Science.gov

Sample records for film materials processes

  1. Electronic processes in thin-film PV materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.C.; Chen, D.; Chen, S.L.

    1998-07-01

    The electronic and optical processes in an important class of thin-film PV materials, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, have been investigated using several experimental techniques designed for thin-film geometries. The experimental techniques include various magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopies and combinations of these two spectroscopies. Two-step optical excitation processes through the manifold of silicon dangling bond states have been identifies as important at low excitation energies. Local hydrogen motion has been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and found to be much more rapid than long range diffusion as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. A new metastable effect has been found in a-Si:H films alloyed with sulfur. Spin-one optically excited states have been unambiguously identified using optically detected electron spin resonance. Local hydrogen bonding in microcrystalline silicon films has been studied using NMR.

  2. Thin film hydrogen sensors: A materials processing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Raviprakash

    results. Also the geometry of the resistors did not have any effect on the sensor sensitivity or response. Mass spectroscopy and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) analysis are important tools for characterizing processing plasmas. In this work, the sputter discharges were studied using energy and quadrupole mass spectrometer from Hiden. The IEDF of pulsed DC sputter discharges indicated a higher energy peak (˜65eV) and a broad distribution in addition to the low energy peak (˜5eV). The high energy peak was absent from the DC sputter discharge. This high energy peak was correlated to the pulsing of the DC source and was found to be independent of the target material.

  3. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  4. Modeling of plume dynamics in laser ablation processes for thin film deposition of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The transport dynamics of laser-ablated neutral/plasma plumes are of significant interest for film growth by pulsed-laser deposition of materials since the magnitude and kinetic energy of the species arriving at the deposition substrate are key processing parameters. Dynamical calculations of plume propagation in vacuum and in background gas have been performed using particle-in-cell hydrodynamics, continuum gas dynamics, and scattering models. Results from these calculations are presented and compared with experimental observations.

  5. Solution-Processable Organic Semiconductors and Conductors: Viable Materials for Functional Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2006-03-01

    Large-area displays based on organic materials promise low-cost fabrication, lightweight construction, mechanical flexibility and durability. To truly realize the low-cost aspects of organic electronics, however, conventional high-vacuum deposition technologies will have to be replaced by solution processing methodologies. This need has in turn driven the development of solution-processable organic semiconductors and conductors. We have focused on fabricating thin-film transistors with triethynylsilyl antradithiophene (TES ADT), a solution-processable p-type organic semiconductor. Subjecting the as-cast thin films of TES ADT to short solvent vapor annealing dramatically increases the device characteristics: we observe three orders of magnitude increase in carrier mobility and current on/off ratio, and a decrease in current hysteresis and threshold voltage. The improvement in the electrical characteristics can be directly correlated with morphological transformations during solvent vapor annealing. Our efforts in solution-processable organic conductors focus on water-dispersible polyaniline (PANI). We have fabricated bottom-contact thin-film transistors with PANI electrodes, which function as effectively as gold electrodes, when on-characteristics are concerned. Examination of the linear source-drain voltage regime suggests that PANI devices exhibit markedly less contact resistance than gold devices.

  6. Thin films for material engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Thin films are defined as two-dimensional materials formed by condensing one by one atomic/molecular/ionic species of matter in contrast to bulk three-dimensional sintered ceramics. They are grown through atomic collisional chemical reaction on a substrate surface. Thin film growth processes are fascinating for developing innovative exotic materials. On the basis of my long research on sputtering deposition, this paper firstly describes the kinetic energy effect of sputtered adatoms on thin film growth and discusses on a possibility of room-temperature growth of cubic diamond crystallites and the perovskite thin films of binary compound PbTiO3. Secondly, high-performance sputtered ferroelectric thin films with extraordinary excellent crystallinity compatible with MBE deposited thin films are described in relation to a possible application for thin-film MEMS. Finally, the present thin-film technologies are discussed in terms of a future material science and engineering.

  7. Growth of thin films of organic nonlinear optical materials by vapor growth processes - An overview and examination of shortfalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Penn, B. G.; Witherow, W. K.; Paley, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    Research on the growth of second- and third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) organic thin film by vapor deposition is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the experimental methods for growing thin films of p-chlorophenylurea, diacetylenes, and phthalocyanines; characteristics of the resulting films; and approaches for advancing thin film technology. It is concluded that the growth of NLO thin films by vapor processes is a promising method for the fabrication of planar waveguides for nonlinear optical devices. Two innovative approaches are proposed including a method of controlling the input beam frequency to maximize nonlinear effects in thin films and single crystals, and the alternate approach to the molecular design of organic NLO materials by increasing the transition dipole moment between ground and excited states of the molecule.

  8. The orientation of microdomains and the progression of shear alignment in block copolymer films: The roles of key material, film, and process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Raleigh Lloyd

    Block copolymers provide attractive templates for nanopatterning at size scales inaccessible to conventional fabrication techniques. To serve effectively for most applications, however, the need to impart well-defined orientational and/or positional order to these microdomains is paramount. Shear alignment, has the powerful ability to macroscopically align microdomains in the direction of the applied shear simply by applying a stress at the film's surface. The primary goal of this dissertation is to investigate the influence of key material, film, and process parameters on the ease and quality of alignment in sheared block copolymer films. One important parameter which influences block copolymer thin film morphology is film thickness. To probe this effect rapidly and systematically, a film casting technique known as flowcoating was utilized. Previously, the quantitative relationship between the film thickness profile and the flowcoating process parameters was unclear. We illuminate this process by comparing experimental film thicknesses with a model based on a Landau-Levich treatment; the model thus provides a design approach which allows a user to produce polymer thin films of virtually any desired thickness profile. Via flowcoating, the influence of film thickness on block copolymer thin film morphology was then investigated using a series of polystyrene-poly(n-hexyl methacrylate) (PS-PHMA) diblocks varying in composition and molecular weight. The influence of additional material, film, and process parameters was then investigated using the same series of PS-PHMAs. To quantitatively compare the alignment process across the different block copolymer films, a melting-recrystallization model was fit to the data, which allowed for the determination of two key alignment parameters: the critical stress needed for alignment, and an orientation rate constant. Collectively, these results provide useful scaling rules which enable predictions of the level of alignment which

  9. Using iridium films to compensate for piezo-electric materials processing stresses in adjustable x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, A.; Bruni, R.; Cotroneo, V.; Johnson-Wilke, R.; Kester, T.; Reid, P.; Romaine, S.; Tolier-McKinstry, S.; Wilke, R. H. T.

    2015-09-01

    Adjustable X-ray optics represent a potential enabling technology for simultaneously achieving large effective area and high angular resolution for future X-ray Astronomy missions. The adjustable optics employ a bimorph mirror composed of a thin (1.5 μm) film of piezoelectric material deposited on the back of a 0.4 mm thick conical mirror segment. The application of localized electric fields in the piezoelectric material, normal to the mirror surface, result in localized deformations in mirror shape. Thus, mirror fabrication and mounting induced figure errors can be corrected, without the need for a massive reaction structure. With this approach, though, film stresses in the piezoelectric layer, resulting from deposition, crystallization, and differences in coefficient of thermal expansion, can distort the mirror. The large relative thickness of the piezoelectric material compared to the glass means that even 100MPa stresses can result in significant distortions. We have examined compensating for the piezoelectric processing related distortions by the deposition of controlled stress chromium/iridium films on the front surface of the mirror. We describe our experiments with tuning the product of the chromium/iridium film stress and film thickness to balance that resulting from the piezoelectric layer. We also evaluated the repeatability of this deposition process, and the robustness of the iridium coating.

  10. Analysis and assessment of film materials and associated manufacturing processes for a solar sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradbury, E. J.; Jakobsen, R. J.; Sliemers, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Candidate resin manufacturers and film producers were surveyed to determine the availability of key materials and to establish the capabilities of fabricators to prepare ultrathin films of these materials within the capacity/cost/time constraints of the Halley program. Infrared spectra of three candidate samples were obtained by pressing each sample against an internal reflection crystal with the polymer sandwiched between the crystal and the metal backing. The sample size was such that less than one-fourth of the surface of the crystal was covered with the sample. This resulted in weak spectra requiring a six-fold expansion. Internal reflection spectra of the three samples were obtained using both a KRS-5 and a Ge internal reflection crystal. Subtracted infrared spectra of the three samples are presented.

  11. Process for forming planarized films

    DOEpatents

    Pang, Stella W.; Horn, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    A planarization process and apparatus which employs plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to form plarnarization films of dielectric or conductive carbonaceous material on step-like substrates.

  12. Alternate film dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C. . Neutron Devices Dept.); Harris, J.O.; Martinez, J.I. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents data on polymeric dielectric films evaluated to support the design of high-energy-density capacitors. Evaluated materials include polycarbonate (two sources), polyphenylene sulfide, polyvinylidene fluoride, polyethermide (three sources), polyimide (four sources), polyethersulfone, and polyetherether ketone. A polyester was evaluated as the control material since many of our prior designs utilized this dielectric. The film evaluations were based on dielectric constant and dissipation factor variation as a function of temperature from {minus}55{degree}C to 300{degree}C, as well as dielectric breakdown strength. Additionally, film/foil capacitors in a dry, wrap-and-fill configuration were fabricated and tested to determine insulation resistance, breakdown voltage, and radiation hardness. Results will be presented for all the evaluations based on the several criteria. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Processing Film, Processing Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkowski, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents are at a ripe age to make meaning and think abstractly (Kerlavage, 1998); yet, they are not "born knowing how to get ideas into materials, or how materials can be manipulated to shape ideas and meaning" (Burton, 2012, p. 14). Adolescents need guidance in understanding abstract concepts, and art teachers play an important role…

  14. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  15. Superconducting materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, John S.; Karikari, Emmanuel K.; Hiamang, S. O.; Danjaji, M.; Bassey, Affiong; Morgan, Andre

    1995-01-01

    The effects of materials processing on the properties and behavior of high temperature yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconductors were investigated. Electrical, magnetic, and structural characteristics of thin films (300 nm) YBA2CU3O(delta) structures grown by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates were used to evaluate processing. Pole projection and thin film diffraction measurements were used to establish grain orientation and verify structural integrity of the samples. Susceptibility magnetization, and transport measurements were used to evaluate the magnetic and electrical transport properties of the samples. Our results verified that an unfortunate consequence of processing is inherent changes to the internal structure of the material. This effect translates into modifications in the properties of the materials, and undesired feature that makes it very difficult to consistently predict material behavior. The results show that processing evaluation must incorporate a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the materials. Future studies will emphasize microstructural characteristics of the materials, in particular, those microscopic properties that map macroscopic behavior.

  16. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  17. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  18. Thin film interconnect processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Farid

    Interconnects and associated photolithography and etching processes play a dominant role in the feature shrinkage of electronic devices. Most interconnects are fabricated by use of thin film processing techniques. Planarization of dielectrics and novel metal deposition methods are the focus of current investigations. Spin-on glass, polyimides, etch-back, bias-sputtered quartz, and plasma-enhanced conformal films are being used to obtain planarized dielectrics over which metal films can be reliably deposited. Recent trends have been towards chemical vapor depositions of metals and refractory metal silicides. Interconnects of the future will be used in conjunction with planarized dielectric layers. Reliability of devices will depend to a large extent on the quality of the interconnects.

  19. Film stacking architecture for immersion lithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Miyagi, Tadashi; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Tamada, Osamu; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary due to film peeling. However, the architecture will restrict lithographic area within a wafer due to top side EBR accuracy In this paper, we report an effective film stacking architecture that also allows maximum lithographic area. This study used a new bevel rinse system on RF3 for all materials to make suitable film stacking on the top side bevel. This evaluation showed that the new bevel rinse system allows the maximum lithographic area and a clean wafer edge. Patterning defects were improved with suitable film stacking.

  20. Alternate capacitor dielectric film materials

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C.

    1990-08-01

    New high-temperature, high-energy density, and high-radiation tolerant capacitor applications require the evaluation of alternate dielectric materials. Evaluation work was performed at GE Neutron Devices (GEND) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque. US Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for capacitor function and environments are unique, and the representations included in this report do not constitute an endorsement of any material or manufacturer. This report presents data on polymeric dielectric films evaluated to support the design of new high-energy density capacitors. Materials which were evaluated include polycarbonate (two sources), polyphenylene sulfide, polyvinylidene fluoride, polyetherimide (three sources), polyimide (four sources), polyethersulfone, and polyetherether ketone. A polyester was evaluated as the control material since many prior designs utilized this dielectric. The film evaluations were based on dielectric constant and dissipation factor variation as a function of temperature ({minus}55{degree}C to 300{degree}C) as well as dielectric breakdown strength. Additionally, film/foil capacitors in a dry wrap-and-fill configuration were fabricated and tested to determine insulation resistance, breakdown voltage, and radiation hardness. Results are given for all evaluations. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Microscale damping using thin film active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrigan, Catherine A.; Ho, Ken K.; Mohanchandra, K. P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2007-04-01

    This paper focuses on understanding and developing a new approach to dampen MEMS structures using both experiments and analytical techniques. Thin film Nitinol and thin film Terfenol-D are evaluated as a damping solution to the micro scale damping problem. Stress induced twin boundary motion in Nitinol is used to passively dampen potentially damaging vibrations. Magnetic domain wall motion is used to passively dampen vibration in Terfenol-D. The thin films of Nitinol, Nitinol/Silicon laminates and Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminates have been produced using a sputter deposition process and damping properties have been evaluated. Dynamic testing shows substantial damping (tan δ) measurable in each case. Nitinol film samples were tested in the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to determine phase transformation temperatures. The twin boundary mechanism by which energy absorption occurs is present at all points below the Austenite start temperature (approximately 69°C in our film) and therefore allows damping at cold temperatures where traditional materials fail. Thin film in the NiTi/Si laminate was found to produce substantially higher damping (tan δ = 0.28) due to the change in loading condition. The NiTi/Si laminate sample was tested in bending allowing the twin boundaries to be reset by cyclic tensile and compressive loads. The thin film Terfenol-D in the Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminate was shown to produce large damping (tan δ = 0.2). In addition to fabricating and testing, an analytical model of a heterogeneous layered thin film damping material was developed and compared to experimental work.

  2. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Hirth, John P.

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  3. Telerobotic electronic materials processing experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, Stanford

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Commercial Programs (OCP), working in conjunction with NASA engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center, is supporting research efforts in robot technology and microelectronics materials processing that will provide many spinoffs for science and industry. The Telerobotic Materials Processing Experiment (TRMPX) is a Shuttle-launched materials processing test payload using a Get Away Special can. The objectives of the project are to define, develop, and demonstrate an automated materials processing capability under realistic flight conditions. TRMPX will provide the capability to test the production processes that are dependent on microgravity. The processes proposed for testing include the annealing of amorphous silicon to increase grain size for more efficient solar cells, thin film deposition to demonstrate the potential of fabricating solar cells in orbit, and the annealing of radiation damaged solar cells.

  4. Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heberlein, Joachim, V.R.; Pfender, Emil; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2005-02-28

    Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials The project had the overall objective of improving our understanding of the influences of process parameters on the properties of advanced superhard materials. The focus was on high rate deposition processes using thermal plasmas and atmospheric pressure glow discharges, and the emphasis on superhard materials was chosen because of the potential impact of such materials on industrial energy use and on the environment. In addition, the development of suitable diagnostic techniques was pursued. The project was divided into four tasks: (1) Deposition of superhard boron containing films using a supersonic plasma jet reactor (SPJR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (2) Deposition of superhard nanocomposite films in the silicon-nitrogen-carbon system using the triple torch plasma reactor (TTPR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (3) Deposition of films consisting of carbon nanotubes using an atmospheric pressure glow discharge reactor. (4) Adapting the Thomson scattering method for characterization of atmospheric pressure non-uniform plasmas with steep spatial gradients and temporal fluctuations. This report summarizes the results.

  5. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility and possible advantages of processing materials in a nongravitational field are considered. Areas of investigation include biomedical applications, the processing of inorganic materials, and flight programs and funding.

  6. Magnetic cassette for radiographic film material

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas, D.

    1985-03-26

    A radiographic film cassette having a plurality of magnet components integral with the cassette holder for adhering the cassette to ferrous material in X-raying for defects in welds or fissures in shipyards, pipe lines, or the like. What is provided is a substantially flexible cassette envelope comprising first and second layers of radiographic intensifying screens with a sheet of radiographic film positioned therebetween. The cassette would be a cassette envelope constructed of waterproof fabric or other suitable material providing a light-free environment, and having the ability to flex around the curvature of the surface of a pipe or the like to be x-rayed. There is further provided a plurality of magnet components, preferably situated in each corner of the cassette envelope and flexibly attached thereto for overall adherence of the envelope to the surface of the pipe or the like to be x-rayed during the process.

  7. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  8. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1992-10-01

    Results of Phase II of a research program on polycrystalline thin film heterojunction solar cells are presented. Relations between processing, materials properties and device performance were studied. The analysis of these solar cells explains how minority carrier recombination at the interface and at grain boundaries can be reduced by doping of windows and absorber layers, such as in high efficiency CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} based solar cells. The additional geometric dimension introduced by the polycrystallinity must be taken into consideration. The solar cells are limited by the diode current, caused by recombination in the space charge region. J-V characteristics of CuInSe{sub 2}/(CdZn)S cells were analyzed. Current-voltage and spectral response measurements were also made on high efficiency CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells prepared by vacuum evaporation. Cu-In bilayers were reacted with Se and H{sub 2}Se gas to form CuInSe{sub 2} films; the reaction pathways and the precursor were studied. Several approaches to fabrication of these thin film solar cells in a superstrate configuration were explored. A self-consistent picture of the effects of processing on the evolution of CdTe cells was developed.

  9. Effect of Process Temperature and Reaction Cycle Number on Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 Thin Films Using TiCl4 and H2O Precursors: Correlation Between Material Properties and Process Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappim, W.; Testoni, G. E.; de Lima, J. S. B.; Medeiros, H. S.; Pessoa, Rodrigo Sávio; Grigorov, K. G.; Vieira, L.; Maciel, H. S.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of process temperature and reaction cycle number on atomic layer-deposited TiO2 thin films onto Si(100) using TiCl4 and H2O precursors was investigated in order to discuss the correlation between the growth per cycle (GPC), film structure (crystallinity), and surface roughness as well as the dependence of some of these properties with gas phase environment such as HCl by-product. In this work, these correlations were studied for two conditions: (i) process temperatures in the range of 100-500 °C during 1000 reaction cycles and (ii) number of cycles in the range of 100-2000 for a fixed temperature of 250 °C. To investigate the material properties, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used. Mass spectrometry technique was used to investigate the time evolution of gas phase species HCl and H2O during ALD process. Results indicate that the GPC does not correlate well with film crystallinity and surface roughness for the evaluated process parameters. Basically, the film crystallinity relies solely on grain growth kinetics of the material. This occurs due to higher HCl by-product content during each purge step. Furthermore, for films deposited at variable cycle number, the evolution of film thickness and elemental composition is altered from an initial amorphous structure to a near stoichiometric TiO2-x and, subsequently, becomes fully stoichiometric TiO2 at 400 cycles or above. At this cycle value, the GIXRD spectrum indicates the formation of (101) anatase orientation.

  10. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels,more » 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.« less

  11. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, R. D.; Criswell, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Processing-refining of raw materials from extraterrestrial sources is detailed for a space materials handling facility. The discussion is constrained to those steps necessary to separate desired components from raw or altered input ores, semi-purified feedstocks, or process scrap and convert the material into elements, alloys, and consumables. The materials are regarded as originating from dead satellites and boosters, lunar materials, and asteroids. Strong attention will be given to recycling reagent substances to avoid the necessity of transporting replacements. It is assumed that since no aqueous processes exist on the moon, the distribution of minerals will be homogeneous. The processing-refining scenario will include hydrochemical, pyrochemical, electrochemical, and physical techniques selected for the output mass rate/unit plant mass ratio. Flow charts of the various materials processing operations which could be performed with lunar materials are provided, noting the necessity of delivering several alloying elements from the earth due to scarcities on the moon.

  12. New materials for thick-film electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffheins, B. S.; Lauf, R. J.

    1990-08-01

    Certain ceramic compounds such as rare-earth perovskites and transition-metal diborides that exhibit metallic conductivity are readily available or can be easily synthesized. Some are stable in air firing temperatures typical of hybrid-circuit processing. The work described is part of an exploratory program to determine whether these materials can be used as low-cost alternatives to precious metals for thick-film conductor and low-resistor inks or as substitutes for copper in nitrogen-fireable compositions.

  13. Preface: Thin films of molecular organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraxedas, J.

    2008-03-01

    /substrate systems (also called heterostructures) based on the physical properties of the bulk materials, usually in the form of single crystals. However, in recent years the thin films community has been continually growing, helping the field to mature. In my opinion two main aspects have advanced the thin molecular films field. The first is the different applications with optical and electrical devices such as OFETs (organic field-effect transistors) and OLEDs (organic light emitting diodes), applications that could not have been achieved with single crystals because of limited size, difficult processability and mechanical fragility. The second is the involvement of the surface science community with their overwhelming arsenal of experimental techniques. From the synthesis point of view, the preparation of thin films is being regarded as a complementary synthesis route. The different externally accessible variables involved in the preparation process (temperature, pressure, molecular flux, distance, time, concentration, solvent, substrate, etc.), which define the so-called parameter hyperspace, can be so diverse when comparing competing synthesis routes (e.g. solution versus vapour growth) that we should not be surprised if different crystallographic phases with different morphologies are obtained, even if metastable. We should not forget here that the amazingly large number of available molecules is due to the longstanding and innovative work of synthesis chemists, a task that has not been sufficiently recognized (laymen in the domain of synthesis of organic molecules tend to believe that almost any molecule can be synthesized). In summary, one of the goals of this issue is to highlight the emerging importance of the field of thin molecular organic films by giving selected examples. It is clear that some important examples are missing, which are due in part to space limitation and to the understandable reluctance of highly-ranked specialists to contribute because of work overload

  14. Thin film dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Gibbons, Brady J.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Park, Bae Ho

    2002-01-01

    A dielectric composite material comprising at least two crystal phases of different components with TiO.sub.2 as a first component and a material selected from the group consisting of Ba.sub.1-x Sr.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.3 to 0.7, Pb.sub.1-x Ca.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.4 to 0.7, Sr.sub.1-x Pb.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, Ba.sub.1-x Cd.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.02 to 0.1, BaTi.sub.1-x Zr.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Sn.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.15 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Hf.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.24 to 0.3, Pb.sub.1-1.3x La.sub.x TiO.sub.3+0.2x where x is from 0.23 to 0.3, (BaTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFeo.sub.0.5 Nb.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.75 to 0.9, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.- (PbCo.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.1 to 0.45, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbMg.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, and (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFe.sub.0.5 Ta.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0 to 0.2, as the second component is described. The dielectric composite material can be formed as a thin film upon suitable substrates.

  15. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B. C., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    Femtosecond lasers enable materials processing of most any material with extremely high precision and negligible shock or thermal loading to the surrounding area Applications ranging from drilling teeth to cutting explosives to making high-aspect ratio cuts in metals with no heat-affected zone are made possible by this technology For material removal at reasonable rates, we developed a fully computer-controlled 15-Watt average power, 100-fs laser machining system.

  16. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B

    1998-08-05

    Femtosecond lasers enable materials processing of most any material with extremely high precision and negligible shock or thermal loading to the surrounding area. Applications ranging from drilling teeth to cutting explosives to precision cuts in composites are possible by using this technology. For material removal at reasonable rates, we have developed a fully computer-controlled 15-Watt average power, 100-fs laser machining system.

  17. Extraterrestrial materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    The first year results of a multi-year study of processing extraterrestrial materials for use in space are summarized. Theoretically, there are potential major advantages to be derived from the use of such materials for future space endeavors. The types of known or postulated starting raw materials are described including silicate-rich mixed oxides on the Moon, some asteroids and Mars; free metals in some asteroids and in small quantities in the lunar soil; and probably volatiles like water and CO2 on Mars and some asteroids. Candidate processes for space materials are likely to be significantly different from their terrestrial counterparts largely because of: absence of atmosphere; lack of of readily available working fluids; low- or micro-gravity; no carbon-based fuels; readily available solar energy; and severe constraints on manned intervention. The extraction of metals and oxygen from lunar material by magma electrolysis or by vapor/ion phase separation appears practical.

  18. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  19. Synthesis of ultra-nano-carbon composite materials with extremely high conductivity by plasma post-treatment process of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Manoharan, Divinah; Chang, Hsin-Tzer; Lin, I-Nan

    2015-08-24

    Needle-like diamond grains encased in nano-graphitic layers are an ideal granular structure of diamond films to achieve high conductivity and superior electron field emission (EFE) properties. This paper describes the plasma post-treatment (ppt) of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films at low substrate temperature to achieve such a unique granular structure. The CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma ppt-processed films exhibit high conductivity of σ = 1099 S/cm as well as excellent EFE properties with turn-on field of E{sub 0} = 2.48 V/μm (J{sub e} = 1.0 mA/cm{sup 2} at 6.5 V/μm). The ppt of UNCD film is simple and robust process that is especially useful for device applications.

  20. Synthesis of ultra-nano-carbon composite materials with extremely high conductivity by plasma post-treatment process of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Jui; Manoharan, Divinah; Chang, Hsin-Tzer; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2015-08-01

    Needle-like diamond grains encased in nano-graphitic layers are an ideal granular structure of diamond films to achieve high conductivity and superior electron field emission (EFE) properties. This paper describes the plasma post-treatment (ppt) of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films at low substrate temperature to achieve such a unique granular structure. The CH4/N2 plasma ppt-processed films exhibit high conductivity of σ = 1099 S/cm as well as excellent EFE properties with turn-on field of E0 = 2.48 V/μm (Je = 1.0 mA/cm2 at 6.5 V/μm). The ppt of UNCD film is simple and robust process that is especially useful for device applications.

  1. Deposition of thin films of multicomponent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Composite films of multicomponent materials, such as oxides and nitrides, e.g., lead zirconate titanate, are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, employing a rotating substrate holder, which rotates relative to a plurality of targets, one target for each metal element of the multicomponent material. The sputtering is carried out in a reactive atmosphere. The substrates on which the layers are deposited are at ambient temperature. Following deposition of the composite film, the film is heated to a temperature sufficient to initiate a solid state reaction and form the final product, which is substantially single phase and substantially homogeneous.

  2. Thin film thermocouples for high temperature measurement on ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high-heating-rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  3. Lasers in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.I.; Rockower, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A status report on the uranium Laser Isotope Separation (LIS) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented. Prior to this status report, process economic analysis is presented so as to understand how the unique properties of laser photons can be best utilized in the production of materials and components despite the high cost of laser energy. The characteristics of potential applications that are necessary for success are identified, and those factors that have up to now frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser induced chemical and physical process for the production of new or existing materials are pointed out.

  4. Film/Adhesive Processing Module for Fiber-Placement Processing of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulcher, A. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    An automated apparatus has been designed and constructed that enables the automated lay-up of composite structures incorporating films, foils, and adhesives during the automated fiber-placement process. This apparatus, denoted a film module, could be used to deposit materials in film or thin sheet form either simultaneously when laying down the fiber composite article or in an independent step.

  5. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qingyou

    2015-08-01

    Irradiation of high-energy ultrasonic vibration in metals and alloys generates oscillating strain and stress fields in solids, and introduces nonlinear effects such as cavitation, acoustic streaming, and radiation pressure in molten materials. These nonlinear effects can be utilized to assist conventional material processing processes. This article describes recent research at Oak Ridge National Labs and Purdue University on using high-intensity ultrasonic vibrations for degassing molten aluminum, processing particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites, refining metals and alloys during solidification process and welding, and producing bulk nanostructures in solid metals and alloys. Research results suggest that high-intensity ultrasonic vibration is capable of degassing and dispersing small particles in molten alloys, reducing grain size during alloy solidification, and inducing nanostructures in solid metals.

  6. Silicon film solar cell process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. B.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The most promising way to reduce the cost of silicon in solar cells while still maintaining performance is to utilize thin films (10 to 20 microns thick) of crystalline silicon. The method of solution growth is being employed to grow thin polycrystalline films of silicon on dissimilar substrates. The initial results indicate that, using tin as the solvent, this growth process only requires operating temperatures in the range of 800 C to 1000 C. Growth rates in the range of 0.4 to 2.0 microns per minute and grain sizes in the range of 20 to 100 microns were achieved on both quartz and coated steel substrates. Typically, an aspect ratio of two to three between the width and the Si grain thickness is seen. Uniform coverage of Si growth on quartz over a 2.5 x 2.5 cm area was observed.

  7. Solution-processed silicon films and transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Tatsuya; Matsuki, Yasuo; Furusawa, Masahiro; Aoki, Takashi; Yudasaka, Ichio; Tanaka, Hideki; Iwasawa, Haruo; Wang, Daohai; Miyasaka, Masami; Takeuchi, Yasumasa

    2006-04-01

    The use of solution processes-as opposed to conventional vacuum processes and vapour-phase deposition-for the fabrication of electronic devices has received considerable attention for a wide range of applications, with a view to reducing processing costs. In particular, the ability to print semiconductor devices using liquid-phase materials could prove essential for some envisaged applications, such as large-area flexible displays. Recent research in this area has largely been focused on organic semiconductors, some of which have mobilities comparable to that of amorphous silicon (a-Si); but issues of reliability remain. Solution processing of metal chalcogenide semiconductors to fabricate stable and high-performance transistors has also been reported. This class of materials is being explored as a possible substitute for silicon, given the complex and expensive manufacturing processes required to fabricate devices from the latter. However, if high-quality silicon films could be prepared by a solution process, this situation might change drastically. Here we demonstrate the solution processing of silicon thin-film transistors (TFTs) using a silane-based liquid precursor. Using this precursor, we have prepared polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films by both spin-coating and ink-jet printing, from which we fabricate TFTs with mobilities of 108cm2V-1s-1 and 6.5cm2V-1s-1, respectively. Although the processing conditions have yet to be optimized, these mobilities are already greater than those that have been achieved in solution-processed organic TFTs, and they exceed those of a-Si TFTs (<= 1cm2V-1s-1).

  8. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.

    1997-02-01

    The use femtosecond pulses for materials processing results in very precise cutting and drilling with high efficiency. Energy deposited in the electrons is not coupled into the bulk during the pulse, resulting in negligible shock or thermal loading to adjacent areas.

  9. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  10. Processing Materials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested program of material processing experiments in space described in 81 page report. For each experiment, report discusses influence of such gravitational effects as convection, buoyancy, sedimentation, and hydrostatic pressure. Report contains estimates of power and mission duration required for each experiment. Lists necessary equipment and appropriate spacecraft.

  11. Materials and Processes Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.; And Others

    This instructional resource guide is intended to assist the industrial arts (IA) teacher in implementing a comprehensive materials and Processes Technology program at the technical level in Virginia high schools. The course is designed to help students make informed educational and occupational choices and prepare them for advanced technical or…

  12. Released Textbooks, Films and Other Teaching Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    Some course and curriculum improvement projects funded by the National Science Foundation have produced definitive editions of textbooks, other printed materials, and instructional films. This bulletin lists materials available in 1968 through commercial or college and university sources. The publications include textbooks, laboratory guides,…

  13. Surface engineering of glazing materials and structures using plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Monteiro, Othon R.

    2003-04-10

    A variety of coatings is commercially produced on a very large scale, including transparent conducting oxides and multi-layer silver-based low-emissivity and solar control coatings. A very brief review of materials and manufacturing process is presented and illustrated by ultrathin silver films and chevron copper films. Understanding the close relation between manufacturing processes and bulk and surface properties of materials is crucial for film growth and self-assembly processes.

  14. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  15. Lunar materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper surveys current information, describes some important unknowns about lunar materials, and discusses ways to gain more scientific and engineering knowledge concerning the industrial processes that could be used on the moon for the production of products useful in future enterprises in space. Lunar rocks and soils are rich in oxygen, but it is mostly chemically bound in silicates, so that chemical or thermal energy must be supplied to recover it. Iron and titanium are abundant and, in some of their known forms, readily recoverable; aluminum is plentiful but harder to extract. Methods for recovering lunar oxygen and metals fall into three classes: chemical, electrolytic, and dissociative, broadly characterized by their respective process temperatures. Examples of these methods are briefly discussed.

  16. Color Imaging management in film processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremeau, Alain; Konik, Hubert; Colantoni, Philippe

    2003-12-01

    The latest research projects in the laboratory LIGIV concerns capture, processing, archiving and display of color images considering the trichromatic nature of the Human Vision System (HSV). Among these projects one addresses digital cinematographic film sequences of high resolution and dynamic range. This project aims to optimize the use of content for the post-production operators and for the end user. The studies presented in this paper address the use of metadata to optimise the consumption of video content on a device of user's choice independent of the nature of the equipment that captured the content. Optimising consumption includes enhancing the quality of image reconstruction on a display. Another part of this project addresses the content-based adaptation of image display. Main focus is on Regions of Interest (ROI) operations, based on the ROI concepts of MPEG-7. The aim of this second part is to characterize and ensure the conditions of display even if display device or display media changes. This requires firstly the definition of a reference color space and the definition of bi-directional color transformations for each peripheral device (camera, display, film recorder, etc.). The complicating factor is that different devices have different color gamuts, depending on the chromaticity of their primaries and the ambient illumination under which they are viewed. To match the displayed image to the aimed appearance, all kind of production metadata (camera specification, camera colour primaries, lighting conditions) should be associated to the film material. Metadata and content build together rich content. The author is assumed to specify conditions as known from digital graphics arts. To control image pre-processing and image post-processing, these specifications should be contained in the film's metadata. The specifications are related to the ICC profiles but need additionally consider mesopic viewing conditions.

  17. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Anderson, Mark T.; Ganguli, Rahul; Lu, Yunfeng

    1999-01-01

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films film with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts.

  18. Physical Properties of Thin Film Semiconducting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, N.; Djebbouri, M.; Outemzabet, R.; Sali, S.; Zerrouki, H.; Zouaoui, A.; Kesri, N.

    2005-10-01

    The physics and chemistry of semiconducting materials is a continuous question of debate. We can find a large stock of well-known properties but at the same time, many things are not understood. In recent years, porous silicon (PS-Si), diselenide of copper and indium (CuInSe2 or CIS) and metal oxide semiconductors like tin oxide (SnO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been subjected to extensive studies because of the rising interest their potential applications in fields such as electronic components, solar panels, catalysis, gas sensors, in biocompatible materials, in Li-based batteries, in new generation of MOSFETS. Bulk structure and surface and interface properties play important roles in all of these applications. A deeper understanding of these fundamental properties would impact largely on technological application performances. In our laboratory, thin films of undoped and antimony-doped films of tin oxide have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition. Spray pyrolysis was used for ZnO. CIS was prepared by flash evaporation or close-space vapor transport. Some of the deposition parameters have been varied, such as substrate temperature, time of deposition (or anodization), and molar concentration of bath preparation. For some samples, thermal annealing was carried out under oxygen (or air), under nitrogen gas and under vacuum. Deposition and post-deposition parameters are known to strongly influence film structure and electrical resistivity. We investigated the influence of film thickness and thermal annealing on structural optical and electrical properties of the films. Examination of SnO2 by x-ray diffraction showed that the main films are polycrystalline with rutile structure. The x-ray spectra of ZnO indicated a hexagonal wurtzite structure. Characterizations of CIS films with compositional analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning microscopy, spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence were carried out.

  19. Processing and characterization of extruded zein-based biodegradable films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    The objectives of this study were to prepare biodegradable zein films by extrusion processing and to evaluate relevant physical properties of resulting films with respect to their potential as packaging materials. The manufacture of protein-based packaging films by extrusion has remained a challenge. In this study, a zein resin was prepared by combining zein and oleic acid. This resin was formed into films by blown extrusion at the bench-top scale. Resin moisture content and extruder barrel temperature profile were identified as major parameters controlling the process. The optimum temperature of the blowing head was determined to be 40--45°C, while optimum moisture at film collection was 14--15%. Physico-chemical properties of the extruded products were characterized. Extruded products exhibited plastic behavior and ductility. Morphology characterization by SEM showed micro voids in extruded zein sheets, caused by entrapped air bubbles or water droplets. DSC characterization showed that zein was effectively plasticized by oleic acid as evidenced by the lowered glass transition temperature of zein films. X-ray scattering was used to investigate changes in zein molecular aggregation during processing. It was observed that higher mechanical energy treatment progressively disrupted zein molecular aggregates, resulting in a more uniform distribution of individual zein molecules. With the incorporation of oleic acid as plasticizer and monoglycerides as emulsifier, zein formed structures with long-range periodicity which varied depending on the formulation and processing methods. Processing methods for film formation affected the binding of oleic acid to zein with higher mechanical energy treatment resulting in better interaction between the two components. The moisture sorption capacity of extruded zein films was reduced due to the compact morphology caused by extrusion. Plasticization with oleic acid further reduced moisture sorption of zein films. The overall

  20. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, B. N.; Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Shafarman, W. N.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.

    1991-11-01

    Results and conclusions of Phase 1 of a multi-year research program on polycrystalline thin film solar cells are presented. The research comprised investigation of the relationships among processing, materials properties and device performance of both CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells. The kinetics of the formation of CuInSe2 by selenization with hydrogen selenide was investigated and a CuInSe2/Cds solar cell was fabricated. An alternative process involving the reaction of deposited copper-indium-selenium layers was used to obtain single phase CuInSe2 films and a cell efficiency of 7 percent. Detailed investigations of the open circuit voltage of CuInSe2 solar cells showed that a simple Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanism can not account for the limitations in open circuit voltage. Examination of the influence of CuInSe2 thickness on cell performance indicated that the back contact behavior has a significant effect when the CuInSe2 is less than 1 micron thick. CdTe/CdS solar cells with efficiencies approaching 10 percent can be repeatedly fabricated using physical vapor deposition and serial post deposition processing. The absence of moisture during post deposition was found to be critical. Improvements in short circuit current of CdTe solar cells to levels approaching 25 mA/cm(exp 2) are achievable by making the CdS window layer thinner. Further reductions in the CdS window layer thickness are presently limited by interdiffusion between the CdS and the CdTe. CdTe/CdS cells stored without protection from the atmosphere were found to degrade. The degradation was attributed to the metal contact. CdTe cells with ZnTe:Cu contacts to the CdTe were found to be more stable than cells with metal contacts. Analysis of current-voltage and spectral response of CdTe/CdS cells indicates the cell operates as a p-n heterojunction with the diode current dominated by SRH recombination in the junction region of the CdTe.

  1. Thermoplastic processing of proteins for film formation--a review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Izquierdo, V M; Krochta, J M

    2008-03-01

    Increasing interest in high-quality food products with increased shelf life and reduced environmental impact has encouraged the study and development of edible and/or biodegradable polymer films and coatings. Edible films provide the opportunity to effectively control mass transfer among different components in a food or between the food and its surrounding environment. The diversity of proteins that results from an almost limitless number of side-chain amino-acid sequential arrangements allows for a wide range of interactions and chemical reactions to take place as proteins denature and cross-link during heat processing. Proteins such as wheat gluten, corn zein, soy protein, myofibrillar proteins, and whey proteins have been successfully formed into films using thermoplastic processes such as compression molding and extrusion. Thermoplastic processing can result in a highly efficient manufacturing method with commercial potential for large-scale production of edible films due to the low moisture levels, high temperatures, and short times used. Addition of water, glycerol, sorbitol, sucrose, and other plasticizers allows the proteins to undergo the glass transition and facilitates deformation and processability without thermal degradation. Target film variables, important in predicting biopackage performance under various conditions, include mechanical, thermal, barrier, and microstructural properties. Comparisons of film properties should be made with care since results depend on parameters such as film-forming materials, film formulation, fabrication method, operating conditions, testing equipment, and testing conditions. Film applications include their use as wraps, pouches, bags, casings, and sachets to protect foods, reduce waste, and improve package recyclability.

  2. Fundamental Materials Research and Advanced Process Development for Thin-Film CIS-Based Photovoltaics: Final Technical Report, 2 October 2001 - 30 September 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T. J.; Li, S. S.; Crisalle, O. D.; Craciun, V.

    2006-09-01

    The objectives for this thin-film copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) solar cell project cover the following areas: Develop and characterize buffer layers for CIS-based solar cell; grow and characterize chemical-bath deposition of Znx Cd1-xS buffer layers grown on CIGS absorbers; study effects of buffer-layer processing on CIGS thin films characterized by the dual-beam optical modulation technique; grow epitaxial CuInSe2 at high temperature; study the defect structure of CGS by photoluminescence spectroscopy; investigate deep-level defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by deep-level transient spectroscopy; conduct thermodynamic modeling of the isothermal 500 C section of the Cu-In-Se system using a defect model; form alpha-CuInSe2 by rapid thermal processing of a stacked binary compound bilayer; investigate pulsed non-melt laser annealing on the film properties and performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells; and conduct device modeling and simulation of CIGS solar cells.

  3. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C.J.; Anderson, M.T.; Ganguli, R.; Lu, Y.F.

    1999-01-12

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts. 12 figs.

  4. Dynamic Characterization of Thin Film Magnetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wei

    A broadband dynamic method for characterizing thin film magnetic material is presented. The method is designed to extract the permeability and linewidth of thin magnetic films from measuring the reflection coefficient (S11) of a house-made and short-circuited strip line testing fixture with or without samples loaded. An adaptive de-embedding method is applied to remove the parasitic noise of the housing. The measurements were carried out with frequency up to 10GHz and biasing magnetic fields up to 600 Gauss. Particular measurement setup and 3-step experimental procedures are described in detail. The complex permeability of a 330nm thick continuous FeGaB, 435nm thick laminated FeGaB film and a 100nm thick NiFe film will be induced dynamically in frequency-biasing magnetic field spectra and compared with a theoretical model based on Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations and eddy current theories. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) phenomenon can be observed among these three magnetic materials investigated in this thesis.

  5. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  6. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  7. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Watkin, David C.; Walton, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  8. Thick-film materials for silicon photovoltaic cell manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    Thick film technology is applicable to three areas of silicon solar cell fabrication; metallization, junction formation, and coating for protection of screened ohmic contacts, particularly wrap around contacts, interconnection and environmental protection. Both material and process parameters were investigated. Printed ohmic contacts on n- and p-type silicon are very sensitive to the processing parameters of firing time, temperature, and atmosphere. Wrap around contacts are easily achieved by first printing and firing a dielectric over the edge and subsequently applying a low firing temperature conductor. Interconnection of cells into arrays can be achieved by printing and cofiring thick film metal pastes, soldering, or with heat curing conductive epoxies on low cost substrates. Printed (thick) film vitreous protection coatings do not yet offer sufficient optical uniformity and transparency for use on silicon. A sprayed, heat curable SiO2 based resin shows promise of providing both optical matching and environmental protection.

  9. Processing and post-processing issues related to polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chad David

    1998-12-01

    In Chapter 1, the effect of heat sealing variables on seal strength of a linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) was examined. Blown films were heat sealed for various times and temperatures so that the films ranged from partially to fully melted. A temperature of 115sp°C or higher was required to form a good seal and was related to the heterogeneous composition of the LLDPE studied. At 115sp°C, the lower molecular weight, more highly branched chains easily diffused across the interface. However, because these chains represented a small fraction of the crystallinity and the molecular weight was low, they contributed much less than the full peel strength. Conversely, chains with less branching represented the main fraction of crystallinity (anchors for tie chains) and the highest molecular weights (more entanglements). Only at temperatures where the higher molecular weight, less branched chains began to melt and diffuse across the interface could high peel strengths be achieved. In Chapter 2, a novel coextrusion process used to create microlayered hierarchically structured films is described. With this technology, two or three polymers can be multiplied into tens or thousands of alternating layers. This unique coextrusion process can be used to combine polymers of widely dissimilar solid state morphologies and properties into unique layered and gradient structures. In addition, the effect of the viscosity ratio of the component materials and the effect of the layer multiplier geometry on the layer structure and uniformity was investigated. In Chapter 3, the development of a breathable film produced by the microlayer process is described. Two systems were produced: one with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and CaCOsb3-filled LLDPE and the other with PEO and CaCOsb3-filled polypropylene. The water vapor transport (WVT) behavior of these films was measured and related to the tortuousity of the path through the PEO and filled polyolefin domains. PEO is water soluble and has

  10. Processing-structure-properties relationships in PLA nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Garofalo, E.; Galdi, M. R.; D'Arienzo, L.; Incarnato, L.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals on the possibility to improve performances of PLA-based nanocomposite films, for packaging applications, through conveniently tuning materials and processing conditions in melt compounding technology. In particular, two types of polylactic acid and different types of filler selected from montmorillonites and bentonites families were used to prepare the hybrid systems by using a twin-screw extruder. The effect of biaxial drawing on morphology and properties of the nanocomposites, produced by film blowing, was investigated.

  11. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    SciTech Connect

    Bharacharya, R.; Parilla, P.A.; Blaugher, R.D.

    1995-12-19

    A process is disclosed for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material. 3 figs.

  12. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    SciTech Connect

    Bharacharya, Raghuthan; Parilla, Philip A.; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material.

  13. Process compilation methods for thin film devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Mohammed Hasanuz

    process flows for thin film devices from schematics of their structures. The algorithms also include the capability of grading the process flows based on the expected device yield and some empirical factors. The MISTIC software uses a lab-specific database of process recipes and materials to produce process flows for a specific set of laboratory resources and process statistics that help to choose the most suitable process flow in a comparative manner. Currently the process compiler consists of five modules, viz., the graphical device editor, the database and the database editor, the compiler, and the process viewer constituting a complete design environment. The program has been implemented with approximately 213,800 lines of C code that utilize the X11/Motif library. The compiler in its current version accepts devices with Manhattan-like geometries over a multiplicity of one dimensional slices of the device, hence all calculations are inherently one-dimensional in nature. The compilation procedure has been successfully tested with several conventional integrated circuit devices, e.g., DIODE, CMOS and BICMOS, etc. It has also been successfully applied to Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) devices such as accelerometer, micro-bridge, micro-motor structures with or without on chip circuits. In each case the compiler has generated a set of process flows which included the established process for that device along with several alternative processes.

