensors were investigated. To evaluate general sensor reponse, sensors were exposed to 100 ppm nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen, with a flow rate of 0.25 liters per minute (L/min), at the temperatures of -46, 20, and 71 °C. For each case, the resistance of the sensor decreased exponentially as a function of exposure duration and reached saturation within 25 minutes. The resistance decrease was measured to be four, three, and two orders of magnitude for the exposure temperatures of -46, 20, and 71 .C respectively. In these experiments, sub-zero temperature detection of nitrogen dioxide with FePc thin films was reported for the first time. It was found that the response at -46 °C was greater than at 20 or 71 °C. To evaluate temperature dependence, sensors were thermal cycled in the range of -50 to 80 °C, first under ultra-high purity nitrogen gas at 0.25 L/min, and then under 100 ppm nitrogen dioxide gas at 0.25 L/min. Intrinsic FePc film conductivity was measured by thermal cycling sensors under nitrogen gas. Extrinsic FePc film conductivity was measured by thermal cycling sensors under nitrogen dioxide gas. Results from these tests indicated that the temperature dependence of

  5. Epitaxial ternary nitride thin films prepared by a chemical solution method

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Hongmei; Feldmann, David M; Wang, Haiyan; Bi, Zhenxing

    2008-01-01

    It is indispensable to use thin films for many technological applications. This is the first report of epitaxial growth of ternary nitride AMN2 films. Epitaxial tetragonal SrTiN2 films have been successfully prepared by a chemical solution approach, polymer-assisted deposition. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of the films are also investigated.

  6. Neural network based analysis for chemical sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J.

    1995-04-01

    Compact, portable systems capable of quickly identifying contaminants in the field are of great importance when monitoring the environment. In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of using artificial neural networks for real-time data analysis of a sensor array. Analyzing the sensor data in parallel may allow for rapid identification of contaminants in the field without requiring highly selective individual sensors. We use a prototype sensor array which consists of nine tin-oxide Taguchi-type sensors, a temperature sensor, and a humidity sensor. We illustrate that by using neural network based analysis of the sensor data, the selectivity of the sensor array may be significantly improved, especially when some (or all) the sensors are not highly selective.

  7. Room temperature ethanol sensors based on SnO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakhoyan, Armen P.; Aroutiounian, Vladimir M.; Adamian, Zaven N.; Barseghian, Robert S.; Dolukhanian, Tigran

    2002-02-01

    The results presented in this paper demonstrate the possibility of using tin dioxide films as sensitive elements for alcohol sensors. The tin dioxide films were deposited by the spray pyrolysis method on alumina substrates as well as on n+ porous silicon upper layer of silicon diode structures. Room temperature, under atmospheric pressure measurements of the parameters of the obtained structures revealed their high sensitivity to the mixture of ethyl alcohol vapors and air. The optimum concentration of precursor solution for precipitation of tin dioxide films and technological regimes for the deposition of tin dioxide films and formation of a porous silicon layer with appropriate thickness and porosity by electrochemical anodization were found.

  8. Highly Sensitive and Fast Response Colorimetric Humidity Sensors Based on Graphene Oxides Film.

    PubMed

    Chi, Hong; Liu, Yan Jun; Wang, FuKe; He, Chaobin

    2015-09-16

    Uniform graphene oxide (GO) film for optical humidity sensing was fabricated by dip-coating technique. The resulting GO thin film shows linear optical shifts in the visible range with increase of humidity in the whole relative humidity range (from dry state to 98%). Moreover, GO films exhibit ultrafast sensing to moisture within 250 ms because of the unique atomic thinness and superpermeability of GO sheets. The humidity sensing mechanism was investigated using XRD and computer simulation. The ultrasensitive humidity colorimetric properties of GOs film may enable many potential applications such as disposable humidity sensors for packaging, health, and environmental monitoring.

  9. First approach to the use of liquid crystal elastomers for chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Binet, Corinne; Bourrier, David; Dilhan, Monique; Estève, Daniel; Ferrère, Sandrine; Garrigue, Jean-Christophe; Granier, Hugues; Lattes, Armand; Gué, Anne-Marie; Mauzac, Monique; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise

    2006-05-15

    Liquid crystalline thin films elastomers that are able to bind pesticides have been developed. The synthesis involves grafting mesogen and crosslinkable groups on a polysiloxane chain in the presence of a template molecule. The molecular imprinted material is obtained after thin film deposition, UV crosslinking and washing. Experiments of readsorption of pesticide are presented. Development of a multisensor platform based on thermal and capacitive sensors is described and tests of deposition of the polymer film are presented.

  10. Investigation of substrate-mounted thin-film meteoroid sensors for use in large area impact experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carollo, S. F.; Davis, J. M.; Dance, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of sensor designs were investigated: (1)a polysulfone dielectric film with vapor-deposited aluminum and gold sensor plates, bonded to a relatively thick aluminum substrate, and (2) an aluminum oxide (A1203) dielectric layer prepared on an aluminum substrate by anodization, with a layer of vapor-deposited aluminum providing one sensor plate and the substrate serving as the other plate. In the first design, specimens were prepared which indicate the state of the art for application of this type of sensor for elements of a meteoroid detection system having an area as large as 10 sq M. Techniques were investigated for casting large-area polysulfone films on the surface of water and for transferring the films from the water. Methods of preparing sensors by layering of films, the deposition of capacitor plates, and sensor film-to-substrate bonding, as well as techniques for making electrical connections to the capacitor plates, were studied.

  11. Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) of binary alloy films: Studies of film composition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Kodas, T.T.

    1995-08-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Cu-Ag and Cu-Pd alloys using aerosol precursor delivery over a range of preheating temperatures, 70 {approximately} 80 C and substrate temperatures, 250 {approximately} 300 C is described. The precursors used include Cu(hfac){sub 2}, (hfac)Ag(SEt{sub 2}) and Pd(hfac){sub 2} dissolved in toluene and 10% H{sub 2} in Ar as carrier gas. The films were characterized by SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The X-ray diffraction results showed the Cu/Ag films were composed of {alpha}- and {beta}-phases of Cu-Ag alloys, the Cu/Pd films were Cu-Pd and Pd-Ag alloy, solid solutions, under these conditions. Compositional variation studies in Cu-Pd and Pd-Ag alloy systems were also conducted by mixing Cu(hfac){sub 2}/Pd(hfac){sub 2} and (hfac) Ag(SEt{sub 2})/Pd(hfac){sub 2} in toluene solution in different ratios. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and the results showed the composition of films was affected by the solution stoichiometry.

  12. Porous silicon and porous polymer substrates for optical chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Kim, Sung-Jin; Cheung, Maurice C.; Yao, Lei; Chodavarapu, Vamsy; Cartwright, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    Mesoporous materials, such as porous silicon and porous polymer gratings (Bragg structures), offer an attractive platform for the encapsulation of chemical and biological recognition elements. These materials include the advantages of high surface to volume ratio, biocompatibility, functionality with various recognition elements, and the ability to modify the material surface/volume properties and porosity. Two porous structures were used for chemical and biological sensing: porous silicon and porous polymer photonic bandgap structures. Specifically, a new dry etching manufacturing technique employing xenon difluoride (XeF2) based etching was used to produce porous silicon Porous silicon continues to be extensively researched for various optical and electronic devices and applications in chemical and biological sensing are abundant. The dry etching technique to manufacture porous silicon offers a simple and efficient alternative to the traditional wet electrochemical etching using hydrofluoric acid. This new porous silicon material was characterized for its pore size and morphology using top and cross-sectional views from scanning electron microscopy. Its optical properties were determined by angular dependence of reflectance measurements. A new class of holographically ordered porous polymer gratings that are an extension of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) structures. As an alternative structure and fabrication process, porous polymer gratings that include a volatile solvent as the phase separation fluid was fabricated. Porous silicon and porous polymer materials were used as substrates to encapsulate gaseous oxygen (O2) responsive luminophores in their nanostructured pores. These substrate materials behave as optical interference filters that allow efficient and selective detection of the wavelengths of interest in optical sensors.

  13. Feasibility of a Stack Integrated SOFC Optical Chemical Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2007-09-30

    The DOE-NETL Innovative Concepts (IC) phase II program investigated the feasibility of harsh environment compatible chemical sensors based on monitoring the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of metal nanoparticle doped YSZ nano-cermets, as a function of fuel concentrations, impurities e.g. CO and temperature(500-900 C). In particular, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) exhibit a strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band whose shape and spectral position is not only highly dependent on the refractive index of the host medium but also on chemical reactions at the interface between the metal and the surrounding environment. Studies have been completed on the oxygen and temperature dependence of the SPR band of the AuNPs, CO sensing studies, oxygen/hydrogen titration experiments, ethanol sensing studies and finally NO{sub 2} sensing studies. Reversible changes in the SPR band are observed for all chemical exposure studies with the sensing mechanism being determined by the oxidative or reductive properties of the exposure gases. Reactions which remove charge from the AuNPs was observed to cause a redshift in the SPR band, while charge donation to the AuNPs causes a blue shift in the SPR band. CO, hydrogen and ethanol in air mixtures were all reductive in nature as they reacted with the YSZ bound oxygen anions forming CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O thus ultimately inducing charge donation to the AuNPs and a blue shift in the SPR band. While NO{sub 2} and oxygen were oxidative and induced the production of YSZ bound oxygen anions, charge removal from the AuNPs and a redshift in the SPR band.

  14. Biosensor and chemical sensor probes for calcium and other metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Viallet, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to chemical sensor and biosensor probes for measuring low concentration of metals and metal ions in complex samples such as biological fluids, living cells, and environmental samples. More particularly the present invention relates to a gel-based Indo-1 and Fura-2 chemical sensor probes for the measurement of low concentrations of calcium, cadmium, magnesium and the like. Also disclosed is a detector device using the sensors of the present invention.

  15. Design and analysis of a silicon-based antiresonant reflecting optical waveguide chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remley, Kate A.; Weisshaar, Andreas

    1996-08-01

    The design of a silicon-based antiresonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW) chemical sensor is presented, and its theoretical performance is compared with that of a conventional structure. The use of an ARROW structure permits incorporation of a thick guiding region for efficient coupling to a single-mode fiber. A high-index overlay is added to fine tune the sensitivity of the ARROW chemical sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor is presented, and design trade-offs are discussed.

  16. Fabrication and laser patterning of polystyrene optical oxygen sensor films for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Grist, S M; Oyunerdene, N; Flueckiger, J; Kim, J; Wong, P C; Chrostowski, L; Cheung, K C

    2014-11-21

    We present a novel and simple method for patterning oxygen-sensitive polystyrene thin films and demonstrate its potential for integration with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Optical oxygen sensing films composed of polystyrene with an embedded luminescent oxygen-sensitive dye present a convenient option for the measurement of oxygen levels in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices; however, patterning and integrating the films with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices has proven difficult due to a residue after dry etch patterning that inhibits subsequent PDMS bonding. Our new method uses mask-less laser ablation by a commercial laser ablation system to define the outline of the structures and subsequent bulk film removal by aqueous lift-off. Because the bulk film is peeled or lifted off of the substrate rather than etched, the process is compatible with standard PDMS plasma bonding. We used ToF-SIMS analysis to investigate how laser ablation facilitates this fabrication process as well as why dry etching polystyrene inhibits PDMS plasma bonding. The results of this analysis showed evidence of chemical species formed during the laser ablation and dry etching processes that can produce these effects. Our new method's mask-less nature, simplicity, speed, and compatibility with PDMS bonding make it ideally suited for single-use lab-on-a-chip applications. To demonstrate the method's compatibility with PDMS microfluidics, we also present a demonstration of the sensors' integration into a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator device.

  17. Fabrication and laser patterning of polystyrene optical oxygen sensor films for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Grist, S M; Oyunerdene, N; Flueckiger, J; Kim, J; Wong, P C; Chrostowski, L; Cheung, K C

    2014-11-21

    We present a novel and simple method for patterning oxygen-sensitive polystyrene thin films and demonstrate its potential for integration with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Optical oxygen sensing films composed of polystyrene with an embedded luminescent oxygen-sensitive dye present a convenient option for the measurement of oxygen levels in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices; however, patterning and integrating the films with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices has proven difficult due to a residue after dry etch patterning that inhibits subsequent PDMS bonding. Our new method uses mask-less laser ablation by a commercial laser ablation system to define the outline of the structures and subsequent bulk film removal by aqueous lift-off. Because the bulk film is peeled or lifted off of the substrate rather than etched, the process is compatible with standard PDMS plasma bonding. We used ToF-SIMS analysis to investigate how laser ablation facilitates this fabrication process as well as why dry etching polystyrene inhibits PDMS plasma bonding. The results of this analysis showed evidence of chemical species formed during the laser ablation and dry etching processes that can produce these effects. Our new method's mask-less nature, simplicity, speed, and compatibility with PDMS bonding make it ideally suited for single-use lab-on-a-chip applications. To demonstrate the method's compatibility with PDMS microfluidics, we also present a demonstration of the sensors' integration into a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator device. PMID:25230092

  18. Preparation and Analysis of Platinum Thin Films for High Temperature Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Laster, Kimala L. H.

