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Sample records for film materials processes

  1. Remote plasma processing of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastenmeier, Bernd E. E.

    1999-09-01

    In this thesis, phenomena and mechanisms of remote plasma processes are investigated. The plasmas are spatially separated from the sample surface. Chemically reactive species are produced in the discharge region from rather inert feed gases. They exit the discharge region and travel in the afterglow towards the reaction chamber, where primarily neutral species arrive. The interaction with the sample surface is purely chemical. The absence of direct plasma surface interactions distinguishes remote plasma Chemical Dry Etching (CDE) from other etch processes like Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) or Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) etching. The etch reactions in CDE are isotropic, potentially offer great etch rate ratios and minimize substrate damage due to the absence of direct plasma-surface interactions. However, some materials like silicon dioxide (SiO2) or fluorocarbon deposits are difficult to remove because of the lack of activation energy otherwise provided by ion bombardment. In CDE, rates can be enhanced by the introduction of a new reaction pathway. Remote plasma CDE of silicon nitride (Si3N4) is an example for increasing the overall reaction rate by introducing a new reaction channel. Typically, the Si3N4 surface is exposed to the fluorine rich afterglow of a fluorocarbon, nitrogen trifluoride (NF 3) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) based discharge. We find that the Si3N4 etch rate is dramatically enhanced when Nitric Oxide (NO) is present in the afterglow as compared to the case in which only fluorine is present. Presented here are detailed analyses of the etching of Si3N 4 and SiO2 in different chemistries. Several experimental techniques are employed to investigate the composition of the plasma and the afterglow, the surface modifications and the etch rates for tetrafluoromethane (CF4) and NF3 based processes. These measurements establish the effect of NO on the Si3N4 etch rate. The dominant mechanism for the etch rate enhancement is shown by mass spectrometry

  2. Electronic processes in thin-film PV materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.C.; Chen, D.; Chen, S.L.

    1998-07-01

    The electronic and optical processes in an important class of thin-film PV materials, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, have been investigated using several experimental techniques designed for thin-film geometries. The experimental techniques include various magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopies and combinations of these two spectroscopies. Two-step optical excitation processes through the manifold of silicon dangling bond states have been identifies as important at low excitation energies. Local hydrogen motion has been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and found to be much more rapid than long range diffusion as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. A new metastable effect has been found in a-Si:H films alloyed with sulfur. Spin-one optically excited states have been unambiguously identified using optically detected electron spin resonance. Local hydrogen bonding in microcrystalline silicon films has been studied using NMR.

  3. Effervescent Cationic Film Forming Corrosion Inhibitor Material and Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-24

    corrosion 13 inhibitor material into the water to form a solution that coats 14 the exposed aluminum surfaces of the weapon with a cation film of 15 the corrosion inhibitor material. 14 OD~ ODV DATE:W

  4. Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and their Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    U AD-A274 325 Semiannual Technical Report U Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and Their... Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin 414v001---01 Films, Devices and Their Characterization 1114SS S. AUTHOS) N00179 Robert F. Davis, Salah... Conformal deposition of SiC has been demonstrated within trenches etched into Si(100) wafers. P-type films have also been achieved using Al as a

  5. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  6. Effervescent Cationic Film Forming Corrosion Inhibitor Material and Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-15

    1000 ppm in the volume of aliminum surface of a weapon in a launch tube on a seawater that floods the weapon tube. submarine with a corrosion inhibitor film, comprising: 20 * * * * * 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 a. 60 65

  7. Chemical-bath deposition of ZnSe thin films: Process and material characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Dona, J.M.; Herrero, J.

    1995-03-01

    Chemical-bath deposition of ZnSe thin films from NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}/SeC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/ZnSO{sub 4} solutions has been studied. The effect of various process parameters on the growth and the film quality is presented. A first approach to a mechanistic interpretation of the chemical process, based on the influence of the process parameters on the film growth rate, is reported. The structural, optical, chemical, and electrical properties of the ZnSe thin-films deposited by this method have been studied. The electron diffraction (EDS) analysis shows that the films are microcrystalline with mixed cubic and hexagonal structure. EDS analysis has demonstrated that the films are highly stoichiometric. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the ZnSe thin films deposited by this method show that the films are continuous and homogeneous. Optical measurements have allowed the authors to detect the presence of the spin-orbit splitting effect in this material. Electrical conductivity measurements have shown the highly resistive nature of these films ({rho} {approximately} 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm).

  8. Thin films for material engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Thin films are defined as two-dimensional materials formed by condensing one by one atomic/molecular/ionic species of matter in contrast to bulk three-dimensional sintered ceramics. They are grown through atomic collisional chemical reaction on a substrate surface. Thin film growth processes are fascinating for developing innovative exotic materials. On the basis of my long research on sputtering deposition, this paper firstly describes the kinetic energy effect of sputtered adatoms on thin film growth and discusses on a possibility of room-temperature growth of cubic diamond crystallites and the perovskite thin films of binary compound PbTiO3. Secondly, high-performance sputtered ferroelectric thin films with extraordinary excellent crystallinity compatible with MBE deposited thin films are described in relation to a possible application for thin-film MEMS. Finally, the present thin-film technologies are discussed in terms of a future material science and engineering.

  9. New Magnetic Materials and Phenomena for Radar and Microwave Signal Processing Devices - Bulk and Thin Film Ferrites and Metallic Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-15

    deposited and liquid phase epitaxy films of low loss cubic yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and lithium ferrite , uniaxial barium hexaferrite, and planar zinc ...barium hexaferrite with losses which are as good as the best bulk single crystals, and (9) the successful PLD growth of low loss zinc lithium ferrite ...Signal Processing Devices - Bulk and Thin Film Ferrites and Metallic Films ONR N00014-07-1-0597, 02 February 2007 - 30 September 2008 Carl E

  10. Growth of thin films of organic nonlinear optical materials by vapor growth processes - An overview and examination of shortfalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Penn, B. G.; Witherow, W. K.; Paley, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    Research on the growth of second- and third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) organic thin film by vapor deposition is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the experimental methods for growing thin films of p-chlorophenylurea, diacetylenes, and phthalocyanines; characteristics of the resulting films; and approaches for advancing thin film technology. It is concluded that the growth of NLO thin films by vapor processes is a promising method for the fabrication of planar waveguides for nonlinear optical devices. Two innovative approaches are proposed including a method of controlling the input beam frequency to maximize nonlinear effects in thin films and single crystals, and the alternate approach to the molecular design of organic NLO materials by increasing the transition dipole moment between ground and excited states of the molecule.

  11. Modeling of laser ablation processes for thin film deposition of materials^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboeuf, Jean-Noel G.

    1996-05-01

    The laser ablation technique for pulsed laser deposition of thin films has proven extremely successful at growing high-quality films of very complex and novel materials, such as high temperature superconducting compounds and diamond-like carbon. The physics ingredients involved are quite complicated given that they include laser-solid interactions at the target, plasma formation off the target, vapor/plasma plume transport towards the deposition substrate, and plume-solid interactions at the substrate. A global physics and computational approach to the laser ablation process has been taken which relies on thermal models to describe laser-solid interactions; on kinetic models of plasma formation in the ablated plume; on an assorted variety of hydrodynamic, gas dynamic and collisional models of plume transport in near vacuum and in a higher pressure background gas; and on molecular dynamics methods to treat plume-substrate interactions. We have chosen to concentrate mostly on silicon to validate our models against experiments. The application of our physics results does however go beyond silicon, given the universality of many experimental observations, such as plume splitting for instance, for a wide variety of laser-ablated materials, be it carbon, copper, yttrium or YBCO. ^* In collaboration with K. R. Chen, J. M. Donato, D. B. Geohegan, C. L. Liu, A. A. Puretzky and R. F. Wood, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8071 ^ Work supported by Oak Ridge National Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Fund under U.S Department of Energy contract No. DE-AC05-96OR22464 with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc.

  12. Using iridium films to compensate for piezo-electric materials processing stresses in adjustable x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, A.; Bruni, R.; Cotroneo, V.; Johnson-Wilke, R.; Kester, T.; Reid, P.; Romaine, S.; Tolier-McKinstry, S.; Wilke, R. H. T.

    2015-09-01

    Adjustable X-ray optics represent a potential enabling technology for simultaneously achieving large effective area and high angular resolution for future X-ray Astronomy missions. The adjustable optics employ a bimorph mirror composed of a thin (1.5 μm) film of piezoelectric material deposited on the back of a 0.4 mm thick conical mirror segment. The application of localized electric fields in the piezoelectric material, normal to the mirror surface, result in localized deformations in mirror shape. Thus, mirror fabrication and mounting induced figure errors can be corrected, without the need for a massive reaction structure. With this approach, though, film stresses in the piezoelectric layer, resulting from deposition, crystallization, and differences in coefficient of thermal expansion, can distort the mirror. The large relative thickness of the piezoelectric material compared to the glass means that even 100MPa stresses can result in significant distortions. We have examined compensating for the piezoelectric processing related distortions by the deposition of controlled stress chromium/iridium films on the front surface of the mirror. We describe our experiments with tuning the product of the chromium/iridium film stress and film thickness to balance that resulting from the piezoelectric layer. We also evaluated the repeatability of this deposition process, and the robustness of the iridium coating.

  13. Analysis and assessment of film materials and associated manufacturing processes for a solar sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradbury, E. J.; Jakobsen, R. J.; Sliemers, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Candidate resin manufacturers and film producers were surveyed to determine the availability of key materials and to establish the capabilities of fabricators to prepare ultrathin films of these materials within the capacity/cost/time constraints of the Halley program. Infrared spectra of three candidate samples were obtained by pressing each sample against an internal reflection crystal with the polymer sandwiched between the crystal and the metal backing. The sample size was such that less than one-fourth of the surface of the crystal was covered with the sample. This resulted in weak spectra requiring a six-fold expansion. Internal reflection spectra of the three samples were obtained using both a KRS-5 and a Ge internal reflection crystal. Subtracted infrared spectra of the three samples are presented.

  14. Microwave Magnetic Materials for Radar and Signal Processing Devices - Thin Film and Bulk Oxides and Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-29

    single crystals, and (9) the indicated below: successful PLD growth of low loss zinc lithium ferrite films. Visiting scientists: 2 In the area of...was a standard commercial nickel zinc spinel ferrite (NZF) from II. MATERIALS PREPARATION AND X-RAY Trans-Tech, 1T2- 111. The ferroelectric component...2.95 157 6 expected from dense nickel zinc ferrite materials. The data 100 3175 2.99 168 8 for the 27 and 16 vol % samples, however, showed that any

  15. Advanced Spin Coating Film Transfer and Hot-Pressing Process for Global Planarization with Dielectric-Material-Viscosity Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Norio; Machida, Katsuyuki; Yano, Masaki; Kudou, Kazuhisa; Kyuragi, Hakaru

    2002-04-01

    A novel method of controlling the viscosity of dielectric material was developed for global planarization by the spin coating film transfer and hot-pressing (STP) technique. In the STP technique, a base film is spin-coated with a dielectric, the dielectric is hot-pressed to a wafer in vacuum, and the base film is then peeled off from the dielectric. For global planarization in the above steps, the viscosity of the dielectric material is one of the most important factors. We propose controlling the viscosity by vacuum drying in the process chamber. The relationship between viscosity and vacuum drying was investigated experimentally, and the effect of viscosity on gap-filling was clarified by analytical modeling. We applied the control method to STP experiments using patterned wafers and a low-k organic material, and found that it achieves complete gap-filling and good uniformity in film thickness. STP planarized line-and-spaces as large as 100 μm wide achieving a small variation in planarity of ± 0.43%. With this viscosity-control method, the STP technique is applicable to low-k materials.

  16. Process for forming planarized films

    DOEpatents

    Pang, Stella W.; Horn, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    A planarization process and apparatus which employs plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to form plarnarization films of dielectric or conductive carbonaceous material on step-like substrates.

  17. First principles-based multiparadigm, multiscale strategy for simulating complex materials processes with applications to amorphous SiC films

    SciTech Connect

    Naserifar, Saber; Goddard, William A.; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2015-05-07

    Progress has recently been made in developing reactive force fields to describe chemical reactions in systems too large for quantum mechanical (QM) methods. In particular, ReaxFF, a force field with parameters that are obtained solely from fitting QM reaction data, has been used to predict structures and properties of many materials. Important applications require, however, determination of the final structures produced by such complex processes as chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and formation of ceramic films by pyrolysis of polymers. This requires the force field to properly describe the formation of other products of the process, in addition to yielding the final structure of the material. We describe a strategy for accomplishing this and present an example of its use for forming amorphous SiC films that have a wide variety of applications. Extensive reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to simulate the pyrolysis of hydridopolycarbosilane. The reaction products all agree with the experimental data. After removing the reaction products, the system is cooled down to room temperature at which it produces amorphous SiC film, for which the computed radial distribution function, x-ray diffraction pattern, and the equation of state describing the three main SiC polytypes agree with the data and with the QM calculations. Extensive MD simulations have also been carried out to compute other structural properties, as well the effective diffusivities of light gases in the amorphous SiC film.

  18. First principles-based multiparadigm, multiscale strategy for simulating complex materials processes with applications to amorphous SiC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naserifar, Saber; Goddard, William A.; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Progress has recently been made in developing reactive force fields to describe chemical reactions in systems too large for quantum mechanical (QM) methods. In particular, ReaxFF, a force field with parameters that are obtained solely from fitting QM reaction data, has been used to predict structures and properties of many materials. Important applications require, however, determination of the final structures produced by such complex processes as chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and formation of ceramic films by pyrolysis of polymers. This requires the force field to properly describe the formation of other products of the process, in addition to yielding the final structure of the material. We describe a strategy for accomplishing this and present an example of its use for forming amorphous SiC films that have a wide variety of applications. Extensive reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to simulate the pyrolysis of hydridopolycarbosilane. The reaction products all agree with the experimental data. After removing the reaction products, the system is cooled down to room temperature at which it produces amorphous SiC film, for which the computed radial distribution function, x-ray diffraction pattern, and the equation of state describing the three main SiC polytypes agree with the data and with the QM calculations. Extensive MD simulations have also been carried out to compute other structural properties, as well the effective diffusivities of light gases in the amorphous SiC film.

  19. MATERIAL AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT LEADING TO ECONOMICAL HIGH-PERFORMANCE THIN-FILM SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Guan; Nguyen Minh

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes the technical progress from April to September 2003 for the program, Material and Process Development Leading to Economical High-Performance Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, contract number DE-AC26-00NT40711. Characteristics of doped lanthanum gallate (LSGMF) powder suitable for thin electrolyte fabrication have been defined. Bilayers with thin LSGMF electrolyte supported on an anode were fabricated and the fabrication process was improved. Preliminary performance was characterized. High performance cathode material Sr{sub 0.5}Sm{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3} has been down-selected and is being optimized by modifying materials characteristics and processing parameters. The selected cathode exhibited excellent performance with cathode polarization of {approx}0.23 ohm-cm{sup 2} at 600 C.

  20. Atomic layer epitaxy group IV materials: Surface processes, thin films, devices and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.; Bedair, Salah; El-Masry, Nadia; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    1993-06-01

    The maximum temperature at which self-terminating monolayers of Si can be formed on Si(100) from Si2H6 has been determined to be 570 deg C. As such, the chemical reactivity of C2H4 has been determined to be insufficient at this temperature, and acetylene has been selected as the successor C precursor due to its superior reactivity and chemisorption properties. A cryogenic purifier for removing acetone has been commissioned. Trenched Si(100) wafers are also being made to assess the ALE process for sidewall deposition uniformity and future bipolar devices. Nonstoichiometric, Si-rich SiC has been produced with an associated decrease in the band gap. An AES/XPS UHV analytical system and associated ALE deposition system has been commissioned and integrated into a much larger surface science system. These dual systems will allow a thorough study and characterization of both the initial nucleation of SiC and the overall ALE growth process of SiC. Tetramethylsilane and hexamethyldisilane have been deposited onto Si substrates in a hot filament CVD chamber to investigate their ability to promote ALE of diamond under DC biasing and a variety of system parameters. An electron gun and heating stage has been added to the growth chamber to enable AES and substrate heating. Good quality diamond films have been nucleated on deposited interlayers of both precursor compounds. The films have been examined by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. Good quality epitaxial films of CeO2 have been grown on Si(111) using laser ablation. Atomically clean substrates and slow growth rates were determined necessary for epitaxy.

  1. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  2. Processing Film, Processing Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkowski, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents are at a ripe age to make meaning and think abstractly (Kerlavage, 1998); yet, they are not "born knowing how to get ideas into materials, or how materials can be manipulated to shape ideas and meaning" (Burton, 2012, p. 14). Adolescents need guidance in understanding abstract concepts, and art teachers play an important role…

  3. Processing Film, Processing Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkowski, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents are at a ripe age to make meaning and think abstractly (Kerlavage, 1998); yet, they are not "born knowing how to get ideas into materials, or how materials can be manipulated to shape ideas and meaning" (Burton, 2012, p. 14). Adolescents need guidance in understanding abstract concepts, and art teachers play an important role…

  4. Atomic layer epitaxy of group 4 materials: Surface processes, thin films, devices and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.; Bedair, Salah; El-Masry, Nadina; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    1993-12-01

    Atomic layer epitaxy of monocrystalline Beta-SiC on Si(100) and alpha (6H)-SiC(0001) substrates has been accomplished at 850 C by alternating the supplies of Si2H6, C2H4, and atomic hydrogen without the use of a carbonizing step. Conformal deposition of SiC has been demonstrated within trenches etched into Si(100) wafers. P-type films have also been achieved using Al as a dopant. Devices including HBT's with Beta-SiC emitters have been designed. Hydrogen plasma cleaning of SiC surfaces has been studied. XPS has shown that this process effectively removes C-O, C-F and C-H bonding at the surface. Temperature programmed desorption has been used to look at the amount of subsurface hydrogen generated during plasma cleaning. The diamond precursors of chlorinated methylsilanes and the substrate of Si(100) were subjected to bias enhanced high-frequency CVD. No difference in diamond nucleation density between the precursors was observed. An interface structure of single crystal CeO2/Si(111) grown by laser ablation has been investigated. An interfacial reaction occurred between these phases during deposition which resulted in the formation of an oxygen deficient amorphous (a) CeOx layer and an SiO2 layer. Post annealing in O2 caused the disappearance of the a-CeOx and the regrowth of crystalline CeO2.

  5. MATERIAL AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT LEADING TO ECONOMICAL HIGH-PERFORMANCE THIN-FILM SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Guan; Nguyen Minh

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of the work conducted under the program: ''Material and Process Development Leading to Economical High-Performance Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells'' under contract number DE-AC26-00NT40711. The program goal is to advance materials and processes that can be used to produce economical, high-performance solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) capable of achieving extraordinary high power densities at reduced temperatures. Under this program, anode-supported thin electrolyte based on lanthanum gallate (LSMGF) has been developed using tape-calendering process. The fabrication parameters such as raw materials characteristics, tape formulations and sintering conditions have been evaluated. Dense anode supported LSGMF electrolytes with thickness range of 10-50 micron have been fabricated. High performance cathode based on Sr{sub 0.5}Sm{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3} (SSC) has been developed. Polarization of {approx}0.23 ohm-cm{sup 2} has been achieved at 600 C with Sr{sub 0.5}Sm{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3}cathode. The high-performance SSC cathode and thin gallate electrolyte have been integrated into single cells and cell performance has been characterized. Tested cells to date generally showed low performance because of low cell OCVs and material interactions between NiO in the anode and lanthanum gallate electrolyte.

  6. The Use of Films as Suitable Packaging Materials for Minimally Processed Foods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    commodities, it is necessary to tailor the permeability of the film to package design (e.g., pillow pack or rigid tray overwrap) and to the rate of tissue...containers where problems ranging from staling to contamination could occur if the packaging does not reseal properly. Devices such as resealable ...cauliflower, leeks, etc.) However, using an overwrapped rigid PVC tray with a micro-perforated PVC film tends to preserve leeks longer (Nash, 1988

  7. Switching and memory characteristics of thin films of an ambipolar organic compound: effects of device processing and electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung-Won; Pearson, Christopher; Moon, Tae Jung; Fisher, Alison L.; Petty, Michael C.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the effects of device processing conditions, and of changing the electrode materials, on the switching and negative differential resistance (NDR) behaviour of metal/organic thin film/metal structures. The organic material was an ambipolar molecule containing both electron transporting (oxadiazole) and hole transporting (carbazole) chemical groups. Switching and NDR effects are observed for device architectures with both electrodes consisting of aluminium; optimized switching behaviour is achieved for structures incorporating gold nanoparticles. If one of the Al electrodes is replaced by a higher work function metal or coated with an electron-blocking layer, switching and NDR are no longer observed. The results are consistent with a model based on the creation and destruction of Al filaments within the thin organic layer.

  8. Thermally processed keratin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Justin; Schmidt, Walter

    2004-03-01

    Keratin obtained from poultry feathers is blended with -OH containing second phases. Films are prepared by pressing the blended keratin at temperatures concurrent with typical polymer processing temperatures. The films are completely cohesive as opposed to partially cohesive if pressed under the same conditions without blending. The films are "tough" and the mechanical properties show similarities to the properties of commercially available commodity thermoplastics. The keratin films are produced in a few minutes without reducing or oxidizing agents. The mobility of the keratin chains during blending is shown to relate to the serine (S), threonine (T), and tyrosine (Y) contents in the amino acid sequence relative to cystine (C).

  9. MATERIAL AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT LEADING TO ECONOMICAL HIGH-PERFORMANCE THIN-FILM SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Guan; Atul Verma; Nguyen Minh

    2003-04-01

    This document summarizes the technical progress from September 2002 to March 2003 for the program, Material and Process Development Leading to Economical High-Performance Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, contract number DE-AC26-00NT40711. The causes have been identified for the unstable open circuit voltage (OCV) and low performance exhibited by the anode-supported lanthanum gallate based cells from the earlier development. Promising results have been obtained in the area of synthesis of electrolyte and cathode powders, which showed excellent sintering and densification at low temperatures. The fabrication of cells using tapecalendering process for anode-supported thin lanthanum gallate electrolyte cells and their performance optimization is in progress.

  10. Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and their Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    high resolution transmission electron microscopy ( HRTEM ) image of a sample where the MSiC film was deposited on a Si(100) substrate at 925*C. Chiu and...become the first step of the optimal 13-SiC/Si(100) deposition recipe. Figures 4 and 5 are HRTEM images of j3-SiC films deposited on Si(100) and cz(6H...Figure 4 shows two SEMI micrographs from growth on the nickel. As can be seen, the majority of the growth on the nickel substrate had DLC growth as

  11. Superconducting materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, John S.; Karikari, Emmanuel K.; Hiamang, S. O.; Danjaji, M.; Bassey, Affiong; Morgan, Andre

    1995-08-01

    The effects of materials processing on the properties and behavior of high temperature yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconductors were investigated. Electrical, magnetic, and structural characteristics of thin films (300 nm) YBA2CU3O(delta) structures grown by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates were used to evaluate processing. Pole projection and thin film diffraction measurements were used to establish grain orientation and verify structural integrity of the samples. Susceptibility magnetization, and transport measurements were used to evaluate the magnetic and electrical transport properties of the samples. Our results verified that an unfortunate consequence of processing is inherent changes to the internal structure of the material. This effect translates into modifications in the properties of the materials, and undesired feature that makes it very difficult to consistently predict material behavior. The results show that processing evaluation must incorporate a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the materials. Future studies will emphasize microstructural characteristics of the materials, in particular, those microscopic properties that map macroscopic behavior.

  12. Superconducting materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, John S.; Karikari, Emmanuel K.; Hiamang, S. O.; Danjaji, M.; Bassey, Affiong; Morgan, Andre

    1995-01-01

    The effects of materials processing on the properties and behavior of high temperature yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconductors were investigated. Electrical, magnetic, and structural characteristics of thin films (300 nm) YBA2CU3O(delta) structures grown by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates were used to evaluate processing. Pole projection and thin film diffraction measurements were used to establish grain orientation and verify structural integrity of the samples. Susceptibility magnetization, and transport measurements were used to evaluate the magnetic and electrical transport properties of the samples. Our results verified that an unfortunate consequence of processing is inherent changes to the internal structure of the material. This effect translates into modifications in the properties of the materials, and undesired feature that makes it very difficult to consistently predict material behavior. The results show that processing evaluation must incorporate a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the materials. Future studies will emphasize microstructural characteristics of the materials, in particular, those microscopic properties that map macroscopic behavior.

  13. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  14. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  15. Atomic Layer Epitaxy Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and their Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Patent 4,058,430 (1977). 2. M . Ahonen, M . Pessa and T. Suntola, Thin Solid Films, 65, 301 (1980). 3. M . Pessa, R. Makela, and T. Suntola, Appl. Phys...1615 (1986). 6. T. Yao, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 25, L544 (1986). 7. T. Yao and T. Takeda, J. Cryst. Growth, 81, 43 (1987). 8. M . Pessa, P. Huttunen and M.A...Herman, J. Appl. Phys., 54, 6047 (1983). 9. C.H.L. Goodman and M.V. Pessa, J. Appl. Phys., 60, R65 (1986). 10. M.A. Herman, M . Valli and M . Pessa, J

  16. Atomic Layer Epitaxy Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and Their Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Discussion 26 m . E. Conclusions 27 DtstrtbutIeu/ F. Future Research Plans/Goals 27. G. References 27 -v’--+tity " od D13t Spgeeial ’o~p WW ++Mo I...figures, tables and references. References 1. T. Suntola and J. Antson, U.S. Patent 4,058,430 (1977). 2. M . Ahonen, M . Pessa and T. Suntola, Thin Solid...Films, 65, 301 (1980). 3. M . Pessa, R. Makela, and T. Suntola, Appl. Phys. Lett., 38, 131 (1981). 4. T. Yao and T. Takeda, Appl. Phys. Lea., 48, 160 (1986

  17. Space processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, N.

    1996-12-31

    Materials processing in space derives unique benefits from reduced levels of gravity and hydrostatic pressure. The attenuation of buoyancy-driven convection and sedimentation have led to the realization of close-to-diffusion-limited conditions for the growth of semiconductors, metals/alloys, proteins, etc., in novel crystal growth configurations. One of the aims of the conference was to bring together scientists, experiment designers/engineers, and educators in a common forum to highlight different aspects of low-gravity research. Two spotlight topics were picked for the conference: materials for detectors and electronics, and thin film technology--theory and applications. In addition, the conference focused on space hardware, low-gravity experiment design, and educational outreach programs. Presentations in materials processing included low-gravity and terrestrial experiments on the growth of mercury cadmium telluride, crystal characterization techniques, and modeling efforts. The growth of heavy metal fluoride glasses and metal alloys in low gravity was also featured in presentations. The session on thin film technology was mainly comprised of papers reporting on investigations in nonlinear optics. The growth, response, and characterization of organic and polymeric thin film materials were discussed. Microgravity experiments ranging from the diverse areas of diffusion studies and thermo-solutal convection to optical pyrometry and the behavior of granular materials in low gravity, were presented in a separate session devoted to space experiment design and implementation. Educational outreach programs for student involvement in ground-based and low-gravity research for materials processing and device fabrication were also featured in a separate conference session. Existing hardware for experiments in low gravity and future hardware concepts for the International Space Station and beyond were presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers.

  18. Atomic layer epitaxy of group 4 materials: Surface processes, thin films, devices and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.

    1994-06-01

    The viability of Si2Cl6, C2H2 and C2H4 as precursors for chemically self-limiting ALE of SiC has been investigated via XPS and LEED. Si2Cl6 readily adsorbs in a self-limiting manner on a Si(100) surface; however, neither hydrocarbon will adsorb or react with a Cl-terminated Si surface to 475 deg C. Conversely, partial chlorination of Si(100) saturated with C2H2 and C2H4 does occur and implies that Si2Cl6 will adsorb/react with a hydrocarbon terminated surface. Layer-by-layer growth of Beta-SiC on Si(100) or 6H-SiC has been achieved with a carrier concentration of approx. 10(exp 17)/cu cm. P-type doping with Al has allowed the achievement of hole concentrations of 4 x 10(exp 18) - 2 10(exp 20)/cu cm. Efforts to produce an HBT using Beta-SiC emitters is described. Ni3Si has been employed for the deposition of diamond because of the close lattice match. Under the same growth conditions, diamond particles were obtained on the Ni3Si, but only diamond-like C and graphite on pure Ni substrates. Evidence of oriented particles was observed. REED and TEM of cerium oxide films grown on Si(111) substrates has revealed the formation of a dual amorphous layer of CeOx and SiO2 at the Si interface followed by a layer of CeO2. Post annealing in dry oxygen caused the CeOx layer to disappear and the SiO2 layer to thicken. D(sub it) = 6 x 10(exp 11)/sq cm and Q sub f = 5 x 10(exp 11)/sq cm. The structure exhibits a high capacitance due to the large dielectric constant of CeO2 and has electrical properties comparable with those of other reported gate insulators on Si.

  19. Nanoscaled tin dioxide films processed from organotin-based hybrid materials: an organometallic route toward metal oxide gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Laetitia; Babot, Odile; Saadaoui, Hassan; Fuess, Hartmut; Brötz, Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander; Arveux, Emmanuel; Klein, Andreas; Toupance, Thierry

    2012-10-01

    Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO2) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO2 films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H2 and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible responses. The sensing properties were discussed in regard to the crystallinity and porosity of the sensing body that can be tuned by the nature of the precursor employed. Organometallic chemistry combined with the sol-gel process therefore offers new possibilities toward metal oxide nanostructures for the reproducible and sensitive detection of combustible and toxic gases.Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO2) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO2 films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H2 and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible

  20. Nanoscaled tin dioxide films processed from organotin-based hybrid materials: an organometallic route toward metal oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Renard, Laetitia; Babot, Odile; Saadaoui, Hassan; Fuess, Hartmut; Brötz, Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander; Arveux, Emmanuel; Klein, Andreas; Toupance, Thierry

    2012-11-07

    Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO(2)) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO(2) films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H(2) and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible responses. The sensing properties were discussed in regard to the crystallinity and porosity of the sensing body that can be tuned by the nature of the precursor employed. Organometallic chemistry combined with the sol-gel process therefore offers new possibilities toward metal oxide nanostructures for the reproducible and sensitive detection of combustible and toxic gases.

  1. Film stacking architecture for immersion lithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Miyagi, Tadashi; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Tamada, Osamu; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary due to film peeling. However, the architecture will restrict lithographic area within a wafer due to top side EBR accuracy In this paper, we report an effective film stacking architecture that also allows maximum lithographic area. This study used a new bevel rinse system on RF3 for all materials to make suitable film stacking on the top side bevel. This evaluation showed that the new bevel rinse system allows the maximum lithographic area and a clean wafer edge. Patterning defects were improved with suitable film stacking.

  2. Optical Properties Of Polymeric Films Of Bacteriorhodopsin And Its Functional Variants: New Materials For Optical Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Norbert; Braeuchle, Christoph R.; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    1990-01-01

    Purple membrane (PM) from Halobacterium halobium consists of a two-dimensional crystal of the photochromic retinal protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Purple membrane embedded in inert polymer matrices can be used as reversible recording medium in holography. The thermal and photochemical stability (at least 100.000 recording cycles at room temperature), the high quantum yield (70%), the high resolution (~ 5000 lines/mm) and the wide spectral range (400-680 nm) of these films are promising features for any possible technical application. The variability of this material was restricted to chemical modifications of the chromophoric group for a long time. new class of BR based recording media is introduced by the availability of variants of BR with a modified amino acid sequence. After generation of a mutant strain PM variants can be easily produced by the same cultivation and purification procedures as the PM of the wildtype and therefore are available in virtually unlimited amounts, too. As an example the properties of PM-films containing the variant BR-326, which differs from the wildtype by a single amino acid, are reported here. The improved diffraction efficiency (~ 2-fold) and increased sensitivity (~ 50%) of films containing BR-326 give an impression of the new possibilities for optimizing reversible recording media by biochemical and gentechnological methods as an alternative or an addition to conventional chemical methods.

  3. Microscale damping using thin film active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrigan, Catherine A.; Ho, Ken K.; Mohanchandra, K. P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2007-04-01

    This paper focuses on understanding and developing a new approach to dampen MEMS structures using both experiments and analytical techniques. Thin film Nitinol and thin film Terfenol-D are evaluated as a damping solution to the micro scale damping problem. Stress induced twin boundary motion in Nitinol is used to passively dampen potentially damaging vibrations. Magnetic domain wall motion is used to passively dampen vibration in Terfenol-D. The thin films of Nitinol, Nitinol/Silicon laminates and Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminates have been produced using a sputter deposition process and damping properties have been evaluated. Dynamic testing shows substantial damping (tan δ) measurable in each case. Nitinol film samples were tested in the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to determine phase transformation temperatures. The twin boundary mechanism by which energy absorption occurs is present at all points below the Austenite start temperature (approximately 69°C in our film) and therefore allows damping at cold temperatures where traditional materials fail. Thin film in the NiTi/Si laminate was found to produce substantially higher damping (tan δ = 0.28) due to the change in loading condition. The NiTi/Si laminate sample was tested in bending allowing the twin boundaries to be reset by cyclic tensile and compressive loads. The thin film Terfenol-D in the Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminate was shown to produce large damping (tan δ = 0.2). In addition to fabricating and testing, an analytical model of a heterogeneous layered thin film damping material was developed and compared to experimental work.

  4. Low dielectric loss and enhanced tunability of Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 based thin films via material compositional design and optimized film processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. W.; Nothwang, W. D.; Hubbard, C.; Ngo, E.; Ervin, M.

    2003-06-01

    Low dielectric loss in conjunction with high tunability are simultaneous requirements for tunable device applications which have proved problematic to achieve. In this work, material compositional design and optimized film processing methods were employed to simultaneously lower the dielectric loss and enhance the dielectric tunability of Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 (BST) based thin films without compromising the device impedance matching (ɛr<500) and control voltage (<10 V) requirements. The films compositional design was achieved by Mg doping BST from 3 to 10 mol %. The Mg doped thin films were fabricated via the metalorganic solution deposition technique using carboxylate-alkoxide precursors and postdeposition annealing in an oxygen ambience at 750 °C for 60 min. The films dielectric loss at these doping levels was identical, tan δ˜0.007. In contrast, the films permittivity (339-220), leakage current density (2.55×10-8-2.43×10-9 A/cm2), tunability (21.3%-5.7%), and grain size (75.2-61.55 nm) were observed to decrease with increasing Mg concentration levels from 3 to 10 mol %, respectively. Device quality values of tunability, 40% and 32%, for the 3 and 7 mol % doped BST films, respectively, were achieved by elevating the applied bias from 237 to 474 kV/cm. This device quality tuning is compatible with voltage requirements of current semiconductor based systems. Our results suggest that the low level acceptor doping from 3 to 7 mol %, optimized precursor solution concentration (0.43 M), and oxygenated postdeposition thermal processing were found to work in concert to lower dielectric loss, limit defect density concentration, optimize film microstructure, and eliminate undesirable film/electrode interfacial phases. As a result, high quality BST thin films, with their resultant high breakdown fields, were realized. It is the excellent film quality (i.e., optimized composition and microstructure), which allowed the enhanced tunability at elevated dc bias to be achieved

  5. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Hirth, John P.

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  6. Telerobotic electronic materials processing experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, Stanford

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Commercial Programs (OCP), working in conjunction with NASA engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center, is supporting research efforts in robot technology and microelectronics materials processing that will provide many spinoffs for science and industry. The Telerobotic Materials Processing Experiment (TRMPX) is a Shuttle-launched materials processing test payload using a Get Away Special can. The objectives of the project are to define, develop, and demonstrate an automated materials processing capability under realistic flight conditions. TRMPX will provide the capability to test the production processes that are dependent on microgravity. The processes proposed for testing include the annealing of amorphous silicon to increase grain size for more efficient solar cells, thin film deposition to demonstrate the potential of fabricating solar cells in orbit, and the annealing of radiation damaged solar cells.

  7. Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heberlein, Joachim, V.R.; Pfender, Emil; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2005-02-28

    Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials The project had the overall objective of improving our understanding of the influences of process parameters on the properties of advanced superhard materials. The focus was on high rate deposition processes using thermal plasmas and atmospheric pressure glow discharges, and the emphasis on superhard materials was chosen because of the potential impact of such materials on industrial energy use and on the environment. In addition, the development of suitable diagnostic techniques was pursued. The project was divided into four tasks: (1) Deposition of superhard boron containing films using a supersonic plasma jet reactor (SPJR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (2) Deposition of superhard nanocomposite films in the silicon-nitrogen-carbon system using the triple torch plasma reactor (TTPR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (3) Deposition of films consisting of carbon nanotubes using an atmospheric pressure glow discharge reactor. (4) Adapting the Thomson scattering method for characterization of atmospheric pressure non-uniform plasmas with steep spatial gradients and temporal fluctuations. This report summarizes the results.

  8. Plasma Processing of Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-22

    inorganic films is possible. Some applications are photovoltaics , mic’roelectronics, surface protection, polymer ,membrane formation, and textiles... photovoltaics for solar energy conversion. (This material has immense potential for the manufacture of inexpensive photovoltaic devices--e.g., solar...8217"-.’ Mexico Barium 41 Peru, Ireland, Mexico, • Morocco Titanium (ilmenite) 23 Australia, Canada, South Africa - Mercury 28 Spain, Algeria , Italy

  9. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility and possible advantages of processing materials in a nongravitational field are considered. Areas of investigation include biomedical applications, the processing of inorganic materials, and flight programs and funding.

  10. Materials processing in space

    SciTech Connect

    Oran, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    A brief overview of the current Materials Processing in Space Program is given, including a tentative schedule of flight experiments. Some recent results of processing materials (e.g., polymers and eutectic materials) in a microgravity environment are given, along with a discussion on additional proposed flight experiments. Ground-based results and the rationale for flight experimentation will be presented for other materials processes, including crystal growth.

  11. Material properties of novel polymeric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gene

    This dissertation will study the material properties of two types of novel polymer films (polyelectrolyte multilayer films and photolithographic polymer films). The formation of polylelectrolyte multilayer films onto functionalized aluminum oxide surfaces and functionalized poly(ethylene terephthaltate) (PET) were studied. Functionalization of the aluminum oxide surfaces was achieved via silane coupling. Functionalization of PET surfaces was achieved via hydrolysis and amidation. Surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic contact angle measurements were used to monitor the polyelectrolyte multilayer formation. Mechanical properties of the aluminum oxide supported polyelectrolyte multilayer films were tested using a simplified peel test. XPS was used to analyze the surfaces before and after peel. Single lap shear joint specimens were constructed to test the adhesive shear strength of the PET-supported polyelectrolyte multilayer film samples with the aid of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. The adhesive shear strength and its relation with the type of functionalization, number of polyelectrolyte layers, and the effect of polyelectrolyte conformation using added salt were explored. Also, characterization on the single lap joints after adhesive failure was carried out to determine the locus of failure within the multilayers by using XPS and SEM. Two types of photolithographic polymers were formulated and tested. These two polymers (photocrosslinkable polyacrylate (PUA), and a photocrosslinkable polyimide (HRP)) were used to investigate factors that would affect the structural integrity of these particular polymers under environmental variables such as processing (time, UV cure, pressure, and temperature) and ink exposure. Thermomechanical characterization was carried out to see the behavior of these two polymers under these environmental variables. Microscopic techniques were employed to study the morphological behavior of

  12. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1992-10-01

    Results of Phase II of a research program on polycrystalline thin film heterojunction solar cells are presented. Relations between processing, materials properties and device performance were studied. The analysis of these solar cells explains how minority carrier recombination at the interface and at grain boundaries can be reduced by doping of windows and absorber layers, such as in high efficiency CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} based solar cells. The additional geometric dimension introduced by the polycrystallinity must be taken into consideration. The solar cells are limited by the diode current, caused by recombination in the space charge region. J-V characteristics of CuInSe{sub 2}/(CdZn)S cells were analyzed. Current-voltage and spectral response measurements were also made on high efficiency CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells prepared by vacuum evaporation. Cu-In bilayers were reacted with Se and H{sub 2}Se gas to form CuInSe{sub 2} films; the reaction pathways and the precursor were studied. Several approaches to fabrication of these thin film solar cells in a superstrate configuration were explored. A self-consistent picture of the effects of processing on the evolution of CdTe cells was developed.

  13. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  14. Automated Composites Processing Technology: Film Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulcher, A. Bruce

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a technology that combines a film/adhesive laydown module with fiber placement technology to enable the processing of composite prepreg tow/tape and films, foils or adhesives on the same placement machine. The development of this technology grew out of NASA's need for lightweight, permeation-resistant cryogenic propellant tanks. Autoclave processing of high performance composites results in thermally-induced stresses due to differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion of the fiber and matrix resin components. These stresses, together with the reduction in temperature due to cryogen storage, tend to initiate microcracking within the composite tank wall. One way in which to mitigate this problem is to introduce a thin, crack-resistant polymer film or foil into the tank wall. Investigation into methods to automate the processing of thin film or foil materials into composites led to the development of this technology. The concept employs an automated film supply and feed module that may be designed to fit existing fiber placement machines, or may be designed as integral equipment to new machines. This patent-pending technology can be designed such that both film and foil materials may be processed simultaneously, leading to a decrease in part build cycle time. The module may be designed having a compaction device independent of the host machine, or may utilize the host machine's compactor. The film module functions are controlled by a dedicated system independent of the fiber placement machine controls. The film, foil, or adhesive is processed via pre-existing placement machine run programs, further reducing operational expense.

  15. Effect of Process Temperature and Reaction Cycle Number on Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 Thin Films Using TiCl4 and H2O Precursors: Correlation Between Material Properties and Process Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappim, W.; Testoni, G. E.; de Lima, J. S. B.; Medeiros, H. S.; Pessoa, Rodrigo Sávio; Grigorov, K. G.; Vieira, L.; Maciel, H. S.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of process temperature and reaction cycle number on atomic layer-deposited TiO2 thin films onto Si(100) using TiCl4 and H2O precursors was investigated in order to discuss the correlation between the growth per cycle (GPC), film structure (crystallinity), and surface roughness as well as the dependence of some of these properties with gas phase environment such as HCl by-product. In this work, these correlations were studied for two conditions: (i) process temperatures in the range of 100-500 °C during 1000 reaction cycles and (ii) number of cycles in the range of 100-2000 for a fixed temperature of 250 °C. To investigate the material properties, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used. Mass spectrometry technique was used to investigate the time evolution of gas phase species HCl and H2O during ALD process. Results indicate that the GPC does not correlate well with film crystallinity and surface roughness for the evaluated process parameters. Basically, the film crystallinity relies solely on grain growth kinetics of the material. This occurs due to higher HCl by-product content during each purge step. Furthermore, for films deposited at variable cycle number, the evolution of film thickness and elemental composition is altered from an initial amorphous structure to a near stoichiometric TiO2-x and, subsequently, becomes fully stoichiometric TiO2 at 400 cycles or above. At this cycle value, the GIXRD spectrum indicates the formation of (101) anatase orientation.

  16. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, R. D.; Criswell, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Processing-refining of raw materials from extraterrestrial sources is detailed for a space materials handling facility. The discussion is constrained to those steps necessary to separate desired components from raw or altered input ores, semi-purified feedstocks, or process scrap and convert the material into elements, alloys, and consumables. The materials are regarded as originating from dead satellites and boosters, lunar materials, and asteroids. Strong attention will be given to recycling reagent substances to avoid the necessity of transporting replacements. It is assumed that since no aqueous processes exist on the moon, the distribution of minerals will be homogeneous. The processing-refining scenario will include hydrochemical, pyrochemical, electrochemical, and physical techniques selected for the output mass rate/unit plant mass ratio. Flow charts of the various materials processing operations which could be performed with lunar materials are provided, noting the necessity of delivering several alloying elements from the earth due to scarcities on the moon.

  17. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels, 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.

  18. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels,more » 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.« less

  19. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels, 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.

  20. New materials for thick-film electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1990-08-01

    Certain ceramic compounds such as rare-earth perovskites and transition-metal diborides that exhibit metallic conductivity are readily available or can be easily synthesized. Some are stable in air firing temperatures typical of hybrid-circuit processing. The work described is part of an exploratory program to determine whether these materials can be used as low-cost alternatives to precious metals for thick-film conductor and low-resistor inks or as substitutes for copper in nitrogen-fireable compositions. 8 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Preface: Thin films of molecular organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraxedas, J.

    2008-03-01

    /substrate systems (also called heterostructures) based on the physical properties of the bulk materials, usually in the form of single crystals. However, in recent years the thin films community has been continually growing, helping the field to mature. In my opinion two main aspects have advanced the thin molecular films field. The first is the different applications with optical and electrical devices such as OFETs (organic field-effect transistors) and OLEDs (organic light emitting diodes), applications that could not have been achieved with single crystals because of limited size, difficult processability and mechanical fragility. The second is the involvement of the surface science community with their overwhelming arsenal of experimental techniques. From the synthesis point of view, the preparation of thin films is being regarded as a complementary synthesis route. The different externally accessible variables involved in the preparation process (temperature, pressure, molecular flux, distance, time, concentration, solvent, substrate, etc.), which define the so-called parameter hyperspace, can be so diverse when comparing competing synthesis routes (e.g. solution versus vapour growth) that we should not be surprised if different crystallographic phases with different morphologies are obtained, even if metastable. We should not forget here that the amazingly large number of available molecules is due to the longstanding and innovative work of synthesis chemists, a task that has not been sufficiently recognized (laymen in the domain of synthesis of organic molecules tend to believe that almost any molecule can be synthesized). In summary, one of the goals of this issue is to highlight the emerging importance of the field of thin molecular organic films by giving selected examples. It is clear that some important examples are missing, which are due in part to space limitation and to the understandable reluctance of highly-ranked specialists to contribute because of work overload

  2. Fixed-film biological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, J.

    1982-07-01

    During the 1970's, interest in fixed-film biological (FFB) processes for wastewater treatment has increased markedly. One reason for this is that these systems have a potential for considerable energy savings, as compared to conventional suspended-growth or activated-sludge systems, and certain FFB processes may eventually become energy producers. In this article, FFB processes are reviewed. Aerobic and anaerobic FFB systems are discussed and compared, along with a discussion of the toxic substances produced by FFB processes.