  14. Mimicry of natural material designs and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, G.M.; Richman, R.H.; McNaughton, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    Biological structural materials, although composed of unremarkable substances synthesized at low temperatures, often exhibit superior mechanical properties. In particular, the quality in which nearly all biologically derived materials excel is toughness. The advantageous mechanical properties are attributable to the hierarchical, composite, structural arrangements common to biological systems. Materials scientists and engineers have increasingly recognized that biological designs or processing approaches applied to man-made materials (biomimesis) may offer improvements in performance over conventional designs and fabrication methods. In this survey, the structures and processing routes of marine shells, avian eggshells, wood, bone, and insect cuticle are briefly reviewed, and biomimesis research inspired by these materials is discussed. In addition, this paper describes and summarizes the applications of biomineralization, self-assembly, and templating with proteins to the fabrication of thin ceramic films and nanostructure devices.

  15. Thermal protection studies of plastic films and fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saad, Michel A.; Altman, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal protection properties of various film and woven materials were studied using an experimental method of radiant heating. The materials studied included aluminized and unaluminized synthetic plastic films and fibrous materials like silicon carbide and phenolic novolac. It is shown that a thin metallized coating with good reflectivity significantly enhances the heat blocking capability of a variety of insulative materials.

  16. Processing composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication of several composite structural articles including DC-10 upper aft rudders, L-1011 vertical fins and composite biomedical appliances are discussed. Innovative composite processing methods are included.

  17. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  18. Processing and modification of films made from recombinant spider silk proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemmerich, D.; Slotta, U.; Scheibel, T.

    2006-02-01

    Protein films represent an interesting class of materials with various possibilities for applications. We investigated films made of two different synthetic spider silk proteins derived from the garden spider’s (Araneus diadematus) two dragline silk proteins ADF-3 and ADF-4. Protein films cast from hexafluoroisopropanol solutions displayed a predominantly α-helical secondary structure. Processing such films with potassium phosphate or methanol resulted in a transition to a β-sheet rich structure. While as-cast films could be dissolved in water, processed β-sheet rich films were water insoluble. The chemical stability of processed films depended on the amino acid sequence of the respective protein employed. As a proof of principle, fluorescent probes or enzymes were covalently attached to the film surface. The presented approach provides a basis for designing tailor-made protein films using silk proteins as scaffold, in which the film properties can be controlled by genetic engineering of the underlying silks.

  19. Cibachrome testing. [photographic processing and printing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Cibachrome products as a solution to problems encountered when contact printing Kodak film type SO-397 onto Kodak Ektrachrome color reversal paper type 1993 is investigated. A roll of aerial imagery consisting of Kodak film types SO-397 and 2443 was contact printed onto Cibachrome and Kodak materials and compared in terms of color quality, resolution, cost, and compatibility with existing equipment and techniques. Objective measurements are given in terms of resolution and sensitometric response. Comparison prints and transparencies were viewed and ranked according to overall quality and aesthetic appeal. It is recommended that Cibachrome Print material be used in place of Kodak Ektachrome paper because it is more easily processed, the cost is equivalent, and it provides improved resolution, color quality, and image fade resistance.

  20. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  1. Discrete component bonding and thick film materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinser, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results are summarized of an investigation of discrete component bonding reliability and a fundamental study of new thick film resistor materials. The component bonding study examined several types of solder bonded components with some processing variable studies to determine their influence upon bonding reliability. The bonding reliability was assessed using the thermal cycle: 15 minutes at room temperature, 15 minutes at +125 C 15 minutes at room temperature, and 15 minutes at -55 C. The thick film resistor materials examined were of the transition metal oxide-phosphate glass family with several elemental metal additions of the same transition metal. These studies were conducted by preparing a paste of the subject composition, printing, drying, and firing using both air and reducing atmospheres. The resulting resistors were examined for adherence, resistance, thermal coefficient of resistance, and voltage coefficient of resistance.

  2. Processing of thin SU-8 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Stephan; Blagoi, Gabriela; Lillemose, Michael; Haefliger, Daniel; Boisen, Anja

    2008-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the process optimization for SU-8 films with thicknesses <=5 µm. The influence of soft-bake conditions, exposure dose and post-exposure-bake parameters on residual film stress, structural stability and lithographic resolution was investigated. Conventionally, the SU-8 is soft-baked after spin coating to remove the solvent. After the exposure, a post-exposure bake at a high temperature TPEB >= 90 °C is required to cross-link the resist. However, for thin SU-8 films this often results in cracking or delamination due to residual film stress. The approach of the process optimization is to keep a considerable amount of the solvent in the SU-8 before exposure to facilitate photo-acid diffusion and to increase the mobility of the monomers. The experiments demonstrate that a replacement of the soft-bake by a short solvent evaporation time at ambient temperature allows cross-linking of the thin SU-8 films even at a low TPEB = 50 °C. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to confirm the increased cross-linking density. The low thermal stress due to the reduced TPEB and the improved structural stability result in crack-free structures and solve the issue of delamination. The knowledge of the influence of different processing parameters on the responses allows the design of optimized processes for thin SU-8 films depending on the specific application.

  3. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  4. Diode laser processed crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, S.; Eggleston, B.; Dore, J.; Evans, R.; Ong, D.; Kunz, O.; Huang, J.; Schubert, U.; Kim, K. H.; Egan, R.; Green, M.

    2013-03-01

    Line-focus diode laser is applied to advance crystalline silicon thin-film solar cell technology. Three new processes have been developed: 1) defect annealing/dopant activation; 2) dopant diffusion; 3) liquid phase crystallisation of thin films. The former two processes are applied to either create a solar cell device from pre-crystallised films or improve its performance while reducing the maximum temperature experienced by substrate. The later process is applied to amorphous silicon films to obtain high crystal and electronic quality material for thin-film solar cells with higher efficiency potential. Defect annealing/dopant activation and dopant diffusion in a few micron thick poly-Si films are achieved by scanning with line-focus 808 nm diode laser beam at 15-24 kW/cm2 laser power and 2~6 ms exposure. Temperature profile in the film during the treatment is independent from laser power and exposure but determined by beam shape. Solar cell open-circuit voltages of about 500 mV after such laser treatments is similar or even higher than voltages after standard rapid-thermal treatments while the highest temperature experienced by glass is 300C lower. Amorphous silicon films can be melted and subsequently liquid-phase crystallised by a single scan of line laser beam at about 20 kW/cm2 power and 10-15 ms exposure. Solar cells made of laser-crystallised material achieve 557 mV opencircuit voltage and 8.4% efficiency. Electronic quality of such cells is consistent with efficiencies exceeding 13% and it is currently limited by research-level simplified cell metallisation.

  5. Electrochromic materials, devices and process of making

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2003-11-11

    Thin films of transition metal compositions formed with magnesium that are metals, alloys, hydrides or mixtures of alloys, metals and/or hydrides exhibit reversible color changes on application of electric current or hydrogen. Thin films of these materials are suitable for optical switching elements, thin film displays, sun roofs, rear-view mirrors and architectural glass.

  6. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  7. PROCESS OF FORMING POWDERED MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Glatter, J.; Schaner, B.E.

    1961-07-14

    A process of forming high-density compacts of a powdered ceramic material is described by agglomerating the powdered ceramic material with a heat- decompossble binder, adding a heat-decompossble lubricant to the agglomerated material, placing a quantity of the material into a die cavity, pressing the material to form a compact, pretreating the compacts in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to remove the binder and lubricant, and sintering the compacts. When this process is used for making nuclear reactor fuel elements, the ceramic material is an oxide powder of a fissionsble material and after forming, the compacts are placed in a cladding tube which is closed at its ends by vapor tight end caps, so that the sintered compacts are held in close contact with each other and with the interior wall of the cladding tube.

  8. Novel solutions for thin film layer deposition for organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiper, Dietmar; Long, Michael; Schwambera, Markus; Gersdorff, Markus; Kreis, Juergen; Heuken, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Innovative systems for carrier-gas enhanced vapor phase deposition of organic layers offer advanced methods for the precise deposition of complex thin-film layer stacks. The approach inherently avoids potential short-comings from solvent-based polymer deposition and offers new opportunities. The process operates at low pressure (thus avoiding complex vacuum setups), and, by employing AIXTRON's extensive experience in freely scalable solutions, can be adapted to virtually any production process and allows for R&D and production systems alike. Deposition of organic layers and stacks recommends the approach for a wide range of organic small molecule and polymer materials (including layers with gradual change of the composition), for conductive layers, for dielectric layers, for barrier systems, for OLED materials, and surface treatments such as oleophobic / hydrophobic coatings. With the combination of other vapor phase deposition solutions, hybrid systems combining organic and inorganic materials and other advanced stacks can be realized.

  9. Nonlinear Optical Image Processing with Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Deiss, Ron (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The transmission properties of some bacteriorhodopsin film spatial light modulators are uniquely suited to allow nonlinear optical image processing operations to be applied to images with multiplicative noise characteristics. A logarithmic amplitude transmission feature of the film permits the conversion of multiplicative noise to additive noise, which may then be linearly filtered out in the Fourier plane of the transformed image. The bacteriorhodopsin film displays the logarithmic amplitude response for write beam intensities spanning a dynamic range greater than 2.0 orders of magnitude. We present experimental results demonstrating the principle and capability for several different image and noise situations, including deterministic noise and speckle. Using the bacteriorhodopsin film, we successfully filter out image noise from the transformed image that cannot be removed from the original image.

  10. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of available terrestrial skills to the gathering of lunar materials and the processing of raw lunar materials into industrial feed stock were investigated. The literature on lunar soils and rocks was reviewed and the chemical processes by which major oxides and chemical elements can be extracted were identified. The gathering of lunar soil by means of excavation equipment was studied in terms of terrestrial experience with strip mining operations on earth. The application of electrostatic benefication techniques was examined for use on the moon to minimize the quantity of materials requiring surface transport and to optimize the stream of raw materials to be transported off the moon for subsequent industrial use.

  11. Support Assembly for Composite Laminate Materials During Roll Press Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catella, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    A composite laminate material is supported during the roll press processing thereof by an assembly having: first and second perforated films disposed adjacent to first and second opposing surfaces of a mixture of uncured resin and fibers defining the composite laminate material, a gas permeable encasement surrounding the mixture and the first and second films, a gas impervious envelope sealed about the gas permeable encasement, and first and second rigid plates clamped about the gas impervious envelope.

  12. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  13. Processes for treating cellulosic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladisch, Michael R. (Inventor); Kohlman, Karen L. (Inventor); Westgate, Paul L. (Inventor); Weil, Joseph R. (Inventor); Yang, Yiqi (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed are processes for pretreating cellulosic materials in liquid water by heating the materials in liquid water at a temperature at or above their glass transition temperature but not substantially exceeding 220.degree. C., while maintaining the pH of the reaction medium in a range that avoids substantial autohydrolysis of the cellulosic materials. Such pretreatments minimize chemical changes to the cellulose while leading to physical changes which substantially increase susceptibility to hydrolysis in the presence of cellulase.

  14. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 {minus}0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of {approx}2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} -- 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mm{sup 3}/Nm and {approx}7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} -- 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mm{sup 3}/Nm were measured for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the {lambda} ratio.

  15. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) and zirconia (ZrO[sub 2]) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 [minus]0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of [approx]2 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] -- 4 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] mm[sup 3]/Nm and [approx]7 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] -- 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] mm[sup 3]/Nm were measured for Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] and ZrO[sub 2] pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the [lambda] ratio.

  16. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  17. Energy Implications of Materials Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Earl T.

    1976-01-01

    Processing of materials could become energy-limited rather than resource-limited. Methods to extract metals, industrial minerals, and energy materials and convert them to useful states requires more than one-fifth of the United States energy budget. Energy accounting by industries must include a total systems analysis of costs to insure net energy…

  18. Color infrared film as a negative material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pease, Robert W.

    1970-01-01

    Original problems encountered in endeavors to use color infraredfilm as a negative material have been overcome by a simple modification in processing. This makes more feasible the production of infrared color prints for field use and yields an infrared counterpart to Aero-Neg.

  19. Heat for film processing from solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes solar water heating system for laboratory in Mill Valley, California. System furnishes 59 percent of hot water requirements for photographic film processing. Text of report discusses system problems and modifications, analyzes performance and economics, and supplies drawings and operation/maintenance manual.

  20. CPT Word Processing Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaymaker, Josephine; Eakman, Donna

    A project to develop a student word processing manual was developed by using input from: (1) information specialists, employees, and educators; and (2) students using the manual. These instructional materials provide workbook assignments and reading for an individualized unit on CPT word processing to be used by 30 to 40 high school students per…

  1. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  2. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, Lawrence S.; Felter, Thomas E.; Talin, Alec; Ohlberg, Douglas; Fox, Ciaran; Han, Sung

    1999-01-01

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/.mu.m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 .mu.m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceeded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material.

  3. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  4. Materials processing in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Work is reported on the Materials Processing Low Gravity Program in which the University of Alabama worked with scientists and engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center to design, implement and perform low gravity experiments with various scientific investigators in materials processing science through March 15, 1989. The facilities used in these short duration low gravity experiments include the Drop Tube and Drop Tower at MSFC, and the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field. The utilization of these ground-based low gravity facilities for materials processing was instrumental in determining the feasibility of either performing a particular experiment in the microgravity of Space or continuing on-going activities which may have been delayed due to the absence of shuttle flights during this contractual effort.

  5. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  6. Materials Processing with Intense Pulsed Ion Beams*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Johnson, D. J.; Friedmann, T. A.; Provencio, P. P.; Thompson, M. O.; Sanders, P. G.; Kasuya, K.; Kishimoto, N.

    1999-11-01

    Materials applications are being investigated on the 700 kV RHEPP-1 facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Surface modification for property improvement is possible in the fluence range 1-5 J/cm^2, with ablation and thin-film synthesis at 5-20 J/cm^2 fluences. Differences from previous efforts include selectability of accelerating ions (H, He, C, N, Ne, Ar, and Xe), and repetitive pulsing of the MAP (Magnetically Confined Anode Plasma) gas-breakdown ion source. Surface modification using melt-resolidification cycles has led to improvement in hardness and corrosion resistance of various metals. Mixing of pre-applied thin-films into the bulk has led to even greater performance improvements. Characterization is ongoing to determine the microstructural basis for these improvements. We have characterized liquid-phase diffusion of implanted elements in Ti and Si during the power pulse. Experiments with Si device processing and polymer modification are also ongoing. Thin-films are being formed from graphite, YBCO, and ZnO targets for various applications, including hard-coatings and optical coatings. Surface topography, stoichiometry, and optical and infrared absorption measurements have been made. *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Co., under US DOE Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Rapid deposition process for zinc oxide film applications in pyroelectric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Yu, Shih-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a rapid process for the deposition of films. Zinc oxide is a low toxicity and environmentally friendly material, and it possesses properties such as semiconductivity, pyroelectricity and piezoelectricity without the poling process. Therefore, AD is used to accelerate the manufacturing process for applications of ZnO films in pyroelectric devices. Increasing the temperature variation rate in pyroelectric films is a useful method for enhancing the responsivity of pyroelectric devices. In the present study, a porous ZnO film possessing the properties of large heat absorption and high temperature variation rate is successfully produced by the AD rapid process and laser annealing for application in pyroelectric devices.

  8. Preparation of silica thin films by novel wet process and study of their optical properties.

    PubMed

    Im, Sang-Hyeok; Kim, Nam-Jin; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, Cha-Won; Yoon, Duck-Ki; Ryu, Bong-Ki

    2012-02-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films have gained considerable attention because of their various industrial applications. For example, SiO2 thin films are used in superhydrophilic self-cleaning surface glass, UV protection films, anti-reflection coatings, and insulating materials. Recently, many processes such as vacuum evaporation, sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and spin coating have been widely applied to prepare thin films of functionally graded materials. However, these processes suffer from several engineering problems. For example, a special apparatus is required for the deposition of films, and conventional wet processes are not suitable for coating the surfaces of substrates with a large surface area and complex morphology. In this study, we investigated the film morphology and optical properties of SiO2 films prepared by a novel technique, namely, liquid phase deposition (LPD). Images of the SiO2 films were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to study the surface morphology of these films: these images indicate that films deposited with different reaction times were uniform and dense and were composed of pure silica. Optical properties such as refractive index and transmittance were estimated by UV-vis spectroscopy and ellipsometry. SiO2 films with porous structures at the nanometer scale (100-250 nm) were successfully produced by LPD. The deposited film had excellent transmittance in the visible wavelength region.

  9. Thermal oscillations in materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The use of thermosolutal and thermocapillary convection in materials processing is experimentally investigated. The flow patterns, unsteady mass transfer, and unsteady temperature variations seen in thermosolutal convection in enclosures are examined. An extensive research program to understand the role of thermocapillary convection in crystal growth for a variety of configurations is reviewed.

  10. High throughput growth and characterization of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-09-01

    It usually takes more than 10 years for a new material from initial research to its first commercial application. Therefore, accelerating the pace of discovery of new materials is critical to tackling challenges in areas ranging from clean energy to national security. As discovery of new materials has not kept pace with the product design cycles in many sectors of industry, there is a pressing need to develop and utilize high throughput screening and discovery technologies for the growth and characterization of new materials. This article presents two distinctive types of high throughput thin film material growth approaches, along with a number of high throughput characterization techniques, established in the author's group. These approaches include a second-generation "discrete" combinatorial semiconductor discovery technology that enables the creation of arrays of individually separated thin film semiconductor materials of different compositions, and a "continuous" high throughput thin film material screening technology that enables the realization of ternary alloy libraries with continuously varying elemental ratios.

  11. Space processing of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.; Kaye, S.

    1975-01-01

    Materials and processes for the testing of aluminum-base fiber and particle composites, and of metal foams under extended-time low-g conditions were investigated. A wetting and dispersion technique was developed, based on the theory that under the absence of a gas phase all solids are wetted by liquids. The process is characterized by a high vacuum environment and a high temperature cycle. Successful wetting and dispersion experiments were carried out with sapphire fibers, whiskers and particles, and with fibers of silicon carbide, pyrolytic graphite and tungsten. The developed process and facilities permit the preparation of a precomposite which serves as sample material for flight experiments. Low-g processing consists then merely in the uniform redistribution of the reinforcements during a melting cycle. For the preparation of metal foams, gas generation by means of a thermally decomposing compound was found most adaptable to flight experiments. For flight experiments, the use of compacted mixture of the component materials limits low-g processing to a simple melt cycle.

  12. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latanision, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    An annual report of the research activities of the Materials Processing Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is given. Research on dielectrophoresis in the microgravity environment, phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids, transport properties of droplet clusters in gravity-free fields, probes and monitors for the study of solidification of molten semiconductors, fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth, and heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification are discussed.

  13. Processing science and materials development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegel, Harold L.

    1988-08-01

    The development of advanced technologies for the fabrication of close-tolerance parts, in conjunction with the development of advanced materials, plays a key role in the design and manufacturing of affordable aerospace systems. New process and product-design concepts must be evolved in parallel with the development of advanced materials for future systems in order to exploit the achievements being made in materials science and to tailor specific properties while simultaneously producing controlled geometrical shapes. A scientific description of production equipment and, in general, physical objects, media, fields, and interface and material-related phenomena requires theoretical models which are capable of predicting the response of the fabricating system to the initial inputs. The design of a product and the corresponding manufacturing process generally requires both deterministic models and expert systems which utilize designer intuition and logic in finding acceptable solutions. Reviewed here are some of the recent developments in process modeling as related primarily to metalworking systems and how they aid in the understanding of the role of computer and human expertise in modern computer-aided engineering (CAE).

  14. Materials processing in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The final report of the Materials Processing in Low Gravity Program in which The University of Alabama in Huntsville designed, fabricated and performed various low gravity experiments in materials processing from November 7, 1989 through November 6, 1990 is presented. The facilities used in these short duration low gravity experiments include the Drop Tube and Drop Tower at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field. During the performance of this contract, the utilization of these ground-based low gravity facilities for materials processing experiments have been instrumental in providing the opportunity to determine the feasibility of performing a number of experiments in the microgravity of Space, without the expense of a space-based experiment. Since the KC-135 was out for repairs during the latter part of the reporting period, a number of the KC-135 activities concentrated on repair and maintenance of the equipment that normally is flown on the aircraft. A number of periodic reports were given to the TCOR during the course of this contract, hence this final report is meant only to summarize the many activities performed and not redundantly cover materials already submitted.

  15. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  16. In situ analysis of adsorption process from residual gases during thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giedraitis, A.; Tamulevicius, S.; Slapikas, K.; Gudaitis, R.; Juraitis, A.

    2008-03-01

    In this work we present the developed experimental technique as well as results of optical control of adsorption processes during thin film deposition. Different metallic films: (silver) as a model material and barium getter films were studied. Thermal evaporation method has been used to deposit thin metallic films and films of barium getter on glass substrates. Kinetics of the optical absorbance of the growing film was registered in situ measuring transmission of the film-substrate structure. These measurements were done in parallel to the ex-situ absorption (UV-VIS) and reflection spectra as well as XRD analysis. Such complex measurements enabled us to follow adsorption process from the residual gases during thermal evaporation as well to control adsorption process after the evaporation.

  17. A flammability study of thin plastic film materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center presently conducts flammability tests on thin plastic film materials by using a small needle rake method. Flammability data from twenty-two thin plastic film materials were obtained and cross-checked by using three different testing methods: (1) the presently used small needle rake; (2) the newly developed large needle rake; and (3) the previously used frame. In order to better discern the melting-burning phenomenon of thin plastic film material, five additional specific experiments were performed. These experiments determined the following: (1) the heat sink effect of each testing method; (2) the effect of the burn angle on the burn length or melting/shrinkage length; (3) the temperature profile above the ignition source; (4) the melting point and the fire point of each material; and (5) the melting/burning profile of each material via infrared (IR) imaging. The results of these experimentations are presented.

  18. Wrinkling of structured thin films via contrasted materials.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-05-01

    Regular surface patterns induced by the wrinkling of thin films have received intense attention in both science and engineering. We investigate the wrinkling of structured thin films that consist of two types of materials arranged in periodic patterns. A mechanical model is proposed to understand the physics of the wrinkling, and a set of scaling laws for the wrinkle wavelength are obtained. Periodic wrinkles are generated in the local regions of structured films via in-plane contrasted elastic modulus between heterogeneous materials. The wrinkle morphology and location can be tailored by designing structured thin films in a controllable way. Our findings provide the basis for understanding the wrinkling of structured thin films and for the manufacture of regular surface patterns via wrinkling. PMID:27010161

  19. Metal containing material processing on coater/developer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Shinichiro; Mizunoura, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Koichi; Hontake, Koichi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimura, Satoru; Enomoto, Masashi

    2016-03-01

    Challenges of processing metal containing materials need to be addressed in order apply this technology to Behavior of metal containing materials on coater/developer processing including coating process, developer process and tool metal contamination is studied using CLEAN TRACKTM LITHIUS ProTM Z (Tokyo Electron Limited). Through this work, coating uniformity and coating film defectivity were studied. Metal containing material performance was comparable to conventional materials. Especially, new dispense system (NDS) demonstrated up to 80% reduction in coating defect for metal containing materials. As for processed wafer metal contamination, coated wafer metal contamination achieved less than 1.0E10 atoms/cm2 with 3 materials. After develop metal contamination also achieved less than 1.0E10 atoms/cm2 with 2 materials. Furthermore, through the metal defect study, metal residues and metal contamination were reduced by developer rinse optimization.

  20. Process for making dense thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2005-07-26

    Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one embodiment the invention provides techniques for firing of device substrate to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another embodiment, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe, Cu and Ag, or alloys thereof.

  1. Process for preparing energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2011-12-13

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  2. Development of Thin Film Thermocouples on Ceramic Materials for Advanced Propulsion System Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 c. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperature of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  3. Development of thin film thermocouples on ceramic materials for advanced propulsion system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples were developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hr or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  4. Industrial Materials Processing Laser Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Followwill, Dorman

    1989-03-01

    The way I would like to handle this morning is first, to give you an overview before I put anything up in terms of slides. An overview of the study that we produced a couple of months ago. It is entitled "Industrial Materials Processing Laser Markets", and if you want information on that particular study, then you can speak with me at the coffee break.

  5. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  6. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  7. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements

  8. Reaction-Diffusion Processes in Ultrathin Films of Photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Ginusha; Stein, Gila

    2011-03-01

    Projection lithography is the primary technology used for patterning semiconductor devices. High-throughput manufacturing requires imaging materials (resists) that are highly sensitive to radiation, and this demand is satisfied through a process termed chemical amplification (CA). CA resists are comprised of a polymer resin (reactant) and photoacid generator (catalyst); a coupled reaction-diffusion mechanism drives image formation, where image resolution is limited by slow diffusion of the acid catalyst. There is evidence that thin film reaction rates deviate from the bulk behavior, and current models for image formation do not capture such effects. We demonstrate that X-Ray Diffraction can measure spatial extent-of-reaction in ultrathin films of a nanopatterned poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tertbutylacrylate) CA resist. The feedback acquired is used to construct predictive models for the coupled reaction-diffusion processes that incorporate the physics of confined polymers. Funded by NSF ECCS 0927147.

  9. Solution processed chalcogenide films and micro-patterns via self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Radhakant; Sachan, Priyanka; Dwivedi, Prabhat K.; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    Chalcogenide (ChG) are the choice materials for IR applications due to their high refractive index, mid IR transparency and high nonlinear optical properties. In this work, we study the characteristics of solution processed Chalcogenide films, As2S3 prepared by various amine solvents, for possible pattern fabrications. Since solution processed ChG films tend to contain solvent related defects, it is important to optimize the process parameters to create defect free films, structurally similar to bulk ChG. We have studied the physical integrity and morphology of solution processed ChG films as a function of annealing conditions and film thickness. Optical and morphological characterizations of these films are carried out in order to fabricate defect free, optically useful micro-structures.

  10. Application of interferometry for evaluation of the effect of contact lens material on tear film quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczesna, Dorota H.; Kasprzak, Henryk T.; Stenevi, Ulf

    2008-08-01

    The lateral shearing interferometer was applied to in vivo investigate the stability of the tear film surface covering the contact lenses. The 8 mW HeNe laser was used as the light source. The sequences of interferograms were recorded by CCD camera in real time during the inter-blink intervals at 25 fps, stored in a computer memory and numerically processed. Every frame illustrates the pattern of interference fringes that corresponds to temporal stage of prelens tear film surface. Fast Fourier Transform was used to quantitative evaluate tear film surface irregularities and the numerical measure M2 was used to obtain quantitative description of the tear film smoothness. The M2 index is the lowest for the smooth and regular surface of the tear film and its values increase if the prelens tear film begins to be unstable. The proposed way of analysis of each interferogram gives opportunity to calculate the credibility of given M2 index and automatically reject a part of a frame, that is not covered by interference fringes with an appropriate contrast due to eye movement. The tear film smoothness has been measured on different types of soft contact lenses of 4 companies. The significance differences in tear film stability have been noticed between low and high water content materials of contact lenses. The tear film was less stable on low water content materials.

  11. Thermal plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-02-01

    Emphasis has been on plasma synthesis of fine powders, plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), on related diagnostics, and on modeling work. Since plasma synthesis as well as plasma CVD make frequent use of plasma jets, the beginning has been devoted of plasma jets and behavior of particulates injected into such plasma jets. Although most of the construction of the Triple-Torch Plasma Reactor (TTPR) has already been done, modifications have been made in particular modifications required for plasma CVD of diamond. A new reactor designed for Counter-Flow Liquid Injection Plasma Synthesis (CFLIPS) proved to be an excellent tool for synthesis of fine powders as well as for plasma CVD. An attempt was made to model flow and temperature fields in this reactor. Substantial efforts were made to single out those parameters which govern particle size, size distribution, and powder quality in our plasma synthesis experiments. This knowledge is crucial for controlling the process and for meaningful diagnostics and modeling work. Plasma CVD of diamond films using both reactors has been very successful and we have been approached by a number of companies interested in using this technology for coating of tools.

  12. Processing of magnetostrictive thin film devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Michael Ray

    (Tb,Dy)Fesb2 intermetallic alloys exhibit very large magnetostrictive strains. Alloys with composition near Tbsb{0.3}Dysb{0.7}Fesb2, known as Terfenol-D, are of particular interest because this is the composition where room temperature anisotropy compensation occurs and the moment can be easily rotated. Terfenol-D has a cubic Laves phase structure and exhibits maximum magnetostrictive strain along $ directions at room temperature. Bulk Terfenol-D tends to grow as twinned dendritic sheets with $ orientation. Recently, there has been increased interest in Terfenol-D thin film devices. Crystallographic texture can change the magnetostrictive properties of thin films. It is the purpose of this research to study the effect of postdeposition annealing and magnetic annealing treatments on the microstructure of Terfenol-D thin films. It is predicted that textured films can be obtained by exploiting increased magnetocrystalline anisotropy at elevated temperatures. This would improve the low field magnetostrictive strains attainable for device applications. Also of recent interest is the fabrication of magnetostrictive composites. Increased toughness and durability are attainable at the cost of reduced magnetostrictive performance. Terfenol-D composites have been made with polymers. Composites with metals would be stronger and tougher but conventional high temperature processing routes cause unwanted reactions. Temperatures high enough to allow appreciable diffusion for sintering would also allow the metal binder phase to interdiffuse with Terfenol-D. This work also examines the feasibility of explosive compaction of Terfenol-D-metal composites. The short duration, on the order of microseconds, of the pressure and temperature pulse experienced by the powder leads to compaction at near room temperature. This is expected to prevent unwanted reactions between Terfenol-D and the metal binder.

  13. Scrounge data processing film products for the thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Information on the format of the film product and type of film used for the LANDSAT-4 scrounge processed thematic mapper data is presented. Image gray scale, annotation field, and general layout are described.

  14. Packaging material for thin film lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Weatherspoon, Kim A.

    1996-01-01

    A thin film battery including components which are capable of reacting upon exposure to air and water vapor incorporates a packaging system which provides a barrier against the penetration of air and water vapor. The packaging system includes a protective sheath overlying and coating the battery components and can be comprised of an overlayer including metal, ceramic, a ceramic-metal combination, a parylene-metal combination, a parylene-ceramic combination or a parylene-metal-ceramic combination.

  15. Computational Material Processing in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Working with Professor David Matthiesen at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) a computer model of the DPIMS (Diffusion Processes in Molten Semiconductors) space experiment was developed that is able to predict the thermal field, flow field and concentration profile within a molten germanium capillary under both ground-based and microgravity conditions as illustrated. These models are coupled with a novel nonlinear statistical methodology for estimating the diffusion coefficient from measured concentration values after a given time that yields a more accurate estimate than traditional methods. This code was integrated into a web-based application that has become a standard tool used by engineers in the Materials Science Department at CWRU.

  16. The processing of semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Five experiments involving the processing of semiconductor materials were performed during the Skylab mission. After discussions on semiconductors and their unique electronic properties, and techniques of crystal growth, these five experiments are presented. Four melt growth experiments were attempted: (1) steady state growth and segregation under zero gravity (InSb); (2) seeded, containerless solidification of InSb; (3) influence of gravity-free solidification on microsegregation; and (4) directional solidification of InSb-GaSb alloys. One vapor growth experiment, crystal growth by vapor transport, was attempted.

  17. Fundamentals of polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the results of a one-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. The research was conducted to better understand the limitations and potential of solar cells using CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe by systematically investigating the fundamental relationships linking material processing, material properties, and device behavior. By selenizing Cu and In layers, we fabricated device-quality CuInSe{sub 2} thin films and demonstrated a CuInSe{sub 2} solar cell with 7% efficiency. We added Ga, to increase the band gap of CuInSe{sub 2} devices to increase the open-circuit voltage to 0.55 V. We fabricated and analyzed Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2}/CuInSe{sub 2} devices to demonstrate the potential for combining the benefits of higher V{sub oc} while retaining the current-generating capacity of CuInSe{sub 2}. We fabricated an innovative superstrate device design with more than 5% efficiency, as well as a bifacial spectral-response technique for determining the electron diffusion length and optical absorption coefficient of CuInSe{sub 2} in an operational cell. The diffusion length was found to be greater than 1 {mu}m. We qualitatively modeled the effect of reducing heat treatments in hydrogen and oxidizing treatments in air on the I-V behavior of CuInSe{sub 2} devices. We also investigated post-deposition heat treatments and chemical processing and used them to fabricate a 9.6%-efficient CdTe/CdS solar cell using physical vapor deposition.

  18. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a summary of the research, citations of publications resulting from the research and abstracts of such publications. We have made no inventions in the performance of the work in this project. The main goals of the project were to set up a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond growth system attached to an UltraHigh Vacuum (UHV) atomic resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) system and carry out experiments aimed at studying the properties and growth of diamond films using atomic resolution UHV STM. We successfully achieved these goals. We observed, for the first time, the atomic structure of the surface of CVD grown epitaxial diamond (100) films using UHV STM. We studied the effects of atomic hydrogen on the CVD diamond growth process. We studied the electronic properties of the diamond (100) (2x1) surface, and the effect of alkali metal adsorbates such as Cs on the work function of this surface using UHV STM spectroscopy techniques. We also studied, using STM, new electronic materials such as carbon nanotubes and gold nanostructures. This work resulted in four publications in refereed scientific journals and five publications in refereed conference proceedings.

  19. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenbing

    The barrier to utilize solar generated electricity mainly comes from their higher cost relative to fossil fuels. However, innovations with new materials and processing techniques can potentially make cost effective photovoltaics. One such strategy is to develop solution processed photovoltaics which avoid the expensive vacuum processing required by traditional solar cells. The dissertation is mainly focused on two absorber material system for thin film solar cells: chalcopyrite CuIn(S,Se)2 (CISS) and kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4 organized in chronological order. Chalcopyrite CISS is a very promising material. It has been demonstrated to achieve the highest efficiency among thin film solar cells. Scaled-up industry production at present has reached the giga-watt per year level. The process however mainly relies on vacuum systems which account for a significant percentage of the manufacturing cost. In the first section of this dissertation, hydrazine based solution processed CISS has been explored. The focus of the research involves the procedures to fabricate devices from solution. The topics covered in Chapter 2 include: precursor solution synthesis with a focus on understanding the solution chemistry, CISS absorber formation from precursor, properties modification toward favorable device performance, and device structure innovation toward tandem device. For photovoltaics to have a significant impact toward meeting energy demands, the annual production capability needs to be on TW-level. On such a level, raw materials supply of rare elements (indium for CIS or tellurium for CdTe) will be the bottleneck limiting the scalability. Replacing indium with zinc and tin, earth abundant kesterite CZTS exhibits great potential to reach the goal of TW-level with no limitations on raw material availability. Chapter 3 shows pioneering work towards solution processing of CZTS film at low temperature. The solution processed devices show performances which rival vacuum

  20. Processes and Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Marshall

    The field of organic photovoltaics is driven by the desire for better and cheaper solar cells. While showing much promise, current generations of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices do not exhibit properties that are suited for wide scale commercialization. While much research has been dedicated towards this goal, more yet needs to be done before it can be clear whether this is an achievable goal. This thesis describes new materials investigations for higher efficiency better stability organic photovoltaics, as well as new processes that broaden the application and fabrication space for these devices. The application of electro-polymerization, a deposition process, towards organic thin-film fabrication is discussed. This novel process for OPVs is followed by an analysis of new and interesting materials for OPV devices, including a higher efficiency hole-transporting material, and two hole-transporting molecules that exhibit self-assembly during OPV fabrication. The results of these investigations indicate the possibility for increased fabrication freedom and control, molecular species design that could allow higher efficiency devices, as well as indications of the role that molecular interactions in OPV heterojunctions play. In addition, the possibilities of integrating graphene, the two-dimensional form of carbon, into OPV architectures is discussed. A new process for graphene transfer that allows the integration of graphene into chemically and physically more fragile systems including those composed of small molecule semiconductors is described and experimentally verified. Graphene is then integrated as a cathode in OPVs, and a modeling and experimental investigation is performed to evaluate the potential for integrating graphene as a recombination layer in tandem OPVs. Based on this investigation, the integration of graphene into tandem OPVs could enable higher efficiency devices and significantly broadened architectural freedom for tandem fabrication.

  1. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  2. Thick film silicon growth techniques. [die materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.; White, V. E.

    1973-01-01

    The research which was directed toward finding an improved die material is reported. Wetting experiments were conducted with various materials to determine their compatibility with silicon. Work has also continued toward the development of quartz as a die material as new techniques have provided more optimistic results than observed in the past. As a result of the thermal modification previously described, improvements in growth stability have contributed to an increase in ribbon quality.

  3. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  4. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  5. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  6. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  7. Integrated lunar materials manufacturing process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Michael A. (Inventor); Knudsen, Christian W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A manufacturing plant and process for production of oxygen on the moon uses lunar minerals as feed and a minimum of earth-imported, process materials. Lunar feed stocks are hydrogen-reducible minerals, ilmenite and lunar agglutinates occurring in numerous, explored locations mixed with other minerals in the pulverized surface layer of lunar soil known as regolith. Ilmenite (FeTiO.sub.3) and agglutinates contain ferrous (Fe.sup.+2) iron reducible by hydrogen to yield H.sub.2 O and metallic Fe at about 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. The H.sub.2 O is electrolyzed in gas phase to yield H.sub.2 for recycle and O.sub.2 for storage and use. Hydrogen losses to lunar vacuum are minimized, with no net hydrogen (or any other earth-derived reagent) consumption except for small leaks. Feed minerals are surface-mined by front shovels and transported in trucks to the processing area. The machines are manned or robotic. Ilmenite and agglutinates occur mixed with silicate minerals which are not hydrogen-reducible at 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. and consequently are separated and concentrated before feeding to the oxygen generation process. Solids rejected from the separation step and reduced solids from the oxygen process are returned to the mine area. The plant is powered by nuclear or solar power generators. Vapor-phase water electrolysis, a staged, countercurrent, fluidized bed reduction reactor and a radio-frequency-driven ceramic gas heater are used to improve thermal efficiency.

  8. Semiconducting boron carbide thin films: Structure, processing, and diode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ruqiang

    The high energy density and long lifetime of betavoltaic devices make them very useful to provide the power for applications ranging from implantable cardiac pacemakers to deep space satellites and remote sensors. However, when made with conventional semiconductors, betavoltaic devices tend to suffer rapid degradation as a result of radiation damage. It has been suggested that the degradation problem could potentially be alleviated by replacing conventional semiconductors with a radiation hard semiconducting material like icosahedral boron carbide. The goal of my dissertation was to better understand the fundamental properties and structure of boron carbide thin films and to explore the processes to fabricate boron carbide based devices for voltaic applications. A pulsed laser deposition system and a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering deposition system were designed and built to achieve the goals. After comparing the experimental results obtained using these two techniques, it was concluded that RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique is a good method to make B4C boron carbide thin films to fabricate repeatable and reproducible voltaic devices. The B4C thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering require in situ dry pre-cleaning to make ohmic contacts for B4C thin films to fabricate the devices. By adding another RF sputtering to pre-clean the substrate and thin films, a process to fabricate B4C / n-Si heterojunctions has been established. In addition, a low energy electron accelerator (LEEA) was built to mimic beta particles emitted from Pm147 and used to characterize the betavoltaic performance of betavoltaic devices as a function of beta energy and beta flux as well as do accelerated lifetime testing for betavoltaic devices. The energy range of LEEA is 20 - 250 keV with the current from several nA to 50 muA. High efficiency Si solar cells were used to demonstrate the powerful capabilities of LEEA, i.e., the characterization of betavoltaic

  9. Lunar materials processing system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    The theme of this paper is that governmental resources will not permit the simultaneous development of all viable lunar materials processing (LMP) candidates. Choices will inevitably be made, based on the results of system integration trade studies comparing candidates to each other for high-leverage applications. It is in the best long-term interest of the LMP community to lead the selection process itself, quickly and practically. The paper is in five parts. The first part explains what systems integration means and why the specialized field of LMP needs this activity now. The second part defines the integration context for LMP -- by outlining potential lunar base functions, their interrelationships and constraints. The third part establishes perspective for prioritizing the development of LMP methods, by estimating realistic scope, scale, and timing of lunar operations. The fourth part describes the use of one type of analytical tool for gaining understanding of system interactions: the input/output model. A simple example solved with linear algebra is used to illustrate. The fifth and closing part identifies specific steps needed to refine the current ability to study lunar base system integration. Research specialists have a crucial role to play now in providing the data upon which this refinement process must be based.

  10. Antireflection effects at nanostructured material interfaces and the suppression of thin-film interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiaoyin; Zhang, Xu A.; Bagal, Abhijeet; Guo, Wei; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2013-06-01

    Thin-film interference is a well-known effect, and it is commonly observed in the colored appearance of many natural phenomena. Caused by the interference of light reflected from the interfaces of thin material layers, such interference effects can lead to wavelength and angle-selective behavior in thin-film devices. In this work, we describe the use of interfacial nanostructures to eliminate interference effects in thin films. Using the same principle inspired by moth-eye structures, this approach creates an effective medium where the index is gradually varying between the neighboring materials. We present the fabrication process for such nanostructures at a polymer-silicon interface, and experimentally demonstrate its effectiveness in suppressing thin-film interference. The principle demonstrated in this work can lead to enhanced efficiency and reduce wavelength/angle sensitivity in multilayer optoelectronic devices.

  11. Research on polycrystalline thin-film materials, cells, and modules

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Zweibel, K.; Ullal, H.S.

    1990-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports research activities in polycrystalline thin films through the Polycrystalline Thin-Film Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). This program includes research and development (R D) in both copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films for photovoltaic applications. The objective of this program is to support R D of photovoltaic cells and modules that meet the DOE long-term goals of high efficiency (15%--20%), low cost ($50/m{sup 2}), and reliability (30-year life time). Research carried out in this area is receiving increased recognition due to important advances in polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells and modules. These have become the leading thin-film materials for photovoltaics in terms of efficiency and stability. DOE has recognized this potential through a competitive initiative for the development of CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe modules. This paper focuses on the recent progress and future directions of the Polycrystalline Thin-Film Program and the status of the subcontracted research on these promising photovoltaic materials. 26 refs., 12 figs, 1 tab.

  12. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the primary purposes of this work are to study important technologies, particularly involving thin films, relevant to organic and polymeric materials for improving applicability to optical circuitry and devices and to assess the contribution of convection on film quality in unit and microgravity environments. Among the most important materials processing techniques of interest in this work are solution-based and by physical vapor transport, both having proven gravitational and acceleration dependence. In particular, PolyDiAcetylenes (PDA's) and PhthaloCyanines (Pc's) are excellent NonLinear Optical (NLO) materials with the promise of significantly improved NLO properties through order and film quality enhancements possible through microgravity processing. Our approach is to focus research on integrated optical circuits and optoelectronic devices relevant to solution-based and vapor processes of interest in the Space Sciences Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Modification of organic materials is an important aspect of achieving more highly ordered structures in conjunction with microgravity processing. Parallel activities include characterization of materials for particular NLO properties and determination of appropriation device designs consistent with selected applications. One result of this work is the determination, theoretically, that buoyancy-driven convection occurs at low pressures in an ideal gas in a thermalgradient from source to sink. Subsequent experiment supports the theory. We have also determined theoretically that buoyancy-driven convection occurs during photodeposition of PDA, an MSFC-patented process for fabricating complex circuits, which is also supported by experiment. Finally, the discovery of intrinsic optical bistability in metal-free Pc films enables the possibility of the development of logic gate technology on the basis of these materials.

  13. Apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a thin-film substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Eric J.; Kooyer, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a surface of a continuous thin-film substrate and a treated thin-film cathode having increased smoothness are disclosed. A web of untreated cathode material is moved between a feed mechanism and a take-up mechanism, and passed through a treatment station. The web of cathode material typically includes areas having surface defects, such as prominences extending from the surface of the cathode material. The surface of the cathode material is treated with an abrasive material to reduce the height of the prominences so as to increase an 85 degree gloss value of the cathode material surface by at least approximately 10. The web of cathode material may be subjected to a subsequent abrasive treatment at the same or other treatment station. Burnishing or lapping film is employed at a treatment station to process the cathode material. An abrasive roller may alternatively be used to process the web of cathode material. The apparatus and method of the present invention may also be employed to treat the surface of a lithium anode foil so as to cleanse and reduce the roughness of the anode foil surface.

  14. Apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a thin-film substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Eric J.; Kooyer, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a surface of a continuous thin-film substrate and a treated thin-film cathode having increased smoothness are disclosed. A web of untreated cathode material is moved between a feed mechanism and a take-up mechanism, and passed through a treatment station. The web of cathode material typically includes areas having surface defects, such as prominences extending from the surface of the cathode material. The surface of the cathode material is treated with an abrasive material to reduce the height of the prominences so as to increase an 85 degree gloss value of the cathode material surface by at least approximately 10. The web of cathode material may be subjected to a subsequent abrasive treatment at the same or other treatment station. Burnishing or lapping film is employed at a treatment station to process the cathode material. An abrasive roller may alternatively be used to process the web of cathode material. The apparatus and method of the present invention may also be employed to treat the surface of a lithium anode foil so as to cleanse and reduce the roughness of the anode foil surface.

  15. An acetate precursor process for BSCCO (2223) thin films and coprecipitated powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene H.

    1992-01-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconducting oxides much attention has been paid to finding better and useful ways to take advantage of the special properties exhibited by these materials. One such process is the development of thin films for engineering applications. Another such process is the coprecipitation route to producing superconducting powders. An acetate precursor process for use in thin film fabrication and a chemical coprecipitation route to Bismuth based superconducting materials has been developed. Data obtained from the thin film process were inconclusive to date and require more study. The chemical coprecipitation method of producing bulk material is a viable method, and is preferred over the previously used solid state route. This method of powder production appears to be an excellent route to producing thin section tape cast material and screen printed devices, as it requires less calcines than the oxide route to produce quality powders.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of diamond films and optoelectronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we report on progress achieved from 12/1/92 to 10/1/93 under the grant entitled 'Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials'. We have set-up a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond film growth system and a Raman spectroscopy system to study the nucleation and growth of diamond films with atomic resolution using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A unique feature of the diamond film growth system is that diamond films can be transferred directly to the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber of a scanning tunneling microscope without contaminating the films by exposure to air. The University of North Texas (UNT) provided $20,000 this year as matching funds for the NASA grant to purchase the diamond growth system. In addition, UNT provided a Coherent Innova 90S Argon ion laser, a Spex 1404 double spectrometer, and a Newport optical table costing $90,000 to set-up the Raman spectroscopy system. The CVD diamond growth system and Raman spectroscopy system will be used to grow and characterize diamond films with atomic resolution using STM as described in our proposal. One full-time graduate student and one full-time undergraduate student are supported under this grant. In addition, several graduate and undergraduate students were supported during the summer to assist in setting-up the diamond growth and Raman spectroscopy systems. We have obtained research results concerning STM of the structural and electronic properties of CVD grown diamond films, and STM and scanning tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanotubes. In collaboration with the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) group at UNT, we have also obtained results concerning the optoelectronic material siloxene. These results were published in refereed scientific journals, submitted for publication, and presented as invited and contributed talks at scientific conferences.