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of platinum thin films for application as high temperature resistive sensors. To support NASA Glenn Research Center s high temperature thin film sensor effort, a magnetron sputtering system was installed recently in the GRC Microsystems Fabrication Clean Room Facility. Several samples of platinum films were prepared using various system parameters to establish run conditions. These films were characterized with the intended application of being used as resistive sensing elements, either for temperature or strain measurement. The resistances of several patterned sensors were monitored to document the effect of changes in parameters of deposition and annealing. The parameters were optimized for uniformity and intrinsic strain. The evaporation of platinum via oxidation during annealing over 900 C was documented, and a model for the process developed. The film adhesion was explored on films annealed to 1000 C with various bondcoats on fused quartz and alumina. From this compiled data, a list of optimal parameters and characteristics determined for patterned platinum thin films is given.

  19. Development of a thick film PZT foil sensor for use in structural health monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Pickwell, Andrew J; Dorey, Robert A; Mba, David

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is a technique of growing interest in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). The use of AE devices to monitor the health of structural components is currently limited by the cost of AE equipment, which prohibits the permanent placement of AE devices on structures for the purposes of continuous monitoring and the monitoring of areas with limited access. Micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) can provide solutions to these problems. We present the manufacture of a 4.4-μm-thick lead zirconate titanate (PZT) film on a 110-μm-thick titanium foil substrate for use as an AE sensor. The thick-film sensor is benchmarked against commercially available AE sensors in static and dynamic monitoring applications. The thick-film AE device is found to perform well in the detection of AE in static applications. A low signal-to-noise ratio is found to prohibit the detection of AE in a dynamic application.

  20. CMOS Humidity Sensor System Using Carbon Nitride Film as Sensing Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Pil; Lee, Ji Gong; Chowdhury, Shaestagir

    2008-01-01

    An integrated humidity sensor system with nano-structured carbon nitride film as humidity sensing material is fabricated by a 0.8 μm analog mixed CMOS process. The integrated sensor system consists of differential humidity sensitive field effect transistors (HUSFET), temperature sensor, and operational amplifier. The process contains two poly, two metal and twin well technology. To form CNx film on Si3N4/Si substrate, plasma etching is performed to the gate area as well as trenches. CNx film is deposited by reactive RF magnetron sputtering method and patterned by the lift-off technique. The drain current is proportional to the dielectric constant, and the sensitivity is 2.8 μA/%RH.

  1. An intelligent thick-film gas sensor: Development and preliminary tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauf, R. J.; Hoffheins, B. S.; Walls, C. A.

    1987-05-01

    Thick-film techniques were used to create a gas sensor that has a semiconducting oxide surface whose catalytic activity varies from point to point. An integral heater causes the oxide film to react with combustible gases; the electrical resistance of the oxide film is mapped through an array of electrodes to yield a signature that depends on how a particular gas reacts to each of the different areas on the sensor. The catalytic activity can be varied by establishing a thermal gradient across the sensor, by distributing different catalysts in different areas, or by a combination of both effects. For simple cases, the signature can be related to the functional groups present in the gas. As an example, using a uniform distribution of platinum and a thermal gradient, alcohols, ketones, and alkanes have distinctly different signatures.

  2. Thin-Film Magnetic-Field-Response Fluid-Level Sensor for Non-Viscous Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2008-01-01

    An innovative method has been developed for acquiring fluid-level measurements. This method eliminates the need for the fluid-level sensor to have a physical connection to a power source or to data acquisition equipment. The complete system consists of a lightweight, thin-film magnetic-field-response fluid-level sensor (see Figure 1) and a magnetic field response recorder that was described in Magnetic-Field-Response Measurement-Acquisition System (LAR-16908-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2006), page 28. The sensor circuit is a capacitor connected to an inductor. The response recorder powers the sensor using a series of oscillating magnetic fields. Once electrically active, the sensor responds with its own harmonic magnetic field. The sensor will oscillate at its resonant electrical frequency, which is dependent upon the capacitance and inductance values of the circuit.

  3. Development of micro engine oil condition sensor using multi-wall carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Dae Seok; Jung-Ho Pak, James; Kyeong Kim, Jai

    2007-03-01

    A new interdigit-type micro oil condition sensor was designed and fabricated for monitoring the deterioration of lubricating and insulating oils. The designed sensor operates based on the change of the dielectric constant and electrical conductivity. In order to improve sensor performance, an oil condition sensor was fabricated using MEMS technology and multi-wall carbon nanotube film. The experiment was performed with automobile engine oils with the same brand and quality so as to ensure measurement reliability. Capacitance changes were measured according to increasing mileage and the sensors' performance was improved. These results show that the proposed sensor could measure the degree of oil deterioration with a high sensitivity and it is applicable to other lubricating systems as well as insulating systems.

  4. Chemical microsensors

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  5. Advances and trends in ionophore-based chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhelson, K. N.; Peshkova, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    The recent advances in the theory and practice of potentiometric, conductometric and optical sensors based on ionophores are critically reviewed. The role of the heterogeneity of the sensor/sample systems is emphasized, and it is shown that due to this heterogeneity such sensors respond to the analyte activities rather than to concentrations. The basics of the origin of the response of all three kinds of ionophore-based sensors are briefly described. The use of novel sensor materials, new preparation and application techniques of the sensors as well as advances in theoretical treatment of the sensor response are analyzed using literature sources published mainly from 2012 to 2014. The basic achievements made in the past are also addressed when necessary for better understanding of the trends in the field of ionophore-based sensors. The bibliography includes 295 references.

  6. A novel quartz crystal microbalance gas sensor based on porous film coatings. A high sensitivity porous poly(methylmethacrylate) water vapor sensor.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ho Yeon; Bruckenstein, Stanley

    2013-06-27

    We describe a novel and generally applicable approach for creating voids in films deposited on the surface of solid substrates. Such films are advantageous when a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is the basis of a sensor. We show that films with large void volumes produce more sensitive sensors than with the original film. Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) was used as the polymer layer deposited on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to demonstrate our technique for the model system of water vapor analysis in flowing nitrogen gas. A film of pure PMMA on a QCM is a sensor for water vapor in a gas phase. A more sensitive sensor was created by dip coating QCM crystals into solutions containing mixtures of PMMA and poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLL) and then evaporating the solution films on the QCM crystals to form mixed polymer films of varying PDLL content. The PDLL was then removed from the mixed polymer films by exposure to a NaOH solution to form pure PMMA films having various void volumes. A leached PMMA film that originally contained 50% by weight PDLL had a 3.7 times larger QCM sensitivity for water vapor than a pure PMMA film.

  7. Heat flux sensor research and development: The cool film calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, A.; Dean, P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal was to meet the measurement requirement of the NASP program for a gauge capable of measuring heat flux into a 'typical' structure in a 'typical' hypersonic flight environment. A device is conceptually described that has fast response times and is small enough to fit in leading edge or cowl lip structures. The device relies heavily on thin film technology. The main conclusion is the description of the limitations of thin film technology both in the art of fabrication and in the assumption that thin films have the same material properties as the original bulk material. Three gauges were designed and fabricated. Thin film deposition processes were evaluated. The effect of different thin film materials on the performance and fabrication of the gauge was studied. The gauges were tested in an arcjet facility. Survivability and accuracy were determined under various hostile environment conditions.

  8. The physical and chemical properties of ultrathin oxide films.

    PubMed

    Street, S C; Xu, C; Goodman, D W

    1997-01-01

    Thin oxide films (from one to tens of monolayers) of SiO2, MgO, NiO, Al2O3, FexOy, and TiO2 supported on refractory metal substrates have been prepared by depositing the oxide metal precursor in a background of oxygen (ca 1 x 10(-5) Torr). The thinness of these oxide samples facilitates investigation by an array of surface techniques, many of which are precluded when applied to the corresponding bulk oxide. Layered and mixed binary oxides have been prepared by sequential synthesis of dissimilar oxide layers or co-deposition of two different oxides. Recent work has shown that the underlying oxide substrate can markedly influence the electronic and chemical properties of the overlayer oxide. The structural, electronic, and chemical properties of these ultrathin oxide films have been probed using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS), ion-scattering spectroscopy (ISS), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), infrared reflectance absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS).

  9. Anomalous Hall effect sensors based on magnetic element doped topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yan; Zhang, Zhen; Nlebedim, Ikenna; Jiles, David

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is recently discovered in magnetic element doped topological insulators (TIs), which promises low power consumption highly efficient spintronics and electronics. This discovery broaden the family of Hall effect (HE) sensors. In this work, both HE and AHE sensor based on Mn and Cr doped Bi2Te3 TI thin films will be systematically studied. The influence of Mn concentration on sensitivity of MnxBi2-xTe3 HE sensors will be discussed. The Hall sensitivity increase 8 times caused by quantum AHE will be reported. AHE senor based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 TI thin films will also be studied and compared with Mn doped Bi2Te3 AHE sensor. The influence of thickness on sensitivity of CrxBi2-xTe3 AHE sensors will be discussed. Ultrahigh Hall sensitivity is obtained in Cr doped Bi2Te3. The largest Hall sensitivity can reach 2620 Ω/T in sensor which is almost twice higher than that of the normal semiconductor HE sensor. Our work indicates that magnetic element doped topological insulator with AHE are good candidates for ultra-sensitive Hall effect sensors.

  10. Thin film molybdenum silicide as potential temperature sensors for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. H.; Prakash, S.; Deshpandey, C. V.; Doerr, H. J.; Bunshah, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Temperature measurements of Mo-Si-based thin-film resistance thermometers were studied. Annealing in an argon ambient at a temperature above 1000 C for at least 1 h is required to form the stable tetragonal MoSi2 phase. With a crack-free 2-micron-thick AlN barrier layer on top, a sensor was tested up to 1200 C. The resistivity vs temperature characteristic shows the room temperature resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) of the sensor to be approximately 350 microohm and 0.01195 K, respectively. No film adhesion problems were observed for at least four testing cycles.

  11. Elaboration of ammonia gas sensors based on electrodeposited polypyrrole--cobalt phthalocyanine hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Patois, Tilia; Sanchez, Jean-Baptiste; Berger, Franck; Fievet, Patrick; Segut, Olivier; Moutarlier, Virginie; Bouvet, Marcel; Lakard, Boris

    2013-12-15

    The electrochemical incorporation of a sulfonated cobalt phthalocyanine (sCoPc) in conducting polypyrrole (PPy) was done, in the presence or absence of LiClO4, in order to use the resulting hybrid material for the sensing of ammonia. After electrochemical deposition, the morphological features and structural properties of polypyrrole/phthalocyanine hybrid films were investigated and compared to those of polypyrrole films. A gas sensor consisting in platinum microelectrodes arrays was fabricated using silicon microtechnologies, and the polypyrrole and polypyrrole/phthalocyanine films were electrochemically deposited on the platinum microelectrodes arrays of this gas sensor. When exposed to ammonia, polymer-based gas sensors exhibited a decrease in conductance due to the electron exchange between ammonia and sensitive polymer-based layer. The characteristics of the gas sensors (response time, response amplitude, reversibility) were studied for ammonia concentrations varying from 1 ppm to 100 ppm. Polypyrrole/phthalocyanine films exhibited a high sensitivity and low detection limit to ammonia as well as a fast and reproducible response at room temperature. The response to ammonia exposition of polypyrrole films was found to be strongly enhanced thanks to the incorporation of the phthalocyanine in the polypyrrole matrix.

  12. Ceramic thick film humidity sensor based on MgTiO{sub 3} + LiF

    SciTech Connect

    Kassas, Ahmad; Bernard, Jérôme; Lelièvre, Céline; Besq, Anthony; Guhel, Yannick; Houivet, David; Boudart, Bertrand; Lakiss, Hassan; Hamieh, Tayssir

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The fabricated sensor based on MgTiO{sub 3} + LiF materials used the spin coating technology. • The response time is 70 s to detect variation between 5 and 95% relative humidity. • The addition of Scleroglucan controls the viscosity and decreases the roughness of thick film surface. • This humidity sensor is a promising, low-cost, high-quality, reliable ceramic films, that is highly sensitive to humidity. - Abstract: The feasibility of humidity sensor, consisting of a thick layer of MgTiO{sub 3}/LiF materials on alumina substrate, was studied. The thermal analysis TGA-DTGA and dilatometric analysis worked out to confirm the sintering temperature. An experimental plan was applied to describe the effects of different parameters in the development of the thick film sensor. Structural and microstructural characterizations of the developed thick film were made. Rheological study with different amounts of a thickener (scleroglucan “sclg”), showing the behavior variation, as a function of sclg weight % was illustrated and rapprochement with the results of thickness variation as a function of angular velocity applied in the spin coater. The electrical and dielectric measurements confirmed the sensitivity of the elaborated thick film against moisture, along with low response time.

