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Sample records for films passive microwave

  1. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B.

    1994-12-31

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory`s High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  2. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The AgRISTARS Soil Moisture Project has made significant progress in the quantification of microwave sensor capabilities for soil moisture remote sensing. The 21-cm wavelength has been verified to be the best single channel for radiometric observations of soil moisture. It has also been found that other remote sensing approaches used in conjunction with L-band passive data are more successful than multiple wavelength microwave radiometry in this application. AgRISTARS studies have also improved current understanding of noise factors affecting the interpretability of microwave emission data. The absorption of soil emission by vegetation has been quantified, although this effect is less important than absorption effects for microwave radiometry.

  3. Mission 119 passive microwave results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Mennella, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements of the sea surface were made for determining surface wind speeds from the NP3A aircraft (NASA-927). Observations were made at frequencies of 1.4, 10.6, and 31.4 GHz during NASA mission 119, undertaken off Bermuda in the vicinity of Argus Island sea tower during January 1970. Passive microwave observations from Argus Island ocean showed that the surface roughness effect, dependent on wind speed, is also dependent on observational frequency, increasing with increasing frequency. The roughness effect appears to be dominant for wind speeds less than 30 to 40 knots (2).

  4. Passive Microwave Power Distribution Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    wavelength by switching a reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifter in the stub, in response to termination of microwave power from one of the feed tubes....A standby microwave transmitter power amplifier tube is switched into a microwave power distribution system for a phased array in microseconds when...after the switching is completed, the switching being accomplished by changing electrical length of a quarter-wavelength waveguide stub to one-half

  5. High spatial resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Bonanni, P. G.; Gasiewski, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two extensive series of flights aboard the ER-2 aircraft were conducted with the MIT 118 GHz imaging spectrometer together with a 53.6 GHz nadir channel and a TV camera record of the mission. Other microwave sensors, including a 183 GHz imaging spectrometer were flown simultaneously by other research groups. Work also continued on evaluating the impact of high-resolution passive microwave soundings upon numerical weather prediction models.

  6. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.; Entekhabi, Dara

    1996-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing provides a unique capability for direct observation of soil moisture. Remote measurements from space afford the possibility of obtaining frequent, global sampling of soil moisture over a large fraction of the Earth's land surface. Microwave measurements have the benefit of being largely unaffected by cloud cover and variable surface solar illumination, but accurate soil moisture estimates are limited to regions that have either bare soil or low to moderate amounts of vegetation cover. A particular advantage of passive microwave sensors is that in the absence of significant vegetation cover soil moisture is the dominant effect on the received signal. The spatial resolutions of passive Microwave soil moisture sensors currently considered for space operation are in the range 10-20 km. The most useful frequency range for soil moisture sensing is 1-5 GHz. System design considerations include optimum choice of frequencies, polarizations, and scanning configurations, based on trade-offs between requirements for high vegetation penetration capability, freedom from electromagnetic interference, manageable antenna size and complexity, and the requirement that a sufficient number of information channels be available to correct for perturbing geophysical effects. This paper outlines the basic principles of the passive microwave technique for soil moisture sensing, and reviews briefly the status of current retrieval methods. Particularly promising are methods for optimally assimilating passive microwave data into hydrologic models. Further studies are needed to investigate the effects on microwave observations of within-footprint spatial heterogeneity of vegetation cover and subsurface soil characteristics, and to assess the limitations imposed by heterogeneity on the retrievability of large-scale soil moisture information from remote observations.

  7. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    During the four years of the AgRISTARS Program, significant progress was made in quantifying the capabilities of microwave sensors for the remote sensing of soil moisture. In this paper, a discussion is provided of the results of numerous field and aircraft experiments, analysis of spacecraft data, and modeling activities which examined the various noise factors such as roughness and vegetation that affect the interpretability of microwave emission measurements. While determining that a 21-cm wavelength radiometer was the best single sensor for soil moisture research, these studies demonstrated that a multisensor approach will provide more accurate soil moisture information for a wider range of naturally occurring conditions.

  8. Passive Polarimetric Microwave Signatures Observed Over Antarctica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    WindSat satellite-based fully polarimetric passive microwave observations, expressed in the form of the Stokes vector, were analyzed over the Antarctic ice sheet. The vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (first two Stokes components) from WindSat are shown to be consistent w...

  9. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing for Land Applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land applications, in particular soil moisture retrieval, have been hampered by the lack of low frequency passive microwave observations and the coarse spatial resolution of existing sensors. The next decade could see several improved operational and exploratory missions using new technologies as w...

  10. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, William J.

    2004-10-01

    This book provides a general description of many aspects of microwave Earth remote sensing, including a description of many of the basic mathematical techniques used for remote sensing. Also, the book points out the relevance of Earth remote sensing, by describing many remote sensing applications. Many are well-written and interesting, and each chapter includes a paragraph describing its purpose and what it covers. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of the Earth begins with a good discussion of remote sensing and what can be learned from the interaction between electromagnetic waves and the Earth. There is a good comparison of optical, infrared, and microwave remote sensing and what can be learned from each wavelength region. One of the most interesting aspects of this book is the description of a number of Russian aircraft and space microwave experiments in this field. These experiments are somewhat dated, 1980-1990, but provide examples of the pioneering techniques and results achieved by Russian scientists.

  11. The thin film microwave iris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, R. L.; Landes, H. S.; Manus, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of waveguide iris for microwave coupling applications using thin film techniques is discussed. Production process and installation of iris are described. Iris improves power transmission properties of waveguide window.

  12. Passive microwave remote sensing of the ocean - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of passive microwave remote sensing of the ocean. The physics of emission and instrumentation are highlighted in order to establish a relationship between the thermal emission and retrieved geophysical parameters. A discussion then follows on measurements of temperature, salinity, windspeed, etc. using passive microwave systems. These measurements are related to the accuracy and spatial resolution required by the users. The status of passive microwave remote sensing is summarized and recommendations for future research are presented.

  13. Passive microwave studies of frozen lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1978-01-01

    Lakes of various sizes, depths and ice thicknesses in Alaska, Utah and Colorado were overflown with passive microwave sensors providing observations at several wavelengths. A layer model is used to calculate the microwave brightness temperature, T sub B (a function of the emissivity and physical temperatures of the object), of snowcovered ice underlain with water. Calculated T sub B's are comparable to measured T sub B's. At short wavelengths, e.g., 0.8 cm, T sub B data provide information on the near surface properties of ice covered lakes where the long wavelength, 21.0 cm, observations sense the entire thickness of ice including underlying water. Additionally, T sub B is found to increase with ice thickness. 1.55 cm observations on Chandalar Lake in Alaska show a T sub B increase of 38 K with an approximate 124 cm increase in ice thickness.

  14. Passive microwave algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Grant W.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific objectives of this grant are: (1) thoroughly evaluate, both theoretically and empirically, all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) retrieval algorithms for column water vapor, column liquid water, and surface wind speed; (2) where both appropriate and feasible, develop, validate, and document satellite passive microwave retrieval algorithms that offer significantly improved performance compared with currently available algorithms; and (3) refine and validate a novel physical inversion scheme for retrieving rain rate over the ocean. This report summarizes work accomplished or in progress during the first year of a three year grant. The emphasis during the first year has been on the validation and refinement of the rain rate algorithm published by Petty and on the analysis of independent data sets that can be used to help evaluate the performance of rain rate algorithms over remote areas of the ocean. Two articles in the area of global oceanic precipitation are attached.

  15. Roughness characterizations in active and passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ying; Walker, Jeffrey; Panciera, Rocco; Monerris, Alessandra; Ryu, Dongryeol

    2014-05-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing at L-band is widely recognized as the preferred technique to measure surface soil moisture globally, with resolution ranging from 40-100km. However, passive microwave soil moisture retrieval is highly dependent on ancillary data such as surface roughness, which is difficult to characterize at such a large footprint by ground measurement. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch in Nov 2014, will deploy both active and passive microwave instruments to enhance soil moisture retrieval capabilities. This provides an opportunity to characterize the roughness parameter in passive observations with active measurements. However, the roughness parameters derived from active measurements cannot be directly used in the passive soil moisture retrieval models. While roughness is usually characterized by surface Root Mean Square (RMS) height in active microwave, roughness in passive microwave is described using a parameter HR. This paper compares the two roughness parameters, retrieved from active and passive scattering and emission models respectively, using data sets from the third Soil Moisture Active Passive Experiment (SMAPEx-3) conducted in south-eastern Australia in 2011. Analysis was done over a series of grassland surfaces located within the experiment focus areas. The retrieved surface RMS heights from active measurements were validated against ground samples, after which the relationship between HR and RMS was examined.

  16. Arctic sea-ice variations from time-lapse passive microwave imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.; Ramseier, R. O.; Zwally, H. J.; Gloersen, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents: (1) a short historical review of the passive microwave research on sea ice, which established the observational and theoretical base permitting the interpretation of the first passive microwave images of earth obtained by the Nimbus-5 ESMR; (2) the construction of a time-lapse motion picture film of a 16-month set of serial ESMR images to aid in the formidable data analysis task; and (3) a few of the most significant findings resulting from an early analysis of these data, using selected ESMR images to illustrate these findings.

  17. Arctic sea-ice variations from time-lapse passive microwave imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.J.; Ramseier, R.O.; Zwally, H.J.; Gloersen, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents: (1) a short historical review of the passive microwave research on sea ice which established the observational and theoretical base permitting the interpretation of the first passive microwave images of Earth obtained by the Nimbus-5 ESMR; (2) the construction of a time-lapse motion picture film of a 16-month set of serial ESMR images to aid in the formidable data analysis task; and (3) a few of the most significant findings resulting from an early analysis of these data, using selected ESMR images to illustrate these findings. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  18. A study of passive microwave techniques applied to geologic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, A. T.