  17. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organics which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials.

  18. UV optical properties of thin film oxide layers deposited by different processes.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, Samuel F; Martinez, Carol L

    2011-10-01

    UV optical properties of thin film layers of compound and mixed oxide materials deposited by different processes are presented. Japan Electron Optics Laboratory plasma ion assisted deposition (JEOL PIAD), electron beam with and without IAD, and pulsed DC magnetron sputtering were used. Comparisons are made with published deposition process data. Refractive indices and absorption values to as short as 145 nm were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Electronic interband defect states are detected that are deposition-process dependent. SE might be effective in identifying UV optical film quality, especially in defining processes and material composition beneficial for high-energy excimer laser applications and environments requiring stable optical properties.

  19. Materials Analysis of CED Nb Films Being Coated on Bulk Nb Single Cell SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Reece, Charles; Palczewski, Ari; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Krishnan, Mahadevan; James, Colt; Irfan, Irfan

    2013-09-01

    This study is an on-going research on depositing a Nb film on the internal wall of bulk Nb single cell SRF cavities, via a cathodic arc Nb plasma ions source, an coaxial energetic condensation (CED) facility at AASC company. The motivation is to firstly create a homoepitaxy-like Nb/Nb film in a scale of a ~1.5GHz RF single cell cavity. Next, through SRF measurement and materials analysis, it might reveal the baseline properties of the CED-type homoepitaxy Nb films. Literally, a top-surface layer of Nb films which sustains SRF function, always grows up in homo-epitaxy mode, on top of a Nb nucleation layer. Homo-epitaxy growth of Nb must be the final stage (a crystal thickening process) of any coatings of Nb film on alternative cavity structure materials. Such knowledge of Nb-Nb homo-epitaxy is useful to create future realistic SRF cavity film coatings, such as hetero-epitaxy Nb/Cu Films, or template-layer-mitigated Nb films. One large-grain, and three fine grain bulk Nb cavities were coated. They went through cryogenic RF measurement. Preliminary results show that the Q0 of a Nb film could be as same as the pre-coated bulk Nb surface (which received a chemically-buffered polishing plus a light electro-polishing); but quality factor of two tested cavities dropped quickly. We are investigating if the severe Q-slope is caused by hydrogen incorporation before deposition, or is determined by some structural defects during Nb film growth.

  20. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  1. Thermal Processing and Microwave Processing of Mixed-Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadre, Mandar

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors are promising new materials for various optoelectronic applications. In this study, improved electrical and optical properties upon thermal and microwave processing of mixed-oxide semiconductors are reported. First, arsenic-doped silicon was used as a model system to understand susceptor-assisted microwave annealing. Mixed oxide semiconductor films of indium zinc oxide (IZO) and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) were deposited by room-temperature RF sputtering on flexible polymer substrates. Thermal annealing in different environments---air, vacuum and oxygen was done. Electrical and optical characterization was carried out before and after annealing. The degree of reversal in the degradation in electrical properties of the thin films upon annealing in oxygen was assessed by subjecting samples to subsequent vacuum anneals. To further increase the conductivity of the IGZO films, Ag layers of various thicknesses were embedded between two IGZO layers. Optical performance of the multilayer structures was improved by susceptor-assisted microwave annealing and furnace-annealing in oxygen environment without compromising on their electrical conductivity. The post-processing of the films in different environments was used to develop an understanding of mechanisms of carrier generation, transport and optical absorption. This study establishes IGZO as a viable transparent conductor, which can be deposited at room-temperature and processed by thermal and microwave annealing to improve electrical and optical performance for applications in flexible electronics and optoelectronics.

  2. Thick-film MEMS thermoelectric sensor fabricated using a thermally assisted lift-off process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yuan; Cai, Haogang; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a thick-film microelectromechanical systems thermoelectric sensor fabricated by a low-temperature thermally assisted lift-off process. During the process, thick metal or semiconductor films experience controlled breakup due to thermal reflow of the underlying lithographically defined photoresist patterns, thereby facilitating the sacrificial removal of the photoresist. This enables rapid and reliable patterning of thick films that can otherwise be difficult to achieve by conventional processes. Experimental results with a sensor consisting of a 60-junction thick-film antimony-bismuth thermopile demonstrate an electric conductivity of 5.44×106 S/m and a Seebeck coefficient of 114 μV/K per junction, which are comparable to those obtained from bulk materials. Thus, the thick-film sensor can potentially allow low-noise, high-efficiency thermoelectric measurements.

  3. Cellulose Nanofibril Film as a Piezoelectric Sensor Material.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Satu; Siponkoski, Tuomo; Sarlin, Essi; Mettänen, Marja; Vuoriluoto, Maija; Pammo, Arno; Juuti, Jari; Rojas, Orlando J; Franssila, Sami; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2016-06-22

    Self-standing films (45 μm thick) of native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were synthesized and characterized for their piezoelectric response. The surface and the microstructure of the films were evaluated with image-based analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The measured dielectric properties of the films at 1 kHz and 9.97 GHz indicated a relative permittivity of 3.47 and 3.38 and loss tangent tan δ of 0.011 and 0.071, respectively. The films were used as functional sensing layers in piezoelectric sensors with corresponding sensitivities of 4.7-6.4 pC/N in ambient conditions. This piezoelectric response is expected to increase remarkably upon film polarization resulting from the alignment of the cellulose crystalline regions in the film. The CNF sensor characteristics were compared with those of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as reference piezoelectric polymer. Overall, the results suggest that CNF is a suitable precursor material for disposable piezoelectric sensors, actuators, or energy generators with potential applications in the fields of electronics, sensors, and biomedical diagnostics.

  4. Cellulose Nanofibril Film as a Piezoelectric Sensor Material.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Satu; Siponkoski, Tuomo; Sarlin, Essi; Mettänen, Marja; Vuoriluoto, Maija; Pammo, Arno; Juuti, Jari; Rojas, Orlando J; Franssila, Sami; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2016-06-22

    Self-standing films (45 μm thick) of native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were synthesized and characterized for their piezoelectric response. The surface and the microstructure of the films were evaluated with image-based analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The measured dielectric properties of the films at 1 kHz and 9.97 GHz indicated a relative permittivity of 3.47 and 3.38 and loss tangent tan δ of 0.011 and 0.071, respectively. The films were used as functional sensing layers in piezoelectric sensors with corresponding sensitivities of 4.7-6.4 pC/N in ambient conditions. This piezoelectric response is expected to increase remarkably upon film polarization resulting from the alignment of the cellulose crystalline regions in the film. The CNF sensor characteristics were compared with those of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as reference piezoelectric polymer. Overall, the results suggest that CNF is a suitable precursor material for disposable piezoelectric sensors, actuators, or energy generators with potential applications in the fields of electronics, sensors, and biomedical diagnostics. PMID:27232271

  5. Control of thin film processing behavior through precursor structural modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Voigt, J.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Christenson, T.A.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    In the sol-gel processing of ceramic thin films it has been frequently noted that the processing behavior, microstructure and properties of the films are dependent on the nature of the coating solution. In an attempt to understand such thin film processing-property relationships, the authors have systematically investigated the effects of varying the precursor nature on thin film densification and crystallization for ZrO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} films. Metal alkoxide starting compounds, e.g., zirconium n-butoxide{center_dot}n-butanol and titanium i-propoxide, were reacted with acetic acid and 2,4-pentanedione to prepare coating solutions for thin film deposition. The use of these chelating ligands resulted in solution oligomeric species of different nature. Studies of thin film processing indicated that film processing characteristics, i.e., consolidation, densification and crystallization, were strongly dependent on solution precursor nature. Ligand steric size, pyrolysis behavior, extent of chelation, and precursor reactivity were found to be key variables in controlling film processing characteristics.

  6. Influence Of Film And Processing On Film-Screen Image Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, R. S.

    1982-12-01

    This paper describes experiments which explore the ways in which variations in film and processing influence noise through their effects on the sensitometric curve shape and silver granularity. These include comparisons of several film types and processing conditions for which total radiographic noise from screen exposures and granularity from light exposures are analyzed relative to the instantaneous gradient at the measured density. It is seen that film granularity may indeed contribute substantially to total noise under conditions of low quantum mottle visualization.

  7. Dual ion beam processed diamondlike films for industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Kussmaul, M. T.; Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Single and dual beam ion source systems are used to generate amorphous diamondlike carbon (DLC) films, which were evaluated for a variety of applications including protective coatings on transmitting materials, power electronics as insulated gates and corrosion resistant barriers. A list of the desirable properties of DLC films along with potential applications are presented.

  8. Comparative study of processing methods for starch/gelatin films.

    PubMed

    Fakhouri, Farayde M; Costa, Daryne; Yamashita, Fábio; Martelli, Silvia M; Jesus, Rodolfo C; Alganer, Katlen; Collares-Queiroz, Fernanda P; Innocentini-Mei, Lucia H

    2013-06-20

    In this work, the influence of processing methods on the properties of starch/gelatin films plasticized with glycerol and sorbitol is reported. Four different processing techniques: casting; pressing; pressing followed by blowing and extrusion followed by blowing were evaluated. Bioplastics prepared by casting were homogeneous and transparent with lower opacity and water vapor permeability (WVP) values when compared to films prepared by other techniques. Among the cast films studied, those with 3% lipophilic starch, in 1:1 proportions and plasticized with sorbitol, showed lower WVP values and higher tensile strength (TS). Films obtained by pressing and blowing showed little expansion during blow, had cracks in the surface, low TS and higher WVP. These films were the only samples to show crystallinity as determined by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. In conclusion, different processing techniques have significantly affected the properties of these films. PMID:23648030

  9. Efficient production of nanoparticle-loaded orodispersible films by process integration in a stirred media mill.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Denise; Finke, Jan Henrik; Kwade, Arno

    2016-09-25

    Orodispersible films possess a great potential as a versatile platform for nanoparticle-loaded oral dosage forms. In this case, poorly water-soluble organic materials were ground in a stirred media mill and embedded into a polymer matrix. The aim of this study was the shortening of this manufacturing process by the integration of several process steps into a stirred media mill without facing disadvantages regarding the film quality. Furthermore, this process integration is time conserving due to the high stress intensities provided in the mill and applicable for high solids contents and high suspension viscosities. Two organic materials, the model compound Anthraquinone and the active pharmaceutical ingredient Naproxen were investigated in this study. Besides the impact of the film processing on the crystallinity of the particles in the orodispersible film, a particle load of up to 50% was investigated with the new developed processing route. Additionally, a disintegration test was developed, combining an appropriate amount of saliva substitute and a clear endpoint determination. In summary, high nanoparticle loads in orodispersible films with good particle size preservation after film redispersion in water as well as a manufacturing of the film casting mass within a few minutes in a stirred media mill was achieved.

  10. Efficient production of nanoparticle-loaded orodispersible films by process integration in a stirred media mill.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Denise; Finke, Jan Henrik; Kwade, Arno

    2016-09-25

    Orodispersible films possess a great potential as a versatile platform for nanoparticle-loaded oral dosage forms. In this case, poorly water-soluble organic materials were ground in a stirred media mill and embedded into a polymer matrix. The aim of this study was the shortening of this manufacturing process by the integration of several process steps into a stirred media mill without facing disadvantages regarding the film quality. Furthermore, this process integration is time conserving due to the high stress intensities provided in the mill and applicable for high solids contents and high suspension viscosities. Two organic materials, the model compound Anthraquinone and the active pharmaceutical ingredient Naproxen were investigated in this study. Besides the impact of the film processing on the crystallinity of the particles in the orodispersible film, a particle load of up to 50% was investigated with the new developed processing route. Additionally, a disintegration test was developed, combining an appropriate amount of saliva substitute and a clear endpoint determination. In summary, high nanoparticle loads in orodispersible films with good particle size preservation after film redispersion in water as well as a manufacturing of the film casting mass within a few minutes in a stirred media mill was achieved. PMID:27477101

  11. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Charles Jeffrey; Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  12. Screening of Novel Li-Air Battery Catalyst Materials by a Thin Film Combinatorial Materials Approach.

    PubMed

    Hauck, John G; McGinn, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    A combinatorial synthesis and high-throughput screening process was developed for the investigation of potential oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts for use as Li-air battery cathode materials. Libraries of discrete ternary metal alloy compositions were deposited via thin-film sputtering. The samples were electrochemically tested in parallel using cyclic voltammetry in O2-saturated KOH electrolyte. Compositions were ranked by ORR and OER onset potentials with respect to an internal Pt reference. Results from the Pt-Mn-Co, Cr-Mn-Co, Pd-Mn-Co, and Pd-Mn-Ru systems are reported. Many alloy compositions showed marked improvement in catalytic activity compared to pure Pt. Among the systems considered, Pt12Mn44Co44, Pd43Co57 and Pd36Mn28Ru36 in particular exhibited lower overpotentials for oxygen reactions, which occur at the cathode in Li-air batteries.

  13. Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-31

    A simple, economical nanotechnology coating process that enables the development of nanoparticle thin films with architectures and properties unattainable by any other processing method. 2007 R&D 100 winner (SAND2007-1878P)

  14. Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films

    ScienceCinema

    Sandia

    2016-07-12

    A simple, economical nanotechnology coating process that enables the development of nanoparticle thin films with architectures and properties unattainable by any other processing method. 2007 R&D 100 winner (SAND2007-1878P)

  15. Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    A simple, economical nanotechnology coating process that enables the development of nanoparticle thin films with architectures and properties unattainable by any other processing method. 2007 R&D 100 winner (SAND2007-1878P)

  16. Materials processing in space: Early experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Herring, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of the space environment were reviewed. Potential applications of space processing are discussed and include metallurgical processing, and processing of semiconductor materials. The behavior of fluid in low gravity is described. The evolution of apparatus for materials processing in space was reviewed.

  17. Waveguides in Thin Film Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakisov, Sergey; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; Teague, Zedric

    1996-01-01

    Results on the fabrication of integrated optical components in polymeric materials using photo printing methods will be presented. Optical waveguides were fabricated by spin coating preoxidized silicon wafers with organic dye/polymer solution followed by soft baking. The waveguide modes were studied using prism coupling technique. Propagation losses were measured by collecting light scattered from the trace of a propagation mode by either scanning photodetector or CCD camera. We observed the formation of graded index waveguides in photosensitive polyimides after exposure of UV light from a mercury arc lamp. By using a theoretical model, an index profile was reconstructed which is in agreement with the profile reconstructed by the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculation technique using a modal spectrum of the waveguides. Proposed mechanism for the formation of the graded index includes photocrosslinking followed by UV curing accompanied with optical absorption increase. We also developed the prototype of a novel single-arm double-mode interferometric sensor based on our waveguides. It demonstrates high sensitivity to the chance of ambient temperature. The device can find possible applications in aeropropulsion control systems.

  18. Development and characterization of crosslinked hyaluronic acid polymeric films for use in coating processes.

    PubMed

    Sgorla, Débora; Almeida, Andreia; Azevedo, Claudia; Bunhak, Élcio Jose; Sarmento, Bruno; Cavalcanti, Osvaldo Albuquerque

    2016-09-10

    The aim of this work was to develop and characterize new hyaluronic acid-based responsive materials for film coating of solid dosage forms. Crosslinking of hyaluronic acid with trisodium trimetaphosphate was performed under controlled alkaline aqueous environment. The films were produced through casting process by mixing crosslinked or bare biopolymer in aqueous dispersion of ethylcellulose, at different proportions. Films were further characterized regarding morphology by scanning electron microscopy, robustness by permeation to water vapor transmission, and ability to hydrate in simulated gastric and intestinal physiological fluids. The safety and biocompatibility of films were assessed against Caco-2 and HT29-MTX intestinal cells. The permeation to water vapor transmission was favored by increasing hyaluronic acid content in the final formulation. When in simulated gastric fluid, films exhibited lower hydration ability compared to more extensive hydration in simulated intestinal fluids. Simultaneously, in simulated intestinal fluids, films partially lost weight, revealing ability for preventing drug release at gastric pH, but tailoring the release at higher intestinal pH. The physiochemical characterization suggests thermal stability of films and physical interaction between compounds of formulation. Lastly, cytotoxicity tests demonstrated that films and individual components of the formulations, when incubated for 4h, were safe for intestinal cells Overall, these evidences suggest that hyaluronic acid-based responsive films, applied as coating material of oral solid dosage forms, can prevent the premature release of drugs in harsh stomach conditions, but control the release it in gastrointestinal tract distal portion, assuring safety to intestinal mucosa. PMID:27436707

  19. Bulk and Thin Film Contact Resistance with Dissimilar Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, P.; Tang, W.; Gomez, M. R.; French, D. M.; Zier, J. C.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2011-10-01

    Contact resistance is important to integrated circuits, thin film devices, carbon nanotube based cathodes, MEMS relays and interconnectors, wire-array z-pinches, metal-insulator-vacuum junctions, and high power microwave sources, etc. This paper summarizes the recent modeling efforts at U of M, addressing the effect of dissimilar materials and of finite dimensions on the contact resistance of both bulk contacts and thin film contacts. Accurate analytical scaling laws are constructed for the contact resistance of both bulk and thin film contacts over a large range of resistivity ratios and aspect ratios in Cartesian and cylindrical geometries. They were validated against known limiting cases; and spot-checks with numerical simulations and experiments. Supported by AFOSR, AFRL, L-3, and Northrop-Grumman.

  20. Enzymatically controlled material design with casein--from defined films to localized deposition of particles.

    PubMed

    Strube, Oliver I; Rüdiger, Arne A; Bremser, Wolfgang

    2015-05-10

    A new concept for deposition and material design of coatings from biological compounds is presented. An enzymatic reaction triggers the specific coagulation of particles on a support surface. The first examined model system is casein and is based on the natural rennet reaction as applied in the process of cheese-making. The aspartic protease chymosin is immobilized on a support surface and cleaves the hydrophilic parts of the casein micelles, inducing deposition. The concept allows for a high level of control over film characteristics and enables the formation of site-specific film structures. The variability rages from formation of casein films with several micrometers film thickness to the targeted deposition of casein micelles. PMID:25456052

  1. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  2. Influence of as-deposited conductive type on sensitization process of PbSe films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Jianbang; Qiao, Kai; Li, Xiaojiang

    2016-07-01

    The as-grown n- and p-type polycrystalline PbSe thin films are fabricated by vapor phase deposition using substrate temperature regulation. The surface polycrystalline structures and photoelectric properties of n- and p-type polycrystalline PbSe films are provided. Surface composition of n-type-sensitized PbSe film has been analyzed according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results. The oxygen roles in n- and p-type PbSe polycrystalline films during the sensitization process are studied experimentally, respectively. The dependence of sensitized photoelectric performance on the initial conductive state has been firstly observed and discussed, as we know presently. It is revealed that oxygen can trigger photo-response in the sensitization process for n-type PbSe film, but not for p-type. These discussions may be useful for understanding the sensitization mechanism of lead salt materials.

  3. Solution-Processed Indium Oxide Based Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wangying

    Oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) have attracted considerable attention over the past decade due to their high carrier mobility and excellent uniformity. However, most of these oxide TFTs are usually fabricated using costly vacuum-based techniques. Recently, the solution processes have been developed due to the possibility of low-cost and large-area fabrication. In this thesis, we have carried out a detailed and systematic study of solution-processed oxide thin films and TFTs. At first, we demonstrated a passivation method to overcome the water susceptibility of solution-processed InZnO TFTs by utilizing octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The unpassivated InZnO TFTs exhibited large hysteresis in their electrical characteristics due to the adsorbed water at the semiconductor surface. Formation of a SAM of ODPA on the top of InZnO removed water molecules weakly absorbed at the back channel and prevented water diffusion from the surroundings. Therefore the passivated devices exhibited significantly reduced hysteretic characteristics. Secondly, we developed a simple spin-coating approach for high- k dielectrics (Al2O3, ZrO2, Y 2O3 and TiO2). These materials were used as gate dielectrics for solution-processed In2O3 or InZnO TFTs. Among the high-k dielectrics, the Al2O3-based devices showed the best performance, which is attributed to the smooth dielectric/semiconductor interface and the low interface trap density besides its good insulating property. Thirdly, the formation and properties of Al2O3 thin films under various annealing temperatures were intensively studied, revealing that the sol-gel-derived Al2O3 thin film undergoes the decomposition of organic residuals and nitrate groups, as well as conversion of aluminum hydroxides to form aluminum oxide. Besides, the Al2O 3 film was used as gate dielectric for solution-processed oxide TFTs, resulting in high mobility and low operating voltage. Finally, we proposed a green route for

  4. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications. PMID:25243892

  5. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications.

  6. Materials processing with superposed Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A.; Lei, Shuting

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental results of femtosecond laser processing on the surface of glass and metal thin film using superposed Bessel beams. These beams are generated by a combination of a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an axicon with >50% efficiency, and they possess the long depth-of-focus (propagation-invariant) property as found in ordinary Bessel beams. Through micromachining experiments using femtosecond laser pulses, we show that multiple craters can be fabricated on glass with single-shot exposure, and the 1+(-1) superposed beam can reduce collateral damage caused by the rings in zero-order Bessel beams in the scribing of metal thin film.

  7. Aqueous Processing Material Accountability Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean

    2007-09-01

    Increased use of nuclear power will require new facilities. The U.S. has not built a new spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility for decades. Reprocessing facilities must maintain accountability of their nuclear fuel. This survey report on the techniques used in current aqueous reprocessing facilities, and provides references to source materials to assist facility design efforts.

  8. Development of Bismuth-based Lead-free Piezoelectric Materials: Thin Film Piezoelectric Materials via PVD and CSD Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Yu Hong

    Piezoelectric materials have been widely used in electromechanical actuators, sensors, and ultrasonic transducers. Among these materials, lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 (PZT) has been primarily investigated due to its excellent piezoelectric properties. However, environmental concerns due to the toxicity of PbO have led to investigations into alternative materials systems. Bismuth-based perovskite piezoelectric materials such as (Bi0.5,Na0.5)TiO3 - (Bi0.5K 0.5)TiO3 (BNT - BKT), (Bi0.5,Na0.5 )TiO3 - (Bi0.5K0.5)TiO3 - BaTiO3(BNT - BKT - BT), (Bi0.5K 0.5)TiO3 - Bi(Zn0.5,Ti0.5)O 3 (BKT - BZT), and (Bi0.5,Na0.5)TiO 3 - (Bi0.5K0.5)TiO3 - Bi(Mg 0.5,Ti0.5)O3 (BNT - BKT - BMgT) have been explored as potential alternatives to PZT. These materials systems have been extensively studied in bulk ceramic form, however many of the ultimate applications will be in thin film embodiments (i.e., microelectromechanical systems). For this reason, in this thesis these lead-free piezoelectrics are synthesized in thin film form to understand the structure-property-processing relationships and their impact on the ultimate device response. Fabrication of high quality of 0.95BKT - 0.05BZT thin films on platinized silicon substrates was attempted by pulsed laser deposition. Due to cation volatility, deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, deposition pressure, and target-substrate distance, as well as target overdoping were explored to achieve phase pure materials. This route led to high dielectric loss, indicative of poor ferroelectric behavior. This was likely a result of the poor thin film morphology observed in films deposited via this method. Subsequently, 0.8BNT - 0.2BKT, 85BNT - 10BKT - 5BT, and 72.5BNT - 22.5BKT - 5BMgT (near morphotropic phase boundary composition) were synthesized via chemical solution deposition. To compensate the loss of A-site cations, overdoped precursor solutions were prepared. Crystallization after each spin cast layer were required to

  9. Thin film microelectronics materials production in the vacuum of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, A.; Sterling, M.; Horton, C.; Freundlich, A.; Pei, S.; Hill, R.

    1997-01-01

    The international Space Station era will open up a new dimension in the use of one of the unique attributes of space, vacuum, for the production of advanced semiconductor materials and devices for microelectronics applications. Ultra-vacuum is required for the fabrication in thin film form of high quality semiconductors. This can be accomplished behind a free flying platform similar to the current Wake Shield Facility which is specifically designed to support in-space production. The platform will require apparatus for thin film growth, a robotics interface to allow for the change out of raw materials and the harvesting of finished product, and a servicing plant incorporating Space Station that will support long-term utilization of the platform.

  10. Investigation of the evaporation process conditions on the optical constants of zirconia films.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, J A; Grant, P D; Simpson, R; Waldorf, A J

    1989-09-15

    Deposition parameters required for producing zirconia films for use in optical multilayer systems by electronbeam gun evaporation of zirconia and zirconium starting materials were investigated. The optical constants were determined as a function of distance, partial pressure of oxygen, and angle of incidence. The direct and reactive evaporation processes yielded ZrO(2) films with refractive indices of 2.08 and 2.14, respectively, for vapor incident on the substrate at normal incidence.

  11. Investigation of the evaporation process conditions on the optical constants of zirconia films

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrowolski, J.A.; Grant, P.D.; Simpson, R.; Waldorf, A. )

    1989-09-15

    Deposition parameters required for producing zirconia films for use in optical multilayer systems by electron-beam gun evaporation of zirconia and zirconium starting materials were investigated. The optical constants were determined as a function of distance, partial pressure of oxygen, and angle of incidence. The direct and reactive evaporation processes yielded ZrO{sub 2} films with refractive indices of 2.08 and 2.14, respectively, for vapor incident on the substrate at normal incidence.

  12. High mobility amorphous zinc oxynitride semiconductor material for thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Yan; Lim, Rodney; White, John M.

    2009-10-01

    Zinc oxynitride semiconductor material is produced through a reactive sputtering process in which competition between reactions responsible for the growth of hexagonal zinc oxide (ZnO) and for the growth of cubic zinc nitride (Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2}) is promoted. In contrast to processes in which the reaction for either the oxide or the nitride is dominant, the multireaction process yields a substantially amorphous or a highly disordered nanocrystalline film with higher Hall mobility, 47 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} for the as-deposited film produced at 50 deg. C and 110 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} after annealing at 400 deg. C. In addition, it has been observed that the Hall mobility of the material increases as the carrier concentration decreases in a carrier concentration range where a multicomponent metal oxide semiconductor, indium-gallium-zinc oxide, follows the opposite trend. This indicates that the carrier transports in the single-metal compound and the multimetal compound are probably dominated by different mechanisms. Film stability and thin film transistor performance of the material have also been tested, and results are presented herein.

  13. Fabrication of thin-film superconductors by bulk processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tiefel, T.H.; Jin, S.; Kammlott, G.W.; Graebner, J.E.; van Dover, R.B. ); Spencer, N.D. )

    1991-04-29

    A simple processing technique for preparation of {ital c}-axis-oriented Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O thin films is reported. {similar to}3000-A-thick superconductor films on silver substrate have been obtained by heavy cold rolling and partial melt processing of the superconductor-silver composite structure. The films are highly textured due to the interface-induced, layer-like growth of the superconducting phase, and are essentially free of weak links. They exhibited {ital T}{sub {ital c}}{similar to}80 K and {ital J}{sub {ital c}} (4.2 K) {similar to}10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}. This technique, which does not require epitaxial growth from single-crystal substrates, may be suitable for high-speed, low-cost production of large-area thin films, and points to other novel thin-film processing possibilities.

  14. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  15. Optical Films Deposited By A Reactive Ion Plating Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulker, H. K.; BUhler, M.; Hora, R.

    1986-12-01

    Oxide films on glass substrates, both single and multilayers, were produced by a special reactive ion plating process in the new automatic plating system BALZERS BAP 800. Structure, optical and mechanical film properties have been examined as a function of the deposition parameters. Multilayer systems consisting of TiO2 and Si02 films were deposited, and tests were made concerning optical characteristics, reproducibility and stability. Because of the unique characteristics of the films ion plating promises to become the new technology for the production of optical coatings.

  16. Thin film processing of photorefractive BaTiO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Paul R.; Potember, Richard S.

    1991-01-01

    The principle objectives of this ongoing research involve the preparation and characterization of polycrystalline single-domain thin films of BaTiO3 for photorefractive applications. These films must be continuous, free of cracks, and of high optical quality. The two methods proposed are sputtering and sol-gel related processing.

  17. Dual-mode ion switching conducting polymer films as high energy supercapacitor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Naoi, Katsuhiko; Oura, Yasushi

    1995-12-31

    The electropolymerized polypyrrole films formed from micellar solution of anionic surfactants, viz., Dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS), showed potential-dependent anion and cation ion switching behavior and the peculiar columnar structure. The formation process and the redox of the polypyrrole was studied with the in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) methods. In-situ AFM observation clearly indicated that such a columnar structure started to form around critical charge densities of 60--100 mC cm{sup {minus}2}. The cyclic voltammogram for the PPy doped with DBS{sup {minus}} film showed two redox couples, each of which corresponds to a cation and an anion exchange process. Thus, the film behaves as a dual-mode ion doping/undoping exchanger. As the PPy film was prepared in higher concentration of the surfactant dopant, where the micelles are formed in solution, the resulting film showed a considerably higher (ca. three orders of magnitude) diffusion coefficient compared to ordinary PPy films so far reported. Such an enhanced diffusivity of ions could be attributed to a peculiar structure of the polymer formed. The feasibility of such polypyrrole in use of supercapacitor material was discussed.

  18. Investigation of solution-processed bismuth-niobium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Satoshi; Ariga, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Shin; Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo

    2014-10-21

    The characteristics of bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared using a solution process were investigated. The BNO film annealed at 550°C involving three phases: an amorphous phase, Bi₃NbO₇ fluorite microcrystals, and Nb-rich cubic pyrochlore microcrystals. The cubic pyrochlore structure, which was the main phase in this film, has not previously been reported in BNO films. The relative dielectric constant of the BNO film was approximately 140, which is much higher than that of a corresponding film prepared using a conventional vacuum sputtering process. Notably, the cubic pyrochlore microcrystals disappeared with increasing annealing temperature and were replaced with triclinic β-BiNbO₄ crystals at 590°C. The relative dielectric constant also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Therefore, the high relative dielectric constant of the BNO film annealed at 550°C is thought to result from the BNO cubic pyrochlore structure. In addition, the BNO films annealed at 500°C contained approximately 6.5 atm.% carbon, which was lost at approximately 550°C. This result suggests that the carbon in the BNO film played an important role in the formation of the cubic pyrochlore structure.

  19. Method for growth of CVD diamond on thin film refractory coatings and glass ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes a new method for significantly improving diamond film quality and growth rate on insulating substrates and thin films. The usual method of abrading the substrate surface with diamond particles yields good quality CVD diamond films at reasonable deposition rates on semiconducting materials like silicon. However, on insulating materials like fused silica and sapphire, the conventional method of diamond seeding and surface abrasion almost always results in slow growth rates and poor quality films. Current in-house diamond nucleation and growth studies have focused on depositing CVD diamond on substrates such as fused silica, sapphire, and glass ceramics. Diamond was grown successfully on these types of materials using a sacrificial metal layer method called metal induced nucleation of diamond (MIND). This technique offers a way to deposit diamond on glassy materials with improved adhesion and at lower deposition temperatures (less than 650 degree(s)C). In addition, the MIND technique can be used in combination with metal masking and conventional etching to deposit patterns of diamond. The MIND method was combined with another in-house developed technique called sputtered refractory interlayer nucleation technique (SPRINT). Diamond-crystallite size and orientation can be controlled with SPRINT to fabricate low-scatter diamond films. Both techniques are discussed. A reliable, efficient method for growing diamond on insulating materials significantly enhances the feasibility for practical applications of CVD diamond technology. For example, further development of the MIND technique may provide low-scatter, protective diamond films on sapphire and glass ceramics for visible-wavelength windows and missile domes. For electronic applications, reduction in the growth temperature makes CVD diamond more compatible with existing semiconductor processes. The lower growth temperature also helps to alleviate diffusion problems in metal alloys and facilitates

  20. Do Films Make You Learn? Inference Processes in Expository Film Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibus, Maike; Heier, Anke; Schwan, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The present article examines how suitable expository films are for learning. This question was motivated by the assumption that films are processed in a superficial manner. However, previous research has been dominated by the analyses of outcome measures and has never taken a look at online measures so that no clear conclusions have been drawn.…

  1. CMOS Humidity Sensor System Using Carbon Nitride Film as Sensing Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Pil; Lee, Ji Gong; Chowdhury, Shaestagir

    2008-01-01

    An integrated humidity sensor system with nano-structured carbon nitride film as humidity sensing material is fabricated by a 0.8 μm analog mixed CMOS process. The integrated sensor system consists of differential humidity sensitive field effect transistors (HUSFET), temperature sensor, and operational amplifier. The process contains two poly, two metal and twin well technology. To form CNx film on Si3N4/Si substrate, plasma etching is performed to the gate area as well as trenches. CNx film is deposited by reactive RF magnetron sputtering method and patterned by the lift-off technique. The drain current is proportional to the dielectric constant, and the sensitivity is 2.8 μA/%RH.

  2. Physical and Material Properties of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide High Critical Temperature Superconducting Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiyuan

    1990-01-01

    A simple method of using layered structures and rapid thermal annealing to produce Y_1 Ba_2 Cu_3 O_{7-x} (YBCO) superconducting thin films is presented. Material properties of the films depend strongly on the processing conditions, the film stoichiometry, and the substrates. The films with critical temperature (T_{ rm c}) higher than liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) have been made on various substrates including magnesium oxide, sapphire, and silicon. The best film was obtained on a MgO substrate with T_{rm c} of 84 K. Silicon diffusion and reaction with oxygen during a high temperature anneal degrade the superconductivity of the film on a Si substrate. Using a buffer layer of gold, the Si-YBCO interaction is greatly reduced. Typical resistivity of the film shows a linear temperature dependence which may be attributed to an electron -phonon interaction. Anisotropic resistance behavior has been observed due to the layered structures. Different metal contacts to the YBCO films have been used to study the chemical and electrical properties of metal-YBCO film interfaces. Gold has been found nonreactive to YBCO film, thus, it has the lowest contact resistivity. Near the T_{rm c}, the contact resistivity of a Au-YBCO contact approaches zero. This may be due to the proximity effect. Other metals such as Pt, Pd, Sn and Ti, react with the YBCO film and form thin oxide layers at the interfaces. The oxide layer acts as an insulating barrier which forbids the proximity effect and causes a large contact resistivity. The structural and electrical properties of the Si-YBCO intermixed film have been studied for different thicknesses of the silicon layers. A novel patterning technique of using Si-YBCO intermixing has been developed for fabricating the YBCO superconducting device structures. A superconductor sample has a critical current value I _{rm c}. Below the I _{rm c} the material is superconducting, and above I_{rm c} the sample has a finite resistance. Based on this effect

  3. Materials processing in space bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Literature dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes or with ground based activities that provide supporting research is listed. Included are Government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles. Subdivisions of the bibliography include the five categories: crystal growth; metals, alloys, and composites, fluids and transport; glasses and ceramics; and Ultrahigh Vacuum and Containerless Processing Technologies, in addition to a list of patents and a compilation of anonymously authored collections and reports and a cross reference index.

  4. Positron annihilation studies of vacancy related defects in ceramic and thin film Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} materials

    SciTech Connect

    Keeble, D.J.; Krishnan, A.; Umlor, M.T.; Lynn, K.G.; Warren, W.L.; Dimos, D.; Tuttle, B.A.; Ramesh, R.; Poindexter, E.H.

    1994-07-01

    Preliminary positron annihilation studies of ceramic and thin film Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) materials have been completed. This paper examines effects of processing conditions on vacancy related defects. Positron lifetime measurements on bulk PLZT plates showed an increase in positron trapping to a defect state with increasing grain size consistent with trapping to lead vacancy related defects formed through lead oxide loss during processing. Variable energy positron beam measurements were completed on bulk PLZT plates, sol-gel PZT thin films and laser ablated PLZT thin films. Films processed in a reduced oxygen atmosphere were found to give a higher S-parameter, due to an increase in concentration of neutral or negatively charged vacancy type defects, compared with material processed in an oxidizing ambient.

  5. Ceramic thin-film formation on functionalized interfaces through biomimetic processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, B.C.; Rieke, P.C.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Campbell, A.A.; Fryxell, G.E.; Graff, G.L.; Song, L.; Liu, J.; Virden, J.W.; McVay, G.L. )

    1994-04-01

    Processing routes have been developed for the production of thin ceramic films through precipitation from aqueous solutions. The techniques are based on crystal nucleation and growth onto functionalized interfaces. Surface functionalization routes have been developed by the mimicking of schemes used by organisms to produce complex ceramic composites such as teeth, bones, and shells. High-quality, dense polycrystalline films of oxides, hydroxides, and sulfides have now been prepared for [open quotes]biomimetic[close quotes] synthesis techniques. Ceramic films can be synthesized on plastics and other materials at temperatures below 100[degrees]C. As a low-temperature process in which water rather than organic solvents is used, this synthesis is environmentally benign. Nanocrystalline ceramics can be produced, sometimes with preferred crystallite orientation. The direct deposition of high-resolution patterned films has also been demonstrated. The process is well suited to the production of organic-inorganic composites.

  6. Photo-thermal processing of semiconductor fibers and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nishant

    Furnace processing and rapid thermal processing (RTP) have been an integral part of several processing steps in semiconductor manufacturing. The performance of RTP techniques can be improved many times by exploiting quantum photo-effects of UV and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in thermal processing and this technique is known as rapid photo-thermal processing (RPP). As compared to furnace processing and RTP, RPP provides higher diffusion coefficient, lower stress and lower microscopic defects. In this work, a custom designed automated photo assisted processing system was built from individual parts and an incoherent light source. This photo-assisted processing system is used to anneal silica clad silicon fibers and deposit thin-films. To the best of our knowledge, incoherent light source based rapid photo-thermal processing (RPP) was used for the first time to anneal glass-clad silicon core optical fibers. X-ray diffraction examination, Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements showed a considerable enhancement of structural and crystalline properties of RPP treated silicon fibers. Photons in UV and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions play a very important role in improving the bulk and carrier transport properties of RPP-treated silicon optical fibers, and the resultant annealing permits a path forward to in situ enhancement of the structure and properties of these new crystalline core optical fibers. To explore further applications of RPP, thin-films of Calcium Copper Titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12) or CCTO and Copper (I) Oxide (Cu2O) were also deposited using photo-assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si/SiO2 and n-Si substrate respectively. CCTO is one of the most researched giant dielectric constant materials in recent years. The given photo-assisted MOCVD approach provided polycrystalline CCTO growth on a SiO2 surface with grain sizes as large as 410 nm. Copper (I) oxide (Cu2O) is a direct band gap semiconductor with p-type conductivity and

  7. ALD/MLD processes for Mn and Co based hybrid thin films.

    PubMed

    Ahvenniemi, E; Karppinen, M

    2016-06-28

    Here we report the growth of novel transition metal-organic thin-film materials consisting of manganese or cobalt as the metal component and terephthalate as the rigid organic backbone. The hybrid thin films are deposited by the currently strongly emerging atomic/molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) technique using the combination of a metal β-diketonate, i.e. Mn(thd)3, Co(acac)3 or Co(thd)2, and terephthalic acid (1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid) as precursors. All the processes yield homogeneous and notably smooth amorphous metal-terephthalate hybrid thin films with growth rates of 1-2 Å per cycle. The films are stable towards humidity and withstand high temperatures up to 300 or 400 °C under an oxidative or a reductive atmosphere. The films are characterized with XRR, AFM, GIXRD, XPS and FTIR techniques. PMID:27277668

  8. Effects of process parameters on sheet resistance uniformity of fluorine-doped tin oxide thin films

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An alternative indium-free material for transparent conducting oxides of fluorine-doped tin oxide [FTO] thin films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate [PET] was prepared by electron cyclotron resonance - metal organic chemical vapor deposition [ECR-MOCVD]. One of the essential issues regarding metal oxide film deposition is the sheet resistance uniformity of the film. Variations in process parameters, in this case, working and bubbler pressures of ECR-MOCVD, can lead to a change in resistance uniformity. Both the optical transmittance and electrical resistance uniformity of FTO film-coated PET were investigated. The result shows that sheet resistance uniformity and the transmittance of the film are affected significantly by the changes in bubbler pressure but are less influenced by the working pressure of the ECR-MOCVD system. PMID:22221518

  9. Optical storage in azobenzene-containing epoxy polymers processed as Langmuir Blodgett films.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel; Mondragon, Iñaki; Sanfelice, Rafaela C; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Oyanguren, Patricia; Galante, María J

    2013-04-01

    In this study, azocopolymers containing different main-chain segments have been synthesized with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, DER 332, n=0.03) and the azochromophore Disperse Orange 3 (DO3) cured with two monoamines, viz. benzylamine (BA) and m-toluidine (MT). The photoinduced birefringence was investigated in films produced with these azopolymers using the spin coating (SC) and Langmuir Blodgett (LB) techniques. In the LB films, birefringence increased with the content of azochromophore and the film thickness, as expected. The nanostructured nature of the LB films led to an enhanced birefringence and faster dynamics in the writing process, compared to the SC films. In summary, the combination of azocopolymers and the LB method may allow materials with tuned properties for various optical applications, including in biological systems were photoisomerization may be used to trigger actions such as drug delivery. PMID:23827588

  10. ALD/MLD processes for Mn and Co based hybrid thin films.

    PubMed

    Ahvenniemi, E; Karppinen, M

    2016-06-28

    Here we report the growth of novel transition metal-organic thin-film materials consisting of manganese or cobalt as the metal component and terephthalate as the rigid organic backbone. The hybrid thin films are deposited by the currently strongly emerging atomic/molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) technique using the combination of a metal β-diketonate, i.e. Mn(thd)3, Co(acac)3 or Co(thd)2, and terephthalic acid (1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid) as precursors. All the processes yield homogeneous and notably smooth amorphous metal-terephthalate hybrid thin films with growth rates of 1-2 Å per cycle. The films are stable towards humidity and withstand high temperatures up to 300 or 400 °C under an oxidative or a reductive atmosphere. The films are characterized with XRR, AFM, GIXRD, XPS and FTIR techniques.

  11. Optical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon films synthesized by plasma immersion ion processing

    SciTech Connect

    He, X-M.; Walter, K.C.; Bardeau, J-F.; Nastasi, M.; Lee, S-T.; Sun, X.S.

    1999-04-12

    Hard diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been prepared on PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate), glass, and Si(100) substrates using C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-Ar plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP). The composition, structure, and properties of the films were investigated with regard to variation of the deposition parameters. It was found that the modulation of reactive gas composition during PIIP could enhance the formation of DLC films with an increased sp{sup 3} bonding structure, improved surface smoothness, high density and high hardness. An optimal combination of good optical properties and high hardness was highly dependent on the control of hydrogen content in the DLC films. Tribological tests showed that DLC-coated glass and PMMA samples exhibited a reduced friction coefficient and enhanced wear resistance relative to uncoated glass and PMMA materials. The effects of ion energy and gas composition during PIIP deposition on the formation of optically transparent and wear resistant DLC films are discussed.

  12. Possibilities of Laser Processing of Paper Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Alexander; Saukkonen, Esa; Piili, Heidi

    Nowadays, lasers are applied in many industrial processes: the most developed technologies include such processes as laser welding, hybrid welding, laser cutting of steel, etc. In addition to laser processing of metallic materials, there are also many industrial applications of laser processing of non-metallic materials, like laser welding of polymers, laser marking of glass and laser cutting of wood-based materials. It is commonly known that laser beam is suitable for cutting of paper materials as well as all natural wood-fiber based materials. This study reveals the potential and gives overview of laser application in processing of paper materials. In 1990's laser technology increased its volume in papermaking industry; lasers at paper industry gained acceptance for different perforating and scoring applications. Nowadays, with reduction in the cost of equipment and development of laser technology (especially development of CO2 technology), laser processing of paper material has started to become more widely used and more efficient. However, there exists quite little published research results and reviews about laser processing of paper materials. In addition, forest industry products with pulp and paper products in particular are among major contributors for the Finnish economy with 20% share of total exports in the year 2013. This has been the standpoint of view and motivation for writing this literature review article: when there exists more published research work, knowledge of laser technology can be increased to apply it for processing of paper materials.

  13. Space processing of electronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    The bulk growth of solid solution alloys of mercury telluride and cadmium telluride is discussed. These alloys are usually described by the formula Hg1-xCdxTe, and are useful for the construction of infrared detectors. The electronic energy band gap can be controlled between zero and 1.6 electron volts by adjusting the composition x. The most useful materials are at x approximately 20%, suitable for detection wavelengths of about 10 micrometers. The problems of growing large crystals are rooted in the wide phase diagram of the HgTe-CdTe pseudobinary system which leads to exaggerate segregation in freezing, constitutional supercooling, and other difficulties, and in the high vapor pressure of mercury at the growth temperatures, which leads to loss of stoichiometry and to the necessity of working in strong, pressure resistant sealed containers.

  14. Materials processing routes to trap-free halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Buin, Andrei; Pietsch, Patrick; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ip, Alexander H; Comin, Riccardo; Sargent, Edward H

    2014-11-12

    Photovoltaic devices based on lead iodide perovskite films have seen rapid advancements, recently achieving an impressive 17.9% certified solar power conversion efficiency. Reports have consistently emphasized that the specific choice of growth conditions and chemical precursors is central to achieving superior performance from these materials; yet the roles and mechanisms underlying the selection of materials processing route is poorly understood. Here we show that films grown under iodine-rich conditions are prone to a high density of deep electronic traps (recombination centers), while the use of a chloride precursor avoids the formation of key defects (Pb atom substituted by I) responsible for short diffusion lengths and poor photovoltaic performance. Furthermore, the lowest-energy surfaces of perovskite crystals are found to be entirely trap-free, preserving both electron and hole delocalization to a remarkable degree, helping to account for explaining the success of polycrystalline perovskite films. We construct perovskite films from I-poor conditions using a lead acetate precursor, and our measurement of a long (600 ± 40 nm) diffusion length confirms this new picture of the importance of growth conditions.

  15. Selectiveness of laser processing due to energy coupling localization: case of thin film solar cell scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Račiukaitis, G.; Grubinskas, S.; Gečys, P.; Gedvilas, M.