  13. VOC-Induced Flexing of Single and Multilayer Polyethylene Films As Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Nazanin; Andersson, Richard L; Olsson, Richard T; Gedde, Ulf W; Hedenqvist, Mikael S

    2016-04-20

    The differential swelling and bending of multilayer polymeric films due to the dissimilar uptake of volatile organic compounds (VOCs; n-hexane, limonene) in the different layers was studied. Motions of thin polyethylene films triggered by the penetrant were investigated to learn more about how their deformation is related to VOC absorption. Single layers of metallocene or low-density polyethylene, and multilayers (2-288 layers) of these in alternating positions were considered. Single-, 24-, and 288-layer films displayed no motion when uniformly subjected to VOCs, but they could display simple curving modes when only one side of the film was wetted with a liquid VOC. Two-layer films displayed simple bending when uniformly subjected to VOCs due to the different swelling in the two layers, but when the VOC was applied to only one side of the film, more complex modes of motion as well as dynamic oscillations were observed (e.g., constant amplitude wagging at 2 Hz for ca. 50 s until all the VOC had evaporated). Diffusion modeling was used to study the transport behavior of VOCs inside the films and the different bending modes. Finally a prototype VOC sensor was developed, where the reproducible curving of the two-layer film was calibrated with n-hexane. The sensor is simple, cost-efficient, and nondestructive and requires no electricity. PMID:27023792

  14. Effects of Langmuir-Blodgett-film gas sensors with integrated optical interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fushen, Chen; Yunqi, Liu; Yu, Xu; Qu, Liang

    1996-10-01

    Novel Langmuir-Blodgett-film toxic-gas sensors that have a Ti:LiNbO 3 integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer structure are experimentally investigated. The gas-sensing properties of the sensors are obtained for NO 2, Cl2, NH3, and H2S by means of the detection of optical output changes. All the optical connections are made with optical fiber pigtails.

  15. Chemical and physical sputtering effects on the surface morphology of carbon films grown by plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, Luis

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the influence of chemical and physical sputtering on the surface morphology of hydrogenated carbon films deposited on silicon substrates by bias-enhanced electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition. Atomic force microscopy based power spectrum density (PSD) and roughness analysis have been used to investigate the film morphology. This study has been possible due to the appropriate choice of the experimental variables, in particular, gas mixture, resulting in either nitrogen-free (a-C:H) or nitrogenated carbon (a-CN:H) films, and substrate bias (V{sub b}). Under these conditions, chemical sputtering is present for a-CN:H deposition but it is negligible for a-C:H film growth, while physical sputtering processes appear for both systems for V{sub b}<=-85 V. When physical sputtering does not operate, the film growth with simultaneous chemical sputtering leads to a characteristic a-CN:H granular surface morphology. Furthermore, PSD analysis reveals that a spatial correlation of the a-CN:H film surface roughness, up to distances approx300 nm, becomes a fingerprint of the coexistence of growth and chemical erosion processes on the film morphology. However, once physical sputtering takes place, the influence of chemical sputtering by reactive nitrogen species on the final surface morphology becomes negligible and both a-CN:H and a-C:H film morphologies are ultrasmooth.

  16. Hybrid Integrated Label-Free Chemical and Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Simin; Maker, Ashley J.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Label-free sensors based on electrical, mechanical and optical transduction methods have potential applications in numerous areas of society, ranging from healthcare to environmental monitoring. Initial research in the field focused on the development and optimization of various sensor platforms fabricated from a single material system, such as fiber-based optical sensors and silicon nanowire-based electrical sensors. However, more recent research efforts have explored designing sensors fabricated from multiple materials. For example, synthetic materials and/or biomaterials can also be added to the sensor to improve its response toward analytes of interest. By leveraging the properties of the different material systems, these hybrid sensing devices can have significantly improved performance over their single-material counterparts (better sensitivity, specificity, signal to noise, and/or detection limits). This review will briefly discuss some of the methods for creating these multi-material sensor platforms and the advances enabled by this design approach. PMID:24675757

  17. Metal oxide nanostructures synthesized on flexible and solid substrates and used for catalysts, UV detectors, and chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willander, Magnus; Sadollahkhani, Azar; Echresh, Ahmad; Nur, Omer

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the visibility of the low temperature chemical synthesis for developing device quality material grown on flexible and solid substrates. Both colorimetric sensors and UV photodetectors will be presented. The colorimetric sensors developed on paper were demonstrated for heavy metal detection, in particular for detecting copper ions in aqueous solutions. The demonstrated colorimetric copper ion sensors developed here are based on ZnO@ZnS core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs). These sensors demonstrated an excellent low detection limit of less than 1 ppm of copper ions. Further the colorimetric sensors operate efficiently in a wide pH range between 4 and 11, and even in turbulent water. The CSNPs were additionally used as efficient photocatalytic degradation element and were found to be more efficient than pure ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). Also p-NiO/n-ZnO thin film/nanorods pn junctions were synthesized by a two-step synthesis process and were found to act as efficient UV photodetectors. Additionally we show the effect of the morphology of different CuO nanostructures on the efficiency of photo catalytic degradation of Congo red organic dye.

  18. α-Amylase sensor based on the degradation of oligosaccharide hydrogel films monitored with a quartz crystal sensor.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Martin John; Biela, Anna; Krause, Steffi

    2015-05-15

    α-Amylase hydrolyses starch molecules to produce smaller oligosaccharides and sugars. Amylases are of great importance in biotechnology and find application in fermentation, detergents, food and the paper industry. The measurement of α-amylase activity in serum and urine has been used in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Salivary amylase has also been shown to be a stress indicator. Sensor coatings suitable for the detection of α-amylase activity have been developed. Oligosaccharides such as glycogen and amylopectin were spin-coated onto gold coated quartz crystals with a base frequency of 10 MHz. The films were subsequently cross-linked with hexamethylene diisocyanate. Film degradation was monitored with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance measurements. The films were shown to be stable in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Addition of α-amylase to the solution resulted in the rapid degradation of the films. The maximum rate of degradation was found to be strongly dependent on the amylase activity in the range typically found in serum when diagnosing pancreatitis (0.08-8 U/ml). Sensor responses in serum were found to be very similar to those obtained in buffer indicating the absence of non-specific binding. PMID:25266253

  19. Optical Sensors based on single arm thin film Waveguide Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.

    1998-01-01

    The second achievement meets the second objective for the second year. We choose adjustable prism couplers for connecting the sensor to optical fiber lines in our design of a breadboard prototype of the sensor. These couplers have good coupling efficiency at relatively low cost comparing to any other alternatives such as grating couplers. The third accomplishment meets the third objective for the second year. We performed testing the breadboard prototype of the sensor using heating as a technique of changing its refractive index. The only difference is that we ruled out the channel waveguides as irrelevant to the final goals of the project. The feasibility of the sensor can be shown for the slab waveguide configuration without usage of relatively expensive technologies of channel waveguide delineation.

  20. Development and Application of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, A.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Hall, G.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring and control, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. This paper discusses the needs of space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (Nox, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. Demonstration and application these sensor technologies will be described. The demonstrations range from use of a microsystem based hydrogen sensor on the Shuttle to engine demonstration of a nanocrystalline based sensor for NO, detection. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  1. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Weisenbach, L.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    This project is developing inorganic thin films as membranes for gas separation applications, and as discriminating coatings for liquid-phase chemical sensors. Our goal is to synthesize these coatings with tailored porosity and surface chemistry on porous substrates and on acoustic and optical sensors. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, air, and natural gas constituents at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. We are focusing on improving permeability and molecular sieve properties of crystalline zeolitic membranes made by hydrothermally reacting layered multicomponent sol-gel films deposited on mesoporous substrates. We also used acoustic plate mode (APM) oscillator and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor elements as substrates for sol-gel films, and have both used these modified sensors to determine physical properties of the films and have determined the sensitivity and selectivity of these sensors to aqueous chemical species.

  2. Characterization of chemical-vapor-deposited low-k thin films using x-ray porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Jeong; Lin, Eric K.; Bauer, Barry J.; Wu, Wen-li; Hwang, Byung Keun; Gray, William D.

    2003-02-01

    Trimethylsilane-based carbon-doped silica films prepared with varying chemical-vapor-deposition process conditions were characterized using x-ray reflectivity and porosimetry to measure the film thickness, average film density, density depth profile, wall density, and porosity. Samples deposited under single or dual frequency conditions with either N2O or O2 as an oxidant were compared. The structural parameters were correlated with the chemical bond structure measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The density profiles of the porous films were uniform with a slight densification at the film surface. The distribution of pores was also uniform through the film. Films prepared under a single frequency and/or N2O atmosphere had the lowest film density, wall density, and dielectric constant. The porosities of the films were similar and the pore sizes were less than 10 Å.

  3. Design, Construction and Operation of a Chemical Vapor Deposition System for the Growth of Metal Oxide Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumgarner, John Wesley

    1995-01-01

    A unique low pressure, organometallic chemical vapor deposition system has been designed and constructed for the growth of polycrystalline metal oxide thin films. Control of system variables and in situ monitoring of the process via laser reflectance interferometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy allowed reproducible production of thin films and provided the capability for closed loop control of the deposition process. The films deposited onto Si(100) and Si(111) substrates included titanium dioxide, a representative next generation sensor material; alumina, a common ceramic surface useful in containment; and iron oxide, a potential next generation catalyst surface. Film growth was monitored in situ using LRI, and the films were subsequently analyzed using SEM, EDS, FTIR, Raman, XPS, Auger, SIMS, XRD and ellipsometry. Stoichiometric polycrystalline films of TiO _2 were deposited from TTIP precursor without the addition of O_2 onto Si(100) and Si(111) substrates. Deposition occurred readily at temperatures above 400^circC. The film growth rate increased with temperature to a maximum of 36 nm/min. at 550^circC, and then decreased again at higher temperatures. The overall C content of the films was <10 ^{18} cm^{ -3}. The phase of TiO_2 deposited was found to be anatase or, in a few cases, a mixture of anatase with a lesser proportion of rutile, in agreement with literature reports. Thin films of rm Al_2O_3 were deposited onto Si(100) substrates using ATIP as the precursor and without the addition of oxygen. Bubbler temperatures of at least 140^circ C were required to provide sufficient vapor for film deposition. Depending on the deposition temperature used, the amorphous films produced appeared smooth or granular. Polycrystalline iron oxide thin films were deposited using Fe(CO)_5 + O_2 onto Si(100) and Si(111) substrates. Film quality depended heavily on deposition temperature. Depositions at 350^circC and above were of poor quality, sooty in appearance

  4. Laser Ablative Deposition of Polymer Films: A Promise for Sensor Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevska-Gilev, Jadranka; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    There is a continuing interest in the use of polymer films as insulating components of sensors; a number of such films have been prepared by polymer sputtering or vacuum deposition processes involving gas phase pyrolysis/photolysis and by plasma decomposition of monomers. An attractive and rather new technique for the deposition of novel polymer films is IR laser ablation of polymers containing polar groups. We have recently studied this process with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) and poly(vinyl chloride-co-vinyl acetate) P(VC/VAc) to establish its specific features and differences to conventional pyrolysis.

  5. The coherent gradient sensor for film curvature measurements at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Zhang, Xingyi; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Youhe; Feng, Xue

    2013-11-01

    Coherent Gradient Sensor (CGS) system is presented for measurement of curvatures and nonuniform curvatures changes in film-substrate systems at cryogenic temperature. The influences of the interface of refrigerator and itself on the interferograms which are accounting for the temperature effect are successfully eliminated. Based on the measurement technique, the thermal stresses (including the radial stress, circumferential stress and shear stress) of superconducting YBCO thin-film are obtained by the extended Stoney's formula during the heating process from 30K to 150K. Take the superconducting YBCO thin film as an example, the thermal stresses of which are gained successfully.

  6. Response Behaviour of a Hydrogen Sensor Based on Ionic Conducting Polymer-metal Interfaces Prepared by the Chemical Reduction Method

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Mariappan; Weppner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    A solid-state amperometric hydrogen sensor based on a protonated Nafion membrane and catalytic active electrode operating at room temperature was fabricated and tested. Ionic conducting polymer-metal electrode interfaces were prepared chemically by using the impregnation-reduction method. The polymer membrane was impregnated with tetra-ammine platinum chloride hydrate and the metal ions were subsequently reduced by using either sodium tetrahydroborate or potassium tetrahydroborate. The hydrogen sensing characteristics with air as reference gas is reported. The sensors were capable of detecting hydrogen concentrations from 10 ppm to 10% in nitrogen. The response time was in the range of 10-30 s and a stable linear current output was observed. The thin Pt films were characterized by XRD, Infrared Spectroscopy, Optical Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and EDAX.