    1970-01-01

    Passive microwave techniques were applied to geologic problems, in order to establish the microwave properties of representative rocks and minerals, and to examine the feasibility of using microwave radiometry for geologic mapping problems. A review of microwave pertaining to geology was conducted, coupled with laboratory and field investigations of the microwave emission characteristics of various geologic features. The laboratory studies consisted of dielectric constant measurements of rocks and minerals. A majority of field investigations conducted in the western United States, involved the microwave emission charateristics of rock types, and a portion of the study was concerned with microwave properties of mineralized areas. Experiments were also conducted in the vicinity of a coal seam fire in Colorado and across the San Andreas Fault Zone near the Salton Sea, in Southern California.

  19. Some comments on passive microwave measurement of rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, Thomas T.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that because microwave radiation interacts much more strongly with hydrometeors than with cloud particles, microwave measurements from space offer a significant chance of making global precipitation estimates. Over oceans, passive microwave measurements are essentially attenuation measurements that can be very closely related to the rain rate independently of the details of the drop-size distribution. Over land, scattering of microwave radiation by the hydrometeors, especially in the ice phase, can be used to estimate rainfall. In scattering, the details of the drop-size distribution are very important and it is therefore more difficult to achieve a high degree of accuracy. The SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager), a passive microwave imaging sensor that will be launched soon, will have dual-polarized channels at 85.5 GHz that will be very sensitive to scattering by frozen hydrometeors. Other sensors being considered for the future space missions would extend the ability to estimate rain rates from space. The ideal spaceborne precipitation-measurement system would use the complementary strengths of passive microwave, radar, and visible/infrared measurements.

  20. Research Relative to High Spatial Resolution Passive Microwave Sounding Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Methods to obtain high resolution passive microwave weather observations, and understanding of their probable impact on numerical weather prediction accuracy were investigated. The development of synthetic aperture concepts for geosynchronous passive microwave sounders were studied. The effects of clouds, precipitation, surface phenomena, and atmospheric thermal fine structure on a scale of several kilometers were examined. High resolution passive microwave sounders (e.g., AMSU) with an increased number of channels will produce initialization data for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models with both increased spatial resolution and coverage. The development of statistical models for error growth in high resolution primitive equation NWP models which permit the consequences of various observing system alternatives, including sensors and assimilation times and procedures is discussed. A high resolution three dimensional primitive equation NWP model to determine parameters in an error growth model similar to that formulated by Lorenz, but with more degrees of freedom is utilized.

  1. Passive microwave sensing of coastal area waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    A technique to remotely measure sea-surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated during the 1970's with a dual-frequency microwave radiometer system developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and 1 part per thousand in salinity were obtained using state-of-the-art radiometers. Several aircraft programs for the measurement of coastal area waters demonstrating the application of the microwave radiometer system are discussed. Improvements of the microwave radiometer system during the 1980's and the design and development of new radiometer systems at other frequencies are outlined and related to potential applications.

  2. Microwave bonding of thin film metal coated substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Bonding of materials such as MEMS materials is carried out using microwaves. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity containing other less microwave absorbing materials, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin depth of the films. This causes heating in one place more than another. This thereby minimizes unwanted heating effects during the microwave bonding process.

  3. Analysis of interference to remote passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Douglas; Tillotson, Tom

    1986-01-01

    The final acts of the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) were analyzed to determine potential interference to remote passive microwave sensors. Using interferer populations determined from the U.S. Government and FCC Master File Lists and assuming uniform geographical distribution of interferers, the level of interference from shared services and active services in adjacent and subharmonic bands was calculated for each of the 22 passive sensing bands. In addition, due to the theoretically large antennas required for passive sensing, an analysis was performed to determine if smaller antennas, i.e., relaxed resolution requirements, would have an effect on interference and to what extent.

  4. Passive microwave remote discriminator for the marine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Alexander; Liu, Hao; Qiu, Jinghui; Denisova, Kateryna; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    The specially calculated and prepared antiradar surfaces on special ships is very good for detecting them by the microwave radiometers. It is interesting to evaluate the possibility of using a passive millimeter wave (PMMW) radiometric discriminator for the remote controlling and finding such objects at real distances and also for environmental monitoring.

  5. Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondratyev, K. Y.; Melentyev, V. V.; Rabinovich, Y. I.; Shulgina, E. M.

    1977-01-01

    The theory and calculations of microwave emission from the medium with the depth-dependent physical properties are discussed; the possibility of determining the vertical profiles of temperature and humidity is considered. Laboratory and aircraft measurements of the soil moisture are described; the technique for determining the productive-moisture content in soil, and the results of aircraft measurements are given.

  6. Magnetostrictive thin films for microwave spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, D. E.; Shelford, L. R.; Wadley, P.; Holý, V.; Wang, M.; Hindmarch, A. T.; van der Laan, G.; Campion, R. P.; Edmonds, K. W.; Cavill, S. A.; Rushforth, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Multiferroic composite materials, consisting of coupled ferromagnetic and piezoelectric phases, are of great importance in the drive towards creating faster, smaller and more energy efficient devices for information and communications technologies. Such devices require thin ferromagnetic films with large magnetostriction and narrow microwave resonance linewidths. Both properties are often degraded, compared to bulk materials, due to structural imperfections and interface effects in the thin films. We report the development of epitaxial thin films of Galfenol (Fe81Ga19) with magnetostriction as large as the best reported values for bulk material. This allows the magnetic anisotropy and microwave resonant frequency to be tuned by voltage-induced strain, with a larger magnetoelectric response and a narrower linewidth than any previously reported Galfenol thin films. The combination of these properties make epitaxial thin films excellent candidates for developing tunable devices for magnetic information storage, processing and microwave communications. PMID:23860685

  7. Magnetostrictive thin films for microwave spintronics.

    PubMed

    Parkes, D E; Shelford, L R; Wadley, P; Holý, V; Wang, M; Hindmarch, A T; van der Laan, G; Campion, R P; Edmonds, K W; Cavill, S A; Rushforth, A W

    2013-01-01

    Multiferroic composite materials, consisting of coupled ferromagnetic and piezoelectric phases, are of great importance in the drive towards creating faster, smaller and more energy efficient devices for information and communications technologies. Such devices require thin ferromagnetic films with large magnetostriction and narrow microwave resonance linewidths. Both properties are often degraded, compared to bulk materials, due to structural imperfections and interface effects in the thin films. We report the development of epitaxial thin films of Galfenol (Fe81Ga19) with magnetostriction as large as the best reported values for bulk material. This allows the magnetic anisotropy and microwave resonant frequency to be tuned by voltage-induced strain, with a larger magnetoelectric response and a narrower linewidth than any previously reported Galfenol thin films. The combination of these properties make epitaxial thin films excellent candidates for developing tunable devices for magnetic information storage, processing and microwave communications.

  8. Estimation of global snow cover using passive microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Alfred T. C.; Kelly, Richard E.; Foster, James L.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes an approach to estimate global snow cover using satellite passive microwave data. Snow cover is detected using the high frequency scattering signal from natural microwave radiation, which is observed by passive microwave instruments. Developed for the retrieval of global snow depth and snow water equivalent using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer EOS (AMSR-E), the algorithm uses passive microwave radiation along with a microwave emission model and a snow grain growth model to estimate snow depth. The microwave emission model is based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT) model that uses the quasi-crystalline approach and sticky particle theory to predict the brightness temperature from a single layered snowpack. The grain growth model is a generic single layer model based on an empirical approach to predict snow grain size evolution with time. Gridding to the 25 km EASE-grid projection, a daily record of Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) snow depth estimates was generated for December 2000 to March 2001. The estimates are tested using ground measurements from two continental-scale river catchments (Nelson River and the Ob River in Russia). This regional-scale testing of the algorithm shows that for passive microwave estimates, the average daily snow depth retrieval standard error between estimated and measured snow depths ranges from 0 cm to 40 cm of point observations. Bias characteristics are different for each basin. A fraction of the error is related to uncertainties about the grain growth initialization states and uncertainties about grain size changes through the winter season that directly affect the parameterization of the snow depth estimation in the DMRT model. Also, the algorithm does not include a correction for forest cover and this effect is clearly observed in the retrieval. Finally, error is also related to scale differences between in situ ground measurements and area-integrated satellite estimates. With AMSR

  9. Assimilation of Passive and Active Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, C. S.; Reichle, R. H.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Liu, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Root-zone soil moisture is an important control over the partition of land surface energy and moisture, and the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture has been shown to improve model profile soil moisture [1]. To date, efforts to assimilate remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture at large scales have focused on soil moisture derived from the passive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the active Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT; together with its predecessor on the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS. The assimilation of passive and active microwave soil moisture observations has not yet been directly compared, and so this study compares the impact of assimilating ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture data, both separately and together. Since the soil moisture retrieval skill from active and passive microwave data is thought to differ according to surface characteristics [2], the impact of each assimilation on the model soil moisture skill is assessed according to land cover type, by comparison to in situ soil moisture observations.

  10. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J. C.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation and the properties of thin (a few micron-thick) ferrite films for microwave applications. The films were deposited by RF sputtering from a single ferrite target on two different 4-in-thick substrates, silicon and alumina, both bare and metallized. The as-deposited films were amorphous, requiring careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The optimum annealing temperature was determined by obtaining the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The conditions of microwave measurements are described together with the results.