  3. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Paul S.; Stuart, Brent C.; Komashko, Aleksey M.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Perry, Michael D.

    2000-05-01

    The use of femtosecond lasers allows materials processing of practically any material with extremely high precision and minimal collateral damage. Advantages over conventional laser machining (using pulses longer than a few tens of picoseconds) are realized by depositing the laser energy into the electrons of the material on a time scale short compared to the transfer time of this energy to the bulk of the material, resulting in increased ablation efficiency and negligible shock or thermal stress. The improvement in the morphology by using femtosecond pulses rather than nanosecond pulses has been studied in numerous materials from biological materials to dielectrics to metals. During the drilling process, we have observed the onset of small channels which drill faster than the surrounding material.

  4. Femtosecond Laser Materials Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P.S.; Stuart, B.C.; Komashko, A.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    2000-03-06

    The use of femtosecond lasers allows materials processing of practically any material with extremely high precision and minimal collateral damage. Advantages over conventional laser machining (using pulses longer than a few tens of picoseconds) are realized by depositing the laser energy into the electrons of the material on a time scale short compared to the transfer time of this energy to the bulk of the material, resulting in increased ablation efficiency and negligible shock or thermal stress. The improvement in the morphology by using femtosecond pulses rather than nanosecond pulses has been studied in numerous materials from biologic materials to dielectrics to metals. During the drilling process, we have observed the onset of small channels which drill faster than the surrounding material.

  5. Thin film dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Gibbons, Brady J.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Park, Bae Ho

    2002-01-01

    A dielectric composite material comprising at least two crystal phases of different components with TiO.sub.2 as a first component and a material selected from the group consisting of Ba.sub.1-x Sr.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.3 to 0.7, Pb.sub.1-x Ca.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.4 to 0.7, Sr.sub.1-x Pb.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, Ba.sub.1-x Cd.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.02 to 0.1, BaTi.sub.1-x Zr.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Sn.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.15 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Hf.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.24 to 0.3, Pb.sub.1-1.3x La.sub.x TiO.sub.3+0.2x where x is from 0.23 to 0.3, (BaTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFeo.sub.0.5 Nb.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.75 to 0.9, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.- (PbCo.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.1 to 0.45, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbMg.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, and (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFe.sub.0.5 Ta.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0 to 0.2, as the second component is described. The dielectric composite material can be formed as a thin film upon suitable substrates.

  6. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B. C., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    Femtosecond lasers enable materials processing of most any material with extremely high precision and negligible shock or thermal loading to the surrounding area Applications ranging from drilling teeth to cutting explosives to making high-aspect ratio cuts in metals with no heat-affected zone are made possible by this technology For material removal at reasonable rates, we developed a fully computer-controlled 15-Watt average power, 100-fs laser machining system.

  7. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B

    1998-08-05

    Femtosecond lasers enable materials processing of most any material with extremely high precision and negligible shock or thermal loading to the surrounding area. Applications ranging from drilling teeth to cutting explosives to precision cuts in composites are possible by using this technology. For material removal at reasonable rates, we have developed a fully computer-controlled 15-Watt average power, 100-fs laser machining system.

  8. Materials Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A report describes investigations of materials processing in low-gravity environment. Ultimately, research could lead to new commercially-applicable materials and processes and to an understanding of constraints imposed by gravity. NASA-supported work is carried out in 46 academic, industrial, and Government laboratories, and covers a number of areas. An overview is given of objective and current state of development for over 100 tasks.

  9. Extraterrestrial materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    The first year results of a multi-year study of processing extraterrestrial materials for use in space are summarized. Theoretically, there are potential major advantages to be derived from the use of such materials for future space endeavors. The types of known or postulated starting raw materials are described including silicate-rich mixed oxides on the Moon, some asteroids and Mars; free metals in some asteroids and in small quantities in the lunar soil; and probably volatiles like water and CO2 on Mars and some asteroids. Candidate processes for space materials are likely to be significantly different from their terrestrial counterparts largely because of: absence of atmosphere; lack of of readily available working fluids; low- or micro-gravity; no carbon-based fuels; readily available solar energy; and severe constraints on manned intervention. The extraction of metals and oxygen from lunar material by magma electrolysis or by vapor/ion phase separation appears practical.

  10. Steps Towards Industrialization of Cu-III-VI2Thin-Film Solar Cells:Linking Materials/Device Designs to Process Design For Non-stoichiometric Photovoltaic Materials.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Huey-Liang; Chang, Hsueh-Hsin; Sharma, Poonam; Letha, Arya Jagadhamma; Shao, Lexi; Zhang, Yafei; Tseng, Bae-Heng

    2016-10-01

    The concept of in-line sputtering and selenization become industrial standard for Cu-III-VI2 solar cell fabrication, but still it's very difficult to control and predict the optical and electrical parameters, which are closely related to the chemical composition distribution of the thin film. The present review article addresses onto the material design, device design and process design using parameters closely related to the chemical compositions. Its variation leads to change in the Poisson equation, current equation, and continuity equation governing the device design. To make the device design much realistic and meaningful, we need to build a model that relates the opto-electrical properties to the chemical composition. The material parameters as well as device structural parameters are loaded into the process simulation to give a complete set of process control parameters. The neutral defect concentrations of non-stoichiometric CuMSe2 (M = In and Ga) have been calculated under the specific atomic chemical potential conditions using this methodology. The optical and electrical properties have also been investigated for the development of a full-function analytical solar cell simulator. The future prospects regarding the development of copper-indium-gallium-selenide thin film solar cells have also been discussed.

  11. Steps Towards Industrialization of Cu–III–VI2Thin‐Film Solar Cells:Linking Materials/Device Designs to Process Design For Non‐stoichiometric Photovoltaic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsueh‐Hsin; Sharma, Poonam; Letha, Arya Jagadhamma; Shao, Lexi; Zhang, Yafei; Tseng, Bae‐Heng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of in‐line sputtering and selenization become industrial standard for Cu–III–VI2 solar cell fabrication, but still it's very difficult to control and predict the optical and electrical parameters, which are closely related to the chemical composition distribution of the thin film. The present review article addresses onto the material design, device design and process design using parameters closely related to the chemical compositions. Its variation leads to change in the Poisson equation, current equation, and continuity equation governing the device design. To make the device design much realistic and meaningful, we need to build a model that relates the opto‐electrical properties to the chemical composition. The material parameters as well as device structural parameters are loaded into the process simulation to give a complete set of process control parameters. The neutral defect concentrations of non‐stoichiometric CuMSe2 (M = In and Ga) have been calculated under the specific atomic chemical potential conditions using this methodology. The optical and electrical properties have also been investigated for the development of a full‐function analytical solar cell simulator. The future prospects regarding the development of copper–indium–gallium–selenide thin film solar cells have also been discussed. PMID:27840790

  12. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  13. Deposition of thin films of multicomponent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Composite films of multicomponent materials, such as oxides and nitrides, e.g., lead zirconate titanate, are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, employing a rotating substrate holder, which rotates relative to a plurality of targets, one target for each metal element of the multicomponent material. The sputtering is carried out in a reactive atmosphere. The substrates on which the layers are deposited are at ambient temperature. Following deposition of the composite film, the film is heated to a temperature sufficient to initiate a solid state reaction and form the final product, which is substantially single phase and substantially homogeneous.

  14. Thin film thermocouples for high temperature measurement on ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high-heating-rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  15. Synthesis of ultra-nano-carbon composite materials with extremely high conductivity by plasma post-treatment process of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Manoharan, Divinah; Chang, Hsin-Tzer; Lin, I-Nan

    2015-08-24

    Needle-like diamond grains encased in nano-graphitic layers are an ideal granular structure of diamond films to achieve high conductivity and superior electron field emission (EFE) properties. This paper describes the plasma post-treatment (ppt) of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films at low substrate temperature to achieve such a unique granular structure. The CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma ppt-processed films exhibit high conductivity of σ = 1099 S/cm as well as excellent EFE properties with turn-on field of E{sub 0} = 2.48 V/μm (J{sub e} = 1.0 mA/cm{sup 2} at 6.5 V/μm). The ppt of UNCD film is simple and robust process that is especially useful for device applications.

  16. Synthesis of ultra-nano-carbon composite materials with extremely high conductivity by plasma post-treatment process of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Jui; Manoharan, Divinah; Chang, Hsin-Tzer; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2015-08-01

    Needle-like diamond grains encased in nano-graphitic layers are an ideal granular structure of diamond films to achieve high conductivity and superior electron field emission (EFE) properties. This paper describes the plasma post-treatment (ppt) of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films at low substrate temperature to achieve such a unique granular structure. The CH4/N2 plasma ppt-processed films exhibit high conductivity of σ = 1099 S/cm as well as excellent EFE properties with turn-on field of E0 = 2.48 V/μm (Je = 1.0 mA/cm2 at 6.5 V/μm). The ppt of UNCD film is simple and robust process that is especially useful for device applications.

  17. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qingyou

    2015-08-01

    Irradiation of high-energy ultrasonic vibration in metals and alloys generates oscillating strain and stress fields in solids, and introduces nonlinear effects such as cavitation, acoustic streaming, and radiation pressure in molten materials. These nonlinear effects can be utilized to assist conventional material processing processes. This article describes recent research at Oak Ridge National Labs and Purdue University on using high-intensity ultrasonic vibrations for degassing molten aluminum, processing particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites, refining metals and alloys during solidification process and welding, and producing bulk nanostructures in solid metals and alloys. Research results suggest that high-intensity ultrasonic vibration is capable of degassing and dispersing small particles in molten alloys, reducing grain size during alloy solidification, and inducing nanostructures in solid metals.

  18. Materials and Processes Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.; And Others

    This instructional resource guide is intended to assist the industrial arts (IA) teacher in implementing a comprehensive materials and Processes Technology program at the technical level in Virginia high schools. The course is designed to help students make informed educational and occupational choices and prepare them for advanced technical or…

  19. Processing Materials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested program of material processing experiments in space described in 81 page report. For each experiment, report discusses influence of such gravitational effects as convection, buoyancy, sedimentation, and hydrostatic pressure. Report contains estimates of power and mission duration required for each experiment. Lists necessary equipment and appropriate spacecraft.

  20. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  1. Released Textbooks, Films and Other Teaching Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    Some course and curriculum improvement projects funded by the National Science Foundation have produced definitive editions of textbooks, other printed materials, and instructional films. This bulletin lists materials available in 1968 through commercial or college and university sources. The publications include textbooks, laboratory guides,…

  2. Chitosan films and blends for packaging material.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lambertus A M; Knoop, Rutger J I; Kappen, Frans H J; Boeriu, Carmen G

    2015-02-13

    An increased interest for hygiene in everyday life as well as in food, feed and medical issues lead to a strong interest in films and blends to prevent the growth and accumulation of harmful bacteria. A growing trend is to use synthetic and natural antimicrobial polymers, to provide non-migratory and non-depleting protection agents for application in films, coatings and packaging. In food packaging, antimicrobial effects add up to the barrier properties of the materials, to increase the shelf life and product quality. Chitosan is a natural bioactive polysaccharide with intrinsic antimicrobial activity and, due to its exceptional physicochemical properties imparted by the polysaccharide backbone, has been recognized as a natural alternative to chemically synthesized antimicrobial polymers. This, associated with the increasing preference for biofunctional materials from renewable resources, resulted in a significant interest on the potential for application of chitosan in packaging materials. In this review we describe the latest developments of chitosan films and blends as packaging material.

  3. Film/Adhesive Processing Module for Fiber-Placement Processing of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulcher, A. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    An automated apparatus has been designed and constructed that enables the automated lay-up of composite structures incorporating films, foils, and adhesives during the automated fiber-placement process. This apparatus, denoted a film module, could be used to deposit materials in film or thin sheet form either simultaneously when laying down the fiber composite article or in an independent step.

  4. Advanced processing and properties of superhard materials

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, J.

    1995-06-01

    The author reviews fundamental aspects of Superhard Materials with hardness close to that of diamond. These materials include cubic boron nitride (c-BN), carbon nitride ({beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and diamondlike carbon. Since these materials are metastable at normal temperatures and pressures, novel methods of synthesis and processing of these materials are required. This review focuses on synthesis and processing, detailed materials characterization and properties of c-BN and {beta}C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and diamondlike carbon films.

  5. Silicon film solar cell process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. B.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The most promising way to reduce the cost of silicon in solar cells while still maintaining performance is to utilize thin films (10 to 20 microns thick) of crystalline silicon. The method of solution growth is being employed to grow thin polycrystalline films of silicon on dissimilar substrates. The initial results indicate that, using tin as the solvent, this growth process only requires operating temperatures in the range of 800 C to 1000 C. Growth rates in the range of 0.4 to 2.0 microns per minute and grain sizes in the range of 20 to 100 microns were achieved on both quartz and coated steel substrates. Typically, an aspect ratio of two to three between the width and the Si grain thickness is seen. Uniform coverage of Si growth on quartz over a 2.5 x 2.5 cm area was observed.

  6. Surface engineering of glazing materials and structures using plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Monteiro, Othon R.

    2003-04-10

    A variety of coatings is commercially produced on a very large scale, including transparent conducting oxides and multi-layer silver-based low-emissivity and solar control coatings. A very brief review of materials and manufacturing process is presented and illustrated by ultrathin silver films and chevron copper films. Understanding the close relation between manufacturing processes and bulk and surface properties of materials is crucial for film growth and self-assembly processes.

  7. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  8. Physical Properties of Thin Film Semiconducting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, N.; Djebbouri, M.; Outemzabet, R.; Sali, S.; Zerrouki, H.; Zouaoui, A.; Kesri, N.

    2005-10-01

    The physics and chemistry of semiconducting materials is a continuous question of debate. We can find a large stock of well-known properties but at the same time, many things are not understood. In recent years, porous silicon (PS-Si), diselenide of copper and indium (CuInSe2 or CIS) and metal oxide semiconductors like tin oxide (SnO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been subjected to extensive studies because of the rising interest their potential applications in fields such as electronic components, solar panels, catalysis, gas sensors, in biocompatible materials, in Li-based batteries, in new generation of MOSFETS. Bulk structure and surface and interface properties play important roles in all of these applications. A deeper understanding of these fundamental properties would impact largely on technological application performances. In our laboratory, thin films of undoped and antimony-doped films of tin oxide have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition. Spray pyrolysis was used for ZnO. CIS was prepared by flash evaporation or close-space vapor transport. Some of the deposition parameters have been varied, such as substrate temperature, time of deposition (or anodization), and molar concentration of bath preparation. For some samples, thermal annealing was carried out under oxygen (or air), under nitrogen gas and under vacuum. Deposition and post-deposition parameters are known to strongly influence film structure and electrical resistivity. We investigated the influence of film thickness and thermal annealing on structural optical and electrical properties of the films. Examination of SnO2 by x-ray diffraction showed that the main films are polycrystalline with rutile structure. The x-ray spectra of ZnO indicated a hexagonal wurtzite structure. Characterizations of CIS films with compositional analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning microscopy, spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence were carried out.

  9. Color Imaging management in film processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremeau, Alain; Konik, Hubert; Colantoni, Philippe

    2003-12-01

    The latest research projects in the laboratory LIGIV concerns capture, processing, archiving and display of color images considering the trichromatic nature of the Human Vision System (HSV). Among these projects one addresses digital cinematographic film sequences of high resolution and dynamic range. This project aims to optimize the use of content for the post-production operators and for the end user. The studies presented in this paper address the use of metadata to optimise the consumption of video content on a device of user's choice independent of the nature of the equipment that captured the content. Optimising consumption includes enhancing the quality of image reconstruction on a display. Another part of this project addresses the content-based adaptation of image display. Main focus is on Regions of Interest (ROI) operations, based on the ROI concepts of MPEG-7. The aim of this second part is to characterize and ensure the conditions of display even if display device or display media changes. This requires firstly the definition of a reference color space and the definition of bi-directional color transformations for each peripheral device (camera, display, film recorder, etc.). The complicating factor is that different devices have different color gamuts, depending on the chromaticity of their primaries and the ambient illumination under which they are viewed. To match the displayed image to the aimed appearance, all kind of production metadata (camera specification, camera colour primaries, lighting conditions) should be associated to the film material. Metadata and content build together rich content. The author is assumed to specify conditions as known from digital graphics arts. To control image pre-processing and image post-processing, these specifications should be contained in the film's metadata. The specifications are related to the ICC profiles but need additionally consider mesopic viewing conditions.

  10. Bacteriorhodopsin Film For Processing SAR Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jeffrey W.; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Margalit, Ruth; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1992-01-01

    "Instant" photographic film based on semisynthetic retinal pigment bacteriorhodopsin proposed for optical processing of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) signals. Input image recorded on film by laser operating at writing wavelength of bacteriorhodopsin, and output image recorded on computer by standard frame-grabber. Because it requires no chemical development, enables processing in nearly real time. Fast response and high resolution well suited for application. Film reusable, with concomitant reduction in cost of SAR processing.

  11. Bacteriorhodopsin Film For Processing SAR Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jeffrey W.; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Margalit, Ruth; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1992-01-01

    "Instant" photographic film based on semisynthetic retinal pigment bacteriorhodopsin proposed for optical processing of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) signals. Input image recorded on film by laser operating at writing wavelength of bacteriorhodopsin, and output image recorded on computer by standard frame-grabber. Because it requires no chemical development, enables processing in nearly real time. Fast response and high resolution well suited for application. Film reusable, with concomitant reduction in cost of SAR processing.

  12. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, B. N.; Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Shafarman, W. N.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.

    1991-11-01

    Results and conclusions of Phase 1 of a multi-year research program on polycrystalline thin film solar cells are presented. The research comprised investigation of the relationships among processing, materials properties and device performance of both CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells. The kinetics of the formation of CuInSe2 by selenization with hydrogen selenide was investigated and a CuInSe2/Cds solar cell was fabricated. An alternative process involving the reaction of deposited copper-indium-selenium layers was used to obtain single phase CuInSe2 films and a cell efficiency of 7 percent. Detailed investigations of the open circuit voltage of CuInSe2 solar cells showed that a simple Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanism can not account for the limitations in open circuit voltage. Examination of the influence of CuInSe2 thickness on cell performance indicated that the back contact behavior has a significant effect when the CuInSe2 is less than 1 micron thick. CdTe/CdS solar cells with efficiencies approaching 10 percent can be repeatedly fabricated using physical vapor deposition and serial post deposition processing. The absence of moisture during post deposition was found to be critical. Improvements in short circuit current of CdTe solar cells to levels approaching 25 mA/cm(exp 2) are achievable by making the CdS window layer thinner. Further reductions in the CdS window layer thickness are presently limited by interdiffusion between the CdS and the CdTe. CdTe/CdS cells stored without protection from the atmosphere were found to degrade. The degradation was attributed to the metal contact. CdTe cells with ZnTe:Cu contacts to the CdTe were found to be more stable than cells with metal contacts. Analysis of current-voltage and spectral response of CdTe/CdS cells indicates the cell operates as a p-n heterojunction with the diode current dominated by SRH recombination in the junction region of the CdTe.

  13. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Anderson, Mark T.; Ganguli, Rahul; Lu, Yunfeng

    1999-01-01

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films film with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts.

  14. Research on resistance properties of conductive layer materials of microchannel plate film dynode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ling-ling; Duanmu, Qingduo; Yang, Ji-kai; Wang, Guo-zheng

    2015-03-01

    Silicon Microchannel Plate - MCP - is a new image multiplier devices based semiconductor process technology. Compared with the traditional glass MCP, Silicon MCP has an advantage in technology that the dynode materials and the substrate materials are separate. At the same time, the dynode preparation process and the microchannel arrays are also separate. Two different dynode conductive layer films are prepared: polysilicon conductive films prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) and AZO thin films coated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The conductive films coated by ALD are superior to dynode conductive films prepared by LPCVD. By comparing the resistivity of conductive polysilicon thin film and AZO thin film of different Al concentrations doped, AZO thin film of different Al concentrations doped is a more suitable conductive layer dynode material to satisfy the MCP conductive layer resistivity requirements.

  15. Fundamental Materials Research and Advanced Process Development for Thin-Film CIS-Based Photovoltaics: Final Technical Report, 2 October 2001 - 30 September 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T. J.; Li, S. S.; Crisalle, O. D.; Craciun, V.

    2006-09-01

    The objectives for this thin-film copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) solar cell project cover the following areas: Develop and characterize buffer layers for CIS-based solar cell; grow and characterize chemical-bath deposition of Znx Cd1-xS buffer layers grown on CIGS absorbers; study effects of buffer-layer processing on CIGS thin films characterized by the dual-beam optical modulation technique; grow epitaxial CuInSe2 at high temperature; study the defect structure of CGS by photoluminescence spectroscopy; investigate deep-level defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by deep-level transient spectroscopy; conduct thermodynamic modeling of the isothermal 500 C section of the Cu-In-Se system using a defect model; form alpha-CuInSe2 by rapid thermal processing of a stacked binary compound bilayer; investigate pulsed non-melt laser annealing on the film properties and performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells; and conduct device modeling and simulation of CIGS solar cells.

  16. Thermoplastic processing of proteins for film formation--a review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Izquierdo, V M; Krochta, J M

    2008-03-01

    Increasing interest in high-quality food products with increased shelf life and reduced environmental impact has encouraged the study and development of edible and/or biodegradable polymer films and coatings. Edible films provide the opportunity to effectively control mass transfer among different components in a food or between the food and its surrounding environment. The diversity of proteins that results from an almost limitless number of side-chain amino-acid sequential arrangements allows for a wide range of interactions and chemical reactions to take place as proteins denature and cross-link during heat processing. Proteins such as wheat gluten, corn zein, soy protein, myofibrillar proteins, and whey proteins have been successfully formed into films using thermoplastic processes such as compression molding and extrusion. Thermoplastic processing can result in a highly efficient manufacturing method with commercial potential for large-scale production of edible films due to the low moisture levels, high temperatures, and short times used. Addition of water, glycerol, sorbitol, sucrose, and other plasticizers allows the proteins to undergo the glass transition and facilitates deformation and processability without thermal degradation. Target film variables, important in predicting biopackage performance under various conditions, include mechanical, thermal, barrier, and microstructural properties. Comparisons of film properties should be made with care since results depend on parameters such as film-forming materials, film formulation, fabrication method, operating conditions, testing equipment, and testing conditions. Film applications include their use as wraps, pouches, bags, casings, and sachets to protect foods, reduce waste, and improve package recyclability.

  17. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  18. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  19. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C.J.; Anderson, M.T.; Ganguli, R.; Lu, Y.F.

    1999-01-12

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts. 12 figs.

  20. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  1. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Watkin, David C.; Walton, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  2. A STUDY OF IN-FLIGHT FILM PROCESSING TECHNIQUES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSORS, PROCESSING, PHOTOGRAPHIC RECONNAISSANCE, PHOTOGRAPHIC DRIERS, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGES, PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM , PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMICALS, DIFFUSION, MOTION PICTURE FILM .

  3. Thick-film materials for silicon photovoltaic cell manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    Thick film technology is applicable to three areas of silicon solar cell fabrication; metallization, junction formation, and coating for protection of screened ohmic contacts, particularly wrap around contacts, interconnection and environmental protection. Both material and process parameters were investigated. Printed ohmic contacts on n- and p-type silicon are very sensitive to the processing parameters of firing time, temperature, and atmosphere. Wrap around contacts are easily achieved by first printing and firing a dielectric over the edge and subsequently applying a low firing temperature conductor. Interconnection of cells into arrays can be achieved by printing and cofiring thick film metal pastes, soldering, or with heat curing conductive epoxies on low cost substrates. Printed (thick) film vitreous protection coatings do not yet offer sufficient optical uniformity and transparency for use on silicon. A sprayed, heat curable SiO2 based resin shows promise of providing both optical matching and environmental protection.

  4. Thin film/liquid crystal composite optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sit, Jeremy C.; Brett, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The classic challenge faced by researchers dealing with liquid crystals is to control the LC molecular orientation and hence optimise the optical properties. Well known techniques for influencing LC texture include the use of surfactants or thin film alignment layers. The underlying limitation common to such techniques is that while excellent control of LC anchoring at the substrate surface is achieved, molecular alignment in the bulk of the LC is reliant entirely upon the cooperative effects and resulting elastic properties of the LC material. Generally, this has worked sufficiently well in practice, but unfortunately, the complete dependence on the intermolecular forces of the LC means that unencumbered, reversible switching is not always possible. Our group has taken a unique approach to influence LC orientation. Using glancing angle deposition (GLAD), highly porous thin films can be grown possessing isolated columnar microstructure whose shape can be tailored via substrate motion during film deposition. In particular, we can grow films of helical columns with controlled pitch and handedness. These films exhibit circular dichroism and optical activity similar to that seen in chiral LCs. The high porosity of GLAD films permits fluids such as LCs to be introduced into the pores, leading to a new type of hybrid optical material. Most significantly, initial work showed that when achiral LCs were embedded in chiral GLAD media, there was an enhancement of the circular dichroism and optical activity as the chiral GLAD film served to induce a chiral orientation in the LC. In this report, we start with a brief overview of the GLAD process and some relevant optical studies, leading to a review of GLAD/LC hybrid materials, switchable devices, and finally, a discussion of recent research optical characterisation and some ideas for future avenues of investigation.

  5. Thin film/liquid crystal composite optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sit, Jeremy C.; Brett, Michael J.

    2003-12-01

    The classic challenge faced by researchers dealing with liquid crystals is to control the LC molecular orientation and hence optimise the optical properties. Well known techniques for influencing LC texture include the use of surfactants or thin film alignment layers. The underlying limitation common to such techniques is that while excellent control of LC anchoring at the substrate surface is achieved, molecular alignment in the bulk of the LC is reliant entirely upon the cooperative effects and resulting elastic properties of the LC material. Generally, this has worked sufficiently well in practice, but unfortunately, the complete dependence on the intermolecular forces of the LC means that unencumbered, reversible switching is not always possible. Our group has taken a unique approach to influence LC orientation. Using glancing angle deposition (GLAD), highly porous thin films can be grown possessing isolated columnar microstructure whose shape can be tailored via substrate motion during film deposition. In particular, we can grow films of helical columns with controlled pitch and handedness. These films exhibit circular dichroism and optical activity similar to that seen in chiral LCs. The high porosity of GLAD films permits fluids such as LCs to be introduced into the pores, leading to a new type of hybrid optical material. Most significantly, initial work showed that when achiral LCs were embedded in chiral GLAD media, there was an enhancement of the circular dichroism and optical activity as the chiral GLAD film served to induce a chiral orientation in the LC. In this report, we start with a brief overview of the GLAD process and some relevant optical studies, leading to a review of GLAD/LC hybrid materials, switchable devices, and finally, a discussion of recent research optical characterisation and some ideas for future avenues of investigation.

  6. Chemically amplified photoresist: Materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawloski, Adam Richard

    2002-01-01

    Advances in microfabrication technology to construct smaller and faster integrated circuits depend on improving resolution capabilities of patterning thin films of photoresist materials by photolithographic imaging. Positive-tone, chemically amplified photoresists represent one of the most important classes of photoresist materials. These materials function by the generation of a photoacid catalyst from the decomposition of a photoacid generator with exposure that catalyzes chemical reactions that alter the development rate of the exposed resist. Chemical amplification is derived from the fact that a single molecule of photogenerated catalyst may participate in numerous reactions. Photoacid catalyzes the cleavage of acid-labile protecting groups from the backbone of the resin polymer, increasing the dissolution rate of the resist in aqueous base. A pattern is formed in the photoresist film from the difference between dissolution rates of the exposed and unexposed material. The continual improvement of the resolution of chemically amplified resists depends on understanding, controlling, and optimizing the chemical processes that govern pattern formation, namely photoacid generation, resin deprotection, and resist dissolution. To elucidate how the formulation of the resist affects these processes, a systematic methodology was designed, validated and implemented to analyze the materials and processing of chemically amplified photoresist systems. The efficiency of photoacid generation and the concentration of photoacid produced upon exposure were determined for a wide range of resist formulations, processing conditions, and exposure technologies. The chemical structure of photoacid generators and base quenchers were found to affect the processes of acid-base neutralization, resin deprotection, and resist development. The reaction-diffusion process of photoacid to deprotect the resin was identified to depend on the concentration of the photoacid generator. A much

  7. Mimicry of natural material designs and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, G. M.; Richman, R. H.; McNaughton, W. P.

    1995-06-01

    Biological structural materials, although composed of unremarkable substances synthesized at low temperatures, often exhibit superior mechanical properties. In particular, the quality in which nearly all biologically derived materials excel is toughness. The advantageous mechanical properties are attributable to the hierarchical, composite, structural arrangements common to biological systems. Materials scientists and engineers have increasingly recognized that biological designs or processing approaches applied to man-made materials (biomimesis) may offer improvements in performance over conventional designs and fabrication methods. In this survey, the structures and processing routes of marine shells, avian eggshells, wood, bone, and insect cuticle are briefly reviewed, and biomimesis research inspired by these materials is discussed. In addition, this paper describes and summarizes the applications of biomineralization, self-assembly, and templating with proteins to the fabrication of thin ceramic films and nanostructure devices.

  8. Mimicry of natural material designs and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, G.M.; Richman, R.H.; McNaughton, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    Biological structural materials, although composed of unremarkable substances synthesized at low temperatures, often exhibit superior mechanical properties. In particular, the quality in which nearly all biologically derived materials excel is toughness. The advantageous mechanical properties are attributable to the hierarchical, composite, structural arrangements common to biological systems. Materials scientists and engineers have increasingly recognized that biological designs or processing approaches applied to man-made materials (biomimesis) may offer improvements in performance over conventional designs and fabrication methods. In this survey, the structures and processing routes of marine shells, avian eggshells, wood, bone, and insect cuticle are briefly reviewed, and biomimesis research inspired by these materials is discussed. In addition, this paper describes and summarizes the applications of biomineralization, self-assembly, and templating with proteins to the fabrication of thin ceramic films and nanostructure devices.

  9. Processing-structure-properties relationships in PLA nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Garofalo, E.; Galdi, M. R.; D'Arienzo, L.; Incarnato, L.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals on the possibility to improve performances of PLA-based nanocomposite films, for packaging applications, through conveniently tuning materials and processing conditions in melt compounding technology. In particular, two types of polylactic acid and different types of filler selected from montmorillonites and bentonites families were used to prepare the hybrid systems by using a twin-screw extruder. The effect of biaxial drawing on morphology and properties of the nanocomposites, produced by film blowing, was investigated.

  10. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, R.; Parilla, P.A.; Blaugher, R.D.

    1995-12-19

    A process is disclosed for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material. 3 figs.

  11. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, Raghuthan; Parilla, Philip A.; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material.

  12. Thermal protection studies of plastic films and fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saad, Michel A.; Altman, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal protection properties of various film and woven materials were studied using an experimental method of radiant heating. The materials studied included aluminized and unaluminized synthetic plastic films and fibrous materials like silicon carbide and phenolic novolac. It is shown that a thin metallized coating with good reflectivity significantly enhances the heat blocking capability of a variety of insulative materials.

  13. Thermal protection studies of plastic films and fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saad, Michel A.; Altman, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal protection properties of various film and woven materials were studied using an experimental method of radiant heating. The materials studied included aluminized and unaluminized synthetic plastic films and fibrous materials like silicon carbide and phenolic novolac. It is shown that a thin metallized coating with good reflectivity significantly enhances the heat blocking capability of a variety of insulative materials.

  14. Processing composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication of several composite structural articles including DC-10 upper aft rudders, L-1011 vertical fins and composite biomedical appliances are discussed. Innovative composite processing methods are included.

  15. Transparent materials processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hetherington, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    A zero gravity processing furnace system was designed that will allow acquisition of photographic or other visual information while the sample is being processed. A low temperature (30 to 400 C) test model with a flat specimen heated by quartz-halide lamps was constructed. A high temperature (400 to 1000 C) test model heated by resistance heaters, utilizing a cylindrical specimen and optics, was also built. Each of the test models is discussed in detail. Recommendations are given.

  16. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Sindo

    1996-10-01

    An extremely useful guide to the theory and applications of transport phenomena in materials processing This book defines the unique role that transport phenomena play in materials processing and offers a graphic, comprehensive treatment unlike any other book on the subject. The two parts of the text are, in fact, two useful books. Part I is a very readable introduction to fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer for materials engineers and anyone not yet thoroughly familiar with the subject. It includes governing equations and boundary conditions particularly useful for studying materials processing. For mechanical and chemical engineers, and anyone already familiar with transport phenomena, Part II covers the many specific applications to materials processing, including a brief description of various materials processing technologies. Readable and unencumbered by mathematical manipulations (most of which are allocated to the appendixes), this book is also a useful text for upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level courses in materials, mechanical, and chemical engineering. It includes hundreds of photographs of materials processing in action, single and composite figures of computer simulation, handy charts for problem solving, and more. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing: * Describes eight key materials processing technologies, including crystal growth, casting, welding, powder and fiber processing, bulk and surface heat treating, and semiconductor device fabrication * Covers the latest advances in the field, including recent results of computer simulation and flow visualization * Presents special boundary conditions for transport phenomena in materials processing * Includes charts that summarize commonly encountered boundary conditions and step-by-step procedures for problem solving * Offers a unique derivation of governing equations that leads to both overall and differential balance equations * Provides a list of publicly available computer

  17. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  18. Extrusion process optimization for toughness in balloon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantor, K. M.; Harrison, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental optimization process for blown film extrusion is described and examined in terms of the effects of the technique on the toughness of balloon films. The optimization technique by Cantor (1990) is employed which involves the identification of key process variables including screw speed, nip speed, bubble diameter, and frost-line height for analysis to optimize the merit function. The procedure is employed in the extrusion of a low-density polyethylene polymer, and the resulting optimized materials are toughness- and puncture-tested. Balloon toughness is optimized in the analytical relationship, and the process parameters are modified to attain optimal toughness. The film produced is shown to have an average toughness of 24.5 MPa which is a good value for this key property of balloon materials for high-altitude flights.

  19. Cibachrome testing. [photographic processing and printing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Cibachrome products as a solution to problems encountered when contact printing Kodak film type SO-397 onto Kodak Ektrachrome color reversal paper type 1993 is investigated. A roll of aerial imagery consisting of Kodak film types SO-397 and 2443 was contact printed onto Cibachrome and Kodak materials and compared in terms of color quality, resolution, cost, and compatibility with existing equipment and techniques. Objective measurements are given in terms of resolution and sensitometric response. Comparison prints and transparencies were viewed and ranked according to overall quality and aesthetic appeal. It is recommended that Cibachrome Print material be used in place of Kodak Ektachrome paper because it is more easily processed, the cost is equivalent, and it provides improved resolution, color quality, and image fade resistance.

  20. Discrete component bonding and thick film materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinser, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results are summarized of an investigation of discrete component bonding reliability and a fundamental study of new thick film resistor materials. The component bonding study examined several types of solder bonded components with some processing variable studies to determine their influence upon bonding reliability. The bonding reliability was assessed using the thermal cycle: 15 minutes at room temperature, 15 minutes at +125 C 15 minutes at room temperature, and 15 minutes at -55 C. The thick film resistor materials examined were of the transition metal oxide-phosphate glass family with several elemental metal additions of the same transition metal. These studies were conducted by preparing a paste of the subject composition, printing, drying, and firing using both air and reducing atmospheres. The resulting resistors were examined for adherence, resistance, thermal coefficient of resistance, and voltage coefficient of resistance.

  1. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  2. Library Materials: Selection and Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Michael; And Others

    This script of a slide-tape presentation, which describes the selection and processing of materials for a university library, includes commentary with indicators for specific slide placement. Distinction is made between books and serial publications and the materials are followed from the ordering decision through processing. The role of the…

  3. Towards In Situ-Process Control in Tribological or Tool Applications: A Material Concept for the Design of Smart Thin Film Wear Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Sven; Klever, C.; Leiste, H.; Seemann, K.; Stüber, M.

    The optimization of processes for tribological or machining applications requires the development of (i) high performance substrate materials, especially ultra fine grain cemented carbides for cutting tools, (ii) complex tool geometries and (iii) innovative, nano-scaled hard and tough multi-functional protective coatings. Very important is also the in-situ process control which can be realized with (i) sensors which are embedded in the protective coating using microsystem technology or (ii) if possible, by using tailored coating designs which show itself both protective and sensor functionality.

  4. Process waste assessment: Black and white print/film processing and photomechanical transfer (PMT). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This process waste assessment was performed to determine quantitatively the chemicals and materials used in the black and white print/film process, to determine their ultimate destination, and to explore options for reduced usage. It was determined that the volume of materials and water used for this process can be reduced; however, there would be significant restrictions on the types of reproductions available to customers. The process cannot be eliminated because of the classified artwork requirements.

  5. Electrochromic materials, devices and process of making

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2003-11-11

    Thin films of transition metal compositions formed with magnesium that are metals, alloys, hydrides or mixtures of alloys, metals and/or hydrides exhibit reversible color changes on application of electric current or hydrogen. Thin films of these materials are suitable for optical switching elements, thin film displays, sun roofs, rear-view mirrors and architectural glass.

  6. Optoelectronic Nanocomposite Materials for Thin Film Photovoltaics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    CdTe and ZnO single-phase thin films , nanocomposite films ...for the CdTe -ZnO thin film system under these conditions. c. Optical Absorption The films produced in the present study consistently exhibited...optical absorbance spectra collected from CdTe -ZnO multilayer nanocomposite thin films . The effect of CdTe layer thickness used per deposition cycle

  7. Magnetohydrodynamics in Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be used to melt, pump, stir, and stabilize liquid metals. This provides a nonintrusive means of controlling the flow of metal in commercial casting and refining operations. The quest for greater efficiency and more control in the production of steel, aluminum, and high-performance superalloys has led to a revolution in the application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to process metallurgy. Three typical applications are described here, chosen partially on the basis of their general interest to fluid dynamicists, and partially because of their considerable industrial importance. We look first at magnetic stirring, where a rotating magnetic field is used to agitate and homogenize the liquid zone of a partially-solidified ingot. This is a study in Ekman pumping. Next, we consider magnetic damping, where an intense, static magnetic field is used to suppress fluid motion. In particular, we look at the damping of jets, vortices, and turbulence. We conclude with a discussion of the magnetic destabilization of liquid-liquid interfaces. This is of particular importance in aluminum production.

  8. PROCESS OF FORMING POWDERED MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Glatter, J.; Schaner, B.E.

    1961-07-14

    A process of forming high-density compacts of a powdered ceramic material is described by agglomerating the powdered ceramic material with a heat- decompossble binder, adding a heat-decompossble lubricant to the agglomerated material, placing a quantity of the material into a die cavity, pressing the material to form a compact, pretreating the compacts in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to remove the binder and lubricant, and sintering the compacts. When this process is used for making nuclear reactor fuel elements, the ceramic material is an oxide powder of a fissionsble material and after forming, the compacts are placed in a cladding tube which is closed at its ends by vapor tight end caps, so that the sintered compacts are held in close contact with each other and with the interior wall of the cladding tube.

  9. Thin film resistive materials: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherian Lukose, C.; Zoppi, G.; Birkett, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the key developments in thin film resistive materials for use in the fabrication of discrete precision resistors. Firstly an introduction to the preparation of thin films and their fundamental properties is given with respect to well established systems such as NiCr, TaN and CrSiO. The effect of doping these systems in both solid and gaseous forms to further refine their structural and electrical properties is then discussed before the performance of more recent materials systems such as CuAlMo and MmAgCuN are reviewed. In addition to performance of the materials themselves, the effect of varying processing parameters such as deposition pressure and temperature and subsequent annealing environment, as well as laser trimming energy and geometry are also studied. It is shown how these parameters can be systematically controlled to produce films of the required properties for varying applications such as high precision, long term stability and high power pulse performance.

  10. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of available terrestrial skills to the gathering of lunar materials and the processing of raw lunar materials into industrial feed stock were investigated. The literature on lunar soils and rocks was reviewed and the chemical processes by which major oxides and chemical elements can be extracted were identified. The gathering of lunar soil by means of excavation equipment was studied in terms of terrestrial experience with strip mining operations on earth. The application of electrostatic benefication techniques was examined for use on the moon to minimize the quantity of materials requiring surface transport and to optimize the stream of raw materials to be transported off the moon for subsequent industrial use.

  11. Diode laser processed crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, S.; Eggleston, B.; Dore, J.; Evans, R.; Ong, D.; Kunz, O.; Huang, J.; Schubert, U.; Kim, K. H.; Egan, R.; Green, M.

    2013-03-01

    Line-focus diode laser is applied to advance crystalline silicon thin-film solar cell technology. Three new processes have been developed: 1) defect annealing/dopant activation; 2) dopant diffusion; 3) liquid phase crystallisation of thin films. The former two processes are applied to either create a solar cell device from pre-crystallised films or improve its performance while reducing the maximum temperature experienced by substrate. The later process is applied to amorphous silicon films to obtain high crystal and electronic quality material for thin-film solar cells with higher efficiency potential. Defect annealing/dopant activation and dopant diffusion in a few micron thick poly-Si films are achieved by scanning with line-focus 808 nm diode laser beam at 15-24 kW/cm2 laser power and 2~6 ms exposure. Temperature profile in the film during the treatment is independent from laser power and exposure but determined by beam shape. Solar cell open-circuit voltages of about 500 mV after such laser treatments is similar or even higher than voltages after standard rapid-thermal treatments while the highest temperature experienced by glass is 300C lower. Amorphous silicon films can be melted and subsequently liquid-phase crystallised by a single scan of line laser beam at about 20 kW/cm2 power and 10-15 ms exposure. Solar cells made of laser-crystallised material achieve 557 mV opencircuit voltage and 8.4% efficiency. Electronic quality of such cells is consistent with efficiencies exceeding 13% and it is currently limited by research-level simplified cell metallisation.

  12. Emotional reactivity to film material in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mograbi, Daniel C; Brown, Richard G; Morris, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    To explore emotional reactivity in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) using film material, investigating the influence of dementia-related material and awareness of condition. Twenty-two patients with AD and 21 healthy older adults viewed films with positive, neutral or negative content, including a film about dementia. Reactivity was measured through a self-report questionnaire and filming of facial expressions. Awareness of condition was assessed contrasting patients' versus informants' versions of an anosognosia questionnaire. The AD patients showed reduced self-reported reactivity to negative films, but exhibited a pattern of facial responses similar to controls for all films. Awareness was associated with frequency of negative facial expressions during the dementia film. AD patients may have impairments in self-reported reactivity to negative stimuli. Awareness may mediate responses to dementia-related material. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Support Assembly for Composite Laminate Materials During Roll Press Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catella, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    A composite laminate material is supported during the roll press processing thereof by an assembly having: first and second perforated films disposed adjacent to first and second opposing surfaces of a mixture of uncured resin and fibers defining the composite laminate material, a gas permeable encasement surrounding the mixture and the first and second films, a gas impervious envelope sealed about the gas permeable encasement, and first and second rigid plates clamped about the gas impervious envelope.

  14. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  15. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    This is an editorial article (preface) for the publication of symposium papers in the Journal of Nuclear materials: These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15–19, 2015.

  16. Processes for treating cellulosic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladisch, Michael R. (Inventor); Kohlman, Karen L. (Inventor); Westgate, Paul L. (Inventor); Weil, Joseph R. (Inventor); Yang, Yiqi (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed are processes for pretreating cellulosic materials in liquid water by heating the materials in liquid water at a temperature at or above their glass transition temperature but not substantially exceeding 220.degree. C., while maintaining the pH of the reaction medium in a range that avoids substantial autohydrolysis of the cellulosic materials. Such pretreatments minimize chemical changes to the cellulose while leading to physical changes which substantially increase susceptibility to hydrolysis in the presence of cellulase.

  17. Energy Implications of Materials Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Earl T.

    1976-01-01

    Processing of materials could become energy-limited rather than resource-limited. Methods to extract metals, industrial minerals, and energy materials and convert them to useful states requires more than one-fifth of the United States energy budget. Energy accounting by industries must include a total systems analysis of costs to insure net energy…

  18. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  19. Laser Material Processing in Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marshall

    2014-03-01

    This presentation will address some of the past, present, and potential uses of lasers for material processing in manufacturing. Laser processing includes welding, drilling, cutting, cladding, etc. The U.S. was the hot bed for initial uses of lasers for material processing in the past with Europe, especially Germany, presently leading the way. The future laser processing leader may still be Germany. Selected uses, past and present, of lasers within GE will also be highlighted as seen in such business units as Aviation, Lighting, Power and Water, Healthcare, and Transportation.

  20. Thick-film humidity sensor based on porous ? material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wenmin; Meyer, Jörg-Uwe

    1997-06-01

    A new compact, robust, yet fast and highly sensitive ceramic humidity sensor based on the semiconducting metal oxide 0957-0233/8/6/002/img2 has been developed using thick-film technology. The sensor element possesses a novel `sandwich' configuration with a 0957-0233/8/6/002/img3 porous 0957-0233/8/6/002/img2 ceramic layer sandwiched by two 0957-0233/8/6/002/img5 polarity-reversed interdigitated metal films. Instead of traditional glass frits, LiCl powders were used as adhesion promoters. The sintered ceramic layer exhibits a porous structure. The degree of the porosity is controlled by the amount of LiCl added and by the firing conditions for the ceramic. The surfaces of ceramic grains behave like electrolytes and easily adsorb water vapour through the pores. The novel electrode arrangement combines the advantages of humidity sensors in the form of a parallel capacitor with those in the form of an interdigital capacitor. The influence of temperature on the sensor characteristics has been compensated for by integrating a thick-film NTC resistor. The results of studies on the material processing, the fabrication and the characterization of this novel thick-film humidity sensor are described.

  1. Nonlinear Optical Image Processing with Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Deiss, Ron (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The transmission properties of some bacteriorhodopsin film spatial light modulators are uniquely suited to allow nonlinear optical image processing operations to be applied to images with multiplicative noise characteristics. A logarithmic amplitude transmission feature of the film permits the conversion of multiplicative noise to additive noise, which may then be linearly filtered out in the Fourier plane of the transformed image. The bacteriorhodopsin film displays the logarithmic amplitude response for write beam intensities spanning a dynamic range greater than 2.0 orders of magnitude. We present experimental results demonstrating the principle and capability for several different image and noise situations, including deterministic noise and speckle. Using the bacteriorhodopsin film, we successfully filter out image noise from the transformed image that cannot be removed from the original image.