  7. A stretchable strain sensor based on a metal nanoparticle thin film for human motion detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehwan; Kim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Jinjae; Yang, Daejong; Park, Byong Chon; Ryu, Seunghwa; Park, Inkyu

    2014-10-21

    Wearable strain sensors for human motion detection are being highlighted in various fields such as medical, entertainment and sports industry. In this paper, we propose a new type of stretchable strain sensor that can detect both tensile and compressive strains and can be fabricated by a very simple process. A silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin film patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp by a single-step direct transfer process is used as the strain sensing material. The working principle is the change in the electrical resistance caused by the opening/closure of micro-cracks under mechanical deformation. The fabricated stretchable strain sensor shows highly sensitive and durable sensing performances in various tensile/compressive strains, long-term cyclic loading and relaxation tests. We demonstrate the applications of our stretchable strain sensors such as flexible pressure sensors and wearable human motion detection devices with high sensitivity, response speed and mechanical robustness. PMID:25175360

  8. A stretchable strain sensor based on a metal nanoparticle thin film for human motion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehwan; Kim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Jinjae; Yang, Daejong; Park, Byong Chon; Ryu, Seunghwa; Park, Inkyu

    2014-09-01

    Wearable strain sensors for human motion detection are being highlighted in various fields such as medical, entertainment and sports industry. In this paper, we propose a new type of stretchable strain sensor that can detect both tensile and compressive strains and can be fabricated by a very simple process. A silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin film patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp by a single-step direct transfer process is used as the strain sensing material. The working principle is the change in the electrical resistance caused by the opening/closure of micro-cracks under mechanical deformation. The fabricated stretchable strain sensor shows highly sensitive and durable sensing performances in various tensile/compressive strains, long-term cyclic loading and relaxation tests. We demonstrate the applications of our stretchable strain sensors such as flexible pressure sensors and wearable human motion detection devices with high sensitivity, response speed and mechanical robustness.Wearable strain sensors for human motion detection are being highlighted in various fields such as medical, entertainment and sports industry. In this paper, we propose a new type of stretchable strain sensor that can detect both tensile and compressive strains and can be fabricated by a very simple process. A silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin film patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp by a single-step direct transfer process is used as the strain sensing material. The working principle is the change in the electrical resistance caused by the opening/closure of micro-cracks under mechanical deformation. The fabricated stretchable strain sensor shows highly sensitive and durable sensing performances in various tensile/compressive strains, long-term cyclic loading and relaxation tests. We demonstrate the applications of our stretchable strain sensors such as flexible pressure sensors and wearable human motion detection devices with high sensitivity, response

  9. TiO2 nanoparticle thin film-coated optical fiber Fabry-Perot sensor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingshun; Li, Qiu-Shun; Wang, Jun-Nan; Jin, Zhongwei; Sui, Qingmei; Ma, Yaohong; Shi, Jianguo; Zhang, Faye; Jia, Lei; Yao, Wei-Guo; Dong, Wen-Fei

    2013-02-11

    In this paper, a novel TiO(2) nanoparticle thin film coated optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) sensor had been developed for refractive index (RI) sensing by monitoring the shifts of the fringe contrast in the reflectance spectra. Using in situ liquid phase deposition approach, the TiO(2) nanoparticle thin film could be formed on the fiber surface in a controlled fashion. The optical properties of as-prepared F-P sensors were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The results indicated that the RI sensitivity of F-P sensors could be effectively improved after the deposition of nanoparticle thin-films. It was about 69.38 dB/RIU, which was 2.6 times higher than that of uncoated one. The linear RI measurement range was also extended from 1.333~1.457 to 1.333~1.8423. More importantly, its optical properties exhibited the unique temperature-independent performance. Therefore, owing to these special optical properties, the TiO(2) nanoparticle thin film coated F-P sensors have great potentials in medical diagnostics, food quality testing, environmental monitoring, biohazard detection and homeland security, even at elevated temperature. PMID:23481766

  10. Development of a fluorescence based flux sensor for thin film growth and nanoparticle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Rajala, Markku; Miller, Toni; Guillon, Herve; Seo, Jin Won; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    An optical flux sensor, based on the fluorescence properties of materials and nanoparticles, has been developed to control the deposition rate in thin film deposition systems. Using a simple diode laser and a photomultiplier tube with a light filter, we report the detection of gallium atoms and CdSe-ZnS quantum dots. This setup has a high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  11. Development of a fluorescence based flux sensor for thin film growth and nanoparticle deposition.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Rajala, Markku; Miller, Toni; Guillon, Herve; Seo, Jin Won; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    An optical flux sensor, based on the fluorescence properties of materials and nanoparticles, has been developed to control the deposition rate in thin film deposition systems. Using a simple diode laser and a photomultiplier tube with a light filter, we report the detection of gallium atoms and CdSe-ZnS quantum dots. This setup has a high sensitivity and reproducibility. PMID:27475600

  12. Nanocrystalline mesoporous SMO thin films prepared by sol gel process for MEMS-based hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jianwei; Fei, Weifeng; Seal, Sudipta; Chen, Quanfang

    2004-01-01

    MEMS based SnO2 gas sensor with sol gel synthesized mesoporous nanocrystalline (<10 nm) semiconductor thin (100~150 nm) film has been recently developed. The SnO2 nano film is fabricated with the combination of polymeric sol gel chemistry with block copolymers used for structure directing agents. The novel hydrogen sensor has a fast response time (1s) and quick recovery time (3s), as well as good sensitivity (about 90%), comparing to other hydrogen sensors developed. The improved capabilities are credited to the large surface to volume ratio of gas sensing thin film with nano sized porous surface topology, which can greatly increase the sensitivity even at relatively low working temperature. The gas sensing film is deposited onto a thin dielectric membrane of low thermal conductivity, which provides good thermal isolation between substrate and the gas-sensitive heated area on the membrane. In this way the power consumption can be kept very low. Since the fabrication process is completely compatible with IC industry, it makes mass production possible and greatly reduces the cost. The working temperature of the new sensor can be reduced as low as 100°C. The low working temperature posse advantages such as lower power consumption, lower thermal induced signal shift as well as safe detection in certain environments where temperature is strictly limited.

  13. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  14. MEMS-based method of polymer bead handling for chemical array sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byunghwa; Park, Yoon S.; Kim, Jun Wan; Sohn, Young-Soo; Neikirk, Dean P.

    2005-07-01

    Combination of micromachined platforms and chemically sensitive micro-beads have been demonstrated for use as multi-analyte chemical and biological agent detectors [1,2]. In many of these systems agarose beads have been used as the "container" of various chemical sensors and enzymes. This paper discusses a method of array assembly using such sub-millimeter size beads.

  15. Inline chemical process analysis in micro-plants based on thermoelectric flow and impedimetric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, T.; Kutzner, C.; Kropp, M.; Brokmann, G.; Lang, W.; Steinke, A.; Kienle, A.; Hauptmann, P.

    2010-10-01

    In micro-plants, as used in chemical micro-process engineering, an integrated inline analytics is regarded as an important factor for the development and optimization of chemical processes. Up to now, there is a lack of sensitive, robust and low-priced micro-sensors for monitoring mixing and chemical conversion in micro-fluidic channels. In this paper a novel sensor system combining an impedimetric sensor and a novel pressure stable thermoelectric flow sensor for monitoring chemical reactions in micro-plants is presented. The CMOS-technology-based impedimetric sensor mainly consists of two capacitively coupled interdigital electrodes on a silicon chip. The thermoelectric flow sensor consists of a heater in between two thermopiles on a perforated membrane. The pulsed and constant current feeds of the heater were analyzed. Both sensors enable the analysis of chemical conversion by means of changes in the thermal and electrical properties of the liquid. The homogeneously catalyzed synthesis of n-butyl acetate as a chemical model system was studied. Experimental results revealed that in an overpressure regime, relative changes of less than 1% in terms of thermal and electrical properties can be detected. Furthermore, the transition from one to two liquid phases accompanied by the change in slug flow conditions could be reproducibly detected.

  16. Chemical Sensors Based On Oxygen Detection By Optical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jennifer W.; Cox, M. E.; Dunn, Bruce S.

    1986-08-01

    Fluorescence quenching is shown to be a viable method of measuring oxygen concentration. Two oxygen/optical transducers based on fluorescence quenching have been developed and characterized: one is hydrophobic and the other is hydrophilic. The development of both transducers provides great flexibility in the application of fluorescence to oxygen measurement. One transducer is produced by entrapping a fluorophor, 9,10-diphenyl anthracene, in poly(dimethyl siloxane) to yield a homogeneous composite polymer matrix. The resulting matrix is hydrophobic. This transducer is extremely sensitive to PO2 as a result of oxygen quenching the fluorescence of 9,10-diphenyl anthracene. This quenching is utilized in the novel method employed to measure the transport properties of oxygen within Ulf 2matrix. Results show large values for the diffusion coefficient at 25°C, D = 3.5 x 10-5 cm /s. The fluorescence intensity varies inversely with P02. The second oxygen transducer is fabricated by entrapping 9,10-diphenyl anthracene in poly(hydroxy ethyl methacrylate). Free radical, room temperature polymerization is employed. This transducer is hydrophilic, and contains 37% water. The transport properties of oxygen within this transducer are compared with those of the hydrophobic transducer. The feasibility of generalizing the oxygen transducers to a wider class of chemical sensors through coupling to other chemistries is proposed. An example of such coupling is given in a glucose/oxygen transducer. The glucose transducer is produced by entrapping an enzyme, glucose oxidase, in the composite matrix of the hydrophilic oxygen transducer. Glucose oxidase catalyzes a reaction between glucose and oxygen, thereby lowering the local oxygen concentration. This transducer yields a glucose modified optical oxygen signal. The operation of this transducer and preliminary results of its characterization are presented.

  17. Optical Sensors Based on Single Arm Thin Film Waveguide Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.

    1997-01-01

    All the goals of the research effort for the first year were met by the accomplishments. Additional efforts were done to speed up the process of development and construction of the experimental gas chamber which will be completed by the end of 1997. This chamber incorporates vacuum sealed multimode optical fiber lines which connect the sensor to the remote light source and signal processing equipment. This optical fiber line is a prototype of actual optical communication links connecting real sensors to a control unit within an aircraft or spacecraft. An important problem which we are planning to focus on during the second year is coupling of optical fiber line to the sensor. Currently this problem is solved using focusing optics and prism couplers. More reliable solutions are planned to be investigated.

  18. Hierarchical graphene-polyaniline nanocomposite films for high-performance flexible electronic gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunlong; Wang, Ting; Chen, Fanhong; Sun, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Zhongzhen; Wan, Pengbo; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    A hierarchically nanostructured graphene-polyaniline composite film is developed and assembled for a flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor to be integrated into wearable and foldable electronic devices. The hierarchical nanocomposite film is obtained via aniline polymerization in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) solution and simultaneous deposition on flexible PET substrate. The PANI nanoparticles (PPANI) anchored onto rGO surfaces (PPANI/rGO) and the PANI nanofiber (FPANI) are successfully interconnected and deposited onto flexible PET substrates to form hierarchical nanocomposite (PPANI/rGO-FPANI) network films. The assembled flexible, transparent electronic gas sensor exhibits high sensing performance towards NH3 gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppb to 100 ppm, reliable transparency (90.3% at 550 nm) for the PPANI/rGO-FPANI film (6 h sample), fast response/recovery time (36 s/18 s), and robust flexibility without an obvious performance decrease after 1000 bending/extending cycles. The excellent sensing performance could probably be ascribed to the synergetic effects and the relatively high surface area (47.896 m(2) g(-1)) of the PPANI/rGO-FPANI network films, the efficient artificial neural network sensing channels, and the effectively exposed active surfaces. It is expected to hold great promise for developing flexible, cost-effective, and highly sensitive electronic sensors with real-time analysis to be potentially integrated into wearable flexible electronics. PMID:27249547

  19. Chemical and optical properties of thermally evaporated manganese oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kuhaili, M. F.

    2006-09-15

    Manganese oxide thin films were deposited using thermal evaporation from a tungsten boat. Films were deposited under an oxygen atmosphere, and the effects of thickness, substrate temperature, and deposition rate on their properties were investigated. The chemical properties of the films were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence. The optical properties were determined from normal-incidence transmittance and reflectance. Based on the chemical and optical characterizations, the optimum conditions for the deposition of the films were investigated. Subsequently, the optical properties (refractive index, extinction coefficient, and band gap) of these films were determined.

  20. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  1. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  2. Dry Process Based Infrared Sensors with CNT Film Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kum-Pyo; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lim, Lee-Taek; Choi, Chang-Seon; Lee, Dong Il; Lee, Cheol Jin; Park, Chan-Won; Min, Nam Ki

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication and characterization of a front-side micromachined thermopiles consisting of a suspended membrane and a carbon nanotube (CNT) film absorber. Thermocouples of 52 pairs which are composed of phosphorous-doped silicon and aluminum were formed and connected in series. A CNT film collected by filter was transferred on hot junction. A CNT absorber has an absorptance of about 50% in the midinfrared region. The suspended membrane was fabricated by an isotropic silicon dry etching process with XeF2 gas at the front side of the substrates. The output voltage with the CNT film is found to be 250.2 mV at 7 mW of incident power, approximately 1.8 times higher than that of one without an absorber.

  3. ROC-curve approach for determining the detection limit of a field chemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Carlos G; Melville, Angela M; Wright, Bob W

    2007-03-01

    The detection limit of a field chemical sensor under realistic operating conditions is determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. The chemical sensor is an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) device used to detect a chemical marker in diesel fuel. The detection limit is the lowest concentration of the marker in diesel fuel that obtains the desired true-positive probability (TPP) and false-positive probability (FPP). A TPP of 0.90 and a FPP of 0.10 were selected as acceptable levels for the field sensor in this study. The detection limit under realistic operating conditions is found to be between 2 to 4 ppm (w/w). The upper value is the detection limit under challenging conditions. The ROC-based detection limit is very reliable because it is determined from multiple and repetitive sensor analyses under realistic circumstances. ROC curves also clearly illustrate and gauge the effects data preprocessing and sampling environments have on the sensor's detection limit.