  11. Passive microwave precipitation detection biases: Relationship to cloud morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marter, R. E.; Rapp, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the Earth's hydrologic cycle requires a more precise understanding of precipitation accumulation and intensity on a global scale. While there is a long record of passive microwave satellite measurements, passive microwave rainfall retrievals often fail to detect light precipitation or have light rain intensity biases because they cannot differentiate between emission from cloud and rain water. Previous studies have shown that AMSR-E significantly underestimates rainfall occurrence and volume compared to CloudSat. This underestimation totals just below 0.6 mm/day quasi-globally (60S-60N), but there are larger regional variations related to the dominant cloud regime. This study aims to use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the 94-GHz CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), which has a high sensitivity to light rain, with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations, to help better characterize the properties of clouds that lead to passive microwave rainfall detection biases. CPR cloud and precipitation retrievals. AMSR-E Level-2B Goddard Profiling 2010 Algorithm (GPROF 2010) rainfall retrievals, and MODIS cloud properties were collocated and analyzed for 2008. Results are consistent with past studies and show large passive microwave precipitation detection biases compared to CloudSat in stratocumulus and shallow cumulus regimes. A preliminary examination of cases where AMSR-E failed to detect precipitation detected by CloudSat shows that over 50% of missed warm precipitation occurs in clouds with top heights below 2 km. MODIS cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties, such as optical thickness, particle effective radius, and liquid water path will be analyzed when precipitation is detected by CloudSat and missed by AMSR-E. The overall goal is to understand how cloud morphology relates to detection biases.

  12. Improved passive microwave sounding of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Schwartz, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    The effort this year focused primarily on 118-GHz transmittance experiments. The data analyzed here was collected with the Microwave Temperature Sounder (MTS) radiometer package during the CAMEX deployment of 1993 with the aim of validating current models of atmospheric microwave absorption in the O2 bands near 54 and 118 GHz. Particular attention has been paid to data collected during four flights when the MTS scanned zenith while profiles of downwelling radiances were collected through ascents and descents. These radiances, in conjunction with radiosonde temperature data, permit the retrieval of band-averaged absorption profiles for each channel. The Millimeter-wave Propagation Model (MPM92) provides theoretical expressions for the absorption of microwaves by oxygen and water vapor and accounts for the interference of pressure-broadened spectral lines'. This model is a good fit to laboratory measurements at temperatures ranging from 279-327 K, but it has been suggested that extrapolation to the conditions of the atmospheric tropopause may result in underestimation of absorption by as much as 15 percent. Preliminary results of the analysis of MTS data appear to be in general agreement with the predictions of the MPM model to within the accuracy of the measurements, which through the coldest parts of the atmosphere ranges from less than plus or minus 5 percent in the most opaque channels to greater than plus or minus 10 percent in the most transparent channels. At those altitudes where each channel is most sensitive to changes in absorption, there is some indication that the modeled absorption may be biased low relative to the observations. Accurate instrument calibration provided challenges, particularly when observed radiances were as much as 260 K below the temperatures of the cold calibration load.

  13. Using Passive Microwaves for Open Water Monitoring and Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, R.; Johnson, F.; Sharma, A.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    One of the biggest and severest natural disasters that society faces is floods. An important component that can help in reducing the impact of floods is satellite remote sensing as it allows for consistent monitoring and obtaining catchment information in absence of physical contact. Nowadays, passive microwave remote sensing observations are available in near real time (NRT) with a couple of hours delay from the actual sensing. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is a multi-frequency passive microwave sensor onboard the Global Change Observation Mission 1 - Water that was launched in May 2012. Several of these frequencies have a high sensitivity to the land surface and they also have the capacity to penetrate clouds. These advantages come at the cost of the relatively coarse spatial resolution (footprints range from ~5 to ~50 km) which in turn allows for global monitoring. A relatively simple methodology to monitor the fraction of open water from AMSR2 observations is presented here. Low frequency passive microwave observations have sensitivity to the land surface but are modulated by overlying signals from physical temperature and vegetation cover. We developed a completely microwave based artificial neural network supported by physically based components to monitor the fraction of open water. Three different areas, located in China, Southeast Asia and Australia, were selected for testing purposes and several different characteristics were examined. First, the overall performance of the methodology was evaluated against the NASA NRT Global Flood Mapping system. Second, the skills of the various different AMSR2 frequencies were tested and revealed that artificial contamination is a factor to consider. The different skills of the tested frequencies are of interest to apply the methodology to alternative passive microwave sensors. This will be of benefit in using the numerous multi-frequency passive microwaves sensors currently observing our Earth

  14. Passive Microwave Observation of Soil Water Infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Rawls, Walter J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Parlange, Marc B.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration is a time varying process of water entry into soil. Experiments were conducted here using truck based microwave radiometers to observe small plots during and following sprinkler irrigation. Experiments were conducted on a sandy loam soil in 1994 and a silt loam in 1995. Sandy loam soils typically have higher infiltration capabilities than clays. For the sandy loam the observed brightness temperature (TB) quickly reached a nominally constant value during irrigation. When the irrigation was stopped the TB began to increase as drainage took place. The irrigation rates in 1995 with the silt loam soil exceeded the saturated conductivity of the soil. During irrigation the TB values exhibited a pattern that suggests the occurrence of coherent reflection, a rarely observed phenomena under natural conditions. These results suggested the existence of a sharp dielectric boundary (wet over dry soil) that was increasing in depth with time.

  15. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J.C.

    1988-11-15

    Production of ferrite thin films is the key to integration of microwave ferrite devices (circulators for phased array antennas, for instance). The interesting materials are the usual microwave ferrites: garnets, lithium ferrites, barium hexaferrites. The required thicknesses are a few tens of micrometers, and it will be important to achieve high deposition rates. Different substrates can be used: silicon and alumina both with and without metallization. The films were deposited by rf sputtering from a single target. The as-deposited films are amorphous and therefore require careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The sputtered films are a few micrometers thick on 4 in. substrates. The optimum annealing temperature was found by trying to obtain the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The precision on the value of magnetization is limited by the precision on the thickness of the film. We obtain magnetization values slightly lower than the target's. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth was measured on toroids from 5 to 18 GHz.

  16. Satellite Remote Sensing: Passive-Microwave Measurements of Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite passive-microwave measurements of sea ice have provided global or near-global sea ice data for most of the period since the launch of the Nimbus 5 satellite in December 1972, and have done so with horizontal resolutions on the order of 25-50 km and a frequency of every few days. These data have been used to calculate sea ice concentrations (percent areal coverages), sea ice extents, the length of the sea ice season, sea ice temperatures, and sea ice velocities, and to determine the timing of the seasonal onset of melt as well as aspects of the ice-type composition of the sea ice cover. In each case, the calculations are based on the microwave emission characteristics of sea ice and the important contrasts between the microwave emissions of sea ice and those of the surrounding liquid-water medium.

  17. Passive microwave observations of thunderstorms from high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Fulton, Richard

    1988-01-01

    A high-altitude (20 km) aircraft made overflights of severe and nonsevere Midwest thunderstorms in the central and southeast U.S. during 2 separate experiments. Down-looking instruments on the aircraft are the imaging Multi-Channel Cloud Radiometer with channels in the visible, IR, and near IR, and two passive microwave instruments, the imaging Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder at 92 (atmospheric window) and 183 GHz (centered on a water vapor line) and the 45 deg foward-of-nadir Multi-Channel Precipitation Radiometer at the 18 and 37 GHz window channels. Over land, the 92 GHz frequency distinguishes quite well the precipitating region from the nonprecipitating anvil region. The interpretation of the microwave measurements is complicated by differences in the cloud microphysics between different climatic regions.

  18. Performance of superconducting microwave devices passivated with dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.L.; Kohl, P.A.; Eddy, M.M.; Zuck, B.F.

    1997-09-01

    We present a set of experiments which show that three dielectric processing variables in particular affect the performance of superconducting microwave devices: processing time and temperature, moisture content of the dielectric material, and surface interactions with the high temperature superconductor (HTS). The changes in microwave performance of a straight-line microstrip resonator before and after passivation were quantified by measurements of the loaded and unloaded quality factors for each resonator. Dielectric materials of varying moisture content were used. The dielectrics were processed at different times and temperatures. This study shows that the degradation of the microwave devices can be minimized by choosing dielectrics which (i) have a low moisture content, (ii) interact as little as possible with the HTS surface, and (iii) can be rapidly processed at relatively low temperatures. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Report from the Passive Microwave Data Set Management Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Ed; Conover, Helen; Goodman, Michael; Krupp, Brian; Liu, Zhong; Moses, John; Ramapriyan, H. K.; Scott, Donna; Smith, Deborah; Weaver, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Passive microwave data sets are some of the most important data sets in the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), providing data as far back as the early 1970s. The widespread use of passive microwave (PM) radiometer data has led to their collection and distribution over the years at several different Earth science data centers. The user community is often confused by this proliferation and the uneven spread of information about the data sets. In response to this situation, a Passive Microwave Data Set Management Workshop was held 17 ]19 May 2011 at the Global Hydrology Resource Center, sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The workshop attendees reviewed all primary (Level 1 ]3) PM data sets from NASA and non ]NASA sensors held by NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), as well as high ]value data sets from other NASA ]funded organizations. This report provides the key findings and recommendations from the workshop as well as detailed tabluations of the datasets considered.

  20. Electrolyte and Electrode Passivation for Thin Film Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, W.; Whitacre, J.; Ratnakumar, B.; Brandon, E.; Blosiu, J.; Surampudi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Passivation films for thin film batteries have been prepared and the conductivity and voltage stability window have been measured. Thin films of Li2CO3 have a large voltage stability window of 4.8V, which facilitates the use of this film as a passivation at both the lithium anode-electrolyte interface at high cathodic potentials.