  2. Nonlinear Optical Image Processing with Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Deiss, Ron (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The transmission properties of some bacteriorhodopsin film spatial light modulators are uniquely suited to allow nonlinear optical image processing operations to be applied to images with multiplicative noise characteristics. A logarithmic amplitude transmission feature of the film permits the conversion of multiplicative noise to additive noise, which may then be linearly filtered out in the Fourier plane of the transformed image. The bacteriorhodopsin film displays the logarithmic amplitude response for write beam intensities spanning a dynamic range greater than 2.0 orders of magnitude. We present experimental results demonstrating the principle and capability for several different image and noise situations, including deterministic noise and speckle. Using the bacteriorhodopsin film, we successfully filter out image noise from the transformed image that cannot be removed from the original image.

  3. Process for separating bituminous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.W.; Roach, J.W.

    1981-06-16

    A process is disclosed for separating a solvent from a bituminous material by pressure reduction and steam stripping without carry-over of entrained bituminous material. A fluid-like phase comprising of bituminous material and solvent is reduced in pressure by passage through a pressure reduction valve to vaporize a portion of the solvent. The reduction in pressure also results in dispersing a mist of fine bituminous material particles in the vaporized solvent. The stream of vaporized solvent, mist and fluid-like bituminous material then is introduced into a static mixer. The static mixer intimately mixes the mist with the fluid-like material and causes the mist to recombine with the fluid-like material from which it was formed. The resulting stream is introduced into a steam stripper to separate the solvent remaining in the bituminous material. The vaporized solvent and steam are withdrawn from the stripper substantially free of entrained bituminous material and condensed. The liquid stream is introduced into a solvent surge vessel having a water draw. The solvent then is recycled in the process.

  4. Using Thin Films to Screen Possible Scintillator Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Joly, Alan G.; Matson, Dean W.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Olsen, Larry C.

    2009-06-30

    The discovery and optimization of new scintillators has traditionally been a rather slow process due to the difficulties of single crystal growth. This paper discusses the production of polycrystalline scintillator thin films (a few microns thick) which were tested in order to determine what characterizations could be made concerning a material’s ultimate potential as a scintillator prior to pursuing crystal growth. Thin films of CaF2(Eu), CeF3, and CeCl3, all known scintillators, were produced by vapor deposition. The hygroscopic CeCl3 was coated with multiple polymer-aluminum oxide bi-layers. Emission spectra peak wavelengths and decay times agreed with single crystal values. The films were too thin to measure gamma photopeaks, but using alpha energy deposition peaks, one could compare the relative photon yield/MeV between materials. The values obtained appear to give a relevant indication of a material’s light yield potential. The technique also appears useful for quickly determining the proper dopant amount for a given material.

  5. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  6. CPT Word Processing Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaymaker, Josephine; Eakman, Donna

    A project to develop a student word processing manual was developed by using input from: (1) information specialists, employees, and educators; and (2) students using the manual. These instructional materials provide workbook assignments and reading for an individualized unit on CPT word processing to be used by 30 to 40 high school students per…

  7. PREFACE: Innovations in Thin Film Processing and Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrion, Gérard; Belmahi, Mohammed; Andrieu, Stéphane

    2010-07-01

    This special issue contains selected papers which were presented as invited or contributed communications at the 4th International Conference on Innovation in Thin Film Processing and Characterization (ITFPC'09) which was held on 17-20 November, 2009 in Nancy (France) Jointly organized by the French Vacuum Society and the Institut Jean Lamour-a joint research unit specialized in materials, metallurgy, nano-sciences, plasmas and surfaces-the ITFPC conferences aim at providing an open forum to discuss the progress and latest developments in thin film processing and engineering. Invited lectures aim particularly at providing overviews on scientific topics while contributed communications focus on particular cutting-edge aspects of thin film science and technology, including CVD, PVD and ion beam assisted processes. The 2009 conference was organized along the 6 main following topics: Thin films processing and surface engineering Numerical simulation and thin film characterization Protective applications of thin films Energy, environment and health applications of thin films Micro- and nano-patterning of thin films New properties and applications resulting from patterned thin films which were completed by a special half day session devoted to industry-supported innovation. 180 scientists from 20 worldwide countries attended the different sessions along with the 9 invited lectures and 130 contributions were given. Besides the outstanding scientific program, a half-day tutorial session preceded the conference. During the short courses, emphasis was laid on: Lithography for thin film patterning Mechanical properties of thin films Principles and applications of reactive sputtering processes. The French Vacuum Society granted financial aid to PhD students who applied for it in order to encourage the participation of young scientists. The 19 papers published in this volume were accepted for publication after peerreviewal as for regular papers. As chairmen of this conference

  8. Impact of In doping on GeTe phase-change materials thin films obtained by means of an innovative plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkutnik, P. D.; Aoukar, M.; Todorova, V.; Angélidès, L.; Pelissier, B.; Jourde, D.; Michallon, P.; Vallée, C.; Noé, P.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the deposition and the phase-change properties of In-doped GeTe thin films obtained by plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and doped with indium using a solid delivery system. The sublimated indium precursor flow rate was calculated as a function of sublimation and deposition parameters. Indium related optical emission recorded by means of optical emission spectroscopy during deposition plasma allowed proposing the dissociation mechanisms of the [In(CH3)2N(CH3)2]2 solid precursor. In particular, using an Ar + H2 + NH3 deposition plasma, sublimated indium molecules are completely dissociated and do not induce by-product contamination by addition of nitrogen or carbon in the films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evidences the formation of In-Te bonds in amorphous as-deposited In-doped GeTe films. The formation of an InTe phase after 400 °C annealing is also evidenced by means of X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystallization temperature Tx, deduced from monitoring of optical reflectivity of In-doped GeTe films with doping up to 11 at. % slightly varies as a function of the In dopant level with a decrease of Tx down to a minimum value for an In doping level of about 6-8 at. %. In this In doping range, the structure of crystallized In-GeTe films changes and is dominated by the presence of a crystalline In2Te3 phase. Finally, the Kissinger activation energy for crystallization Ea is showing to monotonically decrease as the indium content in the GeTe film is increased indicating a promising effect of In doping on crystallization speed in memory devices while keeping a good thermal stability for data retention.

  9. Materials processing in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    Activities of the Materials Processing in Low Gravity Program in which the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) designed, fabricated, and performed various low gravity experiments in materials processing between October 26, 1988 through October 25, 1989 are discussed. Details of low gravity experiments using the Drop Facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field are discussed. This effort included the defining of experimental requirements and equipment, experiment-facility integration requirements, building/assembling the necessary experiment apparatus, and conducting experiments which will contribute to the knowledge base for commercialization of materials processing in low gravity. UAH also performed logistical support needed to execute the experimentation, the necessary sample preparation, metallography analysis, and physical properties measurements of the processed samples.

  10. Process optimization for developer soluble immersion topcoat material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroki; Goto, Kentarou; Shima, Motoyuki; Takahashi, Junichi; Shimokawa, Tsutomu; Ichino, Katsunori; Nagatani, Naohiko; Kyoda, Hideharu; Yoshihara, Kosuke

    2007-03-01

    The 193 nm immersion lithography has been increasingly applied to the semiconductor device mass production. Topcoat material would be used in many such cases. Topcoat film can maximize the scan speed during immersion exposure step and also prevent small molecules from leaching out of resist film. However, the use of the topcoat material in the mass production affects productivity including throughput and chemical cost. To manage this problem, we attempted to improve topcoat coating process to reduce the topcoat material consumption. Using JSR NFC TCX041, the developersoluble type topcoat material, as a model material, we examined a new coating process which introduces a pre-wet treatment using a solvent which was chosen to be appropriate for this purpose. With this new coating process, we achieved 65 percent (or more) reduction of the topcoat material consumption compared with the current standard coating process (dynamic coating). From the result of film surface observations and leaching tests, it was learned that the topcoat film properties by the new coating process are equivalent to those by the standard coating process. The process performance after development also indicated good results.

  11. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  12. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, Lawrence S.; Felter, Thomas E.; Talin, Alec; Ohlberg, Douglas; Fox, Ciaran; Han, Sung

    1999-01-01

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/.mu.m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 .mu.m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceeded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material.

  13. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  14. Materials processing in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Work is reported on the Materials Processing Low Gravity Program in which the University of Alabama worked with scientists and engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center to design, implement and perform low gravity experiments with various scientific investigators in materials processing science through March 15, 1989. The facilities used in these short duration low gravity experiments include the Drop Tube and Drop Tower at MSFC, and the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field. The utilization of these ground-based low gravity facilities for materials processing was instrumental in determining the feasibility of either performing a particular experiment in the microgravity of Space or continuing on-going activities which may have been delayed due to the absence of shuttle flights during this contractual effort.

  15. The materials processing sciences glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traweek, Larry

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Processing Sciences Glovebox is a rack mounted workstation which allows on orbit sample preparation and characterization of specimens from various experiment facilities. It provides an isolated safe, clean, and sterile environment for the crew member to work with potentially hazardous materials. It has to handle a range of chemicals broader than even PMMS. The theme is that the Space Station Laboratory experiment preparation and characterization operations provide the fundamental glovebox design characteristics. Glovebox subsystem concepts and how internal material handling operations affect the design are discussed.

  16. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  17. Fiber lasers for material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiner, Bill

    2005-03-01

    Low power fiber lasers began entering the commercial markets in the early 1990s. Since their introduction, fiber lasers have rapidly progressed in power levels level with greatly improved beam quality to the point where they now exceed any other commercial material processing laser. These lasers, with single mode operation to 1 kilowatt and multi-mode operation to beyond 20 kilowatts, have high wall plug efficiency, an extremely compact footprint, are maintenance free and have a predicted diode life beyond 100,000 hours of continuous operation. Fiber lasers are making inroads into the scientific, medical, government, and in particular, material processing markets. These lasers have greatly expanded the application umbrella due to their unparallel performance combined with the ability to operate at different wavelengths, address remote applications and be propagated great distances in fiber. In the material processing markets, fiber lasers are rapidly gaining share in the automotive, microelectronic, medical device and marking markets, to name a few. The single mode lasers are redefining process parameters that have been accepted for decades. The high brightness multimode-kilowatt class lasers are achieving speeds and depths greater than comparable powered conventional lasers while providing the only commercial material processing lasers operating beyond 6 kilowatts at the 1 micron region.

  18. High-throughput characterization of film thickness in thin film materials libraries by digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yiu Wai; Krause, Michael; Savan, Alan; Thienhaus, Sigurd; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Hofmann, Martin R; Ludwig, Alfred

    2011-10-01

    A high-throughput characterization technique based on digital holography for mapping film thickness in thin-film materials libraries was developed. Digital holographic microscopy is used for fully automatic measurements of the thickness of patterned films with nanometer resolution. The method has several significant advantages over conventional stylus profilometry: it is contactless and fast, substrate bending is compensated, and the experimental setup is simple. Patterned films prepared by different combinatorial thin-film approaches were characterized to investigate and demonstrate this method. The results show that this technique is valuable for the quick, reliable and high-throughput determination of the film thickness distribution in combinatorial materials research. Importantly, it can also be applied to thin films that have been structured by shadow masking.

  19. Mechanical behaviour of composite materials made by resin film infusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, C.; Casavola, C.; Pappalettere, C.; Tursi, F.

    2010-06-01

    Innovative composite materials are frequently used in designing aerospace, naval and automotive components. In the typical structure of composites, multiple layers are stacked together with a particular sequence in order to give specific mechanical properties. Layers are organized with different angles, different sequences and different technological process to obtain a new and innovative material. From the standpoint of engineering designer it is useful to consider the single layer of composite as macroscopically homogeneous material. However, composites are non homogeneous bodies. Moreover, layers are not often perfectly bonded together and delamination often occurs. Other violations of lamination theory hypotheses, such as plane stress and thin material, are not unusual and in many cases the transverse shear flexibility and the thickness-normal stiffness should be considered. Therefore the real behaviour of composite materials is quite different from the predictions coming from the traditional lamination theory. Due to the increasing structural performance required to innovative composites, the knowledge of the mechanical properties for different loading cases is a fundamental source of concern. Experimental characterization of materials and structures in different environmental conditions is extremely important to understand the mechanical behaviour of these new materials. The purpose of the present work is to characterize a composite material developed for aerospace applications and produced by means of the resin film infusion process (RFI). Different tests have been carried out: tensile, open-hole and filled-hole tensile, compressive, openhole and filled-hole compressive. The experimental campaign has the aim to define mechanical characteristics of this RFI composite material in different conditions: environmental temperature, Hot/Wet and Cold.

  20. Amorphous In-Si-O Films Fabricated via Solution Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Hani Esmael; Hoang, Ha; Nakamura, Tsubasa; Koga, Tomoaki; Ina, Toshiaki; Uruga, Tomoya; Kizu, Takio; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Nabatame, Toshihide; Fujiwara, Akihiko

    2017-06-01

    We report the characteristics of an amorphous oxide semiconductor In-Si-O fabricated via solution processing. In-Si-O thin films with nominal silicon concentration of 0 at.%, 1 at.%, 3 at.%, 5 at.%, 9 at.%, 50 at.%, and 100 at.% were fabricated via spin coating. The films were characterized via thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction (XRD), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and electrical resistance measurements. TDS analysis suggested that organic residues, such as organic functional groups from raw materials and solvents, were almost completely desorbed from the films at approximately 400°C. The XRD and EXAFS analyses confirmed that pure In2O3 crystallizes at approximately 350°C and that the crystallization temperature increases with the silicon concentration. In-Si-O films with silicon concentration above 3 at.% exhibited high electrical resistance, indicating that films fabricated via spin coating contain few oxygen vacancies. These results suggest that In-Si-O thin films have significant potential for use as channels in field-effect transistors designed for next-generation flat-panel displays.

  1. Thermoelastic response of thin metal films and their adjacent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, W.

    2013-01-14

    A pulsed laser beam applied to a thin metal film is capable of launching an acoustic wave due to thermal expansion. Heat transfer from the thin metal film to adjacent materials can also induce thermal expansion; thus, the properties of these adjacent materials (as well as the thin metal film) should be considered for a complete description of the thermoelastic response. Here, we show that adjacent materials with a small specific heat and large thermal expansion coefficient can generate an enhanced acoustic wave and we demonstrate a three-fold increase in the peak pressure of the generated acoustic wave on substitution of parylene for polydimethylsiloxane.

  2. Improved process for making thin-film sodium niobate capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micka, E. Z.

    1968-01-01

    Sodium niobate, formed by high vacuum, flash, and reactive evaporations, has a high dielectric constant and is used as a thin film dielectric in microelectronic capacitors. High purity films are formed from relatively inexpensive, pure starting materials. Crystalline sodium niobate films can be formed on amorphous or crystalline materials.

  3. Process for separating bituminous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, J.W.

    1981-07-21

    A process is claimed for separating a solvent from a bituminous material by pressure reduction and steam stripping without carry-over of entrained bituminous material. The fluid-like phase of bituminous material and solvent is reduced in pressure and introduced into a steam stripper. The solvent vaporizes upon pressure reduction and a mist of fine bituminous material particles forms and becomes dispersed in the vaporized solvent. The vaporized solvent and associated mist is separated from the bituminous material in the stripper and is withdrawn from the steam stripper and introduced into a condenser. The solvent and steam from the stripper condense, a substantial portion of the mist of entrained particles solidifies and an emulsion of water and fluid-like bituminous material from the mist forms. The liquid stream is withdrawn from the condenser and introduced into a separator. The liquid stream separates in the separator into an upper fraction of solvent, a middle fraction of emulsion and a lower fraction of water and the solidified particles of bituminous material. The liquid solvent is removed by passage over a weir in the separator and recovered. The emulsion, water and solids can be removed from the base of the separator for disposal.

  4. Magneto-optical activity in organic thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vleugels, Rick; de Vega, Laura; Brullot, Ward; Verbiest, Thierry; Gómez-Lor, Berta; Gutierrez-Puebla, Enrique; Hennrich, Gunther

    2016-12-01

    A series of CF3-capped phenylacetylenes with varying symmetry is obtained by a conventional palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling protocol. The phenylacetylene targets form thin films both, liquid crystalline (LC) and crystalline in nature depending on their molecular structure. The magneto-optical activity of the resulting organic material is extraordinarily high as proved by Faraday rotation spectroscopy on thin film devices.

  5. PHYSICAL EVALUATION OF THIN FILMS OF SOLID STATE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    microscopy and X-ray and electron diffraction methods. These materials include vapor deposited thin films of boron and boron phosphide on single...crystal silicon substrates via halide reduction, electrodeposits of copper onto single crystal copper substrates, thin films of carbon deposited onto

  6. FNAS materials processing and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golben, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Research on melt-sintered high temperature superconducting materials is presented. The vibrating sample magnetometer has become a useful characterization tool for the study of high temperature superconductors. Important information regarding the superconducting properties of a sample can be obtained without actually making contact with the sample itself. A step toward microgravity processing of high temperature superconductors was taken. In the future, the samples need to be optimized prior to this processing of the sample before the specific effects of the microgravity environment can be isolated. A series of melt-sintered samples show that bulk processing of high temperature superconductors is getting better.

  7. Space processing of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.; Kaye, S.

    1975-01-01

    Materials and processes for the testing of aluminum-base fiber and particle composites, and of metal foams under extended-time low-g conditions were investigated. A wetting and dispersion technique was developed, based on the theory that under the absence of a gas phase all solids are wetted by liquids. The process is characterized by a high vacuum environment and a high temperature cycle. Successful wetting and dispersion experiments were carried out with sapphire fibers, whiskers and particles, and with fibers of silicon carbide, pyrolytic graphite and tungsten. The developed process and facilities permit the preparation of a precomposite which serves as sample material for flight experiments. Low-g processing consists then merely in the uniform redistribution of the reinforcements during a melting cycle. For the preparation of metal foams, gas generation by means of a thermally decomposing compound was found most adaptable to flight experiments. For flight experiments, the use of compacted mixture of the component materials limits low-g processing to a simple melt cycle.

  8. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latanision, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    An annual report of the research activities of the Materials Processing Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is given. Research on dielectrophoresis in the microgravity environment, phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids, transport properties of droplet clusters in gravity-free fields, probes and monitors for the study of solidification of molten semiconductors, fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth, and heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification are discussed.

  9. Preparation of silica thin films by novel wet process and study of their optical properties.

    PubMed

    Im, Sang-Hyeok; Kim, Nam-Jin; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, Cha-Won; Yoon, Duck-Ki; Ryu, Bong-Ki

    2012-02-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films have gained considerable attention because of their various industrial applications. For example, SiO2 thin films are used in superhydrophilic self-cleaning surface glass, UV protection films, anti-reflection coatings, and insulating materials. Recently, many processes such as vacuum evaporation, sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and spin coating have been widely applied to prepare thin films of functionally graded materials. However, these processes suffer from several engineering problems. For example, a special apparatus is required for the deposition of films, and conventional wet processes are not suitable for coating the surfaces of substrates with a large surface area and complex morphology. In this study, we investigated the film morphology and optical properties of SiO2 films prepared by a novel technique, namely, liquid phase deposition (LPD). Images of the SiO2 films were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to study the surface morphology of these films: these images indicate that films deposited with different reaction times were uniform and dense and were composed of pure silica. Optical properties such as refractive index and transmittance were estimated by UV-vis spectroscopy and ellipsometry. SiO2 films with porous structures at the nanometer scale (100-250 nm) were successfully produced by LPD. The deposited film had excellent transmittance in the visible wavelength region.

  10. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  11. Investigation of materials processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Douglas R.; Seetharaman, Venkat; Goetz, Robert

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in materials processing research over the 45-month period from April 1989 through December 1992. The research work included projects on measuring the interface heat transfer coefficient in casting, predicting macro-segregation in casting, hot extrusion of TiAl alloy, canned extrusion of TiAl with core insulation, visioplasticity study of 6061 Al, cold rolling of Bi-based superconductor, and die design and process modeling of Mg+B4C alloy. The processing work in the Processing Laboratory included 2,357 extrusion, forging, rolling, vacuum arc melting, vacuum induction melting, and evacuation/outgas operations. The Processing Laboratory was also relocated as part of this program and the 700-ton Lombard extrusion press was completely rebuilt and modernized.

  12. Study on the effect of film formation process and deposition rate on the orientation of the CsI:Tl thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaochuan; Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yijun; Guo, Lina; Ma, Shijun; Wang, Tianyu; Liu, Yong; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Although many new scintillation materials are developed, CsI:Tl is still prevailing because of its high scintillation efficiency. In this work, CsI:Tl thin films were fabricated by vacuum thermal evaporative deposition method and their morphology properties and growth orientation were observed by SEM and XRD. Photoluminescent spectra were used to measure the luminescent properties of the CsI:Tl thin film. The results show us the film formation process of CsI:Tl thin film and analyze the effect of film formation process and the deposition rate on the orientation of the CsI:Tl thin film.

  13. Thin films of energetic materials by physical vapor deposition: TATB and LLM-105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David; Gymer, Sue; O'Conner, Colum; Hazelwood, Adam; Jardine, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of energetic materials enable a diverse range of characterization measurements: structure, surface energy and adhesion, and even reactivity. Here we present a method to grow thin films by a physical vapor deposition method (sublimation) using a dedicated instrument which can operate at ultra-high vacuum. The approach enables fabrication of thin films of energetic materials that are otherwise difficult to process by traditional methods, for example because of their low solubility. The intention is to use this instrument as a platform for studying pure materials and co-deposited materials grown either as multi-layers or as co-crystals. Examples of TATB and LLM-105 film morphologies grown using this technique are presented.

  14. Thin films of energetic materials by physical vapor deposition: TATB and LLM-105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, D. M.; Gymer, S.; O'Connor, C.; Hazelwood, A.; Jardine, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Thin films of energetic materials enable a diverse range of characterization measurements: structure, surface energy and adhesion, and even reactivity. Here we describe growth of thin films by a physical vapor deposition method (sublimation) using a dedicated instrument which can operate at ultra-high vacuum. The approach enables fabrication of thin films of energetic materials that are otherwise difficult to process by traditional methods, for example because of their low solubility. The intention is to use this instrument as a platform for studying pure materials and co-deposited materials grown either as multi-layers or as co-crystals. Examples of TATB and LLM-105 film morphologies grown using this technique are presented.

  15. Film Implementation of a Neutron Detector (FIND): Critical Materials Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    absorption factor much less than one. Other- wise, the measured count rate will be the product of the neutron absorption factor, neutron flux, and detector...TECHNICAL REPORT 1957 September 2007 Film Implementation of a Neutron Detector (FIND): Critical Materials Properties W. C. McGinnis SSC San...TECHNICAL REPORT 1957 September 2007 Film Implementation of a Neutron Detector (FIND): Critical Materials Properties W. C. McGinnis SSC San Diego

  16. Metal containing material processing on coater/developer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Shinichiro; Mizunoura, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Koichi; Hontake, Koichi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimura, Satoru; Enomoto, Masashi

    2016-03-01

    Challenges of processing metal containing materials need to be addressed in order apply this technology to Behavior of metal containing materials on coater/developer processing including coating process, developer process and tool metal contamination is studied using CLEAN TRACKTM LITHIUS ProTM Z (Tokyo Electron Limited). Through this work, coating uniformity and coating film defectivity were studied. Metal containing material performance was comparable to conventional materials. Especially, new dispense system (NDS) demonstrated up to 80% reduction in coating defect for metal containing materials. As for processed wafer metal contamination, coated wafer metal contamination achieved less than 1.0E10 atoms/cm2 with 3 materials. After develop metal contamination also achieved less than 1.0E10 atoms/cm2 with 2 materials. Furthermore, through the metal defect study, metal residues and metal contamination were reduced by developer rinse optimization.

  17. A flammability study of thin plastic film materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center presently conducts flammability tests on thin plastic film materials by using a small needle rake method. Flammability data from twenty-two thin plastic film materials were obtained and cross-checked by using three different testing methods: (1) the presently used small needle rake; (2) the newly developed large needle rake; and (3) the previously used frame. In order to better discern the melting-burning phenomenon of thin plastic film material, five additional specific experiments were performed. These experiments determined the following: (1) the heat sink effect of each testing method; (2) the effect of the burn angle on the burn length or melting/shrinkage length; (3) the temperature profile above the ignition source; (4) the melting point and the fire point of each material; and (5) the melting/burning profile of each material via infrared (IR) imaging. The results of these experimentations are presented.

  18. Differences between vacuum-deposited and spin-coated amorphous films of OLED materials (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Daisuke; Shibata, Maki

    2014-10-01

    To realize low-cost fabrication processes for high-performance OLED displays and lighting panels, the understanding of solution-processed films and devices is becoming more important nowadays. However, differences between vacuum- and solution-processed films have not been sufficiently discussed, and they are sometimes regarded as identical. In this presentation, we show and discuss the important differences between physical properties of vacuum-deposited and spin-coated films of small-molecule OLED materials, especially focusing on the differences in film densities and molecular orientation. Since they are fundamental factors affecting both electrical and optical properties of amorphous films used in OLEDs, we should consider their differences carefully when discussing device performances in detail.

  19. Process for preparing energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Lee, Ronald S [Livermore, CA; Tillotson, Thomas M [Tracy, CA; Hrubesh, Lawrence W [Pleasanton, CA; Swansiger, Rosalind W [Livermore, CA; Fox, Glenn A [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  20. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  1. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  2. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  3. Ultrastructure Processing of Macromolecular Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-25

    Amherst, MA 01003 I U 93 12 6032 n FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT ULTRASTRUCTURE PROCESSING OF MACROMOLECULARI MATERIALS MIRP GRANT AFOSR 90-C-0019 10 February...members of the Directorate, for their unfailing cooperation, help and courtesy extended to him during the period of this grant.I U I I i DTIC qu1...I. TITLE II. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR III. GRANT NUMBERS/DATES I IV. SENIOR RESEARCH PERSONNEL V. JUNIOR RESEARCH PERSONNEL VI . ABSTRACT OF

  4. Development of thin film thermocouples on ceramic materials for advanced propulsion system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples were developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hr or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  5. Development of Thin Film Thermocouples on Ceramic Materials for Advanced Propulsion System Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 c. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperature of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  6. Laser processing of siliceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzner, Michael; Lenk, Andreas; Wiedemann, Guenter R.; Hauptmann, Jan; Weiss, Hans J.; Ruemenapp, Thomas; Morgenthal, Lothar; Beyer, Eckhard

    2000-08-01

    Laser processing of siliceous materials becomes increasingly important. Analogous to the laser processing of conventional materials there are applications in the fields of cleaning, surface processing, cutting, etc. The present paper concerns the state of the art and new applications: (1) Laser cleaning of natural stone surfaces. The good disability allows restoration work to be carried out conveniently, as for example the complete removal of crusts or the removal to such degree that moisture is not trapped beneath. (2) Non-slip finish of polished natural stone surfaces: The excellent focusing of laser beams on spots as small as 100 micrometer and below can be exploited to produce macroscopically invisible structures on the surfaces of different materials. This permits microscopically small craters and lentil shaped depressions to be generated on the stone surface. Therefore it is possible to provide a non-slip finish to polished natural stone surfaces without noticeably impairing the gloss. (3) Concrete cutting: In Europe, and particularly in Germany, there is a growing demand for redevelopment of concrete apartment buildings, involving the removal of non-bearing walls and the cutting of openings. The temporal relocation of residents due to the noise and moisture from the use of diamond tools could be avoided by applying a laser cutting technology. With a 3 kW-Nd-YAG-laser, 70 mm concrete can be cut with rates up to 25 mm/min.

  7. Thin film morphology of organic electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, S. D.; Kline, R. J.; Delongchamp, D. M.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Gundlach, D. J.; Richter, L. J.

    2009-03-01

    The crystal orientation and morphology of a polythiophene (pBTTT) and an anthradithiophene (diF-TEADT, a pentacene analog) in thin films have been explored by TEM, SEM, AFM, GISAXD, NEXAFS, polarized FTIR and ellipsometry. The orientation has a striking influence on the performance of thin film transistors. We show that solution casting and annealing conditions have a significant effect on the morphology of pBTTT. Correlations between film surface step morphology and crystal orientation are determined. Interfacial interactions with the substrate (gold, silica, or fluorinated sam) govern the crystal orientation and crystal aggregate morphology of diF-TESADT. Depending on this orientation, the carrier mobility spans from approximately 0.001 cm^2/Vs to 0.4 cm^2/Vs. Epitaxial relationships within crystal aggregates are observed.

  8. Plasma Processing of Metallic and Semiconductor Thin Films in the Fisk Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampkin, Gregory; Thomas, Edward, Jr.; Watson, Michael; Wallace, Kent; Chen, Henry; Burger, Arnold

    1998-01-01

    The use of plasmas to process materials has become widespread throughout the semiconductor industry. Plasmas are used to modify the morphology and chemistry of surfaces. We report on initial plasma processing experiments using the Fisk Plasma Source. Metallic and semiconductor thin films deposited on a silicon substrate have been exposed to argon plasmas. Results of microscopy and chemical analyses of processed materials are presented.

  9. Solution processed silver sulfide thin films for filament memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shong

    Filament Memories based on resistive switching have been attracting attention in recent years as a potential replacement for flash memory in CMOS technology and as a potential candidate memory for low-cost, large-area electronics. These memories operate at low voltages with fast switching speeds. These devices are based on ionic conduction through an electrolyte layer and differ fundamentally in operation from conventional flash memory, which is based on the field effect transistor. To facilitate development of this technology, effects of film structure on ionic and electronic conducting properties and the filament formation processes must be studied. In this work, silver sulfide, a mixed ionic-electronic conductor, is used as a model material for studying the solution processing of filament memories, and to study the impact of film structure on conducting and switching properties. Three different solution processing methods are investigated for depositing silver sulfide: sulfidation of elemental silver films, and sintering of two types of silver sulfide nanoparticles. Effects of nanoparticle sintering conditions on electrolyte structured and mixed conducting properties are investigated by a combination of X-ray diffraction, electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Impact of forming voltage and time on filament morphology is examined to provide an overall view of the impact of electrical and material parameters on device operation.

  10. Process for making dense thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2005-07-26

    Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one embodiment the invention provides techniques for firing of device substrate to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another embodiment, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe, Cu and Ag, or alloys thereof.

  11. Thermal plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-02-01

    Emphasis has been on plasma synthesis of fine powders, plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), on related diagnostics, and on modeling work. Since plasma synthesis as well as plasma CVD make frequent use of plasma jets, the beginning has been devoted of plasma jets and behavior of particulates injected into such plasma jets. Although most of the construction of the Triple-Torch Plasma Reactor (TTPR) has already been done, modifications have been made in particular modifications required for plasma CVD of diamond. A new reactor designed for Counter-Flow Liquid Injection Plasma Synthesis (CFLIPS) proved to be an excellent tool for synthesis of fine powders as well as for plasma CVD. An attempt was made to model flow and temperature fields in this reactor. Substantial efforts were made to single out those parameters which govern particle size, size distribution, and powder quality in our plasma synthesis experiments. This knowledge is crucial for controlling the process and for meaningful diagnostics and modeling work. Plasma CVD of diamond films using both reactors has been very successful and we have been approached by a number of companies interested in using this technology for coating of tools.

  12. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements

  13. Computational Material Processing in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Working with Professor David Matthiesen at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) a computer model of the DPIMS (Diffusion Processes in Molten Semiconductors) space experiment was developed that is able to predict the thermal field, flow field and concentration profile within a molten germanium capillary under both ground-based and microgravity conditions as illustrated. These models are coupled with a novel nonlinear statistical methodology for estimating the diffusion coefficient from measured concentration values after a given time that yields a more accurate estimate than traditional methods. This code was integrated into a web-based application that has become a standard tool used by engineers in the Materials Science Department at CWRU.

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the nucleation processes and chemistry of CdS thin films deposited by sublimation on different solar cell substrate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Espinos, J.P.; Martin-Concepcion, A.I.; Mansilla, C.; Yubero, F.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2006-07-15

    Cadmium sulfide has been deposited by evaporation on five different substrates: CdTe, ZnO, Ag, TiO{sub 2}, and partially reduced titanium oxide (i.e., TiO{sub 1.73}). The deposition rate and the evolution of the Cd/S ratio on the different substrates have been determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The growth mode of the films has been also studied by analyzing the shape of the backgrounds behind the photoemission peaks (peak shape analysis). It has been found that, under completely equivalent conditions, the deposition efficiency (i.e., sticking coefficient) is large on CdTe and TiO{sub 1.73}, but very small on ZnO and TiO{sub 2}. Silver constitutes an intermediate situation characterized by a long induction period where the deposition rate is small and a later increase in deposition efficiency comparable to that on CdTe. For the initial stages of deposition, below an equivalent monolayer, it has been also found that the Cd/S ratio is smaller than unity on TiO{sub 1.73} and ZnO but larger than unity on CdTe and Ag substrates. For sufficiently long deposition times the Cd/S ratio on the surface reaches unity. Except for silver substrate, cadmium appears as Cd{sup 2+} and sulfur as S{sup -2} species at the initial stages of deposition. On the silver surface, cadmium adsorbs as Cd{sup 0} at low coverage. Peak shape analysis has shown that cadmium sulfide grows according to layer-by-layer mechanism (Frank-van de Merwe model) when the substrates are CdTe and TiO{sub 1.73}, but large particles are formed that do not cover the surface for ZnO and Ag substrates (Volmer-Weber growth model). These results are consistent with the different chemical affinities of the substrate towards the atoms of cadmium and sulfur produced during the evaporation of the cadmium sulfide.

  15. High Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric Films

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Bonham, Charles C.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Pitman, Stan G.; Dahl, Michael E.; Henager, Charles H.

    2010-12-02

    Abstract: Hydrogen is being considered as a next-generation clean burning fuel. However, hydrogen has well known materials issues, including blistering and embrittlement in metals. Piezoelectric materials are used as actuators in hydrogen fuel technology. We present studies of materials compatibility of piezoelectric films in a high pressure hydrogen environment. Absorption of high pressure hydrogen was studied with Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and barium titanate (BTO) thin films. Hydrogen surface degradation in the form of blistering and Pb mixing was also observed.

  16. Vision Based Instrumentation For Microelectronic Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Donald W.

    1990-02-01

    Proper instrumentation, documentation, and analysis are crucial to the continued advance of micro-electronic materials science. Many important phenomenon are visible. Many of those are progressive events that need observation throughout their transitory period. Microelectronics scientists and engineers have long required optical systems tools which properly handle visible phenomena. An optical based system, called a high-resolution Still/Video system, to fulfill crucial microelec-tronic needs is available. Microelectronic dimensions require the highest possible resolution to resolve the small details. The system provides 1134 by 486 pixel video frames. The transient nature of many events requires video and the associated capability of video recording. The system stores over 14,000 high-resolution video frames on a single standard commercial VHS tape. The widespread use of microscopy requires the ability to operate with a variety of optical microscopes. The system is directly compatible with most microscopes. In addition, analysis requires the ability to produce film and computer processed results of all crucial images. The system has both a companion film printer and a direct computer interface.

  17. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.51 Processing material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced...

  18. Development of film- and- fabric composite materials durability assessing methodology under time-dependent influences of temperature and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayumov, R. A.; Muhamedova, I. Z.; Suleymanov, A. M.; Tazyukov, B. F.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present the design of stress-strain state calculation and film-and- fabric composite materials durability under stresses and solar radiation. We have constructed a two-dimensional finite-state-element computer model of the deforming process of the low- level cell of film-and-fabric-based composite material for the evaluation of its durability which takes into account non-linear viscoelasticity, temperature variations, ageing of the material, the process of upbuilding of microdamage and photodegradation. Qualitative research of operational factors influence (UV, temperature) on film-and-fabric composite materials durability was conducted.

  19. Biocomposite cellulose-alginate films: promising packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, Juho Antti; Kolehmainen, Aleksi; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Niinimäki, Jouko; Hormi, Osmo E O

    2014-05-15

    Biocomposite films based on cellulose and alginate were produced using unmodified birch pulp, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and birch pulp derivate, nanofibrillated anionic dicarboxylic acid cellulose (DCC), having widths of fibres ranging from 19.0 μm to 25 nm as cellulose fibre materials. Ionically cross-linked biocomposites were produced using Ca(2+) cross-linking. Addition of micro- and nanocelluloses as a reinforcement increased the mechanical properties of the alginate films remarkably, e.g. addition of 15% of NFC increased a tensile strength of the film from 70.02 to 97.97 MPa. After ionic cross-linking, the tensile strength of the film containing 10% of DCC was increased from 69.63 to 125.31 MPa. The biocomposite films showed excellent grease barrier properties and reduced water vapour permeability (WVP) after the addition of cellulose fibres, except when unmodified birch pulp was used.

  20. Packaging material for thin film lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Weatherspoon, Kim A.

    1996-01-01

    A thin film battery including components which are capable of reacting upon exposure to air and water vapor incorporates a packaging system which provides a barrier against the penetration of air and water vapor. The packaging system includes a protective sheath overlying and coating the battery components and can be comprised of an overlayer including metal, ceramic, a ceramic-metal combination, a parylene-metal combination, a parylene-ceramic combination or a parylene-metal-ceramic combination.

  1. Fundamentals of polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the results of a one-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. The research was conducted to better understand the limitations and potential of solar cells using CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe by systematically investigating the fundamental relationships linking material processing, material properties, and device behavior. By selenizing Cu and In layers, we fabricated device-quality CuInSe{sub 2} thin films and demonstrated a CuInSe{sub 2} solar cell with 7% efficiency. We added Ga, to increase the band gap of CuInSe{sub 2} devices to increase the open-circuit voltage to 0.55 V. We fabricated and analyzed Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2}/CuInSe{sub 2} devices to demonstrate the potential for combining the benefits of higher V{sub oc} while retaining the current-generating capacity of CuInSe{sub 2}. We fabricated an innovative superstrate device design with more than 5% efficiency, as well as a bifacial spectral-response technique for determining the electron diffusion length and optical absorption coefficient of CuInSe{sub 2} in an operational cell. The diffusion length was found to be greater than 1 {mu}m. We qualitatively modeled the effect of reducing heat treatments in hydrogen and oxidizing treatments in air on the I-V behavior of CuInSe{sub 2} devices. We also investigated post-deposition heat treatments and chemical processing and used them to fabricate a 9.6%-efficient CdTe/CdS solar cell using physical vapor deposition.

  2. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  3. Processing materials in space - The history and the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassay, Roger; Carswell, Bill

    1987-01-01

    The development of materials processing in space, and some of the Soyuz, Apollo, Skylab, and Shuttle orbital materials experiments are reviewed. Consideration is given to protein crystal growth, electrophoresis, low-gravity isoelectric focusing, phase partitioning, a monodisperse latex reactor, semiconductor crystal growth, solution crystal growth, the triglycine sulfate experiment, vapor crystal growth experiments, the mercuric iodide experiment, electronic and electrooptical materials, organic thin films and crystalline solids, deep undercooling of metals and alloys, magnetic materials, immiscible materials, metal solidification research, reluctant glass-forming materials, and containerless glass formation. The space processing apparatuses and ground facilities, for materials processing are described. Future facilities for commercial research, development, and manufacturing in space are proposed.

  4. Processing materials in space - The history and the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassay, Roger; Carswell, Bill

    1987-01-01

    The development of materials processing in space, and some of the Soyuz, Apollo, Skylab, and Shuttle orbital materials experiments are reviewed. Consideration is given to protein crystal growth, electrophoresis, low-gravity isoelectric focusing, phase partitioning, a monodisperse latex reactor, semiconductor crystal growth, solution crystal growth, the triglycine sulfate experiment, vapor crystal growth experiments, the mercuric iodide experiment, electronic and electrooptical materials, organic thin films and crystalline solids, deep undercooling of metals and alloys, magnetic materials, immiscible materials, metal solidification research, reluctant glass-forming materials, and containerless glass formation. The space processing apparatuses and ground facilities, for materials processing are described. Future facilities for commercial research, development, and manufacturing in space are proposed.

  5. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a summary of the research, citations of publications resulting from the research and abstracts of such publications. We have made no inventions in the performance of the work in this project. The main goals of the project were to set up a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond growth system attached to an UltraHigh Vacuum (UHV) atomic resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) system and carry out experiments aimed at studying the properties and growth of diamond films using atomic resolution UHV STM. We successfully achieved these goals. We observed, for the first time, the atomic structure of the surface of CVD grown epitaxial diamond (100) films using UHV STM. We studied the effects of atomic hydrogen on the CVD diamond growth process. We studied the electronic properties of the diamond (100) (2x1) surface, and the effect of alkali metal adsorbates such as Cs on the work function of this surface using UHV STM spectroscopy techniques. We also studied, using STM, new electronic materials such as carbon nanotubes and gold nanostructures. This work resulted in four publications in refereed scientific journals and five publications in refereed conference proceedings.

  6. Development of a Process Analytical Technology (PAT) for in-line monitoring of film thickness and mass of coating materials during a pan coating operation.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Claire; Genty, Muriel; Boiret, Mathieu; Julien, Marc; Meunier, Loïc; Lecoq, Olivier; Baron, Michel; Chaminade, Pierre; Péan, Jean Manuel

    2011-07-17

    The aim of this study was to perform in-line Near Infrared (NIR) measurements inside a pan coater to monitor a coating operation in real-time, by predicting the increases in mass of coating materials and coating thickness. A polymer combination of ethylcellulose/poly(vinyl-alcohol)-poly(ethylene-glycol) graft copolymer was used as functional aqueous coating. Coated tablets were sampled at regular intervals during the coating operation, then subjected to either simple and fast weighing (n=50) or accurate and non-destructive Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI) measurements (n=3). Off-line NIR spectra analysis revealed that the coating operation could efficiently be controlled by focusing on two distinct NIR regions, related to absorption bands of ethylcellulose. Principal component analysis of in-line NIR spectra gave a clear classification of the collected coated tablets. Real-time quantitative monitoring of the coating operation was successfully performed from partial least square calibration models built using either TPI or weighing as reference method. Coating thicknesses as well as mass of coating materials used as primary values provided accurate NIR predictions. A comparison study demonstrated that both reference methods led to reliable and accurate real-time monitoring of the coating operation. This work demonstrated that in-line NIR measurements associated with multivariate analyses can be implemented to monitor in real-time a pan coating operation in order to fulfil the expectations of ICH Q8 guideline on pharmaceutical development, especially in terms of PAT control strategy and reduced end-product testing.

  7. Ultra-Thin Pyrocarbon Films as a Versatile Coating Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplas, Tommi; Kuzhir, Polina

    2017-02-01

    The properties and synthesis procedures of the nanometrically thin pyrolyzed photoresist films (PPF) and the pyrolytic carbon films (PCF) were compared, and a number of similarities were found. Closer examination showed that the optical properties of these films are almost identical; however, the DC resistance of PPF is about three times higher than that of PCF. Moreover, we observed that the wettability of amorphous PPF and PCF was almost comparable to crystalline graphite. Potential applications executed by utilizing the small difference in the synthesis procedure of these two materials are suggested.

  8. Ultra-Thin Pyrocarbon Films as a Versatile Coating Material.

    PubMed

    Kaplas, Tommi; Kuzhir, Polina

    2017-12-01

    The properties and synthesis procedures of the nanometrically thin pyrolyzed photoresist films (PPF) and the pyrolytic carbon films (PCF) were compared, and a number of similarities were found. Closer examination showed that the optical properties of these films are almost identical; however, the DC resistance of PPF is about three times higher than that of PCF. Moreover, we observed that the wettability of amorphous PPF and PCF was almost comparable to crystalline graphite. Potential applications executed by utilizing the small difference in the synthesis procedure of these two materials are suggested.

  9. Thick film silicon growth techniques. [die materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.; White, V. E.

    1973-01-01

    The research which was directed toward finding an improved die material is reported. Wetting experiments were conducted with various materials to determine their compatibility with silicon. Work has also continued toward the development of quartz as a die material as new techniques have provided more optimistic results than observed in the past. As a result of the thermal modification previously described, improvements in growth stability have contributed to an increase in ribbon quality.

  10. Low-temperature Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Silicon Materials and Thin-film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, Andrei; Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia

    Low-temperature processing and characterization of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) materials and devices are reviewed. An overview of silicon-based low-temperature thin-film dielectrics is given in the context of thin-film transistor (TFT) device operation. The low-temperature growth and synthesis of these materials are also presented and compared to conventionally fabricated high-temperature processed devices. The effect of using nc-Si contacts on a-Si:H TFTs and the stability of nc-Si TFTs is reviewed.

  11. Cosolvent approach for solution-processable electronic thin films.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhaoyang; He, Qiyuan; Yin, Anxiang; Xu, Yuxi; Wang, Chen; Ding, Mengning; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Papandrea, Benjamin; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-04-28

    Low-temperature solution-processable electronic materials are of considerable interest for large-area, low-cost electronics, thermoelectrics, and photovoltaics. Using a soluble precursor and suitable solvent to formulate a semiconductor ink is essential for large-area fabrication of semiconductor thin films. To date, it has been shown that hydrazine can be used as a versatile solvent to process a wide range of inorganic semiconductors. However, hydrazine is highly toxic and not suitable for large-scale manufacturing. Here we report a binary mixed solvent of amine and thiol for effective dispersion and dissolution of a large number of inorganic semiconductors including Cu2S, Cu2Se, In2S3, In2Se3, CdS, SnSe, and others. The mixed solvent is significantly less toxic and safer than hydrazine, while at the same time offering the comparable capability of formulating diverse semiconductor ink with a concentration as high as >200 mg/mL. We further show that such ink material can be readily processed into high-performance semiconducting thin films (Cu2S and Cu2Se) with the highest room-temperature conductivity among solution-based materials. Furthermore, we show that complex semiconductor alloys with tunable band gaps, such as CuIn(S(x)Se(1-x))2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1), can also be readily prepared by simply mixing Cu2S, Cu2Se, In2S3, and In2Se3 ink solutions in a proper ratio. Our study outlines a general strategy for the formulation of inorganic semiconductor ink for low-temperature processing of large-area electronic thin films on diverse substrates and can greatly impact diverse areas including flexible electronics, thermoelectrics, and photovoltaics.