    2013-07-01

    Selectiveness of the laser processing is the top-most important for applications of the processing technology in thin-film electronics, including photovoltaics. Coupling of laser energy in multilayered thin-film structures, depending on photo-physical properties of the layers and laser wavelength was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Energy coupling within thin films highly depends on the film structure. The finite element and two-temperature models were applied to simulate the energy and temperature distributions inside the stack of different layers of a thin-film solar cell during a picosecond laser irradiation. Reaction of the films to the laser irradiation was conditioned by optical properties of the layers at the wavelength of laser radiation. Simulation results are consistent with the experimental data achieved in laser scribing of copper-indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells on a flexible polymer substrate using picosecond-pulsed lasers. Selection of the right laser wavelength (1064 nm or 1572 nm) enabled keeping the energy coupling in a well-defined volume at the interlayer interface. High absorption at inner interface of the layers triggered localized temperature increase. Transient stress caused by the rapid temperature rise facilitating peeling of the films rather than evaporation. Ultra-short pulses ensured high energy input rate into absorbing material permitting peeling of the layers with no influence on the remaining material.

  16. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  17. Hydrogen gettering packing material and process for making same

    SciTech Connect

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    1999-09-09

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  18. Spray Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Source Precursors for Chalcopyrite I-III-VI2 Thin-Film Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Harris, Jerry D.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Dickman, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Thin-film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provide an attractive approach to fabricating solar arrays with high mass-specific power. A polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer is among the new generation of photovoltaic device technologies for thin film solar cells. At NASA Glenn Research Center we have focused on the development of new single-source precursors (SSPs) for deposition of semiconducting chalcopyrite materials onto lightweight, flexible substrates. We describe the syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering. Copper indium disulfide and related thin-film materials were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using SSPs. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties to optimize device quality. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hotwall reactor at 395 C yielded the best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier-, smoother-, and denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was one percent.

  19. Laser Material Processing for Microengineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helvajian, H.

    1995-01-01

    The processing of materials via laser irradiation is presented in a brief survey. Various techniques currently used in laser processing are outlined and the significance to the development of space qualified microinstrumentation are identified. In general the laser processing technique permits the transferring of patterns (i.e. lithography), machining (i.e. with nanometer precision), material deposition (e.g., metals, dielectrics), the removal of contaminants/debris/passivation layers and the ability to provide process control through spectroscopy.

  20. Infrared Database for Process Support Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K. E.; Boothe, R. E.; Burns, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    Process support materials' compatibility with cleaning processes is critical to ensure final hardware cleanliness and that performance requirements are met. Previous discovery of potential contaminants in process materials shows the need for incoming materials testing and establishment of a process materials database. The Contamination Control Team of the Materials, Processes, and Manufacturing (MP&M) Department at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has initiated the development of such an infrared (IR) database, called the MSFC Process Materials IR database, of the common process support materials used at MSFC. These process support materials include solvents, wiper cloths, gloves, bagging materials, etc. Testing includes evaluation of the potential of gloves, wiper cloths, and other items to transfer contamination to handled articles in the absence of solvent exposure, and the potential for solvent exposure to induce material degradation. This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the initial testing completed through December 2002. It is anticipated that additional testing will be conducted with updates provided in future TMs.Materials were analyzed using two different IR techniques: (1) Dry transference and (2) liquid extraction testing. The first of these techniques utilized the Nicolet Magna 750 IR spectrometer outfitted with a horizontal attenuated total reflectance (HATR) crystal accessory. The region from 650 to 4,000 wave numbers was analyzed, and 50 scans were performed per IR spectrum. A dry transference test was conducted by applying each sample with hand pressure to the HATR crystal to first obtain a spectrum of the parent material. The material was then removed from the HATR crystal and analyzed to determine the presence of any residues. If volatile, liquid samples were examined both prior to and following evaporation.The second technique was to perform an extraction test with each sample in five different solvents.Once the scans were complete for

  1. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  2. Roadmap for Process Equipment Materials Technology

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-10-01

    This Technology Roadmap addresses the ever-changing material needs of the chemical and allied process industries, and the energy, economic and environmental burdens associated with corrosion and other materials performance and lifetime issues. This Technology Roadmap outlines the most critical of these R&D needs, and how they can impact the challenges facing today’s materials of construction.

  3. Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to the Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN), which was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of NASA-Marshall. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. The data base is NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) to be hazardous to the environment. The data base also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these materials.

  4. New spin-on metal hardmask materials for lithography processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huirong; Mullen, Salem; Wolfer, Elizabeth; Rahman, Dalil; Anyadiegwu, Clement; Mckenzie, Douglas; Dioses, Alberto; Cho, Joonyeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna

    2013-03-01

    Since the critical dimensions in integrated circuit (IC) device fabrication continue to shrink below 32 nm, multilayer stacks with alternating etch selectivities are required for successful pattern transfer from the exposed photoresist to the substrate. Inorganic resist underlayer materials are used as hard masks in reactive ion etching (RIE) with oxidative gases. The conventional silicon hardmask has demonstrated good reflectivity control and reasonable etch selectivity. However, some issues such as the rework of trilayer stacks and cleaning of oxide residue by wet chemistry are challenging problems for manufacturability. The present work reveals novel spin-on underlayer materials containing significant amounts of metal oxides in the film after baking at normal processing conditions. Such an inorganic metal hardmask (MHM) has excellent etch selectivity in plasma etch processes of the trilayer stack. The composition has good long term shelf life and pot life stability based on solution LPC analysis and wafer defect studies, respectively. The material absorbs DUV wavelengths and can be used as a spin-on inorganic or hybrid antireflective coating to control substrate reflectivity under DUV exposure of photoresist. Some of these metal-containing materials can be used as an underlayer in EUV lithography to significantly enhance photospeed. Specific metal hard masks are also developed for via or trench filling applications in IRT processes. The materials have shown good coating and lithography performance with a film thicknesses as low as 10 nm under ArF dry or immersion conditions. In addition, the metal oxide films or residues can be partially or completely removed by using various wet-etching solutions at ambient temperature.

  5. The Constitutive Modeling of Thin Films with Randon Material Wrinkles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphey, Thomas W.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2001-01-01

    Material wrinkles drastically alter the structural constitutive properties of thin films. Normally linear elastic materials, when wrinkled, become highly nonlinear and initially inelastic. Stiffness' reduced by 99% and negative Poisson's ratios are typically observed. This paper presents an effective continuum constitutive model for the elastic effects of material wrinkles in thin films. The model considers general two-dimensional stress and strain states (simultaneous bi-axial and shear stress/strain) and neglects out of plane bending. The constitutive model is derived from a traditional mechanics analysis of an idealized physical model of random material wrinkles. Model parameters are the directly measurable wrinkle characteristics of amplitude and wavelength. For these reasons, the equations are mechanistic and deterministic. The model is compared with bi-axial tensile test data for wrinkled Kaptong(Registered Trademark) HN and is shown to deterministically predict strain as a function of stress with an average RMS error of 22%. On average, fitting the model to test data yields an RMS error of 1.2%

  6. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques.

  7. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks.

  8. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks. PMID:24663836

  9. Effects of acetylacetone additions on PZT thin film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Assink, R.A.; Dimos, D.; Sinclair, M.B.; Boyle, T.J.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    Sol-gel processing methods are frequently used for the fabrication of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films for many electronic applications. Our standard approach for film fabrication utilizes lead acetate and acetic acid modified metal alkoxides of zirconium and titanium in the preparation of our precursor solutions. This report highlights some of our recent results on the effects of the addition of a second chelating ligand, acetylacetone, to this process. The authors discuss the changes in film drying behavior, densification and ceramic microstructure which accompany acetylacetone additions to the precursor solution and relate the observed variations in processing behavior to differences in chemical precursor structure induced by the acetylacetone ligand. Improvements in thin film microstructure, ferroelectric and optical properties are observed when acetylacetone is added to the precursor solution.

  10. Novel wide band gap materials for highly efficient thin film tandem solar cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brian E. Hardin; Connor, Stephen T.; Peters, Craig H.

    2012-06-11

    Tandem solar cells (TSCs), which use two or more materials to absorb sunlight, have achieved power conversion efficiencies of >25% versus 11-20% for commercialized single junction solar cell modules. The key to widespread commercialization of TSCs is to develop the wide-band, top solar cell that is both cheap to fabricate and has a high open-circuit voltage (i.e. >1V). Previous work in TSCs has generally focused on using expensive processing techniques with slow growth rates resulting in costs that are two orders of magnitude too expensive to be used in conventional solar cell modules. The objective of the PLANT PV proposal was to investigate the feasibility of using Ag(In,Ga)Se2 (AIGS) as the wide-bandgap absorber in the top cell of a thin film tandem solar cell (TSC). Despite being studied by very few in the solar community, AIGS solar cells have achieved one of the highest open-circuit voltages within the chalcogenide material family with a Voc of 949 mV when grown with an expensive processing technique (i.e. Molecular Beam Epitaxy). PLANT PV's goal in Phase I of the DOE SBIR was to (1) develop the chemistry to grow AIGS thin films via solution processing techniques to reduce costs and (2) fabricate new device architectures with high open-circuit voltage to produce full tandem solar cells in Phase II. PLANT PV attempted to translate solution processing chemistries that were successful in producing >12% efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by replacing copper compounds with silver. The main thrust of the research was to determine if it was possible to make high quality AIGS thin films using solution processing and to fully characterize the materials properties. PLANT PV developed several different types of silver compounds in an attempt to fabricate high quality thin films from solution. We found that silver compounds that were similar to the copper based system did not result in high quality thin films. PLANT PV was able to deposit AIGS thin

  11. Thin film capillary process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-11-18

    Method and system of forming microfluidic capillaries in a variety of substrate materials. A first layer of a material such as silicon dioxide is applied to a channel etched in substrate. A second, sacrificial layer of a material such as a polymer is deposited on the first layer. A third layer which may be of the same material as the first layer is placed on the second layer. The sacrificial layer is removed to form a smooth walled capillary in the substrate.

  12. Magnetization Processes During FM Transitions of Supercooled Er Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2000-03-01

    FM transitions are generally accompanied by dimensional changes of the crystal lattice. In magnetic films, the in-plane dimensional changes are inhibited by clamping to the substrate, creating a rich variety of phenomena (e.g. supercooling, dislocation formation and motion, bowing of dislocations, and altered magnetization processes), which can be directly observed with x-rays. Here we characterize the magnetization processes exhibited by unstrained Er films. Below the Curie temperature, the film exhibits supercooling, remaining in a metastable non-FM state and only relaxing to the FM state when a magnetic field is applied. This occurs by two distinct processes. The first process, which broadens the x-ray line shape, is nucleation and growth of FM domains. The second, which produces no line broadening, is isotropic magnetization of the entire film. Once magnetized, the film remains in the FM state until the temperature is raised several degrees above the Curie temperature, at which point the film relaxes to the non-FM state via one of these two paths. This process depends on the temperature when the field is removed.

  13. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2010-10-12

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  14. Method for double-sided processing of thin film transistors

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2008-04-08

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  15. Molybdenum as a contact material in zinc tin oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Peterson, R. L.

    2014-05-12

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors are of increasing interest for a variety of thin film electronics applications. Here, the contact properties of different source/drain electrode materials to solution-processed amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin-film transistors are studied using the transmission line method. The width-normalized contact resistance between ZTO and sputtered molybdenum is measured to be 8.7 Ω-cm, which is 10, 20, and 600 times smaller than that of gold/titanium, indium tin oxide, and evaporated molybdenum electrodes, respectively. The superior contact formed using sputtered molybdenum is due to a favorable work function lineup, an insulator-free interface, bombardment of ZTO during molybdenum sputtering, and trap-assisted tunneling. The transfer length of the sputtered molybdenum/ZTO contact is 0.34 μm, opening the door to future radio-frequency sub-micron molybdenum/ZTO thin film transistors.

  16. Designing thin film materials — Ternary borides from first principles

    PubMed Central

    Euchner, H.; Mayrhofer, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting the mechanisms responsible for the exceptional properties of aluminum based nitride coatings, we apply ab initio calculations to develop a recipe for designing functional thin film materials based on ternary diborides. The combination of binary diborides, preferring different structure types, results in supersaturated metastable ternary systems with potential for phase transformation induced effects. For the exemplary cases of MxW1 − xB2 (with M = Al, Ti, V) we show by detailed ab initio calculations that the respective ternary solid solutions are likely to be experimentally accessible by modern depositions techniques. PMID:26082562

  17. Materials micro-processing using femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabu, R.; Zamfirescu, M.; Anghel, I.; Jipa, F.

    2013-06-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena which dominate the interaction of tightly focused femtosecond laser beams with materials are discussed. Different femtosecond laser based techniques for material processing such as laser ablation, two-photon photo-polymerization, and material surface nano-structuring are described. For the computer controlled micro-processing of materials, near-infrared Ti:sapphire femtosecond lasers, with nano-Joule/micro-Joule pulse energy, were coupled with direct laser writing workstations. Laser fabricated micro-nanostructures and their applications are presented.

  18. High index glass thin film processing for photonics and photovoltaic (PV) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu Anthony

    To favorably compete with fossil-fuel technology, the greatest challenge for thin film solar-cells is to improve efficiency and reduce material cost. Thickness scaling to thin film reduces material cost but affects the light absorption in the cells; therefore a concept that traps incident photons and increases its optical path length is needed to boost absorption in thin film solar cells. One approach is the integration of low symmetric gratings (LSG), using high index material, on either the front-side or backside of 30 um thin c-Si cells. In this study, Multicomponent TeO2--Bi2O 3--ZnO (TBZ) glass thin films were prepared using RF magnetron sputtering under different oxygen flow rates. The influences of oxygen flow rate on the structural and optical properties of the resulting thin films were investigated. The structural origin of the optical property variation was studied using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that TBZ glass thin film is a suitable material for front side LSG material photovoltaic and photonics applications due to their amorphous nature, high refractive index (n > 2), broad band optical transparency window, low processing temperature. We developed a simple maskless method to pattern sputtered tellurite based glass thin films using unconventional agarose hydrogel mediated wet etching. Conventional wet etching process, while claiming low cost and high throughput, suffers from reproducibility and pattern fidelity issues due to the isotropic nature of wet chemical etching when applied to glasses and polymers. This method overcomes these challenges by using an agarose hydrogel stamp to mediate a conformal etching process. In our maskless method, agarose hydrogel stamps are patterned following a standard soft lithography and replica molding process from micropatterned masters and soaked in a chemical etchant. The micro-scale features on the stamp are

  19. Chemically Deposited Thin-Film Solar Cell Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R.; Junek, W.; Gorse, J.; Thompson, T.; Harris, J.; Hehemann, D.; Hepp, A.; Rybicki, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have been working on the development of thin film photovoltaic solar cell materials that can be produced entirely by wet chemical methods on low-cost flexible substrates. P-type copper indium diselenide (CIS) absorber layers have been deposited via electrochemical deposition. Similar techniques have also allowed us to incorporate both Ga and S into the CIS structure, in order to increase its optical bandgap. The ability to deposit similar absorber layers with a variety of bandgaps is essential to our efforts to develop a multi-junction thin-film solar cell. Chemical bath deposition methods were used to deposit a cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layers on our CIS-based absorber layers. Window contacts were made to these CdS/CIS junctions by the electrodeposition of zinc oxide (ZnO). Structural and elemental determinations of the individual ZnO, CdS and CIS-based films via transmission spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy will be presented. The electrical characterization of the resulting devices will be discussed.

  20. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  1. Surface energy characteristics of zeolite embedded PVDF nanofiber films with electrospinning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong Hee; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-11-01

    Electrospinning is a nano-scale fiber production method with various polymer materials. This technique allows simple fiber diameters control by changing the physical conditions such as applied voltage and polymer solution viscosity during the fabrication process. The electrospun polymer fibers form a thin porous film with high surface area to volume ratio. Due to these unique characteristics, it is widely used for many application fields such as photocatalyst, electric sensor, and antibacterial scaffold for tissue engineering. Filtration is one of the main applications of electrospun polymer fibers for specific application of filtering out dust particles and dehumidification. Most polymers which are commonly used in electrospinning are hard to perform the filtering and dehumidification simultaneously because of their low hygroscopic property. To overcome this obstacle, the desiccant polymers are developed such as polyacrylic acid and polysulfobetaine methacrylate. However, the desiccant polymers are generally expensive and need special solvent for electrospinning. An alternating way to solve these problems is mixing desiccant material like zeolite in polymer solution during an electrospinning process. In this study, the free surface energy characteristics of electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film with various zeolite concentrations are investigated to control the hygroscopic property of general polymers. Fundamental physical property of wettability with PVDF shows hydrophobicity. The electrospun PVDF film with small weight ratio with higher than 0.1% of zeolite powder shows diminished contact angles that certifying the wettability of PVDF can be controlled using desiccant material in electrospinning process. To quantify the surface energy of electrospun PVDF films, sessile water droplets are introduced on the electrospun PVDF film surface and the contact angles are measured. The contact angles of PVDF film are 140° for without zeolite and 80° for with 5

  2. Thin films of copper antimony sulfide: A photovoltaic absorber material

    SciTech Connect

    Ornelas-Acosta, R.E.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K.; Krishnan, B.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • CuSbS{sub 2} thin films were prepared by heating Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers. • Analyzed the structure, composition, optical, and electrical properties. • PV structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag were formed at different conditions. • The PV parameters (J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF) were evaluated from the J–V characteristics. • J{sub sc}: 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, V{sub oc}:187–323 mV, FF: 0.27–0.48 were obtained. - Abstract: In this work, we report preparation and characterization of CuSbS{sub 2} thin films by heating glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers and their use as absorber material in photovoltaic structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag. The Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films of 600 nm were prepared by chemical bath deposition on which copper thin films of 50 nm were thermally evaporated, and the glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu multilayers were heated in vacuum at different temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of orthorhombic CuSbS{sub 2} after heating the precursor layers. Studies on identification and chemical state of the elements were done using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical band gap of the CuSbS{sub 2} thin films was 1.55 eV and the thin films were photoconductive. The photovoltaic parameters of the devices using CuSbS{sub 2} as absorber and CdS as window layer were evaluated from the J–V curves, yielding J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF values in the range of 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, 187–323 mV, and 0.27–0.48, respectively, under illumination of AM1.5 radiation.

  3. Planning for Materials Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A systems design study to describe the conceptual evolution, the institutional interrelationshiphs, and the basic physical requirements to implement materials processing in space was conducted. Planning for a processing era, rather than hardware design, was emphasized. Product development in space was examined in terms of fluid phenomena, phase separation, and heat and mass transfer. The effect of materials processing on the environment was studied. A concept for modular, unmanned orbiting facilities using the modified external tank of the space shuttle is presented. Organizational and finding structures which would provide for the efficient movement of materials from user to space are discussed.

  4. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  5. The preparation of fluorine doped cadmium oxide thin film by sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Yea; Kim, Jong Sung

    2014-11-01

    During the several decades, CdO thin film has attracted many attentions as a candidate for the transparent conducting electrodes due to its high electrical conductivity and high optical transmittance. Various dopants such as F, In, Al, Sn, and Cr have been used to improve the optical and electrical properties of the film. Generally, the optical and electrical property of the thin film is dependent on its oxidation state, the amount of dopant materials, and the fabrication process. In this study, fluorine doped CdO thin films were prepared by using sol-gel process with various atomic ratios of Cd:F, and their electrical and optical properties were investigated. The precursor solution for sol-gel film was prepared with pH 5 and pH 8, and the film was annealed at 350 degrees C. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the cubic CdO:F phase formation, and the 10% fluorine doped film prepared with pH 8 precursor solution showed the lowest resistivity of 0.01574 Ω cm.

  6. Laser Processing of Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew

    Transparent conducting films, or TCFs, are 2D electrical conductors with the ability to transmit light. Because of this, they are used in many popular electronics including smart phones, tablets, solar panels, and televisions. The most common material used as a TCF is indium tin oxide, or ITO. Although ITO has great electrical and optical characteristics, it is expensive, brittle, and difficult to pattern. These limitations have led researchers toward other materials for the next generation of displays and touch panels. The most promising material for next generation TCFs is carbon nanotubes, or CNTs. CNTs are cylindrical tubes of carbon no more than a few atoms thick. They have different electrical and optical properties depending on their atomic structure, and are extremely strong. As an electrode, they conduct electricity through an array of randomly dispersed tubes. The array is highly transparent because of gaps between the tubes, and size and optical properties of the CNTs. Many research groups have tried making CNT TCFs with opto-electric properties similar to ITO but have difficultly achieving high conductivity. This is partly attributed to impurities from fabrication and a mix of different tube types, but is mainly caused by low junction conductivity. In functionalized nanotubes, junction conductivity is impaired by covalently bonded molecules added to the sidewalls of the tubes. The addition of this molecule, known as functionalization, is designed to facilitate CNT dispersion in a solvent by adding properties of the molecule to the CNTs. While necessary for a good solution, functionalization decreases the conductivity in the CNT array by creating defects in the tube's structures and preventing direct inter-carbon bonding. This research investigates removing the functional coating (after tube deposition) by laser processing. Laser light is able to preferentially heat the CNTs because of their optical and electrical properties. Through local conduction

  7. Laser Materials Processing for NASA's Aerospace Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Hunyady, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, and surface treatment. Due to the multifunctional nature of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed, these attributes are attractive in order to support long-term missions in space. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications. Specifically, size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials are all concerns. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in solidstate laser (e.g., diode-pumped lasers) and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques in space has increased significantly. A review of the historical development of lasers from their infancy to the present will be used to show how these issues may be addressed. The review will also indicate where further development is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. Both short- and long-term space missions will benefit from the development of a universal laser-based tool with low power consumption, improved process flexibility, compactness (e.g., miniaturization), robustness, and automation for maximum utility with a minimum of human interaction. The potential advantages of using lasers with suitable wavelength and beam properties for future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond will be discussed. The laser processing experiments in the present report were performed using a diode pumped, pulsed/continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (50 W max average laser power), with a 1064 nm wavelength. The processed materials included Ti-6AI-4V, Al-2219 and Al-2090. For Phase I of this project, the laser process conditions were varied and optimized

  8. The processing of materials in outer space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Colling, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Zero-gravity environment may lead to fabrication of new and improved materials. According to comprehensive study of application of this promising technology to superconducting and electrical contact materials, outer space processing could improve microstructure and homogeneity of many single and multicomponent systems formed from solidification of fluid phases. New structures that are impossible to form terrestrially may also be accessible in space environment.

  9. Structure and properties of polypropylene cast films: Polymer type and processing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileva, Daniela; Gahleitner, Markus; Gloger, Dietrich

    2016-05-01

    The influence of processing parameters in a cast film extrusion process of thin films of isotactic polypropylene homopolymer and random propylene-ethylene copolymer was analyzed. Variation of the chill roll temperature allowed changing the supercooling of the melt and thus the generation of different crystal polymorphs of iPP. Additional focus was placed on the effect of flow induced crystallization via changing the output rate of the line. The crystal structure and morphology of the materials were evaluated and correlated to selected optical and mechanical properties.

  10. Aqueous processing in materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooiman, Michael B.; Sole, Kathryn C.

    1994-06-01

    Reviews of aqueous processing in JOM have traditionally focused on hydrometallurgical process routes. This article, however, addresses the application of aqueous processing in materials engineering and presents some promising developments that employ aqueous-based routes for the manufacture of high-tech components and specialty products. Such applications include producing metallic and ceramic powders; etching; surface modification by electroplating and electroless plating; manufacturing jewelry and intricate components by electroforming; and producing advanced ceramics, composites, and nanophase materials by sol-gel and biomimetic processing.

  11. Electronic materials processing and the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and origin of deficiencies in bulk electronic materials for device fabrication are analyzed. It is found that gravity generated perturbations during their formation account largely for the introduction of critical chemical and crystalline defects and, moreover, are responsible for the still existing gap between theory and experiment and thus for excessive reliance on proprietary empiricism in processing technology. Exploration of the potential of reduced gravity environment for electronic materials processing is found to be not only desirable but mandatory.

  12. Theoretical and material studies on thin-film electroluminescent devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, C. J.; Brennan, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    Electroluminescent materials and device technology were assessed. The evaluation strongly suggests the need for a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of both materials and device structures, particularly in the following areas: carrier generation and multiplication; radiative and nonradiative processes of luminescent centers; device modeling; new device concepts; and single crystal materials growth and characterization. Modeling of transport properties of hot electrons in ZnSe and the generation of device concepts were initiated.

  13. Plasma-assisted microwave processing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin (Inventor); Ylin, Tzu-yuan (Inventor); Jackson, Henry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A microwave plasma assisted method and system for heating and joining materials. The invention uses a microwave induced plasma to controllably preheat workpiece materials that are poorly microwave absorbing. The plasma preheats the workpiece to a temperature that improves the materials' ability to absorb microwave energy. The plasma is extinguished and microwave energy is able to volumetrically heat the workpiece. Localized heating of good microwave absorbing materials is done by shielding certain parts of the workpiece and igniting the plasma in the areas not shielded. Microwave induced plasma is also used to induce self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) process for the joining of materials. Preferably, a microwave induced plasma preheats the material and then microwave energy ignites the center of the material, thereby causing a high temperature spherical wave front from the center outward.

  14. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction. [space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.; Mckenzie, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Three different chemical processing schemes were identified for separating lunar soils into the major oxides and elements. Feedstock production for space industry; an HF acid leach process; electrorefining processes for lunar free metal and metal derived from chemical processing of lunar soils; production and use of silanes and spectrally selective materials; glass, ceramics, and electrochemistry workshops; and an econometric model of bootstrapping space industry are discussed.

  15. The cognitive processing of film and musical soundtracks.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Marilyn G

    2004-10-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that musical soundtracks can influence the interpretation, emotional impact, and remembering of film information. The intent here was to examine how music is encoded into the cognitive system and subsequently represented relative to its accompanying visual action. In Experiment 1, participants viewed a set of music/film clips that were either congruent or incongruent in their emotional affects. Selective attending was also systematically manipulated by instructing viewers to attend to and remember the music, film, or both in tandem. The results from tune recognition, film recall, and paired discrimination tasks collectively revealed that mood-congruent pairs lead to a joint encoding of music/film information as well as an integrated memory code. Incongruent pairs, on the other hand, result in an independent encoding in which a given dimension, music or film, is only remembered well if it was selectively attended to at the time of encoding. Experiment 2 extended these findings by showing that tunes from mood-congruent pairs are better recognized when cued by their original scenes, while those from incongruent pairs are better remembered in the absence of scene information. These findings both support and extend the "Congruence Associationist Model" (A. J. Cohen, 2001), which addresses those cognitive mechanisms involved in the processing of music/film information.

  16. A novel class of strain gauges based on layered percolative films of 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Marek; Nezich, Daniel; Kong, Jing; Hofmann, Mario

    2012-11-14

    Here we report on the fabrication and characterization of a novel type of strain gauge based on percolative networks of 2D materials. The high sensitivity of the percolative carrier transport to strain induced morphology changes was exploited in strain sensors that can be produced from a wide variety of materials. Highly reliable and sensitive graphene-based thin film strain gauges were produced from solution processed graphene flakes by spray deposition. Control of the gauge sensitivity could be exerted through deposition-induced changes to the film morphology. This exceptional property was explained through modeling of the strain induced changes to the flake-flake overlap for different percolation networks. The ability to directly deposit strain gauges on complex-shaped and transparent surfaces was presented. The demonstrated scalable fabrication, superior sensitivity over conventional sensors, and unique properties of the described strain gauges have the potential to improve existing technology and open up new fields of applications for strain sensors.

  17. Aircraft gas turbine materials and processes.

    PubMed

    Kear, B H; Thompson, E R

    1980-05-23

    Materials and processing innovations that have been incorporated into the manufacture of critical components for high-performance aircraft gas turbine engines are described. The materials of interest are the nickel- and cobalt-base superalloys for turbine and burner sections of the engine, and titanium alloys and composites for compressor and fan sections of the engine. Advanced processing methods considered include directional solidification, hot isostatic pressing, superplastic foring, directional recrystallization, and diffusion brazing. Future trends in gas turbine technology are discussed in terms of materials availability, substitution, and further advances in air-cooled hardware. PMID:17772808

  18. Aircraft gas turbine materials and processes.

    PubMed

    Kear, B H; Thompson, E R

    1980-05-23

    Materials and processing innovations that have been incorporated into the manufacture of critical components for high-performance aircraft gas turbine engines are described. The materials of interest are the nickel- and cobalt-base superalloys for turbine and burner sections of the engine, and titanium alloys and composites for compressor and fan sections of the engine. Advanced processing methods considered include directional solidification, hot isostatic pressing, superplastic foring, directional recrystallization, and diffusion brazing. Future trends in gas turbine technology are discussed in terms of materials availability, substitution, and further advances in air-cooled hardware.

  19. Materials Processing in Space (MPS) program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Insight is provided into the scientific rotationale for materials processing in space (MPS), and a comprehensive and cohesive approach for implementation and integration of the many, diverse aspects of MPS is described. The programmatic and management functions apply to all projects and activities implemented under MPS. It is intended that specific project plans, providing project unique details, will be appended to this document for endeavors such as the Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) Project, the Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) Project, the MPS/Spacelab (MPS/SL) Project, and the Materials Experiment Carrier (MEC) Payloads.

  20. Functionally graded materials: Design, processing and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Y.; Kaysser, W.A.; Rabin, B.H.; Kawasaki, A.; Ford, R.G.

    1999-09-01

    In a Functionally Graded Material (FGM), the composition and structure gradually change over volume, resulting in corresponding changes in the properties of the material. By applying the many possibilities inherent in the FGM concept, it is anticipated that materials will be improved and new functions for them created. A comprehensive description of design, modeling, processing, and evaluation of FGMs as well as their applications is covered in this book. The contents include: lessons from nature; graded microstructures; modeling and design; characterization of properties; processing and fabrication; applications; and summary and outlook.

  1. Materials processing using a variable frequency microwave furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Maddox, S.R.; Everleigh, C.A.; Espinosa, R.J.; Johnson, A.C.

    1993-12-31

    We describe a materials processing system that uses a high power traveling wave tube (TWT) as the microwave source. The TWT provides approximately one octave bandwidth and variable power levels up to 2 kW into a multimode cavity. By controlling the frequency, efficient coupling to the load can be maintained even as the load`s dielectric properties change. Alternatively, can be used as a means of mode stirring at rates far beyond those attainable through mechanical stirring. The system has been tested for sintering alumina ceramics, annealing a tungsten penetrator alloy, curing epoxy resin, and depositing diamond films from a microwave plasma.

  2. Process optimization of ultrasonic spray coating of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sanjukta; Keller, Stephan S; Alstrøm, Tommy S; Boisen, Anja; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-06-11

    In this work we have performed a detailed study of the influence of various parameters on spray coating of polymer films. Our aim is to produce polymer films of uniform thickness (500 nm to 1 μm) and low roughness compared to the film thickness. The coatings are characterized with respect to thickness, roughness (profilometer), and morphology (optical microscopy). Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is used to do a full factorial design of experiments with selected process parameters such as temperature, distance between spray nozzle and substrate, and speed of the spray nozzle. A mathematical model is developed for statistical analysis which identifies the distance between nozzle and substrate as the most significant parameter. Depending on the drying of the sprayed droplets on the substrate, we define two broad regimes, "dry" and "wet". The optimum condition of spraying lies in a narrow window between these two regimes, where we obtain a film of desired quality. Both with increasing nozzle-substrate distance and temperature, the deposition moves from a wet state to a dry regime. Similar results are also achieved for solvents with low boiling points. Finally, we study film formation during spray coating with poly (D,L-lactide) (PDLLA). The results confirm the processing knowledge obtained with PVP and indicate that the observed trends are identical for spraying of other polymer films.

  3. Process optimization of ultrasonic spray coating of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sanjukta; Keller, Stephan S; Alstrøm, Tommy S; Boisen, Anja; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-06-11

    In this work we have performed a detailed study of the influence of various parameters on spray coating of polymer films. Our aim is to produce polymer films of uniform thickness (500 nm to 1 μm) and low roughness compared to the film thickness. The coatings are characterized with respect to thickness, roughness (profilometer), and morphology (optical microscopy). Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is used to do a full factorial design of experiments with selected process parameters such as temperature, distance between spray nozzle and substrate, and speed of the spray nozzle. A mathematical model is developed for statistical analysis which identifies the distance between nozzle and substrate as the most significant parameter. Depending on the drying of the sprayed droplets on the substrate, we define two broad regimes, "dry" and "wet". The optimum condition of spraying lies in a narrow window between these two regimes, where we obtain a film of desired quality. Both with increasing nozzle-substrate distance and temperature, the deposition moves from a wet state to a dry regime. Similar results are also achieved for solvents with low boiling points. Finally, we study film formation during spray coating with poly (D,L-lactide) (PDLLA). The results confirm the processing knowledge obtained with PVP and indicate that the observed trends are identical for spraying of other polymer films. PMID:23631433

  4. CaTiO.sub.3 Interfacial template structure on semiconductor-based material and the growth of electroceramic thin-films in the perovskite class

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A structure including a film of a desired perovskite oxide which overlies and is fully commensurate with the material surface of a semiconductor-based substrate and an associated process for constructing the structure involves the build up of an interfacial template film of perovskite between the material surface and the desired perovskite film. The lattice parameters of the material surface and the perovskite of the template film are taken into account so that during the growth of the perovskite template film upon the material surface, the orientation of the perovskite of the template is rotated 45.degree. with respect to the orientation of the underlying material surface and thereby effects a transition in the lattice structure from fcc (of the semiconductor-based material) to the simple cubic lattice structure of perovskite while the fully commensurate periodicity between the perovskite template film and the underlying material surface is maintained. The film-growth techniques of the invention can be used to fabricate solid state electrical components wherein a perovskite film is built up upon a semiconductor-based material and the perovskite film is adapted to exhibit ferroelectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric, electro-optic or large dielectric properties during use of the component.

  5. Electronic conduction processes in DNA-doped polypyrrole nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, P.; Mandal, S. K.

    2004-03-01

    The electron transport process in DNA-doped polypyrrole (PPY) nanocomposite film deposited on tin oxide coated glass by a simple electrodeposition technique is demonstrated here. Optical absorbance spectra clearly exhibited features corresponding to doped PPY nanocomposite film. The I-V characteristics of the films were non-ohmic and showed a significant change when illuminated with light. Photoinduced I-V profiles suggested carrier hopping to be the dominant transport mechanism in the nanocomposite PPY film. The temperature-dependent dc electrical conductivity data showed a crossover from variable-range hopping to thermally activated hopping of electrons with the increase in temperature. The ac electrical transport properties displayed a frequency-independent region below a characteristic frequency of {\\sim } 400 kHz, above which the conductivity showed a strong frequency-dependent behaviour.

  6. Commercial use of materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.; Brown, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the scientific and commercial aspects of Materials Processing in the Space program. The elimination of gravity driven convection in molten materials can preclude undesirable stirring and mixing during crystal growth, and improve the casting of alloys and composites, chemical reactions, and the separation of biological materials. The elimination of hydrostatic pressure will allow alloy heat-treatment without distortion and growth of heavy crystals, such as thorium oxide, and containerless processing of liquids and molten materials. On the other hand, more sophisticated process control and diagnostic methods in sample preparation and temperature control must be developed, concluding that space made products of commercial interest are likely to be low volume, high value items.

  7. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C.R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Staggs, M.; Rainer, F.

    1995-12-05

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold. 9 figs.

  8. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C. Robert; Kozlowski, Mark R.; Campbell, John H.; Staggs, Michael; Rainer, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold.

  9. Solution processable semiconductor thin films: Correlation between morphological, structural, optical and charge transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Dilek

    This Ph.D. thesis is a result of multidisciplinary research bringing together fundamental concepts in thin film engineering, materials science, materials processing and characterization, electrochemistry, microfabrication, and device physics. Experiments were conducted by tackling scientific problems in the field of thin films and interfaces, with the aim to correlate the morphology, crystalline structure, electronic structure of thin films with the functional properties of the films and the performances of electronic devices based thereon. Furthermore, novel strategies based on interfacial phenomena at electrolyte/thin film interfaces were explored and exploited to control the electrical conductivity of the thin films. Three main chemical systems were the object of the studies performed during this Ph.D., two types of organic semiconductors (azomethine-based oligomers and polymers and soluble pentacene derivatives) and one metal oxide semiconductor (tungsten trioxide, WO3). To explore the morphological properties of the thin films, atomic force microscopy was employed. The morphological properties were further investigated by hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy and tentatively correlated to the charge transport properties of the films. X-ray diffraction (Grazing incidence XRD, GIXRD) was used to investigate the crystallinity of the film and the effect of the heat treatment on such crystallinity, as well as to understand the molecular arrangement of the organic molecules in the thin film. The charge transport properties of the films were evaluated in thin film transistor configuration. For electrolyte gated thin film transistors, time dependent transient measurements were conducted, in parallel to more conventional transistor characterizations, to explore the specific effects played on the gating by the anion and cation constituting the electrolyte. The capacitances of the electrical double layers at the electrolyte/WO3 interface were obtained from

  10. Space Environmental Effects on Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabbann, Leslie M.

    2009-01-01

    The Materials and Processes (M&P) Branch of the Structural Engineering Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) seeks to uphold the production of dependable space hardware through materials research, which fits into NASA's purpose of advancing human exploration, use, and development of space. The Space Environmental Effects projects fully support these Agency goals. Two tasks were assigned to support M&P. Both assignments were to further the research of material behavior outside of Earth's atmosphere in order to determine which materials are most durable and safe to use in space for mitigating risks. One project, the Materials on International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) task, was to compile data from International Space Station (ISS) experiments to pinpoint beneficial space hardware. The other project was researching the effects on composite materials of exposure to high doses of radiation for a Lunar habitat project.

  11. Artificial intelligence in the materials processing laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials science and engineering provides a vast arena for applications of artificial intelligence. Advanced materials research is an area in which challenging requirements confront the researcher, from the drawing board through production and into service. Advanced techniques results in the development of new materials for specialized applications. Hand-in-hand with these new materials are also requirements for state-of-the-art inspection methods to determine the integrity or fitness for service of structures fabricated from these materials. Two problems of current interest to the Materials Processing Laboratory at UAH are an expert system to assist in eddy current inspection of graphite epoxy components for aerospace and an expert system to assist in the design of superalloys for high temperature applications. Each project requires a different approach to reach the defined goals. Results to date are described for the eddy current analysis, but only the original concepts and approaches considered are given for the expert system to design superalloys.

  12. Microwave processing of radioactive materials-I

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Berry, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is the first of two papers that reviews the major past and present applications of microwave energy for processing radioactive materials, with particular emphasis on processing radioactive wastes. Microwave heating occurs through the internal friction produced inside a dielectric material when its molecules vibrate in response to an oscillating microwave field. For this presentation, we shall focus on the two FCC-approved microwave frequencies for industrial, scientific, and medical use, 915 and 2450 MHz. Also, because of space limitations, we shall postpone addressing plasma processing of hazardous wastes using microwave energy until a later date. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Process for Polycrystalline film silicon growth

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing polycrystalline silicon on substrates, including foreign substrates, occurs in a chamber at about atmospheric pressure, wherein a temperature gradient is formed, and both the atmospheric pressure and the temperature gradient are maintained throughout the process. Formation of a vapor barrier within the chamber that precludes exit of the constituent chemicals, which include silicon, iodine, silicon diiodide, and silicon tetraiodide. The deposition occurs beneath the vapor barrier. One embodiment of the process also includes the use of a blanketing gas that precludes the entrance of oxygen or other impurities. The process is capable of repetition without the need to reset the deposition zone conditions.

  14. An improved approach for process monitoring in laser material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Hans-Georg; Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Process monitoring is used in many different laser material processes due to the demand for reliable and stable processes. Among different methods, on-axis process monitoring offers multiple advantages. To observe a laser material process it is unavoidable to choose a wavelength for observation that is different to the one used for material processing, otherwise the light of the processing laser would outshine the picture of the process. By choosing a different wavelength, lateral chromatic aberration occurs in not chromatically corrected optical systems with optical scanning units and f-Theta lenses. These aberrations lead to a truncated image of the process on the camera or the pyrometer, respectively. This is the reason for adulterated measurements and non-satisfying images of the process. A new approach for solving the problem of field dependent lateral chromatic aberration in process monitoring is presented. Therefore, the scanner-based optical system is reproduced in a simulation environment, to predict the occurring lateral chromatic aberrations. In addition, a second deflecting system is integrated into the system. By using simulation, a predictive control is designed that uses the additional deflecting system to introduce reverse lateral deviations in order to compensate the lateral effect of chromatic aberration. This paper illustrates the concept and the implementation of the predictive control, which is used to eliminate lateral chromatic aberrations in process monitoring, the simulation on which the system is based the optical system as well as the control concept.

  15. Processing of thick-film dielectrics compatible with thin-film superconductors for analog signal processing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. C.; Anderson, A. C.; Rudman, D. A.

    1989-03-01

    The authors demonstrate the feasibility of integrating thick-film dielectrics with thin-film superconductors in the fabrication of signal processing devices. Thin films of Nb and NbN are deposited by RF sputtering and patterned photolithographically. Thick film dielectrics can be spun on to a controlled thickness of 10 to 25 microns, which is an optimum range for high-density, low-loss microwave delay lines. After an organic-binder burnout step at 450 C in air, the ceramic dielectrics are sintered onto the NbN thin films at 850 C in vacuum. The transition temperature of the NbN changes from 15 K as sputtered to 9 K after sintering, but superconductivity is preserved by the presence of thin-film MgO and SiO2 barrier layers. Lumped-element resonators, in which the inductor and the capacitor electrodes are made of NbN and the dielectric of thick-film ceramic, have been successfully fabricated for measuring the dielectric properties of the ceramics at 4.2 K and 10 MHz. Preliminary results indicate a dielectric constant of 6-8 and tan delta of 0.01.

  16. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Final subcontract report, 16 January 1990--15 January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Yokimcus, T.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes results and conclusions of the final phase (III) of a three-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film heterojunction solar cells. The research consisted of the investigation of the relationships between processing, materials properties, and device performance. This relationship was quantified by device modeling and analysis. The analysis of thin-film polycrystalline heterojunction solar cells explains how minority-carrier recombination at the metallurgical interface and at grain boundaries can be greatly reduced by the proper doping of the window and absorber layers. Additional analysis and measurements show that the present solar cells are limited by the magnitude of the diode current, which appears to be caused by recombination in the space charge region. Developing an efficient commercial-scale process for fabricating large-area polycrystalline, thin-film solar cells from a research process requires a detailed understanding of the individual steps in making the solar cell, and their relationship to device performance and reliability. The complexities involved in characterizing a process are demonstrated with results from our research program on CuInSe{sub 2}, and CdTe processes.

  17. Laser-induced metallic nanograined thin films processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, Nicoleta E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Toadere, Florin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Hojbota, Calin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Tosa, Valer E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro

    2013-11-13

    A direct laser writing method for designing metallic nanograined thin films is presented. This method takes advantage of photon conversion within a chemical process localized at the focal point. A computer controlled positioning system allows the control of experimental parameters and spatial resolution of the pattern. Spectroscopic investigations reveal variable attenuation of the optical properties in UV-visible range and a spectral imaging processing algorithm simulated the functionality of these films in visible light. This could be an important step for obtaining neutral density attenuators.

  18. Citrate complexing sol-gel process of lead-free (K,Na)NbO3 ferroelectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linlin; Zhu, Kongjun

    2016-05-01

    The citrate complexing sol-gel process to fabricate lead-free (K,Na)NbO3 ferroelectric thin films was studied. Soluble niobium source of niobium-citric acid (Nb-CA) solution was utilized as a raw material to synthesize (K,Na)NbO3 thin films, by pyrolyzing at 450-550∘C and annealing at 650∘C. The film pyrolyzed at 450∘C shows poor crystallization with porous morphology, whereas the film pyrolyzed at 550∘C appear to be well-crystallized and denser, and the ferroelectricity was also proved by the P-E hysteresis loop measurement.

  19. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Annual subcontract report, 16 January 1991--15 January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    Results of Phase II of a research program on polycrystalline thin film heterojunction solar cells are presented. Relations between processing, materials properties and device performance were studied. The analysis of these solar cells explains how minority carrier recombination at the interface and at grain boundaries can be reduced by doping of windows and absorber layers, such as in high efficiency CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} based solar cells. The additional geometric dimension introduced by the polycrystallinity must be taken into consideration. The solar cells are limited by the diode current, caused by recombination in the space charge region. J-V characteristics of CuInSe{sub 2}/(CdZn)S cells were analyzed. Current-voltage and spectral response measurements were also made on high efficiency CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells prepared by vacuum evaporation. Cu-In bilayers were reacted with Se and H{sub 2}Se gas to form CuInSe{sub 2} films; the reaction pathways and the precursor were studied. Several approaches to fabrication of these thin film solar cells in a superstrate configuration were explored. A self-consistent picture of the effects of processing on the evolution of CdTe cells was developed.

  20. Combinatorial techniques to efficiently investigate and optimize organic thin film processing and properties.

    PubMed

    Wieberger, Florian; Kolb, Tristan; Neuber, Christian; Ober, Christopher K; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2013-04-08

    In this article we present several developed and improved combinatorial techniques to optimize processing conditions and material properties of organic thin films. The combinatorial approach allows investigations of multi-variable dependencies and is the perfect tool to investigate organic thin films regarding their high performance purposes. In this context we develop and establish the reliable preparation of gradients of material composition, temperature, exposure, and immersion time. Furthermore we demonstrate the smart application of combinations of composition and processing gradients to create combinatorial libraries. First a binary combinatorial library is created by applying two gradients perpendicular to each other. A third gradient is carried out in very small areas and arranged matrix-like over the entire binary combinatorial library resulting in a ternary combinatorial library. Ternary combinatorial libraries allow identifying precise trends for the optimization of multi-variable dependent processes which is demonstrated on the lithographic patterning process. Here we verify conclusively the strong interaction and thus the interdependency of variables in the preparation and properties of complex organic thin film systems. The established gradient preparation techniques are not limited to lithographic patterning. It is possible to utilize and transfer the reported combinatorial techniques to other multi-variable dependent processes and to investigate and optimize thin film layers and devices for optical, electro-optical, and electronic applications.

  1. Space processing applications of ion beam technology. [surface finishing, welding, milling and film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Ion thruster engines for spacecraft propulsion can serve as ion beam sources for potential space processing applications. The advantages of space vacuum environments and the possible gravity effects on thruster ion beam materials operations such as thin film growth, ion milling, and surface texturing were investigated. The direct gravity effect on sputter deposition and vapor deposition processes are discussed as well as techniques for cold and warm welding.