  1. Passive Microwave Spectral Imaging of Amospheric Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Rosenkranz, Philip W.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to improve the scientific foundation necessary to full realization of the meteorological potential of the NOAA Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) recently first launched on the NOAA-15 satellite in May, 1998. These advances were made in four main areas: (1) improvements, based on aircraft observations, in the atmospheric transmittance expressions used for interpreting AMSU and similar data; (2) development of neural network retrieval methods for cloud top altitude estimates of approximately 1-km accuracy under cirrus shields--the altitude is that of the larger ice particles aloft, which is related to precipitation rate; (3) analysis of early AMSU flight data with respect to its precipitation sensitivity and fine-scale thermal structure; and (4) improvements to the 54-GHz and 118-GHz MTS aircraft imaging spectrometer now operating on the NASA ER-2 aircraft. More specifically, the oxygen transmittance expressions near 118 GHz were in better agreement with aircraft data when the temperature dependence exponent of the 118.75-GHz linewidth was increased from the MPM92 value (Liebe et al., 1992) of 0.8 to 0.97+/-0.03. In contrast, the observations 52.5-55.8 GHz were consistent with the MPM92 model. Neural networks trained on comparisons of 118-GHz spectral data and coincident stereoscopic video images of convective cells observed from 20-km altitude yielded agreement in their peak altitudes within as little as 1.36 km rms, much of which is stereoscopic error. Imagery using these methods produced useful characterizations for Cyclone Oliver in 1993 and other storms (Schwartz et al., 1996; Spina et al., 1998). Similar neural network techniques yielded simulated rms errors in relative humidity retrievals of 6-14 percent over ocean and 6-15 percent over land at pressure levels from 1013 to 131 mbar (Cabrera-Mercader and Staelin, 1995).

  2. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  3. Snowfall Rate Retrieval using NPP ATMS Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua; Zhao, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2014). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The ATMS SFR product is validated against radar and gauge snowfall data and shows that the ATMS algorithm outperforms the AMSU/MHS SFR.

  4. Silicon surface passivation by polystyrenesulfonate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianhui; Shen, Yanjiao; Guo, Jianxin; Chen, Bingbing; Fan, Jiandong; Li, Feng; Liu, Haixu; Xu, Ying; Mai, Yaohua

    2017-02-01

    The use of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) thin films in a high-quality passivation scheme involving the suppression of minority carrier recombination at the silicon surface is presented. PSS has been used as a dispersant for aqueous poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene. In this work, PSS is coated as a form of thin film on a Si surface. A millisecond level minority carrier lifetime on a high resistivity Si wafer is obtained. The film thickness, oxygen content, and relative humidity are found to be important factors affecting the passivation quality. While applied to low resistivity silicon wafers, which are widely used for photovoltaic cell fabrication, this scheme yields relatively shorter lifetime, for example, 2.40 ms on n-type and 2.05 ms on p-type wafers with a resistivity of 1-5 Ω.cm. However, these lifetimes are still high enough to obtain high implied open circuit voltages (Voc) of 708 mV and 697 mV for n-type and p-type wafers, respectively. The formation of oxides at the PSS/Si interface is suggested to be responsible for the passivation mechanism.

  5. Passive Microwave Precipitation Detection Biases: Relationship to Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viramontez, A.; Rapp, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate satellite precipitation estimates are essential for understanding the long-term variability in the global hydrologic cycle and for constraining global climate models. Spaceborne precipitation estimates depend heavily on passive microwave remote sensors due to the large spatial coverage and long record of observations available from such sensors; however, light precipitation is frequently undetected or underestimated by passive microwave rainfall retrievals. Observations from the CloudSat Profiling Radar (CPR) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) provide a unique opportunity for long-term collocated precipitation measurements from passive microwave sensors and an active radar with sensitivity to very light precipitation that can be used to assess the precipitation detection biases. For this study, collocated measurements from AMSR-E and CloudSat during 2008 will be used to identify environments where AMSR-E underestimates precipitation. Environmental variables from the ECMWF Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) will be used to understand the characteristics of the large-scale and thermodynamic environments associated with AMSR-E precipitation biases. A preliminary comparison of CPR rain rates and AMSR-E Level-2B rain rates show a large fraction of rain missed by AMSR-E, with nearly 80% of missed light rain in regions with SSTs below 25°C. This is consistent with prior studies showing large detection biases in regions of large-scale subsidence. The relationship between precipitation biases and other factors such as 2 m air temperature, column water vapor, lower tropospheric stability, and vertical velocity will be explored.

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  7. Passive Microwave Observations of Hurricanes Bonnie, Danielle, and Georges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Guillory, Anthony; LaFontaine, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 hurricane season, three hurricanes were sampled by the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) which was flown aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the Third Convection And Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX-3). The ER-2 aircraft was deployed from Patrick Air Force Base, Florida for hurricane missions over the Atlantic Basin and Gulf of Mexico between 6 August - 23 September. Hurricanes Bonnie, Danielle and Georges were each sampled multiple times during several subsequent aircraft missions. The passive microwave observations of these hurricanes collected by the AMPR at 10.7, 19.35, 37.1, and 85.5 GHz frequencies will be presented to explain differences in precipitation features of the hurricanes. In particular, the relationship of the passive microwave signatures of precipitation-sized ice to vertical updraft strength will be examined as a possible indicator of future convective intensity. Correlating aircraft radar information will also be examined to provide further insight.

  8. Passive Microwave Rainfall Estimates from the GPM Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Petkovic, Veljko

    2017-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched in February 2014 as a joint mission between JAXA from Japan and NASA from the United States. GPM carries a state of the art dual-frequency precipitation radar and a multi-channel passive microwave radiometer that acts not only to enhance the radar's retrieval capability, but also as a reference for a constellation of existing satellites carrying passive microwave sensors. In March of 2016, GPM released Version 4 of its precipitation products that consists of radar, radiometer, and combined radar/radiometer products. The precipitation products from these sensors or sensor combination are consistent by design and show relatively minor differences in the mean global sense. Closer examination of the biases, however, reveals regional biases between active and passive sensors that can be directly related top the nature of the convection. By looking at cloud systems instead of individual satellite pixels, the relationship between biases and the large scale environmental state become obvious. Organized convection, which occurs more readily in regimes with large Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and shear tend to drive biases in different directions than isolated convection. This is true over both land and ocean. This talk will present the latest findings and explore these discrepancies from a physical perspective in order to gain some understanding between cloud structures, information content, and retrieval differences. This analysis will be used to then drive a bigger picture of how GPM's latest results inform the Global Water and Energy budgets.

  9. [Atmospheric Influences Analysis on the Satellite Passive Microwave Remote Sensing].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu-bao; Shi, Li-juan; Shi, Jian-cheng; Zhao, Shao-jie

    2016-02-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing offers its all-weather work capabilities, but atmospheric influences on satellite microwave brightness temperature were different under different atmospheric conditions and environments. In order to clarify atmospheric influences on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), atmospheric radiation were simulated based on AMSR-E configuration under clear sky and cloudy conditions, by using radiative transfer model and atmospheric conditions data. Results showed that atmospheric water vapor was the major factor for atmospheric radiation under clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances were almost above 0.98 at AMSR-E's low frequencies (< 18.7 GHz) and the microwave brightness temperature changes caused by atmosphere can be ignored in clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances at 36.5 and 89 GHz were 0.896 and 0.756 respectively. The effects of atmospheric water vapor needed to be corrected when using microwave high-frequency channels to inverse land surface parameters in clear sky condition. But under cloud cover or cloudy conditions, cloud liquid water was the key factor to cause atmospheric radiation. When sky was covered by typical stratus cloud, atmospheric transmittances at 10.7, 18.7 and 36.5 GHz were 0.942, 0.828 and 0.605 respectively. Comparing with the clear sky condition, the down-welling atmospheric radiation caused by cloud liquid water increased up to 75.365 K at 36.5 GHz. It showed that the atmospheric correction under different clouds covered condition was the primary work to improve the accuracy of land surface parameters inversion of passive microwave remote sensing. The results also provided the basis for microwave atmospheric correction algorithm development. Finally, the atmospheric sounding data was utilized to calculate the atmospheric transmittance of Hailaer Region, Inner Mongolia province, in July 2013. The results indicated that atmospheric transmittances were close to 1

  10. Passive Microwave Studies of Atmospheric Precipitation and State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Rosenkranz, Philip W.; Shiue, James C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The principal contributions of this research on novel passive microwave spectral techniques are in the areas of: (1) global precipitation mapping using the opaque spectral bands on research and operational weather satellites, (2) development and analysis of extensive aircraft observational imaging data sets obtained using the MIT instrument NAST-M near 54 and 118 GHz over hurricanes and weather ranging from tropical to polar; simultaneous data from the 8500-channel infrared spectrometer NAST-I was obtained and analyzed separately, (3) estimation of hydrometeor diameters in cell tops using data from aircraft and spacecraft, (4) continued improvement of expressions for atmospheric transmittance at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths, (5) development and airborne use of spectrometers operating near 183- and 425-GHz bands, appropriate to practical systems in geosynchronous orbit, and (6) preliminary studies of the design and performance of future geosynchronous microwave sounders for temperature and humidity profiles and for continuous monitoring of regional precipitation through most clouds. This work was a natural extension of work under NASA Grant NAG5-2545 and its predecessors. This earlier work had developed improved airborne imaging microwave spectrometers and had shown their sensitivity to precipitation altitude and character. They also had prepared the foundations for precipitation estimation using the opaque microwave bands. The field demonstration and improvement of these capabilities was then a central part of the present research reported here, during which period the first AMSU data became available and several hurricanes were overflown by NAST-M, yielding unique data about their microwave signatures. This present work has in turn helped lay the foundation for future progress in incorporating the opaque microwave channels in systems for climatologically precise global precipitation mapping from current and future operational satellites. Extension of

  11. A Review on Passive and Integrated Near-Field Microwave Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Guha, Subhajit; Jamal, Farabi Ibne; Wenger, Christian

    2017-09-23

    In this paper we review the advancement of passive and integrated microwave biosensors. The interaction of microwave with biological material is discussed in this paper. Passive microwave biosensors are microwave structures, which are fabricated on a substrate and are used for sensing biological materials. On the other hand, integrated biosensors are microwave structures fabricated in standard semiconductor technology platform (CMOS or BiCMOS). The CMOS or BiCMOS sensor technology offers a more compact sensing approach which has the potential in the future for point of care testing systems. Various applications of the passive and the integrated sensors have been discussed in this review paper.