  4. Hall current sensor IC with integrated Co-based alloy thin film magnetic concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, V.; Marchesi, M.; Chiesi, V.; Paci, D.; Iuliano, P.; Toia, F.; Casoli, F.; Ranzieri, P.; Albertini, F.; Morelli, M.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with a cobalt-based alloy thin film magnetic concentrator (MC) which is fully integrated on a Hall sensor integrated circuit (IC) developed in the 0.35 µm Bipolar CMOS DMOS (BCD) technology on 8" silicon wafer. An amorphous magnetic film with a thickness of 1µm, coercitive field Hc<10A/m and saturation magnetization (µ0MS) of 0.45T has been obtained with a sputtering process. The Hall sensor IC has shown sensitivity to magnetic field at room temperature of 240V/AT without concentrator and 2550V/AT with concentrator, gaining a factor of 10.5. A current sensor demonstrator has been realized showing linear response in the range -50 to 50A.

  5. Convective response of a wall-mounted hot-film sensor in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.; Ortgies, Kelly R.; Gartenberg, Ehud; Carraway, Debra L.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed in order to determine the response of a single hot-film element of a sensor array to transiently induced flow behind weak normal shock waves. The experiments attempt to isolate the response due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface mounted on the wall of the shock tube. The experiments are described, the results being correlated with transient boundary layer theory and compared with an independent set of experimental results. One of the findings indicates that the change in the air properties (temperature and pressure) precedes the air mass transport, causing an ambiguity in the sensor response to the development of the velocity boundary layer. Also, a transient, local heat transfer coefficient is formulated to be used as a forcing function in an hot-film instrument model and simulation which remains under investigation.

  6. Flexible high-resolution film recorder system. [in NASA image processing facility for remote sensor data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffner, P.; Connell, E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a high-resolution film recorder (HRFR) system capable of meeting the requirements of all of the imaging sensors for the recording support of NASA missions. The technical requirements imposed by sensor constraints and end users of the film product are examined, along with the implementation techniques to satisfy these requirements. The recorder can produce annotated imagery with array sizes ranging from 1 to 400 million picture elements and a programmable radiometric transfer function provided by the recorder. The HRFR requirements were grouped into three categories: (1) front end (input) requirements defined by the input medium, (2) operational requirements based on the volume, throughput, and changeover time from one mode to another, and (3) film product requirements determined by the needs of the end product user.

  7. Nano-based chemical sensor array systems for uninhabited ground and airborne vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, Christina; Ruffin, Paul B.; Edwards, Eugene

    2009-03-01

    In a time when homemade explosive devices are being used against soldiers and in the homeland security environment, it is becoming increasingly evident that there is an urgent need for high-tech chemical sensor packages to be mounted aboard ground and air vehicles to aid soldiers in determining the location of explosive devices and the origin of bio-chemical warfare agents associated with terrorist activities from a safe distance. Current technologies utilize relatively large handheld detection systems that are housed on sizeable robotic vehicles. Research and development efforts are underway at the Army Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) to develop novel and less expensive nano-based chemical sensors for detecting explosives and chemical agents used against the soldier. More specifically, an array of chemical sensors integrated with an electronics control module on a flexible substrate that can conform to and be surface-mounted to manned or unmanned vehicles to detect harmful species from bio-chemical warfare and other explosive devices is being developed. The sensor system under development is a voltammetry-based sensor system capable of aiding in the detection of any chemical agent and in the optimization of sensor microarray geometry to provide nonlinear Fourier algorithms to characterize target area background (e.g., footprint areas). The status of the research project is reviewed in this paper. Critical technical challenges associated with achieving system cost, size, and performance requirements are discussed. The results obtained from field tests using an unmanned remote controlled vehicle that houses a CO2/chemical sensor, which detects harmful chemical agents and wirelessly transmits warning signals back to the warfighter, are presented. Finally, the technical barriers associated with employing the sensor array system aboard small air vehicles will be discussed.

  8. IN-LINE CHEMICAL SENSOR DEPLOYMENT IN A TRITIUM PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Tovo, L.; Wright, J.; Torres, R.; Peters, B.

    2013-10-02

    The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. Though new sensor technologies have been brought to various readiness levels, the TP has been reluctant to install technologies that have not been tested in tritium service. This gap between sensor technology development and incorporating new technologies into practical applications demonstrates fundamental challenges that exist when transitioning from status quo to state-of-the-art in an extreme environment such as a tritium plant. These challenges stem from three root obstacles: 1) The need for a comprehensive assessment of process sensing needs and requirements; 2) The lack of a pick-list of process-compatible sensor technologies; and 3) The need to test technologies in a tritium-contaminated process environment without risking production. At Savannah River, these issues are being addressed in a two phase project. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting roadmap links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. To provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment, an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box. This station was fabricated to TP process requirements and designed to handle high activity samples. The combination of roadmap and demonstration station provides the following assets: Creates a partnership between the process engineers and researchers for sensor selection, maturation, and insertion, Selects the right sensors for process conditions Provides a means for safely inserting new sensor technology into the process without risking production, and Provides a means to evaluate off normal occurrences where and when they occur

  9. High-performance NO2 sensors based on chemically modified graphene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenjing; Liu, Anran; Huang, Liang; Li, Chun; Shi, Gaoquan

    2013-02-01

    Covalently grafting reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets with sulfophenyl or ethylenediamine groups can produce chemically modified graphene (CMG) for fabricating high-performance gas sensors. The NO(2) sensors based on these CMGs exhibit sensitivities 4 to 16 times higher than that of a sensor based on rGO. They also show excellent selectivity and repeatability without the aid of UV-light or thermal treatment. PMID:23139053

  10. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Label-Free Chemical/Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, PingAn; Zhang, Jia; Li, Le; Wang, Zhenlong; O’Neill, William; Estrela, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells. PMID:22399927

  11. Use of a piezoelectric film sensor for monitoring vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Dietzek, A M; Veith, F J; Torres, M; Kram, H B; Wengerter, K R

    1990-08-01

    Detection of failing arterial reconstructions requires intensive surveillance by frequent physical examination and noninvasive laboratory testing. However, many grafts fail during the intervals between these examinations. For this reason, we have developed an implantable miniaturized piezoelectric flow detection device whose function can be monitored externally by radiotransmission across the skin. Sensors were constructed from ultrathin polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) with piezoelectric activity and attached with silicone fixative to 6-mm polytetrafluoroethylene grafts. Ten of these grafts were placed in mongrel dogs as iliofemoral bypasses. Real time data were acquired from the sensors at a rate of 200 Hz, using a DATAQ A/D data acquisition board and CODAS data acquisition software, while simultaneous blood flow (using an electromagnetic flowmeter) and intraluminal pressure were processed by using separate channels of the same data acquisition board. The data were stored on computer storage media and analyzed by the ASYST software, which allows simultaneous signal curves to be compared using regression analysis. In the resting state, the mean blood flow was 123 +/- 16 mL and the mean intraluminal pressure was 124/78 mm Hg, and there was perfect correlation between the PVF2 sensor and the flowmeter and between the sensor and the intraluminal pressure (correlation coefficient, r greater than or equal to 0.99 and r greater than or equal to 0.93, respectively). A tourniquet was applied to the iliac artery proximal to the graft to reduce the flow to approximately half of the resting state (mean flow after tourniquet: 66 +/- 6 mL/minute). Signal tracings from the three sources showed a remarkable similarity with a very high correlation coefficient (r greater than or equal to 0.99 between sensor and flowmeter and r greater than or equal to 0.92 between sensor and the pressure signal). These preliminary results show that the sensors made from low-profile and low-mass PVF2

  12. Temperature sensor based on composite film of vanadium complex (VO2(3-fl)) and CNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimov, Kh. S.; Mahroof-Tahir, M.; Saleem, M.; Tariq Saeed Chani, M.; Niaz, A. Khan

    2015-07-01

    A vanadium complex (VO2(3-fl)) and CNT composite film based temperature sensor is reported in this study. Surface-type silver electrodes were deposited on the glass substrates. A thin film of VO2(3-fl) and CNT composite was coated as a temperature-sensing material on the top of the pre-patterned Ag electrodes. The temperature-sensing principle of the sensor was based on the conductivity change of the coated sensing element upon heating or cooling processes. DC and AC (100 Hz) resistances of the temperature sensor decreased quasilinearly with increasing the temperature in the range of 25-80 °C. The overall resistance of the sensor decreases by 1.8-2.1 and 1.9-2.0 times at DC and AC voltage, respectively. The resistance temperature coefficients of the sensor were in the range of -(0.9-1.3)% and -(1.1-1.3)% at DC and AC voltage, respectively. The properties of the sensor studied in this work, make it beneficial to be used in the instruments for environmental monitoring of temperature.

  13. Optical properties of porous chalcogenide films for sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalova, A.; Todorov, R.

    2012-12-01

    The object of the present work is investigation of the optical properties of obliquely deposited thin films from As - S - Ge system. Aiming to obtain high porous coatings the deposition rate was varied in the range of 0.05-10 nm/s. The conditions for deposition of thin As - S - Ge films with columnar structure and high porosity were established. The role of the actual deposition conditions on the optical properties is examined. The optical constants (refractive index, n and absorption coefficient, α) and thickness, d as well as the optical band gap, Eg, and slope parameter B in dependence of the deposition angle and rate are determined from specrophotometric measurements in the spectral range 400-2000 nm applying the Swanepoel's envelope method and Tauc's procedure. Increasing of the value of n from 2.40 to 1.83 for thin film with composition As10Ge30S60 with increasing deposition angle from 0° to 75° is observed. The possibility of using the thin films for optical sensing of SO2 and H2S was examined. Reversible changes of the refractive index, Δn = 0.015 were observed as a consequence of treatment virgin - exposure to H2SO4 vapors- annealing at 120 °C.

  14. Single walled carbon nanotubes with functionally adsorbed biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T

    2013-12-17

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA or RNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  15. Whole Wafer Design and Fabrication for the Alignment of Nanostructures for Chemical Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2013-01-01

    A major objective in aerospace sensor development is to produce sensors that are small in size, easy to batch fabricate and low in cost, and have low power consumption The fabrication of chemical sensors involving nanostructured materials can provide these properties as well as the potential for the development of sensor systems with unique properties and improved performance. However, the fabrication and processing of nanostructures for sensor applications currently is limited in the ability to control their location on the sensor. Currently, our group at NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated the controlled placement of nanostructures in sensors using a sawtooth patterned electrode design. With this design the nanostructures are aligned between opposing sawtooth electrodes by applying an alternating current.

  16. Fiber optic chemical sensors for characterizing the carbon cycle in ocean margin regions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrandpre, M.D.; Sayles, F.L.

    1993-04-13

    The overall objective of our DOE-Ocean Margins Programs grant is to develop a pCO{sub 2} sensor for long-term monitoring of pCO{sub 2} in the ocean margins and to establish a proving ground for the development of other chemical sensors for characterizing the carbon cycle in these regions. We have succeeded in keeping with the approximate timeline outlined in the original proposal, which, for year 1 included the following objectives: Continue sensor optimization, test response characteristics (reagent and sample flow rates, temperature), introduce position sensitive photodiode and photodiode array spectrophotometers and evaluate, develop reliable and reproducible fabrication techniques, develop sensor based on preliminary studies optimized for field measurements (minimize size and power requirements), test long-term stability of the sensor in the laboratory, determine susceptibility to fouling and corrosion. This work is summarized below along with a brief review of the sensor`s operating principle.

  17. Recent Development in Optical Chemical Sensors Coupling with Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Catalina Bosch; Rojas, Fuensanta Sánchez

    2006-01-01

    Optical techniques for chemical analysis are well established and sensors based on these techniques are now attracting considerable attention because of their importance in applications such as environmental monitoring, biomedical sensing, and industrial process control. On the other hand, flow injection analysis (FIA) is advisable for the rapid analysis of microliter volume samples and can be interfaced directly to the chemical process. The FIA has become a widespread automatic analytical method for more reasons; mainly due to the simplicity and low cost of the setups, their versatility, and ease of assembling. In this paper, an overview of flow injection determinations by using optical chemical sensors is provided, and instrumentation, sensor design, and applications are discussed. This work summarizes the most relevant manuscripts from 1980 to date referred to analysis using optical chemical sensors in FIA.

  18. Integrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor for detection of air contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manfreda, A. M.; Homer, M. L.; Ksendzov, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report a silicon nitride-based ring resonator chemical sensor with sensing polymer coating. Its sensitivity to isopropanol in air is at least 50 ppm - well under the permissible exposure level of 400 ppm.

  19. Intregrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor for detection of air contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksendzov, Alexander; Homer, Margie L.; Manfreda, Allison M.

    2004-01-01

    We report a silicon nitride-based ring resonator chemical sensor with sensing polymer coating. Its sensitivity to isopropanol in air is at least 50 ppm - well under the permissible exposure level of 400 ppm.

  20. Structural and electrochemical properties of lutetium bis-octachloro-phthalocyaninate nanostructured films. Application as voltammetric sensors.

    PubMed

    Alessio, P; Apetrei, C; Rubira, R J G; Constantino, C J L; Medina-Plazal, C; De Saja, J A; Rodríguez-Méndez, M L

    2014-09-01

    Thin films of the bis[2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octachlorophthalocyaninate] lutetium(III) complex (LuPc2Cl32) have been prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett and the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) techniques. The influence of the chlorine substituents in the structure of the films and in their spectroscopic, electrochemical and sensing properties has been evaluated. The π-A isotherms exhibit a monolayer stability greater than the observed in the unsubstituted analogue (LuPc2), being easily transferred to solid substrates, also in contrast to LuPc2. The LB and LS films present a linear growth forming stratified layers, monitored by UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. The latter also revealed the presence of LuPc2Cl32 in the form of monomers and aggregates in both films. The FTIR data showed that the LuPc2Cl32 molecules present a non-preferential arrangement in both films. Monolayers of LB and LS were deposited onto 6 nm Ag island films to record surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), leading to enhancement factors close to 2 x 10(3). Finally, LB and LS films deposited onto ITO glass have been successfully used as voltammetric sensors for the detection of catechol. The improved electroactivity of the LB and LS films has been confirmed by the reduction of the overpotential of the oxidation of catechol. The enhancement of the electrocatalytic effect observed in LB and LS films is the result of the nanostructured arrangement of the surface which increases the number of active sites. The sensors show a limit of detection in the range of 10(-5) mol/L.