  12. Materials genomics of thin film strain relaxation by misfit dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, R.; Parvaneh, H.; Andersen, D.; Bean, John C.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize the development and implementation of a "process simulator" for modeling thin film strain relaxation by injection of misfit dislocations. The process simulator, initially developed for GexSi1-x/Si(100) lattice-mismatched epitaxy, integrates elasticity and dislocation theory with experimental measurements of kinetic parameters describing dislocation nucleation, propagation, and interactions. This enables predictive simulation of the development of misfit dislocation arrays during growth and thermal annealing sequences. Further, in the spirit of the materials genome initiative, we show how once a relatively complete description is built for one materials system, extension to a related system may be implemented using a greatly reduced data set. We illustrate this concept by translation of the simulator for GexSi1-x/Si(100) epitaxy into predictive simulation for the GexSi1-x/Si(110) system (which has quite different dislocation microstructure and kinetics) using greatly reduced data sets for the latter system and incorporating data refinement methods to extract unknown kinetic parameters. This sets the platform for extension of these methods to a broader set of strained layer systems.

  13. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenbing

    The barrier to utilize solar generated electricity mainly comes from their higher cost relative to fossil fuels. However, innovations with new materials and processing techniques can potentially make cost effective photovoltaics. One such strategy is to develop solution processed photovoltaics which avoid the expensive vacuum processing required by traditional solar cells. The dissertation is mainly focused on two absorber material system for thin film solar cells: chalcopyrite CuIn(S,Se)2 (CISS) and kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4 organized in chronological order. Chalcopyrite CISS is a very promising material. It has been demonstrated to achieve the highest efficiency among thin film solar cells. Scaled-up industry production at present has reached the giga-watt per year level. The process however mainly relies on vacuum systems which account for a significant percentage of the manufacturing cost. In the first section of this dissertation, hydrazine based solution processed CISS has been explored. The focus of the research involves the procedures to fabricate devices from solution. The topics covered in Chapter 2 include: precursor solution synthesis with a focus on understanding the solution chemistry, CISS absorber formation from precursor, properties modification toward favorable device performance, and device structure innovation toward tandem device. For photovoltaics to have a significant impact toward meeting energy demands, the annual production capability needs to be on TW-level. On such a level, raw materials supply of rare elements (indium for CIS or tellurium for CdTe) will be the bottleneck limiting the scalability. Replacing indium with zinc and tin, earth abundant kesterite CZTS exhibits great potential to reach the goal of TW-level with no limitations on raw material availability. Chapter 3 shows pioneering work towards solution processing of CZTS film at low temperature. The solution processed devices show performances which rival vacuum

  14. Integrated lunar materials manufacturing process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Michael A. (Inventor); Knudsen, Christian W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A manufacturing plant and process for production of oxygen on the moon uses lunar minerals as feed and a minimum of earth-imported, process materials. Lunar feed stocks are hydrogen-reducible minerals, ilmenite and lunar agglutinates occurring in numerous, explored locations mixed with other minerals in the pulverized surface layer of lunar soil known as regolith. Ilmenite (FeTiO.sub.3) and agglutinates contain ferrous (Fe.sup.+2) iron reducible by hydrogen to yield H.sub.2 O and metallic Fe at about 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. The H.sub.2 O is electrolyzed in gas phase to yield H.sub.2 for recycle and O.sub.2 for storage and use. Hydrogen losses to lunar vacuum are minimized, with no net hydrogen (or any other earth-derived reagent) consumption except for small leaks. Feed minerals are surface-mined by front shovels and transported in trucks to the processing area. The machines are manned or robotic. Ilmenite and agglutinates occur mixed with silicate minerals which are not hydrogen-reducible at 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. and consequently are separated and concentrated before feeding to the oxygen generation process. Solids rejected from the separation step and reduced solids from the oxygen process are returned to the mine area. The plant is powered by nuclear or solar power generators. Vapor-phase water electrolysis, a staged, countercurrent, fluidized bed reduction reactor and a radio-frequency-driven ceramic gas heater are used to improve thermal efficiency.

  15. Lunar materials processing system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    The theme of this paper is that governmental resources will not permit the simultaneous development of all viable lunar materials processing (LMP) candidates. Choices will inevitably be made, based on the results of system integration trade studies comparing candidates to each other for high-leverage applications. It is in the best long-term interest of the LMP community to lead the selection process itself, quickly and practically. The paper is in five parts. The first part explains what systems integration means and why the specialized field of LMP needs this activity now. The second part defines the integration context for LMP -- by outlining potential lunar base functions, their interrelationships and constraints. The third part establishes perspective for prioritizing the development of LMP methods, by estimating realistic scope, scale, and timing of lunar operations. The fourth part describes the use of one type of analytical tool for gaining understanding of system interactions: the input/output model. A simple example solved with linear algebra is used to illustrate. The fifth and closing part identifies specific steps needed to refine the current ability to study lunar base system integration. Research specialists have a crucial role to play now in providing the data upon which this refinement process must be based.

  16. Ultrastructure Processing of Advanced Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    also succeeded in growing up to twelve alternating layers of PbTiO 3 and SrTiO3 , that is, six pairs. These films will be evaluated for quantum well...applications. Another significant development in this period is the discovery by our group of ferroelectricity in ax- Nb 20 5 and y-Nb20 5. These compounds... Nb 2 0 5 powder and (b) a- Nb 20 5 powder -6- P-E hysteresis loop (at 60Hz) In the Pt(electrode)/LINbO3 thin film/ Au(electrode) sample with sandwich

  17. Control method and system for use when growing thin-films on semiconductor-based materials

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    2001-01-01

    A process and system for use during the growth of a thin film upon the surface of a substrate by exposing the substrate surface to vaporized material in a high vacuum (HV) facility involves the directing of an electron beam generally toward the surface of the substrate as the substrate is exposed to vaporized material so that electrons are diffracted from the substrate surface by the beam and the monitoring of the pattern of electrons diffracted from the substrate surface as vaporized material settles upon the substrate surface. When the monitored pattern achieves a condition indicative of the desired condition of the thin film being grown upon the substrate, the exposure of the substrate to the vaporized materials is shut off or otherwise adjusted. To facilitate the adjustment of the crystallographic orientation of the film relative to the electron beam, the system includes a mechanism for altering the orientation of the surface of the substrate relative to the electron beam.

  18. Complex Fluids and Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. Gary

    1998-11-01

    Complex fluids, such as polymeric liquids, colloidal dispersions, surfactant solutions, immiscible fluid blends and fiber suspensions are the basis of many manufactured products. These fluids are distinct from common Newtonian liquids in that there is a strong coupling between flow and the microstructural state of the fluid. Thus, when processed in the liquid state, the macroscopic properties of the material may be changed. This can either be detrimental or it may offer an opportunity to tailor the processing flow to optimize the property of interest. In any case, there is a tremendous need and an opportunity for fluid mechanicians to develop a theoretical and experimental basis for understanding the fluid mechanics of complex fluids, including the coupling between flow and the microstructural state of the material. In the present talk, I discuss (a personal view of) the underlying basis of current fluid mechanics research on the dynamics of complex fluids. The general principles are then illustrated using the specific example of nematic liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs). At the theoretical model level, LCPs resemble a concentrated suspension of rod-like fibers with the addition of a so-called nematic potential energy that is minimized when the system is in a state of uniform alignment. The primary technological interest in LCPs is their potential for high modulus, low weight, structural materials. The one very successful example of a product which realizes this potential is the DuPont fiber known as Kevlar.® To date, however, no two- or three-dimensional object with comparable strength has been made successfully. The main problem is the tendency for the fluid to spontaneously degenerate into a polydomain structure in the shear-like flows that exist in injection molding a sea of small, well-oriented microdomains, each of which is oriented randomly relative to its neighbors. The predecessor to this polydomain state is the appearance in flow of orientational

  19. SAW chemical sensor arrays using new thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ricco, A.J.; Xu, Chuanjing; Crooks, R.M.; Allred, R.E.

    1994-05-01

    We have used two classes of materials, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and plasma-grafted films (PGFs), as new chemically sensitive layers for an array of 97-MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay-line-based devices. Responses of these materials to each of 14 different analytes, representing the classes of saturated alkane, aromatic hydrocarbon, chlorinated hydrocarbon, alcohol, ketone, organophosphonate, and water, have been evaluated using our six-SAW device array. Results reveal a qualitative ``chemical orthogonality`` of the films that is very promising for pattern recognition analysis.

  20. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  1. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  2. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  3. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  4. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  5. High mobility solution processed organic thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Kyu

    To date, most high mobility organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) have used vapor-deposited organic semiconductors as the active material. The OTFT fabrication processes for vapor deposited organic materials are not so different from conventional inorganic TFT fabrication. Therefore they are constrained by similar production costs with some savings related to reduced processing temperatures and low cost substrates. Solution-processed OTFTs are of interest because of their compatibility with roll-to-roll processing which may allow simplified device fabrication and further reduced processing costs. In the project outlined for this thesis, high performance solution processed small molecule OTFTs were developed for their application in integrated circuits and flat panel displays. 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) and fluorinated 5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl) anthradithiophene (F-TES ADT) were used as high performance solution processible small molecules. Using TIPS-pentacene and F-TES ADT in combination with a variety of device fabrication techniques, mobilities greater than 1.2 cm2/V·s and 3 cm2/V·s respectively have been obtained. These devices were made using a drop casting process and represent the best mobility for solution processed OTFTs to date. Additionally, using the F-TES ADT, spin cast OTFTs which show mobilities of greater than 1.0 cm2/V·s with relatively good film uniformity have been obtained. Film growth which is considerably more ordered on pentafluorobenzene (PFBT) treated Au surfaces, and on samples with patterned PFBT-Au structures grains appear to grow out from the PFBT-Au areas into the oxide areas were observed. This results in a substantial variation in field effect mobility with gate length as grains growing from the source and drain electrodes meet and overlap. Spun F-TES ADT OTFTs fabricated with films deposited on PFBT-treated Au electrodes show mobilities of 0.1--0.5 cm2/V·s from a toluene solution and 0

  6. Thin Film Composite Materials, Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    were Kevlar coated with silicone, EPDM , or neoprene rubber, with the following results: 1. Tensile testing of coated Kevlar fabric is very difficult...materials. 2. A method was developed for measuring water vapor permeability. Neoprene and EPDM are promising as coatings with good water resistance; however...barrier to prevent loss of the working fluid. The outside would be coated with a high emissivity material that would also shield the Kevlar from degrading

  7. Antireflection effects at nanostructured material interfaces and the suppression of thin-film interference.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiaoyin; Zhang, Xu A; Bagal, Abhijeet; Guo, Wei; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2013-06-14

    Thin-film interference is a well-known effect, and it is commonly observed in the colored appearance of many natural phenomena. Caused by the interference of light reflected from the interfaces of thin material layers, such interference effects can lead to wavelength and angle-selective behavior in thin-film devices. In this work, we describe the use of interfacial nanostructures to eliminate interference effects in thin films. Using the same principle inspired by moth-eye structures, this approach creates an effective medium where the index is gradually varying between the neighboring materials. We present the fabrication process for such nanostructures at a polymer-silicon interface, and experimentally demonstrate its effectiveness in suppressing thin-film interference. The principle demonstrated in this work can lead to enhanced efficiency and reduce wavelength/angle sensitivity in multilayer optoelectronic devices.

  8. Apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a thin-film substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Eric J.; Kooyer, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a surface of a continuous thin-film substrate and a treated thin-film cathode having increased smoothness are disclosed. A web of untreated cathode material is moved between a feed mechanism and a take-up mechanism, and passed through a treatment station. The web of cathode material typically includes areas having surface defects, such as prominences extending from the surface of the cathode material. The surface of the cathode material is treated with an abrasive material to reduce the height of the prominences so as to increase an 85 degree gloss value of the cathode material surface by at least approximately 10. The web of cathode material may be subjected to a subsequent abrasive treatment at the same or other treatment station. Burnishing or lapping film is employed at a treatment station to process the cathode material. An abrasive roller may alternatively be used to process the web of cathode material. The apparatus and method of the present invention may also be employed to treat the surface of a lithium anode foil so as to cleanse and reduce the roughness of the anode foil surface.

  9. Apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a thin-film substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Eric J.; Kooyer, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a surface of a continuous thin-film substrate and a treated thin-film cathode having increased smoothness are disclosed. A web of untreated cathode material is moved between a feed mechanism and a take-up mechanism, and passed through a treatment station. The web of cathode material typically includes areas having surface defects, such as prominences extending from the surface of the cathode material. The surface of the cathode material is treated with an abrasive material to reduce the height of the prominences so as to increase an 85 degree gloss value of the cathode material surface by at least approximately 10. The web of cathode material may be subjected to a subsequent abrasive treatment at the same or other treatment station. Burnishing or lapping film is employed at a treatment station to process the cathode material. An abrasive roller may alternatively be used to process the web of cathode material. The apparatus and method of the present invention may also be employed to treat the surface of a lithium anode foil so as to cleanse and reduce the roughness of the anode foil surface.

  10. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the primary purposes of this work are to study important technologies, particularly involving thin films, relevant to organic and polymeric materials for improving applicability to optical circuitry and devices and to assess the contribution of convection on film quality in unit and microgravity environments. Among the most important materials processing techniques of interest in this work are solution-based and by physical vapor transport, both having proven gravitational and acceleration dependence. In particular, PolyDiAcetylenes (PDA's) and PhthaloCyanines (Pc's) are excellent NonLinear Optical (NLO) materials with the promise of significantly improved NLO properties through order and film quality enhancements possible through microgravity processing. Our approach is to focus research on integrated optical circuits and optoelectronic devices relevant to solution-based and vapor processes of interest in the Space Sciences Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Modification of organic materials is an important aspect of achieving more highly ordered structures in conjunction with microgravity processing. Parallel activities include characterization of materials for particular NLO properties and determination of appropriation device designs consistent with selected applications. One result of this work is the determination, theoretically, that buoyancy-driven convection occurs at low pressures in an ideal gas in a thermalgradient from source to sink. Subsequent experiment supports the theory. We have also determined theoretically that buoyancy-driven convection occurs during photodeposition of PDA, an MSFC-patented process for fabricating complex circuits, which is also supported by experiment. Finally, the discovery of intrinsic optical bistability in metal-free Pc films enables the possibility of the development of logic gate technology on the basis of these materials.

  11. Absorption of thin film materials at 10.6 microm.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, W E; Butterfield, A W

    1975-12-01

    Absorption indices at a wavelength of 10.6 mum for thin films of As(2)S(3), GeSe, BaF(2), ZnSe, and CdTe were measured by calorimetric techniques with a CO(2) laser. The values obtained, 4.6 x 10(-4), 1.4 x 10(-3), 2.8 x 10(-3), 2.8 x 10(-3), and 5.0 x 10(-3), respectively, were significantly greater than the corresponding values for the bulk materials. This difference was least for the vitreous films, As(2)S(3) and GeSe, which also had a lower absorption than the remaining polycrystalline films. Details are presented of the microstructure of the films as determined by scanning electron microscopy and k-ray diffraction.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of diamond films and optoelectronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we report on progress achieved from 12/1/92 to 10/1/93 under the grant entitled 'Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials'. We have set-up a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond film growth system and a Raman spectroscopy system to study the nucleation and growth of diamond films with atomic resolution using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A unique feature of the diamond film growth system is that diamond films can be transferred directly to the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber of a scanning tunneling microscope without contaminating the films by exposure to air. The University of North Texas (UNT) provided $20,000 this year as matching funds for the NASA grant to purchase the diamond growth system. In addition, UNT provided a Coherent Innova 90S Argon ion laser, a Spex 1404 double spectrometer, and a Newport optical table costing $90,000 to set-up the Raman spectroscopy system. The CVD diamond growth system and Raman spectroscopy system will be used to grow and characterize diamond films with atomic resolution using STM as described in our proposal. One full-time graduate student and one full-time undergraduate student are supported under this grant. In addition, several graduate and undergraduate students were supported during the summer to assist in setting-up the diamond growth and Raman spectroscopy systems. We have obtained research results concerning STM of the structural and electronic properties of CVD grown diamond films, and STM and scanning tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanotubes. In collaboration with the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) group at UNT, we have also obtained results concerning the optoelectronic material siloxene. These results were published in refereed scientific journals, submitted for publication, and presented as invited and contributed talks at scientific conferences.

  13. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organics which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials.

  14. Process and film characterization of chemical-bath-deposited ZnS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dona, J.M.; Herrero, J.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical-bath deposition of ZnS thin films from NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}/SC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}/ZnSO{sub 4} solutions has been studied. The effect of various process parameters on the growth and the film quality is presented. A first approach to a mechanistic interpretation of the chemical process is reported. The structural, optical, chemical, and electrical properties of the ZNS thin films deposited by this method have been studied. The electron diffraction (EDS) analysis shows that the films are microcrystalline with a cubic structure. EDS analysis has demonstrated that the films are highly stoichiometric. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the ZnS thin films deposited by this method show that the films are continuous and homogeneous. Electrical conductivity measurements have shown the highly resistivity nature of these films ({sigma} = 10{sup {minus}9} S/cm).

  15. Characterization of Thin Films by XAFS: Application to Spintronics Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, Steve M.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2009-10-25

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has proven very valuable in characterizing thin films. This is illustrated with some examples from the area of diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) materials for spintronics applications. A promising route to DMS materials is doping of oxides such as TiO2 and ZnO with magnetic atoms such as Co. These can be grown as epitaxial thin films on various substrates. XAFS is especially valuable for characterizing the dopant atoms. The near edge region is sensitive to the symmetry of the bonding and valence of the dopants, and the extended XAFS can determine the details of the lattice site. XAFS is also valuable for detecting metallic nanoparticles. These can be difficult to detect by other methods, and can give a spurious magnetic signal. The power of XAFS is illustrated by examples from studies on Co doped ZnO films.

  16. Materials and processes control for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and processes control relative to space applications is discussed. The components of a total material and process control system are identified, contamination control issues are listed, and recommendations are made.

  17. Optical fiber magnetic field sensors with TbDyFe magnetostrictive thin films as sensing materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minghong; Dai, Jixiang; Zhou, Ciming; Jiang, Desheng

    2009-11-09

    Different from usually-used bulk magnetostrictive materials, magnetostrictive TbDyFe thin films were firstly proposed as sensing materials for fiber-optic magnetic field sensing characterization. By magnetron sputtering process, TbDyFe thin films were deposited on etched side circle of a fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) as sensing element. There exists more than 45pm change of FBG wavelength when magnet field increase up to 50 mT. The response to magnetic field is reversible, and could be applicable for magnetic and current sensing.

  18. Synthesis of thin films and materials utilizing a gaseous catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Daniel E; Schwenzer, Birgit; Gomm, John R; Roth, Kristian M; Heiken, Brandon; Brutchey, Richard

    2013-10-29

    A method for the fabrication of nanostructured semiconducting, photoconductive, photovoltaic, optoelectronic and electrical battery thin films and materials at low temperature, with no molecular template and no organic contaminants. High-quality metal oxide semiconductor, photovoltaic and optoelectronic materials can be fabricated with nanometer-scale dimensions and high dopant densities through the use of low-temperature biologically inspired synthesis routes, without the use of any biological or biochemical templates.

  19. Materials Analysis of CED Nb Films Being Coated on Bulk Nb Single Cell SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Reece, Charles; Palczewski, Ari; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Krishnan, Mahadevan; James, Colt; Irfan, Irfan

    2013-09-01

    This study is an on-going research on depositing a Nb film on the internal wall of bulk Nb single cell SRF cavities, via a cathodic arc Nb plasma ions source, an coaxial energetic condensation (CED) facility at AASC company. The motivation is to firstly create a homoepitaxy-like Nb/Nb film in a scale of a ~1.5GHz RF single cell cavity. Next, through SRF measurement and materials analysis, it might reveal the baseline properties of the CED-type homoepitaxy Nb films. Literally, a top-surface layer of Nb films which sustains SRF function, always grows up in homo-epitaxy mode, on top of a Nb nucleation layer. Homo-epitaxy growth of Nb must be the final stage (a crystal thickening process) of any coatings of Nb film on alternative cavity structure materials. Such knowledge of Nb-Nb homo-epitaxy is useful to create future realistic SRF cavity film coatings, such as hetero-epitaxy Nb/Cu Films, or template-layer-mitigated Nb films. One large-grain, and three fine grain bulk Nb cavities were coated. They went through cryogenic RF measurement. Preliminary results show that the Q0 of a Nb film could be as same as the pre-coated bulk Nb surface (which received a chemically-buffered polishing plus a light electro-polishing); but quality factor of two tested cavities dropped quickly. We are investigating if the severe Q-slope is caused by hydrogen incorporation before deposition, or is determined by some structural defects during Nb film growth.

  20. Thin film thermocouples for thermoelectric characterization of nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Matthew; Zhou, Chuanle; Varrenti, Andrew; Chyung, Seung Hye; Long, Jieyi; Memik, Seda

    2011-03-01

    The increased use of nanostructured materials as thermoelectrics requires reliable and accurate characterization of the anisotropic thermal coefficients of small structures, such as superlattices and quantum wire networks. Thin evaporated metal films can be used to create thermocouples with a very small thermal mass and low thermal conductivity, in order to measure thermal gradients on nanostructures and thereby measure the thermal conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient of the nanostructure. In this work we confirm the known result that thin metal films have lower Seebeck coefficients than bulk metals, and we also calibrate the Seebeck coefficient of a thin-film Ni/Cr thermocouple with 50 nm thickness, showing it to have about 1/4 the bulk value. We demonstrate reproducibility of this thin-filmSeebeck coefficient on multiple substrates, and we show that this coefficient does, in fact, change as a function of film thickness. We will discuss prototype measurement designs and preliminary work as to how these thin films can be used to study both Seebeck coefficients and thermal conductivities of superlattices in various geometries. The same technology can in principle be used on integrated circuits for thermal mapping, under the name ``Integrated On-Chip Thermocouple Array'' (IOTA).

  1. Cellulose Nanofibril Film as a Piezoelectric Sensor Material.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Satu; Siponkoski, Tuomo; Sarlin, Essi; Mettänen, Marja; Vuoriluoto, Maija; Pammo, Arno; Juuti, Jari; Rojas, Orlando J; Franssila, Sami; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2016-06-22

    Self-standing films (45 μm thick) of native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were synthesized and characterized for their piezoelectric response. The surface and the microstructure of the films were evaluated with image-based analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The measured dielectric properties of the films at 1 kHz and 9.97 GHz indicated a relative permittivity of 3.47 and 3.38 and loss tangent tan δ of 0.011 and 0.071, respectively. The films were used as functional sensing layers in piezoelectric sensors with corresponding sensitivities of 4.7-6.4 pC/N in ambient conditions. This piezoelectric response is expected to increase remarkably upon film polarization resulting from the alignment of the cellulose crystalline regions in the film. The CNF sensor characteristics were compared with those of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as reference piezoelectric polymer. Overall, the results suggest that CNF is a suitable precursor material for disposable piezoelectric sensors, actuators, or energy generators with potential applications in the fields of electronics, sensors, and biomedical diagnostics.

  2. IN-SITU Diagnostics For Deposition And Processing Of High Tc Superconducting Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1990-02-01

    The deposition of high quality superconducting thin films based on the metal oxides has given rise to a variety of needs for diagnostic techniques. These needs are primarily for monitoring, 1. the material ejection process from the target, 2. the ejected vapor interaction with the background oxygen, 3. the crystallization dynamics at the substrate and 4. post deposition analysis and processing of the film. This paper summarizes some of the recent work in this direction

  3. Thick-film MEMS thermoelectric sensor fabricated using a thermally assisted lift-off process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yuan; Cai, Haogang; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a thick-film microelectromechanical systems thermoelectric sensor fabricated by a low-temperature thermally assisted lift-off process. During the process, thick metal or semiconductor films experience controlled breakup due to thermal reflow of the underlying lithographically defined photoresist patterns, thereby facilitating the sacrificial removal of the photoresist. This enables rapid and reliable patterning of thick films that can otherwise be difficult to achieve by conventional processes. Experimental results with a sensor consisting of a 60-junction thick-film antimony-bismuth thermopile demonstrate an electric conductivity of 5.44×106 S/m and a Seebeck coefficient of 114 μV/K per junction, which are comparable to those obtained from bulk materials. Thus, the thick-film sensor can potentially allow low-noise, high-efficiency thermoelectric measurements.

  4. FMR study of thin film FeGe skyrmionic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Page, Michael R.; Gallagher, James; Purser, Carola; Schulze, Joseph; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    Magnetic Skyrmions have attracted intense interest due to their novel topological properties and the potential for energy efficient computing. Magnetic dynamics play an important part in enabling some of these functionalities. Understanding these dynamics can shed light on the interplay of the various magnetic interactions that exist in these materials and lead to a rich magnetic phase diagram, including the Skyrmion phase. We have grown phase-pure FeGe epitaxial films on Si (111) and studied them using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). FeGe has one of the highest recorded skyrmion transition temperatures, close to room temperature, and thin films are known to further stabilize the Skyrmion phase in the magnetic field-temperature space. We have performed cavity-based single frequency FMR from liquid nitrogen to room temperature on 120 nm thick films in both in-plane and out-of-plane geometries. The resulting complex spectra are consistent with those reported in literature for the bulk material and can be understood in terms of a conical model for the magnetism. Variable temperature broadband spectroscopy and measurements on thinner films, to better identify the various magnetic phases and their dynamic behavior, are ongoing and their progress will be discussed. Funding for this research was provided by the Center for Emergent Materials: an NSF MRSEC under Award Number DMR-1420451.

  5. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  6. Materials processing in space: Early experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Herring, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of the space environment were reviewed. Potential applications of space processing are discussed and include metallurgical processing, and processing of semiconductor materials. The behavior of fluid in low gravity is described. The evolution of apparatus for materials processing in space was reviewed.

  7. Dual ion beam processed diamondlike films for industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Kussmaul, M. T.; Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Single and dual beam ion source systems are used to generate amorphous diamondlike carbon (DLC) films, which were evaluated for a variety of applications including protective coatings on transmitting materials, power electronics as insulated gates and corrosion resistant barriers. A list of the desirable properties of DLC films along with potential applications are presented.

  8. Repair materials and processes for the MD-11 Composite Tailcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Bonnar, Gerard R.

    This paper describes field and depot level repair methods for the MD-11 Composite Tailcone. The repair materials, processing methods, and mechanical properties of the test specimens and subcomponents are discussed. According to recent tests, the dry carbon cloth and the liquid resin matrix that can be cured under 93 C have better processing and mechanical properties than the 121 C curing prepregs and film adhesives. The moisture in the parent CFRP is the main cause of creating voids in the adhesive layer during the 121 C/vacuum pressure cure cycle. The lower processing temperature (wet layup) showed better results than higher processing temperature (prepreg/adhesive layup) for composite repair.

  9. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  10. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  11. Waveguides in Thin Film Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakisov, Sergey; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; Teague, Zedric

    1996-01-01

    Results on the fabrication of integrated optical components in polymeric materials using photo printing methods will be presented. Optical waveguides were fabricated by spin coating preoxidized silicon wafers with organic dye/polymer solution followed by soft baking. The waveguide modes were studied using prism coupling technique. Propagation losses were measured by collecting light scattered from the trace of a propagation mode by either scanning photodetector or CCD camera. We observed the formation of graded index waveguides in photosensitive polyimides after exposure of UV light from a mercury arc lamp. By using a theoretical model, an index profile was reconstructed which is in agreement with the profile reconstructed by the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculation technique using a modal spectrum of the waveguides. Proposed mechanism for the formation of the graded index includes photocrosslinking followed by UV curing accompanied with optical absorption increase. We also developed the prototype of a novel single-arm double-mode interferometric sensor based on our waveguides. It demonstrates high sensitivity to the chance of ambient temperature. The device can find possible applications in aeropropulsion control systems.

  12. Waveguides in Thin Film Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakisov, Sergey; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; Teague, Zedric

    1996-01-01

    Results on the fabrication of integrated optical components in polymeric materials using photo printing methods will be presented. Optical waveguides were fabricated by spin coating preoxidized silicon wafers with organic dye/polymer solution followed by soft baking. The waveguide modes were studied using prism coupling technique. Propagation losses were measured by collecting light scattered from the trace of a propagation mode by either scanning photodetector or CCD camera. We observed the formation of graded index waveguides in photosensitive polyimides after exposure of UV light from a mercury arc lamp. By using a theoretical model, an index profile was reconstructed which is in agreement with the profile reconstructed by the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculation technique using a modal spectrum of the waveguides. Proposed mechanism for the formation of the graded index includes photocrosslinking followed by UV curing accompanied with optical absorption increase. We also developed the prototype of a novel single-arm double-mode interferometric sensor based on our waveguides. It demonstrates high sensitivity to the chance of ambient temperature. The device can find possible applications in aeropropulsion control systems.

  13. Effect of material properties on the drainage of symmetric, plane parallel, mobile foam films

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, G.; Hirasaki, G.J.; Miller, C.A.

    1996-12-01

    Drainage of a mobile, symmetric, plane parallel thin liquid film between two gas bubbles is studies. An analytical solution for the rate of thinning of such a liquid film with an insoluble surfactant and having both film elasticity and surface viscosity is presented for the first time. Analysis is extended to the more general case of a soluble surfactant and compared with previous analyses. Surfactant material parameters affecting the rate of thinning are identified and grouped into a single dimensionless parameter which describes the transition from a mobile to an immobile film. Significant deviation from the Reynolds velocity is found when this dimensionless parameter is small. Dispersed fluid systems are very important in chemical engineering processes and products, e.g., distillation, pulping in the paper industry, enhanced oil recovery, and soil remediation.

  14. Radiopacity of endodontic materials on film and a digital sensor.

    PubMed

    Rasimick, Brian J; Shah, Rinal P; Musikant, Barry Lee; Deutsch, Allan S

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the radiographic appearance of 12 endodontic materials as visualized on either Kodak Ultra-speed D speed film (Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY) or a Gendex eHD digital sensor (Gendex Dental Systems, Milan, Italy). Ten discs of each material were radiographed alongside an aluminum alloy 1100 (Alcoa, Pittsburgh, PA) stepwedge that was used for reference. For every radiograph, the average grayscale value of the material was converted into absorbance notation and compared with that of the reference stepwedge in order to determine the equivalent radiopacity in terms of millimeters of Al 1100 per millimeter of material. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance testing detected significant differences with respect to imaging system, material, and the interaction of the two factors (p < 0.001). The difference in a material's radiopacity as measured on the digital sensor compared with film was greater than 10% for 4 of the 12 materials and over 40% for InnoEndo (Heraus Kulzer, Armonk, NY). It was speculated that barium fillers cause this effect.

  15. Thin film materials and devices for resistive temperature sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basantani, Hitesh A.

    Thin films of vanadium oxide (VOx) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are the two dominant material systems used in resistive infrared radiation detectors (microbolometers) for sensing long wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths in the 8--14 microm range. Typical thin films of VO x (x < 2) currently used in the bolometer industry have a magnitude of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) between 2%/K -- 3%/K. In contrast, thin films of hydrogenated germanium (SiGe:H) have |TCR| between 3%/K to 4%/K. Devices made from either of these materials have resulted in similar device performance with NETD ≈ 25 mK. The performance of the microbolometers is limited by the electronic noise, especially 1/f noise. Therefore, regardless of the choice of bolometer sensing material and read out circuitry, manufacturers are constantly striving to reduce 1/f noise while simultaneously increasing TCR to give better signal to noise ratios in their bolometers and ultimately, better image quality with more thermal information to the end user. In this work, thin films of VOx and hydrogenated germanium (Ge:H), having TCR values > 4 %/K are investigated as potential candidates for higher sensitivity next generation of microbolometers. Thin films of VO x were deposited by Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition (BTIBD) (˜85 nm thick). Electrical characterization of lateral resistor structures showed resistivity ranging from 104 O--cm to 2.1 x 104 O--cm, TCR varying from --4%/K to --5%/K, normalized Hooge parameter (alphaH/n) of 5 x 10 -21 to 5 x 10-18 cm3. Thin films of Ge:H were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) by incorporating an increasing amount of crystal fraction in the growing thin films. Thin films of Ge:H having a mixed phase, amorphous + nanocrystalline, having a |TCR| > 6 %/K were deposited with resistivity < 2,300 O--cm and a normalized Hooge's parameter 'alphaH/n' < 2 x 10-20 cm3. Higher TCR materials are desired, however, such materials have

  16. Process Diagnostics: Materials, Combustion Fusion. Volume 117. Materials Research Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    reference volume for professionals working in the area of materials process control as well as a graduate level textbook for a course in applied ... spectroscopy or process engineering that might be given as part of a chemistry, physics, chemical or materials engineering curriculum.

  17. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C.J.; Prakash, S.S.

    1999-09-07

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process is disclosed. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  18. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Charles Jeffrey; Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  19. Ultrastructure Processing of Advanced Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    As a continuation of our efforts to improve the molecular level understanding of the sol-gel process , we have recently carried out several studies...using various experimental techniques are necessary to improve our molecular-level understanding of the gelation process . 22 UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOL...present in the solution. They are sometimes added in order to improve the process such as catalysts [4], stabilizing additives [5], or drying control

  20. Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films

    ScienceCinema

    Sandia

    2016-07-12

    A simple, economical nanotechnology coating process that enables the development of nanoparticle thin films with architectures and properties unattainable by any other processing method. 2007 R&D 100 winner (SAND2007-1878P)

  1. Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-31

    A simple, economical nanotechnology coating process that enables the development of nanoparticle thin films with architectures and properties unattainable by any other processing method. 2007 R&D 100 winner (SAND2007-1878P)

  2. Aqueous Processing Material Accountability Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean

    2007-09-01

    Increased use of nuclear power will require new facilities. The U.S. has not built a new spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility for decades. Reprocessing facilities must maintain accountability of their nuclear fuel. This survey report on the techniques used in current aqueous reprocessing facilities, and provides references to source materials to assist facility design efforts.

  3. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications.

  4. Thin-film ferroelectric materials and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Lane W.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Ferroelectric materials, because of their robust spontaneous electrical polarization, are widely used in various applications. Recent advances in modelling, synthesis and characterization techniques are spurring unprecedented advances in the study of these materials. In this Review, we focus on thin-film ferroelectric materials and, in particular, on the possibility of controlling their properties through the application of strain engineering in conventional and unconventional ways. We explore how the study of ferroelectric materials has expanded our understanding of fundamental effects, enabled the discovery of novel phases and physics, and allowed unprecedented control of materials properties. We discuss several exciting possibilities for the development of new devices, including those in electronic, thermal and photovoltaic applications, and transduction sensors and actuators. We conclude with a brief survey of the different directions that the field may expand to over the coming years.

  5. Converting printed wiring product processing to aqueous processable dry film photoresist. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldammer, S.E.

    1996-07-01

    Fully aqueous processable dry film photoresists were evaluated to determine which dry film in the Federal Manufacturing and Technologies printed wiring board facility performed the best. The photoresists were chosen for their compatibility in alkaline etching, copper electroplating, and tin-lead electroplating. The processing evaluation included both single layer and double layer dry film photoresist for pattern plating.

  6. Thin film microelectronics materials production in the vacuum of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, A.; Sterling, M.; Horton, C.; Freundlich, A.; Pei, S.; Hill, R.

    1997-01-01

    The international Space Station era will open up a new dimension in the use of one of the unique attributes of space, vacuum, for the production of advanced semiconductor materials and devices for microelectronics applications. Ultra-vacuum is required for the fabrication in thin film form of high quality semiconductors. This can be accomplished behind a free flying platform similar to the current Wake Shield Facility which is specifically designed to support in-space production. The platform will require apparatus for thin film growth, a robotics interface to allow for the change out of raw materials and the harvesting of finished product, and a servicing plant incorporating Space Station that will support long-term utilization of the platform.

  7. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  8. All-Wet Metallization Process for Transparent Polyimide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Fujiwara, Y.; Akamatsu, K.; Nawafune, H.

    2013-03-01

    Electrically conductive Ag thin films were successfully formed onto optically transparent polyimide films via all-wet chemical process. The process involves alkaline-induced surface modification of polyimide films, subsequent incorporation of Ag+ ions through ion exchange reaction followed by reduction of incorporated Ag+ ions. Initial alkaline treatment time determines thickness (depth) of surface-modified layer and amount of Ag+ ions loading consequently. Higher Ag+ ions loading result in forming electrically conductive Ag thin films and its granular interfacial structure. Cu electroplating is able to be conducted on the resulting Ag thin films directly, and adhesive strength between the Cu(/Ag) film and transparent polyimide substrate reached up to 2 kN m-1.

  9. Materials Processing Research and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    of microstructural evolution, (5) development of Gamma and Beta-Gamma titanium alloys towards rolled sheets for thermal protection applications, ( 6 ...the hydrostatic stress. This work was published in Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A by Nicolaou, Miller, and Semiatin [ 6 ]. 4 2.2.2 The...observed values for the Titanium 6242s measured by Porter and John, as well as Ti6- 4 alloy reported on by Chan in Mater. Trans, 2008. In addition

  10. Structure-processing-property correlations in thin films of conjugated polymer nanocomposites and blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeram, Arvind

    Conjugated polymers have found several applications in recent years, in energy conversion and storage devices such as organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, batteries, and super capacitors. Thin films of polymers used for these applications need to be mechanically and thermally stable to withstand the harsh operating conditions. Although there is significant information on the optoelectronic properties of many of these polymers, there are only few studies on their mechanical properties. There is little information in the literature on how processing of these films influence mechanical properties. In the first part of this study, poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) films were prepared by thermolytic conversion of poly[p -phenylene (tetrahydrothiophenium)ethylene chloride] precursor films, at different temperatures and the kinetics of reaction was investigated using thermogravimetry and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The mechanical properties of the films, studied using nanoindentation, showed a dependence on the extent of conversion and chemical composition of the films. The presence of chemical defects (e.g., carbonyl groups, detected using FTIR spectroscopy), was also found to have a noticeable effect on the modulus and hardness of the films. The storage modulus, E', and plasticity decreased with an increase in conversion, whereas the loss modulus, E", showed the opposite trend. Both the precursor and the fully-converted PPV films were found to have significantly lower E" than E', consistent with the glassy nature of the polymers at room temperature. In the second part of the study, polyacetylene films were synthesized by acid-catalyzed dehydration reaction of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) precursor films. The kinetics of this reaction was monitored by thermogravimetry. The chemical structure of the conjugated polymer films was characterized by Raman and IR spectroscopy. Polyacetylene films incorporated with 1-propyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquid

  11. Hybrid Laser Processing of Transparent Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki

    The following chapter is an overview of processing fused silica and other transparent materials by pulsed-laser irradiation: (1) Direct excitation of materials with multi-wavelength excitation processes, and (2) Media-assisted process with a conventional pulsed laser. A method to etch transparent materials by using laserinduced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA), or laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE), has been described in detail.

  12. 3D tissue culture substrates produced by microthermoforming of pre-processed polymer films.

    PubMed

    Giselbrecht, S; Gietzelt, T; Gottwald, E; Trautmann, C; Truckenmüller, R; Weibezahn, K F; Welle, A

    2006-09-01

    We describe a new technology based on thermoforming as a microfabrication process. It significantly enhances the tailoring of polymers for three dimensional tissue engineering purposes since for the first time highly resolved surface and bulk modifications prior to a microstructuring process can be realised. In contrast to typical micro moulding techniques, the melting phase is avoided and thus allows the forming of pre-processed polymer films. The polymer is formed in a thermoelastic state without loss of material coherence. Therefore, previously generated modifications can be preserved. To prove the feasibility of our newly developed technique, so called SMART = Substrate Modification And Replication by Thermoforming, polymer films treated by various polymer modification methods, like UV-based patterned films, and films modified by the bombardment with energetic heavy ions, were post-processed by microthermoforming. The preservation of locally applied specific surface and bulk features was demonstrated e.g. by the selective adhesion of cells to patterned microcavity walls.

  13. Technical aspects of screen-film radiography, film processing, and quality control.

    PubMed

    Gray, J E

    1997-01-01

    The broad goal of quality control (QC) of screen-film radiography and film processing is to provide radiographs of consistent, high quality. Achievement of this goal requires attention to several areas, including QC of the screen-film system and photographic processor, acceptance testing of all components, and skill in analysis of film artifacts to "diagnose" the processor problems causing the aberrations. Methods to reduce waste, recycle by-products, and reuse resources such as silver are also part of the QC process. To optimize the photographic process, one should use the film, chemical solutions, processor, and screens and cassettes produced by one manufacturer or the combination recommended by the film manufacturer. Important variables in film processing (eg, density, density difference, and base plus fog) are recorded on control charts, which plot the variables as a function of time and allow easy analysis of changes in operating levels. Many variables can affect any component in the screen-film imaging system; problems caused by manufacturing batch-to-batch variation, which is perhaps the most pervasive variable, can be lessened by purchasing film, screens, and cassettes in large batches and of the same batch and by purchasing photographic chemicals in concentrated form and mixing them as needed. Acceptance testing ensures that the product meets expectations, ensures that its performance meets specifications, and establishes the operating level for the ongoing QC program.

  14. Dual-mode ion switching conducting polymer films as high energy supercapacitor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Naoi, Katsuhiko; Oura, Yasushi

    1995-12-31

    The electropolymerized polypyrrole films formed from micellar solution of anionic surfactants, viz., Dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS), showed potential-dependent anion and cation ion switching behavior and the peculiar columnar structure. The formation process and the redox of the polypyrrole was studied with the in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) methods. In-situ AFM observation clearly indicated that such a columnar structure started to form around critical charge densities of 60--100 mC cm{sup {minus}2}. The cyclic voltammogram for the PPy doped with DBS{sup {minus}} film showed two redox couples, each of which corresponds to a cation and an anion exchange process. Thus, the film behaves as a dual-mode ion doping/undoping exchanger. As the PPy film was prepared in higher concentration of the surfactant dopant, where the micelles are formed in solution, the resulting film showed a considerably higher (ca. three orders of magnitude) diffusion coefficient compared to ordinary PPy films so far reported. Such an enhanced diffusivity of ions could be attributed to a peculiar structure of the polymer formed. The feasibility of such polypyrrole in use of supercapacitor material was discussed.

  15. Smart materials behavior in phosphates: Role of hydroxyl groups and relevance to antiwear films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhvorostov, Dmitry; Müser, Martin H.; Song, Yang; Norton, Peter R.

    2009-07-01

    The elastic properties of materials under high pressure are relevant to the understanding and performance of many systems of current interest, for example, in geology and tribology. Of particular interest is the origin of the dramatic increase in modulus with increasing pressure, a response which is also called "smart materials behavior." In this context, simple phosphate-containing materials have been studied experimentally and theoretically, and the origins of this behavior have been associated with factors such as coordination of the cations and changes in the degree of polymerization and hydrogenation of the phosphate units. In the present paper we extend the former analysis on simple metal phosphate model compounds to so-called thermal films, an intermediate stage in the formation of effective antiwear films. The material was produced by heating a commercial zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), a common antiwear additive in lubricating oils, in poly-α-olefin base oil solutions to 150 °C, a process known to produce the thermal films. Its structure and equation of state were studied by means of x-ray diffraction and IR synchrotron radiation techniques during compression up to 25 GPa in a diamond anvil cell as well as during the subsequent decompression. As is the case for the simple metal phosphates, we find that the thermal films are relatively soft at low pressures but stiffen rapidly and ultimately amorphize irreversibly at high pressure. However, in addition to phase transformations involving cation sites occurring in the metal phosphates studied previously, thermal films undergo displacive transitions associated with instabilities of the hydroxyl groups. These results may imply that ZDDP ligands and those of the transformed materials not only affect ZDDP decomposition rate in engines but also the mechanical properties of the resulting antiwear films.

  16. Intelligent Processing of Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    and in-situ ellipsometry in one chamber. Results from the automatic spinner were compared with those of the bulk ceramics. In general, thin films on Ag ...coated thin films on Ag foil substrates and hot pressed bulk ceramics were fabricated and compared with respect to electrical and electrooptic...methanol at a 2:1 ratio by weight. The solution was spun onto Ag foil for comparison with bulk ceramics using a photoresist spinner at 2000 rpm for 15

  17. Multiferroic Applications of Nanoarchitectured, Solution-Processed Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buditama, Abraham Nataniel

    This dissertation compiles work on sol-gel syntheses of multiferroic materials and applications thereof. Multiferroics, or materials that simultaneously exhibit multiple order parameters such as ferromagnetism, ferroelectricity, or ferroelasticity, may be fabricated by solution processing techniques. Specifically, these techniques may be used to control both the atomic and the nanoscale structures of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PbZrxTi 1-xO3 or PZT) and magnetostrictive cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O4 or CFO). The first part of this work focuses on strain-coupling PZT and CFO into a magnetoelectric composite. A mesoporous CFO framework was synthesized using block copolymer templating, which was subsequently conformally filled by PZT by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The final porosity of the film is controlled by the ALD PZT layer, and we show that this porosity influences the magnetoelectric coupling of the composite. An ex situ external electric field is applied to the composite, and samples with the greatest porosity, and thus greatest mechanical flexibility, were able to accommodate strain transfer to the CFO, resulting in a greater reduction of the sample saturation magnetization. The second part of this work focuses on using solution processing to control domain-level contributions to the material's ferroic properties. An iterative spin coating process can be used to create PZT films of arbitrary thickness. Electric domains are generally pinned in nanoscale PZT thin films, but models of PZT films on the mesoscale must consider domain reorientation. As for CFO, solution processing may be used to control the CFO grain size, which in turn limits the size of its magnetic domains, and subsequently its static magnetic properties.