  2. Catalogo de peliculas educativas y otros materiales audiovisuales (Catalogue of Educational Films and other Audiovisual Materials).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    This catalogue of educational films and other audiovisual materials consists predominantly of films in Spanish and English which are intended for use in elementary and secondary schools. A wide variety of topics including films for social studies, language arts, humanities, physical and natural sciences, safety and health, agriculture, physical…

  3. High-performance and flexible thermoelectric films by screen printing solution-processed nanoplate crystals

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Tony; Hollar, Courtney; Richardson, Joseph; Kempf, Nicholas; Han, Chao; Gamarachchi, Pasindu; Estrada, David; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Zhang, Yanliang

    2016-01-01

    Screen printing allows for direct conversion of thermoelectric nanocrystals into flexible energy harvesters and coolers. However, obtaining flexible thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit ZT through printing is an exacting challenge due to the difficulties to synthesize high-performance thermoelectric inks and the poor density and electrical conductivity of the printed films. Here, we demonstrate high-performance flexible films and devices by screen printing bismuth telluride based nanocrystal inks synthesized using a microwave-stimulated wet-chemical method. Thermoelectric films of several tens of microns thickness were screen printed onto a flexible polyimide substrate followed by cold compaction and sintering. The n-type films demonstrate a peak ZT of 0.43 along with superior flexibility, which is among the highest reported ZT values in flexible thermoelectric materials. A flexible thermoelectric device fabricated using the printed films produces a high power density of 4.1 mW/cm2 with 60 °C temperature difference between the hot side and cold side. The highly scalable and low cost process to fabricate flexible thermoelectric materials and devices demonstrated here opens up many opportunities to transform thermoelectric energy harvesting and cooling applications. PMID:27615036

  4. High-performance and flexible thermoelectric films by screen printing solution-processed nanoplate crystals.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Tony; Hollar, Courtney; Richardson, Joseph; Kempf, Nicholas; Han, Chao; Gamarachchi, Pasindu; Estrada, David; Mehta, Rutvik J; Zhang, Yanliang

    2016-01-01

    Screen printing allows for direct conversion of thermoelectric nanocrystals into flexible energy harvesters and coolers. However, obtaining flexible thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit ZT through printing is an exacting challenge due to the difficulties to synthesize high-performance thermoelectric inks and the poor density and electrical conductivity of the printed films. Here, we demonstrate high-performance flexible films and devices by screen printing bismuth telluride based nanocrystal inks synthesized using a microwave-stimulated wet-chemical method. Thermoelectric films of several tens of microns thickness were screen printed onto a flexible polyimide substrate followed by cold compaction and sintering. The n-type films demonstrate a peak ZT of 0.43 along with superior flexibility, which is among the highest reported ZT values in flexible thermoelectric materials. A flexible thermoelectric device fabricated using the printed films produces a high power density of 4.1 mW/cm(2) with 60 °C temperature difference between the hot side and cold side. The highly scalable and low cost process to fabricate flexible thermoelectric materials and devices demonstrated here opens up many opportunities to transform thermoelectric energy harvesting and cooling applications. PMID:27615036

  5. High-performance and flexible thermoelectric films by screen printing solution-processed nanoplate crystals.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Tony; Hollar, Courtney; Richardson, Joseph; Kempf, Nicholas; Han, Chao; Gamarachchi, Pasindu; Estrada, David; Mehta, Rutvik J; Zhang, Yanliang

    2016-09-12

    Screen printing allows for direct conversion of thermoelectric nanocrystals into flexible energy harvesters and coolers. However, obtaining flexible thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit ZT through printing is an exacting challenge due to the difficulties to synthesize high-performance thermoelectric inks and the poor density and electrical conductivity of the printed films. Here, we demonstrate high-performance flexible films and devices by screen printing bismuth telluride based nanocrystal inks synthesized using a microwave-stimulated wet-chemical method. Thermoelectric films of several tens of microns thickness were screen printed onto a flexible polyimide substrate followed by cold compaction and sintering. The n-type films demonstrate a peak ZT of 0.43 along with superior flexibility, which is among the highest reported ZT values in flexible thermoelectric materials. A flexible thermoelectric device fabricated using the printed films produces a high power density of 4.1 mW/cm(2) with 60 °C temperature difference between the hot side and cold side. The highly scalable and low cost process to fabricate flexible thermoelectric materials and devices demonstrated here opens up many opportunities to transform thermoelectric energy harvesting and cooling applications.

  6. High-performance and flexible thermoelectric films by screen printing solution-processed nanoplate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tony; Hollar, Courtney; Richardson, Joseph; Kempf, Nicholas; Han, Chao; Gamarachchi, Pasindu; Estrada, David; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Zhang, Yanliang

    2016-09-01

    Screen printing allows for direct conversion of thermoelectric nanocrystals into flexible energy harvesters and coolers. However, obtaining flexible thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit ZT through printing is an exacting challenge due to the difficulties to synthesize high-performance thermoelectric inks and the poor density and electrical conductivity of the printed films. Here, we demonstrate high-performance flexible films and devices by screen printing bismuth telluride based nanocrystal inks synthesized using a microwave-stimulated wet-chemical method. Thermoelectric films of several tens of microns thickness were screen printed onto a flexible polyimide substrate followed by cold compaction and sintering. The n-type films demonstrate a peak ZT of 0.43 along with superior flexibility, which is among the highest reported ZT values in flexible thermoelectric materials. A flexible thermoelectric device fabricated using the printed films produces a high power density of 4.1 mW/cm2 with 60 °C temperature difference between the hot side and cold side. The highly scalable and low cost process to fabricate flexible thermoelectric materials and devices demonstrated here opens up many opportunities to transform thermoelectric energy harvesting and cooling applications.

  7. Novel Low Temperature Processing for Enhanced Properties of Ion Implanted Thin Films and Amorphous Mixed Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, Rajitha

    This research emphasizes the use of low energy and low temperature post processing to improve the performance and lifetime of thin films and thin film transistors, by applying the fundamentals of interaction of materials with conductive heating and electromagnetic radiation. Single frequency microwave anneal is used to rapidly recrystallize the damage induced during ion implantation in Si substrates. Volumetric heating of the sample in the presence of the microwave field facilitates quick absorption of radiation to promote recrystallization at the amorphous-crystalline interface, apart from electrical activation of the dopants due to relocation to the substitutional sites. Structural and electrical characterization confirm recrystallization of heavily implanted Si within 40 seconds anneal time with minimum dopant diffusion compared to rapid thermal annealed samples. The use of microwave anneal to improve performance of multilayer thin film devices, e.g. thin film transistors (TFTs) requires extensive study of interaction of individual layers with electromagnetic radiation. This issue has been addressed by developing detail understanding of thin films and interfaces in TFTs by studying reliability and failure mechanisms upon extensive stress test. Electrical and ambient stresses such as illumination, thermal, and mechanical stresses are inflicted on the mixed oxide based thin film transistors, which are explored due to high mobilities of the mixed oxide (indium zinc oxide, indium gallium zinc oxide) channel layer material. Semiconductor parameter analyzer is employed to extract transfer characteristics, useful to derive mobility, subthreshold, and threshold voltage parameters of the transistors. Low temperature post processing anneals compatible with polymer substrates are performed in several ambients (oxygen, forming gas and vacuum) at 150 °C as a preliminary step. The analysis of the results pre and post low temperature anneals using device physics fundamentals

  8. Effect of annealing process on the phase formation in poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Ibtisam Yahya; Yahaya, Muhammad; Jumali, Mohd Hafizuddin Haji; Shanshool, Haider Mohammed

    2014-09-03

    This work reports the initial study on the effect of annealing process on the crystalline phase of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) thin film. PVDF powder was dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide before spin-coated onto a glass substrate to form a film. The films were annealed at 30°C, 90°C and 110°C for 5 hrs. The crystalline phase of the powder PVDF as received was investigated by using XRD and FTIR techniques. Moreover, the crystalline phases of thin films after annealing were investigated by using the same techniques. XRD analysis showed that in powder form PVDF exists in α-phase. Each annealed PVDF thin films exhibited identical formation of three-phases material namely γ (as major phase) while α and β phases as the minor phases. The FTIR analysis showed that the powder form of PVDF exists in α and β phases. FTIR measurement further confirmed the XRD results implying that the annealing process has no significant effect on the phase formation in PVDF films.

  9. Effect of annealing process on the phase formation in poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Ibtisam Yahya; Yahaya, Muhammad; Jumali, Mohd Hafizuddin Haji; Shanshool, Haider Mohammed

    2014-09-01

    This work reports the initial study on the effect of annealing process on the crystalline phase of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) thin film. PVDF powder was dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide before spin-coated onto a glass substrate to form a film. The films were annealed at 30°C, 90°C and 110°C for 5 hrs. The crystalline phase of the powder PVDF as received was investigated by using XRD and FTIR techniques. Moreover, the crystalline phases of thin films after annealing were investigated by using the same techniques. XRD analysis showed that in powder form PVDF exists in α-phase. Each annealed PVDF thin films exhibited identical formation of three-phases material namely γ (as major phase) while α and β phases as the minor phases. The FTIR analysis showed that the powder form of PVDF exists in α and β phases. FTIR measurement further confirmed the XRD results implying that the annealing process has no significant effect on the phase formation in PVDF films.

  10. Sol-gel processing of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tillotson, T.M.; Hrubesh, L.H.; Fox, G.L.; Simpson, R.L.; Lee, R.W.; Swansiger, R.W.; Simpson, L.R.

    1997-08-18

    As part of a new materials effort, we are exploring the use of sol- gel chemistry to manufacture energetic materials. Traditional manufacturing of energetic materials involves processing of granular solids. One application is the production of detonators where powders of energetic material and a binder are typically mixed and compacted at high pressure to make pellets. Performance properties are strongly dependent on particle size distribution, surface area of its constituents, homogeneity of the mix, and void volume. The goal is to produce detonators with fast energy release rate the are insensitive to unintended initiation. In this paper, we report results of our early work in this field of research, including the preparation of detonators from xerogel molding powders and aerogels, comparing the material properties with present state-of-the-art technology.

  11. Characterization of the deposition and materials parameters of thin-film TiNi for microactuators and smart materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, A.P.; Madsen, J.S.; Mercado, P.G. . Dept. of Materials Science)

    1994-04-01

    Development of smart materials and materials for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are complicated by the need to grow dissimilar active or adaptive materials in close proximity. This entails discouraging unwanted chemical and physical interactions that prevent production of the appropriate phases. An important component of these systems will be thin-film shape memory effect TiNi. This article discusses the characterization of the deposition of thin film TiNi for these applications as well as the cycling speed for MEMS.

  12. Alternative nano-structured thin-film materials used as durable thermal nanoimprint lithography templates.

    PubMed

    Bossard, M; Boussey, J; Le Drogoff, B; Chaker, M

    2016-02-19

    Nanoimprint templates made of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) thin films and fluorine-doped associated materials, i.e. F-DLC and F-SiC were investigated in the context of thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL) with respect to their release properties. Their performances in terms of durability and stability were evaluated and compared to those of conventional silicon or silica molds coated with antisticking molecules applied as a self-assembled monolayer. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition parameters were firstly tuned to optimize mechanical and structural properties of the DLC and SiC thin films. The impact of the amount of fluorine dopant on the deposited thin films properties was then analyzed. A comparative analysis of DLC, F-DLC as well as SiC and F-SiC molds was then carried out over multiple imprints, performed into poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thermo-plastic resist. The release properties of un-patterned films were evaluated by the measurement of demolding energies and surface energies, associated with a systematic analysis of the mold surface contamination. These analyses showed that the developed materials behave as intrinsically easy-demolding and contamination-free molds over series of up to 40 imprints. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a large number of imprints has been considered within an exhaustive comparative study of materials for NIL. Finally, the developed materials went through standard e-beam lithography and plasma etching processes to obtain nanoscale-patterned templates. The replicas of those patterned molds, imprinted into PMMA, were shown to be of high fidelity and good stability after several imprints. PMID:26783068

  13. Alternative nano-structured thin-film materials used as durable thermal nanoimprint lithography templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, M.; Boussey, J.; Le Drogoff, B.; Chaker, M.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoimprint templates made of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) thin films and fluorine-doped associated materials, i.e. F-DLC and F-SiC were investigated in the context of thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL) with respect to their release properties. Their performances in terms of durability and stability were evaluated and compared to those of conventional silicon or silica molds coated with antisticking molecules applied as a self-assembled monolayer. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition parameters were firstly tuned to optimize mechanical and structural properties of the DLC and SiC thin films. The impact of the amount of fluorine dopant on the deposited thin films properties was then analyzed. A comparative analysis of DLC, F-DLC as well as SiC and F-SiC molds was then carried out over multiple imprints, performed into poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thermo-plastic resist. The release properties of un-patterned films were evaluated by the measurement of demolding energies and surface energies, associated with a systematic analysis of the mold surface contamination. These analyses showed that the developed materials behave as intrinsically easy-demolding and contamination-free molds over series of up to 40 imprints. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a large number of imprints has been considered within an exhaustive comparative study of materials for NIL. Finally, the developed materials went through standard e-beam lithography and plasma etching processes to obtain nanoscale-patterned templates. The replicas of those patterned molds, imprinted into PMMA, were shown to be of high fidelity and good stability after several imprints.

  14. Advances in Processing of Bulk Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galassi, Carmen

    The development of ferroelectric bulk materials is still under extensive investigation, as new and challenging issues are growing in relation to their widespread applications. Progress in understanding the fundamental aspects requires adequate technological tools. This would enable controlling and tuning the material properties as well as fully exploiting them into the scale production. Apart from the growing number of new compositions, interest in the first ferroelectrics like BaTiO3 or PZT materials is far from dropping. The need to find new lead-free materials, with as high performance as PZT ceramics, is pushing towards a full exploitation of bariumbased compositions. However, lead-based materials remain the best performing at reasonably low production costs. Therefore, the main trends are towards nano-size effects and miniaturisation, multifunctional materials, integration, and enhancement of the processing ability in powder synthesis. Also, in control of dispersion and packing, to let densification occur in milder conditions. In this chapter, after a general review of the composition and main properties of the principal ferroelectric materials, methods of synthesis are analysed with emphasis on recent results from chemical routes and cold consolidation methods based on the colloidal processing.

  15. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  16. Preparation of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode thin films for thin film lithium secondary batteries by a mist CVD process

    SciTech Connect

    Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Sakuda, Atsushi; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro; Duran, Alicia; Aparacio, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films were prepared by using the mist CVD process. • An aqueous solution of lithium and manganese acetates is used for the precursor solution. • The cell with the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films exhibited a capacity of about 80 mAh/g. • The cell showed good cycling performance during 10 cycles. - Abstract: LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode thin films for thin film lithium secondary batteries were prepared by using so-called the “mist CVD process”, employing an aqueous solution of lithium acetate and manganese acetate, as the source of Li and Mn, respectively. The aqueous solution of starting materials was ultrasonically atomized to form mist particles, and mists were transferred by nitrogen gas to silica glass substrate to form thin films. FE-SEM observation revealed that thin films obtained by this process were dense and smooth, and thin films with a thickness of about 750 nm were obtained. The electrochemical cell with the thin films obtained by sintering at 700 °C exhibited a capacity of about 80 mAh/g, and the cell showed good cycling performance during 10 cycles.

  17. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    SciTech Connect

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-05-18

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration.

  18. Coprecal: materials accounting in the modified process

    SciTech Connect

    Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.; Shipley, J.P.

    1980-05-01

    This report presents the design and evaluation of an advanced materials accounting system for a uranium-plutonium nitrate-to-oxide coconversion facility based on the General Electric Coprecal process as modified by Savannah River Laboratory and Plant and DuPont Engineering. The modifications include adding small aliquot tanks to feed the process and reconfiguring the calciner filter systems. Diversion detection sensitivities for the modified Coprecal process are somewhat better than the original Coprecal design, but they are still significantly worse than a same-sized conversion facility based on the oxalate (III) precipitation process.

  19. Robot development for nuclear material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrotti, L.R.; Armantrout, G.A.; Allen, D.C.; Sievers, R.H. Sr.

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Energy is seeking to modernize its special nuclear material (SNM) production facilities and concurrently reduce radiation exposures and process and incidental radioactive waste generated. As part of this program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) lead team is developing and adapting generic and specific applications of commercial robotic technologies to SNM pyrochemical processing and other operations. A working gantry robot within a sealed processing glove box and a telerobot control test bed are manifestations of this effort. This paper describes the development challenges and progress in adapting processing, robotic, and nuclear safety technologies to the application. 3 figs.

  20. Simulation of materials processing: Fantasy or reality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Thomas J.; Bright, Victor M.

    1994-01-01

    This experiment introduces students to the application of computer-aided design (CAD) and analysis of materials processing in the context of integrated circuit (IC) fabrication. The fabrication of modern IC's is a complex process which consists of several sequential steps. These steps involve the precise control of processing variables such as temperature, humidity, and ambient gas composition. In essence, the particular process employed during the fabrication becomes a 'recipe'. Due to economic and other considerations, CAD is becoming an indispensable part of the development of new recipes for IC fabrication. In particular, this experiment permits the students to explore the CAD of the thermal oxidation of silicon.

  1. Thermoplastics as engineering materials: The mechanics, materials, design, processing link

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, V.K.

    1995-10-01

    While the use of plastics has been growing at a significant pace because of weight reduction, ease of fabrication of complex shapes, and cost reduction resulting from function integration, the engineering applications of plastics have only become important in the past fifteen years. An inadequate understanding of the mechanics issues underlying the close coupling among the design, the processing (fabrication), and the assembly with these materials is a barrier to their use in structural applications. Recent progress on some issues relating to the engineering uses of plastics is surveyed, highlighting the need for a better understanding of plastics and how processing affects the performance of plastic parts. Topics addressed include the large deformation behavior of ductile resins, fiber orientation in chopped-fiber filled materials, structural foams, random glass mat composites, modeling of thickness distributions in blow-molded and thermoformed parts, dimensional stability (shrinkage, warpage, and residual stresses) in injection-molded parts, and welding of thermoplastics.

  2. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.

    2012-01-03

    This invention provides thin film devices that have been processed on their front- and backside. The devices include an active layer that is sufficiently thin to be mechanically flexible. Examples of the devices include back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  3. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived.

  4. Materials evaluation for a transuranic processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, S.A., Schwenk, E.B. ); Divine, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company, with the assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is developing a transuranium extraction process for preheating double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site to reduce the volume of transuranic waste being sent to a repository. The bench- scale transuranium extraction process development is reaching a stage where a pilot plant design has begun for the construction of a facility in the existing B Plant. Because of the potential corrosivity of neutralized cladding removal waste process streams, existing embedded piping alloys in B Plant are being evaluated and new'' alloys are being selected for the full-scale plant screening corrosion tests. Once the waste is acidified with HNO{sub 3}, some of the process streams that are high in F{sup {minus}} and low in Al and zr can produce corrosion rates exceeding 30,000 mil/yr in austenitic alloys. Initial results results are reported concerning the applicability of existing plant materials to withstand expected process solutions and conditions to help determine the feasibility of locating the plant at the selected facility. In addition, process changes are presented that should make the process solutions less corrosive to the existing materials. Experimental work confirms that Hastelloy B is unsatisfactory for the expected process solutions; type 304L, 347 and 309S stainless steels are satisfactory for service at room temperature and 60{degrees}C, if process stream complexing is performed. Inconel 625 was satisfactory for all solutions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Applications of membrane processes for in-process materials recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Thornton, R.F.; Shapiro, A.P.; Freshour, A.R.; El-Shoubary, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Zero discharge of wastes should be the ultimate goal of manufacturers. Waste reduction lowers costs and lessens liability associated with plant effluents. One approach toward this goal is elimination or minimization of wastes by in-process recycling of waste materials. We have examined opportunities for waste minimization for many equipment manufacturing plants and have evaluated membrane processes for in-process recycling. Membrane processes evaluated include vibrating membranes for suspended solid removal, ion exchange membranes for acid recovery, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis for dissolved salt removal, microporous membranes for recycling of machining coolants, oil emulsions, alkaline cleaners and others. This paper presents several examples of evaluations of membrane processes for materials recycling in manufacturing plants. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Optimization of the Solution and Processing Parameters for Strontium Titanate Thin Films for Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Claire Victoria

    Metallo-organic solution deposition (MOSD) and spin-coating were used to deposit strontium titanate (SrTiO3 or STO) thin films on Si and metalized Si substrates. In addition, a thermodynamic model was constructed based on the Landau polynomial for the free energy. Using this model, the thin film strain due to the difference in thermal expansion coefficients (TECs) of the film and substrate was calculated, as well as its effect on the permittivity and tunability. It was found that a large tensile thermal strain develops in the STO/Si material system, and this strain significantly lowers the dielectric response as compared to bulk STO. A multi-dimensional parameter optimization process was used to systematically vary the solution, deposition, and processing parameters of the STO thin films. These parameters include the precursor solution heating, solution molarity/concentration, solution aging, spin-coating recipe, pyrolysis procedure/temperature, annealing temperature, and annealing oxygen environment. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), and dielectric/insulating measurements were used to characterize the STO thin film devices. By optimizing various deposition parameters, such as the solution molarity and the pyrolysis temperature, the tensile stress induced from the difference in TECs of the film and substrate, which was predicted by the thermodynamic theory, can be reduced or completely eliminated. This stress relaxation is achieved through the tailoring of compressive "growth stresses" by optimizing the precursor solution molarity as well as the post-deposition heat treatment processing. By utilizing the multi-dimensional parameter optimization process, high-quality, electronic-grade thin film STO can be deposited via the affordable, simple, and industry-standard MOSD technique.

  7. Damage thresholds of thin film materials and high reflectors at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Carniglia, C.K.; Hart, T.T.; Lichtenstein, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-ns, 248-nm KrF laser pulses were used to measure laser damage thresholds for halfwave-thick layers of 15 oxide and fluoride coating materials, and for high reflectance coatings made with 13 combinations of these materials. The damage thresholds of the reflectors and single-layer films were compared to measurements of several properties of the halfwave-thick films to determine whether measurements of these properties of single-layer films to determine whether measurements of these properties of single-layer films were useful for identifying materials for fabrication of damage resistant coatings.

  8. Transparent megahertz circuits from solution-processed composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingqiang; Wan, Da; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Xiangheng; Guo, Shishang; Jiang, Changzhong; Li, Jinchai; Chen, Tangsheng; Duan, Xiangfeng; Fan, Zhiyong; Liao, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Solution-processed amorphous oxide semiconductors have attracted considerable interest in large-area transparent electronics. However, due to its relative low carrier mobility (~10 cm2 V-1 s-1), the demonstrated circuit performance has been limited to 800 kHz or less. Herein, we report solution-processed high-speed thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuits with an operation frequency beyond the megahertz region on 4 inch glass. The TFTs can be fabricated from an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube (a-IGZO/SWNT) composite thin film with high yield and high carrier mobility of >70 cm2 V-1 s-1. On-chip microwave measurements demonstrate that these TFTs can deliver an unprecedented operation frequency in solution-processed semiconductors, including an extrinsic cut-off frequency (fT = 102 MHz) and a maximum oscillation frequency (fmax = 122 MHz). Ring oscillators further demonstrated an oscillation frequency of 4.13 MHz, for the first time, realizing megahertz circuit operation from solution-processed semiconductors. Our studies represent an important step toward high-speed solution-processed thin film electronics.Solution-processed amorphous oxide semiconductors have attracted considerable interest in large-area transparent electronics. However, due to its relative low carrier mobility (~10 cm2 V-1 s-1), the demonstrated circuit performance has been limited to 800 kHz or less. Herein, we report solution-processed high-speed thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuits with an operation frequency beyond the megahertz region on 4 inch glass. The TFTs can be fabricated from an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube (a-IGZO/SWNT) composite thin film with high yield and high carrier mobility of >70 cm2 V-1 s-1. On-chip microwave measurements demonstrate that these TFTs can deliver an unprecedented operation frequency in solution-processed semiconductors, including an extrinsic cut-off frequency (f

  9. Alternative starting materials for industrial processes.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J W

    1992-01-01

    In the manufacture of chemical feedstocks and subsequent processing into derivatives and materials, the U.S. chemical industry sets the current standard of excellence for technological competitiveness. This world-class leadership is attributed to the innovation and advancement of chemical engineering process technology. Whether this status is sustained over the next decade depends strongly on meeting increasingly demanding challenges stimulated by growing concerns about the safe production and use of chemicals without harmful impacts on the environment. To comply with stringent environmental regulations while remaining economically competitive, industry must exploit alternative benign starting materials and develop environmentally neutral industrial processes. Opportunities are described for development of environmentally compatible alternatives and substitutes for some of the most abundantly produced, potentially hazardous industrial chemicals now labeled as "high-priority toxic chemicals." For several other uniquely important commodity chemicals where no economically competitive, environmentally satisfactory, nontoxic alternative starting material exists, we advocate the development of new dynamic processes for the on-demand generation of toxic chemicals. In this general concept, which obviates mass storage and transportation of chemicals, toxic raw materials are produced in real time, where possible, from less-hazardous starting materials and then chemically transformed immediately into the final product. As a selected example for semiconductor technology, recent progress is reviewed for the on-demand production of arsine in turnkey electrochemical generators. Innovation of on-demand chemical generators and alternative processes provide rich areas for environmentally responsive chemical engineering processing research and development for next-generation technology. Images PMID:11607260

  10. Fabrication of polycrystalline thin films by pulsed laser processing

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1998-02-03

    A method for fabricating polycrystalline thin films on low-temperature (or high-temperature) substrates which uses processing temperatures that are low enough to avoid damage to the substrate, and then transiently heating select layers of the thin films with at least one pulse of a laser or other homogenized beam source. The pulse length is selected so that the layers of interest are transiently heated to a temperature which allows recrystallization and/or dopant activation while maintaining the substrate at a temperature which is sufficiently low to avoid damage to the substrate. This method is particularly applicable in the fabrication of solar cells.

  11. Fabrication of polycrystalline thin films by pulsed laser processing

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Colella, N.J.

    1998-02-03

    A method is disclosed for fabricating polycrystalline thin films on low-temperature (or high-temperature) substrates which uses processing temperatures that are low enough to avoid damage to the substrate, and then transiently heating select layers of the thin films with at least one pulse of a laser or other homogenized beam source. The pulse length is selected so that the layers of interest are transiently heated to a temperature which allows recrystallization and/or dopant activation while maintaining the substrate at a temperature which is sufficiently low to avoid damage to the substrate. This method is particularly applicable in the fabrication of solar cells. 1 fig.

  12. PREFACE: Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yu Lung; Chen, John J. J.; Hodgson, Michael A.; Thambyah, Ashvin

    2009-07-01

    A workshop on Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials was held at the University of Auckland, School of Engineering, on 8-9 April 2009. Organised by the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, this meeting consisted of international participants and aimed at addressing the state-of-the-art research activities in processing, microstructure characterization and performance integrity investigation of materials. This two-day conference brought together scientists and engineers from New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, France, and the United Kingdom. Undoubtedly, this diverse group of participants brought a very international flair to the proceedings which also featured original research papers on areas such as Materials processing; Microstructure characterisation and microanalysis; Mechanical response at different length scales, Biomaterials and Material Structural integrity. There were a total of 10 invited speakers, 16 paper presentations, and 14 poster presentations. Consequently, the presentations were carefully considered by the scientific committee and participants were invited to submit full papers for this volume. All the invited paper submissions for this volume have been peer reviewed by experts in the various fields represented in this conference, this in accordance to the expected standards of the journal's Peer review policy for IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The works in this publication consists of new and original research as well as several expert reviews of current state-of-the art technologies and scientific developments. Knowing some of the real constraints on hard-copy publishing of high quality, high resolution images, the editors are grateful to IOP Publishing for this opportunity to have the papers from this conference published on the online open-access platform. Listed in this volume are papers on a range of topics on materials research, including Ferguson's high strain

  13. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51 Section 18.51 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.51...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TOOLS FOR MATERIAL AND PROCESS SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of tools are being used within the Sustainable Technology Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to provide decision-makers with information on environmentally favorable materials and processes. These tools include LCA (Life Cycle Assessment), GREENSCOPE (...

  15. Materials processing in space: Future technology trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barter, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    NASA's materials processing in space- (MPS) program involves both ground and space-based research and looks to frequent and cost effective access to the space environment for necessary progress. The first generation payloads for research are under active design and development. They will be hosted by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab on Earth orbital flights in the early 1980's. hese missions will focus on the acquisition of materials behavior research data, the potential enhancement of Earth based technology, and the implementation of space based processing for specialized, high value materials. Some materials to be studied in these payloads may provide future breakthroughs for stronger alloys, ultrapure glasses, superior electronic components, and new or better chemicals. An operational 25 kW power system is expected to be operational to support sustained, systematic space processing activity beyond shuttle capability for second generation payload systems for SPACELAB and free flyer missions to study solidification and crystal growth and to process metal/alloys, glasses/ceramics, and chemicals and biologicals.

  16. Materials processing in space program support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin; Vanalstine, James M.

    1987-01-01

    Activities in support of NASA's Materials Processing in Space (MPS) program are reported. The overall task of the MPS project support contract was to provide the organization and administration of colloquiums, science reviews, workshops, technical meetings, bibliographic services, and visiting scientist programs. The research objectives and accomplishments of the University Space Research Association visiting scientist team are also summarized.

  17. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The history, strategy, and overall goal of NASA's Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications program for materials processing in space are described as well as the organizational structures and personnel involved. An overview of each research task is presented and recent publications are listed.

  18. Food Processing Curriculum Material and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    Intended for secondary vocational agriculture teachers, this curriculum guide contains a course outline and a resource manual for a seven-unit food processing course on meats. Within the course outline, units are divided into separate lessons. Materials provided for each lesson include preparation for instruction (student objectives, review of…

  19. Advanced laser processing of glass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji; Obata, Kotaro; Cheng, Ya; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2003-09-01

    Three kinds of advanced technologies using lasers for glass microprocessing are reviewed. Simultaneous irradiation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser beam, which possesses extremely small laser fluence, with ultraviolet (UV) laser achieves enhanced high surface and edge quality ablation in fused silica and other hard materials with little debris deposition as well as high-speed and high-efficiency refractive index modification of fused silica (VUV-UV multiwavelength excitation processing). Metal plasma generated by the laser beam effectively assists high-quality ablation of transparent materials, resulting in surface microstructuring, high-speed holes drilling, crack-free marking, color marking, painting and metal interconnection for the various kinds of glass materials (laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA)). In the meanwhile, a nature of multiphoton absorption of femtosecond laser by transparent materials realizes fabrication of true three-dimensional microstructures embedded in photosensitive glass.

  20. Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Muruska, H. Paul; Sansregret, Joseph L.; Young, Archie R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

  1. Dry Process Based Infrared Sensors with CNT Film Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kum-Pyo; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lim, Lee-Taek; Choi, Chang-Seon; Lee, Dong Il; Lee, Cheol Jin; Park, Chan-Won; Min, Nam Ki

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication and characterization of a front-side micromachined thermopiles consisting of a suspended membrane and a carbon nanotube (CNT) film absorber. Thermocouples of 52 pairs which are composed of phosphorous-doped silicon and aluminum were formed and connected in series. A CNT film collected by filter was transferred on hot junction. A CNT absorber has an absorptance of about 50% in the midinfrared region. The suspended membrane was fabricated by an isotropic silicon dry etching process with XeF2 gas at the front side of the substrates. The output voltage with the CNT film is found to be 250.2 mV at 7 mW of incident power, approximately 1.8 times higher than that of one without an absorber.

  2. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Jha, M.; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-03-07

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB{sub 6}-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB{sub 6} coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films.

  3. A simple solution to the problem of effective utilisation of the target material for pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzanyan, A. S.; Kuzanyan, A. A.; Petrosyan, V. A.; Pilosyan, S. Kh; Grasiuk, A. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The factors determining the efficiency of the target material utilisation for pulsed laser deposition of films are considered. The target volume is calculated, which is evaporated in the ablation process by the focused laser radiation having a rectangular form. The new device is suggested and developed for obtaining thin films by the method of laser deposition, which is specific in the employment of a simple optical system mounted outside a deposition chamber that comprises two lenses and the diaphragm and focuses the laser beam onto a target in the form of a sector-like spot. Thin films of CuO and YBaCuO were deposited with this device. Several deposition cycles revealed that the target material is consumed uniformly from the entire surface of the target. A maximal spread of the target thickness was not greater than +/-2% both prior to deposition and after it. The device designed provides a high coefficient of the target material utilisation efficiency.

  4. Growth of mesoporous materials within colloidal crystal films by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, Luis A; Mihi, Agustín; Rodríguez, Isabel; García-Bennett, Alfonso E; Míguez, Hernan

    2005-10-27

    A combination of colloidal crystal planarization, stabilization, and novel infiltration techniques is used to build a bimodal porous silica film showing order at both the micron and the nanometer length scale. An infiltration method based on the spin-coating of the mesophase precursor onto a three-dimensional polystyrene colloidal crystal film allows a nanometer control tuning of the filling fraction of the mesoporous phase while preserving the optical quality of the template. These materials combine a high specific surface arising from the nanopores with increased mass transport and photonic crystal properties provided by the order of the macropores. Optical Bragg diffraction from these type of hierarchically ordered oxides is observed, allowing performing of optical monitoring of the different processes involved in the formation of the bimodal silica structure.

  5. Growth of mesoporous materials within colloidal crystal films by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, Luis A; Mihi, Agustín; Rodríguez, Isabel; García-Bennett, Alfonso E; Míguez, Hernan

    2005-10-27

    A combination of colloidal crystal planarization, stabilization, and novel infiltration techniques is used to build a bimodal porous silica film showing order at both the micron and the nanometer length scale. An infiltration method based on the spin-coating of the mesophase precursor onto a three-dimensional polystyrene colloidal crystal film allows a nanometer control tuning of the filling fraction of the mesoporous phase while preserving the optical quality of the template. These materials combine a high specific surface arising from the nanopores with increased mass transport and photonic crystal properties provided by the order of the macropores. Optical Bragg diffraction from these type of hierarchically ordered oxides is observed, allowing performing of optical monitoring of the different processes involved in the formation of the bimodal silica structure. PMID:16853540

  6. Relationships between processing temperature and microstructure in isothermal melt processed Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Phillips, D.S.; Willis, J.O.; Peterson, D.E.

    1995-05-01

    The microstructure and phase assemblage of isothermal melt processed (IMP) Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) thick films have been evaluated. Results from compositional analysis and phase identification indicate that the characteristics of the partial melt greatly influence the microstructural and chemical development of the thick films. The highest critical current densities were obtained in films processed below 800{degrees}C where the partial melt uniformly coats the substrate without excessive phase segregation.

  7. Dual-beam laser thermal processing of silicon photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Teal, Anthony; Zhang, Tian; Hadler, Josh; Zhou, Zibo; Varlamov, Sergey; Perez-Würfl, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an all-laser processing technique by means of two industrially-relevant continuous-wave fiber lasers operating at 1070 nm. This approach is capable of both substrate heating with a large defocused beam and material processing with a second scanned beam, and is suitable for a variety of photovoltaic applications. We have demonstrated this technique for rapid crystallization of thin film (~10 μm) silicon on glass, which is a low cost alternative to wafer-based solar cells. We have also applied this technique to wafer silicon to control dopant diffusion at the surface region where the focused line beam rapidly melts the substrate that then regrows epitaxially. Finite element simulations have been used to model the melt depth as a function of preheat temperature and line beam power. This process is carried out in tens of seconds for an area approximately 10 cm2 using only about 1 kW of total optical power and is readily scalable. In this paper, we will discuss our results with both c-Si wafers and thin-film silicon.

  8. Formation of CuInSSe thin films by conventional two-stage process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrotriya, Vipin; Rajaram, P.

    2016-05-01

    We have fabricated Crystalline CuInSSe thin films on glass substrate by conventional two-stage process. In first stage CuInS2 thin films have been grown on glass substrate by spray pyrolysis method at constant temperature 320°C. The CuCl2, InCl3, and thiourea were used as source materials for the Cu, In, and S precursors respectively and the Cu/In ratio is kept at 1.0. In second stage the precursor films of CuInS2 are selenized to get CuInSSe. The grown thin films of CuInS2 and CuInSSe were characterized by XRD, SEM and optical studies. The average crystallite size of the CISS thin films is found to be in the range 10-20 nm, using the Scherrer formula. The band gap value of the CuInSSe films is found to be 1.26 eV.

  9. Fabrication of solution processed 3D nanostructured CuInGaS₂ thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Van Ben; Cho, Jin Woo; Park, Se Jin; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Park, Hoo Keun; Do, Young Rag; Min, Byoung Koun

    2014-03-28

    In this study we demonstrate the fabrication of CuInGaS₂ (CIGS) thin film solar cells with a three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure based on indium tin oxide (ITO) nanorod films and precursor solutions (Cu, In and Ga nitrates in alcohol). To obtain solution processed 3D nanostructured CIGS thin film solar cells, two different precursor solutions were applied to complete gap filling in ITO nanorods and achieve the desirable absorber film thickness. Specifically, a coating of precursor solution without polymer binder material was first applied to fill the gap between ITO nanorods followed by deposition of the second precursor solution in the presence of a binder to generate an absorber film thickness of ∼1.3 μm. A solar cell device with a (Al, Ni)/AZO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS/ITO nanorod/glass structure was constructed using the CIGS film, and the highest power conversion efficiency was measured to be ∼6.3% at standard irradiation conditions, which was 22.5% higher than the planar type of CIGS solar cell on ITO substrate fabricated using the same precursor solutions. PMID:24569126

  10. Bamboo (Neosinocalamus affinis)-based thin film, a novel biomass material with high performances.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Xu, Chen; Bao, Wen-Yi; Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-03-30

    Exploration of biomass based materials to replace conventional petroleum based ones has been a trend in recent decades. In this work, bamboo (Neosinocalamus affinis) with abundant resources was used for the first time to prepare films in the presence of cellulose. The effects of weight ratio of bamboo/cellulose on the appearances and properties of the films were investigated. It was confirmed there existed strong interactions between bamboo and cellulose, which were favorable to formation of homogeneous structure of blend films. Particularly, the presence of bamboo could improve the surface hydrophobicity, water resistance and thermal stability of blend films, and the films possessed an excellent oxygen barrier property, compared with generally used commercial packaging films. The bamboo biomass, therefore, is successfully used to create a new film material with a good application prospect in the fields of packaging, coating, and food industry.

  11. Oxide films at the nanoscale: new structures, new functions, and new materials.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2011-11-15

    We all make use of oxide ultrathin films, even if we are unaware of doing so. They are essential components of many common devices, such as mobile phones and laptops. The films in these ubiquitous electronics are composed of silicon dioxide, an unsurpassed material in the design of transistors. But oxide films at the nanoscale (typically just 10 nm or less in thickness) are integral to many other applications. In some cases, they form under normal reactive conditions and confer new properties to a material: one example is the corrosion protection of stainless steel, which is the result of a passive film. A new generation of devices for energy production and communications technology, such as ferroelectric ultrathin film capacitors, tunneling magnetoresistance sensors, solar energy materials, solid oxide fuel cells, and many others, are being specifically designed to exploit the unusual properties afforded by reduced oxide thickness. Oxide ultrathin films also have tremendous potential in chemistry, representing a rich new source of catalytic materials. About 20 years ago, researchers began to prepare model systems of truly heterogeneous catalysts based on thin oxide layers grown on single crystals of metal. Only recently, however, was it realized that these systems may behave quite differently from their corresponding bulk oxides. One of the phenomena uncovered is the occurrence of a spontaneous charge transfer from the metal support to an adsorbed species through the thin insulating layer (or vice versa). The importance of this property is clear: conceptually, the activation and bond breaking of adsorbed molecules begin with precisely the same process, electron transfer into an antibonding orbital. But electron transfer can also be harnessed to make a supported metal particle more chemically active, increase its adhesion energy, or change its shape. Most importantly, the basic principles underlying electron transfer and other phenomena (such as structural

  12. Initial Study on Thin Film Preparation of Carbon Nanodots Composites as Luminescence Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, F.; Aimon, A. H.; Akmaluddin, A. R.; Nuryadin, B. W.; Abdullah, M.

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the developments of phosphors materials require elements without noble metals and simple production process. Carbon nanodots (C-dots) are one of phosphor materials with wide range of emission band, and high biocompatibility. In this research thin film carbon nanodots composite have been prepared by spin coating method. Prior deposition, powder carbon nanodots were synthesized from a mixture of commercial urea as the nitrogen sources and citric acid as a carbon source by using hydrothermal and microwave-assisted heating method. The prepared powder was dispersed in transparent epoxy resin and then coated on glass substrate. The photoluminescence result for sample with 0.035 g citric acid exhibited an intense, single, homogeneous and broad spectrum with yellowish emission upon excitation at 365 nm. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) result showed the existences of C=C, C-H, C=O, N-H and O-H functional groups which confirmed the quality of the sample. Further, based on UV-Vis measurement, the prepared thin film was highly transparent (transmittance 90%) with estimated film thickness around 764 nm. This result may open an opportunity for optoelectronic devices.

  13. Materials for Conoco zinc chloride hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Use of zinc chloride to augment hydrogenation of coal and yield a high-octane gasoline product is the most significant feature of a coal liquefaction process being developed by Conoco Coal Development Company. The zinc chloride catalyst is regenerated in a fluidized sand bed, where the spent melt is mixed with air and hydrogen chloride at about 1000/sup 0/C. Recovery is completed at 370/sup 0/C in a condenser, where the zinc chloride is collected and the oxygen and sulfur are separated as H/sub 2/O and SO/sub 2/. The economic viability of the entire process is highly dependent on almost complete recovery of the zinc chloride. The severe environmental conditions of this recovery process cause unique materials problems. Although high-temperature oxidation and sulfidation are being studied in related programs, suitable materials to resist their combined effects along with those of chlorides have not yet been specifically addressed. Common engineering materials, such as the austenitic stainless steels and many nickel-base alloys, are unsuitable because of their inability to tolerate the elevated temperatures and sulfidation, respectively. The objectives of this task are to screen various metallic and ceramic materials for resistance to the zinc chloride recovery system environment and to determine the nature of the attack by exposing coupons to the simulated environment in the laboratory.

  14. Dielectric barrier discharge processing of aerospace materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Figgures, C. C.; Dixon, D. G.

    2004-08-01

    We report the use of atmospheric pressure, air based, dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) to treat materials commonly used in the aerospace industries. The material samples were processed using a test-bed of a conventional DBD configuration in which the sample formed one of the electrodes and was placed in close proximity to a ceramic electrode. The discharges generated a powerful, cold oxidizing environment which was able to remove organic contaminants, etch primer and paint layers, oxidize aluminium and roughen carbon fibre composites by the selective removal of resin.

  15. Early space experiments in materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of the flight experiments conducted in conjunction with the United States Materials Processing in Space Program is presented. Also included are a brief description of the conditions prevailing in an orbiting spacecraft and the research implications provided by this unique environment. What was done and what was learned are summarized in order to serve as a background for future experiments. It is assumed that the reader has some knowledge of the physical sciences but no background in spaceflight experimentation or in the materials science per se.

  16. Effects of anode materials on resistive characteristics of NiO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Ze; Wang, Linkai; Zhang, Naiwen; Ren, Tianling; Liou, Juin J.

    2013-01-28

    This letter shows that the NiO-based structure with different anodes has different resistive switching properties. A conical conductive filament (CF) model is proposed for oxygen vacancies distributed in NiO films. Modeling analysis reveals much larger dissolution velocity of CF near anodes than near cathodes during the reset process. Different interfaces shown in Auger electron spectroscopy can be bound with the model to reveal that CF is dissolved in the structure with Pt or Au as anodes, while CF remains constant if the anode material is Ti or Al, which can explain whether switching properties occur in the specific NiO-based structures.

  17. Transparent megahertz circuits from solution-processed composite thin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingqiang; Wan, Da; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Xiangheng; Guo, Shishang; Jiang, Changzhong; Li, Jinchai; Chen, Tangsheng; Duan, Xiangfeng; Fan, Zhiyong; Liao, Lei

    2016-04-21

    Solution-processed amorphous oxide semiconductors have attracted considerable interest in large-area transparent electronics. However, due to its relative low carrier mobility (∼10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), the demonstrated circuit performance has been limited to 800 kHz or less. Herein, we report solution-processed high-speed thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuits with an operation frequency beyond the megahertz region on 4 inch glass. The TFTs can be fabricated from an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube (a-IGZO/SWNT) composite thin film with high yield and high carrier mobility of >70 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). On-chip microwave measurements demonstrate that these TFTs can deliver an unprecedented operation frequency in solution-processed semiconductors, including an extrinsic cut-off frequency (f(T) = 102 MHz) and a maximum oscillation frequency (f(max) = 122 MHz). Ring oscillators further demonstrated an oscillation frequency of 4.13 MHz, for the first time, realizing megahertz circuit operation from solution-processed semiconductors. Our studies represent an important step toward high-speed solution-processed thin film electronics. PMID:27009830

  18. Molecular basis of processing wheat gluten toward biobased materials.

    PubMed

    Lagrain, Bert; Goderis, Bart; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2010-03-01

    The unique properties of the wheat grain reside primarily in the gluten-forming storage proteins of its endosperm. Wheat gluten's structural and functional properties have led to an expanding diversity of applications in food products. However, its viscoelastic properties and low water solubility also are very interesting features for nonfood applications. Moreover, gluten is annually renewable and perfectly biodegradable. In the processing and setting of gluten containing products, temperature plays a very important role. In this review, the structure and reactivity of gluten are discussed and the importance of sulfhydryl (SH) and disulfide (SS) groups is demonstrated. Wheat gluten aggregation upon thermosetting proceeds through direct covalent cross-linking in and between its protein groups, glutenin and gliadin. Predominant reactions include SH oxidation and SH/SS interchange reactions leading to the formation of SS cross-links. Additionally, thermal treatment of gluten can result in the formation of other than SS covalent bonds. We here review two main technological approaches to make gluten-based materials: wet processes resulting in thin films and dry processes, such as extrusion or compression molding, exploiting the thermoplastic properties of proteins under low moisture conditions and potentially resulting in very useful materials. Gluten bioplastics can also be reinforced with natural fibers, resulting in biocomposites. Although a lot of progress has been made the past decade, the current gluten materials are still outperformed by their synthetic polymer counterparts. PMID:20141101

  19. Active barrier films of PET for solar cell application: Processing and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2014-05-15

    A preliminary investigation was carried out on the possibility to improve the protective action offered by the standard multilayer structures used to encapsulate photovoltaic devices. With this aim, a commercial active barrier PET-based material, able to absorb oxygen when activated by liquid water, was used to produce flexible and transparent active barrier films, by means of a lab-scale film production plant. The obtained film, tested in terms of thermal, optical and oxygen absorption properties, shows a slow oxygen absorption kinetics, an acceptable transparency and an easy roll-to-roll processability, so proving itself as a good candidate for the development of protective coating for solar cells against the atmospheric degradation agents like the rain.