  1. Liquid precursor films spreading on chemically patterned substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checco, Antonio

    2008-03-01

    We study the spreading of nonvolatile liquid squalane on chemically patterned nanostripes by using non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (NC-AFM). The substrates are octadecylthrichlorosilane(OTS)-coated silicon wafers chemically patterned on multiple length-scales using a combination of UV and AFM oxidative lithographies. This process allows us to locally convert the terminal methyl groups of the OTS surface (non-wettable) into carboxylic acid groups (wettable) without affecting considerably the substrate roughness (< 0.3nm rms). The patterned regions are shaped as a network of large (mm-sized) wettable lines connected to smaller and smaller (nm-sized) lines. Liquid squalane spreads across this ``microfluidic network'' starting from the large lines eventually reaching the nanolines (50 to 500 nm-wide). NC-AFM is used to image the morphology of the liquid as it spreads across the nanolines. We find that the liquid thickness on the nanolines grows with time (up to ˜10 nm) according to a power-law with exponent ˜1. These preliminary results suggest that the spreading dynamics of laterally-confined liquids slightly differs, as expected, from the one of laterally homogeneous precursor films. We compare our findings to recent theoretical predictions of confined liquid flow and also discuss its relevance to nanofluidics.

  2. Electrochemical sensing chemical oxygen demand based on the catalytic activity of cobalt oxide film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinqi; Wu, Can; Wu, Kangbing; Cheng, Qin; Zhou, Yikai

    2012-07-29

    Cobalt oxide sensing film was in situ prepared on glassy carbon electrode surface via constant potential oxidation. Controlling at 0.8 V in NaOH solution, the high-valence cobalt catalytically oxidized the reduced compounds, decreasing its surface amount and current signal. The current decline was used as the response signal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) because COD represents the summation of reduced compounds in water. The surface morphology and electrocatalytic activity of cobalt oxide were readily tuned by variation of deposition potential, time, medium and Co(2+) concentration. As confirmed from the atomic force microscopy measurements, the cobalt oxide film, that prepared at 1.3 V for 40 s in pH 4.6 acetate buffer containing 10 mM Co(NO(3))(2), possesses large surface roughness and numerous three-dimensional structures. Electrochemical tests indicated that the prepared cobalt oxide exhibited high electrocatalytic activity to the reduced compounds, accompanied with strong COD signal enhancement. As a result, a novel electrochemical sensor with high sensitivity, rapid response and operational simplicity was developed for COD. The detection limit was as low as 1.1 mg L(-1). The analytical application was studied using a large number of lake water samples, and the accuracy was tested by standard method.

  3. Integration of Chemical Sensors with LSI Technology — History and Applications —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixier-Mita, Agnès; Takahashi, Takuya; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi

    Chemical sensors are one of the oldest fields of research closely related to the semiconductor technology. From the Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistors (ISFET) in the 70's, through Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) sensors from the end of the 80's, chemical sensors are combining in the 90's MEMS technology with LSI intelligence to devise more selective, sensitive and autonomous devices to analyse complex mixtures. A brief history of chemical sensors from the ISFET to the nowadays LSI integrated sensors is first detailed. Then the states-of-the-art of LSI integrated chemical sensors and their wide range of applications are discussed. Finally the authors propose a brand-new usage of integrated wireless MEMS sensors for remote surveillance of chemical substances, such as food-industry or pharmaceutical products, that are stored in closed environment like a bottle, for a long period. In such environment, in-situ analyse is necessary, and electrical cables, for energy supply or data transfer, cannot be used. Thanks to integrated MEMS, an autonomous long-term in-situ quality deterioration tracking system is possible.

  4. Chemical sensors using peptide-functionalized conducting polymer nanojunction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Alvaro Díaz; Forzani, Erica S.; Li, Xiulan; Tao, Nongjian; Nagahara, Larry A.; Amlani, Islamshah; Tsui, Raymond

    2005-11-01

    We demonstrate a heavy metal-ion sensor for drinking water analysis using a conducting polymer nanojunction array. Each nanojunction is formed by bridging a pair of nanoelectrodes separated with a small gap (<60nm) with electrodeposited peptide-modified polyanilines. The signal transduction mechanism of the sensor is based on the change in the nanojunction conductance as a result of polymer conformational changes induced by the metal-ion chelating peptide. The nanojunction sensor allows real-time detection of Cu2+ and Ni2+ at ppt range.

  5. Surface plasmon resonance image sensor module of spin-coated silver film with polymer layer.

    PubMed

    Son, Jung-Han; Lee, Dong Hun; Cho, Yong-Jin; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Prism modules of 20 nm-, 40 nm-, and 60 nm-thick spin-coated silver films both without and with an upper 100 nm-thick spin-coated polymer layer were fabricated for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image sensor applications. The prism modules were applied to an SPR image sensor system. The coefficients of determination (R2s) for the 20 nm-, 40 nm- and 60 nm-thick silver films without the polymer layer were 0.9231, 0.9901, and 0.9889, respectively, and with the polymer layer 0.9228, 0.9951, and 0.9880, respectively when standard ethanol solutions with 0.1% intervals in the range of 20.0% to 20.5% were applied. The upper polymer layer has no effect on the R2. The prism modules of the 40-nm-thick spin-coated silver films had the highest R2 value of approximately 0.99. The durability of the 40 nm-thick spin-coated silver film with the 100 nm-thick polymer layer is much better than that without the upper low-loss polymer layer. The developed SPR image sensor module of the 40 nm-thick spin-coated silver film with the upper 100 nm-thick low-loss polymer film is expected to be a very cost-effective and robust solution because the films are formed at low temperatures in a short period of time without requiring a vacuum system and are very durable.

  6. Micro-patterning and characterization of PHEMA-co-PAM-based optical chemical sensors for lab-on-a-chip applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haixin; Zhou, Xianfeng; Su, Fengyu; Tian, Yanqing; Ashili, Shashanka; Holl, Mark R.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel method for wafer level, high throughput optical chemical sensor patterning, with precise control of the sensor volume and capability of producing arbitrary microscale patterns. Monomeric oxygen (O2) and pH optical probes were polymerized with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrylamide (AM) to form spin-coatable and further crosslinkable polymers. A micro-patterning method based on micro-fabrication techniques (photolithography, wet chemical process and reactive ion etch) was developed to miniaturize the sensor film onto glass substrates in arbitrary sizes and shapes. The sensitivity of fabricated micro-patterns was characterized under various oxygen concentrations and pH values. The process for spatially integration of two sensors (Oxygen and pH) on the same substrate surface was also developed, and preliminary fabrication and characterization results were presented. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that poly (2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate)-co-poly (acrylamide) (PHEMA-co-PAM)-based sensors had been patterned and integrated at the wafer level with micron scale precision control using microfabrication techniques. The developed methods can provide a feasible way to miniaturize and integrate the optical chemical sensor system and can be applied to any lab-on-a-chip system, especially the biological micro-systems requiring optical sensing of single or multiple analytes. PMID:23175599

  7. Polymer waveguide grating sensor integrated with a thin-film photodetector.

    PubMed

    Song, Fuchuan; Xiao, Jing; Xie, Antonio Jou; Seo, Sang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a planar waveguide grating sensor integrated with a photodetector (PD) for on-chip optical sensing systems which are suitable for diagnostics in the field and in-situ measurements. III-V semiconductor-based thin-film PD is integrated with a polymer based waveguide grating device on a silicon platform. The fabricated optical sensor successfully discriminates optical spectral characteristics of the polymer waveguide grating from the on-chip PD. In addition, its potential use as a refractive index sensor is demonstrated. Based on a planar waveguide structure, the demonstrated sensor chip may incorporate multiple grating waveguide sensing regions with their own optical detection PDs. In addition, the demonstrated processing is based on a post-integration process which is compatible with silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics. Potentially, this leads a compact, chip-scale optical sensing system which can monitor multiple physical parameters simultaneously without need for external signal processing.

  8. Fast Responsive Gas Sensor of Vertically Aligned Fluorine-Doped Tin Oxide Nanorod Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chan-Woo; Lee, Jong-Heun; Riu, Doh-Hyung; Kim, Chang-Yeoul

    2012-04-01

    We prepared fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) nanorod films and a conventional FTO thin film for the application of a semiconducting gas sensor by spray pyrolysis method. The lengths of FTO nanorods (FTON, 100 and 500 nm) were controlled by changing deposition times, and FTO thin film (FTOT) was also prepared as a reference. The gas sensitivity test shows FTON with long nanorods had higher sensitivity for both hydrogen and ethanol gases but slow response and recovery times, despite an advantage of the higher gas sensitivity. FTO nanorod film with short length about 100 nm showed relatively lower sensitivity, but fast gas response and recovery characteristics. The fast response and recovery for the analyte gases are attributed to the conductance of FTO nanorods, which is closely related to the diameter and length of nanorods.

  9. Al doped ZnO thin films - microstructure, physical and sensor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starbov, N.; Balabanov, S.; Bineva, I.; Rachkova, A.; Krumov, E.; Starbova, K.

    2012-12-01

    Thin ZnO films doped with Al are deposited by spray pyrolysis onto glass substrates using starting solution of Zn-acetate + n.AlCl (where 0.1 < n < 30 at.%). The ZnO phase composition and surface morphology are revealed via X-ray diffraction or atomic force and scanning electron microscopy respectively. UV/VIS transmittance/reflectance, as well as DC-conductivity measurements are applied in order to reveal the influence of the Al doping on the optical and electrical transport properties of the films studied. The sensing efficiency of the pure as well as of doped ZnO films for detection of noxious gases is checked via resistivity measurements under saturated vapours of ethanol, acetone, ammonia, dimethylamine and formalin at room temperature. Finally the results obtained are discussed concerning the application of the ZnO:Al films studied in the field of sensor technique.

  10. Miniaturized acceleration sensors with in-plane polarized piezoelectric thin films produced by micromachining.

    PubMed

    Shanmugavel, Saravanan; Yao, Kui; Luong, Trung Dung; Oh, Sharon Roslyn; Chen, Yifan; Tan, Chin Yaw; Gaunekar, Ajit; Ng, Peter Hon Yu; Li, Marchy Hing Leung

    2011-11-01

    Miniaturized acceleration sensors employing piezoelectric thin films were fabricated through batch micromachining with silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. The acceleration sensors comprised multiple suspension beams supporting a central seismic mass. Ferroelectric (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti) O(3) (PLZT) thin films were coated and in-plane polarized on the surfaces of the suspension beams for realizing electromechanical conversion through the piezoelectric effect. Interdigital electrodes were formed on the PLZT films and connected in parallel. Finite element analyses were conducted for the stress and strain distributions, providing guidance to the structural design, including optimizing electrode positioning for collecting the electrical output constructively. Uniformity of the beam thickness and sample consistency were significantly improved by using SOI wafers instead of silicon wafers. The measurement results showed that all the sensor samples had fundamental resonances of symmetric out-of-plane vibration mode at frequencies in the range of 8 to 35 kHz, depending on the sample dimensions. These sensors exhibited stable electrical outputs in response to acceleration input, achieving a high signal-to-noise ratio without any external amplifier or signal conditioning.

  11. A novel polymerization of ultrathin sensitive imprinted film on surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianwei; Peng, Yuan; Gao, Na; Bai, Jialei; Ning, Baoan; Liu, Ming; Gao, Zhixian

    2012-10-01

    A new surface-initiated polymerization based on pasting the initiator on a sensor chip surface was applied to prepare a malachite green (MG) imprinted ultrathin film on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. First, the initiator (2,2-azoisobutyronitrile) was pasted on the gold surface using polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The initiator-covered gold chip was then soaked in a pre-polymerization solution prepared by dissolving methacrylic acid (functional monomer), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (cross-linker), and MG (template) in DMSO in a weighing bottle. Finally, the weighing bottle was placed in a vacuum oven and thermal-initiated polymerization was conducted at 60 °C for 16 h. This method was simple and time-saving compared with the commonly used surface-initiated polymerization. More importantly, the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film prepared using this method was much thicker than that of commonly used methods; the adsorption quantity was also much larger. The MIP modified SPR sensor showed high sensitivity and selectivity as well as good stability in detecting MG. The results suggest that the ultrathin MIP film prepared using the new method in this study is suitable to serve as the recognition element of the SPR sensor.