  18. Investigation of Materials Processing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    macrosegregation. Interdendritic fluid flow occurs as a result of solidification shrinkage and the force of gravity acting on a liquid of variable density ...MATERIAL ARMYUP @ 0.$000 0$9.3•W R E 1.51 S S 6.96 -1.00 ) TEý E 4% • •e TE RATLII• -3- ’LG $T (C) Figure 22: Plot of flow stress 42 43 LOG STRAIN RATE ...plots ..................... 32 Figure 21: Plot of copper content vs distance from chill plate ................. 33 Figure 22: Plot of flow stress

  19. CMOS Humidity Sensor System Using Carbon Nitride Film as Sensing Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Pil; Lee, Ji Gong; Chowdhury, Shaestagir

    2008-01-01

    An integrated humidity sensor system with nano-structured carbon nitride film as humidity sensing material is fabricated by a 0.8 μm analog mixed CMOS process. The integrated sensor system consists of differential humidity sensitive field effect transistors (HUSFET), temperature sensor, and operational amplifier. The process contains two poly, two metal and twin well technology. To form CNx film on Si3N4/Si substrate, plasma etching is performed to the gate area as well as trenches. CNx film is deposited by reactive RF magnetron sputtering method and patterned by the lift-off technique. The drain current is proportional to the dielectric constant, and the sensitivity is 2.8 μA/%RH. PMID:27879842

  20. Materials processing in space bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Literature dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes or with ground based activities that provide supporting research is listed. Included are Government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles. Subdivisions of the bibliography include the five categories: crystal growth; metals, alloys, and composites, fluids and transport; glasses and ceramics; and Ultrahigh Vacuum and Containerless Processing Technologies, in addition to a list of patents and a compilation of anonymously authored collections and reports and a cross reference index.

  1. Controlled release of vancomycin from thin sol-gel films on titanium alloy fracture plate material.

    PubMed

    Radin, Shula; Ducheyne, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Risk of infection is considerable in open fractures and its management is challenging, especially when fracture fixation material is used. Thus, it may be desirable to use a device from which antibiotics can be released in a controlled way. Room temperature processed silica sol-gels are novel, resorbable and biocompatible, controlled release materials. Vancomycin, a potent antibiotic used in treating osteomyelitis, can be released from silica sol-gels. Herein, we describe the synthesis of thin, resorbable, controlled release bactericidal sol-gel films on a Ti-alloy substrate and determine the effect of processing parameters on its degradation and vancomycin release. A close correlation between release and degradation rates suggests that film degradation is the main mechanism underlying the control of release. Using a multi-layer process and various concentrations of vancomycin, released concentrations exceed the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin against Staphylococcus aureus. The findings enable the tailoring of release and degradation properties of the films to therapeutic needs by controlling sol-gel processing parameters. Given the bactericidal properties of released vancomycin, and the biocompatibility of the sol-gel films, the present data suggest great promise to prevent and treat bone infections in a clinical setting.

  2. Redistribution of a material at femtosecond laser ablation of a thin silver film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, P. A.; Zayarny, D. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Rudenko, A. A.; Kuchmizhak, A. A.; Vitrik, O. B.; Kulchin, Yu. N.; Zhakhovsky, V. V.; Inogamov, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray microspectroscopy is used for the first time to quantitatively study the spatial displacement of the material of a 100-nm silver film irradiated by a single femtosecond laser pulse focused on a small spot in the diffraction limit. The silver mass distribution over radial cross sections is determined and matter balance is analyzed for the resulting radially symmetric submicron structures of a microcone with a nanospike with various heights and a through hole. Hydrodynamic processes and phase transitions inducing the melting of the film, motion of the melt, and its recrystallization within a focal spot are studied.

  3. Possibilities of Laser Processing of Paper Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Alexander; Saukkonen, Esa; Piili, Heidi

    Nowadays, lasers are applied in many industrial processes: the most developed technologies include such processes as laser welding, hybrid welding, laser cutting of steel, etc. In addition to laser processing of metallic materials, there are also many industrial applications of laser processing of non-metallic materials, like laser welding of polymers, laser marking of glass and laser cutting of wood-based materials. It is commonly known that laser beam is suitable for cutting of paper materials as well as all natural wood-fiber based materials. This study reveals the potential and gives overview of laser application in processing of paper materials. In 1990's laser technology increased its volume in papermaking industry; lasers at paper industry gained acceptance for different perforating and scoring applications. Nowadays, with reduction in the cost of equipment and development of laser technology (especially development of CO2 technology), laser processing of paper material has started to become more widely used and more efficient. However, there exists quite little published research results and reviews about laser processing of paper materials. In addition, forest industry products with pulp and paper products in particular are among major contributors for the Finnish economy with 20% share of total exports in the year 2013. This has been the standpoint of view and motivation for writing this literature review article: when there exists more published research work, knowledge of laser technology can be increased to apply it for processing of paper materials.

  4. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  5. Commercialization of materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.

    1979-01-01

    The primary motivation of the Materials Processing in Space program is the scientific and commercial utilization of the effects of the unique environments of space on material processes. The reduction or elimination of the pervasive influences of gravity on Earth-based process mechanisms affords opportunities for understanding and improving ground-based processing or producing select materials in space which, typically, would be of low volume, high value commercial interest. Additionally, the unlimited, if not 'hard' vacuum of space affords equally interesting influences on material processes. To evolve the commercialization of Materials Processing in Space, the program seeks to establish and demonstrate the scientific/technological precepts for analyzing and using the space environment and, in parallel, to establish the legal and management mechanisms to implement commercial ventures.

  6. Space processing of electronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    The bulk growth of solid solution alloys of mercury telluride and cadmium telluride is discussed. These alloys are usually described by the formula Hg1-xCdxTe, and are useful for the construction of infrared detectors. The electronic energy band gap can be controlled between zero and 1.6 electron volts by adjusting the composition x. The most useful materials are at x approximately 20%, suitable for detection wavelengths of about 10 micrometers. The problems of growing large crystals are rooted in the wide phase diagram of the HgTe-CdTe pseudobinary system which leads to exaggerate segregation in freezing, constitutional supercooling, and other difficulties, and in the high vapor pressure of mercury at the growth temperatures, which leads to loss of stoichiometry and to the necessity of working in strong, pressure resistant sealed containers.

  7. Thin film processing of photorefractive BaTiO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Paul R.; Potember, Richard S.

    1991-01-01

    The principle objectives of this ongoing research involve the preparation and characterization of polycrystalline single-domain thin films of BaTiO3 for photorefractive applications. These films must be continuous, free of cracks, and of high optical quality. The two methods proposed are sputtering and sol-gel related processing.

  8. Laser Material Processing for Microengineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helvajian, H.

    1995-01-01

    The processing of materials via laser irradiation is presented in a brief survey. Various techniques currently used in laser processing are outlined and the significance to the development of space qualified microinstrumentation are identified. In general the laser processing technique permits the transferring of patterns (i.e. lithography), machining (i.e. with nanometer precision), material deposition (e.g., metals, dielectrics), the removal of contaminants/debris/passivation layers and the ability to provide process control through spectroscopy.

  9. Infrared Database for Process Support Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K. E.; Boothe, R. E.; Burns, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    Process support materials' compatibility with cleaning processes is critical to ensure final hardware cleanliness and that performance requirements are met. Previous discovery of potential contaminants in process materials shows the need for incoming materials testing and establishment of a process materials database. The Contamination Control Team of the Materials, Processes, and Manufacturing (MP&M) Department at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has initiated the development of such an infrared (IR) database, called the MSFC Process Materials IR database, of the common process support materials used at MSFC. These process support materials include solvents, wiper cloths, gloves, bagging materials, etc. Testing includes evaluation of the potential of gloves, wiper cloths, and other items to transfer contamination to handled articles in the absence of solvent exposure, and the potential for solvent exposure to induce material degradation. This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the initial testing completed through December 2002. It is anticipated that additional testing will be conducted with updates provided in future TMs.Materials were analyzed using two different IR techniques: (1) Dry transference and (2) liquid extraction testing. The first of these techniques utilized the Nicolet Magna 750 IR spectrometer outfitted with a horizontal attenuated total reflectance (HATR) crystal accessory. The region from 650 to 4,000 wave numbers was analyzed, and 50 scans were performed per IR spectrum. A dry transference test was conducted by applying each sample with hand pressure to the HATR crystal to first obtain a spectrum of the parent material. The material was then removed from the HATR crystal and analyzed to determine the presence of any residues. If volatile, liquid samples were examined both prior to and following evaporation.The second technique was to perform an extraction test with each sample in five different solvents.Once the scans were complete for

  10. Roadmap for Process Equipment Materials Technology

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-10-01

    This Technology Roadmap addresses the ever-changing material needs of the chemical and allied process industries, and the energy, economic and environmental burdens associated with corrosion and other materials performance and lifetime issues. This Technology Roadmap outlines the most critical of these R&D needs, and how they can impact the challenges facing today’s materials of construction.

  11. Investigation of solution-processed bismuth-niobium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Satoshi; Ariga, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Shin; Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo

    2014-10-21

    The characteristics of bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared using a solution process were investigated. The BNO film annealed at 550°C involving three phases: an amorphous phase, Bi₃NbO₇ fluorite microcrystals, and Nb-rich cubic pyrochlore microcrystals. The cubic pyrochlore structure, which was the main phase in this film, has not previously been reported in BNO films. The relative dielectric constant of the BNO film was approximately 140, which is much higher than that of a corresponding film prepared using a conventional vacuum sputtering process. Notably, the cubic pyrochlore microcrystals disappeared with increasing annealing temperature and were replaced with triclinic β-BiNbO₄ crystals at 590°C. The relative dielectric constant also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Therefore, the high relative dielectric constant of the BNO film annealed at 550°C is thought to result from the BNO cubic pyrochlore structure. In addition, the BNO films annealed at 500°C contained approximately 6.5 atm.% carbon, which was lost at approximately 550°C. This result suggests that the carbon in the BNO film played an important role in the formation of the cubic pyrochlore structure.

  12. Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to the Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN), which was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of NASA-Marshall. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. The data base is NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) to be hazardous to the environment. The data base also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these materials.

  13. Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to the Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN), which was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of NASA-Marshall. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. The data base is NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) to be hazardous to the environment. The data base also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these materials.

  14. Spray Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Source Precursors for Chalcopyrite I-III-VI2 Thin-Film Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Harris, Jerry D.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Dickman, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Thin-film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provide an attractive approach to fabricating solar arrays with high mass-specific power. A polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer is among the new generation of photovoltaic device technologies for thin film solar cells. At NASA Glenn Research Center we have focused on the development of new single-source precursors (SSPs) for deposition of semiconducting chalcopyrite materials onto lightweight, flexible substrates. We describe the syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering. Copper indium disulfide and related thin-film materials were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using SSPs. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties to optimize device quality. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hotwall reactor at 395 C yielded the best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier-, smoother-, and denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was one percent.

  15. New spin-on metal hardmask materials for lithography processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huirong; Mullen, Salem; Wolfer, Elizabeth; Rahman, Dalil; Anyadiegwu, Clement; Mckenzie, Douglas; Dioses, Alberto; Cho, Joonyeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna

    2013-03-01

    Since the critical dimensions in integrated circuit (IC) device fabrication continue to shrink below 32 nm, multilayer stacks with alternating etch selectivities are required for successful pattern transfer from the exposed photoresist to the substrate. Inorganic resist underlayer materials are used as hard masks in reactive ion etching (RIE) with oxidative gases. The conventional silicon hardmask has demonstrated good reflectivity control and reasonable etch selectivity. However, some issues such as the rework of trilayer stacks and cleaning of oxide residue by wet chemistry are challenging problems for manufacturability. The present work reveals novel spin-on underlayer materials containing significant amounts of metal oxides in the film after baking at normal processing conditions. Such an inorganic metal hardmask (MHM) has excellent etch selectivity in plasma etch processes of the trilayer stack. The composition has good long term shelf life and pot life stability based on solution LPC analysis and wafer defect studies, respectively. The material absorbs DUV wavelengths and can be used as a spin-on inorganic or hybrid antireflective coating to control substrate reflectivity under DUV exposure of photoresist. Some of these metal-containing materials can be used as an underlayer in EUV lithography to significantly enhance photospeed. Specific metal hard masks are also developed for via or trench filling applications in IRT processes. The materials have shown good coating and lithography performance with a film thicknesses as low as 10 nm under ArF dry or immersion conditions. In addition, the metal oxide films or residues can be partially or completely removed by using various wet-etching solutions at ambient temperature.

  16. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques.

  17. Do Films Make You Learn? Inference Processes in Expository Film Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibus, Maike; Heier, Anke; Schwan, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The present article examines how suitable expository films are for learning. This question was motivated by the assumption that films are processed in a superficial manner. However, previous research has been dominated by the analyses of outcome measures and has never taken a look at online measures so that no clear conclusions have been drawn.…

  18. Do Films Make You Learn? Inference Processes in Expository Film Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibus, Maike; Heier, Anke; Schwan, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The present article examines how suitable expository films are for learning. This question was motivated by the assumption that films are processed in a superficial manner. However, previous research has been dominated by the analyses of outcome measures and has never taken a look at online measures so that no clear conclusions have been drawn.…

  19. The Constitutive Modeling of Thin Films with Randon Material Wrinkles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphey, Thomas W.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2001-01-01

    Material wrinkles drastically alter the structural constitutive properties of thin films. Normally linear elastic materials, when wrinkled, become highly nonlinear and initially inelastic. Stiffness' reduced by 99% and negative Poisson's ratios are typically observed. This paper presents an effective continuum constitutive model for the elastic effects of material wrinkles in thin films. The model considers general two-dimensional stress and strain states (simultaneous bi-axial and shear stress/strain) and neglects out of plane bending. The constitutive model is derived from a traditional mechanics analysis of an idealized physical model of random material wrinkles. Model parameters are the directly measurable wrinkle characteristics of amplitude and wavelength. For these reasons, the equations are mechanistic and deterministic. The model is compared with bi-axial tensile test data for wrinkled Kaptong(Registered Trademark) HN and is shown to deterministically predict strain as a function of stress with an average RMS error of 22%. On average, fitting the model to test data yields an RMS error of 1.2%

  20. Effects of processing history on the modulus of silica xerogel films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anurag; Rogojevic, Svetlana; Gill, William N.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Matthew, Itty; Tomozawa, Minoru; Simonyi, Eva

    2001-12-01

    Sintered xerogel films (porous SiO2) show a higher elastic modulus than other amorphous low dielectric constant (K) materials available for the same value of K. By comparing xerogels that were sintered, templated or made with ethylene glycol or ethanol as solvents, we show that process history is at least as important as the chemistry of the solid matrix or the porosity. The modulus extrapolated to zero porosity for the porous sintered and templated films is the same as those of the dense films made by chemical vapor deposition of SiO2. This suggests that the solid matrix for sintered xerogel films is close to ideal and their modulus is better because of the ordered arrangement of pores and fusion of particles making up the matrix. The modulus measured by nanoindentation on thick xerogel films (>0.8 μm) is well explained by the open cell foam model.

  1. Effects of process parameters on sheet resistance uniformity of fluorine-doped tin oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Hudaya, Chairul; Park, Ji Hun; Lee, Joong Kee

    2012-01-05

    An alternative indium-free material for transparent conducting oxides of fluorine-doped tin oxide [FTO] thin films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate [PET] was prepared by electron cyclotron resonance - metal organic chemical vapor deposition [ECR-MOCVD]. One of the essential issues regarding metal oxide film deposition is the sheet resistance uniformity of the film. Variations in process parameters, in this case, working and bubbler pressures of ECR-MOCVD, can lead to a change in resistance uniformity. Both the optical transmittance and electrical resistance uniformity of FTO film-coated PET were investigated. The result shows that sheet resistance uniformity and the transmittance of the film are affected significantly by the changes in bubbler pressure but are less influenced by the working pressure of the ECR-MOCVD system.

  2. Optical storage in azobenzene-containing epoxy polymers processed as Langmuir Blodgett films.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel; Mondragon, Iñaki; Sanfelice, Rafaela C; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Oyanguren, Patricia; Galante, María J

    2013-04-01

    In this study, azocopolymers containing different main-chain segments have been synthesized with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, DER 332, n=0.03) and the azochromophore Disperse Orange 3 (DO3) cured with two monoamines, viz. benzylamine (BA) and m-toluidine (MT). The photoinduced birefringence was investigated in films produced with these azopolymers using the spin coating (SC) and Langmuir Blodgett (LB) techniques. In the LB films, birefringence increased with the content of azochromophore and the film thickness, as expected. The nanostructured nature of the LB films led to an enhanced birefringence and faster dynamics in the writing process, compared to the SC films. In summary, the combination of azocopolymers and the LB method may allow materials with tuned properties for various optical applications, including in biological systems were photoisomerization may be used to trigger actions such as drug delivery.

  3. Preparation of metal oxide thin films using coating photolysis process with ArF excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Akio; Imai, Yoji; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira; Yamaguchi, Iwao; Manabe, Takaaki; Kumagai, Toshiya; Mizuta, Susumu

    2000-11-01

    The preparation of metal oxide thin films have been developed using the metalorganic (MO) compounds coating photolysis process with ArF excimer laser irradiation at room temperature. The effect of the starting materials and irradiation method on the product films was investigated by FT-IR, UV, XRD and SEM. It was found that metal acetylacetonates or metal 2-ethylhexanoate was effective as the starting materials. When using metal acetylacetonates as the starting materials, crystallized TiO2, In2O3 and ZrO2 were obtained with ArF laser irradiation at 50 mJ/cm2 at a repetition rate of 5 Hz for 5 min. When using An-acac, Fe, Sn, or In 2-ethylhexanoate as the starting material, a two-step process consisting of both preliminary weak (10mJ/cm2) and sufficiently strong irradiation (50mJ/cm2) was found to be effective for obtaining crystallized ZnO, Fe2O3, SnO2 and In2O3 films. In addition, crystallized complex oxide thin films such as ITO, PbTo3 and PbZrO3 were successfully obtained from the metal acetylacetonates or metal 2-ethylhexanoate using MO coating photolysis process. Patterned metal oxide thin films were also obtained by the ArF laser irradiation through the photomask, followed by leaching with solvents. The crystallization mechanism was discussed from the point of view of the photochemical reaction and photothermal reaction.

  4. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks.

  5. Chemical Solution Processing of Strontium Bismuth Tantalate Films

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Lakeman, C.D.E.

    1998-12-21

    We describe Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD) processes by which Strontium Bismuth Tantalate (SBT) thin films can be prepared at temperatures as low as 550 C. In this paper, we will present strategies used to optimize the properties of the films including solution chemistry, film composition, the nature of the substrate (or bottom electrode) used, and the thermal processing cycle. Under suitable conditions, {approximately} 1700 {angstrom} films can be prepared which have a large switchable polarization (2P{sub r} > 10{micro}C/cm{sup 2}), and an operating voltage, defined as the voltage at which 0.80 x 2P{sub r} max is switched, 2.0V. We also describe an all-alkoxide route to SBT films from which SBT can be crystallized at 550 C.

  6. Synthetic Reference Materials Based on Polymer Films for the Control of Welding Fumes Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, O. V.; Kuznetsova, A. N.; Begunova, L. A.

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of the current hygienic situation in the welding production showed that the intensification of welding processes involves the deterioration of air quality, which negatively affects the welders health. Welders are exposed to a variety of metal fumes, including manganese that may elevate the risk for neurological diseases. The control of metals concentration in the air of the working area is difficult due to the lack of reference materials. The creation of reference materials of welding fumes composition is a challenge due to chemical characteristics of their physical properties. Synthetic samples in a form of the polymer film containing powder particles of welding fumes were create. Studies on the selection of the polymer were done. Experiments proved that the qualitative materials of synthetic welding fumes are obtained by using polyvinyl alcohol. The metals concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The obtained data demonstrates indirectly the uniform distribution of welding fumes powder particles on the polymer film.

  7. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  8. Iron Oxide Films Prepared by Rapid Thermal Processing for Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickman, B.; Bastos Fanta, A.; Burrows, A.; Hellman, A.; Wagner, J. B.; Iandolo, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hematite is a promising and extensively investigated material for various photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes for energy conversion and storage, in particular for oxidation reactions. Thermal treatments during synthesis of hematite are found to affect the performance of hematite electrodes considerably. Herein, we present hematite thin films fabricated via one-step oxidation of Fe by rapid thermal processing (RTP). In particular, we investigate the effect of oxidation temperature on the PEC properties of hematite. Films prepared at 750 °C show the highest activity towards water oxidation. These films show the largest average grain size and the highest charge carrier density, as determined from electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy analysis. We believe that the fast processing enabled by RTP makes this technique a preferred method for investigation of novel materials and architectures, potentially also on nanostructured electrodes, where retaining high surface area is crucial to maximize performance.

  9. Iron Oxide Films Prepared by Rapid Thermal Processing for Solar Energy Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Wickman, B.; Bastos Fanta, A.; Burrows, A.; Hellman, A.; Wagner, J. B.; Iandolo, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hematite is a promising and extensively investigated material for various photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes for energy conversion and storage, in particular for oxidation reactions. Thermal treatments during synthesis of hematite are found to affect the performance of hematite electrodes considerably. Herein, we present hematite thin films fabricated via one-step oxidation of Fe by rapid thermal processing (RTP). In particular, we investigate the effect of oxidation temperature on the PEC properties of hematite. Films prepared at 750 °C show the highest activity towards water oxidation. These films show the largest average grain size and the highest charge carrier density, as determined from electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy analysis. We believe that the fast processing enabled by RTP makes this technique a preferred method for investigation of novel materials and architectures, potentially also on nanostructured electrodes, where retaining high surface area is crucial to maximize performance. PMID:28091573

  10. Novel wide band gap materials for highly efficient thin film tandem solar cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brian E. Hardin; Connor, Stephen T.; Peters, Craig H.

    2012-06-11

    Tandem solar cells (TSCs), which use two or more materials to absorb sunlight, have achieved power conversion efficiencies of >25% versus 11-20% for commercialized single junction solar cell modules. The key to widespread commercialization of TSCs is to develop the wide-band, top solar cell that is both cheap to fabricate and has a high open-circuit voltage (i.e. >1V). Previous work in TSCs has generally focused on using expensive processing techniques with slow growth rates resulting in costs that are two orders of magnitude too expensive to be used in conventional solar cell modules. The objective of the PLANT PV proposal was to investigate the feasibility of using Ag(In,Ga)Se2 (AIGS) as the wide-bandgap absorber in the top cell of a thin film tandem solar cell (TSC). Despite being studied by very few in the solar community, AIGS solar cells have achieved one of the highest open-circuit voltages within the chalcogenide material family with a Voc of 949 mV when grown with an expensive processing technique (i.e. Molecular Beam Epitaxy). PLANT PV's goal in Phase I of the DOE SBIR was to (1) develop the chemistry to grow AIGS thin films via solution processing techniques to reduce costs and (2) fabricate new device architectures with high open-circuit voltage to produce full tandem solar cells in Phase II. PLANT PV attempted to translate solution processing chemistries that were successful in producing >12% efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by replacing copper compounds with silver. The main thrust of the research was to determine if it was possible to make high quality AIGS thin films using solution processing and to fully characterize the materials properties. PLANT PV developed several different types of silver compounds in an attempt to fabricate high quality thin films from solution. We found that silver compounds that were similar to the copper based system did not result in high quality thin films. PLANT PV was able to deposit AIGS thin

  11. Toward an Understanding of Thin-Film Transistor Performance in Solution-Processed Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide (ZTO) Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Sanctis, Shawn; Koslowski, Nico; Hoffmann, Rudolf; Guhl, Conrad; Erdem, Emre; Weber, Stefan; Schneider, Jörg J

    2017-06-28

    Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin films are accessible by a molecular precursor approach using mononuclear zinc(II) and tin(II) compounds with methoxyiminopropionic acid ligands. Solution processing of two precursor solutions containing a mixture of zinc and tin(II)-methoxyiminopropinato complexes results in the formation of smooth homogeneous thin films, which upon calcination are converted into the desired semiconducting amorphous ZTO thin films. ZTO films integrated within a field-effect transistor (FET) device exhibit an active semiconducting behavior in the temperature range between 250 and 400 °C, giving an increased performance, with mobility values between μ = 0.03 and 5.5 cm(2)/V s, with on/off ratios increasing from 10(5) to 10(8) when going from 250 to 400 °C. Herein, our main emphasis, however, was on an improved understanding of the material transformation pathway from weak to high performance of the semiconductor in a solution-processed FET as a function of the processing temperature. We have correlated this with the chemical composition and defects states within the microstructure of the obtained ZTO thin film via photoelectron spectroscopy (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy), Auger electron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and photoluminescence investigations. The critical factor observed for the improved performance within this ZTO material could be attributed to a higher tin concentration, wherein the contributions of point defects arising from the tin oxide within the final amorphous ZTO material play the dominant role in governing the transistor performance.

  12. Development of FeNiMoB thin film materials for microfabricated magnetoelastic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka; Cha, Dongkyu; Chen Long; Kosel, Jurgen; Gianchandani, Yogesh

    2012-12-01

    Metglas{sup TM} 2826MB foils of 25-30 {mu}m thickness with the composition of Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 38}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 18} have been used for magnetoelastic sensors in various applications over many years. This work is directed at the investigation of {approx}3 {mu}m thick iron-nickel-molybdenum-boron (FeNiMoB) thin films that are intended for integrated microsystems. The films are deposited on Si substrate by co-sputtering of iron-nickel (FeNi), molybdenum (Mo), and boron (B) targets. The results show that dopants of Mo and B can significantly change the microstructure and magnetic properties of FeNi materials. When FeNi is doped with only Mo its crystal structure changes from polycrystalline to amorphous with the increase of dopant concentration; the transition point is found at about 10 at. % of Mo content. A significant change in anisotropic magnetic properties of FeNi is also observed as the Mo dopant level increases. The coercivity of FeNi films doped with Mo decreases to a value less than one third of the value without dopant. Doping the FeNi with B together with Mo considerably decreases the value of coercivity and the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy properties, and it also greatly changes the microstructure of the material. In addition, doping B to FeNiMo remarkably reduces the remanence of the material. The film material that is fabricated using an optimized process is magnetically as soft as amorphous Metglas{sup TM} 2826MB with a coercivity of less than 40 Am{sup -1}. The findings of this study provide us a better understanding of the effects of the compositions and microstructure of FeNiMoB thin film materials on their magnetic properties.

  13. Development of FeNiMoB thin film materials for microfabricated magnetoelastic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka; Cha, Dongkyu; Chen, Long; Gianchandani, Yogesh; Kosel, Jurgen

    2012-12-01

    MetglasTM 2826MB foils of 25-30 μm thickness with the composition of Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 have been used for magnetoelastic sensors in various applications over many years. This work is directed at the investigation of ˜3 μm thick iron-nickel-molybdenum-boron (FeNiMoB) thin films that are intended for integrated microsystems. The films are deposited on Si substrate by co-sputtering of iron-nickel (FeNi), molybdenum (Mo), and boron (B) targets. The results show that dopants of Mo and B can significantly change the microstructure and magnetic properties of FeNi materials. When FeNi is doped with only Mo its crystal structure changes from polycrystalline to amorphous with the increase of dopant concentration; the transition point is found at about 10 at. % of Mo content. A significant change in anisotropic magnetic properties of FeNi is also observed as the Mo dopant level increases. The coercivity of FeNi films doped with Mo decreases to a value less than one third of the value without dopant. Doping the FeNi with B together with Mo considerably decreases the value of coercivity and the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy properties, and it also greatly changes the microstructure of the material. In addition, doping B to FeNiMo remarkably reduces the remanence of the material. The film material that is fabricated using an optimized process is magnetically as soft as amorphous MetglasTM 2826MB with a coercivity of less than 40 Am-1. The findings of this study provide us a better understanding of the effects of the compositions and microstructure of FeNiMoB thin film materials on their magnetic properties.

  14. Characterization and integrity testing of flexible film materials utilizing a unique corona beam technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, Gregory J.

    2005-11-01

    The characterization, porosity, permeability and integrity of conductive and non-conductive medical and consumer flexible barrier packaging material are determined utilizing a novel electron beam technology and electronic instrumentation in an open atmosphere for 100% real-time, on-line testing. The electron beam developed in an open atmosphere maintains its prescribed frequency through the use of a nitrogen cover gas, ionizing the gas to create a corona beam. The corona beam discharge, maintained at a high negative voltage, forms from the holes or anomalies in the flexible barrier material. The anomaly is detected and analyzed in order to determine the presence of viral and sub-viral sized voids or holes, as well as other anomalies such as blisters and bubbles. The process can also utilize an established range of acceptability to certify materials that require a well defined level of permeability. This process can be performed by the flexible barrier film manufacturer to certify a specific quality level. It can be performed by the material fabricator to ensure quality standards for preformed materials. It can also be performed by the product packaging manufacturer that uses the packaging material to wrap their products and confirm the integrity of the final sealed package by measuring the atmosphere inside the finished package. There are many other packaging applications that can utilize this technology for film characterization, validation and integrity testing within the pharmaceutical, medical device, and food processing industries, as well as other industrial applications.

  15. Atomic-scale analysis of plastic deformation in thin-film forms of electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolluri, Kedarnath

    Nanometer-scale-thick films of metals and semiconductor heterostructures are used increasingly in modern technologies, from microelectronics to various areas of nanofabrication. Processing of such ultrathin-film materials generates structural defects, including voids and cracks, and may induce structural transformations. Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of these small-volume structures is very different from that of bulk materials. Improvement of the reliability, functionality, and performance of nano-scale devices requires a fundamental understanding of the atomistic mechanisms that govern the thin-film response to mechanical loading in order to establish links between the films' structural evolution and their mechanical behavior. Toward this end, a significant part of this study is focused on the analysis of atomic-scale mechanisms of plastic deformation in freestanding, ultrathin films of face-centered cubic (fcc) copper (Cu) that are subjected to biaxial tensile strain. The analysis is based on large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations. Elementary mechanisms of dislocation nucleation are studied and several problems involving the structural evolution of the thin films due to the glide of and interactions between dislocations are addressed. These problems include void nucleation, martensitic transformation, and the role of stacking faults in facilitating dislocation depletion in ultrathin films and other small-volume structures of fcc metals. Void nucleation is analyzed as a mechanism of strain relaxation in Cu thin films. The glide of multiple dislocations causes shearing of atomic planes and leads to formation of surface pits, while vacancies are generated due to the glide motion of jogged dislocations. Coalescence of vacancy clusters with surface pits leads to formation of voids. In addition, the phase transformation of fcc Cu films to hexagonal-close packed (hcp) ones is studied. The resulting martensite phase nucleates at the film's free surface and

  16. Soft nanostructured films for directing the assembly of functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, D.; Kang, M.; Leal, C.

    2017-04-01

    Lipids are a class of biological small molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic constituents forming the structural membranes in cells. Over the past century an extensive understanding of lipid biology and biophysics has been developed illuminating lipids as an intricate, highly tunable, and hierarchical soft-matter system. In addition to serving as cell membrane models, lipids have been investigated as microphase separated structures in aqueous solutions. In terms of applications lipids have been realized as powerful structural motifs for the encapsulation and cellular delivery of genetic material. More recently, lipids have also revealed promise as thin film materials, exhibiting long-range periodic nano-scale order and tunable orientation. In this review we summarize the pertinent understanding of lipid nanostructure development in bulk aqueous systems followed by the current and potential perturbations to these results induced by introduction of a substrate. These effects are punctuated by a summary of our published results in the field of lipid thin films with added nucleic acids and key results introducing hard materials into lipid nanostructured substrates.

  17. Soft nanostructured films for directing the assembly of functional materials.

    PubMed

    Steer, D; Kang, M; Leal, C

    2017-04-07

    Lipids are a class of biological small molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic constituents forming the structural membranes in cells. Over the past century an extensive understanding of lipid biology and biophysics has been developed illuminating lipids as an intricate, highly tunable, and hierarchical soft-matter system. In addition to serving as cell membrane models, lipids have been investigated as microphase separated structures in aqueous solutions. In terms of applications lipids have been realized as powerful structural motifs for the encapsulation and cellular delivery of genetic material. More recently, lipids have also revealed promise as thin film materials, exhibiting long-range periodic nano-scale order and tunable orientation. In this review we summarize the pertinent understanding of lipid nanostructure development in bulk aqueous systems followed by the current and potential perturbations to these results induced by introduction of a substrate. These effects are punctuated by a summary of our published results in the field of lipid thin films with added nucleic acids and key results introducing hard materials into lipid nanostructured substrates.

  18. Development of antioxidant packaging material by applying corn-zein to LLDPE film in combination with phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Ki Myong; You, Young-Sun; Kim, So Yeon; Han, Jaejoon

    2012-10-01

    Functional active packaging materials were successfully developed by incorporating antioxidant agents into corn-zein-laminated linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) film. The minimum effective concentrations of the active compounds (for example, thymol, carvacrol, eugenol) were determined and these compounds were then laminated into LLDPE films to develop corn-zein-laminated films with antioxidant agents. The release rate of antioxidant agents in gas and liquid media were determined along with the mechanical and water barrier properties of the films containing these compounds. Tensile strength and percentage elongation at break were reduced in the corn-zein-laminated LLDPE films when compared to typical LLDPE film. Furthermore, the ability of the corn-zein-laminated films to repel moisture decreased by approximately 12.2%, but was improved by incorporating hydrophobic antioxidant compounds in the corn-zein layer. Examination of release kinetics in the gas and liquid phases verified that antioxidants were effectively released from the films and inhibited oxidation during testing. Finally, the films were used for fresh ground beef packaging, and effectively inhibited lipid oxidation and had a positive effect on the color stability of beef patties during storage. These results indicate that the developed antioxidant films are a novel active packaging material that can be effectively implemented by the food industry to improve the quality and safety of foods. Zein protein, a by-product of corn processing industry, was laminated into plastic films in combination with natural phenolic compounds to develop antioxidant packaging films. The films demonstrated their efficient release patterns of antioxidant compounds, which are suitable for packaging applications and food protection. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Recombination Dynamics in Thin-film Photovoltaic Materials via Time-resolved Microwave Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Guse, Joanna A; Jones, Timothy W; Danos, Andrew; McCamey, Dane R

    2017-03-06

    A method for investigating recombination dynamics of photo-induced charge carriers in thin film semiconductors, specifically in photovoltaic materials such as organo-lead halide perovskites is presented. The perovskite film thickness and absorption coefficient are initially characterized by profilometry and UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. Calibration of both laser power and cavity sensitivity is described in detail. A protocol for performing Flash-photolysis Time Resolved Microwave Conductivity (TRMC) experiments, a non-contact method of determining the conductivity of a material, is presented. A process for identifying the real and imaginary components of the complex conductivity by performing TRMC as a function of microwave frequency is given. Charge carrier dynamics are determined under different excitation regimes (including both power and wavelength). Techniques for distinguishing between direct and trap-mediated decay processes are presented and discussed. Results are modelled and interpreted with reference to a general kinetic model of photoinduced charge carriers in a semiconductor. The techniques described are applicable to a wide range of optoelectronic materials, including organic and inorganic photovoltaic materials, nanoparticles, and conducting/semiconducting thin films.

  20. Molybdenum as a contact material in zinc tin oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Peterson, R. L.

    2014-05-12

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors are of increasing interest for a variety of thin film electronics applications. Here, the contact properties of different source/drain electrode materials to solution-processed amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin-film transistors are studied using the transmission line method. The width-normalized contact resistance between ZTO and sputtered molybdenum is measured to be 8.7 Ω-cm, which is 10, 20, and 600 times smaller than that of gold/titanium, indium tin oxide, and evaporated molybdenum electrodes, respectively. The superior contact formed using sputtered molybdenum is due to a favorable work function lineup, an insulator-free interface, bombardment of ZTO during molybdenum sputtering, and trap-assisted tunneling. The transfer length of the sputtered molybdenum/ZTO contact is 0.34 μm, opening the door to future radio-frequency sub-micron molybdenum/ZTO thin film transistors.

  1. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  2. Bacteriorhodopsin Material and Film Fabrication Issues for Holographic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Smithey, Daniel T.; Crew, Marshall; Rayfield, George W.; Lan, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We discuss issues associated with bacteriorhodopsin (BR) materials and films that affect optical performance in holographic applications. For the D85N variant, some critical parameters include degree of hydration and recording wavelength. The quantum efficiency of the molecular state transition is observed to be apparently dependent on the illumination wavelength. We explain this effect by modeling the photo-activity of the D85N variant as two competing photocycles between the 9-cis and 13-cis retinal configurations. We are able to determine the pure excited P-state absorbance spectrum from the ground state spectrum and mixed population spectra obtained by bleaching to steady-state conditions.

  3. Designing thin film materials — Ternary borides from first principles

    PubMed Central

    Euchner, H.; Mayrhofer, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting the mechanisms responsible for the exceptional properties of aluminum based nitride coatings, we apply ab initio calculations to develop a recipe for designing functional thin film materials based on ternary diborides. The combination of binary diborides, preferring different structure types, results in supersaturated metastable ternary systems with potential for phase transformation induced effects. For the exemplary cases of MxW1 − xB2 (with M = Al, Ti, V) we show by detailed ab initio calculations that the respective ternary solid solutions are likely to be experimentally accessible by modern depositions techniques. PMID:26082562

  4. Bacteriorhodopsin Material and Film Fabrication Issues for Holographic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Smithey, Daniel T.; Crew, Marshall; Rayfield, George W.; Lan, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We discuss issues associated with bacteriorhodopsin (BR) materials and films that affect optical performance in holographic applications. For the D85N variant, some critical parameters include degree of hydration and recording wavelength. The quantum efficiency of the molecular state transition is observed to be apparently dependent on the illumination wavelength. We explain this effect by modeling the photo-activity of the D85N variant as two competing photocycles between the 9-cis and 13-cis retinal configurations. We are able to determine the pure excited P-state absorbance spectrum from the ground state spectrum and mixed population spectra obtained by bleaching to steady-state conditions.

  5. Thin film electrochromic materials for energy efficient windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, C. M.

    1980-10-01

    By use of electrochromic thin films, it is possible electronically to control transmission or reflection properties of a window, thus allowing it to be optically and thermally managed, thereby reducing space heating and cooling load. The properties of transition metal oxides, such as WO3, MoO3, Ir2O3, and V2O5 are detailed. Organic systems such as Heptyl Viologen, Polytungsten anion are reviewed. Also, intercalated structures are discussed. The designs of working devices are outlined. From this quantification, materials, devices, and appropriate deposition technology are selected for window applications.

  6. Magnetic Properties of FeNi-Based Thin Film Materials with Different Additives

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Wang, Qing Xiao; Liu, Yang; Gianchandani, Yogesh; Kosel, Jurgen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of FeNi-based thin film materials deposited with Mo, Al and B using a co-sputtering process. The existence of soft magnetic properties in combination with strong magneto-mechanical coupling makes these materials attractive for sensor applications. Our findings show that FeNi deposited with Mo or Al yields magnetically soft materials and that depositing with B further increases the softness. The out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of FeNi thin films is reduced by depositing with Al and completely removed by depositing with B. The effect of depositing with Mo is dependent on the Mo concentration. The coercivity of FeNiMo and FeNiAl is reduced to less than a half of that of FeNi, and a value as low as 40 A/m is obtained for FeNiB. The surfaces of the obtained FeNiMo, FeNiAl and FeNiB thin films reveal very different morphologies. The surface of FeNiMo shows nano-cracks, while the FeNiAl films show large clusters and fewer nano-cracks. When FeNi is deposited with B, a very smooth morphology is obtained. The crystal structure of FeNiMo strongly depends on the depositant concentration and changes into an amorphous structure at a higher Mo level. FeNiAl thin films remain polycrystalline, even at a very high concentration of Al, and FeNiB films are amorphous, even at a very low concentration of B. PMID:25587418

  7. Magnetic Properties of FeNi-Based Thin Film Materials with Different Additives.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Wang, Qing Xiao; Liu, Yang; Gianchandani, Yogesh; Kosel, Jurgen

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a study of FeNi-based thin film materials deposited with Mo, Al and B using a co-sputtering process. The existence of soft magnetic properties in combination with strong magneto-mechanical coupling makes these materials attractive for sensor applications. Our findings show that FeNi deposited with Mo or Al yields magnetically soft materials and that depositing with B further increases the softness. The out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of FeNi thin films is reduced by depositing with Al and completely removed by depositing with B. The effect of depositing with Mo is dependent on the Mo concentration. The coercivity of FeNiMo and FeNiAl is reduced to less than a half of that of FeNi, and a value as low as 40 A/m is obtained for FeNiB. The surfaces of the obtained FeNiMo, FeNiAl and FeNiB thin films reveal very different morphologies. The surface of FeNiMo shows nano-cracks, while the FeNiAl films show large clusters and fewer nano-cracks. When FeNi is deposited with B, a very smooth morphology is obtained. The crystal structure of FeNiMo strongly depends on the depositant concentration and changes into an amorphous structure at a higher Mo level. FeNiAl thin films remain polycrystalline, even at a very high concentration of Al, and FeNiB films are amorphous, even at a very low concentration of B.

  8. Planning for Materials Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A systems design study to describe the conceptual evolution, the institutional interrelationshiphs, and the basic physical requirements to implement materials processing in space was conducted. Planning for a processing era, rather than hardware design, was emphasized. Product development in space was examined in terms of fluid phenomena, phase separation, and heat and mass transfer. The effect of materials processing on the environment was studied. A concept for modular, unmanned orbiting facilities using the modified external tank of the space shuttle is presented. Organizational and finding structures which would provide for the efficient movement of materials from user to space are discussed.

  9. Chemically Deposited Thin-Film Solar Cell Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R.; Junek, W.; Gorse, J.; Thompson, T.; Harris, J.; Hehemann, D.; Hepp, A.; Rybicki, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have been working on the development of thin film photovoltaic solar cell materials that can be produced entirely by wet chemical methods on low-cost flexible substrates. P-type copper indium diselenide (CIS) absorber layers have been deposited via electrochemical deposition. Similar techniques have also allowed us to incorporate both Ga and S into the CIS structure, in order to increase its optical bandgap. The ability to deposit similar absorber layers with a variety of bandgaps is essential to our efforts to develop a multi-junction thin-film solar cell. Chemical bath deposition methods were used to deposit a cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layers on our CIS-based absorber layers. Window contacts were made to these CdS/CIS junctions by the electrodeposition of zinc oxide (ZnO). Structural and elemental determinations of the individual ZnO, CdS and CIS-based films via transmission spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy will be presented. The electrical characterization of the resulting devices will be discussed.

  10. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  11. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  12. Fluid bed technology in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, C.K.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    1999-01-01

    The author explores the various aspects of fluidization engineering and examines its applications in a multitude of materials processing techniques. Topics include process metallurgy, fluidization in nuclear engineering, and the pros and cons of various fluidization equipment. Gupta emphasizes fluidization engineering in high temperature processing, and high temperature fluidized bed furnaces.

  13. Thin film capillary process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-11-18

    Method and system of forming microfluidic capillaries in a variety of substrate materials. A first layer of a material such as silicon dioxide is applied to a channel etched in substrate. A second, sacrificial layer of a material such as a polymer is deposited on the first layer. A third layer which may be of the same material as the first layer is placed on the second layer. The sacrificial layer is removed to form a smooth walled capillary in the substrate.

  14. Effects of acetylacetone additions on PZT thin film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Assink, R.A.; Dimos, D.; Sinclair, M.B.; Boyle, T.J.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    Sol-gel processing methods are frequently used for the fabrication of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films for many electronic applications. Our standard approach for film fabrication utilizes lead acetate and acetic acid modified metal alkoxides of zirconium and titanium in the preparation of our precursor solutions. This report highlights some of our recent results on the effects of the addition of a second chelating ligand, acetylacetone, to this process. The authors discuss the changes in film drying behavior, densification and ceramic microstructure which accompany acetylacetone additions to the precursor solution and relate the observed variations in processing behavior to differences in chemical precursor structure induced by the acetylacetone ligand. Improvements in thin film microstructure, ferroelectric and optical properties are observed when acetylacetone is added to the precursor solution.

  15. Thin films of copper antimony sulfide: A photovoltaic absorber material

    SciTech Connect

    Ornelas-Acosta, R.E.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K.; Krishnan, B.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • CuSbS{sub 2} thin films were prepared by heating Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers. • Analyzed the structure, composition, optical, and electrical properties. • PV structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag were formed at different conditions. • The PV parameters (J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF) were evaluated from the J–V characteristics. • J{sub sc}: 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, V{sub oc}:187–323 mV, FF: 0.27–0.48 were obtained. - Abstract: In this work, we report preparation and characterization of CuSbS{sub 2} thin films by heating glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers and their use as absorber material in photovoltaic structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag. The Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films of 600 nm were prepared by chemical bath deposition on which copper thin films of 50 nm were thermally evaporated, and the glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu multilayers were heated in vacuum at different temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of orthorhombic CuSbS{sub 2} after heating the precursor layers. Studies on identification and chemical state of the elements were done using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical band gap of the CuSbS{sub 2} thin films was 1.55 eV and the thin films were photoconductive. The photovoltaic parameters of the devices using CuSbS{sub 2} as absorber and CdS as window layer were evaluated from the J–V curves, yielding J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF values in the range of 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, 187–323 mV, and 0.27–0.48, respectively, under illumination of AM1.5 radiation.

  16. Radiation effects on separations materials and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.

    1991-12-31

    This paper briefly summarizes published information on the effects of ionizing radiation on separation processes and materials. Special emphasis is given those processes, solvent extraction, ion exchange, and precipitation, that may have application in removing radioactivity from nuclear waste solutions. The separation and eventual isolation of any radionuclide requires a knowledge of the effect of radiation on the separations process itself and on the materials used in the process. The higher the radiation dose rate, i.e. the more concentrated the radionuclides being processed, the more important is this knowledge. In some cases, such as the separation of intense alpha emitters or the treatment of concentrated solutions of fission products, consideration of the effects of the radiation is a critical factor in the design of the separations materials and in the implementation of the process.

  17. Radiation effects on separations materials and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes published information on the effects of ionizing radiation on separation processes and materials. Special emphasis is given those processes, solvent extraction, ion exchange, and precipitation, that may have application in removing radioactivity from nuclear waste solutions. The separation and eventual isolation of any radionuclide requires a knowledge of the effect of radiation on the separations process itself and on the materials used in the process. The higher the radiation dose rate, i.e. the more concentrated the radionuclides being processed, the more important is this knowledge. In some cases, such as the separation of intense alpha emitters or the treatment of concentrated solutions of fission products, consideration of the effects of the radiation is a critical factor in the design of the separations materials and in the implementation of the process.