  12. A Comparison between Lightning Activity and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kevin, Driscoll T.; Hugh, Christian J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    1999-01-01

    A recent examination of data from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) suggests that storm with the highest frequency of lightning also possess the most pronounced microwave scattering signatures at 37 and 85 GHz. This study demonstrates a clear dependence between lightning and the passive microwave measurements, and accentuates how direct the relationship really is between cloud ice and lightning activity. In addition, the relationship between the quantity of ice content and the frequency of lightning (not just the presence of lightning) , is consistent throughout the seasons in a variety of regimes. Scatter plots will be presented which show the storm-averaged brightness temperatures as a function of the lightning density of the storms (L/Area) . In the 85 GHz and 37 GHz scatter plots, the brightness temperature is presented in the form Tb = k1 x log10(L/Area) + k2, where the slope of the regression, k1, is 58 for the 85 GHz relationship and 30.7 for the 37 GHz relationship. The regression for both these fits showed a correlation of 0.76 (r2 = 0.58), which is quite promising considering the simple procedure used to make the comparisons, which have not yet even been corrected for the view angle differences between the instruments, or the polarization corrections in the microwave imager.

  13. Determination of precipitation profiles from airborne passive microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Pierce, Harold F.; Weinman, James A.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of precipitation derived from multispectral passive microwave radiometry. Measurements of microwave brightness temperature (Tb) obtained by a NASA high-altitude research aircraft are related to profiles of rainfall rate through a multichannel piecewise-linear statistical regression procedure. Statistics for Tb are obtained from a set of cloud radiative models representing a wide variety of convective, stratiform, and anvil structures. The retrieval scheme itself determines which cloud model best fits the observed meteorological conditions. Retrieved rainfall rate profiles are converted to equivalent radar reflectivity for comparison with observed reflectivities from a ground-based research radar. Results for two case studies, a stratiform rain situation and an intense convective thunderstorm, show that the radiometrically derived profiles capture the major features of the observed vertical structure of hydrometer density.

  14. Passive microwave remote sensing for sea ice research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for gathering data by remote sensors on satellites utilized for sea ice research are summarized. Measurement of brightness temperatures by a passive microwave imager converted to maps of total sea ice concentration and to the areal fractions covered by first year and multiyear ice are described. Several ancillary observations, especially by means of automatic data buoys and submarines equipped with upward looking sonars, are needed to improve the validation and interpretation of satellite data. The design and performance characteristics of the Navy's Special Sensor Microwave Imager, expected to be in orbit in late 1985, are described. It is recommended that data from that instrument be processed to a form suitable for research applications and archived in a readily accessible form. The sea ice data products required for research purposes are described and recommendations for their archival and distribution to the scientific community are presented.

  15. Passive film growth on carbon steel and its nanoscale features at various passivating potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the passivation and topographic sub-structure of passive films on a carbon steel in a carbonate/bicarbonate solution was characterized by electrochemical measurements, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When passivating at a potential near the active-passive transition, the film contains the mixture of Fe3O4, Fe2O3 and FeOOH, with numerous nanoscale features. As the film-forming potential shifts positively, the passive film becomes more compact and the nanoscale features disappear. When the film is formed at a passive potential where the oxygen evolution is enabled, the content of FeOOH in the film increases, resulting in an amorphous topography and reduced corrosion resistance.

  16. Passive microwave tags : LDRD 52709, FY04 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-10-01

    This report describes both a general methodology and specific examples of completely passive microwave tags. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices were used to make tags for both identification and sensing applications at different frequencies. SAW correlators were optimized for wireless identification, and SAW filters were developed to enable wireless remote sensing of physical properties. Identification tag applications and wireless remote measurement applications are discussed. Significant effort went into optimizing the SAW devices used for this work, and the lessons learned from that effort are reviewed.

  17. Orbiting passive microwave sensor simulation applied to soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W. (Principal Investigator); Clark, B. V.; Pitchford, W. M.; Paris, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A sensor/scene simulation program was developed and used to determine the effects of scene heterogeneity, resolution, frequency, look angle, and surface and temperature relations on the performance of a spaceborne passive microwave system designed to estimate soil water information. The ground scene is based on classified LANDSAT images which provide realistic ground classes, as well as geometries. It was determined that the average sensitivity of antenna temperature to soil moisture improves as the antenna footprint size increased. Also, the precision (or variability) of the sensitivity changes as a function of resolution.

  18. Passive Microwave Measurements of Salinity: The Gulf Stream Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Koblinsky, C.; Haken, M.; Howden, S.; Bingham, F.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Passive microwave sensors at L-band (1.4 GHz) operating from aircraft have demonstrated that salinity can be measured with sufficient accuracy (I psu) to be scientifically meaningful in coastal waters. However, measuring salinity in the open ocean presents unresolved issues largely because of the much greater accuracy (approximately 0.2 psu) required of global maps to be scientifically viable. The development of a satellite microwave instrument to make global measurements of SSS (Sea Surface Salinity) is the focus of a joint JPL/GSFC/NASA ocean research program called Aquarius. In the summer of 1999 a series of measurements called, The Gulf Stream Experiment, were conducted as part of research at the Goddard Space Flight Center to test the potential for passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in the open ocean. The measurements consisted of airborne microwave instruments together with ships and drifters for surface truth. The study area was a 200 km by 100 km rectangle about 250 km east of Delaware Bay between the continental shelf waters and north wall of the Gulf Stream. The primary passive instruments were the ESTAR radiometer (L-band, H-pol) and the SLFMR radiometer (L-band, V-pol). In addition, the instruments on the aircraft included a C-band radiometer (ACMR), an ocean wave scatterometer (ROWS) and an infrared radiometer (for surface temperature). These instruments were mounted on the NASA P-3 Orion aircraft. Sea surface measurements consisted of thermosalinograph data provided by the R/V Cape Henlopen and the MN Oleander, and data from salinity and temperature sensors on three surface drifters deployed from the R/V Cape Henlopen. The primary experiment period was August 26-September 2, 1999. During this period the salinity field within the study area consisted of a gradient on the order of 2-3 psu in the vicinity of the shelf break and a warm core ring with a gradient of 1-2 psu. Detailed maps were made with the airborne sensors on August 28 and 29 and

  19. Passive Microwave Measurements of Salinity: The Gulf Stream Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Koblinsky, C.; Haken, M.; Howden, S.; Bingham, F.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Passive microwave sensors at L-band (1.4 GHz) operating from aircraft have demonstrated that salinity can be measured with sufficient accuracy (I psu) to be scientifically meaningful in coastal waters. However, measuring salinity in the open ocean presents unresolved issues largely because of the much greater accuracy (approximately 0.2 psu) required of global maps to be scientifically viable. The development of a satellite microwave instrument to make global measurements of SSS (Sea Surface Salinity) is the focus of a joint JPL/GSFC/NASA ocean research program called Aquarius. In the summer of 1999 a series of measurements called, The Gulf Stream Experiment, were conducted as part of research at the Goddard Space Flight Center to test the potential for passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in the open ocean. The measurements consisted of airborne microwave instruments together with ships and drifters for surface truth. The study area was a 200 km by 100 km rectangle about 250 km east of Delaware Bay between the continental shelf waters and north wall of the Gulf Stream. The primary passive instruments were the ESTAR radiometer (L-band, H-pol) and the SLFMR radiometer (L-band, V-pol). In addition, the instruments on the aircraft included a C-band radiometer (ACMR), an ocean wave scatterometer (ROWS) and an infrared radiometer (for surface temperature). These instruments were mounted on the NASA P-3 Orion aircraft. Sea surface measurements consisted of thermosalinograph data provided by the R/V Cape Henlopen and the MN Oleander, and data from salinity and temperature sensors on three surface drifters deployed from the R/V Cape Henlopen. The primary experiment period was August 26-September 2, 1999. During this period the salinity field within the study area consisted of a gradient on the order of 2-3 psu in the vicinity of the shelf break and a warm core ring with a gradient of 1-2 psu. Detailed maps were made with the airborne sensors on August 28 and 29 and

  20. General Corrosion and Passive Film Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, C; Gray, J; Hayes, J; Wong, L; Rebak, R; Carroll, S; Harper, J; Gdowski, G

    2005-07-19

    This report summarizes both general corrosion of Alloy 22 from 60 to 220 C and the stability of the passive (oxide) film from 60 to 90 C over a range of solution compositions that are relevant to the in-drift chemical environment at the waste package surface. The general corrosion rates were determined by weight-loss measurements in a range of complex solution compositions representing the products of both the evaporation of seepage water and also the deliquescence of dust previously deposited on the waste canisters. These data represent the first weight-loss measurements performed by the program at temperatures above 90 C. The low corrosion rates of Alloy 22 are attributed to the protective oxide film that forms at the metal surface. In this report, changes in the oxide film composition are correlated with weight loss at the higher temperatures (140-220 C) where film characterization had not been previously performed. The stability of the oxide film was further analyzed by conducting a series of electrochemical tests in progressively more acidic solutions to measure the general corrosion rates in solutions that mimic crevice or pit environments.