  12. Design of efficient loadcell for measurement of mechanical impact by piezoelectric PVDF film sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, Priyanka; Roy, Arijit

    2016-09-01

    Conversion efficiency of mechanical impact into electrical voltage remains ever increasing demand for piezoelectric PVDF film sensor. For a given film sensor, the output voltage produced due to mechanical impact is highly dependent on the direction of stretching (or compressing) and active area of the film sensor. More is the active area of the film; higher will be the output voltage. It is shown that the active area is significantly increased due to the ridge-like shape given at the inner surfaces of the plates of sandwich type loadcell and as a result of which higher conversion efficiency is obtained. The effectiveness of the ridge-like shape is confirmed statistically by conducting two factorial design of experiment in which shape and material of the loadcell are considered as the two factors with 2×4 matrix. In case of loadcell made of glass plates, more than 100% increase in the output voltage is observed for ridge-like shape in comparison to its plain counterpart. Both the bandwidth and frequency range of the output signal is found to be independent and dependent of the loadcell materials for indirect and direct impact with the loadcell respectively. The merits and demerits of the fabricated loadcells are discussed.

  13. Fiber optic humidity sensor based on the graphene oxide/PVA composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youqing; Shen, Changyu; Lou, Weimin; Shentu, Fengying

    2016-08-01

    Fiber optic humidity sensor based on an in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) coated with graphene oxide (GO)/PVA composite film was investigated. The MZI is constructed of two waist-enlarged tapers. The length between two waist-enlarged tapers is 20 mm. By comparing the experiment results of MZI coated with different GO/PVA composite films, composite film formed by the ratio of 0.3 g PVA mixed with 10 ml GO dispersion shows a better performance of relative humidity sensing. By using the molecular structure model of the composited GO/PVA, the operation mechanism between GO/PVA composite film and water molecules was illustrated. The sensitivity of 0.193 dB/%RH with a linear correlation coefficient of 99.1% and good stability under the relative humidity range of 25-80% was obtained. Temperature effect on the proposed fiber optic humidity sensor was also considered and analyzed. According to the repetitive experimental results, the proposed humidity sensor shows a good repeatability.

  14. Polyvinylidene fluoride film based nasal sensor to monitor human respiration pattern: an initial clinical study.

    PubMed

    Roopa Manjunatha, G; Rajanna, K; Mahapatra, D Roy; Nayak, M M; Krishnaswamy, Uma Maheswari; Srinivasa, R

    2013-12-01

    Design and development of a piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) thin film based nasal sensor to monitor human respiration pattern (RP) from each nostril simultaneously is presented in this paper. Thin film based PVDF nasal sensor is designed in a cantilever beam configuration. Two cantilevers are mounted on a spectacle frame in such a way that the air flow from each nostril impinges on this sensor causing bending of the cantilever beams. Voltage signal produced due to air flow induced dynamic piezoelectric effect produce a respective RP. A group of 23 healthy awake human subjects are studied. The RP in terms of respiratory rate (RR) and Respiratory air-flow changes/alterations obtained from the developed PVDF nasal sensor are compared with RP obtained from respiratory inductance plethysmograph (RIP) device. The mean RR of the developed nasal sensor (19.65 ± 4.1) and the RIP (19.57 ± 4.1) are found to be almost same (difference not significant, p > 0.05) with the correlation coefficient 0.96, p < 0.0001. It was observed that any change/alterations in the pattern of RIP is followed by same amount of change/alterations in the pattern of PVDF nasal sensor with k = 0.815 indicating strong agreement between the PVDF nasal sensor and RIP respiratory air-flow pattern. The developed sensor is simple in design, non-invasive, patient friendly and hence shows promising routine clinical usage. The preliminary result shows that this new method can have various applications in respiratory monitoring and diagnosis. PMID:23771706

  15. Performance of a compact, hybrid optical evanescent-wave sensor for chemical and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmers, H.; Greco, Pierre; Benech, Pierre; Rustad, Rolf; Kherrat, Rochdi; Bouvier, Gérard

    1996-02-01

    We describe a hybrid evanescent-wave sensor component that we fabricated by using an integrated optical interferometer with a specially adapted photodetector array. The design of the interferometer is based on the use of tapered waveguides to obtain two intersecting collimated beams. Phase shifts can be measured with an angular precision of better than 10-3 rad, which corresponds to a superstrate index change inferior of 10-6 with our structure. The interest in the device as a chemical sensor is experimentally demonstrated. The same optical component could be used in a variety of other sensor applications, e.g., biological and immunological sensors.

  16. Enhanced Sensitivity of Micro Mechanical Chemical Sensors Through Structural Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.C.

    2001-04-16

    Chemical detection devices are very effective; however, their bulkiness makes them undesirable for portable applications. The next generation of chemical detectors is microscopic mechanical devices capable of measuring trace amounts of chemical vapor within the environment. The chemicals do not react directly with the detector, instead intermolecular forces cause chemicals to adhere to the surface. This surface adhesion of the chemical creates surface stress on the detectors leading to measurable movement. Modifications to the structural design of these microstructures have resulted in signal enhancement to over seven hundred percent.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of silicon nanowire chemical sensor based on its geometry and the operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayachandran Nair, Deepthi

    Silicon Nano Wires (SiNW) have been used in recent times as major building block in various nano devices like sensors, FETs etc. SiNW devices have also manifested many advantages over nano tube (NT) devices such as their fabrication in today's silicon world. Chemical sensor based on SiNW changes its conductivity when the target molecules are captured by the receptors spread across the nano wire (NW). Chemical sensitivity, which is defined as the change in conductance, is analyzed analytically to see how it is affected by different parameters. The sensitivity of the sensor based on the length of the SiNW is verified from previous works and the temperature which has not been considered before as an important parameter in the sensor performance are taken into account to see how it affects the sensitivity of the sensor.

  18. Multi-Sensor Integration to Map Odor Distribution for the Detection of Chemical Sources.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Acar, Levent

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of mapping odor distribution derived from a chemical source using multi-sensor integration and reasoning system design. Odor localization is the problem of finding the source of an odor or other volatile chemical. Most localization methods require a mobile vehicle to follow an odor plume along its entire path, which is time consuming and may be especially difficult in a cluttered environment. To solve both of the above challenges, this paper proposes a novel algorithm that combines data from odor and anemometer sensors, and combine sensors' data at different positions. Initially, a multi-sensor integration method, together with the path of airflow was used to map the pattern of odor particle movement. Then, more sensors are introduced at specific regions to determine the probable location of the odor source. Finally, the results of odor source location simulation and a real experiment are presented. PMID:27384568

  19. The development of micro/nano chemical sensor systems for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Evans, L.; Biaggi-Labiosa, A.; Ward, B. J.; Rowe, S.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Dutta, P.; Berger, G. M.; Vander Wal, R. L.

    2010-04-01

    Aerospace applications require a range of chemical sensing technologies to monitor conditions related to both space exploration and aeronautic aircraft operations. These applications include leak detection, engine emissions monitoring, fire detection, human health monitoring, and environmental monitoring. This paper discusses efforts to produce microsensor platforms and Smart Sensor Systems that can be tailored to measure a range of chemical species. This technology development ranges from development of base sensor platforms to the evaluation of more mature systems in relevant environments. Although microsensor systems can have a significant impact on aerospace applications, extensive application testing is necessary for their long-term implementation. The introduction of nanomaterials into microsensor platforms has the potential to significantly enable improved sensor performance, but control of those nanostructures is necessary in order to achieve maximum benefits. Examples will be given of microsensor platform technology, Smart Sensor Systems, application testing, and efforts to integrate and control nanostructures into sensor structures.

  20. Evaluation of Fabry-Perot polymer film sensors made using hard dielectric mirror deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, Jens; Zhang, Edward; Scharfenorth, Chris; Spannekrebs, Bastian; Villringer, Claus; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Fabry-Perot (FP) polymer film sensors offer high acoustic sensitivity, small element sizes, broadband frequency response and optical transmission to enable high resolution, backward mode photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Typical approaches to sensor fabrication involve the deposition of stacks of alternating dielectric materials to form interferometer mirrors, which are separated by a polymer spacer. If hygroscopic soft dielectric materials are used, a protective polymer layer is typically required. In this study, methods for the deposition of water-resistant, hard dielectric materials onto polymers were explored to improve the robustness and performance of the sensors. This involved the optimisation of the fabrication process, the optical and acoustic characterisation of the sensors, and a comparison of the frequency response with the output of an acoustic forward model. The mirrors, which were separated by a 20 μm Parylene spacer, consisted of eight double layers of Ta2O5 and SiO2 deposited onto polymer substrates using temperature-optimised electron vapour deposition. The free spectral range of the interferometer was 32 nm, its finesse FR = 91, and its visibility V = 0.72. The noise-equivalent pressure was 0.3 kPa (20 MHz bandwidth). The measured frequency response was found to be more resonant at 25 MHz compared to sensors with soft dielectric mirrors, which was also in good agreement with the output of a forward model of the sensor. The sensors were used in a PA scanner to acquire 3-D images in tissue phantoms.

  1. Preparation and spectroscopic properties of multiluminophore luminescent oxygen and temperature sensor films.

    PubMed

    Köse, Muhammet Erkan; Carroll, Bruce F; Schanze, Kirk S

    2005-09-27

    A new luminescent oxygen and temperature sensor has been developed that utilizes two luminescent dyes, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin platinum(II) (PtTFPP, the oxygen sensor) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) dichloride (Ruphen, the temperature sensor). The two dyes are dispersed in an oxygen-permeable polymer binder consisting of a copolymer of 4-tert-butylstyrene (tBS) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate (p-tBS-co-TFEM). To alleviate energy transfer and other quenching interactions between the two luminescent dyes in the p-tBS-co-TFEM binder, the Ruphen temperature sensor is encapsulated in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymer nanospheres that are prepared by coprecipitation of PAN and Ruphen from N,N-dimethylformamide solution. The temperature and air-pressure response of the emission from the sensor film is fully characterized by using emission spectroscopy. The emission from the two luminescent dyes is spectrally well-separated. The intensity of the Ruphen emission varies strongly with temperature (approximately 1.4% degrees C(-1)), whereas the intensity of the PtTFPP emission varies with temperature and air pressure. The two-dye luminescent coating is useful as a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP), where the emission from the Ruphen temperature sensor is used to correct for the temperature dependence of the pressure response of the PtTFPP sensor. To demonstrate the PSP application, a coupon coated with the sensor was imaged using a CCD camera, and the CCD images were analyzed by intensity ratio methods. Spectroscopic studies were also carried out on a sensor that contains three dyes in order to demonstrate the feasibility of including an intensity reference dye along with the temperature and pressure dyes into the sensor.

  2. Refractometric fiber optic mode-filtered light chemical sensor for acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Leiji; Wang, Kemin; Xiao, Dan; Yang, Xiaohai; Chen, Rui

    2001-09-01

    A refractometric fiber-optic chemical sensor bas don mode- filtered light detection (MFLD) was designed. This sensor was fabricated by inserting a non-chem- or bio-modified fiber core into a silica capillary with a CCD detector as the multichannel-signal capture. An interesting observation was obtained that there is an increase in signal with a decrease in sample refractive index in this unclad fiber sensor, just contrary to the polymer-clad fiber instead sensor reported previously. Academic deduction of the light propagation in detail, which was demonstrated by our experimental results, further interprets the reason of the difference between the unclad sensor and the polymer-clad sensor, and provides theoretical foundation on development of a MFLD-derived analyzer with synchronization of separation and assay in future work. This sensor was also demonstrated to successfully apply to detection of acetic acid with linear response of 0-90 percent and relative coefficient of 0.9972. The sensor's advantages in high S/N ratio and instant response show its potentials in food and chemical industries as a general sensor.

  3. Chemical-mechanical polishing of thin copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qiuliang

    Chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) of copper was conducted in both acidic and alkaline media. In acidic media, ferric nitrate (Fe(NOsb3)sb3) was used as an etchant and ammonia as the etchant in alkaline media. BTA worsened the slurry stability in Fe(NOsb3)sb3 slurries, especially at higher concentration. The addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (MW = 1,000,000) improved the slurry stability significantly. Copper polish rate is well correlated to the inhibition layer growth rate in the presence of etchant. A selectivity of copper to silicon dioxide removal rate greater than 100 was achievable. However, the polish selectivity of copper to silicon dioxide films is low for alkaline media, ranging from about 6:1 to 18:1. Copper dishing increases dramatically with Fe(NOsb3)sb3 concentration in the absence of BTA. However, BTA decreases copper dishing significantly. Copper dissolution in those media during CMP was investigated using weight loss and electrochemical techniques. The dissolution of copper in stagnant aqueous ammonia solutions is controlled by oxygen diffusion at high NHsb4OH concentrations and by mixed kinetics at low NHsb4OH concentrations (≤0.3 wt%). In acidic media, the dissolution is mainly controlled by diffusion of Fesp{3+} to copper surface at low rotational speeds of the electrode and by surface reaction at high rpm's. The copper dissolution rate decreases with BTA concentration significantly. The copper dissolution in the presence of BTA is controlled by the diffusion of Fesp{3+} and/or reaction products through the CuBTA inhibition layer formed on copper surface. Copper CMP in the presence of BTA follows the cyclic sequence: formation of the inhibition layer-mechanical removal of the inhibition layer associated with copper-reformation of the inhibition layer. The copper CMP process is primarily mechanical and the direct chemical etching during copper CMP is minimal. It is suggested that chemicals in the polishing slurries change the copper surface

  4. Double pulse laser deposition of polymer nanocomposite: NaYF4:Tm3+,Yb3+ films for optical sensors and light emitting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Wilson, Simeon; Sarkisov, Sergey; Patel, Darayas

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing operationally Nanocomposite polymeric thin films for sensor and light emitting applications using the innovative modified double pulsed laser deposition (DPLD) technique. The existing PLD vacuum chamber was modified to accommodate multiple wavelength laser beams for in-situ-double-ablation/Deposition (DPLD) of multiple targets of host and dopants. Special design was made for cooling of the target to the threshold of the polymer ablation without interrupting the continuity of the ablation process. Multilayered of nanocomposites of acrylic polymers and nanoparticles of NaYF4:Tm3+ ,Yb3+ are fabricated using ultra-violet (UV) radiation (355 nm) ablating polymer targets and near-infra-red (near-IR) radiation (1064 nm) ablating inorganic targets. The films were characterized using the reflected high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), XRD , XRF, AFM, and FTIR absorption spectroscopy and tested as possible chemical sensors and light emitters.