  18. Laser Materials Processing for NASA's Aerospace Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Hunyady, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, and surface treatment. Due to the multifunctional nature of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed, these attributes are attractive in order to support long-term missions in space. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications. Specifically, size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials are all concerns. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in solidstate laser (e.g., diode-pumped lasers) and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques in space has increased significantly. A review of the historical development of lasers from their infancy to the present will be used to show how these issues may be addressed. The review will also indicate where further development is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. Both short- and long-term space missions will benefit from the development of a universal laser-based tool with low power consumption, improved process flexibility, compactness (e.g., miniaturization), robustness, and automation for maximum utility with a minimum of human interaction. The potential advantages of using lasers with suitable wavelength and beam properties for future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond will be discussed. The laser processing experiments in the present report were performed using a diode pumped, pulsed/continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (50 W max average laser power), with a 1064 nm wavelength. The processed materials included Ti-6AI-4V, Al-2219 and Al-2090. For Phase I of this project, the laser process conditions were varied and optimized

  19. Process for gasification of carbonaceous material

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Gorin, E.

    1984-04-03

    A process of tar destruction in gasification of carbonaceous material comprises providing a mixture of finely divided calcium compound of a particle size smaller than 65 mesh and finely divided carbonaceous material of a particle size smaller than 65 mesh, the calcium compound to carbonaceous material ratio being from about 0.5 to 1.0 and contacting the mixture with CO/sub 2/ and tar exothermally whereby the tar is destroyed.

  20. High index glass thin film processing for photonics and photovoltaic (PV) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu Anthony

    To favorably compete with fossil-fuel technology, the greatest challenge for thin film solar-cells is to improve efficiency and reduce material cost. Thickness scaling to thin film reduces material cost but affects the light absorption in the cells; therefore a concept that traps incident photons and increases its optical path length is needed to boost absorption in thin film solar cells. One approach is the integration of low symmetric gratings (LSG), using high index material, on either the front-side or backside of 30 um thin c-Si cells. In this study, Multicomponent TeO2--Bi2O 3--ZnO (TBZ) glass thin films were prepared using RF magnetron sputtering under different oxygen flow rates. The influences of oxygen flow rate on the structural and optical properties of the resulting thin films were investigated. The structural origin of the optical property variation was studied using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that TBZ glass thin film is a suitable material for front side LSG material photovoltaic and photonics applications due to their amorphous nature, high refractive index (n > 2), broad band optical transparency window, low processing temperature. We developed a simple maskless method to pattern sputtered tellurite based glass thin films using unconventional agarose hydrogel mediated wet etching. Conventional wet etching process, while claiming low cost and high throughput, suffers from reproducibility and pattern fidelity issues due to the isotropic nature of wet chemical etching when applied to glasses and polymers. This method overcomes these challenges by using an agarose hydrogel stamp to mediate a conformal etching process. In our maskless method, agarose hydrogel stamps are patterned following a standard soft lithography and replica molding process from micropatterned masters and soaked in a chemical etchant. The micro-scale features on the stamp are

  1. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2010-10-12

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  2. Method for double-sided processing of thin film transistors

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.; Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2008-04-08

    This invention provides methods for fabricating thin film electronic devices with both front- and backside processing capabilities. Using these methods, high temperature processing steps may be carried out during both frontside and backside processing. The methods are well-suited for fabricating back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  3. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to MTR environment measurements. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to Material Testing Reactor environment measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Very, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Combette, P.; Ferrandis, J.Y.; Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Villard, J.F.

    2015-07-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. An acoustic method for fission gas release detection was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3 in 2010 and 2011, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). The maximal temperature on the sensor during the irradiation was about 150 deg. C. In this paper we present a thick film transducer produce by screen printing process. The screen printing of piezoelectric offers a wide range of possible applications for the development of acoustic sensors and piezoelectric structure for measurements in high temperature environment. We firstly produced a Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based paste composed of Pz27 powder from Ferroperm, CF7575 glass, and organic solvent ESL 400. Likewise a Bismuth Titanate based paste synthesized in our laboratory was produced. With these inks we produced thick film up to 130 μm by screen printing process. Material properties characterizations of these thick-film resonators are essential for device design and applications. The piezoelectric coefficients d33 and pyro-electric P(T) coefficient are investigated. The highest P(T) and d33 are respectively 80 μC.m{sup -2}.K{sup -1} and 130 μC.N{sup -1} for the PZT transducer -which validates the fabrication process-. In view of the development of this transducer oriented for high temperature and irradiation environment, we investigated the electrical properties of the transducers for different ranges of frequencies and temperature - from 20 Hz up to 40 MHz between 30 and 400 deg. C. We highlight the evolution of the impedance response and piezoelectric parameters of screen printed piezoelectric structures on alumina. Shortly an irradiation will be realized in

  4. Material removal processes: Engineering mechanics consideration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the material removal process called machining, a layer of material of constant thickness is removed from the workpiece by a wedge-shaped tool that travels parallel to the workpiece at a preselected depth. Even though the speed of relative movement between workpiece and tool is low (typical 1--10 M/S), the strain-rates in the workpiece near the tool can be high, on the order of 10[sup 4]-10[sup 5] s[sup [minus]1]. When machining brittle materials or unlubricated ductile materials at low speed, the removed metal (or chip) will be discontinuous and made up of small fractured segments. On the other hand, when machining ductile material under lubricated conditions, the removed material forms a continuous coil. In this case, we can represent the material removal process as a steady-state process. In this presentation, we will restrict ourselves to orthogonal machining where the cutting edge is perpendicular to the relative motion-a situation also approximated by other material removal processes such as planing and broaching, and turning on a lathe.

  5. Material removal processes: Engineering mechanics consideration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1993-04-01

    In the material removal process called machining, a layer of material of constant thickness is removed from the workpiece by a wedge-shaped tool that travels parallel to the workpiece at a preselected depth. Even though the speed of relative movement between workpiece and tool is low (typical 1--10 M/S), the strain-rates in the workpiece near the tool can be high, on the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}. When machining brittle materials or unlubricated ductile materials at low speed, the removed metal (or chip) will be discontinuous and made up of small fractured segments. On the other hand, when machining ductile material under lubricated conditions, the removed material forms a continuous coil. In this case, we can represent the material removal process as a steady-state process. In this presentation, we will restrict ourselves to orthogonal machining where the cutting edge is perpendicular to the relative motion-a situation also approximated by other material removal processes such as planing and broaching, and turning on a lathe.

  6. Integrated processing of anthracite into sorption materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sych, N.V.; Kartel, N.T.; Nikolaichuk, A.D.; Strelko, V.V.; Tsyba, N.N.; Denisovich, V.A.

    2006-05-15

    The possibility of using anthracite to produce activated carbon in the form of microporous and mesoporous anthracite, a cation exchanger, and composite sorption materials was analyzed and the porometric properties of a variety of sorption materials based on anthracite from the Donets coal basin were studied. A flowsheet for integrated processing of anthracite to give a set of four products was composed.

  7. Surface energy characteristics of zeolite embedded PVDF nanofiber films with electrospinning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong Hee; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-11-01

    Electrospinning is a nano-scale fiber production method with various polymer materials. This technique allows simple fiber diameters control by changing the physical conditions such as applied voltage and polymer solution viscosity during the fabrication process. The electrospun polymer fibers form a thin porous film with high surface area to volume ratio. Due to these unique characteristics, it is widely used for many application fields such as photocatalyst, electric sensor, and antibacterial scaffold for tissue engineering. Filtration is one of the main applications of electrospun polymer fibers for specific application of filtering out dust particles and dehumidification. Most polymers which are commonly used in electrospinning are hard to perform the filtering and dehumidification simultaneously because of their low hygroscopic property. To overcome this obstacle, the desiccant polymers are developed such as polyacrylic acid and polysulfobetaine methacrylate. However, the desiccant polymers are generally expensive and need special solvent for electrospinning. An alternating way to solve these problems is mixing desiccant material like zeolite in polymer solution during an electrospinning process. In this study, the free surface energy characteristics of electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film with various zeolite concentrations are investigated to control the hygroscopic property of general polymers. Fundamental physical property of wettability with PVDF shows hydrophobicity. The electrospun PVDF film with small weight ratio with higher than 0.1% of zeolite powder shows diminished contact angles that certifying the wettability of PVDF can be controlled using desiccant material in electrospinning process. To quantify the surface energy of electrospun PVDF films, sessile water droplets are introduced on the electrospun PVDF film surface and the contact angles are measured. The contact angles of PVDF film are 140° for without zeolite and 80° for with 5

  8. Plasma-assisted microwave processing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin (Inventor); Ylin, Tzu-yuan (Inventor); Jackson, Henry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A microwave plasma assisted method and system for heating and joining materials. The invention uses a microwave induced plasma to controllably preheat workpiece materials that are poorly microwave absorbing. The plasma preheats the workpiece to a temperature that improves the materials' ability to absorb microwave energy. The plasma is extinguished and microwave energy is able to volumetrically heat the workpiece. Localized heating of good microwave absorbing materials is done by shielding certain parts of the workpiece and igniting the plasma in the areas not shielded. Microwave induced plasma is also used to induce self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) process for the joining of materials. Preferably, a microwave induced plasma preheats the material and then microwave energy ignites the center of the material, thereby causing a high temperature spherical wave front from the center outward.

  9. Determination of mechanical properties of polymer film materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. J.; Rutherford, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Five polymeric film materials, Tedlar, Teflon, Kapton H, Kapton F, and a fiberglass reinforced polyimide, PG-402, in thickness ranging from 0.002 to 0.005 inch, were tested over a temperature range of -195 to 200 C in the "machine" and transverse direction to determine: elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, three percent offset yield stress, fracture stress, and strain to fracture. The elastic modulus, yield stress and fracture stress decreased with increasing temperature for all the materials while the fracture strain increased. Teflon and Tedlar had the greatest temperature dependence and PG-402 the least. At 200 C the Poisson ratio values ranged from 0.39 to 0.5; they diminished as the temperature decreased covering a range of 0.26 to 0.42 at -195 C. Shortening the gauge length from eight inches to one inch increased the strain to fracture and lowered the elastic modulus values.

  10. Electronic materials processing and the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and origin of deficiencies in bulk electronic materials for device fabrication are analyzed. It is found that gravity generated perturbations during their formation account largely for the introduction of critical chemical and crystalline defects and, moreover, are responsible for the still existing gap between theory and experiment and thus for excessive reliance on proprietary empiricism in processing technology. Exploration of the potential of reduced gravity environment for electronic materials processing is found to be not only desirable but mandatory.

  11. Aqueous processing in materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooiman, Michael B.; Sole, Kathryn C.

    1994-06-01

    Reviews of aqueous processing in JOM have traditionally focused on hydrometallurgical process routes. This article, however, addresses the application of aqueous processing in materials engineering and presents some promising developments that employ aqueous-based routes for the manufacture of high-tech components and specialty products. Such applications include producing metallic and ceramic powders; etching; surface modification by electroplating and electroless plating; manufacturing jewelry and intricate components by electroforming; and producing advanced ceramics, composites, and nanophase materials by sol-gel and biomimetic processing.

  12. Theoretical and material studies on thin-film electroluminescent devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, C. J.; Brennan, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    Electroluminescent materials and device technology were assessed. The evaluation strongly suggests the need for a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of both materials and device structures, particularly in the following areas: carrier generation and multiplication; radiative and nonradiative processes of luminescent centers; device modeling; new device concepts; and single crystal materials growth and characterization. Modeling of transport properties of hot electrons in ZnSe and the generation of device concepts were initiated.

  13. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction. [space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.; Mckenzie, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Three different chemical processing schemes were identified for separating lunar soils into the major oxides and elements. Feedstock production for space industry; an HF acid leach process; electrorefining processes for lunar free metal and metal derived from chemical processing of lunar soils; production and use of silanes and spectrally selective materials; glass, ceramics, and electrochemistry workshops; and an econometric model of bootstrapping space industry are discussed.

  14. Relationships between processing temperature and microstructure in isothermal melt processed Bi-2212 thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holesinger, T. G.; Phillips, D. S.; Willis, J. O.; Peterson, D. E.

    The microstructure and phase assemblage of isothermal melt processed (IMP) Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(y) (Bi-2212) thick films have been evaluated. Results from compositional analysis and phase identification indicate that the characteristics of the partial melt greatly influence the microstructural and chemical development of the thick films. The highest critical current densities were obtained in films processed below 800 C where the partial melt uniformly coats the substrate without excessive phase segregation.

  15. Relation between surface roughness of free films and process parameters in spray coating.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, G; Alphazan, T; van Hee, P; Wildeboer, W J; Meesters, G M H

    2011-02-14

    A novel spraying apparatus was developed to obtain reproducible free sprayed films. Aqueous solutions of PolyVinyl Alcohol PVA 4-98, HydroxyPropyl MethylCellulose HPMC 603 and HPMC 615 were used as reference coating materials. The apparatus is composed by a spraying system, a closed chamber containing a rotating Teflon cylinder, a pressured air supply system, a spray solution supply system, and a computerized control system. The spraying air pressure, the cylinder rotation speed, and the cylinder-spray nozzle distance were tailored in such a manner that the roughness of the obtained free films was similar to that from reference coated particles. Optimum spraying process conditions were found for all three coating materials using design of experiments. The morphology of the sprayed films obtained using the optimum conditions is evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and then compared with those from corresponding cast films and coating layers on particles. A match was found between the morphology of sprayed films and that from the corresponding coating layer on the particle surface. The spray apparatus produced reproducible sprayed films with tuneable roughness and/or smoothness depending on the set of processing parameters. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intelligent Processing of Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-03

    substrates such a3 Ag. which possessed a higher thermal expansion coefficient (22x1O-6°C- 1) than those of the Pt-coated Si (2.6x106oCŕ) and I fused SiO...properties [2]. It was reported that the thermal expansion mismatch between a ferroelecric thin film and its substrate significantly influences the...three different substrate along with their thermal expansion coefficients. (a) i [tb) 5 5 _i ’ ______ to So• 1o B a’ 20 Figure 1. X-ray diffraction

  17. Materials Processing in Space (MPS) program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Insight is provided into the scientific rotationale for materials processing in space (MPS), and a comprehensive and cohesive approach for implementation and integration of the many, diverse aspects of MPS is described. The programmatic and management functions apply to all projects and activities implemented under MPS. It is intended that specific project plans, providing project unique details, will be appended to this document for endeavors such as the Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) Project, the Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) Project, the MPS/Spacelab (MPS/SL) Project, and the Materials Experiment Carrier (MEC) Payloads.

  18. Aircraft gas turbine materials and processes.

    PubMed

    Kear, B H; Thompson, E R

    1980-05-23

    Materials and processing innovations that have been incorporated into the manufacture of critical components for high-performance aircraft gas turbine engines are described. The materials of interest are the nickel- and cobalt-base superalloys for turbine and burner sections of the engine, and titanium alloys and composites for compressor and fan sections of the engine. Advanced processing methods considered include directional solidification, hot isostatic pressing, superplastic foring, directional recrystallization, and diffusion brazing. Future trends in gas turbine technology are discussed in terms of materials availability, substitution, and further advances in air-cooled hardware.

  19. Laser Processing of Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew

    Transparent conducting films, or TCFs, are 2D electrical conductors with the ability to transmit light. Because of this, they are used in many popular electronics including smart phones, tablets, solar panels, and televisions. The most common material used as a TCF is indium tin oxide, or ITO. Although ITO has great electrical and optical characteristics, it is expensive, brittle, and difficult to pattern. These limitations have led researchers toward other materials for the next generation of displays and touch panels. The most promising material for next generation TCFs is carbon nanotubes, or CNTs. CNTs are cylindrical tubes of carbon no more than a few atoms thick. They have different electrical and optical properties depending on their atomic structure, and are extremely strong. As an electrode, they conduct electricity through an array of randomly dispersed tubes. The array is highly transparent because of gaps between the tubes, and size and optical properties of the CNTs. Many research groups have tried making CNT TCFs with opto-electric properties similar to ITO but have difficultly achieving high conductivity. This is partly attributed to impurities from fabrication and a mix of different tube types, but is mainly caused by low junction conductivity. In functionalized nanotubes, junction conductivity is impaired by covalently bonded molecules added to the sidewalls of the tubes. The addition of this molecule, known as functionalization, is designed to facilitate CNT dispersion in a solvent by adding properties of the molecule to the CNTs. While necessary for a good solution, functionalization decreases the conductivity in the CNT array by creating defects in the tube's structures and preventing direct inter-carbon bonding. This research investigates removing the functional coating (after tube deposition) by laser processing. Laser light is able to preferentially heat the CNTs because of their optical and electrical properties. Through local conduction

  20. Materials processing using a variable frequency microwave furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Maddox, S.R.; Everleigh, C.A.; Espinosa, R.J.; Johnson, A.C.

    1993-12-31

    We describe a materials processing system that uses a high power traveling wave tube (TWT) as the microwave source. The TWT provides approximately one octave bandwidth and variable power levels up to 2 kW into a multimode cavity. By controlling the frequency, efficient coupling to the load can be maintained even as the load`s dielectric properties change. Alternatively, can be used as a means of mode stirring at rates far beyond those attainable through mechanical stirring. The system has been tested for sintering alumina ceramics, annealing a tungsten penetrator alloy, curing epoxy resin, and depositing diamond films from a microwave plasma.

  1. Development, processing, and characterization of cellulose nanocrystal neat films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Alexander B.

    Methods for processing quality cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) suspensions using sulfuric acid hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose were developed and optimized. The resulting suspensions were used to develop shear-based methods for casting neat CNC films. These methods were used to produce oriented CNC films from the Purdue-made (long crystals, CNC-L) and FPL-made (short crystals, CNC-S) CNC suspensions. Increased casting shear rate increased the degree of CNC orientation as quantified by Hermans order parameter, S. The highest shear rate (100·s-1) produced maximum orientation, with resulting Hermans order parameter of S = 0.36 in the CNC-S film. Elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation at failure were measured with respect to film casting direction and CNC orientation. Elastic modulus in CNC films scaled directly with orientation and reached a maximum average of 23 GPa. Tensile strength did not scale with orientation, but was strongly linked to CNC length, where a maximum strength of 196 MPa was measured. In addition to CNC length and shear rate, suspension pH and heat treatment also affected film properties. As the pH of casting suspensions was increased from ˜3 to ˜7, orientation retention in films was increased, and a new maximum modulus of 30 GPa was observed at S = 0.53 for the CNC-S film. The mechanical properties of all neutral pH films were further enhanced through heat treatment, in which a 1-4 GPa increase in elastic modulus was observed, as well as a 40-80 MPa increase in tensile strength for all axially oriented films.

  2. CaTiO.sub.3 Interfacial template structure on semiconductor-based material and the growth of electroceramic thin-films in the perovskite class

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A structure including a film of a desired perovskite oxide which overlies and is fully commensurate with the material surface of a semiconductor-based substrate and an associated process for constructing the structure involves the build up of an interfacial template film of perovskite between the material surface and the desired perovskite film. The lattice parameters of the material surface and the perovskite of the template film are taken into account so that during the growth of the perovskite template film upon the material surface, the orientation of the perovskite of the template is rotated 45.degree. with respect to the orientation of the underlying material surface and thereby effects a transition in the lattice structure from fcc (of the semiconductor-based material) to the simple cubic lattice structure of perovskite while the fully commensurate periodicity between the perovskite template film and the underlying material surface is maintained. The film-growth techniques of the invention can be used to fabricate solid state electrical components wherein a perovskite film is built up upon a semiconductor-based material and the perovskite film is adapted to exhibit ferroelectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric, electro-optic or large dielectric properties during use of the component.

  3. Diffusion processes in freely suspended smectic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwa, I.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    A molecular model describing translational diffusion in freely suspended smectic films (FSSFs) in air is proposed. This model is based on the random walk theory and allows calculation of the translational diffusion coefficient (TDC) across smectic layers (along the director). All values necessary for calculating the TDC are obtained within the generalized mean-field model considering not only anisotropic interactions between nearest neighbors of molecules forming FSSFs, but also the stabilizing effect of the smectic/air interface. The spatial inhomogeneity of order parameters over the FSSF section, arising in this case, results in the fact that the surface tension at the smectic/air interface not only suppresses thermal fluctuations in surface layers, but also completely suppresses translational diffusion of molecules from the FSSF to air. The results of calculations of dimensional translational diffusion in the bulk of the FSSF formed by 5- n-alkyl-2-(4- n-(perfluoroalkyl-metyleneoxy))pentyl molecules during its thinning show that the TDC monotonically increases as the smectic film is thinned.

  4. Commercial use of materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.; Brown, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the scientific and commercial aspects of Materials Processing in the Space program. The elimination of gravity driven convection in molten materials can preclude undesirable stirring and mixing during crystal growth, and improve the casting of alloys and composites, chemical reactions, and the separation of biological materials. The elimination of hydrostatic pressure will allow alloy heat-treatment without distortion and growth of heavy crystals, such as thorium oxide, and containerless processing of liquids and molten materials. On the other hand, more sophisticated process control and diagnostic methods in sample preparation and temperature control must be developed, concluding that space made products of commercial interest are likely to be low volume, high value items.

  5. High power DUV lasers for material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, Toshio; Kakizaki, Kouji; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Fujimoto, Junichi; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2016-11-01

    A frontier in laser machining has been required by material processing in DUV region because it is hard to get high power solid-state lasers in this spectral region. DUV excimer lasers are the only solution, and now the time has come to examine the new applications of material processing with DUV excimer lasers. The excimer lasers at 193nm and 248nm have been used in the semiconductor manufacturing for long years, and have field-proven stability and reliability. The high photon energy of 6.4 eV at 193nm is expected to interact directly with the chemical bond of hard-machining materials, such as CFRP, diamond and tempered glasses. We report the latest results of material processing by 193nm high power DUV laser.

  6. Copper Selenide Nanocrystals as a High Performance, Solution Processed Thermoelectric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Jason; Lynch, Jared; Coates, Nelson; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Liu, Jun; Cahill, David; Urban, Jeff

    Nano-structuring a thermoelectric material often results in enhanced performance due to a decrease in the materials' thermal conductivity. Traditional nano-structuring techniques involve ball milling a bulk material followed by spark plasma sintering, a very energy intensive process. In this talk, we will describe the development of a self-assembled, high-performing, nano-structured thin film based on copper selenide nanocrystals. Mild thermal annealing of these films results in concurrent increases in the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity. We are able to achieve power factors at room temperature that are as high as the best spark plasma sintered materials. These solution-processed films have potential applications as conformal, flexible materials for thermoelectric power generation.

  7. Structure and properties of polypropylene cast films: Polymer type and processing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileva, Daniela; Gahleitner, Markus; Gloger, Dietrich

    2016-05-01

    The influence of processing parameters in a cast film extrusion process of thin films of isotactic polypropylene homopolymer and random propylene-ethylene copolymer was analyzed. Variation of the chill roll temperature allowed changing the supercooling of the melt and thus the generation of different crystal polymorphs of iPP. Additional focus was placed on the effect of flow induced crystallization via changing the output rate of the line. The crystal structure and morphology of the materials were evaluated and correlated to selected optical and mechanical properties.

  8. Artificial intelligence in the materials processing laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials science and engineering provides a vast arena for applications of artificial intelligence. Advanced materials research is an area in which challenging requirements confront the researcher, from the drawing board through production and into service. Advanced techniques results in the development of new materials for specialized applications. Hand-in-hand with these new materials are also requirements for state-of-the-art inspection methods to determine the integrity or fitness for service of structures fabricated from these materials. Two problems of current interest to the Materials Processing Laboratory at UAH are an expert system to assist in eddy current inspection of graphite epoxy components for aerospace and an expert system to assist in the design of superalloys for high temperature applications. Each project requires a different approach to reach the defined goals. Results to date are described for the eddy current analysis, but only the original concepts and approaches considered are given for the expert system to design superalloys.

  9. Synthesis and processing of nanostructured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1992-12-01

    Significant and growing interest is being exhibited in the novel and enhanced properties of nanostructured materials. These materials, with their constituent phase or grain structures modulated on a length scale less than 100 nm, are artificially synthesized by a wide variety of physical, chemical, and mechanical methods. In this NATO Advanced Study Institute, where mechanical behavior is emphasized, nanostructured materials with modulation dimensionalities from one (multilayers) to three (nanophase materials) are mainly considered. No attempt is made in this review to cover in detail all of the diverse methods available for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. Rather, the basic principles involved in their synthesis are discussed in terms of the special properties sought using examples of particular synthesis and processing methodologies. Some examples of the property changes that can result from one of these methods, cluster assembly of nanophase materials, are presented.

  10. Space Environmental Effects on Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabbann, Leslie M.

    2009-01-01

    The Materials and Processes (M&P) Branch of the Structural Engineering Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) seeks to uphold the production of dependable space hardware through materials research, which fits into NASA's purpose of advancing human exploration, use, and development of space. The Space Environmental Effects projects fully support these Agency goals. Two tasks were assigned to support M&P. Both assignments were to further the research of material behavior outside of Earth's atmosphere in order to determine which materials are most durable and safe to use in space for mitigating risks. One project, the Materials on International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) task, was to compile data from International Space Station (ISS) experiments to pinpoint beneficial space hardware. The other project was researching the effects on composite materials of exposure to high doses of radiation for a Lunar habitat project.

  11. Materials And Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) LDEF materials database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John M.; Strickland, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) is a collection of materials data which was computerized and is available to engineers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. Consisting of various database segments, MAPTIS provides the user with information such as material properties, test data derived from tests specifically conducted for qualification of materials for use in space, verification and control, project management, material information, and various administrative requirements. A recent addition to the project management segment consists of materials data derived from the LDEF flight. This tremendous quantity of data consists of both pre-flight and post-flight data in such diverse areas as optical/thermal, mechanical and electrical properties, atomic concentration surface analysis data, as well as general data such as sample placement on the satellite, A-O flux, equivalent sun hours, etc. Each data point is referenced to the primary investigator(s) and the published paper from which the data was taken. The MAPTIS system is envisioned to become the central location for all LDEF materials data. This paper consists of multiple parts, comprising a general overview of the MAPTIS System and the types of data contained within, and the specific LDEF data element and the data contained in that segment.

  12. Alternative starting materials for industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J W

    1992-02-01

    In the manufacture of chemical feedstocks and subsequent processing into derivatives and materials, the U.S. chemical industry sets the current standard of excellence for technological competitiveness. This world-class leadership is attributed to the innovation and advancement of chemical engineering process technology. Whether this status is sustained over the next decade depends strongly on meeting increasingly demanding challenges stimulated by growing concerns about the safe production and use of chemicals without harmful impacts on the environment. To comply with stringent environmental regulations while remaining economically competitive, industry must exploit alternative benign starting materials and develop environmentally neutral industrial processes. Opportunities are described for development of environmentally compatible alternatives and substitutes for some of the most abundantly produced, potentially hazardous industrial chemicals now labeled as "high-priority toxic chemicals." For several other uniquely important commodity chemicals where no economically competitive, environmentally satisfactory, nontoxic alternative starting material exists, we advocate the development of new dynamic processes for the on-demand generation of toxic chemicals. In this general concept, which obviates mass storage and transportation of chemicals, toxic raw materials are produced in real time, where possible, from less-hazardous starting materials and then chemically transformed immediately into the final product. As a selected example for semiconductor technology, recent progress is reviewed for the on-demand production of arsine in turnkey electrochemical generators. Innovation of on-demand chemical generators and alternative processes provide rich areas for environmentally responsive chemical engineering processing research and development for next-generation technology.

  13. Isothermal melt processing of Bi-2212 thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holesinger, T. G.; Phillips, D. S.; Coulter, J. Y.; Willis, J. O.; Peterson, D. E.

    1995-02-01

    An alternative melt-processing technique has been developed for the fabrication of Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O y (Bi-2212) thick films at temperatures over 100°C lower than those employed in conventional Bi-2212 melt processing. Isothermal melt processing combines the melting and solidification steps at the same temperature [T.G. Holesinger et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 63 (1993) 982]. This technique is possible due to the large drop in the solidus temperature with decreasing oxygen partial pressure. High-quality thick films were processed at temperatures as low as 770°C. Such films were found to be well-textured, contain relatively few secondary phases, and possess critical current densities over 1 × 10 5 A/cm 2 at 4 K in self-field.

  14. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C.R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Staggs, M.; Rainer, F.

    1995-12-05

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold. 9 figs.

  15. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C. Robert; Kozlowski, Mark R.; Campbell, John H.; Staggs, Michael; Rainer, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold.

  16. Some thermomechanical instabilites in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R.

    1995-12-31

    Instabilities in the form of buckling or periodic defects can be induced by thermal effects during material processing. Correcting distorted products requires additional processing steps, and controlling product uniformity places additional constraints on the processes. A complete quantitative understanding of the phenomena is required to optimize the processes for specific alloys and to increase productivity. Examples of two types of thermally related instabilities are presented. The first is plastic buckling of a sheet or plate induced by rapid quenching following solution heat treatment. The second example, of hot tearing during extrusion, is thought to result from deformation induced temperature increases near the die surface coupled to friction and the thermal softening and strain rate sensitivity of the material. These processes are understood qualitatively, but quantitative predictive capabilities are necessary for process optimization.

  17. Tuning optoelectronic properties and understanding charge transport in nanocrystal thin films of earth abundant semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riha, Shannon C.

    2011-12-01

    With the capability of producing nearly 600 TW annually, solar power is one renewable energy source with the potential to meet a large fraction of the world's burgeoning energy demand. To make solar technology cost-competitive with carbon-based fuels, cheaper devices need to be realized. Solution-processed solar cells from nanocrystal inks of earth abundant materials satisfy this requirement. Nonetheless, a major hurdle in commercializing such devices is poor charge transport through nanocrystal thin films. The efficiency of charge transport through nanocrystal thin films is strongly dependent on the quality of the nanocrystals, as well as their optoelectronic properties. Therefore, the first part of this dissertation is focused on synthesizing high quality nanocrystals of Cu2ZnSnS4, a promising earth abundant photovoltaic absorber material. The optoelectronic properties of the nanocrystals were tuned by altering the copper to zinc ratio, as well as by introducing selenium to create Cu2ZnSn(S1-xSe x)4 solid solutions. Photoelectrochemical characterization was used to test the Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2ZnSn(S 1-xSex)4 nanocrystal thin films. The results identify minority carrier diffusion and recombination via the redox shuttle as the major loss mechanisms hindering efficient charge transport through the nanocrystal thin films. One way to solve this issue is to sinter the nanocrystals together, creating large grains for efficient charge transport. Although this may be quick and effective, it can lead to the formation of structural defects, among other issues. To this end, using a different copper-based material, namely Cu2Se, and simple surface chemistry treatments, an alternative route to enhance charge transport through nanocrystals thin films is proposed.

  18. The cognitive processing of film and musical soundtracks.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Marilyn G

    2004-10-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that musical soundtracks can influence the interpretation, emotional impact, and remembering of film information. The intent here was to examine how music is encoded into the cognitive system and subsequently represented relative to its accompanying visual action. In Experiment 1, participants viewed a set of music/film clips that were either congruent or incongruent in their emotional affects. Selective attending was also systematically manipulated by instructing viewers to attend to and remember the music, film, or both in tandem. The results from tune recognition, film recall, and paired discrimination tasks collectively revealed that mood-congruent pairs lead to a joint encoding of music/film information as well as an integrated memory code. Incongruent pairs, on the other hand, result in an independent encoding in which a given dimension, music or film, is only remembered well if it was selectively attended to at the time of encoding. Experiment 2 extended these findings by showing that tunes from mood-congruent pairs are better recognized when cued by their original scenes, while those from incongruent pairs are better remembered in the absence of scene information. These findings both support and extend the "Congruence Associationist Model" (A. J. Cohen, 2001), which addresses those cognitive mechanisms involved in the processing of music/film information.

  19. An improved approach for process monitoring in laser material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Hans-Georg; Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Process monitoring is used in many different laser material processes due to the demand for reliable and stable processes. Among different methods, on-axis process monitoring offers multiple advantages. To observe a laser material process it is unavoidable to choose a wavelength for observation that is different to the one used for material processing, otherwise the light of the processing laser would outshine the picture of the process. By choosing a different wavelength, lateral chromatic aberration occurs in not chromatically corrected optical systems with optical scanning units and f-Theta lenses. These aberrations lead to a truncated image of the process on the camera or the pyrometer, respectively. This is the reason for adulterated measurements and non-satisfying images of the process. A new approach for solving the problem of field dependent lateral chromatic aberration in process monitoring is presented. Therefore, the scanner-based optical system is reproduced in a simulation environment, to predict the occurring lateral chromatic aberrations. In addition, a second deflecting system is integrated into the system. By using simulation, a predictive control is designed that uses the additional deflecting system to introduce reverse lateral deviations in order to compensate the lateral effect of chromatic aberration. This paper illustrates the concept and the implementation of the predictive control, which is used to eliminate lateral chromatic aberrations in process monitoring, the simulation on which the system is based the optical system as well as the control concept.

  20. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Final subcontract report, 16 January 1990--15 January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Yokimcus, T.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes results and conclusions of the final phase (III) of a three-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film heterojunction solar cells. The research consisted of the investigation of the relationships between processing, materials properties, and device performance. This relationship was quantified by device modeling and analysis. The analysis of thin-film polycrystalline heterojunction solar cells explains how minority-carrier recombination at the metallurgical interface and at grain boundaries can be greatly reduced by the proper doping of the window and absorber layers. Additional analysis and measurements show that the present solar cells are limited by the magnitude of the diode current, which appears to be caused by recombination in the space charge region. Developing an efficient commercial-scale process for fabricating large-area polycrystalline, thin-film solar cells from a research process requires a detailed understanding of the individual steps in making the solar cell, and their relationship to device performance and reliability. The complexities involved in characterizing a process are demonstrated with results from our research program on CuInSe{sub 2}, and CdTe processes.

  1. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Annual subcontract report, 16 January 1991--15 January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    Results of Phase II of a research program on polycrystalline thin film heterojunction solar cells are presented. Relations between processing, materials properties and device performance were studied. The analysis of these solar cells explains how minority carrier recombination at the interface and at grain boundaries can be reduced by doping of windows and absorber layers, such as in high efficiency CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} based solar cells. The additional geometric dimension introduced by the polycrystallinity must be taken into consideration. The solar cells are limited by the diode current, caused by recombination in the space charge region. J-V characteristics of CuInSe{sub 2}/(CdZn)S cells were analyzed. Current-voltage and spectral response measurements were also made on high efficiency CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells prepared by vacuum evaporation. Cu-In bilayers were reacted with Se and H{sub 2}Se gas to form CuInSe{sub 2} films; the reaction pathways and the precursor were studied. Several approaches to fabrication of these thin film solar cells in a superstrate configuration were explored. A self-consistent picture of the effects of processing on the evolution of CdTe cells was developed.

  2. Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, III, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures.

  3. Catalogo de peliculas educativas y otros materiales audiovisuales (Catalogue of Educational Films and other Audiovisual Materials).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    This catalogue of educational films and other audiovisual materials consists predominantly of films in Spanish and English which are intended for use in elementary and secondary schools. A wide variety of topics including films for social studies, language arts, humanities, physical and natural sciences, safety and health, agriculture, physical…

  4. Incorporation of nisin in poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) films by melt processing: a study on the antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Scaffaro, Roberto; Botta, Luigi; Marineo, Sandra; Puglia, Anna Maria

    2011-07-01

    Both industry and academia have shown a growing interest in materials with antimicrobial properties suitable for food packaging applications. In this study, we prepared and characterized thin films of ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer with antimicrobial properties. The films were prepared with a film blowing process by incorporating a nisin preparation as an antimicrobial agent in the melt. Two grades of EVA containing 14 and 28% (wt/wt) vinyl acetate (EVA 14 and EVA 28, respectively) and two commercial formulations of nisin with different nominal activities were used. The effect of the nisin concentration also was evaluated. The films with the highest antimicrobial activity were those formulated with nisin at the highest activity and EVA with the highest content of vinyl acetate. The use of the commercial formulation of nisin with high activity in the EVA films allowed reduction in the amount of nisin needed to provide antimicrobial properties. Consequently, the mechanical properties of these films were only slightly inferior to those of the pure polymers. In contrast, films prepared by incorporating more of the nisin with lower activity had poor mechanical properties. The effect of different processing temperatures used in the preparation of the films on the antimicrobial properties of the films also was evaluated. The materials displayed antimicrobial properties even when they were prepared at temperatures as high as 160 °C, probably because of the very short processing time (60 to 90 s) required for preparation.

  5. Process optimization of ultrasonic spray coating of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sanjukta; Keller, Stephan S; Alstrøm, Tommy S; Boisen, Anja; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-06-11

    In this work we have performed a detailed study of the influence of various parameters on spray coating of polymer films. Our aim is to produce polymer films of uniform thickness (500 nm to 1 μm) and low roughness compared to the film thickness. The coatings are characterized with respect to thickness, roughness (profilometer), and morphology (optical microscopy). Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is used to do a full factorial design of experiments with selected process parameters such as temperature, distance between spray nozzle and substrate, and speed of the spray nozzle. A mathematical model is developed for statistical analysis which identifies the distance between nozzle and substrate as the most significant parameter. Depending on the drying of the sprayed droplets on the substrate, we define two broad regimes, "dry" and "wet". The optimum condition of spraying lies in a narrow window between these two regimes, where we obtain a film of desired quality. Both with increasing nozzle-substrate distance and temperature, the deposition moves from a wet state to a dry regime. Similar results are also achieved for solvents with low boiling points. Finally, we study film formation during spray coating with poly (D,L-lactide) (PDLLA). The results confirm the processing knowledge obtained with PVP and indicate that the observed trends are identical for spraying of other polymer films.

  6. Patterning Multicomponent Polymer Thin Films via Dynamic Thermal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet

    Bottom-up patterning is gaining increased importance owing to the physical limitations and rising costs of top-down patterning. One example of bottom-up patterning is self-assembling polymer thin films. Although there are several pathways to facilitate polymer thin film self-assembly, this presentation will focus on dynamic thermal field based processes for patterning multicomponent polymer thin films. Dynamic thermal field processing is an attractive roll­to­roll (R2R) amenable directed self­assembly (DSA) method for molecular level organization of multicomponent polymer systems such as block copolymer thin films over large areas without requiring guiding templates. The talk will first outline how parameters such as magnitude of the temperature gradient, velocity of annealing, thermal expansion, and molecular weight of the polymer can be optimized to finely tune the morphology of the block copolymer thin films and also elucidate their associated physical mechanisms. The second part of the talk will outline application of dynamic thermal field processes for fabricating functional nanomaterials and discuss the recent advancements achieved using these processes.

  7. Atomic layer deposition synthesized TiO{sub x} thin films and their application as microbolometer active materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tanrikulu, Mahmud Yusuf; Rasouli, Hamid Reza; Ghaffari, Mohammad; Topalli, Kagan; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2016-05-15

    This paper demonstrates the possible usage of TiO{sub x} thin films synthesized by atomic layer deposition as a microbolometer active material. Thin film electrical resistance is investigated as a function of thermal annealing. It is found that the temperature coefficient of resistance values can be controlled by coating/annealing processes, and the value as high as −9%/K near room temperature is obtained. The noise properties of TiO{sub x} films are characterized. It is shown that TiO{sub x} films grown by atomic layer deposition technique could have a significant potential to be used as a new active material for microbolometer-based applications.

  8. Thin-Film Thermal-Conductivity Measurement on Semi-Conducting Polymer Material Using the 3ω Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, S.; Rauh, D.; Deibel, C.; Vidi, S.; Ebert, H. P.

    2013-05-01

    Organic solar cells have gained increasing interest in recent years due to their promising low-cost processing possibility and high throughput compared to inorganic solar cells. Since the efficiency of organic solar cells is still low, further optimization has to be done. Reliable simulation of solar cell layout and performance strongly depends on correct input data of the electrical and thermal transport properties of the applied film materials. In many cases these material properties are only available for bulk material if available at all. Owing to the given film thicknesses on the order of tenths to hundreds of nanometer and to the preparation methods, the properties of the used system can differ from the bulk material values. For determination of the thin-film thermal conductivity, only a few measurement methods are known to provide accurate results with one of them being the 3ω technique. It allows the determination of the thermal conductivity of bulk materials as well as thin films down to a thickness of around 50 nm. This study is part of an investigation on the influence of local hot spots, generated by defects in the active layer of organic solar cells, and on the charge carrier mobility as well as the propagation of the hot spot due to the thermal conduction of the material. Applying the 3ω technique, the effective thermal conductivity of solution-derived poly(3-hexylthiophene) thin films of different thickness on a common glass substrate was investigated.

  9. Determining the thermal expansion coefficient of thin films for a CMOS MEMS process using test cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chao-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Han; Fang, Weileun

    2015-02-01

    Many standard CMOS processes, provided by existing foundries, are available. These standard CMOS processes, with stacking of various metal and dielectric layers, have been extensively applied in integrated circuits as well as micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). It is of importance to determine the material properties of the metal and dielectric films to predict the performance and reliability of micro devices. This study employs an existing approach to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) of metal and dielectric films for standard CMOS processes. Test cantilevers with different stacking of metal and dielectric layers for standard CMOS processes have been designed and implemented. The CTEs of standard CMOS films can be determined from measurements of the out-of-plane thermal deformations of the test cantilevers. To demonstrate the feasibility of the present approach, thin films prepared by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process are characterized. Eight test cantilevers with different stacking of CMOS layers and an auxiliary Si cantilever on a SOI wafer are fabricated. The equivalent elastic moduli and CTEs of the CMOS thin films including the metal and dielectric layers are determined, respectively, from the resonant frequency and static thermal deformation of the test cantilevers. Moreover, thermal deformations of cantilevers with stacked layers different to those of the test beams have been employed to verify the measured CTEs and elastic moduli.

  10. Sol-gel processing of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tillotson, T.M.; Hrubesh, L.H.; Fox, G.L.; Simpson, R.L.; Lee, R.W.; Swansiger, R.W.; Simpson, L.R.

    1997-08-18

    As part of a new materials effort, we are exploring the use of sol- gel chemistry to manufacture energetic materials. Traditional manufacturing of energetic materials involves processing of granular solids. One application is the production of detonators where powders of energetic material and a binder are typically mixed and compacted at high pressure to make pellets. Performance properties are strongly dependent on particle size distribution, surface area of its constituents, homogeneity of the mix, and void volume. The goal is to produce detonators with fast energy release rate the are insensitive to unintended initiation. In this paper, we report results of our early work in this field of research, including the preparation of detonators from xerogel molding powders and aerogels, comparing the material properties with present state-of-the-art technology.

  11. Innovative materials processing strategies: A biomimetic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, A.H.; Blackwell, J.; Caplan, A.I. ); Fink, D.J. ); Laraia, V.J. ); Arias, J.L. ); Calvert, P.D. ); Kendall, K. ); Messing, G.L. ); Rieke, P.C. ); Thompson, D.H. ); Wheeler, A.P. ); Veis, A. )

    1992-02-28

    Many organisms construct structural ceramic (biomineral) composites from seemingly mundane materials; cell-mediated processes control both the nucleation and growth of mineral and the development of composite microarchitecture. Living systems fabricate biocomposites by: confining biomineralization within specific subunit compartments; producing a specific mineral with defined crystal size and orientation; and packaging many incremental units together in a moving front process to form fully densified, macroscopic structures. By adapting biological principles, materials scientists are attempting to produce novel materials. To date, neither the elegance of the biomineral assembly mechanisms nor the intricate composite microarchitectures have been duplicated by nonbiological processing. However, substantial progress has been made in the understanding of how biomineralization occurs, and the first steps are now being taken to exploit the basic principles involved.

  12. Microstructural revolution of CIGS thin film using CuInGa ternary target during sputtering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kuang-Hsiang; Su, Cherng-Yuh; Ding, Yu-Ting; Pan, Cheng-Tang

    2012-12-01

    CuInGa (CIG) ternary targets were prepared by vacuum arc remelting and used to deposit CIG thin films through direct current (DC) sputtering. We adjusted the sputtering energy (1-2 kWh) by tuning both the sputtering power and the accumulative sputtering time. The impact of the varying sputtering energy on the microstructure of CIG targets and thin films was subsequently investigated. The experimental results indicated that the compositional uniformity of CIG targets is strongly influenced by this parameter. CIG thin films with a flat topography, low porosity, and dense grain boundaries were obtained when targets were accumulatively sputtered at 1 kWh. These films showed good compositional uniformity while the CIG targets were found to maintain their microstructural characteristics as compared to their as-melted counterparts. On the other hand, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films, obtained by a selenization process, exhibited large faceted grains composed of a single chalcopyrite phase with a preferred orientation along the (1 1 2) plane. Accumulative sputtering of CIG targets at higher energies (e.g., 2 kWh) resulted in phase transformation and loss of In material as a result of an excess of residual heat budget on the surface generated by Ar ions bombardment. The CIG thin films thus showed an In-rich composition ratio, thereby potentially leading to In-rich CIGS thin films containing traces of an InSe compound.

  13. Solution-processing of chalcogenide materials for device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yunlai

    Chalcogenide glasses are well-known for their desirable optical properties, which have enabled many infrared applications in the fields of photonics, medicine, environmental sensing and security. Conventional deposition methods such as thermal evaporation, chemical vapor deposition, sputtering or pulse laser deposition are efficient for fabricating structures on flat surfaces. However, they have limitations in deposition on curved surfaces, deposition of thick layers and component integration. In these cases, solution-based methods, which involve the dissolution of chalcogenide glasses and processing as a liquid, become a better choice for their flexibility. After proper treatment, the associated structures can have similar optical, chemical and physical properties to the bulk. This thesis presents an in-depth study of solution-processing chalcogenide glasses, starting from the "solution state" to the "film state" and the "structure state". Firstly, chalcogenide dissolution is studied to reveal the mechanisms at molecular level and build a foundation for material processing. Dissolution processes for various chalcogenide solvent pairs are reviewed and compared. Secondly, thermal processing, in the context of high temperature annealing, is explained along with the chemical and physical properties of the annealed films. Another focus is on nanopore formation in propylamine-processed arsenic sulfide films. Pore density changes with respect to annealing temperatures and durations are characterized. Base on a proposed vacancy coalescence theory, we have identified new dissolution strategies and achieved the breakthrough of pore-free film deposition. Thirdly, several solution methods developed along with the associated photonic structures are demonstrated. The first example is "spin-coating and lamination", which produces thick (over 10 mum) chalcogenide structures. Both homogeneous thick chalcogenide structures and heterogeneous layers of different chalcogenide glasses

  14. Advances in Processing of Bulk Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galassi, Carmen

    The development of ferroelectric bulk materials is still under extensive investigation, as new and challenging issues are growing in relation to their widespread applications. Progress in understanding the fundamental aspects requires adequate technological tools. This would enable controlling and tuning the material properties as well as fully exploiting them into the scale production. Apart from the growing number of new compositions, interest in the first ferroelectrics like BaTiO3 or PZT materials is far from dropping. The need to find new lead-free materials, with as high performance as PZT ceramics, is pushing towards a full exploitation of bariumbased compositions. However, lead-based materials remain the best performing at reasonably low production costs. Therefore, the main trends are towards nano-size effects and miniaturisation, multifunctional materials, integration, and enhancement of the processing ability in powder synthesis. Also, in control of dispersion and packing, to let densification occur in milder conditions. In this chapter, after a general review of the composition and main properties of the principal ferroelectric materials, methods of synthesis are analysed with emphasis on recent results from chemical routes and cold consolidation methods based on the colloidal processing.