  1. Satellite remote sensing of global rainfall using passive microwave radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ferriday, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    Global rainfall over land and ocean is estimated using measurements of upwelling microwaves by a satellite passive microwave radiometer. Radiative transfer calculations through a cloud model are used to parameterize an inversion technique for retrieving rain rates from brightness temperatures measured by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). The rainfall retrieval technique is based on the interaction between multi-spectral microwave radiances and millimeter sized liquid and frozen hydrometeors distributed in the satellite`s field of view. The rain rate algorithm is sensitive to both hydrometeor emission and scattering while being relatively insensitive to extraneous atmospheric and surface effects. Separate formulations are used over ocean and land to account for different background microwave characteristics and the algorithm corrects for inhomogeneous distributions of rain rates within the satellite`s field of view. Estimates of instantaneous and climate scale rainfall are validated through comparisons with modeled clouds, surface radars, rain gauges and alternative satellite estimates. The accuracy of the rainfall estimates is determined from a combination of validation comparisons, theoretical sampling error calculations, and modeled sensitivity to variations in atmospheric and surface radiative properties. An error budget is constructed for both instantaneous rain rates and climate scale global estimates. At a one degree resolution, the root mean square errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates are 13% over ocean and 20% over land. The root mean square errors in global rainfall totals over a four month period are found to be 46% over ocean and 63% over land. Global rainfall totals are computed on a monthly scale for a three year period from 1987 to 1990. The time series is analyzed for climate scale rainfall distribution and variability.

  2. A method for combining passive microwave and infrared rainfall observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Giglio, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Because passive microwave instruments are confined to polar-orbiting satellites, rainfall estimates must interpolate across long time periods, during which no measurements are available. In this paper the authors discuss a technique that allows one to partially overcome the sampling limitations by using frequent infrared observations from geosynchronous platforms. To accomplish this, the technique compares all coincident microwave and infrared observations. From each coincident pair, the infrared temperature threshold is selected that corresponds to an area equal to the raining area observed in the microwave image. The mean conditional rainfall rate as determined from the microwave image is then assigned to pixels in the infrared image that are colder than the selected threshold. The calibration is also applied to a fixed threshold of 235 K for comparison with established infrared techniques. Once a calibration is determined, it is applied to all infrared images. Monthly accumulations for both methods are then obtained by summing rainfall from all available infrared images. Two examples are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. The first consists of a one-month period (February 1988) over Darwin, Australia, where good validation data are available from radar and rain gauges. For this case it was found that the technique approximately doubled the rain inferred by the microwave method alone and produced exceptional agreement with the validation data. The second example involved comparisons with atoll rain gauges in the western Pacific for June 1989. Results here are overshadowed by the fact that the hourly infrared estimates from established techniques, by themselves, produced very good correlations with the rain gauges. The calibration technique was not able to improve upon these results.

  3. Application of lightning to passive microwave convective and stratiform partitioning in passive microwave rainfall retrieval algorithm over land from TRMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nai-Yu; Gopalan, Kaushik; Albrecht, Rachel I.

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzes relationships between lightning flash rate, radar reflectivity factor (reflectivity), and passive microwave brightness temperature (Tb) for convective and stratiform precipitation over land using multiyear data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. A new convective and stratiform index (CSI (an estimate of convective areal fraction)) for the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) is developed from the analysis. Four years of TRMM TMI, Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), and Precipitation Radar (PR) data (2002-2005) are colocated and remapped to 0.1 and 0.05 degree grids for analysis. The scientific objective of this study is to understand the relationship between lightning and active and passive microwave precipitation observations and explore ways of using lightning information to enhance the discrimination between convective and stratiform precipitation in TMI rain rate retrieval algorithm. PR provides the reference convective and stratiform classification and is coincident with LIS which reports lightning parameters such as the occurrence (yes or no) and flash rates. Analysis of ˜14 million coincident precipitating TRMM measurements over land (i.e., excluding oceans and coasts) reveals that 6% of rain data have lightning flash rates greater than zero. For all lightning data, 60% have 0-1 fl min-1, 28% have 1-2 fl min-1, and 12% have flash rates greater than 2 fl min-1. Overall, 86.5% (13.5%) of lightning occurred in convective (stratiform) precipitation. In other words, stratiform rainfall is predominant when LIS detects no lightning, and the convective rain probability increases with increasing lightning frequency. For example, 34% of rainfall is convective for low flash rates (0-1 fl/min), whereas the convective probability increases to 99.7% for high flash rates (>=2 fl/min). This study develops a simple method that incorporates lightning into the CSI to test if lightning can help passive microwave (PM) delineate convective and

  4. Assimilation of passive microwave-based soil moisture and snow depth retrievals for drought estimation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article examines the influence of passive microwave based soil moisture and snow depth retrievals towards improving estimates of drought through data assimilation. Passive microwave based soil moisture and snow depth retrievals from a variety of sensors are assimilated separately into the Noah ...

  5. Target detection using microwave irradiances from natural sources: A passive, local and global surveillance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Detection of metal objects on or near the Earth's surface was investigated using existing, passive, microwave sensors operating from Earth orbit. The range equations are derived from basic microwave principles and theories and the expressions are given explicitly to estimate the signal to noise ratio for detecting metal targets operating as bistatic scatterers. Actual measurements are made on a range of metal objects observed from orbit using existing passive microwave receiving systems. The details of the measurements and the results are tabulated and discussed. The advantages of a passive microwave sensor as it is applied to surveillance of metal objects as viewed from aerial platforms or from orbit, are examined.

  6. Microwave properties of high transition temperature superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive studies of the interaction of microwaves with YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), Bi-based, and Tl-based superconducting thin films deposited in several microwave substrates were performed. The data were obtained by measuring the microwave power transmitted through the film in the normal and the superconducting state and by resonant cavity techniques. The main motives were to qualify and understand the physical parameters such as the magnetic penetration depth, the complex conductivity, and the surface impedance, of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials at microwave frequencies. Based on these parameters, the suitability of these HTS thin films is discussed for microwave applications.

  7. Using Superconducting Thin Films in Microwave Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genkin, Varery

    1997-01-01

    High temperature superconductors(HTS) and microwaves devices form the ideal partnership. The application of superconductors in microwave devices, components and systems allows the reduction in size, power consumption and insertion loss. The surface resistance of high-Tc superconductors has been found to be two orders of magnitude lower than normal conducting copper materials. The reduction in size and power requirements, which together both lead to a reduction in system mass, coupled with reasonably accessible operating temperatures, suggest that HTS microwave components should find ready application in satellite communications systems. At present, multi- channeling communication networks demand filters with narrow bandwidth in order to allow the available RF frequency spectrum to be partitioned into small frequency bands, -and possible variation of dielectric constant from substrate to substrate is undesirable. Microwave multiplexers demand the fabrication of two identical filters in each channel. Thus, the filter with tuning function is preferable. Tunable filters are the critical component for phased array antennas in order to electronically steer the radiated beam. To fabricate a tunable filter that uses an electric field for operation, one would like a material that provides a large change on dielectric constant for a given electric field, yet has a relatively low tangent in order to minimize the insertion loss of the device. Ferroelectrics have been the materials of choice. Their large dielectric constant sufficiently increases the coupling between microwave resonators and its dependence on electric field provides timability. Development of technology promises to diminish tangent loss. The use of thin ferroelectric films sufficiently decreases insertion losses keeping considerable potential for applications. NASA Lewis Research Center is the one of the leading centers in investigation of superconductors/ferroelectric tunable components for microwave devices

  8. A passive and active microwave-vector radiative transfer (PAM-VRT) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Min, Qilong

    2015-11-01

    A passive and active microwave vector radiative transfer (PAM-VRT) package has been developed. This fast and accurate forward microwave model, with flexible and versatile input and output components, self-consistently and realistically simulates measurements/radiation of passive and active microwave sensors. The core PAM-VRT, microwave radiative transfer model, consists of five modules: gas absorption (two line-by-line databases and four fast models); hydrometeor property of water droplets and ice (spherical and nonspherical) particles; surface emissivity (from Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM)); vector radiative transfer of successive order of scattering (VSOS); and passive and active microwave simulation. The PAM-VRT package has been validated against other existing models, demonstrating good accuracy. The PAM-VRT not only can be used to simulate or assimilate measurements of existing microwave sensors, but also can be used to simulate observation results at some new microwave sensors.