  20. Hard X-rays for processing hybrid organic-inorganic thick films.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Carboni, Davide; Pinna, Alessandra; Marmiroli, Benedetta; Malfatti, Luca; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2016-01-01

    Hard X-rays, deriving from a synchrotron light source, have been used as an effective tool for processing hybrid organic-inorganic films and thick coatings up to several micrometres. These coatings could be directly modified, in terms of composition and properties, by controlled exposure to X-rays. The physico-chemical properties of the coatings, such as hardness, refractive index and fluorescence, can be properly tuned using the interaction of hard X-rays with the sol-gel hybrid films. The changes in the microstructure have been correlated especially with the modification of the optical and the mechanical properties. A relationship between the degradation rate of the organic groups and the rise of fluorescence from the hybrid material has been observed; nanoindentation analysis of the coatings as a function of the X-ray doses has shown a not linear dependence between thickness and film hardness.

  1. 76 FR 72902 - Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee (MPETAC) will meet... controls applicable to materials processing equipment and related technology. Agenda Open Session...

  2. Phosphorous and aluminum gettering in Silicon-Film{trademark} Product II material

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, J.E.; Barnett, A.M.; Hall, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    Gettering processes are being developed for the Silicon-Film{trademark} Product II solar cell structure. These processes have been developed specifically for films of silicon grown on dissimilar substrates with barrier layers. Gettering with both phosphorous- and aluminum-based processing sequences has resulted in enhancement of minority carrier diffusion length. Long diffusion lengths have allowed the characterization of light trapping in thin films of silicon grown on barrier-coated substrates.

  3. Limited reaction processing for semiconductor materials preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, J. L.

    1991-07-01

    Limited Reaction Processing (LRP) is a layer deposition technique based upon a combination of rapid thermal processing (RTP) and chemical vapor deposition. The versatility of LRP was shwon in research on epitaxial growth in three different materials systems. Research was spurred at several other laboratories in the area of epitaxial growth and applications involving RTP techniques, particularly in the Si(1-x)Ge(x) materials system. The first CVD grown Si/Si(1-x)Ge(x) heterojunction bipolar transistors were fabricated using this technique, with maximum oscillation frequencies on the order of 40 GHz. In the III-V area, arsine alternative sources were explored for GaAs expitaxy which greatly improve the safety of MOCVD. A new atomic layer growth technique was developed by combining LRP with an alternating gas pulse method.

  4. Exposures and their determinants in radiographic film processing.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Kay; Chow, Yat; Brauer, Michael; Chessor, Ed; Hirtle, Bob; Kennedy, Susan M; Yeung, Moira Chan; Ward, Helen Dimich

    2002-01-01

    Radiographers process X-ray films using developer and fixer solutions that contain chemicals known to cause or exacerbate asthma. In a study in British Columbia, Canada, radiographers' personal exposures to glutaraldehyde (a constituent of the developer chemistry), acetic acid (a constituent of the fixer chemistry), and sulfur dioxide (a byproduct of sulfites, present in both developer and fixer solutions) were measured. Average full-shift exposures to glutaraldehyde, acetic acid, and sulfur dioxide were 0.0009 mg/m3, 0.09 mg/m3, and 0.08 mg/m3, respectively, all more than one order of magnitude lower than current occupational exposure limits. Local exhaust ventilation of the processing machines and use of silver recovery units lowered exposures, whereas the number of films processed per machine and the time spent near the machines increased exposures. Personnel in clinic facilities had higher exposures than those in hospitals. Private clinics were less likely to have local exhaust ventilation and silver recovery units. Their radiographers spent more time in the processor areas and processed more films per machine. Although exposures were low compared with exposure standards, there are good reasons to continue practices to minimize or eliminate exposures: glutaraldehyde and hydroquinone (present in the developer) are sensitizers; the levels at which health effects occur are not yet clearly established, but appear to be lower than current standards; and health effects resulting from the mixture of chemicals are not understood. Developments in digital imaging technology are making available options that do not involve wet-processing of photographic film and therefore could eliminate the use of developer and fixer chemicals altogether. PMID:11843420

  5. Tubular filamentation for laser material processing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chen; Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Giust, Remo; Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Itina, Tatiana; Dudley, John M.; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    An open challenge in the important field of femtosecond laser material processing is the controlled internal structuring of dielectric materials. Although the availability of high energy high repetition rate femtosecond lasers has led to many advances in this field, writing structures within transparent dielectrics at intensities exceeding 1013 W/cm2 has remained difficult as it is associated with significant nonlinear spatial distortion. This letter reports the existence of a new propagation regime for femtosecond pulses at high power that overcomes this challenge, associated with the generation of a hollow uniform and intense light tube that remains propagation invariant even at intensities associated with dense plasma formation. This regime is seeded from higher order nondiffracting Bessel beams, which carry an optical vortex charge. Numerical simulations are quantitatively confirmed by experiments where a novel experimental approach allows direct imaging of the 3D fluence distribution within transparent solids. We also analyze the transitions to other propagation regimes in near and far fields. We demonstrate how the generation of plasma in this tubular geometry can lead to applications in ultrafast laser material processing in terms of single shot index writing, and discuss how it opens important perspectives for material compression and filamentation guiding in atmosphere. PMID:25753215

  6. Tubular filamentation for laser material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chen; Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Giust, Remo; Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Itina, Tatiana; Dudley, John M.; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-03-01

    An open challenge in the important field of femtosecond laser material processing is the controlled internal structuring of dielectric materials. Although the availability of high energy high repetition rate femtosecond lasers has led to many advances in this field, writing structures within transparent dielectrics at intensities exceeding 1013 W/cm2 has remained difficult as it is associated with significant nonlinear spatial distortion. This letter reports the existence of a new propagation regime for femtosecond pulses at high power that overcomes this challenge, associated with the generation of a hollow uniform and intense light tube that remains propagation invariant even at intensities associated with dense plasma formation. This regime is seeded from higher order nondiffracting Bessel beams, which carry an optical vortex charge. Numerical simulations are quantitatively confirmed by experiments where a novel experimental approach allows direct imaging of the 3D fluence distribution within transparent solids. We also analyze the transitions to other propagation regimes in near and far fields. We demonstrate how the generation of plasma in this tubular geometry can lead to applications in ultrafast laser material processing in terms of single shot index writing, and discuss how it opens important perspectives for material compression and filamentation guiding in atmosphere.

  7. Tubular filamentation for laser material processing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Giust, Remo; Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Itina, Tatiana; Dudley, John M; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    An open challenge in the important field of femtosecond laser material processing is the controlled internal structuring of dielectric materials. Although the availability of high energy high repetition rate femtosecond lasers has led to many advances in this field, writing structures within transparent dielectrics at intensities exceeding 10(13) W/cm(2) has remained difficult as it is associated with significant nonlinear spatial distortion. This letter reports the existence of a new propagation regime for femtosecond pulses at high power that overcomes this challenge, associated with the generation of a hollow uniform and intense light tube that remains propagation invariant even at intensities associated with dense plasma formation. This regime is seeded from higher order nondiffracting Bessel beams, which carry an optical vortex charge. Numerical simulations are quantitatively confirmed by experiments where a novel experimental approach allows direct imaging of the 3D fluence distribution within transparent solids. We also analyze the transitions to other propagation regimes in near and far fields. We demonstrate how the generation of plasma in this tubular geometry can lead to applications in ultrafast laser material processing in terms of single shot index writing, and discuss how it opens important perspectives for material compression and filamentation guiding in atmosphere. PMID:25753215

  8. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckannan, E. C. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A list of active research tasks as of the end of 1978 of the Materials Processing in Space Program of the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications, involving several NASA Centers and other organizations is reported. An overview of the program scope for managers and scientists in industry, university and government communities is provided. The program, its history, strategy and overall goal; the organizational structures and people involved; and each research task are described. Tasks are categorized by ground based research according to four process areas. Cross references to the performing organizations and principal investigators are provided.

  9. Computational Modeling in Structural Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High temperature materials such as silicon carbide, a variety of nitrides, and ceramic matrix composites find use in aerospace, automotive, machine tool industries and in high speed civil transport applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used in processing such structural materials. Variations of CVD include deposition on substrates, coating of fibers, inside cavities and on complex objects, and infiltration within preforms called chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Our current knowledge of the process mechanisms, ability to optimize processes, and scale-up for large scale manufacturing is limited. In this regard, computational modeling of the processes is valuable since a validated model can be used as a design tool. The effort is similar to traditional chemically reacting flow modeling with emphasis on multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, large sets of homogeneous reactions, and surface chemistry. In the case of CVI, models for pore infiltration are needed. In the present talk, examples of SiC nitride, and Boron deposition from the author's past work will be used to illustrate the utility of computational process modeling.

  10. Pyroelectric Materials for Uncooled Infrared Detectors: Processing, Properties, and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Guggilla, P.; Edwards, M. E.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric detectors find applications in diverse and wide areas such as industrial production; automotive; aerospace applications for satellite-borne ozone sensors assembled with an infrared spectrometer; health care; space exploration; imaging systems for ships, cars, and aircraft; and military and security surveillance systems. These detectors are the prime candidates for NASA s thermal infrared detector requirements. In this Technical Memorandum, the physical phenomena underlying the operation and advantages of pyroelectric infrared detectors is introduced. A list and applications of important ferroelectrics is given, which is a subclass of pyroelectrics. The basic concepts of processing of important pyroelectrics in various forms are described: single crystal growth, ceramic processing, polymer-composites preparation, and thin- and thick-film fabrications. The present status of materials and their characteristics and detectors figures-of-merit are presented in detail. In the end, the unique techniques demonstrated for improving/enhancing the performance of pyroelectric detectors are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on recent advances and emerging technologies such as thin-film array devices and novel single crystal sensors.

  11. Evaporation system and method for gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for depositing thin films of materials such as metals, oxides and nitrides at low temperature relies on a supersonic free jet of inert carrier gas to transport vapor species generated from an evaporation source to the surface of a substrate. Film deposition vapors are generated from solid film precursor materials, including those in the form of wires or powders. The vapor from these sources is carried downstream in a low pressure supersonic jet of inert gas to the surface of a substrate where the vapors deposit to form a thin film. A reactant gas can be introduced into the gas jet to form a reaction product with the evaporated material. The substrate can be moved from the gas jet past a gas jet containing a reactant gas in which a discharge has been generated, the speed of movement being sufficient to form a thin film which is chemically composed of the evaporated material and reactant gases.

  12. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Processing of Barium Titanate Nanoparticles Embedded in Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Michael D; Gao, Kai; Mendis, Gamini P; Slamovich, Elliott B; Howarter, John A

    2015-12-30

    Barium titanate nanoparticles embedded in flexible polymer films were synthesized using hydrothermal processing methods. The resulting films were characterized with respect to material composition, size distribution of nanoparticles, and spatial location of particles within the polymer film. Synthesis conditions were varied based on the mechanical properties of the polymer films, ratio of polymer to barium titanate precursors, and length of aging time between initial formulations of the solution to final processing of nanoparticles. Block copolymers of poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (SMAh) were used to spatially separate titanium precursors based on specific chemical interactions with the maleic anhydride moiety. However, the glassy nature of this copolymer restricted mobility of the titanium precursors during hydrothermal processing. The addition of rubbery butadiene moieties, through mixing of the SMAh with poly(styrene-butadiene-styrene) (SBS) copolymer, increased the nanoparticle dispersion as a result of greater diffusivity of the titanium precursor via higher mobility of the polymer matrix. Additionally, an aminosilane was used as a means to retard cross-linking in polymer-metalorganic solutions, as the titanium precursor molecules were shown to react and form networks prior to hydrothermal processing. By adding small amounts of competing aminosilane, excessive cross-linking was prevented without significantly impacting the quality and composition of the final barium titanate nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to verify nanoparticle compositions. Particle sizes within the polymer films were measured to be 108 ± 5 nm, 100 ± 6 nm, and 60 ± 5 nm under different synthetic conditions using electron microscopy. Flexibility of the films was assessed through measurement of the glass transition temperature using dynamic mechanical analysis. Dielectric permittivity was measured using an impedance analyzer.

  13. Numerical simulation of film coating process in a novel rotating fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hideya; Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Watano, Satoru

    2006-06-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of film coating process in a novel rotating fluidized bed (RFB) was conducted by using a Discrete Element Method (DEM)-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling model. Particle movements and fluid motions in a centrifugal force field were simulated at three-dimensional cylindrical coordinate, and this model was applied to film coating process. Film coating process in a RFB was numerically analyzed by using a simplified assumption that a particle was coated only when a particle existed within a spray zone. The experiments were also conducted and uniformity of sprayed material was evaluated by investigating color difference of the coated particles. As a result of the numerical simulation, three-dimensional bubble movements and particle circulation could be well simulated. In addition, mass of the sprayed material on a single particle in a RFB could be visualized by using our proposed model. The relationship between distribution of the sprayed material and the coating time was also analyzed. Calculated mass distributions of the sprayed material could be expressed by a normal distribution function, showing qualitative good agreement with the previous studies. Effect of the operating parameters, such as gas velocity and centrifugal acceleration, on the uniformity of the sprayed material was also investigated by both numerical and experimental approaches. Comparison of the coating process in a RFB with that in a conventional fluidized bed was also conducted by the numerical simulation. The result showed that uniformity of the sprayed material was greatly improved in a RFB due to the much smaller circulation time. PMID:16755055

  14. Redox processes in silicon dioxide thin films using copper microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappertzhofen, S.; Menzel, S.; Valov, I.; Waser, R.

    2011-11-01

    Although SiO2 is a typical insulator, we demonstrate an electrochemical characteristic of the Cu/Cu+ oxidation at the interface with 30 nm thick silicon dioxide thin films studied by cyclic voltammetry. This study reveals the process of anodic oxidation and subsequent reduction of oxidized Cu ions injected in the SiO2 layer with special attention to the kinetics of the redox process. We estimated the diffusion coefficient and the mobility of Cu ions in SiO2. The results gain deeper insight in the processes involved during resistive switching of Cu/SiO2 based nonvolatile memory devices.

  15. Bacteriorhodopsin films for optical signal processing and data storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkup, John F. (Principal Investigator); Mehrl, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the research results obtained on NASA Ames Grant NAG 2-878 entitled 'Investigations of Bacteriorhodopsin Films for Optical Signal Processing and Data Storage.' Specifically we performed research, at Texas Tech University, on applications of Bacteriorhodopisin film to both (1) dynamic spatial filtering and (2) holographic data storage. In addition, measurements of the noise properties of an acousto-optical matrix-vestor multiplier built for NASA Ames by Photonic Systems Inc. were performed at NASA Ames' Photonics Laboratory. This research resulted in two papers presented at major optical data processing conferences and a journal paper which is to appear in APPLIED OPTICS. A new proposal for additional BR research has recently been submitted to NASA Ames Research Center.

  16. Study on preparation and polarization process of PVDF thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaopei; Wang, Jun; Ding, Jie; Jiang, Yadong

    2014-09-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is a semi-crystalline polymer, which indicates four different crystalline forms. In this paper, the preparation of nanoscale PVDF thin film was introduced in detail. Initially PVDF was dissolved in the N,N-dimethyl Formamide and acetone mixed solution (volume ratio 1:1). The PVDF films were prepared by spin coating method with different solution concentration, then were characterized by SEM, XRD and FTIR after annealed at different annealing temperatures (60 centigrade to 120 centigrade). Due to the formation of polarized β crystal phase in the annealing process, the pyroelectric coefficient p would be affected by different annealing temperatures. The thermal poling technique of PVDF was also shown in this paper. We investigated the polarization behavior of PVDF when they were subjected to different poling electric fields (from 50 V/μm to 80 V/μm) and poling temperatures (from 90 centigrade to 120 centigrade). For a long enough poling time, the polarization is only related to poling electric filed, while poling temperature affects the poling rate merely. Under the condition of PVDF thin film beforet breakdown, the strongger the poling electric filed intensity, the higher the pyroelectric coefficient is. The pyroelectric coefficient of fibricated PVDF film is 9.0×10-10C/cm2K after 80v/μm electric field intensity polarization from experiment result.

  17. Laser processing for manufacturing nanocarbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Hai Hoang

    CNTs have been considered as the excellent candidate to revolutionize a broad range of applications. There have been many method developed to manipulate the chemistry and the structure of CNTs. Laser with non-contact treatment capability exhibits many processing advantages, including solid-state treatment, extremely fast processing rate, and high processing resolution. In addition, the outstanding monochromatic, coherent, and directional beam generates the powerful energy absorption and the resultant extreme processing conditions. In my research, a unique laser scanning method was developed to process CNTs, controlling the oxidation and the graphitization. The achieved controllability of this method was applied to address the important issues of the current CNT processing methods for three applications. The controllable oxidation of CNTs by laser scanning method was applied to cut CNT films to produce high-performance cathodes for FE devices. The production method includes two important self-developed techniques to produce the cold cathodes: the production of highly oriented and uniformly distributed CNT sheets and the precise laser trimming process. Laser cutting is the unique method to produce the cathodes with remarkable features, including ultrathin freestanding structure (~200 nm), greatly high aspect ratio, hybrid CNT-GNR emitter arrays, even emitter separation, and directional emitter alignment. This unique cathode structure was unachievable by other methods. The developed FE devices successfully solved the screening effect issue encounter by current FE devices. The laser-control oxidation method was further developed to sequentially remove graphitic walls of CNTs. The laser oxidation process was directed to occur along the CNT axes by the laser scanning direction. Additionally, the oxidation was further assisted by the curvature stress and the thermal expansion of the graphitic nanotubes, ultimately opening (namely unzipping) the tubular structure to

  18. All solution processed organic thin film transistor-backplane with printing technology for electrophoretic display

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Song, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, solution processes were developed for backplane using an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) as a driving device for an electrophoretic display (EPD) panel. The processes covered not only the key device of OTFTs but also interlayer and pixel electrodes. The various materials and printing processes were adopted to achieve the requirements of devices and functioning layers. The performance of OTFT of the backplane was sufficient to drive EPD sheet by producing a mobility of 0.12 cm2/v x sec and on/off current ratio of 10(5).

  19. Mechanical properties of thin-film materials evaluated from amplitude-dependent internal friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Yoichi

    1999-09-01

    A method is presented to evaluate the mechanical properties of thin-film materials from measurements of the amplitude-dependent internal friction. According to the constitutive equation, the internal friction in the film can be determined separately from measured damping of the film/substrate composite. The internal friction in aluminum films is dependent on the strain amplitude that is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that for bulk aluminum. On the basis of the microplasticity theory, the amplitude-dependent internal friction in the film can be converted into the plastic strain as a function of effective stress on dislocation motion. The mechanical responses thus obtained for aluminum films show that the plastic strain of the order of 10-9 increases nonlinearly with increasing stress. These curves tend to shift to a higher stress with decreasing film thickness and also with decreasing temperature, both indicating a suppression of microplastic flow. The microflow stress at a constant level of the plastic strain varies inversely with the film thickness, provided the grain size is larger than the film thickness. The film thickness effect in the microplastic range can be well explained by the bowing of a dislocation segment whose ends are pinned at the film surface and at the film/substrate interface.

  20. Hydrogen uptake on film surfaces produced by a unique codeposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Kenneth V.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Sandoval, Cynthia W.

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen uptake on several different film surfaces has been achieved by deposition of a conventional hydrogen gettering system via a novel combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. We decided to use a conventional hydrogen gettering system, developed by Smith and Schicker [J.R. Schicker, AS/KCD Project No. EPN-047620, May 1994], that uses an acetylenic organic compound mixed with carbon supported palladium metal. The organic material, 1,4-bis-(phenylethynyl) benzene (DEB), is mixed with palladium and carbon by employing conventional solid state ceramic preparative techniques. Our novel codeposition process combines PVD and CVD techniques for fabricating thin-film coatings of the palladium-catalyzed DEB hydrogen gettering system. Hydrogen uptake was confirmed by 1H NMR and our novel process lends itself well to placing hydrogen getter onto complex shapes and substrates of various compositions.

  1. Femtosecond laser processing of fuel injectors - a materials processing evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B C; Wynne, A

    2000-12-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a new laser-based machining technology that utilizes ultrashort-pulse (0.1-1.0 picosecond) lasers to cut materials with negligible generation of heat or shock. The ultrashort pulse laser, developed for the Department of Energy (Defense Programs) has numerous applications in operations requiring high precision machining. Due to the extremely short duration of the laser pulse, material removal occurs by a different physical mechanism than in conventional machining. As a result, any material (e.g., hardened steel, ceramics, diamond, silicon, etc.) can be machined with minimal heat-affected zone or damage to the remaining material. As a result of the threshold nature of the process, shaped holes, cuts, and textures can be achieved with simple beam shaping. Conventional laser tools used for cutting or high-precision machining (e.g., sculpting, drilling) use long laser pulses (10{sup -8} to over 1 sec) to remove material by heating it to the melting or boiling point (Figure 1.1a). This often results in significant damage to the remaining material and produces considerable slag (Figure 1.2a). With ultrashort laser pulses, material is removed by ionizing the material (Figure 1.1b). The ionized plasma expands away from the surface too quickly for significant energy transfer to the remaining material. This distinct mechanism produces extremely precise and clean-edged holes without melting or degrading the remaining material (Figures 1.2 and 1.3). Since only a very small amount of material ({approx} <0.5 microns) is removed per laser pulse, extremely precise machining can be achieved. High machining speed is achieved by operating the lasers at repetition rates up to 10,000 pulses per second. As a diagnostic, the character of the short-pulse laser produced plasma enables determination of the material being machined between pulses. This feature allows the machining of multilayer materials, metal on metal or metal on

  2. Processing and characterization of protein polymer thin films for surface modification of neural prosthetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchko, Christopher John

    The objective of this research has been to develop methods for modifying the surfaces of neural prosthetic devices to enhance biocompatibility. Also central to this work was the characterization of the processes used to modify the surfaces, the resulting macroscopic and microscopic structure, and the relevant physical properties of the new surface. The application required a coating that could attract and adhere cells, mediate the stiffness mismatch between the device and tissue, and facilitate signal transport from the device to tissue. The materials chosen for use as surface modifiers were genetically engineered polypeptides that combine biofunctional sequences with structural segments, creating a processable bioadhesive agent. An electric field mediated deposition process was used to create thin coatings on the devices from these protein polymers. Varying the process parameters was found to exert controllable changes on the morphology, and porous thin films with a range of structures were fabricated. This deposition process was combined with lithographic techniques to generate high-fidelity patterned surfaces. It was anticipated that the surface structure of these films could augment their biochemical composition and facilitate cell adhesion. A Fourier Transform-based method of explicitly quantifying the surface topography was employed to evaluate the effects of process parameters on topography. The mechanical properties of the coatings were examined to determine a suitable morphology for joining the mechanically dissimilar device and tissue. Fibrous coatings composed of randomly oriented filaments exhibited a stiffness gradient while under compression. The films were compliant near the tissue and stiffer near the device. The biological performance of these films was assayed and the films were seen to be potent cellular adhesives. The coatings were also found to be capable of delivering biologically-relevant molecules in vitro.

  3. Process Research of Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A passivation process (hydrogenation) that will improve the power generation of solar cells fabricated from presently produced, large grain, cast polycrystalline silicon (Semix), a potentially low cost material are developed. The first objective is to verify the operation of a DC plasma hydrogenation system and to investigate the effect of hydrogen on the electrical performance of a variety of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The second objective is to parameterize and optimize a hydrogenation process for cast polycrystalline silicon, and will include a process sensitivity analysis. The sample preparation for the first phase is outlined. The hydrogenation system is described, and some early results that were obtained using the hydrogenation system without a plasma are summarized. Light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements of minicell samples, and their correlation to dark current voltage characteristics, are discussed.

  4. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Active research areas as of the end of the fiscal year 1982 of the Materials Processing in Space Program, NASA-Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications, involving several NASA centers and other organizations are highlighted to provide an overview of the program scope for managers and scientists in industry, university, and government communities. The program is described as well as its history, strategy and overall goal; the organizational structures and people involved are identified and each research task is described together with a list of recent publications. The tasks are grouped into four categories: crystal growth; solidification of metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, transports, and chemical processes; and ultrahigh vacuum and containerless processing technologies.

  5. Dynamics of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates under fast thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2007-11-01

    deformation. Hence, surface deformation caused by liquid phase instabilities is rapidly quenched-in during the cooling phase. This deformed state is further evolved by subsequent laser pulses. These results have implications to developing accurate computer simulations of thin-film dewetting by energetic beams aimed at the manufacturing of optically active nanoscale materials for applications including information processing, optical devices, and solar energy harvesting.

  6. Materials that can replace liquid electrolytes in Li batteries: Superionic conductivities in Li1.7Al0.3Ti1.7Si0.4P2.6O12. Processing combustion synthesized nanopowders to free standing thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Eongyu; Wang, Weimin; Mohanty, Som; Kieffer, John; Tamaki, Ryo; Laine, Richard M.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that liquid-feed flame spray pyrolysis (LF-FSP) processing provides non-aggregated nanopowders that can be used immediately to tape cast, producing thin films (<100 μm) of Li+ ion conducting membranes when sintered. Glass-ceramic or sol-gel processing methods are commonly used for such but require additional high-energy milling and/or calcining to obtain powder feedstock. Li1+x+yAlxTi2-xSiyP3-yO12 (x = 0.1, 0.3/y = 0.2, 0.4) nanopowders were prepared by LF-FSP with a primary focus on the effects of Al0.3/Si0.4 doping on conductivities. Furthermore, the effects of excess Li2O on Al0.3/Si0.4 doped materials were studied. Li1.7Al0.3Ti1.7Si0.4P2.6O12 pellets sintered to 93-94% of theoretical density and samples with varying excess Li2O contents all show superionic conductivities of 2-3 × 10-3 S cm-1 at room temperature. Li2O lowers both the crystallization temperatures and temperatures required to sinter. Total conductivities range from 2 × 10-3 to 5 × 10-2 S cm-1 in the temperature span of 25°-125 °C. Small grain sizes of 600 ± 200 nm were produced. Initial attempts to make thin films gave films with thicknesses of 52 ± 1 μm on sintering just to 1000 °C. Measured conductivities were 3-5 × 10-4 S cm-1; attributed to final densities of only ≈88%.

  7. Two kinds of composite films: Graphene oxide/carbon nanotube film and graphene oxide/activated carbon film via a self-assemble preparation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Li-feng; Ma, Nan; Sun, Mei; Ji, Tian-hao

    2014-11-01

    Two kinds of free-standing composite films, including graphene oxide and activated carbon film as well as graphene oxide and carbon nanotube film, were fabricated through a simple suspension mixing and then natural deposition process. The films were characterized by various measurement techniques in detail. The results show that the composite films without any treatment almost still remain the original properties of the corresponding precursors, and exhibit loose structure, which can be easily broken in water; whereas after treated at 200 °C in air, the films become relatively more dense, and even if immersed into concentrated strong alkali or acid for five days, they still keep the film-morphologies, but regretfully, they show obvious brittleness and slight hydrophilicity. As soon as the treated films are performed in high concentrated strong alkali for about one day, their brittleness and wettability can be improved and became good flexibility and complete hydrophilicity.

  8. Charge density waves in exfoliated films of van der Waals materials: evolution of Raman spectrum in TiSe2.

    PubMed

    Goli, Pradyumna; Khan, Javed; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Lake, Roger K; Balandin, Alexander A

    2012-11-14

    A number of the charge-density-wave materials reveal a transition to the macroscopic quantum state around 200 K. We used graphene-like mechanical exfoliation of TiSe(2) crystals to prepare a set of films with different thicknesses. The transition temperature to the charge-density-wave state was determined via modification of Raman spectra of TiSe(2) films. It was established that the transition temperature can increase from its bulk value to ~240 K as the thickness of the van der Waals films reduces to the nanometer range. The obtained results are important for the proposed applications of such materials in the collective-state information processing, which require room-temperature operation.

  9. Short-pulse laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Myers, B.R.; Banks, P.S.; Honea, E.C.

    1997-06-18

    While there is much that we have learned about materials processing in the ultrashort-pulse regime, there is an enormous amount that we don`t know. How short does the pulse have to be to achieve a particular cut (depth, material, quality)? How deep can you cut? What is the surface roughness? These questions are clearly dependent upon the properties of the material of interest along with the short-pulse interaction physics. From a technology standpoint, we are asked: Can you build a 100 W average power system ? A 1000 W average power system? This proposal seeks to address these questions with a combined experimental and theoretical program of study. Specifically, To develop an empirical database for both metals and dielectrics which can be used to determine the pulse duration and wavelength necessary to achieve a specific machining requirement. To investigate Yb:YAG as a potential laser material for high average power short-pulse systems both directly and in combination with titanium doped sapphire. To develop a conceptual design for a lOOW and eventually 5OOW average power short-pulse system.

  10. Manned Spacecraft Requirements for Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    A major cause of project failure can be attributed to an emphasized focus on end products and inadequate attention to resolving development risks during the initial phases of a project. The initial phases of a project, which we will call the "study period", are critical to determining project scope and costs, and can make or break most projects. If the requirements are not defined adequately, how can the scope be adequately determined, also how can the costs of the entire project be effectively estimated, and how can the risk of project success be accurately assessed? Using the proper material specifications and standards and incorporating these specifications and standards in the design process should be considered inherently crucial to the technical success of a project as just as importantly, crucial to the cost and schedule success. This paper will intertwine several important aspects or considerations for project success: 1) Characteristics of a "Good Material Requirement"; 2) Linking material requirements to the implementation of "Design for Manufacturing"; techniques and 3) The importance of decomposing materials requirements during the study phase/development phase to mitigate project risk for the maturation of technologies before the building of hardware.

  11. Exposure of Polymer Film Thermal Control Materials on the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce; Miller, Sharon; Messer, Russell; Sechkar, Edward; Tollis, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Seventy-nine samples of polymer film thermal control (PFTC) materials have been provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) for exposure to the low Earth orbit environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). MISSE is a materials flight experiment sponsored by the Air Force Research Lab/Materials Lab and NASA. This paper will describe background, objectives, and configurations for the GRC PFTC samples for MISSE. These samples include polyimides, fluorinated polyimides, and Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) with and without second-surface metallizing layers and/or surface coatings. Also included are polyphenylene benzobisoxazole (PBO) and a polyarylene ether benzimidazole (TOR-LM). On August 16, 2001, astronauts installed passive experiment carriers (PECs) on the exterior of the ISS in which were located twenty-eight of the GRC PFTC samples for 1-year space exposure. MISSE PECs for 3-year exposure, which will contain fifty-one GRC PFTC samples, will be installed on the ISS at a later date. Once returned from the ISS, MISSE GRC PFTC samples will be examined for changes in optical and mechanical properties and atomic oxygen (AO) erosion. Additional sapphire witness samples located on the AO exposed trays will be examined for deposition of contaminants.

  12. Process Controlled Multiscale Morphologies in Metal-containing Block Copolymer Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Darling, Seth B.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(styrene-block-ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (PS-b-PFS) is a metal-containing block copolymer that exhibits certain advantages as a mask for lithographic applications. These advantages include compatibility with a wide range of substrates, ease of control over domain morphologies and robust stability to etch plasma, which aid in the development of high-aspect-ratio patterns. An asymmetric cylinder-forming PS-b-PFS copolymer is subjected to different processing to manipulate the morphology of the phase-separated domains. Control of film structure and domain morphology is achieved by adjusting the film thickness, mode of annealing, and/or annealing time. Changing the process from thermal or solvent annealing to hybrid annealing (thermal and then solvent annealing in sequence) leads to the formation of mesoscale spherulitic and dendritic morphologies. In this communication, we show that reversing the order of the hybrid annealing (solvent annealing first and then thermal annealing) of relatively thick films (>100 nm) on homogeneously thick substrates develops disordered lamellar structure. Furthermore, the same processing applied on a substrate with a thin, mechanically flexible window in the center leads to the formation of sub-micron scale concentric ring patterns. Enhanced material mobility in the thick film during hybrid annealing along with dynamic rippling effects that may arise from the vibration of the thin window during spin casting are likely causes for these morphologies.

  13. Real time intelligent process control system for thin film solar cell manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    George Atanasoff

    2010-10-29

    This project addresses the problem of lower solar conversion efficiency and waste in the typical solar cell manufacturing process. The work from the proposed development will lead toward developing a system which should be able to increase solar panel conversion efficiency by an additional 12-15% resulting in lower cost panels, increased solar technology adoption, reduced carbon emissions and reduced dependency on foreign oil. All solar cell manufacturing processes today suffer from manufacturing inefficiencies that currently lead to lower product quality and lower conversion efficiency, increased product cost and greater material and energy consumption. This results in slower solar energy adoption and extends the time solar cells will reach grid parity with traditional energy sources. The thin film solar panel manufacturers struggle on a daily basis with the problem of thin film thickness non-uniformity and other parameters variances over the deposited substrates, which significantly degrade their manufacturing yield and quality. Optical monitoring of the thin films during the process of the film deposition is widely perceived as a necessary step towards resolving the non-uniformity and non-homogeneity problem. In order to enable the development of an optical control system for solar cell manufacturing, a new type of low cost optical sensor is needed, able to acquire local information about the panel under deposition and measure its local characteristics, including the light scattering in very close proximity to the surface of the film. This information cannot be obtained by monitoring from outside the deposition chamber (as traditional monitoring systems do) due to the significant signal attenuation and loss of its scattering component before the reflected beam reaches the detector. In addition, it would be too costly to install traditional external in-situ monitoring systems to perform any real-time monitoring over large solar panels, since it would require

  14. Commercial-scale process design for thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, T. W. F.; Baron, B. N.; Rocheleau, R. E.

    Process and manufacturing costs for commercial-scale production of thin-film solar cells are examined from the viewpoint of the chemical process industry, with emphasis on CdS/Cu2S cells. The cells comprise opaque contact, collector/converter, absorber/generator, transparent contact, and encapsulation/antireflective coating layers. Each layer is deposited as a separate unit operation, through either continuous or batch processing methods. The scale-up of laboratory-verified cell manufacturing steps to commercial processing is detailed from the choice of a Zn-plated copper foil substrate to the bonding of a 1/16 in. tempered glass protective layer with polyvinyl butyral. The total product cost is calculated as a sum of raw materials, utilities, labor, and capital investment costs, using a cost/W for a 1 GW plant. Continuous processing results in a $0.50/W cell with raw materials accounting for 38% of the total product cost.

  15. Skylab materials processing facility experiment developer's report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the Skylab M512 Materials Processing Facility is traced from the design of a portable, self-contained electron beam welding system for terrestrial applications to the highly complex experiment system ultimately developed for three Skylab missions. The M512 experiment facility was designed to support six in-space experiments intended to explore the advantages of manufacturing materials in the near-zero-gravity environment of Earth orbit. Detailed descriptions of the M512 facility and related experiment hardware are provided, with discussions of hardware verification and man-machine interfaces included. An analysis of the operation of the facility and experiments during the three Skylab missions is presented, including discussions of the hardware performance, anomalies, and data returned to earth.

  16. High-gravity-assisted pulsed laser ablation system for the fabrication of functionally graded material thin film.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, T; Morinaga, S; Nagayama, K

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the fabrication of a thin film deposited on an appropriate substrate having a continuous composition gradient. The composition gradient was achieved by a combination of pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of the target material with a very strong acceleration field generated on a moving disk rotating at a very high speed. The PLA process was used to produce a cloud of high-energy particles of the target material that will be deposited on a substrate placed on the rotating disk. After deposition, the particles will diffuse on the surface of the thin film under a strong acceleration field. The high energy of the particles and their diffusion on the substrate surface in a high-vacuum environment produces a macroscopic composition distribution in the thin film. We have constructed an experimental apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber in which a circular disk made of titanium is driven by a high-frequency inductive motor. An acceleration field of up to 10,000 G can be generated by this apparatus. Functionally graded material thin films of FeSi(2) with a continuous concentration gradient were successfully fabricated by this method under a gravity field of 5400 G. A significant advantage of this method is that it allows us to fabricate graded thin films with a very smooth surface covered by few droplets.

  17. High-gravity-assisted pulsed laser ablation system for the fabrication of functionally graded material thin film.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, T; Morinaga, S; Nagayama, K

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the fabrication of a thin film deposited on an appropriate substrate having a continuous composition gradient. The composition gradient was achieved by a combination of pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of the target material with a very strong acceleration field generated on a moving disk rotating at a very high speed. The PLA process was used to produce a cloud of high-energy particles of the target material that will be deposited on a substrate placed on the rotating disk. After deposition, the particles will diffuse on the surface of the thin film under a strong acceleration field. The high energy of the particles and their diffusion on the substrate surface in a high-vacuum environment produces a macroscopic composition distribution in the thin film. We have constructed an experimental apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber in which a circular disk made of titanium is driven by a high-frequency inductive motor. An acceleration field of up to 10,000 G can be generated by this apparatus. Functionally graded material thin films of FeSi(2) with a continuous concentration gradient were successfully fabricated by this method under a gravity field of 5400 G. A significant advantage of this method is that it allows us to fabricate graded thin films with a very smooth surface covered by few droplets. PMID:19334931

  18. 2010 Membranes: Materials & Processes Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Lin

    2010-07-30

    The GRC series on Membranes: Materials and Processes have gained significant international recognition, attracting leading experts on membranes and other related areas from around the world. It is now known for being an interdisciplinary and synergistic meeting. The next summer's edition will keep with the past tradition and include new, exciting aspects of material science, chemistry, chemical engineering, computer simulation with participants from academia, industry and national laboratories. This edition will focus on cutting edge topics of membranes for addressing several grand challenges facing our society, in particular, energy, water, health and more generally sustainability. During the technical program, we want to discuss new membrane structure and characterization techniques, the role of advanced membranes and membrane-based processes in sustainability/environment (including carbon dioxide capture), membranes in water processes, and membranes for biological and life support applications. As usual, the informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the oral presentations and posters, and ample opportunity to meet many outstanding colleagues make this an excellent conference for established scientists as well as for students. A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) on the weekend prior to the GRC meeting will provide young researchers an opportunity to present their work and network with outstanding experts. It will also be a right warm-up for the conference participants to join and enjoy the main conference.

  19. Microwave processing of materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Garard, R.S.

    1997-11-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) and Lambda Technologies, Inc. (Lambda) of Raleigh, N.C., was initiated in May 1995. [Lockheed Martin Energy Research, Corp. (LMER) has replaced LMES]. The completion data for the Agreement was December 31, 1996. The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace (VFMF); and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The VFMF, whose initial conception and design was funded by the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies.

  20. Chemistry and Processing of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G A; Baumann, T F; Hope-Weeks, L J; Vance, A L

    2002-01-18

    Nanostructured materials can be formed through the sol-gel polymerization of inorganic or organic monomer systems. For example, a two step polymerization of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) was developed such that silica aerogels with densities as low as 3 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx} two times the density of air) could be achieved. Organic aerogels based upon resorcinol-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde can also be prepared using the sol-gel process. Materials of this type have received significant attention at LLNL due to their ultrafine cell sizes, continuous porosity, high surface area and low mass density. For both types of aerogels, sol-gel polymerization depends upon the transformation of these monomers into nanometer-sized clusters followed by cross-linking into a 3-dimensional gel network. While sol-gel chemistry provides the opportunity to synthesize new material compositions, it suffers from the inability to separate the process of cluster formation from gelation. This limitation results in structural deficiencies in the gel that impact the physical properties of the aerogel, xerogel or nanocomposite. In order to control the properties of the resultant gel, one should be able to regulate the formation of the clusters and their subsequent cross-linking. Towards this goal, we are utilizing dendrimer chemistry to separate the cluster formation from the gelation so that new nanostructured materials can be produced. Dendrimers are three-dimensional, highly branched macromolecules that are prepared in such a way that their size, shape and surface functionality are readily controlled. The dendrimers will be used as pre-formed clusters of known size that can be cross-linked to form an ordered gel network.

  1. Saving Material with Systematic Process Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerausch, M.

    2011-08-01

    Global competition is forcing the stamping industry to further increase quality, to shorten time-to-market and to reduce total cost. Continuous balancing between these classical time-cost-quality targets throughout the product development cycle is required to ensure future economical success. In today's industrial practice, die layout standards are typically assumed to implicitly ensure the balancing of company specific time-cost-quality targets. Although die layout standards are a very successful approach, there are two methodical disadvantages. First, the capabilities for tool design have to be continuously adapted to technological innovations; e.g. to take advantage of the full forming capability of new materials. Secondly, the great variety of die design aspects have to be reduced to a generic rule or guideline; e.g. binder shape, draw-in conditions or the use of drawbeads. Therefore, it is important to not overlook cost or quality opportunities when applying die design standards. This paper describes a systematic workflow with focus on minimizing material consumption. The starting point of the investigation is a full process plan for a typical structural part. All requirements are definedaccording to a predefined set of die design standards with industrial relevance are fulfilled. In a first step binder and addendum geometry is systematically checked for material saving potentials. In a second step, blank shape and draw-in are adjusted to meet thinning, wrinkling and springback targets for a minimum blank solution. Finally the identified die layout is validated with respect to production robustness versus splits, wrinkles and springback. For all three steps the applied methodology is based on finite element simulation combined with a stochastical variation of input variables. With the proposed workflow a well-balanced (time-cost-quality) production process assuring minimal material consumption can be achieved.

  2. Mechanical property changes in porous low-k dielectric thin films during processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, G.; Gates, R. S.; Kavuri, P.; Torres, J.; Michalak, D.; Ege, C.; Bielefeld, J.; King, S. W.

    2014-10-01

    The design of future generations of Cu-low-k dielectric interconnects with reduced electronic crosstalk often requires engineering materials with an optimal trade off between their dielectric constant and elastic modulus. This is because the benefits associated with the reduction of the dielectric constant by increasing the porosity of materials, for example, can adversely affect their mechanical integrity during processing. By using load-dependent contact-resonance atomic force microscopy, the changes in the elastic modulus of low-k dielectric materials due to processing were accurately measured. These changes were linked to alterations sustained by the structure of low-k dielectric films during processing. A two-phase model was used for quantitative assessments of the elastic modulus changes undergone by the organosilicate skeleton of the structure of porous and pore-filled dielectrics.

  3. Mechanical property changes in porous low-k dielectric thin films during processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stan, G. Gates, R. S.; Kavuri, P.; Torres, J.; Michalak, D.; Ege, C.; Bielefeld, J.; King, S. W.

    2014-10-13

    The design of future generations of Cu-low-k dielectric interconnects with reduced electronic crosstalk often requires engineering materials with an optimal trade off between their dielectric constant and elastic modulus. This is because the benefits associated with the reduction of the dielectric constant by increasing the porosity of materials, for example, can adversely affect their mechanical integrity during processing. By using load-dependent contact-resonance atomic force microscopy, the changes in the elastic modulus of low-k dielectric materials due to processing were accurately measured. These changes were linked to alterations sustained by the structure of low-k dielectric films during processing. A two-phase model was used for quantitative assessments of the elastic modulus changes undergone by the organosilicate skeleton of the structure of porous and pore-filled dielectrics.

  4. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1993--January 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Buchanan, W.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Yokimcus, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    The overall objective of the research presented in this report is to advance the development and acceptance of thin-film photovoltaic modules by increasing the understanding of film growth and processing and its relationship to materials properties and solar cell performance. The specific means toward meeting this larger goal include: (1) investigating scalable, cost-effective deposition processes; (2) preparing thin-film materials and device layers and completed cell structures; (3) performing detailed material and device analysis; and (4) participating in collaborative research efforts that address the needs of PV-manufacturers. These objectives are being pursued with CuInSe{sub 2}, CdTe and a-Si based solar cells.

  5. Apparatus and process for deposition of hard carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, Ali R.; Garwin, Edward L.

    1989-01-03

    A process and an apparatus for depositing thin, amorphous carbon films having extreme hardness on a substrate is described. An enclosed chamber maintained at less than atmospheric pressure houses the substrate and plasma producing elements. A first electrode is comprised of a cavity enclosed within an RF coil which excites the plasma. A substrate located on a second electrode is excited by radio frequency power applied to the substrate. A magnetic field confines the plasma produced by the first electrode to the area away from the walls of the chamber and focuses the plasma onto the substrate thereby yielding film deposits having higher purity and having more rapid buildup than other methods of the prior art.

  6. Apparatus and process for deposition of hard carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, Ali R.; Garwin, Edward L.

    1989-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for depositing thin, amorphous carbon films having extreme hardness on a substrate is described. An enclosed chamber maintained at less than atmospheric pressure houses the substrate and plasma producing elements. A first electrode is comprised of a cavity enclosed within an RF coil which excites the plasma. A substrate located on a second electrode is excited by radio frequency power applied to the substrate. A magnetic field confines the plasma produced by the first electrode to the area away from the walls of the chamber and focuses the plasma onto the substrate thereby yielding film deposits having higher purity and having more rapid buildup than other methods of the prior art.

  7. Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M.; Fukui, T.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T.

    2012-01-01

    A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

  8. A nanoparticle ink printing process for all printed thin film copper-indium-selenide (CIS) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Charles; Soltesz, Istvan; Wu, Mindy; Ziobro, Frank; Amidon, Roger; Kiss, Zoltan

    2008-08-01

    Copper indium selenide (CIS) or its derivatives (such as gallium doped CIS and sulfur substituted CIS) are considered the best optical absorber material used in polycrystalline thin film photovoltaic solar cells due to their favorable electrical and optical properties, and long term stability. To develop a low cost yet high throughput thin film deposition process with both composition and film uniformity control, precursor ink has been formulated using nanoparticle metal oxide of copper and indium in an organic solvent system dissolved with selenium or sulfur. Smooth thin film of precursor oxide mixture has been demonstrated by wet printing process. Upon heat treatment of the precursor thin film under atmosphere of selenium and/or sulfur, copper-indium selenide and/or sulfide (CIS) was formed. Several approaches of nanoparticle ink coating processes have been investigated through spin-coating, screen-printing and contact printing. For using glass substrate, contact printing demonstrated superior uniformity and composition control. By using a post-thermal treatment process on the nanoparticle-coated film, good morphology thin film with composition control was achieved. Both the chemical composition and physical morphology has been investigated using ICP-OES and XRD measurements. Based on molybdenum glass substrate, all-printed solar cells have been demonstrated.