  15. Aluminum thin film enhanced IR nanosecond laser-induced frontside etching of transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Daniel; Cambronero, Ferran; Flores-Arias, María Teresa; Farid, Nazar; O'Connor, Gerard M.

    2017-01-01

    Laser processing of glass is of significant commercial interest for microfabrication of precision optical engineering devices. In this work, a laser ablation enhancement mechanism for microstructuring of glass materials is presented. The method consists of depositing a thin film of aluminum on the front surface of the glass material to be etched. The laser beam modifies the glass material by being incident on this front-side. The influence of ablation fluence in the nanosecond regime, in combination with the deposition of the aluminum layer of various thicknesses, is investigated by determining the ablation threshold for different glass materials including soda-lime, borosilicate, fused silica and sapphire. Experiments are performed using single laser pulse per shot in an air environment. The best enhancement in terms of threshold fluence reduction is obtained for a 16 nm thick aluminum layer where a reduction of two orders of magnitude in the ablation threshold fluence is observed for all the glass samples investigated in this work.

  16. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  17. Space processing applications of ion beam technology. [surface finishing, welding, milling and film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Ion thruster engines for spacecraft propulsion can serve as ion beam sources for potential space processing applications. The advantages of space vacuum environments and the possible gravity effects on thruster ion beam materials operations such as thin film growth, ion milling, and surface texturing were investigated. The direct gravity effect on sputter deposition and vapor deposition processes are discussed as well as techniques for cold and warm welding.

  18. Combinatorial techniques to efficiently investigate and optimize organic thin film processing and properties.

    PubMed

    Wieberger, Florian; Kolb, Tristan; Neuber, Christian; Ober, Christopher K; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2013-04-08

    In this article we present several developed and improved combinatorial techniques to optimize processing conditions and material properties of organic thin films. The combinatorial approach allows investigations of multi-variable dependencies and is the perfect tool to investigate organic thin films regarding their high performance purposes. In this context we develop and establish the reliable preparation of gradients of material composition, temperature, exposure, and immersion time. Furthermore we demonstrate the smart application of combinations of composition and processing gradients to create combinatorial libraries. First a binary combinatorial library is created by applying two gradients perpendicular to each other. A third gradient is carried out in very small areas and arranged matrix-like over the entire binary combinatorial library resulting in a ternary combinatorial library. Ternary combinatorial libraries allow identifying precise trends for the optimization of multi-variable dependent processes which is demonstrated on the lithographic patterning process. Here we verify conclusively the strong interaction and thus the interdependency of variables in the preparation and properties of complex organic thin film systems. The established gradient preparation techniques are not limited to lithographic patterning. It is possible to utilize and transfer the reported combinatorial techniques to other multi-variable dependent processes and to investigate and optimize thin film layers and devices for optical, electro-optical, and electronic applications.

  19. Process for Polycrystalline film silicon growth

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing polycrystalline silicon on substrates, including foreign substrates, occurs in a chamber at about atmospheric pressure, wherein a temperature gradient is formed, and both the atmospheric pressure and the temperature gradient are maintained throughout the process. Formation of a vapor barrier within the chamber that precludes exit of the constituent chemicals, which include silicon, iodine, silicon diiodide, and silicon tetraiodide. The deposition occurs beneath the vapor barrier. One embodiment of the process also includes the use of a blanketing gas that precludes the entrance of oxygen or other impurities. The process is capable of repetition without the need to reset the deposition zone conditions.

  20. Needs for Process Control in Advanced Processing of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabian, Robert; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

    1985-02-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of new materials with complex microstructures, coupled with an improved understanding of process/microtructure/property relationships, has created a new challenge for NDE—the redirection of a technology originally conceived for flaw detection/characterization to the nondestructive measurement of process and microstructure variables during materials processing. This review shows how NDE techniques could play the sensor role in automated process control. The techniques, originally developed for detecting cracks, show merit in monitoring solidification. Other ultrasonic techniques show promise in characterizing temperature distributions and porosity. Problems include: the need for inverse modeling/calibration/high speed data acquisition and reconstruction; and display and hardware able to survive the harsh processing environment. Feedback systems based on artificial intelligence combine heuristic and mathematical predictions with developing sensor technologies to drive process development.

  1. Alternative nano-structured thin-film materials used as durable thermal nanoimprint lithography templates.

    PubMed

    Bossard, M; Boussey, J; Le Drogoff, B; Chaker, M

    2016-02-19

    Nanoimprint templates made of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) thin films and fluorine-doped associated materials, i.e. F-DLC and F-SiC were investigated in the context of thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL) with respect to their release properties. Their performances in terms of durability and stability were evaluated and compared to those of conventional silicon or silica molds coated with antisticking molecules applied as a self-assembled monolayer. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition parameters were firstly tuned to optimize mechanical and structural properties of the DLC and SiC thin films. The impact of the amount of fluorine dopant on the deposited thin films properties was then analyzed. A comparative analysis of DLC, F-DLC as well as SiC and F-SiC molds was then carried out over multiple imprints, performed into poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thermo-plastic resist. The release properties of un-patterned films were evaluated by the measurement of demolding energies and surface energies, associated with a systematic analysis of the mold surface contamination. These analyses showed that the developed materials behave as intrinsically easy-demolding and contamination-free molds over series of up to 40 imprints. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a large number of imprints has been considered within an exhaustive comparative study of materials for NIL. Finally, the developed materials went through standard e-beam lithography and plasma etching processes to obtain nanoscale-patterned templates. The replicas of those patterned molds, imprinted into PMMA, were shown to be of high fidelity and good stability after several imprints.

  2. High performance computing for materials process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Bjerke, M.A.; Simunovic, S.

    1993-12-31

    Advanced mathematical techniques and computer simulation play a major role in providing enhanced understanding of conventional materials processing operations such as welding and joining. Many of these numerical models are highly compute-intensive. It is not unusual for an analysis to require several hours of computational time on current supercomputers despite the simplicity of the models being studied. As computer simulations and materials databases grow in complexity, massively parallel computers have become important tools. This paper briefly describes massively parallel computational research at the ORNL with the objective of providing fundamental insight into the welding process.

  3. Laser-induced metallic nanograined thin films processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, Nicoleta E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Toadere, Florin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Hojbota, Calin E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro; Tosa, Valer E-mail: florin.toadere@itim-cj.ro

    2013-11-13

    A direct laser writing method for designing metallic nanograined thin films is presented. This method takes advantage of photon conversion within a chemical process localized at the focal point. A computer controlled positioning system allows the control of experimental parameters and spatial resolution of the pattern. Spectroscopic investigations reveal variable attenuation of the optical properties in UV-visible range and a spectral imaging processing algorithm simulated the functionality of these films in visible light. This could be an important step for obtaining neutral density attenuators.

  4. Enhancement of efficiency of storage and processing of food raw materials using radiation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracheva, A. Yu.; Zav'yalov, M. A.; Ilyukhina, N. V.; Kukhto, V. A.; Tarasyuk, V. T.; Filippovich, V. P.; Egorkin, A. V.; Chasovskikh, A. V.; Pavlov, Yu. S.; Prokopenko, A. V.; Strokova, N. E.; Artem'ev, S. A.; Polyakova, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    The work is dedicated to improvement of efficiency of storage and processing of food raw materials using radiation technologies. International practice of radiation processing of food raw materials is presented and an increase in the consumption of irradiated food products is shown. The prospects of using radiation technologies for the processing of food products in Russia are discussed. The results of studies of radiation effects on various food products and packaging film by γ radiation and accelerated electrons are presented.

  5. Enhancement of efficiency of storage and processing of food raw materials using radiation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gracheva, A. Yu.; Zav’yalov, M. A.; Ilyukhina, N. V.; Kukhto, V. A.; Tarasyuk, V. T.; Filippovich, V. P.; Egorkin, A. V.; Chasovskikh, A. V.; Pavlov, Yu. S.; Prokopenko, A. V.; Strokova, N. E.; Artem’ev, S. A.; Polyakova, S. P.

    2016-12-15

    The work is dedicated to improvement of efficiency of storage and processing of food raw materials using radiation technologies. International practice of radiation processing of food raw materials is presented and an increase in the consumption of irradiated food products is shown. The prospects of using radiation technologies for the processing of food products in Russia are discussed. The results of studies of radiation effects on various food products and packaging film by γ radiation and accelerated electrons are presented.

  6. Coprecal: materials accounting in the modified process

    SciTech Connect

    Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.; Shipley, J.P.

    1980-05-01

    This report presents the design and evaluation of an advanced materials accounting system for a uranium-plutonium nitrate-to-oxide coconversion facility based on the General Electric Coprecal process as modified by Savannah River Laboratory and Plant and DuPont Engineering. The modifications include adding small aliquot tanks to feed the process and reconfiguring the calciner filter systems. Diversion detection sensitivities for the modified Coprecal process are somewhat better than the original Coprecal design, but they are still significantly worse than a same-sized conversion facility based on the oxalate (III) precipitation process.

  7. Simulation of materials processing: Fantasy or reality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Thomas J.; Bright, Victor M.

    1994-01-01

    This experiment introduces students to the application of computer-aided design (CAD) and analysis of materials processing in the context of integrated circuit (IC) fabrication. The fabrication of modern IC's is a complex process which consists of several sequential steps. These steps involve the precise control of processing variables such as temperature, humidity, and ambient gas composition. In essence, the particular process employed during the fabrication becomes a 'recipe'. Due to economic and other considerations, CAD is becoming an indispensable part of the development of new recipes for IC fabrication. In particular, this experiment permits the students to explore the CAD of the thermal oxidation of silicon.

  8. Robot development for nuclear material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrotti, L.R.; Armantrout, G.A.; Allen, D.C.; Sievers, R.H. Sr.

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Energy is seeking to modernize its special nuclear material (SNM) production facilities and concurrently reduce radiation exposures and process and incidental radioactive waste generated. As part of this program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) lead team is developing and adapting generic and specific applications of commercial robotic technologies to SNM pyrochemical processing and other operations. A working gantry robot within a sealed processing glove box and a telerobot control test bed are manifestations of this effort. This paper describes the development challenges and progress in adapting processing, robotic, and nuclear safety technologies to the application. 3 figs.

  9. High-performance and flexible thermoelectric films by screen printing solution-processed nanoplate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tony; Hollar, Courtney; Richardson, Joseph; Kempf, Nicholas; Han, Chao; Gamarachchi, Pasindu; Estrada, David; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Zhang, Yanliang

    2016-09-01

    Screen printing allows for direct conversion of thermoelectric nanocrystals into flexible energy harvesters and coolers. However, obtaining flexible thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit ZT through printing is an exacting challenge due to the difficulties to synthesize high-performance thermoelectric inks and the poor density and electrical conductivity of the printed films. Here, we demonstrate high-performance flexible films and devices by screen printing bismuth telluride based nanocrystal inks synthesized using a microwave-stimulated wet-chemical method. Thermoelectric films of several tens of microns thickness were screen printed onto a flexible polyimide substrate followed by cold compaction and sintering. The n-type films demonstrate a peak ZT of 0.43 along with superior flexibility, which is among the highest reported ZT values in flexible thermoelectric materials. A flexible thermoelectric device fabricated using the printed films produces a high power density of 4.1 mW/cm2 with 60 °C temperature difference between the hot side and cold side. The highly scalable and low cost process to fabricate flexible thermoelectric materials and devices demonstrated here opens up many opportunities to transform thermoelectric energy harvesting and cooling applications.

  10. High-performance and flexible thermoelectric films by screen printing solution-processed nanoplate crystals.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Tony; Hollar, Courtney; Richardson, Joseph; Kempf, Nicholas; Han, Chao; Gamarachchi, Pasindu; Estrada, David; Mehta, Rutvik J; Zhang, Yanliang

    2016-09-12

    Screen printing allows for direct conversion of thermoelectric nanocrystals into flexible energy harvesters and coolers. However, obtaining flexible thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit ZT through printing is an exacting challenge due to the difficulties to synthesize high-performance thermoelectric inks and the poor density and electrical conductivity of the printed films. Here, we demonstrate high-performance flexible films and devices by screen printing bismuth telluride based nanocrystal inks synthesized using a microwave-stimulated wet-chemical method. Thermoelectric films of several tens of microns thickness were screen printed onto a flexible polyimide substrate followed by cold compaction and sintering. The n-type films demonstrate a peak ZT of 0.43 along with superior flexibility, which is among the highest reported ZT values in flexible thermoelectric materials. A flexible thermoelectric device fabricated using the printed films produces a high power density of 4.1 mW/cm(2) with 60 °C temperature difference between the hot side and cold side. The highly scalable and low cost process to fabricate flexible thermoelectric materials and devices demonstrated here opens up many opportunities to transform thermoelectric energy harvesting and cooling applications.

  11. High-performance and flexible thermoelectric films by screen printing solution-processed nanoplate crystals

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Tony; Hollar, Courtney; Richardson, Joseph; Kempf, Nicholas; Han, Chao; Gamarachchi, Pasindu; Estrada, David; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Zhang, Yanliang

    2016-01-01

    Screen printing allows for direct conversion of thermoelectric nanocrystals into flexible energy harvesters and coolers. However, obtaining flexible thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit ZT through printing is an exacting challenge due to the difficulties to synthesize high-performance thermoelectric inks and the poor density and electrical conductivity of the printed films. Here, we demonstrate high-performance flexible films and devices by screen printing bismuth telluride based nanocrystal inks synthesized using a microwave-stimulated wet-chemical method. Thermoelectric films of several tens of microns thickness were screen printed onto a flexible polyimide substrate followed by cold compaction and sintering. The n-type films demonstrate a peak ZT of 0.43 along with superior flexibility, which is among the highest reported ZT values in flexible thermoelectric materials. A flexible thermoelectric device fabricated using the printed films produces a high power density of 4.1 mW/cm2 with 60 °C temperature difference between the hot side and cold side. The highly scalable and low cost process to fabricate flexible thermoelectric materials and devices demonstrated here opens up many opportunities to transform thermoelectric energy harvesting and cooling applications. PMID:27615036

  12. Deprivation, context, and processing of textual materials.

    PubMed

    Singh, T; Dwivedi, C B

    1993-03-01

    Levy's (1983) familiarization and proofreading paradigm was used to examine the context-processing relationship during reading of Hindi textual materials. Sixty high- and 60 low-deprived male students in Classes 11 and 12 were asked to proofread error-filled passages of easy and difficult text. Familiarity was manipulated by presenting error-free versions of the passages to some subjects but not to others for a single reading before their actual proofreading. Familiar passages were processed faster than unfamiliar passages irrespective of students' deprivation and passage difficulty. Slow processing was recorded for highly deprived subjects and for easy passages. Faster processing was associated with higher error detection and higher short-term retention scores, whereas the opposite was true for slower processing. Familiarity enhanced short-term retention, suggesting some involvement of conceptually driven process even after familiarization. Findings are discussed in light of interactive processing models of reading.

  13. Laser materials processing at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    The interest in laser processing has been driven by Sandia`s responsibility to design, prototype, manufacture, and steward high reliability defense hardware for the Department of Energy. The system requirements for the hardware generally necessitate hermetic sealing for ensured long life operation. With the advent of miniaturized electronic devices, traditional welding processes were no longer practical choices because of their limited ability to make very small weld closures without heat damage to the hardware. Gas and solid state lasers offered the opportunity to make hermetic closure welds in small, heat sensitive hardware. In order to consistently produce quality product, the Sandia laser materials processing team performed research aimed at identifying those critical parameters which controlled the laser welding process. This has been directed towards both the development of quantitative engineering data needed in product design and process control, and research to achieve fundamental process understanding. In addition, they have developed novel diagnostic systems to measure these important parameters, pioneered the use of calorimetric techniques to measure energy transfer efficiencies, and correlated the occurrence of welding defects with alloy compositions and type of laser welding process. Today, Sandia`s laser materials processing team continues to advance the state of laser processing technology in many areas, including aluminum laser welding, the design of novel optics for specific laser processing needs, laser micromachining of silicon and diamond for microelectronics applications, and fluxless laser soldering. This paper will serve to highlight some examples of where Sandia has made contributions to the field of laser materials processing and will indicate the directions where they expect to focus their future efforts.

  14. Novel Low Temperature Processing for Enhanced Properties of Ion Implanted Thin Films and Amorphous Mixed Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, Rajitha

    This research emphasizes the use of low energy and low temperature post processing to improve the performance and lifetime of thin films and thin film transistors, by applying the fundamentals of interaction of materials with conductive heating and electromagnetic radiation. Single frequency microwave anneal is used to rapidly recrystallize the damage induced during ion implantation in Si substrates. Volumetric heating of the sample in the presence of the microwave field facilitates quick absorption of radiation to promote recrystallization at the amorphous-crystalline interface, apart from electrical activation of the dopants due to relocation to the substitutional sites. Structural and electrical characterization confirm recrystallization of heavily implanted Si within 40 seconds anneal time with minimum dopant diffusion compared to rapid thermal annealed samples. The use of microwave anneal to improve performance of multilayer thin film devices, e.g. thin film transistors (TFTs) requires extensive study of interaction of individual layers with electromagnetic radiation. This issue has been addressed by developing detail understanding of thin films and interfaces in TFTs by studying reliability and failure mechanisms upon extensive stress test. Electrical and ambient stresses such as illumination, thermal, and mechanical stresses are inflicted on the mixed oxide based thin film transistors, which are explored due to high mobilities of the mixed oxide (indium zinc oxide, indium gallium zinc oxide) channel layer material. Semiconductor parameter analyzer is employed to extract transfer characteristics, useful to derive mobility, subthreshold, and threshold voltage parameters of the transistors. Low temperature post processing anneals compatible with polymer substrates are performed in several ambients (oxygen, forming gas and vacuum) at 150 °C as a preliminary step. The analysis of the results pre and post low temperature anneals using device physics fundamentals

  15. Effect of annealing process on the phase formation in poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Ibtisam Yahya; Yahaya, Muhammad; Jumali, Mohd Hafizuddin Haji; Shanshool, Haider Mohammed

    2014-09-03

    This work reports the initial study on the effect of annealing process on the crystalline phase of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) thin film. PVDF powder was dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide before spin-coated onto a glass substrate to form a film. The films were annealed at 30°C, 90°C and 110°C for 5 hrs. The crystalline phase of the powder PVDF as received was investigated by using XRD and FTIR techniques. Moreover, the crystalline phases of thin films after annealing were investigated by using the same techniques. XRD analysis showed that in powder form PVDF exists in α-phase. Each annealed PVDF thin films exhibited identical formation of three-phases material namely γ (as major phase) while α and β phases as the minor phases. The FTIR analysis showed that the powder form of PVDF exists in α and β phases. FTIR measurement further confirmed the XRD results implying that the annealing process has no significant effect on the phase formation in PVDF films.

  16. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-05

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived.

  17. Materials evaluation for a transuranic processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, S.A., Schwenk, E.B. ); Divine, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company, with the assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is developing a transuranium extraction process for preheating double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site to reduce the volume of transuranic waste being sent to a repository. The bench- scale transuranium extraction process development is reaching a stage where a pilot plant design has begun for the construction of a facility in the existing B Plant. Because of the potential corrosivity of neutralized cladding removal waste process streams, existing embedded piping alloys in B Plant are being evaluated and new'' alloys are being selected for the full-scale plant screening corrosion tests. Once the waste is acidified with HNO{sub 3}, some of the process streams that are high in F{sup {minus}} and low in Al and zr can produce corrosion rates exceeding 30,000 mil/yr in austenitic alloys. Initial results results are reported concerning the applicability of existing plant materials to withstand expected process solutions and conditions to help determine the feasibility of locating the plant at the selected facility. In addition, process changes are presented that should make the process solutions less corrosive to the existing materials. Experimental work confirms that Hastelloy B is unsatisfactory for the expected process solutions; type 304L, 347 and 309S stainless steels are satisfactory for service at room temperature and 60{degrees}C, if process stream complexing is performed. Inconel 625 was satisfactory for all solutions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Polytellurophenes as Solution Processable Materials for Applications in Organic Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Ashlee Anne

    With very few previous publications on polytellurophenes prior to 2009, this is a largely unexplored class of conjugated polymers. This thesis details investigations into two types of tellurophene polymers. The synthesis of four novel tellurophene containing polymers is described and the characterization of their optical, solid-state, and electronic properties is discussed. The first chapter provides an introduction to the history of the field of polytellurophenes and provides context for the work presented in this thesis. The second chapter describes the synthesis of a novel bitellurophene monomer and its use in palladium-catalyzed polymerization. Once synthesized, the polymer is used to explore the unique chemistry of tellurium and its ability to form coordination species with bromine. Upon treatment with elemental bromine, changes in the optical properties of the system are observed. In chapter three, the synthesis of the first examples of soluble tellurophene homopolymers is presented. These poly(3-alkyltellurophene)s are solution processable materials and are fully characterized in solution and the solid-state. Chapter four describes further studies into the thin-film morphology of the materials presented in chapter three. Furthermore, semiconductor:insulator blends are prepared using poly(3-alkyltellurophene)s and high-density polyethylene. Taking advantage of the elemental contrast provided by the tellurium heavy atom, the micro- and nanostructure of the blend thin-films are investigated with various microscopy techniques providing insight into these types of blends that was previously unavailable. In the final chapter, the performance of these materials in thin-film field-effect transistors was investigated.

  19. Microwave processing of lunar materials: potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, T.T.; Cocks, F.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Wright, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The microwave processing of lunar materials holds promise for the production of either water, oxygen, primary metals, or ceramic materials. Extra high frequency microwave (EHF) at between 100 and 500 gigahertz have the potential for selective coupling to specific atomic species and a concomitant low energy requirement for the extraction of specific materials, such as oxygen, from lunar ores. The coupling of ultra high frequency (UHF) (e.g., 2.45 gigahertz) microwave frequencies to hydrogen-oxygen bonds might enable the preferential and low energy cost removal (as H/sub 2/O) of implanted protons from the sun or of adosrbed water which might be found in lunar dust in permanently shadowed polar areas. Microwave melting and selective phase melting of lunar materials could also be used either in the preparation of simplified ceramic geometries (e.g., bricks) with custom-tailored microstructures, or for the direct preparation of hermetic walls in underground structures. Speculatively, the preparation of photovoltaic devices based on lunar materials, especially ilmenite, may be a potential use of microwave processing on the moon. Preliminary experiments on UHF melting of terrestrial basalt, basalt/ilmenite and mixtures show that microwave processing is feasible.

  20. Alternative starting materials for industrial processes.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J W

    1992-01-01

    In the manufacture of chemical feedstocks and subsequent processing into derivatives and materials, the U.S. chemical industry sets the current standard of excellence for technological competitiveness. This world-class leadership is attributed to the innovation and advancement of chemical engineering process technology. Whether this status is sustained over the next decade depends strongly on meeting increasingly demanding challenges stimulated by growing concerns about the safe production and use of chemicals without harmful impacts on the environment. To comply with stringent environmental regulations while remaining economically competitive, industry must exploit alternative benign starting materials and develop environmentally neutral industrial processes. Opportunities are described for development of environmentally compatible alternatives and substitutes for some of the most abundantly produced, potentially hazardous industrial chemicals now labeled as "high-priority toxic chemicals." For several other uniquely important commodity chemicals where no economically competitive, environmentally satisfactory, nontoxic alternative starting material exists, we advocate the development of new dynamic processes for the on-demand generation of toxic chemicals. In this general concept, which obviates mass storage and transportation of chemicals, toxic raw materials are produced in real time, where possible, from less-hazardous starting materials and then chemically transformed immediately into the final product. As a selected example for semiconductor technology, recent progress is reviewed for the on-demand production of arsine in turnkey electrochemical generators. Innovation of on-demand chemical generators and alternative processes provide rich areas for environmentally responsive chemical engineering processing research and development for next-generation technology. Images PMID:11607260

  1. Damage thresholds of thin film materials and high reflectors at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Carniglia, C.K.; Hart, T.T.; Lichtenstein, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-ns, 248-nm KrF laser pulses were used to measure laser damage thresholds for halfwave-thick layers of 15 oxide and fluoride coating materials, and for high reflectance coatings made with 13 combinations of these materials. The damage thresholds of the reflectors and single-layer films were compared to measurements of several properties of the halfwave-thick films to determine whether measurements of these properties of single-layer films to determine whether measurements of these properties of single-layer films were useful for identifying materials for fabrication of damage resistant coatings.

  2. PREFACE: Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yu Lung; Chen, John J. J.; Hodgson, Michael A.; Thambyah, Ashvin

    2009-07-01

    A workshop on Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials was held at the University of Auckland, School of Engineering, on 8-9 April 2009. Organised by the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, this meeting consisted of international participants and aimed at addressing the state-of-the-art research activities in processing, microstructure characterization and performance integrity investigation of materials. This two-day conference brought together scientists and engineers from New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, France, and the United Kingdom. Undoubtedly, this diverse group of participants brought a very international flair to the proceedings which also featured original research papers on areas such as Materials processing; Microstructure characterisation and microanalysis; Mechanical response at different length scales, Biomaterials and Material Structural integrity. There were a total of 10 invited speakers, 16 paper presentations, and 14 poster presentations. Consequently, the presentations were carefully considered by the scientific committee and participants were invited to submit full papers for this volume. All the invited paper submissions for this volume have been peer reviewed by experts in the various fields represented in this conference, this in accordance to the expected standards of the journal's Peer review policy for IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The works in this publication consists of new and original research as well as several expert reviews of current state-of-the art technologies and scientific developments. Knowing some of the real constraints on hard-copy publishing of high quality, high resolution images, the editors are grateful to IOP Publishing for this opportunity to have the papers from this conference published on the online open-access platform. Listed in this volume are papers on a range of topics on materials research, including Ferguson's high strain

  3. Fragmentation processes in two-phase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, H. A.; Guimarães, A. V.; Andrade, J. S.; Nikolakopoulos, I.; Wittel, F. K.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the fragmentation process of solid materials with crystalline and amorphous phases using the the discrete element method. Damage initiates inside spherical samples above the contact zone in a region where the circumferential stress field is tensile. Cracks initiated in this region grow to form meridional planes. If the collision energy exceeds a critical value which depends on the material's internal structure, cracks reach the sample surface resulting in fragmentation. We show that this primary fragmentation mechanism is very robust with respect to the internal structure of the material. For all configurations, a sharp transition from the damage to the fragmentation regime is observed, with smaller critical collision energies for crystalline samples. The mass distribution of the fragments follows a power law for small fragments with an exponent that is characteristic for the branching merging process of unstable cracks. Moreover this exponent depends only on the dimensionally of the system and not on the microstructure.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TOOLS FOR MATERIAL AND PROCESS SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of tools are being used within the Sustainable Technology Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to provide decision-makers with information on environmentally favorable materials and processes. These tools include LCA (Life Cycle Assessment), GREENSCOPE (...

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TOOLS FOR MATERIAL AND PROCESS SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of tools are being used within the Sustainable Technology Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to provide decision-makers with information on environmentally favorable materials and processes. These tools include LCA (Life Cycle Assessment), GREENSCOPE (...

  6. Materials processing in space: Future technology trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barter, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    NASA's materials processing in space- (MPS) program involves both ground and space-based research and looks to frequent and cost effective access to the space environment for necessary progress. The first generation payloads for research are under active design and development. They will be hosted by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab on Earth orbital flights in the early 1980's. hese missions will focus on the acquisition of materials behavior research data, the potential enhancement of Earth based technology, and the implementation of space based processing for specialized, high value materials. Some materials to be studied in these payloads may provide future breakthroughs for stronger alloys, ultrapure glasses, superior electronic components, and new or better chemicals. An operational 25 kW power system is expected to be operational to support sustained, systematic space processing activity beyond shuttle capability for second generation payload systems for SPACELAB and free flyer missions to study solidification and crystal growth and to process metal/alloys, glasses/ceramics, and chemicals and biologicals.

  7. Materials processing in space program support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin; Vanalstine, James M.

    1987-01-01

    Activities in support of NASA's Materials Processing in Space (MPS) program are reported. The overall task of the MPS project support contract was to provide the organization and administration of colloquiums, science reviews, workshops, technical meetings, bibliographic services, and visiting scientist programs. The research objectives and accomplishments of the University Space Research Association visiting scientist team are also summarized.

  8. Food Processing Curriculum Material and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    Intended for secondary vocational agriculture teachers, this curriculum guide contains a course outline and a resource manual for a seven-unit food processing course on meats. Within the course outline, units are divided into separate lessons. Materials provided for each lesson include preparation for instruction (student objectives, review of…

  9. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The history, strategy, and overall goal of NASA's Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications program for materials processing in space are described as well as the organizational structures and personnel involved. An overview of each research task is presented and recent publications are listed.

  10. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51 Section 18.51 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.51...

  11. Processing and Characterization of Lightweight Syntactic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    into lightweight (aluminum, magnesium) metal matrices via various metal processing methods. The performance of the resulting foam materials under quasi...selected based on compatibility with their intended matrices . Furthermore, although this report primarily focuses on ceramic-based spheres discussed, it

  12. Low-energy electron excitation effect on formation of graphene nanocrystallites during carbon film growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wencong; Zhang, Xi; Diao, Dongfeng

    2017-09-01

    We report a low-energy electron excitation effect on the formation of graphene nanocrystallites embedded in carbon films in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. In this work, carbon films were deposited at different irradiation electron energies and fluxes monitored using a retarding field energy analyzer, while the deposition temperature was measured using an infrared thermometer. We found that the size and concentration of graphene nanocrystallites strongly depend on the irradiation electron energy and the electron flux but not the temperature, which indicates that the electron excitation effect of the covalent bonds dominates the formation process of these nanocrystallites. This finding shed light on the new fabrication method of 2D materials.

  13. [Study on preparation of lanthanum-doped TiO2 nanometer thin film materials and its photocatalytic activity].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huai-li; Tang, Ming-fang; Gong, Ying-kun; Deng, Xiao-jun; Wu, Bang-hua

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, lanthanum-doped TiO2 nanometer film materials coated on glass were prepared in Ti(OBu)4 precursor solutions by sol-gel processing. Transmittance and photocatalytic activity were respectively investigated and tested for these nanometer thin films prepared with different amount of lanthanum (La), different amount of polyethylene glycol (PEG), and different coating layer times. Some reactive mechanisms were also discussed. For one layer La-addition had little effect on the film transmissivity; but the photocatalytic activity was significantly improved due to La-addition. With increasing PEG, the transmittance of the film decreased for one layer film; but its photocatalytic activity did not rise. Increasing layer number did not affect the transmissivity of multilayer film. After coating two times, increasing layer number did not significantly improve the photocatalytic activity. The highest photocatalytic activity and best transmissivity were obtained for two layer TiO2 film when the dosage of lanthanum was 0.5 g and the dosage of polyethylene was 0.2 g in the precursor solutions. These materials will probably be used in the protection of environment, waste water treatment, and air purification.

  14. Effect of Top Electrode Material on Radiation-Induced Degradation of Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    Effect of Top Electrode Material on Radiation-Induced Degradation of Ferroelectric Thin Films Steven J. Brewer1, Carmen Z. Deng2, Connor P...Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30332, USA 2School of Materials Science and Engineering... material . These results suggest promising avenues to radiation-hard devices and material stacks. Introduction Ferroelectric thin films enable numerous

  15. Growth of mesoporous materials within colloidal crystal films by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, Luis A; Mihi, Agustín; Rodríguez, Isabel; García-Bennett, Alfonso E; Míguez, Hernan

    2005-10-27

    A combination of colloidal crystal planarization, stabilization, and novel infiltration techniques is used to build a bimodal porous silica film showing order at both the micron and the nanometer length scale. An infiltration method based on the spin-coating of the mesophase precursor onto a three-dimensional polystyrene colloidal crystal film allows a nanometer control tuning of the filling fraction of the mesoporous phase while preserving the optical quality of the template. These materials combine a high specific surface arising from the nanopores with increased mass transport and photonic crystal properties provided by the order of the macropores. Optical Bragg diffraction from these type of hierarchically ordered oxides is observed, allowing performing of optical monitoring of the different processes involved in the formation of the bimodal silica structure.

  16. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Jha, M.; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-03-07

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB{sub 6}-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB{sub 6} coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films.

  17. Dual-beam laser thermal processing of silicon photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Teal, Anthony; Zhang, Tian; Hadler, Josh; Zhou, Zibo; Varlamov, Sergey; Perez-Würfl, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an all-laser processing technique by means of two industrially-relevant continuous-wave fiber lasers operating at 1070 nm. This approach is capable of both substrate heating with a large defocused beam and material processing with a second scanned beam, and is suitable for a variety of photovoltaic applications. We have demonstrated this technique for rapid crystallization of thin film (~10 μm) silicon on glass, which is a low cost alternative to wafer-based solar cells. We have also applied this technique to wafer silicon to control dopant diffusion at the surface region where the focused line beam rapidly melts the substrate that then regrows epitaxially. Finite element simulations have been used to model the melt depth as a function of preheat temperature and line beam power. This process is carried out in tens of seconds for an area approximately 10 cm2 using only about 1 kW of total optical power and is readily scalable. In this paper, we will discuss our results with both c-Si wafers and thin-film silicon.

  18. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Paul G [Madison, WI; Lagally, Max G [Madison, WI; Ma, Zhenqiang [Middleton, WI; Yuan, Hao-Chih [Lakewood, CO; Wang, Guogong [Madison, WI; Eriksson, Mark A [Madison, WI

    2012-01-03

    This invention provides thin film devices that have been processed on their front- and backside. The devices include an active layer that is sufficiently thin to be mechanically flexible. Examples of the devices include back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  19. Advances in excimer laser processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.; Nastasi, M.; Hirvonen, J.-P.

    1996-08-01

    The use of pulsed excimer lasers to surface processing of materials hinges on an understanding of the nature of the interaction between the laser energy and the material. The application of this understanding of the laser materials interaction to surface modification must also recognize the existence of thermodynamic driving forces and kinetic limitations in light of the short duration of a single pulse event. For species that have higher solubility in the liquid than in the solid phase, segregation by ``zone refinement`` from multiple passes by a solidification front to the surface results in surface enrichment of those species. The most obvious applications for surface processing occur where the bulk properties of a component are not commensurate with the needed surface properties. Improvements in surface mechanical properties have been observed in a number of metal and ceramic alloys. In the microelectronics industry, apart from micromachining or material removal applications, for which excimers are indeed well suited, the same features of the laser-materials interaction that are used to modify the mechanical or electrochemical properties of a surface can be used to advantage. Further advances, such as those demonstrated in microelectronics, await application-specific developments. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Processing of Ferroelectric Ceramic Thick Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosec, Marija; Kuscer, Danjela; Holc, Janez

    The rapid development of the electronics industry has created the need for highperformance, high-reliability, miniaturised electronic components integrated into various electronic devices. Additional requirements, such as the desired size and weight, low cost, low power consumption, and portability, should be considered to make the devices user friendly and widely accessible. Attempts to miniaturise discrete elements have generally failed due to the difficulty in handling and assembly. A lot of waste material and high costs are also involved. In this approach, the ceramic parts are manufactured as a bulk ceramic, followed by a reduction in size by cutting, polishing, etc., to specified dimensions. The final step is the assembling of a thin layer of ceramic with the other components. This topdown approach imposes limits on the minimum dimensions of the manufactured parts. It constrains the geometry of the parts to simple shapes, like discs, plates, rings, cylinders, etc.

  1. Materials, design and processing of air encapsulated MEMS packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Nathan T.

    integrity. The development of mechanical models complimented the experimental studies. A model of the overcoat materials used the film properties and elastic deformations to study the stress-strain behavior of the suspended dielectric films under external forces. The experimental molding tests and mechanical models were used to establish processing conditions and physical designs for the cavities as a function of cavity size. A novel, metal-free chip package was investigated combining the in-situ thermal decomposition of the sacrificial material during post-mold curing of the lead frame molding compound. Sacrificial materials were characterized for their degree of decomposition during the molding cure to provide a chip package with improved mechanical support and no size restrictions. Improvements to the air cavities for MEMS packaging led to investigations and refinements of other microfabrication processes. The sacrificial polycarbonate materials were shown to be useful as temporary bonding materials for wafer-level bonding. The release temperature and conditions of the processed wafer can be changed based on the polycarbonates formulation. The electroless deposition of metal was investigated as an alternative process for metalizing the air cavities. The deposition of silver and copper using a Sn/Ag catalyst as a replacement for costly palladium activation was demonstrated. The electroless deposition was tested on polymer and silicon dioxide surfaces for organic boards and through-silicon vias.

  2. Sol-gel processes and materials. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning design and development of sol-gel processes and sol-gel derived materials. Sol-gel derived materials include protective and transparent films, ceramic coatings, nanocomposites and microcomposites, porous and dense composites, fiber reinforced composites, oxides, and ductile ceramics. Topics include preparation of high temperature superconducting oxides and films, glass-ceramic composites and ceramic matrix composites for high temperature applications, sol-gel processes for advanced ceramics, coatings on semiconductors, infrared optical coatings, and coatings on carbon/carbon composites. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Bamboo (Neosinocalamus affinis)-based thin film, a novel biomass material with high performances.

    PubMed

    Song, Fei; Xu, Chen; Bao, Wen-Yi; Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-03-30

    Exploration of biomass based materials to replace conventional petroleum based ones has been a trend in recent decades. In this work, bamboo (Neosinocalamus affinis) with abundant resources was used for the first time to prepare films in the presence of cellulose. The effects of weight ratio of bamboo/cellulose on the appearances and properties of the films were investigated. It was confirmed there existed strong interactions between bamboo and cellulose, which were favorable to formation of homogeneous structure of blend films. Particularly, the presence of bamboo could improve the surface hydrophobicity, water resistance and thermal stability of blend films, and the films possessed an excellent oxygen barrier property, compared with generally used commercial packaging films. The bamboo biomass, therefore, is successfully used to create a new film material with a good application prospect in the fields of packaging, coating, and food industry.

  4. Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Yayun; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Liu, J.-M.; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigated the microstructure and electrical properties of Bi2SiO5 (BSO) doped SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) films deposited by chemical solution deposition. X-ray diffraction observation indicated that the crystalline structures of all the BSO-doped SBT films are nearly the same as those of a pure SBT film. Through BSO doping, the 2Pr and 2Ec values of SBT films were changed from 15.3 μC/cm2 and 138 kV/cm of pure SBT to 1.45 μC/cm2 and 74 kV/cm of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The dielectric constant at 1 MHz for SBT varied from 199 of pure SBT to 96 of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The doped SBT films exhibited higher leakage current than that of non-doped SBT films. Nevertheless, all the doped SBT films still had small dielectric loss and low leakage current. Our present work will provide useful insights into the BSO doping effects to the SBT films, and it will be helpful for the material design in the future nonvolatile ferroelectric memories.

  5. Dissolution of materials in artificial skin surface film liquids.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Harvey, Christopher J

    2006-12-01

    The dissolution of chemical constituents from jewelry, textiles, cosmetics, drugs, industrial chemicals, and particles in direct and prolonged contact with human skin is often assessed in vitro using artificial skin surface film liquids (SSFL). To provide meaningful results, the composition of artificial SSFL should accurately mimic human sweat and sebum, and the conditions of the in vitro test system should accurately reflect in vivo skin conditions. We summarized the reported composition of human SSFL and compared it to 45 different formulations of artificial sweat and 18 formulations of artificial sebum (studies published from 1940 to 2005). Conditions of in vitro dissolution test systems were reviewed and compared to in vivo skin conditions. The concentrations of individual constituents and pH of artificial sweat and concentrations of artificial sebum constituents are not always within ranges reported for human SSFL. Nearly all artificial SSFL lack many of the constituents in human SSFL. To develop a comprehensive model SSFL, we propose a standard SSFL, modified from the two best published sweat and sebum formulations. Little is known concerning the influence of test system conditions on dissolution, including SSFL temperature, container material composition, agitation, and physicochemical properties of the test article on dissolution. Thus, both a need and an opportunity exist for standardizing the composition of artificial SSFL and in vitro dissolution test methodologies. To standardize in vitro dissolution test systems, we recommend: maintaining artificial SSFL at a biologically relevant temperature appropriate to the human activity being modeled, carefully selecting test and sample storage containers to avoid bias in dissolution measurements, accounting for friction between a test article and skin in a biologically plausible manner, and physicochemical characterization of the test article or material to better understand mechanisms of dissolution and

  6. Pulsed Laser-Induced Effects in the Material Properties of Tungsten Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R.; Camacho-López, S.; Camacho-López, M. A.; Sánchez-Pérez, C.; Esparza-García, A.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present evidence of photo-induced effects on crystalline Tungsten (W) films. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG (5ns) laser was used in our experiments. The W thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by the DC-sputtering technique using W (Lesker, 99.95% purity) targets in an argon atmosphere. The crystalline phase of the deposited W films was determined by X-ray diffraction. Our experimental results show clear evidence that several events take place as a consequence of exposure of the W films to the laser nanosecond pulses. One of those events has a chemical effect that results in a significant degree of oxidation of the film; a second event affects the structural nature of the initial W material, resulting into a material phase change; and a third event changes the initially homogeneous morphology of the film into an unexpected porous material film. As it has been confirmed by the experiments, all of these effects are laser fluence dependent. A full post exposure analysis of the W thin films included Energy Dispersive Spectrometry to determine the degree of oxidation of the W film; a micro-Raman system was used to explore and to study the transition of the crystalline W to the amorphous-crystalline WO3 phase; further analysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy showed a definite laser-induced porosity which changes the initial homogeneous film into a highly porous film with small features in the range from 100 to 300 nm.

  7. Oxide films at the nanoscale: new structures, new functions, and new materials.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2011-11-15

    We all make use of oxide ultrathin films, even if we are unaware of doing so. They are essential components of many common devices, such as mobile phones and laptops. The films in these ubiquitous electronics are composed of silicon dioxide, an unsurpassed material in the design of transistors. But oxide films at the nanoscale (typically just 10 nm or less in thickness) are integral to many other applications. In some cases, they form under normal reactive conditions and confer new properties to a material: one example is the corrosion protection of stainless steel, which is the result of a passive film. A new generation of devices for energy production and communications technology, such as ferroelectric ultrathin film capacitors, tunneling magnetoresistance sensors, solar energy materials, solid oxide fuel cells, and many others, are being specifically designed to exploit the unusual properties afforded by reduced oxide thickness. Oxide ultrathin films also have tremendous potential in chemistry, representing a rich new source of catalytic materials. About 20 years ago, researchers began to prepare model systems of truly heterogeneous catalysts based on thin oxide layers grown on single crystals of metal. Only recently, however, was it realized that these systems may behave quite differently from their corresponding bulk oxides. One of the phenomena uncovered is the occurrence of a spontaneous charge transfer from the metal support to an adsorbed species through the thin insulating layer (or vice versa). The importance of this property is clear: conceptually, the activation and bond breaking of adsorbed molecules begin with precisely the same process, electron transfer into an antibonding orbital. But electron transfer can also be harnessed to make a supported metal particle more chemically active, increase its adhesion energy, or change its shape. Most importantly, the basic principles underlying electron transfer and other phenomena (such as structural

  8. Transparent megahertz circuits from solution-processed composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingqiang; Wan, Da; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Xiangheng; Guo, Shishang; Jiang, Changzhong; Li, Jinchai; Chen, Tangsheng; Duan, Xiangfeng; Fan, Zhiyong; Liao, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Solution-processed amorphous oxide semiconductors have attracted considerable interest in large-area transparent electronics. However, due to its relative low carrier mobility (~10 cm2 V-1 s-1), the demonstrated circuit performance has been limited to 800 kHz or less. Herein, we report solution-processed high-speed thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuits with an operation frequency beyond the megahertz region on 4 inch glass. The TFTs can be fabricated from an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube (a-IGZO/SWNT) composite thin film with high yield and high carrier mobility of >70 cm2 V-1 s-1. On-chip microwave measurements demonstrate that these TFTs can deliver an unprecedented operation frequency in solution-processed semiconductors, including an extrinsic cut-off frequency (fT = 102 MHz) and a maximum oscillation frequency (fmax = 122 MHz). Ring oscillators further demonstrated an oscillation frequency of 4.13 MHz, for the first time, realizing megahertz circuit operation from solution-processed semiconductors. Our studies represent an important step toward high-speed solution-processed thin film electronics.Solution-processed amorphous oxide semiconductors have attracted considerable interest in large-area transparent electronics. However, due to its relative low carrier mobility (~10 cm2 V-1 s-1), the demonstrated circuit performance has been limited to 800 kHz or less. Herein, we report solution-processed high-speed thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuits with an operation frequency beyond the megahertz region on 4 inch glass. The TFTs can be fabricated from an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube (a-IGZO/SWNT) composite thin film with high yield and high carrier mobility of >70 cm2 V-1 s-1. On-chip microwave measurements demonstrate that these TFTs can deliver an unprecedented operation frequency in solution-processed semiconductors, including an extrinsic cut-off frequency (f

  9. Dielectric barrier discharge processing of aerospace materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Figgures, C. C.; Dixon, D. G.