  9. General Corrosion and Passive Film Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Roberts, S; Evans, K; Wolery, T; Carroll, S

    2005-11-29

    We have studied Alloy 22 corrosion and passive film stability in nitrogen-purged Na-K-Cl-NO{sub 3} brines having NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios of 7.4 at 160 C and NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios of 0.5 and 7.4 at 220 C in autoclave experiments under a slight pressure. The experiments were done to show the effect of high nitrate brines on the durability of the Alloy 22 outer barrier of the waste canisters. Ratios of NO{sub 3}:Cl used in this study were lower than expected ratios for the repository environment at these temperatures and atmospheric pressures (NO{sub 3}:Cl > 25), however they were thought to be high enough to inhibit localized corrosion. Localized corrosion occurred on the liquid-immersed and vapor-exposed creviced specimens under all conditions studied. Crevice penetration depths were difficult to quantify due to the effects of deformation and surface deposits. Further characterization is needed to evaluate the extent of localized corrosion. The bulk of the surface precipitates were derived from the partial dissolution of ceramic crevice formers used in the study. At this time we do not know if the observed localized corrosion reflects the corrosiveness of Na-K-Cl-NO{sub 3} solutions at elevated temperature over nine months or if it was an artifact of the experimental protocol. Nor do we know if much more concentrated brines with higher NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios formed by dust deliquescence will initiate localized corrosion on Alloy 22 at 160 and 220 C. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that nitrate concentrations greater than 18.5 molal may be required to offset localized corrosion of Alloy 22 at 160 and 220 C. Stability of the passive film and general corrosion were evaluated on the liquid-immersed and vapor-exposed non-creviced specimens. Elemental depth profiles of the vapor-exposed specimens are consistent with the development of a protective Cr-rich oxide near the base metal. The combined passive film and alloy oxide of the immersed specimens was much thicker

  10. Satellite Remote Sensing of Global Rainfall Using Passive Microwave Radiometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriday, James Guest

    Global rainfall over land and ocean is estimated using measurements of up-welling microwaves by a satellite passive microwave radiometer. Radiative transfer calculations through a cloud model are used to parameterize an inversion technique for retrieving rain rates from brightness temperatures measured by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The rainfall retrieval technique is based on the interaction between multi-spectral microwave radiances and millimeter sized liquid and frozen hydrometeors distributed in the satellite field-of-view. The rain rate algorithm is sensitive to both hydrometeor emission and scattering while being relatively insensitive to extraneous atmospheric and surface effects. Separate formulations are used over ocean and land to account for different background microwave characteristics and the algorithm corrects for inhomogeneous distributions of rain rates within the satellite field-of-view. Estimates of instantaneous and climate scale rainfall are validated through comparisons with modeled clouds, surface radars, rain gauges and alternative satellite estimates. The accuracy of the rainfall estimates is determined from a combination of validation comparisons, theoretical sampling error calculations, and modeled sensitivity to variations in atmospheric and surface radiative properties. An error budget is constructed for both instantaneous rain rates and climate scale global estimates. At a one degree resolution, the root mean square errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates are 13% over ocean and 20% over land. The root mean square errors in global rainfall totals over a four month period are found to be 46% over ocean and 63% over land. Global rainfall totals are computed on a monthly scale for a three year period from 1987 to 1990. The time series is analyzed for climate scale rainfall distribution and variability. Monthly rainfall patterns over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean exhibit a strong correlation between increased

  11. Passive films on metallic biomaterials under simulated physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Pound, B G

    2014-05-01

    The metallic materials used for implantable medical devices are predominantly stainless steels, Ti and its alloys, and Co-Cr alloys. The corrosion resistance of each of these materials is associated with a passive oxide film on its surface. Since corrosion resistance is crucial to implant performance, considerable effort has been focused on understanding the nature of the passive film present under physiological conditions. Surface analytical techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used in a number of studies to investigate the passive film formed on metallic biomaterials in simulated physiological solutions. This review focuses on the surface characteristics of these materials with regard to composition, thickness, and impedance of the passive films. Of particular interest are changes in the films with surface treatment and the nature of the films developed over time in the simulated solutions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Satellite passive microwave rain measurement techniques for land and ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Multiseasonal rainfall was found to be measurable over land with satellite passive microwave data, based upon comparisons between Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMME) brightness temperatures (T sub B) and operational WSR-57 radar rain rates. All of the SMMR channels (bipolarized 37, 21, 18, 10.7, and 6.6. GHz T sub B) were compared to radar reflectivities for 25 SMMR passes and 234 radar scans over the U.S. during the spring, summer, and fall of 1979. It was found that the radar rain rates were closely related to the difference between 37 and 21 GHz T sub B. This result is due to the volume scattering effects of precipitation which cause emissivity decreases with frequency, as opposed to emissive surfaces (e.g., water) whose emissivities increase with frequency. Two frequencies also act to reduce the effects of thermometric temperature variations on T sub B to a miminum. During summer and fall, multiple correlation coefficients of 0.80 and 0.75 were obtained. These approach the limit of correlation that can be expected to exist between two very different data sources, especially in light of the errors attributable to manual digitization of PPI photographs of variable quality from various operational weather radar not calibrated for research purposes. During the spring, a significantly lower (0.63) correlation was found. This poorer performance was traced to cases of wet, unvegetated soil being sensed at the lower frequencies through light rain, partly negating the rain scattering signal.

  13. Feasibility of detecting aircraft wake vortices using passive microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of detecting the cold core of the wake vortex from the wingtips of an aircraft using a passive microwave radiometer was investigated. It was determined that there is a possibility that a cold core whose physical temperature drop is 10 C or greater and which has a diameter of 5 m or greater can be detected by a microwave radiometer. The radiometer would be a noise injection balanced Dicke radiometer operating at a center frequency of 60 GHz. It would require a noise figure of 5 dB, a predetection bandwidth of 6 GHz, and an integration time of 2 seconds resulting in a radiometric sensitivity of 0.018 K. However, three additional studies are required. The first would determine what are the fluctuations in the radiometric antenna temperature due to short-term fluctuations in atmospheric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity. Second, what is the effect of the pressure and temperature drop within the cold core of the wake vortex on its opacity. The third area concerns the possibility of developing a 60 GHz radiometer with a radio metric sensitivity an order of magnitude improvement over the existing state of the art.

  14. Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Kunkee, D. B.; Piepmeier, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop satellite-based observational techniques for measuring both oceanic and atmospheric variables using passive polarimetric radiometry. Polarimetric radiometry offers a potential alternative to radar scatterometry in observing global ocean surface wind direction from satellites. Polarimetric radiometry might also provide a means of detecting cell-top ice in convective storms by virtue of the polarizing properties of oriented ice particles, and thus facilitate estimation of the phase of the storm. The project focuses on the development of polarimetric microwave radiometers using digital cross-correlators for obtaining precise measurements of all four Stokes' parameters. As part of the project a unique four-band polarimetric imaging radiometer, the Polar Scanning Radiometer (PSR), is being designed for use on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. In addition to providing an aircraft-based demonstration of digital correlation technology the PSR will significantly enhance the microwave imaging capability of the existing suite of DC-8 instruments. During the first grant year excellent progress has been made in the following areas: (1) demonstrating digital correlation radiometry, (2) fabricating aircraft-qualified correlators for use in the PSR, and (3) modeling observed SSM/I brightness signatures of ocean wind direction.

  15. Passive microwave rainfall retrieval: A mathematical approach via sparse learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebtehaj, M.; Lerman, G.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Detection and estimation of surface rainfall from spaceborne radiometric imaging is a challenging problem. The main challenges arise due to the nonlinear relationship of surface rainfall with its microwave multispectral signatures, the presence of noise, insufficient spatial resolution in observations, and the mixture of the earth surface and atmospheric radiations. A mathematical approach is presented for the detection and retrieval of surface rainfall from radiometric observations via supervised learning. In other words, we use a priori known libraries of high-resolution rainfall observations (e.g., obtained by an active radar) and their coincident spectral signatures (i.e., obtained by a radiometer) to design a mathematical model for rainfall retrieval. This model views the rainfall retrieval as a nonlinear inverse problem and relies on sparsity-promoting Bayesian inversion techniques. In this approach, we assume that small neighborhoods of the rainfall fields and their spectral signatures live on manifolds with similar local geometry and encode those neighborhoods in two joint libraries, the so-called rainfall and spectral dictionaries. We model rainfall passive microwave images by sparse linear combinations of the atoms of the spectral dictionary and then use the same representation coefficients to retrieve surface rain rates from the corresponding rainfall dictionary. The proposed methodology is examined by the use of spectral and rainfall dictionaries provided by the microwave imager (TMI) and precipitation radar (PR), aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Pros and cons of the presented approach are studied by extensive comparisons with the current operational rainfall algorithm of the TRMM satellite. Future extensions are also highlighted for potential application in the era of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. Comparing the retrieved rain rates for Hurricane Danielle 08/29/2010 (UTC 09:48:00). (Top panel) PR-2A

  16. Microwave applications and characterization of the microwave properties of high temperature superconducting films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Bautista, J. J.; Riley, A. L.; Dick, G. J.; Housley, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The development by NASA JPL of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) for use in microwave circuit elements is discussed. The synthesis of HTS films and characterization of their microwave absorption are reviewed. Applications to cryogenic low-noise receivers, spacecraft microwave systems, and low-noise oscillators are considered.

  17. Observations of Land Surface Variability Using Passive Microwave Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the global variability of land surface wetness (soil moisture), skin temperature, and related surface fluxes of heat and moisture is key to assessing the importance of the land surface in influencing climate. The feasibility of producing model estimates of these quantities is being studied as part of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP). In the GSWP approach, meteorological observations and analyses are used to drive global circulation models. Satellite measurements can provide independent estimates of key land surface parameters that are needed for initializing and validating the climate models and for monitoring long-term change. Satellite observations of the land surface can also be assimilated into soil models to estimate moisture in the root zone. In our research, passive microwave satellite data recorded during 1978-1987 from the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) are being used to examine spatial and temporal trends in surface soil moisture, vegetation, and temperature. These data include observations at C and X bands (6.6 and 10.7 GHz), which are not available on the current Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and are precursors to data that will become available from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) on Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS-II) and Earth Observing System (EOS) PM1 in the year 2000. A chart shows a time-series of SMMR-derived surface temperature, T-e and surface soil moisture M, retrieved on a 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg grid and further averaged over a 4 deg x 10 deg study region in the African Sahel. Also shown are National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) model outputs of surface temperature, T-sfc, and soil wetness, Soil-w. The variables have been scaled to have similar dynamic ranges on the plots. The NCEP data from the NCEP Reanalysis Project are monthly averages on a 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg grid averaged over

  18. High-Temperature-Superconductor Films In Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Chorey, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses recent developments in continuing research on fabrication and characterization of thin films of high-temperature superconducting material and incorporation of such films into microwave circuits. Research motivated by prospect of exploiting superconductivity to reduce electrical losses and thereby enhancing performance of such critical microwave components as ring resonators, filters, transmission lines, phase shifters, and feed lines in phased-array antennas.