  9. Using Organic Light-Emitting Electrochemical Thin-Film Devices to Teach Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevian, Hannah; Muller, Sean; Rudmann, Hartmut; Rubner, Michael F.

    2004-01-01

    Materials science can be taught by applying organic light-emitting electrochemical thin-film devices and in this method students were allowed to make a light-emitting device by spin coating a thin film containing ruthenium (II) complex ions onto a glass slide. Through this laboratory method students are provided with the opportunity to learn about…

  10. Polycrystalline VO2 thin films via femtosecond laser processing of amorphous VO x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charipar, N. A.; Kim, H.; Breckenfeld, E.; Charipar, K. M.; Mathews, S. A.; Piqué, A.

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond laser processing of pulsed laser-deposited amorphous vanadium oxide thin films was investigated. Polycrystalline VO2 thin films were achieved by femtosecond laser processing in air at room temperature. The electrical transport properties, crystal structure, surface morphology, and optical properties were characterized. The laser-processed films exhibited a metal-insulator phase transition characteristic of VO2, thus presenting a pathway for the growth of crystalline vanadium dioxide films on low-temperature substrates.

  11. Apollo-Soyuz test project photographic film processing and sensitometric summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The Photographic Technology Division at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center processed original photographic films exposed in flight during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). Integrated with processing of the original films were strict sensitometric controls and certification procedures established prior to the flight. Information relative to the processing of the 54 rolls of original ASTP flight film and sensitometric data pertinent to each of these rolls of film is presented.

  12. Solution processable semiconductor thin films: Correlation between morphological, structural, optical and charge transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Dilek

    This Ph.D. thesis is a result of multidisciplinary research bringing together fundamental concepts in thin film engineering, materials science, materials processing and characterization, electrochemistry, microfabrication, and device physics. Experiments were conducted by tackling scientific problems in the field of thin films and interfaces, with the aim to correlate the morphology, crystalline structure, electronic structure of thin films with the functional properties of the films and the performances of electronic devices based thereon. Furthermore, novel strategies based on interfacial phenomena at electrolyte/thin film interfaces were explored and exploited to control the electrical conductivity of the thin films. Three main chemical systems were the object of the studies performed during this Ph.D., two types of organic semiconductors (azomethine-based oligomers and polymers and soluble pentacene derivatives) and one metal oxide semiconductor (tungsten trioxide, WO3). To explore the morphological properties of the thin films, atomic force microscopy was employed. The morphological properties were further investigated by hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy and tentatively correlated to the charge transport properties of the films. X-ray diffraction (Grazing incidence XRD, GIXRD) was used to investigate the crystallinity of the film and the effect of the heat treatment on such crystallinity, as well as to understand the molecular arrangement of the organic molecules in the thin film. The charge transport properties of the films were evaluated in thin film transistor configuration. For electrolyte gated thin film transistors, time dependent transient measurements were conducted, in parallel to more conventional transistor characterizations, to explore the specific effects played on the gating by the anion and cation constituting the electrolyte. The capacitances of the electrical double layers at the electrolyte/WO3 interface were obtained from

  13. Process for Coating Substrates with Catalytic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klelin, Ric J. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for forming catalysts by coating substrates with two or more catalytic components, which comprises the following sequence of steps. First, the substrate is infused with an adequate amount of solution having a starting material comprising a catalytic component precursor, wherein the thermal decomposition product of the catalytic component precursor is a catalytic component. Second, the excess of the solution is removed from the substrate. thereby leaving a coating of the catalytic component precursor on the surface of the substrate. Third, the coating of the catalytic component precursor is converted to the catalytic component by thermal decomposition. Finally, the coated substance is etched to increase the surface area. The list three steps are then repeated for at least a second catalytic component. This process is ideally suited for application in producing efficient low temperature oxidation catalysts.

  14. An easily accessible carbon material derived from carbonization of polyacrylonitrile ultrathin films: ambipolar transport properties and application in a CMOS-like inverter.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Fei; Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Zou, Ye; Di, Chong'an; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben

    2014-03-01

    Ultrathin carbon films were prepared by carbonization of a solution processed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) film in a moderate temperature range (500-700 °C). The films displayed balanced hole (0.50 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and electron mobilities (0.20 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) under ambient conditions. Spectral characterization revealed that the electrical transport is due to the formation of sp(2) hybridized carbon during the carbonization process. A CMOS-like inverter demonstrated the potential application of this material in the area of carbon electronics, considering its processability and low-cost. PMID:24448312

  15. Solar Energy: Materials, Materials Handling, and Fabrication Processes: Student Material. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, William Everet; Orsak, Charles G., Jr.

    Designed for student use in "Materials, Materials Handling, and Fabrication Processes," one of 11 courses in a 2-year associate degree program in solar technology, this manual provides readings, exercises, worksheets, bibliographies, and illustrations for 13 course modules. The manual, which corresponds to an instructor guide for the same course,…

  16. Development of High Band Gap Absorber and Buffer Materials for Thin Film Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Dan

    2011-12-01

    CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) device efficiencies are the highest of the thin film absorber materials (vs. CdTe, alpha-Si, CuInSe2). However, the band gap of the highest efficiency CIGS cells deviates from the expected ideal value predicted by models [1]. Widening the band gap to the theoretically ideal value is one way to increase cell efficiencies. Widening the band gap can be accomplished in two ways; by finding a solution to the Ga-related defects which limit the open circuit voltage at high Ga ratios, or by utilizing different elemental combinations to form an alternative high band gap photoactive Cu-chalcopyrite (which includes any combination of the cations Cu, Al, Ga, and In along with the anions S, Se, and Te). This thesis focuses on the second option, substituting aluminum for gallium in the chalcopyrite lattice to form a CuInAlSe2 (CIAS) film using a sputtering and selenization approach. Both sequential and co-sputtering of metal precursors is performed. Indium was found to be very mobile during both sputtering processes, with a tendency to diffuse to the film surface even when deposited as the base layer in a sequential sputtering process. Elemental diffusion was controlled to a degree using thicker Cu top layer in co-sputtering. The greater thermal conductivity of stainless steel foil (16 W/mK) vs. glass (0.9-1.3 W/mK) can also be used to limit indium diffusion, by keeping the substrate cooler during sputtering. In both sputtering methods aluminum is deposited oxygen-free by capping the film with a Cu capping layer in combination with controlling the indium diffusion. Selenization of metal precursor films is completed using two different techniques. The first is a thermal evaporation approach from a heated box source (method 1 -- reactive thermal evaporation (RTE-Se)). The second is batch selenization using a heated tube furnace (method 2 -- batch selenization). Some batch selenized precursors were capped with ˜ 1mum of selenium. In both selenization methods

  17. Chemical-vapor deposition of complex oxides: materials and process development

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) part of the Advanced Materials Laboratory (AML). The demand for higher performance and lower cost in electronics is driving the need for advanced materials and consequent process integration. Ceramic thin-film technology is becoming more important in the manufacture of microelectronic devices, photovoltaics, optoelectronics, magneto-optics, sensors, microwave, and radio frequency communication devices, and high-Tc superconducting tapes. A flexible processing approach for potential large-scale manufacturing of novel electronic ceramic thin films is desirable. Current thin- film deposition technologies based on physical vapor-deposition techniques are limited in scale potential and have limited control of processing parameters. The lack of control over multiple process parameters inhibits the versatility and reproducibility of the physical vapor deposition processes applied to complex oxides. Chemical vapor deposition is emerging as a viable approach for large- scale manufacturing of electronic materials. Specifically, the ability to control more processing parameters with chemical vapor deposition than with other processing techniques provides the reliability and material property reproducibility required by manufacturing. This project sought to investigate the chemical vapor deposition of complex oxides.

  18. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Colella, N.J.; Davidson, H.L.; Kerns, J.A.; Makowiecki, D.M.

    1998-07-21

    A process is disclosed for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost. 7 figs.

  19. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  20. Low temperature plasma processing for cell growth inspired carbon thin films fabrication.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Piao, Jin Xiang; Jin, Su Bong; Lee, Jung Heon; Tajima, Satomi; Hori, Masaru; Han, Jeon Geon

    2016-09-01

    The recent bio-applications (i.e. bio-sensing, tissue engineering and cell proliferation etc.) are driving the fundamental research in carbon based materials with functional perspectives. High stability in carbon based coatings usually demands the high density deposition. However, the standard techniques, used for the large area and high throughput deposition of crystalline carbon films, often require very high temperature processing (typically >800 °C in inert atmosphere). Here, we present a low temperature (<150 °C) pulsed-DC plasma sputtering process, which enables sufficient ion flux to deposit dense unhydrogenated carbon thin films without any need of substrate-bias or post-deposition thermal treatments. It is found that the control over plasma power density and pulsed frequency governs the density and kinetic energy of carbon ions participating during the film growth. Subsequently, it controls the contents of sp(3) and sp(2) hybridizations via conversion of sp(2) to sp(3) hybridization by ion's energy relaxation. The role of plasma parameters on the chemical and surface properties are presented and correlated to the bio-activity. Bioactivity tests, carried out in mouse fibroblast L-929 and Sarcoma osteogenic (Saos-2) bone cell lines, demonstrate promising cell-proliferation in these films. PMID:27036854

  1. Thin film lithium-based batteries and electrochromic devices fabricated with nanocomposite electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Gillaspie, Dane T; Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, John Roland

    2014-02-04

    Thin-film lithium-based batteries and electrochromic devices (10) are fabricated with positive electrodes (12) comprising a nanocomposite material composed of lithiated metal oxide nanoparticles (40) dispersed in a matrix composed of lithium tungsten oxide.

  2. Influence of film structure on the dewetting kinetics of thin polymer films in the solvent annealing process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanhuan; Xu, Lin; Lai, Yuqing; Shi, Tongfei

    2016-06-28

    On a non-wetting solid substrate, the solvent annealing process of a thin polymer film includes the swelling process and the dewetting process. Owing to difficulties in the in situ analysis of the two processes simultaneously, a quantitative study on the solvent annealing process of thin polymer films on the non-wetting solid substrate is extremely rare. In this paper, we design an experimental method by combining spectroscopic ellipsometry with optical microscopy to achieve the simultaneous in situ study. Using this method, we investigate the influence of the structure of swollen film on its dewetting kinetics during the solvent annealing process. The results show that for a thin PS film with low Mw (Mw = 4.1 kg mol(-1)), acetone molecules can form an ultrathin enriched layer between the PS film and the solid substrate during the swelling process. The presence of the acetone enriched layer accounts for the exponential kinetic behavior in the case of a thin PS film with low Mw. However, the acetone enriched layer is not observed in the case of a thin PS film with high Mw (Mw = 400 kg mol(-1)) and the slippage effect of polymer chains is valid during the dewetting process. PMID:27254136

  3. 49 CFR 175.706 - Separation distances for undeveloped film from packages containing Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Separation distances for undeveloped film from... Classification of Material § 175.706 Separation distances for undeveloped film from packages containing Class 7... film. Transport index Minimum separation distance to nearest undeveloped film for various times...

  4. Method of forming particulate materials for thin-film solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Eberspacher, Chris; Pauls, Karen Lea

    2004-11-23

    A method for preparing particulate materials useful in fabricating thin-film solar cells is disclosed. Particulate materials is prepared by the method include for example materials comprising copper and indium and/or gallium in the form of single-phase, mixed-metal oxide particulates; multi-phase, mixed-metal particulates comprising a metal oxide; and multinary metal particulates.

  5. Precision Photothermal Annealing of Nanoporous Gold Thin Films for the Microfabrication of a Single-chip Material Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C. D.; Shen, N.; Rubenchik, A.; Demos, S. G.; Matthews, M. J.

    2015-06-30

    Single-chip material libraries of thin films of nanostructured materials are a promising approach for high throughput studies of structure-property relationship in the fields of physics and biology. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a nanostructured material of specific interest in both these fields. One attractive property of np-Au is its self-similar coarsening behavior by thermally induced surface diffusion. However, traditional heat application techniques for the modification of np-Au are bulk processes that cannot be used to generate a library of different pore sizes on a single chip. Laser micromachining offers an attractive solution to this problem by providing a means to apply energy with high spatial and temporal resolution. In the present study we use finite element multiphysics simulations to predict the effects of laser mode (continuous-wave vs. pulsed) and supporting substrate thermal conductivity on the local np-Au film temperatures during photothermal annealing and subsequently investigate the mechanisms by which the np-Au network is coarsening. Our simulations predict that continuous-wave mode laser irradiation on a silicon supporting substrate supports the widest range of morphologies that can be created through the photothermal annealing of thin film np-Au. Using this result we successfully fabricate a single-chip material library consisting of 81 np-Au samples of 9 different morphologies for use in increased throughput material interaction studies.

  6. A New Fabrication Process for Thin-Film Multijunction Thermal Converters

    SciTech Connect

    WUNSCH,THOMAS F.; KINARD,J.R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; SOLOMON JR.,OTIS M.; LIPE,T.E.; JUNGLING,KENNETH CORNEAL

    2000-12-08

    Advanced thin film processing and packaging technologies are employed in the fabrication of new planar thin-film multifunction thermal converters. The processing, packaging, and design features build on experience gained from prior NIST demonstrations of thin-film converters and are optimized for improved sensitivity, bandwidth, manufacturability, and reliability.

  7. Effect of temperature gradient on simultaneously experimental determination of thermal expansion coefficients and elastic modulus of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tei-Chen; Lin, Wen-Jong; Chen, Dao-Long

    2004-10-01

    Some specific experimental methods to simultaneously determine the thermal expansion coefficients αF and biaxial elastic modulus EF/(1-νF) of thin film materials have been reported recently. In these methods, the deflections or the curvature change of the thin films, deposited on two different types of circular disks with known material properties, generally can be measured with a variety of optical techniques. The temperature-dependent deflection behaviors of thin films are then obtained by heating the samples in the range from room temperature to a slightly higher temperature level at which the physical properties and microstructures of thin film materials still remain unchanged. By using the relations between stress, deflection, and temperature, the physical properties of thin films can be finally calculated by using the slopes of two lines in the stress versus temperature plot. These relations, however, are formulated under the condition of uniform temperature rise. If the heating processes of samples are conducted in the condition that there exists a small steady-state temperature gradient along the thickness of samples due to the effect of natural heat convection on the upper surface of thin film, the formulation mentioned above shall be modified. It is found that the deflection of sample induced by the small temperature gradient along the thickness due to natural heat convection is very significant and comparable to that induced by uniform temperature rise. Consequently, if the effect of this temperature gradient is carelessly disregarded in physical modeling, a significantly different value of elastic modulus may be misleadingly obtained. Some cases are exemplified and illustrated to show the influence of temperature gradient on the evaluation of material properties.

  8. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    Low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat Plate Solar Array Program (FSA) are investigated. The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost effective and long life solar modules. Accelerated aging techniques for module component lifetime studies, investigation of candidate outer cover films and continued evaluation of soil repellant coatings are also included.

  9. The effect of Ta interface on the crystallization of amorphous phase change material thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, G. E.; Noé, P. Marra, M.; Sabbione, C.; Fillot, F.; Bernier, N.; Ferrand, J.; Maîtrejean, S.; Hippert, F.

    2014-06-02

    The crystallization of amorphous GeTe and Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase change material films, with thickness between 10 and 100 nm, sandwiched between either Ta or SiO{sub 2} layers, was investigated by optical reflectivity. Ta cladding layers were found to increase the crystallization temperature, even for films as thick as 100 nm. X-Ray diffraction investigations of crystallized GeTe films showed a very weak texture in Ta cladded films, in contrast with the strong texture observed for SiO{sub 2} cladding layers. This study shows that crystallization mechanism of phase change materials can be highly impacted by interface effects, even for relatively thick films.

  10. High speed television camera system processes photographic film data for digital computer analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, N. A.

    1970-01-01

    Data acquisition system translates and processes graphical information recorded on high speed photographic film. It automatically scans the film and stores the information with a minimal use of the computer memory.

  11. Development of a continuous roll-to-roll processing system for mass production of plastic optical film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Meng-Hsun

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports a highly effective method for the mass production of large-area plastic optical films with a microlens array pattern based on a continuous roll-to-roll film extrusion and roller embossing process. In this study, a thin steel mold with a micro-circular hole array pattern is fabricated by photolithography and a wet chemical etching process. The thin steel mold was then wrapped onto a metal cylinder to form an embossing roller mold. During the roll-to-roll process operation, a thermoplastic raw material (polycarbonate grains) was put into the barrel of the plastic extruder with a flat T-die. Then, the molten polymer film was extruded and immediately pressed against the surface of the embossing roller mold. Under the proper processing conditions, the molten polymer will just partially fill the micro-circular holes of the mold and due to surface tension form a convex lens surface. A continuous plastic optical film with a microlens array pattern was obtained. Experiments are carried out to investigate the effect of plastic microlens formation on the roll-to-roll process. Finally, the geometrical and optical properties of the fabricated plastic optical film were measured and proved satisfactory. This technique shows great potential for the mass production of large-area plastic optical films with a microlens array pattern.

  12. Thin film superconductors and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1988-01-21

    A process for the preparation of oxide superconductors from high-viscosity non-aqueous solution is described. Solutions of lanthanide nitrates, alkaline earth nitrates and copper nitrates in a 1:2:3 stoichiometric ratio, when added to ethylene glycol containing citric acid solutions, have been used to prepare highly viscous non-aqueous solutions of metal mixed nitrates-citrates. Thin films of these compositions are produced when a layer of the viscous solution is formed on a substrate and subjected to thermal decomposition.

  13. Resonant photothermal laser processing of hybrid gold/titania nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, Lina; Franzka, Steffen; Dzialkowski, Kevin; Hardt, Sebastian; Wiggers, Hartmut; Reichenberger, Sven; Wagener, Philipp; Hartmann, Nils

    2015-05-01

    Photothermal processing of thin anatase TiO2 and hybrid Au/anatase TiO2 nanoparticle films on glass supports is investigated using continuous-wave microfocused lasers at λ = 355 nm and λ = 532 nm. UV/Vis spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used for characterization. Processing of TiO2 nanoparticle films is feasible at λ = 355 nm only. In contrast, the addition of Au nanoparticles enhances the overall absorbance of the material in the visible range and enables processing at both wavelengths, i.e. at λ = 355 nm and λ = 532 nm. Generally, laser heating induces a transition from anatase to rutile. The modification degree increases with increasing laser power and laser irradiation time. Resonant laser processing of hybrid Au/TiO2-mesoporous films provide promising perspectives in various applications, e.g. in photovoltaics, where embedded nanoparticulate Au could be exploited to enhance light trapping.

  14. Fully Solution-Processed Flexible Organic Thin Film Transistor Arrays with High Mobility and Exceptional Uniformity

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Kenjiro; Takeda, Yasunori; Mizukami, Makoto; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2014-01-01

    Printing fully solution-processed organic electronic devices may potentially revolutionize production of flexible electronics for various applications. However, difficulties in forming thin, flat, uniform films through printing techniques have been responsible for poor device performance and low yields. Here, we report on fully solution-processed organic thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays with greatly improved performance and yields, achieved by layering solution-processable materials such as silver nanoparticle inks, organic semiconductors, and insulating polymers on thin plastic films. A treatment layer improves carrier injection between the source/drain electrodes and the semiconducting layer and dramatically reduces contact resistance. Furthermore, an organic semiconductor with large-crystal grains results in TFT devices with shorter channel lengths and higher field-effect mobilities. We obtained mobilities of over 1.2 cm2 V−1 s−1 in TFT devices with channel lengths shorter than 20 μm. By combining these fabrication techniques, we built highly uniform organic TFT arrays with average mobility levels as high as 0.80 cm2 V−1 s−1 and ideal threshold voltages of 0 V. These results represent major progress in the fabrication of fully solution-processed organic TFT device arrays. PMID:24492785

  15. 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M. B. (Editor); Stanley, D. Cross (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Records are presented from the 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology. Topics included pollution prevention, inspection methods, advanced materials, aerospace materials and technical standards,materials testing and evaluation, advanced manufacturing,development in metallic processes, synthesis of nanomaterials, composite cryotank processing, environmentally friendly cleaning, and poster sessions.

  16. The Effects of Ground and Space Processing on the Properties of Organic, Polymeric, and Colloidal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossain A.; Witherow, W. K.; Smith, D.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and phototonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic materials which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials as thin film wave-guides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualifies by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organic-based materials have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices, such as high second-and third-order nonlinearity, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. We discuss the potential role of microgravity processing of a few organic and polymeric materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second-and third-order NLO behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics. The goal of minimizing optical loss obviously depends on processing methods. For solution-based processes, such as solution crystal growth and solution photopolymerization, it is well known that thermal and solutal density gradients can initiate buoyancy-driven convection. Resultant fluid flows can affect transport of material to and from growth interfaces and become manifest in the morphology and homogeneity of the growing film or crystal. Likewise

  17. Fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide films with supercritical carbon dioxide: Processing and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Eunyoung

    Nanostructured metal oxide films have many applications in catalysis, microelectronics, microfluidics, photovoltaics and other fields. Since the performance of a device depends greatly on the structure of the material, the development of methodologies that enable prescriptive control of morphology are of great interest. The focus of this work is to control the structure and properties of the nanostructured metal oxide films using novel synthetic schemes in supercritical fluids and to use those films as key building components in alternative energy applications. A supercritical fluid is a substance at a temperature and pressure above its critical point. It typically exhibits gas-like transport properties and liquid-like densities. Supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) utilizes these properties of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) to deposit chemically pure metal, oxides and alloys of metal films. SFD is a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-like process in the sense that it uses similar metal organic precursors and deposits films at elevated temperatures. Instead of vaporizing or subliming the precursors, they are dissolved in supercritical fluids. SFD has typically shown to exhibit higher precursor concentrations, lower deposition temperatures, conformal deposition of films on high aspect ratio features as compared to CVD. In2 O3, ZnO and SnO2 are attractive materials because they are used in transparent conductors. SFD of these materials were studied and In2 O3 deposition kinetics using tris(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) In (III) as precursor were determined. Growth rate dependence on the deposition temperature and the precursor concentrations were studied and the physicochemical and optical properties of In2 O3 films were characterized. Metal oxide nanochannels that can potentially be used for microfluidics have been fabricated by sequentially performing nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and SFD. NIL was used to pattern photoresist grating on substrates and SFD of TiO2

  18. Low temperature process for obtaining thin glass films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott T.

    1984-01-01

    A method for coating a substrate with a glass-like film comprises, applying to the substrate an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a polymeric network of partially hydrolyzed metal alkoxide into which network there is incorporated finely powdered glass, whereby there is achieved on the substrate a coherent and adherent initial film; and heating said film to a temperature sufficient to melt said powdered glass component, thereby converting said initial film to a final densified film.

  19. Low temperature process for obtaining thin glass films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.T.

    A method for coating a substrate with a glass-like film comprises, applying to the substrate an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a polymeric network of partially hydrolyzed metal alkoxide into which network there is incorporated finely powdered glass, whereby there is achieved on the substrate a coherent and adherent initial film; and heating said film to a temperature sufficient to melt said powdered glass component, thereby converting said initial film to a final densified film.

  20. Controlled Growth of Ultrathin Film of Organic Semiconductors by Balancing the Competitive Processes in Dip-Coating for Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kunjie; Li, Hongwei; Li, Liqiang; Zhang, Suna; Chen, Xiaosong; Xu, Zeyang; Zhang, Xi; Hu, Wenping; Chi, Lifeng; Gao, Xike; Meng, Yancheng

    2016-06-28

    Ultrathin film with thickness below 15 nm of organic semiconductors provides excellent platform for some fundamental research and practical applications in the field of organic electronics. However, it is quite challenging to develop a general principle for the growth of uniform and continuous ultrathin film over large area. Dip-coating is a useful technique to prepare diverse structures of organic semiconductors, but the assembly of organic semiconductors in dip-coating is quite complicated, and there are no reports about the core rules for the growth of ultrathin film via dip-coating until now. In this work, we develop a general strategy for the growth of ultrathin film of organic semiconductor via dip-coating, which provides a relatively facile model to analyze the growth behavior. The balance between the three direct factors (nucleation rate, assembly rate, and recession rate) is the key to determine the growth of ultrathin film. Under the direction of this rule, ultrathin films of four organic semiconductors are obtained. The field-effect transistors constructed on the ultrathin film show good field-effect property. This work provides a general principle and systematic guideline to prepare ultrathin film of organic semiconductors via dip-coating, which would be highly meaningful for organic electronics as well as for the assembly of other materials via solution processes.

  1. Controlled Growth of Ultrathin Film of Organic Semiconductors by Balancing the Competitive Processes in Dip-Coating for Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kunjie; Li, Hongwei; Li, Liqiang; Zhang, Suna; Chen, Xiaosong; Xu, Zeyang; Zhang, Xi; Hu, Wenping; Chi, Lifeng; Gao, Xike; Meng, Yancheng

    2016-06-28

    Ultrathin film with thickness below 15 nm of organic semiconductors provides excellent platform for some fundamental research and practical applications in the field of organic electronics. However, it is quite challenging to develop a general principle for the growth of uniform and continuous ultrathin film over large area. Dip-coating is a useful technique to prepare diverse structures of organic semiconductors, but the assembly of organic semiconductors in dip-coating is quite complicated, and there are no reports about the core rules for the growth of ultrathin film via dip-coating until now. In this work, we develop a general strategy for the growth of ultrathin film of organic semiconductor via dip-coating, which provides a relatively facile model to analyze the growth behavior. The balance between the three direct factors (nucleation rate, assembly rate, and recession rate) is the key to determine the growth of ultrathin film. Under the direction of this rule, ultrathin films of four organic semiconductors are obtained. The field-effect transistors constructed on the ultrathin film show good field-effect property. This work provides a general principle and systematic guideline to prepare ultrathin film of organic semiconductors via dip-coating, which would be highly meaningful for organic electronics as well as for the assembly of other materials via solution processes. PMID:27267545

  2. High Performance, Low Temperature Solution-Processed Barium and Strontium Doped Oxide Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Banger, Kulbinder K; Peterson, Rebecca L; Mori, Kiyotaka; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Leedham, Timothy; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-01-28

    Amorphous mixed metal oxides are emerging as high performance semiconductors for thin film transistor (TFT) applications, with indium gallium zinc oxide, InGaZnO (IGZO), being one of the most widely studied and best performing systems. Here, we investigate alkaline earth (barium or strontium) doped InBa(Sr)ZnO as alternative, semiconducting channel layers and compare their performance of the electrical stress stability with IGZO. In films fabricated by solution-processing from metal alkoxide precursors and annealed to 450 °C we achieve high field-effect electron mobility up to 26 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). We show that it is possible to solution-process these materials at low process temperature (225-200 °C yielding mobilities up to 4.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and demonstrate a facile "ink-on-demand" process for these materials which utilizes the alcoholysis reaction of alkyl metal precursors to negate the need for complex synthesis and purification protocols. Electrical bias stress measurements which can serve as a figure of merit for performance stability for a TFT device reveal Sr- and Ba-doped semiconductors to exhibit enhanced electrical stability and reduced threshold voltage shift compared to IGZO irrespective of the process temperature and preparation method. This enhancement in stability can be attributed to the higher Gibbs energy of oxidation of barium and strontium compared to gallium. PMID:24511184

  3. Integration mockup and process material management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, Adas James, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Work to define and develop a full scale Space Station Freedom (SSF) mockup with the flexibility to evolve into future designs, to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify human task allocations and support trade studies is described. This work began in early 1985 and ended in August, 1991. The mockups are presently being used at MSFC in Building 4755 as a technology and design testbed, as well as for public display. Micro Craft also began work on the Process Material Management System (PMMS) under this contract. The PMMS simulator was a sealed enclosure for testing to identify liquids, gaseous, particulate samples, and specimen including, urine, waste water, condensate, hazardous gases, surrogate gasses, liquids, and solids. The SSF would require many trade studies to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify system task allocations; it was necessary to develop a full scale mockup which would be representative of current SSF design with the ease of changing those designs as the SSF design evolved and changed. The tasks defined for Micro Craft were to provide the personnel, services, tools, and materials for the SSF mockup which would consist of four modules, nodes, interior components, and part task mockups of MSFC responsible engineering systems. This included the Engineering Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) testbed. For the initial study, the mockups were low fidelity, soft mockups of graphics art bottle, and other low cost materials, which evolved into higher fidelity mockups as the R&D design evolved, by modifying or rebuilding, an important cost saving factor in the design process. We designed, fabricated, and maintained the full size mockup shells and support stands. The shells consisted of cylinders, end cones, rings, longerons, docking ports, crew airlocks, and windows. The ECLSS required a heavier cylinder to support the ECLSS systems test program. Details of this activity will be covered. Support stands were

  4. Integration mockup and process material management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verble, Adas James, Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Work to define and develop a full scale Space Station Freedom (SSF) mockup with the flexibility to evolve into future designs, to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify human task allocations and support trade studies is described. This work began in early 1985 and ended in August, 1991. The mockups are presently being used at MSFC in Building 4755 as a technology and design testbed, as well as for public display. Micro Craft also began work on the Process Material Management System (PMMS) under this contract. The PMMS simulator was a sealed enclosure for testing to identify liquids, gaseous, particulate samples, and specimen including, urine, waste water, condensate, hazardous gases, surrogate gasses, liquids, and solids. The SSF would require many trade studies to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify system task allocations; it was necessary to develop a full scale mockup which would be representative of current SSF design with the ease of changing those designs as the SSF design evolved and changed. The tasks defined for Micro Craft were to provide the personnel, services, tools, and materials for the SSF mockup which would consist of four modules, nodes, interior components, and part task mockups of MSFC responsible engineering systems. This included the Engineering Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) testbed. For the initial study, the mockups were low fidelity, soft mockups of graphics art bottle, and other low cost materials, which evolved into higher fidelity mockups as the R&D design evolved, by modifying or rebuilding, an important cost saving factor in the design process. We designed, fabricated, and maintained the full size mockup shells and support stands. The shells consisted of cylinders, end cones, rings, longerons, docking ports, crew airlocks, and windows. The ECLSS required a heavier cylinder to support the ECLSS systems test program. Details of this activity will be covered. Support stands were

  5. Hydrazine-based solution-processing of copper chalcopyrite for thin-film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Wei-Jen

    Owing to the processing complexity associated with the vacuum-based fabrication of photovoltaic cells, the viability of solar energy is constantly challenged by the more economically attractive alternatives from fossil fuels. Solution-processing can overcome these issues due to the inherent processing advantages over conventional vacuum-based processes. The focus of this study is to demonstrate a viable route of fabricating highly efficient thin-film solar cells by means of solution-processing. This dissertation is organized in the chronological order describing the challenges in solution-processing Cu-chalcopyrite materials, and the methods to improve the solar cell efficiency from ground zero to above 8%. Two methods to solution-deposit Cu-chalcopyrite material were examined: nanocrystal suspension and hydrazine-based precursor. Chapter 2 focuses on the nanocrystal-route, and analyzes the formation of zincblende and wurtzite CuInSe2 in the nano-meter dimension. This method, however, presented great difficulties to achieve films with decent physical quality; thus, solar cell performance was not examined. Chapter 3 describes the hydrazine-precursor route to solution-deposit CuInSe2 material. The chalcopyrite structure and p-type semiconducting behavior were both verified from the converted material. This method offers superior processing capability over the nanocrystal-route, and for the first time in this study, a solar cell with significant efficiency (3.50%) was demonstrated. This cell was then used as a reference throughout the remaining studies in this work. The following chapters describe the modifications that were performed on each component in the CuInSe2-based solar cell and the corresponding improvements on the solar cell performance. Chapter 4 focuses on the window layer of the solar cell with the objective of decreasing the sheet resistance of the transparent conducting oxide material. Chapter 5 revisits the CulnSe 2 layer with bandgap engineering of

  6. Study of the formation process of titanium oxides containing micro arc oxidation film on Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yingwei; Dong, Kaihui; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2014-09-01

    A novel micro arc oxidation (MAO) film is developed to protect Mg alloys from corrosion. This film contains plenty of titanium oxides, which exhibits higher chemical stability than traditional MAO films. Especially, the micropores on the surface of the film are in situ sealed during the film formation process instead of the sealing pores post treatment. The film formation process is investigated by the observation of surface and cross-section morphologies and analysis of chemical composition. It is found that the sizes of micropores increase but the quantities decrease with increasing oxidation voltages. The micropores are open in the initial stage of oxidation and then they are sealed gradually. The growth direction of the film takes place change at different oxidation voltages. The elements of F and Ti play a significant role in the film growth process.

  7. A simple solution to the problem of effective utilisation of the target material for pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzanyan, A S; Kuzanyan, A A; Petrosyan, V A; Pilosyan, S Kh; Grasiuk, A Z

    2013-12-31

    The factors determining the efficiency of the target material utilisation for pulsed laser deposition of films are considered. The target volume is calculated, which is evaporated in the ablation process by the focused laser radiation having a rectangular form. The new device is suggested and developed for obtaining thin films by the method of laser deposition, which is specific in the employment of a simple optical system mounted outside a deposition chamber that comprises two lenses and the diaphragm and focuses the laser beam onto a target in the form of a sector-like spot. Thin films of CuO and YBaCuO were deposited with this device. Several deposition cycles revealed that the target material is consumed uniformly from the entire surface of the target. A maximal spread of the target thickness was not greater than ±2% both prior to deposition and after it. The device designed provides a high coefficient of the target material utilisation efficiency. (laser deposition of thin films)

  8. Evaluation of Cadmium-Free Thick Film Materials on Alumina Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    L. H. Perdieu

    2009-09-01

    A new cadmium-free material system was successfully evaluated for the fabrication of thick film hybrid microcircuits at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T). The characterization involved screen printing, drying and firing two groups of resistor networks which were made using the current material system and the cadmium-free material system. Electrical, environmental and adhesion tests were performed on both groups to determine the more suitable material system. Additionally, untrimmed test coupons were evaluated to further characterize the new materials. The cadmiumfree material system did as well or better than the current material system. Therefore, the new cadmium-free material system was approved for use on production thick film product.

  9. Chemical Fabrication Used to Produce Thin-Film Materials for High Power-to- Weight-Ratio Space Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Rybicki, George C.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Harris, Jerry D.; Hehemann, David G.; Junek, William; Gorse, Joseph; Thompson, Tracy L.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Buhro, William E.

    2000-01-01

    The key to achieving high specific power (watts per kilogram) space solar arrays is the development of a high-efficiency, thin-film solar cell that can be fabricated directly on a flexible, lightweight, space-qualified durable substrate such as Kapton (DuPont) or other polyimide or suitable polymer film. Cell efficiencies approaching 20 percent at AM0 (air mass zero) are required. Current thin-film cell fabrication approaches are limited by either (1) the ultimate efficiency that can be achieved with the device material and structure or (2) the requirement for high-temperature deposition processes that are incompatible with all presently known flexible polyimide or other polymer substrate materials. Cell fabrication processes must be developed that will produce high-efficiency cells at temperatures below 400 degrees Celsius, and preferably below 300 degress Celsius to minimize the problems associated with the difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion of the substrate and thin-film solar cell and/or the decomposition of the substrate.

  10. Plasma-based ion implantation: a valuable technology for the elaboration of innovative materials and nanostructured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vempaire, D.; Pelletier, J.; Lacoste, A.; Béchu, S.; Sirou, J.; Miraglia, S.; Fruchart, D.

    2005-05-01

    Plasma-based ion implantation (PBII), invented in 1987, can now be considered as a mature technology for thin film modification. After a brief recapitulation of the principle and physics of PBII, its advantages and disadvantages, as compared to conventional ion beam implantation, are listed and discussed. The elaboration of thin films and the modification of their functional properties by PBII have already been achieved in many fields, such as microelectronics (plasma doping/PLAD), biomaterials (surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible materials), plastics (grafting, surface adhesion) and metallurgy (hard coatings, tribology), to name a few. The major advantages of PBII processing lie, on the one hand, in its flexibility in terms of ion implantation energy (from 0 to 100 keV) and operating conditions (plasma density, collisional or non-collisional ion sheath), and, on the other hand, in the easy transferrability of processes from the laboratory to industry. The possibility of modifying the composition and physical nature of the films, or of drastically changing their physical properties over several orders of magnitude makes this technology very attractive for the elaboration of innovative materials, including metastable materials, and the realization of micro- or nanostructures. A review of the state of the art in these domains is presented and illustrated through a few selected examples. The perspectives opened up by PBII processing, as well as its limitations, are discussed.

  11. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  12. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  13. High-optical-quality ferroelectric film wet-processed from a ferroelectric columnar liquid crystal as observed by non-linear-optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Araoka, Fumito; Masuko, Shiori; Kogure, Akinori; Miyajima, Daigo; Aida, Takuzo; Takezoe, Hideo

    2013-08-01

    The self-organization of ferroelectric columnar liquid crystals (FCLCs) is demonstrated. Columnar order is spontaneously formed in thin films made by the wet-process due to its liquid crystallinity. Electric-field application results in high optical quality and uniform spontaneous polarization. Such good processability and controllability of the wet-processed FCLC films provide us with potential organic ferroelectric materials for device applications. PMID:23740767

  14. Chemically deposited thin films of sulfides and selenides of antimony and bismuth as solar energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, M. T.; Nair, Padmanabhan K.; Garcia, V. M.; Pena, Y.; Arenas, O. L.; Garcia, J. C.; Gomez-Daza, O.

    1997-10-01

    Chemical bath deposition techniques for bismuth sulfide, bismuth selenide, antimony sulfide, and antimony selenide thin films of about 0.20 - 0.25 micrometer thickness are reported. All these materials may be considered as solar absorber films: strong optical absorption edges, with absorption coefficient, (alpha) , greater than 104 cm-1, are located at 1.31 eV for Bi2Se3, 1.33 eV for Bi2S3, 1.8 eV for Sb2S3, and 1.35 eV for Sb2Se3. As deposited, all the films are nearly amorphous. However, well defined crystalline peaks matching bismuthinite (JCPDS 17- 0320), paraguanajuatite (JCPDS 33-0214), and stibnite (JCPDS 6-0474) and antimony selenide (JCPDS 15-0861) for Bi2S3, Bi2Se3, Sb2S3 and Sb2Se3 respectively, are observed when the films are annealed in nitrogen at 300 degrees Celsius. This is accompanied by a substantial modification of the electrical conductivity in the films: from 10-7 (Omega) -1 cm-1 (in as prepared films) to 10 (Omega) -1 cm-1 in the case of bismuth sulfide and selenide films, and enhancement of photosensitivity in the case of antimony sulfide films. The chemical deposition of a CuS/CuxSe film on these Vx- VIy films and subsequent annealing at 300 degrees Celsius for 1 h at 1 torr of nitrogen leads to the formation of p-type films (conductivity of 1 - 100 (Omega) -1 cm-1) of multinary composition. Among these, the formation of Cu3BiS3 (JCPDS 9-0488) and Cu3SbS4 (JCPDS 35- 0581), CuSbS2 (JCPDS 35-0413) have been clearly detected. Solar energy applications of these films are suggested.

  15. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  16. Studies of ferroelectric heterostructure thin films, interfaces, and device-related processes via in situ analytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, S.; Auciello, O.; Dhote, A. M.; Gao, Y.; Gruen, D. M.; Im, J.; Irene, E. A.; Krauss, A. R.; Muller, A. H.; Ramesh, R.

    1999-06-29

    The science and technology of ferroelectric thin films has experienced an explosive development during the last ten years. Low-density non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories (NVFRAMS) are now incorporated in commercial products such as ''smart cards'', while high permittivity capacitors are incorporated in cellular phones. However, substantial work is still needed to develop materials integration strategies for high-density memories. We have demonstrated that the implementation of complementary in situ characterization techniques is critical to understand film growth and device processes relevant to device development. We are using uniquely integrated time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) techniques to perform in situ, real-time studies of film growth processes in the high background gas pressure required to growth ferroelectric thin films. TOF-ISARS provides information on surface processes, while SE permits the investigation of buried interfaces as they are being formed. Recent studies on SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) film growth and interface processes are discussed. Direct imaging of ferroelectric domains under applied electric fields can provide valuable information to understand domain dynamics in ferroelectric films. We discuss results of piezoresponse scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging for nanoscale studies of polarization reversal and retention loss in Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1{minus}x})O{sub 3} (PZT)-based capacitors. Another powerful technique suitable for in situ, real-time characterization of film growth processes and ferroelectric film-based device operation is based on synchrotrons X-ray scattering, which is currently being implemented at Argonne National Laboratory.

  17. Process for producing Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film resistors

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Schmid, Anthony P.

    2001-01-01

    Thin films of Ti-Cr-Al-O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti-Cr-Al-O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti-Cr-Al-O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti-Cr-Al-O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  18. Pulsed laser processing of electronic materials in micro/nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, David Jen

    2005-08-01

    Time-resolved pump-and-probe side-view imaging has been performed to investigate the energy coupling to the target specimen over a wide range of fluences. Plasmas generated during the laser ablation process are visualized and the decrease of the ablation efficiency in the high fluence regime (>10 J/cm2) is attributed to the strong interaction of the laser pulse with the laser-induced plasmas. The high intensity ultra-short laser pulses also trigger volumetric multi-photon absorption (MPA) processes that can be beneficial in applications such as three-dimensional bulk modification of transparent materials. Femtosecond laser pulses were used to fabricate straight and bent through-channels in the optical glass. Drilling was initiated from the rear surface to preserve consistent absorbing conditions of the laser pulse. Machining in the presence of a liquid solution assisted the debris ejection. Drilling process was further enhanced by introducing ultrasonic waves, thereby increasing the aspect ratio of drilled holes and improving the quality of the holes. In conventional lens focusing schemes, the minimum feature size is determined by the diffraction limit. Finer resolution is accomplished by combining pulsed laser radiation with Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) probes. Short laser pulses are coupled to a fiber-based NSOM probes in order to ablate thin metal films. A detailed parametric study on the effects of probe aperture size, laser pulse energy, temporal width and environment gas is performed. The significance of lateral thermal diffusion is highlighted and the dependence of the ablation process on the imparted near-field distribution is revealed. As a promising application of laser ablation in nanoscale, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system has been built up based on NSOM ablation configuration. NSOM-LIBS is demonstrated with nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on Cr sample. Far-field collecting scheme by top objective lens was chosen as

  19. Supercritical fluid processing: opportunities for new resist materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher-Wetmore, Paula M.; Ober, Christopher K.; Gabor, Allen H.; Allen, Robert D.

    1996-05-01

    Over the past two decades supercritical fluids have been utilized as solvents for carrying out separations of materials as diverse as foods, polymers, pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, natural products, and explosives. More recently they have been used for non-extractive applications such as recrystallization, deposition, impregnation, surface modification, and as a solvent alternative for precision parts cleaning. Today, supercritical fluid extraction is being practiced in the foods and beverage industries; there are commercial plants for decaffeinating coffee and tea, extracting beer flavoring agents from hops, and separating oils and oleoresins from spices. Interest in supercritical fluid processing of polymers has grown over the last ten years, and many new purification, fractionation, and even polymerization techniques have emerged. One of the most significant motivations for applying this technology to polymers has been increased performance demands. More recently, with increasing scrutiny of traditional solvents, supercritical fluids, and in particular carbon dioxide, are receiving widespread attention as 'environmentally conscious' solvents. This paper describes several examples of polymers applications, including a few involving photoresists, which demonstrate that as next- generation advanced polymer systems emerge, supercritical fluids are certain to offer advantages as cutting edge processing tools.

  20. Material Processing of Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, Jay Ira

    1995-01-01

    The material and device characterization of furnace and rapid thermally annealed (RTA) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) infrared (IR) photodetectors (QWIPs) epitaxially grown on GaAs and Si substrates is presented. The advances in epitaxial growth allow the precise control of the dimensions, doping, and matrix concentration of the MQW. Therefore, the design of a QWIP with particular electrical and optical characteristics may be undertaken. To utilize a post-growth anneal to improve the QWIP's performance, the trade-offs must be considered to determine its usefulness. Depending on the application, the anneal may be deemed unnecessary due to its detrimental effect on a particular aspect of the operation. The availability of high quality GaAs and Si substrates, complemented by the maturity of GaAs device processing techniques, makes the QWIP an ideal candidate for 8-14 μm long wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. An extensive exploration of the interdiffusion process leads to the development of a suitable technique for shifting the optical response without harming the electrical characteristics. This, however, is a difficult task in light of the out-diffusion of the dopant from the wells into the barriers, which results in a high dark current. Reading-out the QWIP focal plane array (FPA) (on GaAs substrate) is accomplished by indium bump-bonding the FPA to a Si multiplexer. Thermal cycling the hybrid, unfortunately, results in destroyed bonds due to the difference in thermal expansion coefficient of the two substrates. Growing the QWIP on a Si substrate better satisfies the packaging requirements; however, the dark current is higher. The technique of annealing for the purpose of defect annihilation results in improvements in the absolute response and a reduction in the dark current.

  1. Optimization study of the femtosecond laser-induced forward-transfer process with thin aluminum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudipta; Sabbah, A. J.; Yarbrough, J. M.; Allen, C. G.; Winters, Beau; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2007-07-01

    The parameters for an effective laser-induced forward-transfer (LIFT) process of aluminum thin films using a femtosecond laser are studied. Deposited feature size as a function of laser fluence, donor film thickness, quality of focus, and the pulse duration are varied, providing a metric of the most desirable conditions for femtosecond LIFT with thin aluminum films.

  2. DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed

  3. Integration of advanced nuclear materials separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Worl, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.; Berg, J.M.; Neu, M.P.; Reilly, S.D.; Buelow, S.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has examined the fundamental chemistry of plutonium that affects the integration of hydrothermal technology into nuclear materials processing operations. Chemical reactions in high temperature water allow new avenues for waste treatment and radionuclide separation.Successful implementation of hydrothermal technology offers the potential to effective treat many types of radioactive waste, reduce the storage hazards and disposal costs, and minimize the generation of secondary waste streams. The focus has been on the chemistry of plutonium(VI) in solution with carbonate since these are expected to be important species in the effluent from hydrothermal oxidation of Pu-containing organic wastes. The authors investigated the structure, solubility, and stability of the key plutonium complexes. Installation and testing of flow and batch hydrothermal reactors in the Plutonium Facility was accomplished. Preliminary testing with Pu-contaminated organic solutions gave effluent solutions that readily met discard requirements. A new effort in FY 1998 will build on these promising initial results.