  5. Pressure-temperature sensors: Solution deposition of rare earth doped garnet films

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, N.J.; Exarhos, G.J.

    1993-11-01

    An aqueous route to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films is based upon the complexation of precursor metal nitrate salts by glycine, or other organic complexant, followed by spin-coating the homogeneous solution onto pretreated silica substrates. Glycine serves to frustrate the formation of cation oxides, thus precipitation. Upon dehydration, a glassy matrix results through which metal cations and nitrate anions are homogeneously dispersed. Subsequent heating of coated substrates initiates an oxidation-reduction reaction, which removes the organic matrix and residual nitrate leaving behind a film of the desired oxide composition. Using this method, SM:YAG (Sm:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} - garnet) films about 150 nm thick have been deposited. The respective phases have been confirmed by powder XRD measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy. Analogous studies using powders generated by the same technique provided the parameters for optimizing processing conditions to generate phase pure YAG films. The fluorescence emission wavelength and related lifetime of certain electronic transitions arising from metal cation dopants vary as a function of pressure and temperature suggesting their use as optical sensors. This work suggests the possible application of these films as pressure-temperature sensors in a planar waveguide configuration or as a coating material for optical fibers.

  6. Magnetic thin-film split-domain current sensor-recorder

    DOEpatents

    Hsieh, Edmund J.

    1979-01-01

    A sensor-recorder for recording a representation of the direction and peak amplitude of a transient current. A magnetic thin film is coated on a glass substrate under the influence of a magnetic field so that the finished film is magnetically uniaxial and anisotropic. The film is split into two oppositely magnetized contiguous domains with a central boundary by subjecting adjacent portions of the film simultaneously to magnetic fields that are opposed 180.degree.. With the split-domain sensor-recorder placed with the film plane and domain boundary either perpendicular or parallel to the expected conductive path of a transient current, the occurrence of the transient causes switching of a portion of one domain to the direction of the other domain. The amount of the switched domain portion is indicative of the amplitude of the peak current of the transient, while the particular domain that is switched is indicative of the direction of the current. The resulting domain patterns may be read with a passive magnetic tape viewer.

  7. Terahertz ultrathin film thickness sensor below λ/90 based on metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Fan, Fei; Shen, Si; Wang, Xianghui; Chang, Shengjiang

    2016-08-10

    The film thickness sensing based on metamaterial is investigated in the terahertz (THz) region. We fabricated the metamaterial sensor, and demonstrated its resonance by using the THz time-domain spectroscopy system. The results show that the resonant dip redshifts as the film thickness increases, which achieves reliable film sensing in the THz band. Its sensitivity is larger than 9.4 GHz/μm with a film thinner than λ/90. Meanwhile, the sensing mechanism is revealed by the simulation of near-field resonance distribution, which shows that the resonant intensity is stronger when the field is closer to the interface between the metamaterial surface and polyvinyl alcohol film. Therefore, the nonlinear type of the sensing sensitivity in our experiment can be well explained, and a higher sensitive sensing can be obtained when the film thickness is smaller. This simple and flexible method can realize the ultrathin film sensing in the THz region, and has application potential in the real-time monitoring of sample quality. PMID:27534497

  8. Terahertz ultrathin film thickness sensor below λ/90 based on metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Fan, Fei; Shen, Si; Wang, Xianghui; Chang, Shengjiang

    2016-08-10

    The film thickness sensing based on metamaterial is investigated in the terahertz (THz) region. We fabricated the metamaterial sensor, and demonstrated its resonance by using the THz time-domain spectroscopy system. The results show that the resonant dip redshifts as the film thickness increases, which achieves reliable film sensing in the THz band. Its sensitivity is larger than 9.4 GHz/μm with a film thinner than λ/90. Meanwhile, the sensing mechanism is revealed by the simulation of near-field resonance distribution, which shows that the resonant intensity is stronger when the field is closer to the interface between the metamaterial surface and polyvinyl alcohol film. Therefore, the nonlinear type of the sensing sensitivity in our experiment can be well explained, and a higher sensitive sensing can be obtained when the film thickness is smaller. This simple and flexible method can realize the ultrathin film sensing in the THz region, and has application potential in the real-time monitoring of sample quality.

  9. Scanner position sensor for an integrated laser/film rangefiner

    SciTech Connect

    Berdanier, B. N.

    1985-09-24

    In an integrated laser/FLIR rangefinder a scanner position sensor comprising an LED of the array of LEDs of a forward looking infrared (FLIR) system, a reticle grating located at the image plane of LED optical path and a silicon detector positioned to receive the light passing through the reticle grating for producing a plurality of signals in response to light passing through each grating slot. One of the signals is selected for the synchronization logic for controlling the charging and firing of the laser. If there is no range return a second signal is selected for adjusting the position of the timing pulse.

  10. Structural and optical characterization of WO{sub 3} thin films for gas sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gyoergy, E.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Ducu, C.; Ciuca, S.

    2005-05-01

    The structure, chemical composition, and optical properties of tungsten trioxide thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition were investigated. An ultraviolet KrF{sup *} excimer laser ({lambda}=248 nm, {tau}{sub FWHM} congruent with 20 ns, {nu}=2 Hz) was used for irradiation of tungsten trioxide targets in oxygen atmosphere. Our research focused on the effect of the ambient gas pressure and substrate temperature on the chemical composition, crystalline status, and optical properties of the obtained thin films. To this end, the films were studied by x-ray diffractometry Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Optical transmittance measurements were performed with a double beam spectrometer within the 400-1200 nm range. The films deposited at oxygen pressure values higher than 10 Pa and substrate temperatures above 300 deg. C consist of crystalline tungsten trioxide. Their average transmittance in the visible-infrared spectral region reaches about 85% appropriate for the envisaged applications.

  11. Application of MXCD to magnetic thin-film sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P.J.; Tobin, J.G.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1996-05-17

    While Magnetic X-ray Circular Dichroism (MXCD) has been applied extensively to the extraction of elemental magnetic moments in various magnetic multilayers, the configuration of actual devices imposes certain constraints on the application of MXCD to devices. Using a set of real, thin-film spin valve devices with varying Cu spacer layer thicknesses, we demonstrate the correlation between MXCD and R-H measurements on those devices as well as the restrictions on the interpretation of MXCD data imposed by both the device topology and the formulation of realistic error estimates.

  12. Optical porous-silicon-based sensors with chemically modified surface for detection of organic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvojka, T.; Holec, T.; Jelinek, I.; Nemec, I.; Jindrich, J.; Lorenc, M.; Koutnikova, J.; Kral, V.; Dian, Juraj

    2003-07-01

    Photoluminescence quenching response of as prepared and surface modified porous silicon sensors in presence of organic analytes in gas phase was studied. Surface modification aimed at increasing of operational stability and modification of sensoric response was performed by a hydrosilylation reaction with various organic compounds - methyl 10-undecenoate, haemin, cinchonine and quinine. These sensors were tested for a homological set of aliphatic alcohols from methanol to hexanol. We have systematically measured changes in porous silicon photoluminescence intensity as a function of concentration of detected analytes and evaluated sensitivity, detection limit and linear dynamic range of our sensors. Speed of the sensoric response was of the order of seconds. The obtained sensoric parameters were correlated with chemical and physical properties of both the compounds used for derivatization and the detected analytes.

  13. Fiber optic chemical sensors for characterizing the carbon cycle in ocean margin regions

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrandpre, M.D.; Sayles, F.L.

    1993-04-13

    The overall objective of our DOE-Ocean Margins Programs grant is to develop a pCO[sub 2] sensor for long-term monitoring of pCO[sub 2] in the ocean margins and to establish a proving ground for the development of other chemical sensors for characterizing the carbon cycle in these regions. We have succeeded in keeping with the approximate timeline outlined in the original proposal, which, for year 1 included the following objectives: Continue sensor optimization, test response characteristics (reagent and sample flow rates, temperature), introduce position sensitive photodiode and photodiode array spectrophotometers and evaluate, develop reliable and reproducible fabrication techniques, develop sensor based on preliminary studies optimized for field measurements (minimize size and power requirements), test long-term stability of the sensor in the laboratory, determine susceptibility to fouling and corrosion. This work is summarized below along with a brief review of the sensor's operating principle.

  14. Integrated optical sensor platform for multiparameter bio-chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lützow, Peter; Pergande, Daniel; Heidrich, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    There is growing demand for robust, reliable, low cost, and easy to use sensor systems that feature multiparameter analysis in many application areas ranging from safety and security to point of care and medical diagnostics. Here, we highlight the theory and show first experimental results on a novel approach targeting the realization of massively multiplexed sensor arrays. The presented sensor platform is based on arrays of frequency-modulated integrated optical microring resonators (MRR) fed by a single bus waveguide combined with lock-in detection to filter out in a reliable and simple manner their individual response to external stimuli. The working principle is exemplified on an array of four thermo-optically modulated MRR. It is shown that with this technique tracking of individual resonances is possible even in case of strong spectral overlap. PMID:21747482

  15. In-line chemical sensor deployment in a tritium plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.S.; Hope, D.T.; Torres, R.D.; Peters, B.; Tovo, L.L.

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. The use of alternative sensing and detection technologies for in-line and real-time analysis would aid process control and optimization. The TP upgrading follows a 2-phase projects. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting road-map links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. In the second phase an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box in order to provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment.

  16. Integrated optical sensor platform for multiparameter bio-chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lützow, Peter; Pergande, Daniel; Heidrich, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    There is growing demand for robust, reliable, low cost, and easy to use sensor systems that feature multiparameter analysis in many application areas ranging from safety and security to point of care and medical diagnostics. Here, we highlight the theory and show first experimental results on a novel approach targeting the realization of massively multiplexed sensor arrays. The presented sensor platform is based on arrays of frequency-modulated integrated optical microring resonators (MRR) fed by a single bus waveguide combined with lock-in detection to filter out in a reliable and simple manner their individual response to external stimuli. The working principle is exemplified on an array of four thermo-optically modulated MRR. It is shown that with this technique tracking of individual resonances is possible even in case of strong spectral overlap.

  17. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  18. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Nanorod and Thin Film Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hung-Ta; Gila, Brent P.; Lin, Jenshan; Pearton, Stepehn J.

    2006-01-01

    In this review we discuss the advances in use of GaN and ZnO-based solid-state sensors for gas sensing applications. AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) show a strong dependence of source/drain current on the piezoelectric polarization -induced two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Furthermore, spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization induced surface and interface charges can be used to develop very sensitive but robust sensors for the detection of gases. Pt-gated GaN Schottky diodes and Sc2O3/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide semiconductor diodes also show large change in forward currents upon exposure to H2 containing ambients. Of particular interest are methods for detecting ethylene (C2H4), which offers problems because of its strong double bonds and hence the difficulty in dissociating it at modest temperatures. ZnO nanorods offer large surface area, are bio-safe and offer excellent gas sensing characteristics.

  19. Chemically modified cellulose paper as a thin film microextraction phase.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Farajmand, Bahman

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, chemically modified cellulose paper was introduced as a novel extracting phase for thin film microextraction (TFME). Different reagents (Octadecyltrichlorosilane, diphenyldichlorosilane, cyclohexyl isocyanate and phenyl isocyanate) were used to modify the cellulose papers. The modified papers were evaluated as a sorbent for the extraction of some synthetic and natural estrogenic hormones (17α-ethynylestradiol, estriol and estradiol) from aqueous samples. Liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection was used for the quantification of the extracted compounds. The cellulose paper modified with phenyl isocyanate showed the best affinity to the target compounds. TEME parameters such as desorption condition, shaking rate, sample ionic strength and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Limit of detections were between 0.05 and 0.23μgL(-1) and relative standard deviations were less than 11.1% under the optimized condition. The calibration curves were obtained in the range of 0.2-100μgL(-1) with a good linearity (r(2)>0.9935). Wastewater, human urine, pool and river water samples were studied as real samples for the evaluation of the method. Relative recoveries were found to be between 75% and 101%.

  20. Chemical Kinetics, Heat Transfer, and Sensor Dynamics Revisited in a Simple Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sad, Maria E.; Sad, Mario R.; Castro, Alberto A.; Garetto, Teresita F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experiment about thermal effects in chemical reactors is described, which can be used to illustrate chemical reactor models, the determination and validation of their parameters, and some simple principles of heat transfer and sensor dynamics. It is based in the exothermic reaction between aqueous solutions of sodium thiosulfate and…