    2004-08-01

    We report the use of atmospheric pressure, air based, dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) to treat materials commonly used in the aerospace industries. The material samples were processed using a test-bed of a conventional DBD configuration in which the sample formed one of the electrodes and was placed in close proximity to a ceramic electrode. The discharges generated a powerful, cold oxidizing environment which was able to remove organic contaminants, etch primer and paint layers, oxidize aluminium and roughen carbon fibre composites by the selective removal of resin.

  10. Early space experiments in materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of the flight experiments conducted in conjunction with the United States Materials Processing in Space Program is presented. Also included are a brief description of the conditions prevailing in an orbiting spacecraft and the research implications provided by this unique environment. What was done and what was learned are summarized in order to serve as a background for future experiments. It is assumed that the reader has some knowledge of the physical sciences but no background in spaceflight experimentation or in the materials science per se.

  11. Initial Study on Thin Film Preparation of Carbon Nanodots Composites as Luminescence Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, F.; Aimon, A. H.; Akmaluddin, A. R.; Nuryadin, B. W.; Abdullah, M.

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the developments of phosphors materials require elements without noble metals and simple production process. Carbon nanodots (C-dots) are one of phosphor materials with wide range of emission band, and high biocompatibility. In this research thin film carbon nanodots composite have been prepared by spin coating method. Prior deposition, powder carbon nanodots were synthesized from a mixture of commercial urea as the nitrogen sources and citric acid as a carbon source by using hydrothermal and microwave-assisted heating method. The prepared powder was dispersed in transparent epoxy resin and then coated on glass substrate. The photoluminescence result for sample with 0.035 g citric acid exhibited an intense, single, homogeneous and broad spectrum with yellowish emission upon excitation at 365 nm. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) result showed the existences of C=C, C-H, C=O, N-H and O-H functional groups which confirmed the quality of the sample. Further, based on UV-Vis measurement, the prepared thin film was highly transparent (transmittance 90%) with estimated film thickness around 764 nm. This result may open an opportunity for optoelectronic devices.

  12. Multistep processing and stress reduction in CVD diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijhawan, Sumit

    A serious impediment in the utility of diamond films is the large internal stresses that develop during growth. These stresses generally have thermal and growth components. The thermal component is determined by the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of film and substrate while the growth component may arise from several possible mechanisms during CVD growth. These growth stresses tend to be particularly large in diamond. The objective of this work is to understand and reduce the growth stresses in diamond films by tailoring the CVD process. Continuous, polycrystalline diamond films were deposited on Si by microwave plasma-assisted CVD. Very high internal stresses (>2 GPA) consisting of growth and thermal components were observed. The growth component is tensile and increases with growth time. We were able to reduce the evolution of growth stresses considerably by multistep processing of our films. An intermediate annealing step was included between successive growth periods. It is important to note that the annealing step must be conducted at key points during the growth process in order to effectively reduce stress. Maximum reduction in stress is achieved only if the sample is annealed when the diamond grains are partially coalesced (after 2--3 hours of growth). Annealing of continuous films does not produce a significant reduction in stress. The origin of growth stress in our films is attributed to non-equilibrated initial atomic positions during impingement and the successive relaxations to minimize interfacial energies. The film quality was monitored using Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Based on our experimental results and analyses, it is hypothesized that rearrangements of strained boundary structures during the anneal can lower the interfacial energy change during subsequent growth and produce less stress. Multistep processing was also used to enhance diamond nucleation on Ni. An annealing pretreatment step, that consists of saturating

  13. Fabrication of polycrystalline thin films by pulsed laser processing

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1998-02-03

    A method for fabricating polycrystalline thin films on low-temperature (or high-temperature) substrates which uses processing temperatures that are low enough to avoid damage to the substrate, and then transiently heating select layers of the thin films with at least one pulse of a laser or other homogenized beam source. The pulse length is selected so that the layers of interest are transiently heated to a temperature which allows recrystallization and/or dopant activation while maintaining the substrate at a temperature which is sufficiently low to avoid damage to the substrate. This method is particularly applicable in the fabrication of solar cells.

  14. Fabrication of polycrystalline thin films by pulsed laser processing

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Colella, N.J.

    1998-02-03

    A method is disclosed for fabricating polycrystalline thin films on low-temperature (or high-temperature) substrates which uses processing temperatures that are low enough to avoid damage to the substrate, and then transiently heating select layers of the thin films with at least one pulse of a laser or other homogenized beam source. The pulse length is selected so that the layers of interest are transiently heated to a temperature which allows recrystallization and/or dopant activation while maintaining the substrate at a temperature which is sufficiently low to avoid damage to the substrate. This method is particularly applicable in the fabrication of solar cells. 1 fig.

  15. Materials and processing science: Limits for microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R.

    1988-09-01

    The theme of this talk will be to illustrate examples of technologies that will drive materials and processing sciences to the limit and to describe some of the research being pursued to understand materials interactions which are pervasive to projected structure fabrication. It is to be expected that the future will see a progression to nanostructures where scaling laws will be tested and quantum transport will become more in evidence, to low temperature operation for tighter control and improved performance, to complex vertical profiles where 3D stacking and superlattices will produce denser packing and device flexibility, to faster communication links with optoelectronics, and to compatible packaging technologies. New low temperature processing techniques, such as epitaxy of silicon, PECVD of dielectrics, low temperature high pressure oxidation, silicon-germanium heterostructures, etc., must be combined with shallow metallurgies, new lithographic technologies, maskless patterning, rapid thermal processing (RTP) to produce needed profile control, reduce process incompatibilities and develop new device geometries. Materials interactions are of special consequence for chip substrates and illustrations of work in metal-ceramic and metal-polymer adhesion will be offered.

  16. Effects of anode materials on resistive characteristics of NiO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Ze; Wang, Linkai; Zhang, Naiwen; Ren, Tianling; Liou, Juin J.

    2013-01-28

    This letter shows that the NiO-based structure with different anodes has different resistive switching properties. A conical conductive filament (CF) model is proposed for oxygen vacancies distributed in NiO films. Modeling analysis reveals much larger dissolution velocity of CF near anodes than near cathodes during the reset process. Different interfaces shown in Auger electron spectroscopy can be bound with the model to reveal that CF is dissolved in the structure with Pt or Au as anodes, while CF remains constant if the anode material is Ti or Al, which can explain whether switching properties occur in the specific NiO-based structures.

  17. Fabrication of solution processed 3D nanostructured CuInGaS₂ thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Van Ben; Cho, Jin Woo; Park, Se Jin; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Park, Hoo Keun; Do, Young Rag; Min, Byoung Koun

    2014-03-28

    In this study we demonstrate the fabrication of CuInGaS₂ (CIGS) thin film solar cells with a three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure based on indium tin oxide (ITO) nanorod films and precursor solutions (Cu, In and Ga nitrates in alcohol). To obtain solution processed 3D nanostructured CIGS thin film solar cells, two different precursor solutions were applied to complete gap filling in ITO nanorods and achieve the desirable absorber film thickness. Specifically, a coating of precursor solution without polymer binder material was first applied to fill the gap between ITO nanorods followed by deposition of the second precursor solution in the presence of a binder to generate an absorber film thickness of ∼1.3 μm. A solar cell device with a (Al, Ni)/AZO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS/ITO nanorod/glass structure was constructed using the CIGS film, and the highest power conversion efficiency was measured to be ∼6.3% at standard irradiation conditions, which was 22.5% higher than the planar type of CIGS solar cell on ITO substrate fabricated using the same precursor solutions.

  18. Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Muruska, H. Paul; Sansregret, Joseph L.; Young, Archie R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

  19. 76 FR 72902 - Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee (MPETAC) will meet... controls applicable to materials processing equipment and related technology. Agenda Open Session...

  20. Conceptual design and practical implementation of dichromated gelatin films as an optimal holographic recording material for large-format holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanoff, Christo G.; Brasseur, Olivier; Tropartz, Stephan; Schuette, Hartmut

    1994-01-01

    The commercial manufacturing of large format holographic optical elements (HOE) -- these are used in the fabrication of holographic solar concentrators or for daylighting applications in buildings -- requires inexpensive materials exhibiting high diffraction efficiency, bandwidth and controlled shift of the operating wavelength. Hence, the ideal recording material must possess adequate spectral sensitivity at the wavelengths of present day high power lasers and permit the desired shift of the operating wavelength by means of process control. The material should manifest a predictable diffraction efficiency as a function of the layer fabrication technique, of the exposure, and of the development process and display high spatial resolution and low noise. The properties of dichromated gelatin (DCG) as a recording material for volume holograms are close to ideal. It provides a large refractive index modulation, high resolution, negligible absorption, and low scattering. The holographic film is prepared in the laboratory and extensively tested. The processing of the film after exposure is a sequence of chemical reactions and physical treatments. We report in this paper our experience with large format DCG films on glass substrates and present the dependence of the holographic properties upon the layer preparation procedures and upon the exposure energy. The results for the film development and after-treatment are presented in a forthcoming paper.

  1. A review on the recent developments of solution processes for oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Ahn, Byung; Jeon, Hye-Ji; Sheng, Jiazhen; Park, Jozeph; Park, Jin-Seong

    2015-06-01

    This review article introduces the recent advances in the development of oxide semiconductor materials based on solution processes and their potential applications. In the early stage, thin film transistors based on oxide semiconductors fabricated by solution processes used to face critical problems such as high annealing temperatures (>400 °C) required to obtain reasonable film quality, and the relatively low field effect mobility (<5 cm2 V-1 s-1) compared to devices fabricated by conventional vacuum-based techniques. In order to overcome such hurdles, the proper selection of high mobility amorphous oxide semiconductor materials is addressed first. The latter involves the combination of high mobility compounds and multilayered active stacks. Ensuing overviews are provided on the selection of optimum precursors and alternative annealing methods that enable the growth of high quality films at relatively low process temperatures (<200 °C). Reasonably high field effect mobility values (~10 cm2 V-1 s-1) could thus be obtained by optimizing the above process parameters. Finally, potential applications of solution processed oxide semiconductor devices are summarized, involving, for instance, flexible displays, biosensors, and non-volatile memory devices. As such, further innovations in the solution process methods of oxide semiconductor devices are anticipated to allow the realization of cost effective, large area electronics in the near future.

  2. Relationships between processing temperature and microstructure in isothermal melt processed Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Phillips, D.S.; Willis, J.O.; Peterson, D.E.

    1995-05-01

    The microstructure and phase assemblage of isothermal melt processed (IMP) Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) thick films have been evaluated. Results from compositional analysis and phase identification indicate that the characteristics of the partial melt greatly influence the microstructural and chemical development of the thick films. The highest critical current densities were obtained in films processed below 800{degrees}C where the partial melt uniformly coats the substrate without excessive phase segregation.

  3. Computer simulation of surface and film processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.; Halicioglu, M. T.

    1983-01-01

    Adequate computer methods, based on interactions between discrete particles, provide information leading to an atomic level understanding of various physical processes. The success of these simulation methods, however, is related to the accuracy of the potential energy function representing the interactions among the particles. The development of a potential energy function for crystalline SiO2 forms that can be employed in lengthy computer modelling procedures was investigated. In many of the simulation methods which deal with discrete particles, semiempirical two body potentials were employed to analyze energy and structure related properties of the system. Many body interactions are required for a proper representation of the total energy for many systems. Many body interactions for simulations based on discrete particles are discussed.

  4. Optical monitoring of thin oil film thickness in extrusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanowicz, Robert; Wroczyński, Piotr; Graczyk, Jan; Gnyba, Marcin

    2005-09-01

    We have used reflectance spectroscopy for the in-situ, non-invasive monitoring of a thin oil film thickness during extrusion process of ceramic paste in capillary rheometer. Investigated pastes are disperse solid liquid systems prepared from the silicone oil AK106 (Wacker) and ceramic powder AlOOH. The thin oil film, extracted from the extruded paste, appears on walls of the rheometer die. A borosilicate view-port-glass provides optical access to the thin film inside the die. Reflectance spectroscopy enables the thin film thickness measurements by wideband spectral analysis of light back reflected from the sample. This spectrum includes extremes, which results from interference between beams reflected from glass-oil boundary and oil-paste boundary. Position and intensity of this extremes were determined by thickness of the thin film as well as refractive indices of the oil and the paste. Optoelectronic system dedicated for process monitoring by means of reflectance spectroscopy had been designed and built. The system comprises tungsten halogen lamp and fiber optic spectrometer. Optical signals are transmitted through bifurcated fibers, focusing optics and the view-port-window. Spectroscopic monitoring was carried out in VIS-NIR range from 400 to 900 nm as a function of extrusion velocity (0.01-5mm/s) and paste particle granulation (5-20 μm). Computer calculation, performed using dedicated software, enables fast determination of thickness even for reflectance spectra interfered by high noise level. Fast development of ceramic components technology requires detailed description of complex rheometric processes. Monitoring of the most important process parameter - oil layer thickness - enables pre-determination of rheometric factors required for proper paste extrusion and accurate shape filling.

  5. Tubular filamentation for laser material processing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chen; Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Giust, Remo; Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Itina, Tatiana; Dudley, John M.; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    An open challenge in the important field of femtosecond laser material processing is the controlled internal structuring of dielectric materials. Although the availability of high energy high repetition rate femtosecond lasers has led to many advances in this field, writing structures within transparent dielectrics at intensities exceeding 1013 W/cm2 has remained difficult as it is associated with significant nonlinear spatial distortion. This letter reports the existence of a new propagation regime for femtosecond pulses at high power that overcomes this challenge, associated with the generation of a hollow uniform and intense light tube that remains propagation invariant even at intensities associated with dense plasma formation. This regime is seeded from higher order nondiffracting Bessel beams, which carry an optical vortex charge. Numerical simulations are quantitatively confirmed by experiments where a novel experimental approach allows direct imaging of the 3D fluence distribution within transparent solids. We also analyze the transitions to other propagation regimes in near and far fields. We demonstrate how the generation of plasma in this tubular geometry can lead to applications in ultrafast laser material processing in terms of single shot index writing, and discuss how it opens important perspectives for material compression and filamentation guiding in atmosphere. PMID:25753215

  6. Numerical Testbed for Laser Materials Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-24

    parametesis s cut edge S\\ \\ Bottom edge Adherent dross of sheet Figure 5. A schematic of the cut zone. The high surface tension of the melt and its...adhesion to the workpiece results in dross adhering to the lower edge of the cut.is A similar scatter of theories and the limited predictive capabilities...of current simulations prevails in context with other features in laser materials processing such as humping, rippling and dross formation. The

  7. Commercialization of materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, Charles F.

    1986-01-01

    NASA research to date on materials processing in space (MPS) has revealed that microgravity conditions to a large degree eliminate normal convection, sedimentation, buoyancy, and deformations due to gravity, and permit the exploration of containerless processing. The goals of current NASA MPS work is to augment the fundamental database on MPS and to foster commercial participation in MPS. Techniques being applied by NASA to fulfill the latter goal are described, including technical exchange, industrial guest investigator and joint endeavor agreements, and tangible market incentives. Guidelines for each type of agreement are summarized.

  8. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckannan, E. C. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A list of active research tasks as of the end of 1978 of the Materials Processing in Space Program of the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications, involving several NASA Centers and other organizations is reported. An overview of the program scope for managers and scientists in industry, university and government communities is provided. The program, its history, strategy and overall goal; the organizational structures and people involved; and each research task are described. Tasks are categorized by ground based research according to four process areas. Cross references to the performing organizations and principal investigators are provided.

  9. Commercialization of materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, Charles F.

    1986-01-01

    NASA research to date on materials processing in space (MPS) has revealed that microgravity conditions to a large degree eliminate normal convection, sedimentation, buoyancy, and deformations due to gravity, and permit the exploration of containerless processing. The goals of current NASA MPS work is to augment the fundamental database on MPS and to foster commercial participation in MPS. Techniques being applied by NASA to fulfill the latter goal are described, including technical exchange, industrial guest investigator and joint endeavor agreements, and tangible market incentives. Guidelines for each type of agreement are summarized.

  10. Computational Modeling in Structural Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High temperature materials such as silicon carbide, a variety of nitrides, and ceramic matrix composites find use in aerospace, automotive, machine tool industries and in high speed civil transport applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used in processing such structural materials. Variations of CVD include deposition on substrates, coating of fibers, inside cavities and on complex objects, and infiltration within preforms called chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Our current knowledge of the process mechanisms, ability to optimize processes, and scale-up for large scale manufacturing is limited. In this regard, computational modeling of the processes is valuable since a validated model can be used as a design tool. The effort is similar to traditional chemically reacting flow modeling with emphasis on multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, large sets of homogeneous reactions, and surface chemistry. In the case of CVI, models for pore infiltration are needed. In the present talk, examples of SiC nitride, and Boron deposition from the author's past work will be used to illustrate the utility of computational process modeling.

  11. Computational Modeling in Structural Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High temperature materials such as silicon carbide, a variety of nitrides, and ceramic matrix composites find use in aerospace, automotive, machine tool industries and in high speed civil transport applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used in processing such structural materials. Variations of CVD include deposition on substrates, coating of fibers, inside cavities and on complex objects, and infiltration within preforms called chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Our current knowledge of the process mechanisms, ability to optimize processes, and scale-up for large scale manufacturing is limited. In this regard, computational modeling of the processes is valuable since a validated model can be used as a design tool. The effort is similar to traditional chemically reacting flow modeling with emphasis on multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, large sets of homogeneous reactions, and surface chemistry. In the case of CVI, models for pore infiltration are needed. In the present talk, examples of SiC nitride, and Boron deposition from the author's past work will be used to illustrate the utility of computational process modeling.

  12. Pyroelectric Materials for Uncooled Infrared Detectors: Processing, Properties, and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Guggilla, P.; Edwards, M. E.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric detectors find applications in diverse and wide areas such as industrial production; automotive; aerospace applications for satellite-borne ozone sensors assembled with an infrared spectrometer; health care; space exploration; imaging systems for ships, cars, and aircraft; and military and security surveillance systems. These detectors are the prime candidates for NASA s thermal infrared detector requirements. In this Technical Memorandum, the physical phenomena underlying the operation and advantages of pyroelectric infrared detectors is introduced. A list and applications of important ferroelectrics is given, which is a subclass of pyroelectrics. The basic concepts of processing of important pyroelectrics in various forms are described: single crystal growth, ceramic processing, polymer-composites preparation, and thin- and thick-film fabrications. The present status of materials and their characteristics and detectors figures-of-merit are presented in detail. In the end, the unique techniques demonstrated for improving/enhancing the performance of pyroelectric detectors are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on recent advances and emerging technologies such as thin-film array devices and novel single crystal sensors.

  13. Review of solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si Joon; Yoon, Seokhyun; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-02-01

    In this review, we summarize solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) researches based on our fulfillments. We describe the fundamental studies of precursor composition effects at the beginning in order to figure out the role of each component in oxide semiconductors, and then present low temperature process for the adoption of flexible devices. Moreover, channel engineering for high performance and reliability of solution-processed oxide TFTs and various coating methods: spin-coating, inkjet printing, and gravure printing are also presented. The last topic of this review is an overview of multi-functional solution-processed oxide TFTs for various applications such as photodetector, biosensor, and memory.

  14. Evaporation system and method for gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for depositing thin films of materials such as metals, oxides and nitrides at low temperature relies on a supersonic free jet of inert carrier gas to transport vapor species generated from an evaporation source to the surface of a substrate. Film deposition vapors are generated from solid film precursor materials, including those in the form of wires or powders. The vapor from these sources is carried downstream in a low pressure supersonic jet of inert gas to the surface of a substrate where the vapors deposit to form a thin film. A reactant gas can be introduced into the gas jet to form a reaction product with the evaporated material. The substrate can be moved from the gas jet past a gas jet containing a reactant gas in which a discharge has been generated, the speed of movement being sufficient to form a thin film which is chemically composed of the evaporated material and reactant gases.

  15. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on texture development in lead zirconate titanate thin films processed from metalorganic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, Jarrod L.; Liedl, Gerald L.; Slamovich, Elliott B.

    1999-12-01

    Metalorganic liquid precursors were used to examine the effects of processing atmosphere on texture development in oriented Pb(Zr{sub 0.60}Ti{sub 0.40})O{sub 3} thin films. After removal of organic ligands via pyrolysis, the films were heated at 25 degree sign C/min in a 5% H{sub 2}/Ar atmosphere until a switching temperature, after which the atmosphere was switched to pure oxygen. The films were heated to a maximum temperature of 650 degree sign C with switching temperatures ranging from 450 to 600 degree sign C. The degree of (111) orientation in the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films increased with increasing switching temperature, resulting in highly textured (111) PZT films. These results suggest that atmosphere control plays a significant role in texture development during rapid thermal processing. (c) 1999 Materials Research Society.

  16. Phosphorous and aluminum gettering in Silicon-Film{trademark} Product II material

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, J.E.; Barnett, A.M.; Hall, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    Gettering processes are being developed for the Silicon-Film{trademark} Product II solar cell structure. These processes have been developed specifically for films of silicon grown on dissimilar substrates with barrier layers. Gettering with both phosphorous- and aluminum-based processing sequences has resulted in enhancement of minority carrier diffusion length. Long diffusion lengths have allowed the characterization of light trapping in thin films of silicon grown on barrier-coated substrates.

  17. Transparent megahertz circuits from solution-processed composite thin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingqiang; Wan, Da; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Xiangheng; Guo, Shishang; Jiang, Changzhong; Li, Jinchai; Chen, Tangsheng; Duan, Xiangfeng; Fan, Zhiyong; Liao, Lei

    2016-04-21

    Solution-processed amorphous oxide semiconductors have attracted considerable interest in large-area transparent electronics. However, due to its relative low carrier mobility (∼10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), the demonstrated circuit performance has been limited to 800 kHz or less. Herein, we report solution-processed high-speed thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuits with an operation frequency beyond the megahertz region on 4 inch glass. The TFTs can be fabricated from an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube (a-IGZO/SWNT) composite thin film with high yield and high carrier mobility of >70 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). On-chip microwave measurements demonstrate that these TFTs can deliver an unprecedented operation frequency in solution-processed semiconductors, including an extrinsic cut-off frequency (f(T) = 102 MHz) and a maximum oscillation frequency (f(max) = 122 MHz). Ring oscillators further demonstrated an oscillation frequency of 4.13 MHz, for the first time, realizing megahertz circuit operation from solution-processed semiconductors. Our studies represent an important step toward high-speed solution-processed thin film electronics.

  18. Active barrier films of PET for solar cell application: Processing and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2014-05-15

    A preliminary investigation was carried out on the possibility to improve the protective action offered by the standard multilayer structures used to encapsulate photovoltaic devices. With this aim, a commercial active barrier PET-based material, able to absorb oxygen when activated by liquid water, was used to produce flexible and transparent active barrier films, by means of a lab-scale film production plant. The obtained film, tested in terms of thermal, optical and oxygen absorption properties, shows a slow oxygen absorption kinetics, an acceptable transparency and an easy roll-to-roll processability, so proving itself as a good candidate for the development of protective coating for solar cells against the atmospheric degradation agents like the rain.

  19. Investigation of Processing, Microstructures and Efficiencies of Polycrystalline CdTe Photovoltaic Films and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Amit Harenkumar

    CdTe based photovoltaics have been commercialized at multiple GWs/year level. The performance of CdTe thin film photovoltaic devices is sensitive to process conditions. Variations in deposition temperatures as well as other treatment parameters have a significant impact on film microstructure and device performance. In this work, extensive investigations are carried out using advanced microstructural characterization techniques in an attempt to relate microstructural changes due to varying deposition parameters and their effects on device performance for cadmium telluride based photovoltaic cells deposited using close space sublimation (CSS). The goal of this investigation is to apply advanced material characterization techniques to aid process development for higher efficiency CdTe based photovoltaic devices. Several techniques have been used to observe the morphological changes to the microstructure along with materials and crystallographic changes as a function of deposition temperature and treatment times. Traditional device structures as well as advanced structures with electron reflector and films deposited on Mg1-xZnxO instead of conventional CdS window layer are investigated. These techniques include Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to study grain structure and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) with electron diffraction and EDS. These investigations have provided insights into the mechanisms that lead to change in film structure and device performance with change in deposition conditions. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is used for chemical mapping of the films as well as to understand interlayer material diffusion between subsequent layers. Electrical performance of these devices has been studied using current density vs voltage plots. Devices with efficiency over 18% have been fabricated on low cost commercial glass substrates

  20. Controlling mesopore size and processability of transparent enzyme-loaded silica films for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Anguiano, Oswaldo; Wenger, Bernard; Pugin, Raphaël; Hofmann, Heinrich; Scolan, Emmanuel

    2015-02-04

    Silica-based nanoporous thin films including large mesopores are relevant as enzyme supports for applications in biosensing. The diffusion and immobilization of large biomolecules such as enzymes in such porous films require the presence of large mesopores. Creating such morphologies based on a bottom-up synthesis using colloidal templates is a challenge in view of the combination of desired material properties and the robustness of the casting process for the fabrication of thin films. Here a strategy to reproducibly synthesize transparent porous silica thin films with submicrometer thickness and homogeneously distributed porosity is presented. For this purpose, polystyrene-poly-2-vinylpyridine (PS-P2VP) amphiphilic block copolymers are used as porogenic templates. Low-chain alcohols are employed as both selective solvents for the P2VP blocks and reaction media for silica synthesis. Rheology measurements reveal a strong influence of the block copolymer length on the behavior of PS-P2VP micelles in suspension. The pore distribution and accessibility into the film are controlled by adjusting the silica to block copolymer weight ratio. The solvent choice is shown to control not only the micelle size and the generated pore morphology but also the structural homogeneity of the films. Finally, the suitability of the synthesized films as supports for enzymes is tested using a model enzyme, horseradish peroxidase EC 1.11.1.7. Our approach is innovative, robust, and reproducible and provides a convenient alternative to synthesize large mesopores up to small macropores (20-100 nm) in nanostructured thin films with applications in biosensing and functional coatings.

  1. Thin-film semiconductor perspective of organometal trihalide perovskite materials for high-efficiency solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Yuan, Yongbo; Wang, Qi; Shao, Yuchuan; Bai, Yang; Deng, Yehao; Dong, Qingfeng; Hu, Miao; Bi, Cheng; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-02-19

    Organolead trihalide perovskites (OTPs) are arising as a new generation of low-cost active materials for solar cells with efficiency rocketing from 3.5% to over 20% within only five years. From “dye” in dye sensitized solar cells to “hole conductors” and “electron conductors” in mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells, there has been a dramatic conceptual evolution on the function of OTPs in photovoltaic devices. OTPs were originally used as dyes in Gratzel cells, achieving a high efficiency above 15% which, however, did not manifest the excellent charge transport properties of OTPs. An analogy of OTPs to traditional semiconductors was drawn after the demonstration of highly efficient planar heterojunction structure OTP devices and the observation of their excellent bipolar transport properties with a large diffusion length exceeding 100 nm in CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) polycrystalline thin films. Here, this review aims to provide the most recent advances in the understanding of the origin of the high OTP device efficiency. Specifically we will focus on reviewing the progress in understanding 1) the characterization of fantastic optoelectronic property of OTPs, 2) the unusual defect physics that originate the optoelectronic property; 3) morphology control of the perovskite film from fabrication process and film post-treatment, and 4) device interface and charge transport layers that dramatically impact device efficiency in the OTP thin film devices; 5) photocurrent hysteresis; 6) tandem solar cells; 7) stability of the perovskite materials and solar cell devices.

  2. Thin-film semiconductor perspective of organometal trihalide perovskite materials for high-efficiency solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Yuan, Yongbo; Wang, Qi; ...

    2016-02-19

    Organolead trihalide perovskites (OTPs) are arising as a new generation of low-cost active materials for solar cells with efficiency rocketing from 3.5% to over 20% within only five years. From “dye” in dye sensitized solar cells to “hole conductors” and “electron conductors” in mesoscopic heterojunction solar cells, there has been a dramatic conceptual evolution on the function of OTPs in photovoltaic devices. OTPs were originally used as dyes in Gratzel cells, achieving a high efficiency above 15% which, however, did not manifest the excellent charge transport properties of OTPs. An analogy of OTPs to traditional semiconductors was drawn after themore » demonstration of highly efficient planar heterojunction structure OTP devices and the observation of their excellent bipolar transport properties with a large diffusion length exceeding 100 nm in CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) polycrystalline thin films. Here, this review aims to provide the most recent advances in the understanding of the origin of the high OTP device efficiency. Specifically we will focus on reviewing the progress in understanding 1) the characterization of fantastic optoelectronic property of OTPs, 2) the unusual defect physics that originate the optoelectronic property; 3) morphology control of the perovskite film from fabrication process and film post-treatment, and 4) device interface and charge transport layers that dramatically impact device efficiency in the OTP thin film devices; 5) photocurrent hysteresis; 6) tandem solar cells; 7) stability of the perovskite materials and solar cell devices.« less

  3. Laser processing for manufacturing nanocarbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Hai Hoang

    CNTs have been considered as the excellent candidate to revolutionize a broad range of applications. There have been many method developed to manipulate the chemistry and the structure of CNTs. Laser with non-contact treatment capability exhibits many processing advantages, including solid-state treatment, extremely fast processing rate, and high processing resolution. In addition, the outstanding monochromatic, coherent, and directional beam generates the powerful energy absorption and the resultant extreme processing conditions. In my research, a unique laser scanning method was developed to process CNTs, controlling the oxidation and the graphitization. The achieved controllability of this method was applied to address the important issues of the current CNT processing methods for three applications. The controllable oxidation of CNTs by laser scanning method was applied to cut CNT films to produce high-performance cathodes for FE devices. The production method includes two important self-developed techniques to produce the cold cathodes: the production of highly oriented and uniformly distributed CNT sheets and the precise laser trimming process. Laser cutting is the unique method to produce the cathodes with remarkable features, including ultrathin freestanding structure (~200 nm), greatly high aspect ratio, hybrid CNT-GNR emitter arrays, even emitter separation, and directional emitter alignment. This unique cathode structure was unachievable by other methods. The developed FE devices successfully solved the screening effect issue encounter by current FE devices. The laser-control oxidation method was further developed to sequentially remove graphitic walls of CNTs. The laser oxidation process was directed to occur along the CNT axes by the laser scanning direction. Additionally, the oxidation was further assisted by the curvature stress and the thermal expansion of the graphitic nanotubes, ultimately opening (namely unzipping) the tubular structure to

  4. Progress In Materials Synthesis And Processing Of Barium Titanium Oxide (BaTiO3) and Barium Strontium Titanium Oxide (BaTiSrO3) Films For Uncooled Infrared (IR) Detector Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    This wavelength is ideal for enhancing the near IR photoresponse of solar cells , and we are transitioning this technology to our quantum dot solar ...4 2.2 Nanoscale Ferroelectric Characterization of Laser-induced Pyroelectric Activation in ICB Perovskite Thin Films...6 2.3 Measurement of Optical Band Gap Energies for CeO2-doped Perovskite Thin

  5. Femtosecond laser processing of fuel injectors - a materials processing evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B C; Wynne, A

    2000-12-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a new laser-based machining technology that utilizes ultrashort-pulse (0.1-1.0 picosecond) lasers to cut materials with negligible generation of heat or shock. The ultrashort pulse laser, developed for the Department of Energy (Defense Programs) has numerous applications in operations requiring high precision machining. Due to the extremely short duration of the laser pulse, material removal occurs by a different physical mechanism than in conventional machining. As a result, any material (e.g., hardened steel, ceramics, diamond, silicon, etc.) can be machined with minimal heat-affected zone or damage to the remaining material. As a result of the threshold nature of the process, shaped holes, cuts, and textures can be achieved with simple beam shaping. Conventional laser tools used for cutting or high-precision machining (e.g., sculpting, drilling) use long laser pulses (10{sup -8} to over 1 sec) to remove material by heating it to the melting or boiling point (Figure 1.1a). This often results in significant damage to the remaining material and produces considerable slag (Figure 1.2a). With ultrashort laser pulses, material is removed by ionizing the material (Figure 1.1b). The ionized plasma expands away from the surface too quickly for significant energy transfer to the remaining material. This distinct mechanism produces extremely precise and clean-edged holes without melting or degrading the remaining material (Figures 1.2 and 1.3). Since only a very small amount of material ({approx} <0.5 microns) is removed per laser pulse, extremely precise machining can be achieved. High machining speed is achieved by operating the lasers at repetition rates up to 10,000 pulses per second. As a diagnostic, the character of the short-pulse laser produced plasma enables determination of the material being machined between pulses. This feature allows the machining of multilayer materials, metal on metal or metal on

  6. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Active research areas as of the end of the fiscal year 1982 of the Materials Processing in Space Program, NASA-Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications, involving several NASA centers and other organizations are highlighted to provide an overview of the program scope for managers and scientists in industry, university, and government communities. The program is described as well as its history, strategy and overall goal; the organizational structures and people involved are identified and each research task is described together with a list of recent publications. The tasks are grouped into four categories: crystal growth; solidification of metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, transports, and chemical processes; and ultrahigh vacuum and containerless processing technologies.

  7. Process Research of Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A passivation process (hydrogenation) that will improve the power generation of solar cells fabricated from presently produced, large grain, cast polycrystalline silicon (Semix), a potentially low cost material are developed. The first objective is to verify the operation of a DC plasma hydrogenation system and to investigate the effect of hydrogen on the electrical performance of a variety of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The second objective is to parameterize and optimize a hydrogenation process for cast polycrystalline silicon, and will include a process sensitivity analysis. The sample preparation for the first phase is outlined. The hydrogenation system is described, and some early results that were obtained using the hydrogenation system without a plasma are summarized. Light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements of minicell samples, and their correlation to dark current voltage characteristics, are discussed.

  8. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Processing of Barium Titanate Nanoparticles Embedded in Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Michael D; Gao, Kai; Mendis, Gamini P; Slamovich, Elliott B; Howarter, John A

    2015-12-30

    Barium titanate nanoparticles embedded in flexible polymer films were synthesized using hydrothermal processing methods. The resulting films were characterized with respect to material composition, size distribution of nanoparticles, and spatial location of particles within the polymer film. Synthesis conditions were varied based on the mechanical properties of the polymer films, ratio of polymer to barium titanate precursors, and length of aging time between initial formulations of the solution to final processing of nanoparticles. Block copolymers of poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (SMAh) were used to spatially separate titanium precursors based on specific chemical interactions with the maleic anhydride moiety. However, the glassy nature of this copolymer restricted mobility of the titanium precursors during hydrothermal processing. The addition of rubbery butadiene moieties, through mixing of the SMAh with poly(styrene-butadiene-styrene) (SBS) copolymer, increased the nanoparticle dispersion as a result of greater diffusivity of the titanium precursor via higher mobility of the polymer matrix. Additionally, an aminosilane was used as a means to retard cross-linking in polymer-metalorganic solutions, as the titanium precursor molecules were shown to react and form networks prior to hydrothermal processing. By adding small amounts of competing aminosilane, excessive cross-linking was prevented without significantly impacting the quality and composition of the final barium titanate nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to verify nanoparticle compositions. Particle sizes within the polymer films were measured to be 108 ± 5 nm, 100 ± 6 nm, and 60 ± 5 nm under different synthetic conditions using electron microscopy. Flexibility of the films was assessed through measurement of the glass transition temperature using dynamic mechanical analysis. Dielectric permittivity was measured using an impedance analyzer.

  9. Exposures and their determinants in radiographic film processing.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Kay; Chow, Yat; Brauer, Michael; Chessor, Ed; Hirtle, Bob; Kennedy, Susan M; Yeung, Moira Chan; Ward, Helen Dimich

    2002-01-01

    Radiographers process X-ray films using developer and fixer solutions that contain chemicals known to cause or exacerbate asthma. In a study in British Columbia, Canada, radiographers' personal exposures to glutaraldehyde (a constituent of the developer chemistry), acetic acid (a constituent of the fixer chemistry), and sulfur dioxide (a byproduct of sulfites, present in both developer and fixer solutions) were measured. Average full-shift exposures to glutaraldehyde, acetic acid, and sulfur dioxide were 0.0009 mg/m3, 0.09 mg/m3, and 0.08 mg/m3, respectively, all more than one order of magnitude lower than current occupational exposure limits. Local exhaust ventilation of the processing machines and use of silver recovery units lowered exposures, whereas the number of films processed per machine and the time spent near the machines increased exposures. Personnel in clinic facilities had higher exposures than those in hospitals. Private clinics were less likely to have local exhaust ventilation and silver recovery units. Their radiographers spent more time in the processor areas and processed more films per machine. Although exposures were low compared with exposure standards, there are good reasons to continue practices to minimize or eliminate exposures: glutaraldehyde and hydroquinone (present in the developer) are sensitizers; the levels at which health effects occur are not yet clearly established, but appear to be lower than current standards; and health effects resulting from the mixture of chemicals are not understood. Developments in digital imaging technology are making available options that do not involve wet-processing of photographic film and therefore could eliminate the use of developer and fixer chemicals altogether.

  10. Short-pulse laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Myers, B.R.; Banks, P.S.; Honea, E.C.

    1997-06-18

    While there is much that we have learned about materials processing in the ultrashort-pulse regime, there is an enormous amount that we don`t know. How short does the pulse have to be to achieve a particular cut (depth, material, quality)? How deep can you cut? What is the surface roughness? These questions are clearly dependent upon the properties of the material of interest along with the short-pulse interaction physics. From a technology standpoint, we are asked: Can you build a 100 W average power system ? A 1000 W average power system? This proposal seeks to address these questions with a combined experimental and theoretical program of study. Specifically, To develop an empirical database for both metals and dielectrics which can be used to determine the pulse duration and wavelength necessary to achieve a specific machining requirement. To investigate Yb:YAG as a potential laser material for high average power short-pulse systems both directly and in combination with titanium doped sapphire. To develop a conceptual design for a lOOW and eventually 5OOW average power short-pulse system.

  11. Manned Spacecraft Requirements for Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    A major cause of project failure can be attributed to an emphasized focus on end products and inadequate attention to resolving development risks during the initial phases of a project. The initial phases of a project, which we will call the "study period", are critical to determining project scope and costs, and can make or break most projects. If the requirements are not defined adequately, how can the scope be adequately determined, also how can the costs of the entire project be effectively estimated, and how can the risk of project success be accurately assessed? Using the proper material specifications and standards and incorporating these specifications and standards in the design process should be considered inherently crucial to the technical success of a project as just as importantly, crucial to the cost and schedule success. This paper will intertwine several important aspects or considerations for project success: 1) Characteristics of a "Good Material Requirement"; 2) Linking material requirements to the implementation of "Design for Manufacturing"; techniques and 3) The importance of decomposing materials requirements during the study phase/development phase to mitigate project risk for the maturation of technologies before the building of hardware.

  12. Exposure of Polymer Film Thermal Control Materials on the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce; Miller, Sharon; Messer, Russell; Sechkar, Edward; Tollis, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Seventy-nine samples of polymer film thermal control (PFTC) materials have been provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) for exposure to the low Earth orbit environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). MISSE is a materials flight experiment sponsored by the Air Force Research Lab/Materials Lab and NASA. This paper will describe background, objectives, and configurations for the GRC PFTC samples for MISSE. These samples include polyimides, fluorinated polyimides, and Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) with and without second-surface metallizing layers and/or surface coatings. Also included are polyphenylene benzobisoxazole (PBO) and a polyarylene ether benzimidazole (TOR-LM). On August 16, 2001, astronauts installed passive experiment carriers (PECs) on the exterior of the ISS in which were located twenty-eight of the GRC PFTC samples for 1-year space exposure. MISSE PECs for 3-year exposure, which will contain fifty-one GRC PFTC samples, will be installed on the ISS at a later date. Once returned from the ISS, MISSE GRC PFTC samples will be examined for changes in optical and mechanical properties and atomic oxygen (AO) erosion. Additional sapphire witness samples located on the AO exposed trays will be examined for deposition of contaminants.

  13. The liquid-liquid interface as a medium to generate nanocrystalline films of inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N R; Kalyanikutty, K P

    2008-04-01

    Unlike the air-water interface, the organic-aqueous (liquid-liquid) interface has not been exploited sufficiently for materials synthesis. In this Account, we demonstrate how ultrathin nanocrystalline films of metals such as gold and silver as well as of inorganic materials such as semiconducting metal chalcogenides (e.g., CdS, CuS, CdSe) and oxides are readily generated at the liquid-liquid interface. What is particularly noteworthy is that single-crystalline films of certain metal chalcogenides are also obtained by this method. The as-prepared gold films at the toluene-water interface comprise fairly monodisperse nanocrystals that are closely packed, the nature and properties of the films being influenced by various reaction parameters such as reaction temperature, time, reactant concentrations, mechanical vibrations, and the viscosity of the medium. The surface plasmon band of gold is markedly red-shifted in the films due to electronic coupling between the particles. The shift of the surface plasmon band of the Au film toward higher wavelengths with an accompanying increase in intensity as a function of reaction time marks the growth of the film. Depending on the reaction temperature, the Au films show interesting electrical transport properties. Films of metals such as gold are disintegrated by the addition of alkanethiols, the effectiveness depending on the alkane chain length, clearly evidenced by shifts of the surface plasmon bands. A time evolution study of the polycrystalline Au and CdS films as well as the single-crystalline CuS films is carried out by employing atomic force microscopy. X-ray reflectivity studies reveal the formation of a monolayer of capped clusters having 13 gold atoms each, arranged in a hexagonal manner at the toluene-water interface. The measurements also reveal an extremely small value of the interfacial tension. Besides describing features of such nanocrystalline films and their mode of formation, their rheological properties have

  14. Evaluation of nonaqueous processes for nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, B.C.; Grens, J.Z.; Knighton, J.B.; Coops, M.S.

    1983-12-01

    A working group was assigned the task of evaluating the status of nonaqueous processes for nuclear materials and the prospects for successful deployment of these technologies in the future. In the initial evaluation, the study was narrowed to the pyrochemical/pyrometallurgical processes closely related to the processes used for purification of plutonium and its conversion to metal. The status of the chemistry and process hardware were reviewed and the development needs in both chemistry and process equipment technology were evaluated. Finally, the requirements were established for successful deployment of this technology. The status of the technology was evaluated along three lines: (1) first the current applications were examined for completeness, (2) an attempt was made to construct closed-cycle flow sheets for several proposed applications, (3) and finally the status of technical development and future development needs for general applications were reviewed. By using these three evaluations, three different perspectives were constructed that together present a clear picture of how complete the technical development of these processes are.

  15. "Silent" Films Revisited: Captioned Films for the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Gail L.

    1992-01-01

    Provides a history of the Captioned Films/Videos for the Deaf program and describes the kinds of films and videos available, including feature films and educational materials. Silent films are discussed; captioning processes are described; implications for librarians are discussed; and regional depository libraries for captioned films for the deaf…

  16. Skylab materials processing facility experiment developer's report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the Skylab M512 Materials Processing Facility is traced from the design of a portable, self-contained electron beam welding system for terrestrial applications to the highly complex experiment system ultimately developed for three Skylab missions. The M512 experiment facility was designed to support six in-space experiments intended to explore the advantages of manufacturing materials in the near-zero-gravity environment of Earth orbit. Detailed descriptions of the M512 facility and related experiment hardware are provided, with discussions of hardware verification and man-machine interfaces included. An analysis of the operation of the facility and experiments during the three Skylab missions is presented, including discussions of the hardware performance, anomalies, and data returned to earth.

  17. Pulsed Laser Processing of Paper Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechtel, Florian; Reg, Yvonne; Zimmermann, Maik; Stocker, Thomas; Knorr, Fabian; Mann, Vincent; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    At present the trends in paper and packaging industries are the personalization of products and the use of novel high-tech materials. Laser processes as non-contact and flexible techniques seem to be the obvious choice to address those developments. In this paper we present a basic understanding of the occurring mechanisms of laser based engraving of different paper and paperboard materials, using a picosecond laser source at 1064 nm. The influences on the beam-paper-interaction of grammage, the composition of the paper matrix, as well as the paper inherent cellulose fibers were investigated. Here the ablation threshold of commercially available paper was determined and a matrix ablation effect under the 1064 nm radiation observed. These results were characterized and qualified mainly by means of laser scanning microscope (LSM) micrographs in combination with color-space analytics.

  18. Advancements in MEMS materials and processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivas, John D.; Bolin, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    From achievements in display imaging to air bag deployment, microelectromechanical systems are becoming more commonplace in everyday life. With an abundance of opportunities for innovative R&D in the field, the research trends are not only directed toward novel sensor and actuator development, but also toward further miniaturization, specifically achieving micro- and nanoscaled integrated systems. R&D efforts in space, military, and commercial applications are directing specific research programs focused on the area of materials science as an enabling technology to be exploited by researchers and to further push the envelope of micrometerscaled device technology. These endeavors are making significant progress in bringing this aspect of the microelectro-mechanical field to maturation through advances in materials and processing technologies.

  19. Thin film processing of photorefractive BaTiO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Paul R.

    1993-01-01

    During the period covered by this report, October 11, 1991 through October 10, 1992, the research has progressed in a number of different areas. The sol-gel technique was initially studied and experimentally evaluated for depositing films of BaTiO3. The difficulties with the precursors and the poor quality of the films deposited lead to the investigation of pulsed laser deposition as an alternative approach. The development of the pulsed laser deposition technique has resulted in continuous improvements to the quality of deposited films of BaTiO3. The initial depositions of BaTiO3 resulted in amorphous films, however, as the pulsed laser deposition technique continued to evolve, films were deposited in the polycrystalline state, then the textured polycrystalline state, and most recently heteroepitaxial films have also been successfully deposited on cubic (100) oriented SrTiO3 substrates. A technique for poling samples at room temperature and in air is also undergoing development with some very preliminary but positive results. The analytical techniques, which include x-ray diffraction, ferroelectric analysis, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray compositional analysis, optical and polarized light microscopy, and surface profilometry have been enhanced to allow for more detailed evaluation of the samples. In the area of optical characterization, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser has been incorporated into the experimental configuration. Now data can also be acquired within various temporal domains resulting in more detailed information on the optical response of the samples and on their photorefractive sensitivity. The recent establishment of collaborative efforts with two departments at Johns Hopkins University and the Army Research Lab at Fort Belvoir has also produced preliminary results using the metallo-organic decomposition technique as an alternative method for thin film processing of BaTiO3. RF and DC sputtering is another film deposition

  20. Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, J.J. III; Halpern, B.L.

    1993-10-26

    An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures. 5 figures.