  4. Study on the effect of process conditions on the thermo-optic coefficient of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Shuang; Tang, Haihua; Zhong, Zhiyong; Liu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    A thermo-optical coefficient (TOC) test platform based on FILMeasure-20 was designed and the thermal coefficient of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films material at 1330 nm was tested. a-Si:H were deposited on the quartz glass using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) was used to characterize the infrared spectral feature of films. The hydrogen content of films was influenced by different radio frequency (RF) power and deposition pressure conditions according to the FTIR spectra and theoretical analysis, and the thermo-optic effect of a-Si:H varied with temperature characteristics. Experimental results indicated that selecting the appropriate process conditions to prepare a-Si:H films can effectively increase or avoid the impact of thermo-optical effect on the optical devices.

  5. Superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ films on SrTiO 3 by electrodeposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, A. J. S.; Moehlecke, S.; Kopelevich, Y.; Robin, A.; dos Santos, C. A. M.

    An ac electrodeposition (ED) process to obtain good quality YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) high-temperature superconductor (HTS) films was developed. These films were deposited on SrTiO 3 (100) single crystal substrates previously coated with a thin silver layer (800 Å) that was deposited by chemical reduction. A small amount of Ag (0.7% in weight) added to the electrolyte bath was shown to improve the quality of the deposited films. YBCO films after an appropriate heat treatment present single phase material with an onset T c ∼ 90 K, ΔT c ∼ 2 K, homogeneous grain morphology and strong biaxial texture. Transport measurements show a metallic behavior in the normal state and a self-field critical current densities ∼ 10 5 A/cm 2 at 4.2 K and ∼ 10 4 A/cm 2 at 77K.

  6. Characterization of the variation of the material properties in a freestanding inhomogeneous thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaoshan; Jin, Feng; Jeon, Insu

    2010-12-01

    This Letter presents a new technique for measuring the variation of the material properties along the thickness in a freestanding inhomogeneous thin film. The analytical results reveal a simple relation between the material properties and the set of cut-off frequencies of Lamb waves. The influence of the graded properties on the variation of cut-off frequencies in three different kinds of models, including artificial FGM model, sub-surface damage model, and nano-porous thin film model, is discussed. These results provide theoretical guidance for characterizing the material property variations of MEMS/NEMS.

  7. The space technology demand on materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauphin, J.

    1983-01-01

    Space technology requires a rational and accurate policy of materials and processes selection. This paper examines some areas of space technology where materials and process problems have occurred in the past and how they can be solved in the future.

  8. Wear of selected materials and composites sliding against MoS2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, A. W.; Peterson, M. B.

    1993-04-01

    Improved vacuum deposition methods are now available to produce dense, suitably oriented, durable films of molybdenum disulfide on substrates appropriate for tribological applications. It is of interest to examine materials in sliding contact with such films in order to identify optimum combinations, and to improve further tribological performance of the system. Results of wear and friction measurements are presented on a number of materials including self-lubricating composites sliding against four different types of vacuum-deposited MoS2 films. The testing program utilized a controlled environment, pin-on-ring tribometer, with load and speed conditions appropriate to a possible application. Differences in wear over four orders of magnitude, and friction up to a factor of seven times, were measured among the materials. One application area of interest for these material combinations would be as ball retainers in rolling element bearings for space satellite systems.

  9. OUT Success Stories: Thin-Film PV: Leadership in Materials R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchford, P.

    2000-08-31

    Photovoltaics (PV) is a modern energy technology that makes use of semiconductor materials to convert sunlight directly to electricity. The idea of thin film technology is to produce truly low-cost PV devices by using pennies worth of active semiconductor materials.

  10. Process for leveling film surfaces and products thereof

    DOEpatents

    Birkmire, R.W.; McCandless, B.E.

    1990-03-20

    Semiconductor films and photovoltaic devices prepared therefrom are provided wherein the semiconductor films have a specular surface with a texture less than about 0.25 micron greater than the average planar film surface and wherein the semiconductor films are surface modified by exposing the surface to an aqueous solution of bromine containing an acid or salt and continuing such exposure for a time sufficient to etch the surface. 8 figs.

  11. Process for levelling film surfaces and products thereof

    DOEpatents

    Birkmire, Robert W.; McCandless, Brian E.

    1990-03-20

    Semiconductor films and photovoltaic devices prepared therefrom are provided wherein the semiconductor films have a specular surface with a texture less than about 0.25 micron greater than the average planar film surface and wherein the semiconductor films are surface modified by exposing the surface to an aqueous solution of bromine containing an acid or salt and continuing such exposure for a time sufficient to etch the surface.

  12. Fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials using sol-gel processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. T.; Chu, Jay; Zheng, Haixing

    1995-01-01

    Advanced materials play an important role in electrochemical energy devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrochemical capacitors. They are being used as both electrodes and electrolytes. Sol-gel processing is a versatile solution technique used in fabrication of ceramic materials with tailored stoichiometry, microstructure, and properties. The application of sol-gel processing in the fabrication of advanced electrochemical energy materials will be presented. The potentials of sol-gel derived materials for electrochemical energy applications will be discussed along with some examples of successful applications. Sol-gel derived metal oxide electrode materials such as V2O5 cathodes have been demonstrated in solid-slate thin film batteries; solid electrolytes materials such as beta-alumina for advanced secondary batteries had been prepared by the sol-gel technique long time ago; and high surface area transition metal compounds for capacitive energy storage applications can also be synthesized with this method.

  13. Enhancing performance characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Guillermo C; Heeger, Alan J; Moses, Daniel; Peet, Jeffrey

    2013-09-25

    Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

  14. Enhancing performing characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Guillermo C; Moses, Daniel; Peet, Jeffrey; Heeger, Alan J

    2014-05-13

    Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

  15. Enhancing performance characteristics of organic semiconducting films by improved solution processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Guillermo C; Mikhailovsky, Alexander; Moses, Daniel; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Peet, Jeffrey; Soci, Cesare

    2012-11-27

    Improved processing methods for enhanced properties of conjugated polymer films are disclosed, as well as the enhanced conjugated polymer films produced thereby. Addition of low molecular weight alkyl-containing molecules to solutions used to form conjugated polymer films leads to improved photoconductivity and improvements in other electronic properties. The enhanced conjugated polymer films can be used in a variety of electronic devices, such as solar cells and photodiodes.

  16. Measurement of residual stresses in deposited films of SOFC component materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, T.; Momma, A.; Nagata, S.; Kasuga, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The stress induced in Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)s has important influence on the lifetime of SOFC. But the data on stress in SOFC and mechanical properties of SOW component materials have not been accumulated enough to manufacture SOFC. Especially, the data of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} cathode and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} interconnection have been extremely limited. We have estimated numerically the dependences of residual stress in SOFC on the material properties, the cell structure and the fabrication temperatures of the components, but these unknown factors have caused obstruction to simulate the accurate behavior of residual stress. Therefore, the residual stresses in deposited La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} films are researched by the observation of the bending behavior of the substrate strips. The films of SOFC component materials were prepared by the RF sputtering method, because: (1) It can fabricate dense films of poor sinterable material such as La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} compared with sintering or plasma spray method. (2) For the complicated material such as perovskite materials, the difference between the composition of a film and that of a target material is generally small. (3) It can fabricate a thick ceramics film by improving of the deposition rate. For example, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thick films of 50{mu}m can be fabricated with the deposition rate of approximately 5{mu}m/h industrially. In this paper, the dependence of residual stress on the deposition conditions is defined and mechanical properties of these materials are estimated from the results of the experiments.

  17. Formation and post-deposition compression of smooth and processable silicon thin films from nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafferis, Noah T.; Sturm, James C.

    2012-03-01

    We report the formation of smooth and processable silicon thin-films from single-crystal silicon-nanoparticle suspensions. Single-crystal Si-nanoparticles (1-4 nm) are produced and suspended in various solvents. Films deposited from the suspension are mechanically stable and can be patterned and processed upon deposition. Physical compression of the films is presented as a mechanism to reduce porosity and global roughness. These thin-films, ˜100 nm thick and deposited from a single droplet, contain significant levels of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Resistivities of the as-deposited films are ˜7.107 Ω.cm—comparable to intrinsic nanocrystalline-Si.

  18. Effect of different film packaging on microbial growth in minimally processed cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica).

    PubMed

    Palma, A; Mangia, N P; Fadda, A; Barberis, A; Schirra, M; D'Aquino, S

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are natural contaminants of fresh produce and minimally processed products, and contamination arises from a number of sources, including the environment, postharvest handling and processing. Fresh-cut products are particularly susceptible to microbial contaminations because of the changes occurring in the tissues during processing. In package gas composition of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) in combination with low storage temperatures besides reducing physiological activity of packaged produce, can also delay pathogen growth. Present study investigated on the effect of MAPs, achieved with different plastic films, on microbial growth of minimally processed cactus pear (Opuntio ficus-indica) fruit. Five different plastic materials were used for packaging the manually peeled fruit. That is: a) polypropylene film (Termoplast MY 40 micron thickness, O2 transmission rate 300 cc/m2/24h); b) polyethylene film (Bolphane BHE, 11 micron thickness, O2 transmission rate 19000 cc/m2/24h); c) polypropylene laser-perforated films (Mach Packaging) with 8, 16 or 32 100-micron holes. Total aerobic psychrophilic, mesophilic microorganisms, Enterobacteriaceae, yeast, mould populations and in-package CO2, O2 and C2H4 were determined at each storage time. Different final gas compositions, ranging from 7.8 KPa to 17.1 KPa O2, and 12.7 KPa to 2.6 KPa CO2, were achieved with MY and micro perforated films, respectively. Differences were detected in the mesophilic, Enterobacteriaceae and yeast loads, while no difference was detected in psychrophilic microorganisms. At the end of storage, microbial load in fruits sealed with MY film was significantly lower than in those sealed with BHE and micro perforated films. Furthermore, fruits packed with micro-perforated films showed the highest microbial load. This occurrence may in part be related to in-package gas composition and in part to a continuous contamination of microorganisms through micro-holes.

  19. Concurrent materials and process selection in conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, S.D.

    1998-07-01

    The sequential manner in which materials and processes for a manufactured product are selected is inherently less than optimal. Designers` tendency to choose processes and materials with which they are familiar exacerbate this problem. A method for concurrent selection of materials and a joining process based on product requirements using a knowledge-based, constraint satisfaction approach is presented.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of oxide-based thin film transistors, and process development for oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wantae

    2009-12-01

    This dissertation is focused on the development of thin film transistors (TFTs) using oxide materials composed of post-transitional cations with (n-1)d 10ns0 (n≥4). The goal is to achieve high performance oxide-based TFTs fabricated at low processing temperature on either glass or flexible substrates for next generation display applications. In addition, etching mechanism and Ohmic contact formation for oxide heterostructure (ZnO/CuCrO 2) system is demonstrated. The deposition and characterization of oxide semiconductors (In 2O3-ZnO, and InGaZnO4) using a RF-magnetron sputtering system are studied. The main influence on the resistivity of the films is found to be the oxygen partial pressure in the sputtering ambient. The films remained amorphous and transparent (> 70%) at all process conditions. These films showed good transmittance at suitable conductivity for transistor fabrication. The electrical characteristics of both top- and bottom-gate type Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) and Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide (InGaZnO4)-based TFTs are reported. The InZnO films were favorable for depletion-mode TFTs due to their tendency to form oxygen vacancies, while enhancement-mode devices were realized with InGaZnO4 films. The InGaZnO4-based TFTs fabricated on either glass or plastic substrates at low temperature (<100°C) exhibit good electrical properties: the saturation mobility of 5--12 cm2.V-1.s-1 and threshold voltage of 0.5--2.5V. The devices are also examined as a function of aging time in order to verify long-term stability in air. The effect of gate dielectric materials on electrical properties of InGaZnO 4-based TFTs was investigated. The use of SiNx film as a gate dielectric reduces the trap density and the roughness at the channel/gate dielectric interface compared to SiO2 gate dielectric, resulting in an improvement of device parameters by reducing scattering of trapped charges at the interface. The quality of interface is shown to have large effect on TFT performance

  1. Design of camouflage material for visible and near infrared based on thin film technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Lei; Shi, Jia-ming; Zhao, Da-peng; Liu, Hao; Wang, Chao; Xu, Yan-liang

    2015-11-01

    Visible light and near infrared based camouflage materials achieve good stealth under traditional optical detection equipment but its spectral differences with green plants can be taken advantage of by high spectrum based detection technologies. Based on the thin structure of bandpass filter, we designed an optical film with both green and near infrared spectrum. We conducted simulations using transfer matrix methods and optimized the result by simplex methods. The spectral reflectance curve of the proposed thin film matches that of green plants, and experiments show that the proposed thin film achieve good invisibility under visible light and near infrared in a wide viewing angle.

  2. Measurements of material properties for solar cells. [aluminum film and KAPTON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, J. G., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements on two candidate materials for space flight are reported. The observed optical transmittance of aluminum films vapor deposited on fused quartz showed anomalously high transmittance thru 400 A and 600 A and showed an effective skin depth of 110 A in the latter part of the 1000 A thickness. KAPTON films are shown by their optical transmission spectra to have an energy gap for electron excitation of approximately 2.5 eV, which value depends on the thickness as manufactured. The resistance of KAPTON film to ionizing radiation is described by their optical spectra and their electron spin resonance spectra.

  3. Consideration of the condensation processes of thin films in the crystal substrate's potential field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupik, V. A.; Margolin, V. I.; Trong Su, Chu

    2016-07-01

    The condensation process of a single particle in an ideal crystal substrate's potential field is considered. The optimal deposition path and the potential barrier of deposited particle's motion are shown. Some computer modeling examples of thin film's growth process were carried out on the basis of the implemented programs. A fractal analysis of obtained thin films was made, on the basis of which the possibility of estimating the performance of thin film's growth process will be discussed.

  4. Selective structuring of multi-layer functional thin films using a laser-induced shockwave delamination process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Molpeceres, C.; Ramirez, C. Antonio Herrera; Zimmer, K.

    2016-03-01

    The laser assisted micro structuring of thin films especially for electronic applications without influence the functionality of the multi-layer system e.g. due to melting products is a challenge for the laser micro machining techniques. The P2 scribing of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells on stainless steel carrier foil was studied using shockwave- induced film delamination (SWIFD) patterning. The delamination process is induced by a shock wave generated by the laser ablation of the rear side of the carrier foil. In the present study UV nanosecond laser pulses provided by a KrF excimer laser were used to induce the SWIFD process. The morphology and size of the achieved thin-film structures were studied in dependence on various laser irradiation parameters by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the materials composition after the laser patterning was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The temporal sequences of processes involved in the SWIFD process were analyzed with high speed shadowgraph experiments. The results of the present study shows that in dependence on the laser parameter used a large process window exist in which the CIGS thin film can be removed from the substrate without visible thermal modification of the CIGS thin film.

  5. Advanced materials for geothermal energy processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1985-08-01

    The primary goal of the geothermal materials program is to ensure that the private sector development of geothermal energy resources is not constrained by the availability of technologically and economically viable materials of construction. This requires the performance of long-term high risk GHTD-sponsored materials R and D. Ongoing programs described include high temperature elastomers for dynamic sealing applications, advanced materials for lost circulation control, waste utilization and disposal, corrosion resistant elastomeric liners for well casing, and non-metallic heat exchangers. 9 refs.

  6. Centrifugation-based Purification of Emerging Low-dimensional Materials and Their Thin-film Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Woo

    Polydispersity in low-dimensional materials offers many interesting challenges and properties. In particular, the one- and two-dimensional carbon allotropes such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have demonstrated exquisite optoelectronic properties that are highly sensitive to their physical structures, where subtle variations in diameter and thickness render them with significantly different electronic band structures. Thus, the carbon nanomaterials have been the subject of extensive studies that address their polydispersity issues. Among these, solution-phase, buoyant density-based methods such as density gradient ultracentrifugation have been widely utilized to enrich subpopulations of carbon nanotubes and graphene with narrow distribution in diameter and thickness, enabling their applications in various next-generation thin-film devices. In this thesis, I present further advancement of centrifugation-based processing methods for emerging low-dimensional materials through systematic utilization of previously explored surfactant systems, development of novel surfactant types, and study of correlation between the chemical structure of surfactants and the dispersion and optoelectronic properties of the nanomaterials. First, I employ an iterative density gradient ultracentrifugation with a combination of anionic surfactants and addition of excess counter-ions to achieve isolation of novel diameter species of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. The purification of carbon nanotubes with simultaneous, ultrahigh-purity refinement in electronic type and diameter distribution leads to collaborative studies on heat distribution characteristics and diameter-dependent direct current and radio frequency performances in monodisperse carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. Next, I develop the use of non-ionic polymeric surfactants for centrifugation-based processes. Specifically, I utilize polypropylene and polyethylene oxide-based block copolymers with density

  7. Conducting and Optical Properties of Transparent Conducting Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films by Sol-Gel Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.; Kaydanova, T.; Miedaner, A.; Ginley, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    Transparent conducting oxides were successfully prepared from mixed zinc nitrate hexahydrate and indium nitrate hydrate solutions in ethylene glycol using sol-gel technique. The In content in the film was varied (0, 2, 10, 20, 40, 75 and 100 atom %). Films were prepared by spin coating of the liquid precursors followed by thermal decomposition at 400° C after each layer. According to X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, the pure ZnO and pure InO films (0 and at 100 % In) were crystalline as-deposited. The crystallinity was suppressed in mixed compositions such that the films with compositions between 10 and 75 at % were amorphous. All the films were transparent with the transmission cut-off frequency near 400 nm, which is characteristic of TCO materials. All as-deposited films were conductive with 0 and 100 atom % In having the lowest resistivities. The resistivity of all compositions were improved by post-deposition reducing anneal in pure Ar at 300° C. The lowest resistivity of 0.2 Ωcm was obtained for the pure ZnO after Ar anneal. It was two-orders of magnitude higher than reported in the literature for the In-doped ZnO, which was attributed to the low processing temperature. The resistivities of as-deposited and annealed in Ar films were increased by consequent air anneal at 300° C.

  8. Polymer film selection for corrosion protection of data storage magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Chatruprachewin, Santi; Supadee, Laddawan; Titiroongruang, Wisut

    2011-12-01

    Due to the current requirement of high recording density of hard disk drive, the thickness of DLC layer which is the protective layer is needed to be reduced. Therefore, the corrosion of read-write elements that are fabricated from soft magnetic materials is more critical. During the photolithography process, polymer photoresist is playing the major role on controlling the corrosion of soft magnetic materials. Two different types of polymer photoresists are selected to investigate, noted as wet photoresist and dry photoresist, respectively. Contact angle measurement, AFM and SEM are techniques using to determine the quality of polymer photoresists. Furthermore, the direct corrosion is also studied by using potentiostat/galvanostat-based measurements. The result suggested that the wet photoresist, AZ4999 Clariant, is better as compared to that of dry photoresist. No surface degradation as well as surface defects of the wet photoresist was found after lithography process. The corrosion rate of the specimen coated by this corresponding wet film is found to be only 1.44 x 10(-6) mm/y. In addition, the wet photoresist surface is hydrophobic posed of more than 75 degree of contact angle.

  9. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Buchanan, W. A.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.; Shafarman, W. N.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes results achieved during the second phase of a four year subcontract to develop and understand thin film solar cell technology related to a-Si and its alloys, CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2, and CdTe. Accomplishments during this phase include development of equations and reaction rates for the formation of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 films by selenization, fabrication of a 15% efficient CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 cell, development of a reproducible, reliable Cu-diffused contact to CdTe, investigation of the role of CdTe-CdS interdiffusion on device operation, investigation of the substitution of HCl for CdCl2 in the post-deposition heat treatment of CdTe/CdS, demonstration of an improved reactor design for deposition of a-Si films, demonstration of improved process control in the fabrication of a ten set series of runs producing approximately 8% efficient a-Si devices, demonstration of the utility of a simplified optical model for determining quantity and effect of current generation in each layer of a triple stacked a-Si cell, presentation of analytical and modeling procedures adapted to devices produced with each material system, presentation of baseline parameters for devices produced with each material system, and various investigations of the roles played by other layers in thin film devices including the Mo underlayer, CdS and ZnO in CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 devices, the CdS in CdTe devices, and the ZnO as window layer and as part of the back surface reflector in a-Si devices. In addition, collaborations with over ten research groups are briefly described.

  10. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Paul F.; Frank, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    Methods and techniques are described for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The methods are useful in a variety of applications. The biological materials may include microbes, proteins, and viruses. The electrode surface may consist of reversibly electroactive materials such as polyvinylferrocene, silicon-linked ferrocene or quinone.

  11. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, P.F.; Frank, A.J.

    1993-05-04

    Methods and techniques are described for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The methods are useful in a variety of applications. The biological materials may include microbes, proteins, and viruses. The electrode surface may consist of reversibly electroactive materials such as polyvinylferrocene, silicon-linked ferrocene or quinone.

  12. Characterization of novel BaZnSnO thin films by solution process and applications in thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Huang, Chuan-Xin; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Zhu, Wen-Qing; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhang, Zhi-Lin

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: This work reports the Ba content on thin film transistor based on a novel BaZnSnO semiconductor using solution process. - Highlights: • No reports about BaZnSnO thin film using solution process. • BaZnSnO thin film transistor (TFT) was firstly fabricated. • BaZnSnO-TFT shows a acceptable performace. • Influence of Ba content on BaZnSnO-TFT. - Abstract: A novel BaZnSnO semiconductor is fabricated using solution process and the influence of Ba addition on the structure, the chemical state of oxygen and electrical performance of BaZnSnO thin films are investigated. A high performance BaZnSnO-based thin film transistor with 15 mol% Ba is obtained, showing a saturation mobility of 1.94 cm{sup 2}/V s, a threshold voltage of 3.6 V, an on/off current ratio of 6.2 × 10{sup 6}, a subthreshold swing of 0.94 V/decade, and a good bias stability. Transistors with solution processed BaZnSnO films are promising candidates for the development of future large-area, low-cost and high-performance electronic devices.

  13. Effects of pyrolysis conditions on dielectric properties of PLZT films derived from a polyvinylpyrrolidone-modified sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Sheng; Ma, Beihai; Liu, Shanshan; Narayanan, Manoj; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: SEM images showing the surface morphology of PLZT films derived from solutions with various PVP content and treated with either RTA (rapid thermal annealing) or SPT (step-wise preheat treatment) process. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-quality PLZT films were fabricated by using a polyvinylpyrrolidone-modified sol-gel method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved film density and integrity was achieved by employing a novel step-wise preheat treatment (SPT) process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced dielectric properties were correlated to the improved microstructures as a result of the SPT process. -- Abstract: Pb{sub 0.92}La{sub 0.08}Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} (PLZT) films were deposited on platinized silicon substrates (Pt/Si) using a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) modified sol-gel method. Pyrolysis of the green films was conducted via two methods: rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and a step-wise preheat treatment (SPT). Microstructure analysis and dielectric property characterization were performed on samples treated by these two methods. Results showed that the SPT-pyrolyzed films exhibited much better dielectric properties when compared with the RTA-pyrolyzed films. The differences in dielectric properties were correlated to microstructural features caused by the different pyrolysis conditions. High-quality PLZT films with high dielectric constant ( Almost-Equal-To 860 at zero bias) and high breakdown strength ( Almost-Equal-To 2.1 MV/cm) were fabricated under controlled pyrolysis conditions. This work demonstrated the potential application of this material for power electronics in electric drive vehicles.

  14. Evaporation system and method for gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, J.J.; Halpern, B.L.

    1994-10-18

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for depositing thin films of materials such as metals, oxides and nitrides at low temperature relies on a supersonic free jet of inert carrier gas to transport vapor species generated from an evaporation source to the surface of a substrate. Film deposition vapors are generated from solid film precursor materials, including those in the form of wires or powders. The vapor from these sources is carried downstream in a low pressure supersonic jet of inert gas to the surface of a substrate where the vapors deposit to form a thin film. A reactant gas can be introduced into the gas jet to form a reaction product with the evaporated material. The substrate can be moved from the gas jet past a gas jet containing a reactant gas in which a discharge has been generated, the speed of movement being sufficient to form a thin film which is chemically composed of the evaporated material and reactant gases. 8 figs.

  15. Femtosecond laser processing of photovoltaic and transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sanghoon

    The photovoltaic semiconducting and transparent dielectric materials are of high interest in current industry. Femtosecond laser processing can be an effective technique to fabricate such materials since non-linear photochemical mechanisms predominantly occur. In this series of studies, femtosecond (fs) laser processing techniques that include laser drilling on Si wafer, laser scribing on CIGS thin film, laser ablation on Lithium Niobate (LN) crystal, and fabrication of 3D structures in fused silica were studied. The fs laser drilling on Si wafer was performed to fabricate via holes for wrap-through PV devices. For reduction of the number of shots in fs laser drilling process, self-action of laser light in the air was initiated. To understand physical phenomena during laser drilling, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), emission, and shadowgraph images were studied. The result indicated the presence of two mechanisms that include fabrication by self-guided beam and wall-guided beam. Based on our study, we could fabricate ~16 micrometer circular-shaped via holes with ~200 laser pulses on 160-170 micrometer thick c- and mc-Si wafer. For the fs laser scribing on ink jet printed CIGS thin film solar cell, the effect of various parameters that include pulse accumulation, wavelength, pulse energy, and overlapping were elucidated. In our processing regime, the effect of wavelength could be diminished due to compensation between beam size, pulse accumulation, energy fluence, and the absorption coefficient. On the other hand, for high PRF fs laser processing, pulse accumulation effect cannot be ignored, while it can be negligible in low PRF fs laser processing. The result indicated the presence of a critical energy fluence for initiating delamination of CIGS layer. To avoid delamination and fabricate fine isolation lines, the overlapping method can be applied. With this method, ~1 micrometer width isolation lines were fabricated. The fs laser ablation on LN wafer was studied

  16. Film Deposition, Cryogenic RF Testing and Materials Analysis of a Nb/Cu Single Cell SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Rongli; Palczerski, Ari; Li, Yongming

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we present preliminary results on using a cathodic-arc-discharge Nb plasma ion source to establish a Nb film-coated single-cell Cu cavity for SRF research. The polycrystalline Cu cavity was fabricated and mirror-surface-finished by a centrifugal barrel polishing (CBP) process at Jefferson Lab. Special pre-coating processes were conducted, in order to create a template-layer for follow-on Nb grain thickening. A sequence of cryogenic RF testing demonstrated that the Nb film does show superconductivity. But the quality factor of this Nb/Cu cavity is low as a result of high residual surface resistance. We are conducting a thorough materials characterization to explore if some microstructural defects or hydrogen impurities, led to such a low quality factor.

  17. Microstructural Evolution of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Due to CH4/Ar/H2 Plasma Post-Treatment Process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Chang; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Manoharan, Divinah; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan

    2015-10-01

    Plasma post-treatment process was observed to markedly enhance the electron field emission (EFE) properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. TEM examinations reveal that the prime factor which improves the EFE properties of these films is the coalescence of ultrasmall diamond grains (∼5 nm) forming large diamond grains about hundreds of nanometers accompanied by the formation of nanographitic clusters along the grain boundaries due to the plasma post-treatment process. OES studies reveal the presence of large proportion of atomic hydrogen and C2 (or CH) species, which are the main ingredients that altered the granular structure of the UNCD films. In the post-treatment process, the plasma interacts with the diamond films by a diffusion process. The recrystallization of diamond grains started at the surface region of the material, and the interaction zone increased with the post-treatment period. The entire diamond film can be converted into a nanocrystalline granular structure when post-treated for a sufficient length of time.

  18. Study of materials for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Materials were selected for device applications and their commercial use. Experimental arrangements were also made for electrical characterization of single crystals using electrical resistivity and Hall effect measurements. The experimental set-up was tested with some standard samples.

  19. Directed Ordering of Block Copolymer Thin Films with Flexible Interfaces for Functional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Alamgir

    2012-02-01

    Orientation control of block copolymer (BCP) films is important for advanced technological applications. We present studies on directed ordering of block copolymer thin films on rigid substrates such as quartz to elastomeric PDMS and flexible Kapton substrates for tunable orientation of microphase separated poly (styrene) -- block -poly (methylmethacrylate) (PS-PMMA) cylinder and lamellae forming BCP films. Although the crosslinked PDMS has low surface energy, its surface energy can be tuned by exposing to UV-Ozone (UVO) that presents an opportunity to change BCP-PDMS interfacial energy to control BCP orientation across full range of orientation and film wettability. On the other hand, Kapton offers a near neutral surface for PS-PMMA without surface modification. Via a modified version of a dynamic thermal processing termed cold zone annealing-sharp (CZA-S), we obtain a wide range of orientations of the block copolymer films in unfilled and nanoparticle filled systems with an interest in photovoltaic systems. With CZA-S, vertical orientation of PS-PMMA can be obtained in films as thick as 1 micron with etchable PMMA domains for membrane applications. GISAXS characterization of these etched BCP membranes reveals up to 5 orders of diffraction indicating hexagonally packed vertical nanopores that extend throughout the film. Under similar thermal gradient, but static conditions, temporally stable vertical cylinders form only within a narrow zone of maximum temperature gradient. Primary CZA-S ordering mechanism thus involves propagating this narrow vertically oriented zone of BCP cylinders created at the maximum thermal gradient section, across the film. An optimal speed is needed since the process competes with preferential surface wetting dynamics that favors parallel orientation. These results are reproduced on large area flexible films on a prototype dynamic R2R assembly platform with incorporated multi-CZA gradient for thin (100 nm) BCP films currently.

  20. A new model for the blown film process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demay, Yves; Clamond, Didier

    2011-11-01

    Polymer films are generally manufactured by film blowing. In this process the polymer (a polyethylene for example) is molten in a screw extruder and forced into a tubular die (typical dimensions are several decimeters in diameter and about one mm in thickness). At extrusion, it forms a liquid tube which is simultaneously drawn in the vertical direction by nip rolls, inflated by an internal pressure and cooled by external air rings. Typical dimensions of the bubble at take up are 1 m or more in diameter and several 10 μm in thickness. From a mechanical point of view, it is an extensional thin layer flow. Readers not familiar with this process will find easily pictures and schematic descriptions with a web research using keywords blown film extrusion. In order to simplify, it is assumed that the temperature profile is known and that the molten polymer behaves as a Newtonian fluid. This crude rheological behavior allows to capture qualitatively an important part of observed phenomena. The classical model introduced by Pearson and Petrie in 1970 is based on three hypothesis: the polymer flow in air is steady and axisymmetric and the film is thin. It uses a tangent frame affixed to the membrane to describe kinematics and to compute stress and strain tensors. In this model the balance equations are written using a stretching force and a curvature equation. It results in a nonlinear system of differential equations for velocity, thickness, radius and stress components according to distance z to extrusion. Solution is then computed using a tedious shooting method to determine force and internal pressure. For stability reasons this system of equations is solved from take up to extrusion. In this Note we derive also balance equations according to a curvilinear abscissa s. It allows us to derive a coupled system of equations for velocity and geometry according to radius r. This strategy which is classically used to determine surfaces of revolution with given mean curvature

  1. Stress level evaluation of thin films under thermal loading from a brazing process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1996-06-01

    X-ray front end beamline windows are made of thin beryllium foil that is commonly brazed or diffusion bonded onto a copper frame. In the brazing process, due to differences in the thermal expansion coefficient of the beryllium and copper materials, the beryllium film ends up in a state of very high level compression stress after cooling from 700{degrees}C (the brazing temperature) to room temperature. This makes the thin Be foil deform into a dome-shaped structure due to the usual asymmetrical geometry of the window. This paper studies the brazing process using a finite element method and explains the reason for such phenomena. Recommendations are offered for possible improvement in the bonding process of beryllium to the window block.

  2. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The potentially useful encapsulating materials for Task 3 of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project were studied to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Materials for study were chosen on the basis of existing knowledge of generic chemical types having high resistance to environmental weathering. The materials varied from rubbers to thermoplastics and presented a broad range of mechanical properties and processing requirements. Basic physical and optical properties were measured on the polymers and were redetermined after exposure to indoor artificial accelerated aging conditions covering four time periods. Strengths and weaknesses of the various materials were revealed and data was accumulated for the development of predictive methodologies. To date, silicone rubbers, fluorocarbons, and acrylic polymers appear to have the most promising combination of characteristics. The fluorocarbons may be used only as films, however, because of their high cost.

  3. Theoretical and material studies of thin-film electroluminescent devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    Thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) devices are studied for a possible means of achieving a high resolution, light weight, compact video display panel for computer terminals or television screens. The performance of TFEL devices depends upon the probability of an electron impact exciting a luminescent center which in turn depends upon the density of centers present in the semiconductor layer, the possibility of an electron achieving the impact excitation threshold energy, and the collision cross section itself. Efficiency of such a device is presently very poor. It can best be improved by increasing the number of hot electrons capable of impact exciting a center. Hot electron distributions and a method for increasing the efficiency and brightness of TFEL devices (with the additional advantage of low voltage direct current operation) are investigated.

  4. Process for production of solution-derived (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} thin films and powders

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, T.J.

    1999-01-12

    A simple and rapid process for synthesizing (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} precursor solutions and subsequent ferroelectric thin films and powders of the perovskite phase of these materials has been developed. This process offers advantages over standard methods, including: rapid solution synthesis (<10 minutes), use of commercially available materials, film production under ambient conditions, ease of lanthanum dissolution at high concentrations, and no heating requirements during solution synthesis. For lanthanum-doped ferroelectric materials, the lanthanum source can be added with total synthesis time less than 10 minutes. Films and powders are crystallized at approximately 650 C and exhibit ferroelectric properties comparable to films and powders produced by other techniques which require higher crystallization temperatures. 2 figs.

  5. Process for production of solution-derived (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O.sub.3 thin films and powders

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    A simple and rapid process for synthesizing (Pb,La)(Nb,Sn,Zr,Ti)O.sub.3 precursor solutions and subsequent ferroelectric thin films and powders of the perovskite phase of these materials has been developed. This process offers advantages over standard methods, including: rapid solution synthesis (<10 minutes), use of commercially available materials, film production under ambient conditions, ease of lanthanum dissolution at high concentrations, and no heating requirements during solution synthesis. For lanthanum-doped ferroelectric materials, the lanthanum source can be added with total synthesis time less than 10 minutes. Films and powders are crystallized at approximately 650.degree. C. and exhibit ferroelectric properties comparable to films and powders produced by other techniques which require higher crystallization temperatures.

  6. Wide-Area Thermal Processing of Light-Emitting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, C.; Quick, N.

    2011-09-30

    Silicon carbide based materials and devices have been successfully exploited for diverse electronic applications. However, they have not achieved the same success as Si technologies due to higher material cost and higher processing temperatures required for device development. Traditionally, SiC is not considered for optoelectronic applications because it has an indirect bandgap. However, AppliCote Associates, LLC has developed a laser-based doping process which enables light emission in SiC through the creation of embedded p-n junctions. AppliCote laser irradiation of silicon carbide allows two different interaction mechanisms: (1) Laser conversion or induced phase transformation which creates carbon rich regions that have conductive properties. These conductive regions are required for interconnection to the light emitting semiconducting region. (2) Laser doping which injects external dopant atoms into the substrate that introduces deep level transition states that emit light when electrically excited. The current collaboration with AppliCote has focused on the evaluation of ORNL's unique Pulse Thermal Processing (PTP) technique as a replacement for laser processing. Compared to laser processing, Pulse Thermal Processing can deliver similar energy intensities (20-50 kW/cm2) over a much larger area (up to 1,000 cm2) at a lower cost and much higher throughput. The main findings of our investigation; which are significant for the realization of SiC based optoelectronic devices, are as follows: (1) The PTP technique is effective in low thermal budget activation of dopants in SiC similar to the laser technique. The surface electrical conductivity of the SiC samples improved by about three orders of magnitude as a result of PTP processing which is significant for charge injection in the devices; (2) The surface composition of the SiC film can be modified by the PTP technique to create a carbon-rich surface (increased local C:Si ratio from 1:1 to 2.9:1). This is

  7. Processing, electrical and microwave properties of sputtered Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanyam, G.; Kapoor, V. J.; Chorey, C. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    A reproducible fabrication process has been established for TlCaBaCuO thin films on LaAlO3 substrates by RF magnetron sputtering and post-deposition processing methods. Electrical transport properties of the thin films were measured on patterned four-probe test devices. Microwave properties of the films were obtained from unloaded Q measurements of all-superconducting ring resonators. This paper describes the processing, electrical and microwave properties of Tl2Ca1Ba2Cu2O(x) 2122-plane phase thin films.

  8. When block copolymer self-assembly in hierarchically ordered honeycomb films depicts the breath figure process.

    PubMed

    Escalé, Pierre; Save, Maud; Billon, Laurent; Ruokolainen, Janne; Rubatat, Laurent

    2016-01-21

    Nowadays, a challenge in the preparation of hierarchically ordered materials is the control of concomitant and interacting self-organization processes occurring in time at different length scales. In the present paper, the breath figure process is combined with block copolymer nano-phase segregation to elaborate hierarchically structured honeycomb porous films. Copolymer ordering, at the nanometer length scale, is observed and described in detail with respect to the array of pores of micrometer dimension, hence pointing out the structural interplays between both length-scales. The study is focused on two diblock copolymers made of polystyrene and poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PS-b-PtBA) with compositions producing lamellae or hexagonal packing of cylinders at thermodynamical equilibrium. Transmission Electron Microscopy completed with Small and Ultra-Small Angle Scattering are performed to evidence the inner morphologies of the honeycomb. The structural data are discussed in the light of the honeycomb film formation process establishing the interest in using kinetically trapped block copolymer self-organization as an imprint to elucidate the complex breath figure process. PMID:26528753

  9. Evolution of lateral ordering in symmetric block copolymer thin films upon rapid thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Ceresoli, Monica; Ferrarese Lupi, Federico; Seguini, Gabriele; Sparnacci, Katia; Gianotti, Valentina; Antonioli, Diego; Laus, Michele; Boarino, Luca; Perego, Michele

    2014-07-11

    This work reports experimental findings about the evolution of lateral ordering of lamellar microdomains in symmetric PS-b-PMMA thin films on featureless substrates. Phase separation and microdomain evolution are explored in a rather wide range of temperatures (190-340 °C) using a rapid thermal processing (RTP) system. The maximum processing temperature that enables the ordering of block copolymers without introducing any significant degradation of macromolecules is identified. The reported results clearly indicate that the range of accessible temperatures in the processing of these self-assembling materials is mainly limited by the thermal instability of the grafted random copolymer layer, which starts to degrade at T > 300 °C, inducing detachment of the block copolymer thin film. For T ⩽ 290 °C, clear dependence of correlation length (ξ) values on temperature is observed. The highest level of lateral order achievable in the current system in a quasi-equilibrium condition was obtained at the upper processing temperature limit after an annealing time as short as 60 s.

  10. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-10

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, ...) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1--contraband material in the sea containers, case 2 - explosives in soil (landmines), case 3 - explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  11. Calcium Film Based Testing of Edge-Seal Materials for Photovoltaic Applications (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.; Dameron, A.; Reese, M.

    2011-04-01

    Because of the sensitivity of some photovoltaic devices to moisture-induced corrosion, they are packaged using impermeable front- and back-sheets with an edge seal to prevent moisture ingress. Evaluation of edge seal materials can be difficult because of the low permeation rates involved and/or non-Fickian behavior. Here, using a Ca film deposited on a glass substrate, we demonstrate the evaluation of edge seal materials in a manner that effectively duplicates their use in a photovoltaic application and compare the results with standard methods for measuring water vapor transport. We demonstrate how moisture permeation data from polymer films can be used to estimate moisture ingress rates and compare the results of these two methods. Encapsulant materials were also evaluated for comparison and to highlight the need for edge seals. Of the materials studied, dessicant-filled polyisobutene materials demonstrate by far the best potential to keep moisture out for a 20 to 30 year lifetime.

  12. Multilayer Films Assembled from Naturally-Derived Materials for Controlled Protein Release

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Bryan B.; Hagerman, Samantha R; Jamieson, Kelsey; Veselinovic, Jovana; O’Neill, Nicholas; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Herein we designed and characterized films composed of naturally derived materials for controlled release of proteins. Traditional drug delivery strategies rely on synthetic or semi-synthetic materials, or utilize potentially denaturing assembly conditions that are not optimal for sensitive biologics. Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly of films uses benign conditions and can generate films with various release mechanisms including hydrolysis-facilitated degradation. These use components such as synthetic polycations that degrade into non-natural products. Herein we report the use of a naturally-derived, biocompatible and degradable polyanion, poly(β-l-malic acid), alone and in combination with chitosan in an LbL film, whose degradation products of malic acid and chitosan are both generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the FDA. We have found that films based on this polyanion have shown sustained release of a model protein, lysozyme that can be timed from tens of minutes to multiple days through different film architectures. We also report the incorporation and release of a clinically used biologic, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which demonstrates the use of this strategy as a platform for controlled release of various biologics. PMID:24825478

  13. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center. Report for FY 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The work described, while involving research in the broad field of materials processing, has two common features: the problems are closed related to space precessing of materials and have both practical and fundamental significance. An interesting and important feature of many of the projects is that the interdisciplinary nature of the problem mandates complementary analytical modeling/experimental approaches. An other important aspect of many of the projects is the increasing use of mathematical modeling techniques as one of the research tools. The predictive capability of these models, when tested against measurements, plays a very important role in both the planning of experimental programs and in the rational interpretation of the results. Many of the projects described have a space experiment as their ultimate objective. Mathematical models are proving to be extremely valuable in projecting the findings of ground - based experiments to microgravity conditions.

  14. A Soluble Dynamic Complex Strategy for the Solution-Processed Fabrication of Organic Thin-Film Transistors of a Boron-Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kyohei; Saito, Shohei; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-09-19

    The solution-processed fabrication of thin films of organic semiconductors enables the production of cost-effective, large-area organic electronic devices under mild conditions. The formation/dissociation of a dynamic B-N coordination bond can be used for the solution-processed fabrication of semiconducting films of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) materials. The poor solubility of a boron-containing PAH in chloroform, toluene, and chlorobenzene was significantly improved by addition of minor amounts (1 wt % of solvent) of pyridine derivatives, as their coordination to the boron atom suppresses the inherent propensity of the PAHs to form π-stacks. Spin-coating solutions of the thus formed Lewis acid-base complexes resulted in the formation of amorphous thin films, which could be converted into polycrystalline films of the boron-containing PAH upon thermal annealing. Organic thin-film transistors prepared by this solution process displayed typical p-type characteristics. PMID:27576306

  15. A Soluble Dynamic Complex Strategy for the Solution-Processed Fabrication of Organic Thin-Film Transistors of a Boron-Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kyohei; Saito, Shohei; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-09-19

    The solution-processed fabrication of thin films of organic semiconductors enables the production of cost-effective, large-area organic electronic devices under mild conditions. The formation/dissociation of a dynamic B-N coordination bond can be used for the solution-processed fabrication of semiconducting films of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) materials. The poor solubility of a boron-containing PAH in chloroform, toluene, and chlorobenzene was significantly improved by addition of minor amounts (1 wt % of solvent) of pyridine derivatives, as their coordination to the boron atom suppresses the inherent propensity of the PAHs to form π-stacks. Spin-coating solutions of the thus formed Lewis acid-base complexes resulted in the formation of amorphous thin films, which could be converted into polycrystalline films of the boron-containing PAH upon thermal annealing. Organic thin-film transistors prepared by this solution process displayed typical p-type characteristics.

  16. PECVD grown SiO2 film process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Song; Jie, Lian; Gao, Shang; Li, Ping; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Shiliang; Ma, Zheng

    2011-02-01

    SiO2 films have been widely applied in the production of electronic devices, integrated devices, optical thin film devices, sensors because of their desirable properties, such as good insulation, high light transmittance, strong corrosion resistance, good dielectric properties, etc. Amorphous silicon dioxide was fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical deposition on GaAs substrate. The thickness and refractive index are obtained by optical transmittance of the film, which are measured by ellipsometer. The deposition rate of the film and the refractive index are studied at different time, pressure, and the ratio of SiH4/N2O. The SiO2 thin film growth rate remained basically unchanged versus time. The reaction chamber pressure, which make the SiO2 thin film growth rate getting the peak, should be about 105Pa. But the SiO2 thin film growth rate and the refractive index are anti-related. The enormous changes of the gas flow rate do not have huge impact to the response rate. However, the refractive index of SiO2 thin film changed greatly when the SiH4flow increased the refractive index of the thin films is highest when the ratio of SiH4/N2O is 200:20

  17. Process for the preparation of metal-containing nanostructured films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yunfeng (Inventor); Wang, Donghai (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Metal-containing nanostructured films are prepared by electrodepositing a metal-containing composition within the pores of a mesoporous silica template to form a metal-containing silica nanocomposite. The nanocomposite is annealed to strengthen the deposited metal-containing composition. The silica is then removed from the nanocomposite, e.g., by dissolving the silica in an etching solution to provide a self-supporting metal-containing nanostructured film. The nanostructured films have a nanowire or nanomesh architecture depending on the pore structure of the mesoporous silica template used to prepare the films.

  18. Pulse thermal processing of functional materials using directed plasma arc

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Ronald D.; Blue, Craig A.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Harper, David C.

    2007-05-22

    A method of thermally processing a material includes exposing the material to at least one pulse of infrared light emitted from a directed plasma arc to thermally process the material, the pulse having a duration of no more than 10 s.

  19. Materials and Processes for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul W.; Richardson, Rod W.

    2004-01-01

    The single greatest threat to material availability over the last decade has been Compliance to New Environmental Regulations. Federal Regulations: a) Clean Air Acts Amendments - 1990 - Titles I, III and VI; b) NASA Interim Policy- 1995 end date; c) Montreal Protocol - 2000 and 2005 end dates; d) Industrial Toxics Project - HAP emissions by 1995; e) Florida DER - VOC limits by 1995 (CA); f) OSHA Health Related Regulations 1) Carcinogens 2) Mutagens 3). Material availability is complicated by local and state regulations and their own compliance schedules.

  20. Materials processing in space bibliography, 1983, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes, or ground based activities that provide supporting research are compiled. Six major categories: crystal growth; solidification of metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, transports, and chemical processes; glasses and ceramics; ultrahigh vacuum and containerless processing technologies; and combustion are included. A list of patents and appendices providing a compilation of anonymously authored collections and reports and a cross reference index are included.