  19. Environmental Influence on Passive Films Formed on Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Szmodis, A W; Anderson, K L; Farmer, J C; Lian, T; Orme, C A

    2002-10-07

    The passive corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is exceptionally low in a wide range of aqueous solutions, temperatures and electrochemical potentials, Alloy 22 contains approximately 22% chromium (Cr) by weight; thus, it forms a Cr-rich passive film in most environments. Very little is known about the composition, thickness and other properties of this passive film. The aim of this research was to determine the general characteristics of the oxide film that forms on Alloy 22, as a function of solution pH, temperature and applied electrochemical potential.

  20. Increased carrier mobility and lifetime in CdSe quantum dot thin films through surface trap passivation and doping.

    PubMed

    Straus, Daniel B; Goodwin, E D; Gaulding, E Ashley; Muramoto, Shin; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2015-11-19

    Passivating surface defects and controlling the carrier concentration and mobility in quantum dot (QD) thin films is prerequisite to designing electronic and optoelectronic devices. We investigate the effect of introducing indium in CdSe QD thin films on the dark mobility and the photogenerated carrier mobility and lifetime using field-effect transistor (FET) and time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements. We evaporate indium films ranging from 1 to 11 nm in thickness on top of approximately 40 nm thick thiocyanate-capped CdSe QD thin films and anneal the QD films at 300 °C to densify and drive diffusion of indium through the films. As the amount of indium increases, the FET and TRMC mobilities and the TRMC lifetime increase. The increase in mobility and lifetime is consistent with increased indium passivating midgap and band-tail trap states and doping the films, shifting the Fermi energy closer to and into the conduction band.

  1. Evolution of the passive film on mechanically damaged nitinol.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Valeska

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of Nitinol-based medical implants is critical to their success in vivo. Contemporary Nitinol-based medical implants are typically chemically passivated or electrochemically polished to form a protective passive film. However, mechanically formed surfaces caused by handling damage, fretting, or fatigue fracture may also be present on a device in vivo. In this study, mechanically polished surfaces are used to simulate mechanically damaged surfaces such that analytical techniques, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, open circuit potential monitoring, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mott-Schottky analysis may be used to monitor the evolution of the passive film on mechanically damaged Nitinol. These mechanically polished Nitinol surfaces are compared with chemically passivated and electrochemically polished Nitinol surfaces and mechanically polished titanium surfaces in phosphate buffered saline solution. The mechanically polished Nitinol exhibits lower impedance at low frequencies, empirically modeled to a thinner film with lower film resistance than chemically passivated and electrochemically polished Nitinol and mechanically polished titanium. Moreover, the passive film on mechanically polished Nitinol continues to develop over time, increasing in its thickness and film resistance. This characterization demonstrates that mechanically formed surfaces may be initially less protective than chemically passivated and electrochemically polished Nitinol surfaces, but continue to become thicker and more resistant to electrochemical reactions with exposure to saline solution.

  2. The Passive Film on Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, C A

    2005-09-09

    This report describes oxide (passive film) formation on Alloy 22 surfaces when aged in air (25-750 C) and in solutions (90-110 C) over times ranging from days to 5 years. Most zero-valent metals (and their alloys) are thermodynamically unstable on the earth's surface and in its upper crust. Most will therefore convert to oxides when exposed to a surficial or underground environment. Despite the presence of thermodynamic driving forces, metals and their alloys may persist over lengthy timescales, even under normal atmospheric oxidizing conditions. One reason for this is that as metal is converted to metal oxide, the oxide forms a film on the surface that limits diffusion of chemical components between the environment and the metal. The formation of surface oxide is integral to understanding corrosion rates and processes for many of the more ''resistant'' metals and alloys. This report describes the correlation between oxide composition and oxide stability for Alloy 22 under a range of relevant repository environments. In the case in which the oxide itself is thermodynamically stable, the growth of the oxide film is a self-limiting process (i.e., as the film thickens, the diffusion across it slows, and the metal oxidizes at an ever-diminishing rate). In the case where the oxide is not thermodynamically stable, it dissolves at the oxide--solution interface as the metal oxidizes at the metal--oxide interface. The system achieves a steady state with a particular oxide thickness when the oxide dissolution and the metal oxidation rates are balanced. Once sufficient metal has transferred to solution, the solution may become saturated with respect to the oxide, which is then thermodynamically stable. The driving force for dissolution at the oxide--solution interface then ceases, and the first case is obtained. In the case of a complex alloy such as Alloy 22 (Haynes International 1997), the development and behavior of the oxide layer is complicated by the fact that different

  3. Active-Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Martian Permafrost and Subsurface Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raizer, V.; Linkin, V. M.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Smythe, W. D.; Zoubkov, B.; Babkin, F.

    2000-01-01

    The investigation of permafrost formation global distribution and their appearance in h less than or equal 1 m thick subsurface layer would be investigated successfully by employment of active-passive microwave remote sensing techniques.

  4. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Active and Passive Microwave Ocean Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    of both analytical and efficient numerical methods for electromagnetics and hydrodynamics. New insights regarding these phenomena can then be applied to improve microwave active and passive remote sensing of the ocean surface.

  5. Global Wetland Monitoring with AMSR-E Passive Microwave Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, R.; McDonald, K.; Podest, E.; Heimann, M.; Zimmermann, R.

    2006-12-01

    Methane is the most potent green house gas in Earth's atmosphere. Recent findings have raised wide concern as to whether living plants have a significant role in producing large amounts of methane. Although such findings may contradict the common understanding of many atmospheric scientists, laboratory studies have demonstrated that it is not clear how accurately natural methane production can be measured. Our study investigates the impact of natural wetlands on variations in methane out-gassing within a global modeling construct. At a first step, we utilize newly available passive microwave measurements from the AMSR-E radiometer to observe Earth's largest wetland regions and to monitor their seasonal behavior. A remote sensing technique is presented that exploits the temporal variability of daily AMSR-E brightness temperature observations to detect changes in water distribution that control inundation patterns for large wetlands in Siberia, North America, and the Amazon Basin susceptible to strong seasonal shifts in surface water retention or precipitation amounts. Initial results demonstrate that our method can be applied directly and without any tuning applied to the input remote sensing signal, though careful evaluation of our product with in-situ information remains to be carried out. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Large scale evaluation of soil moisture retrievals from passive microwave observations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture from the Earth’s surface. Several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and WindSat have been used for this purpose using multi-channel observations. Large sc...

  7. Ceramic dielectric film for microwave filter deposited at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Yoshihiko; Takenouchi, Masatoshi; Akedo, Jun

    2005-02-01

    Integrating and embedding passive components like resistors, capacitors, and inductors into a single system module is an attractive way of achieving downsizing, cost reduction, and higher performance in RF wireless communication products such as cellular phones and personal digital assistants (PDA). The aerosol deposition (AD) method can be used to produce modules with passive components by incorporating different materials with appropriate electrical properties. Our tentative goal is to use the AD method to develop a compact microwave filter that can be incorporated into a single RF module for frequencies of more than 10 GHz with low loss. Since bulk Ba(Zn 1/3Ta 2/3)O 3 has a high Q value at high frequencies, it is a promising candidate for use as a filter dielectric. In this paper, we present the results of our experiments and offer discussions regarding the microstructure, internal stress, and dielectric properties of Ba(Zn 1/3Ta 2/3)O 3 AD films deposited under a range of conditions.

  8. Ba-hexaferrite Films for Next Generation Microwave Devices (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris,V.; Chen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Yoon, S.; Sakai, T.; Geiler, A.; Yang, A.; He, Y.; Ziemer, K.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Next generation magnetic microwave devices require ferrite films to be thick (>300 {mu}m), self-biased (high remanent magnetization), and low loss in the microwave and millimeter wave bands. Here we examine recent advances in the processing of thick Ba-hexaferrite (M-type) films using pulsed laser deposition (PLD), liquid-phase epitaxy, and screen printing. These techniques are compared and contrasted as to their suitability for microwave materials processing and industrial production. Recent advances include the PLD growth of BaM on wide-band-gap semiconductor substrates and the development of thick, self-biased, low-loss BaM films by screen printing.

  9. Potential of bias correction for downscaling passive microwave and soil moisture data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Passive microwave satellites such as SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) or SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) observe brightness temperature (TB) and retrieve soil moisture at a spatial resolution greater than most hydrological processes. Bias correction is proposed as a simple method to disag...

  10. The impact of land surface temperature on soil moisture anomaly detection from passive microwave observations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve soil moisture from the Earth’s surface. Low frequency observations have the most sensitivity to soil moisture, therefore the modern Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) ...

  11. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 3 - From theory to applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of volume scattering and emission theory are discussed, taking into account a weakly scattering medium, the Born approximation, first-order renormalization, the radiative transfer method, and the matrix-doubling method. Other topics explored are related to scatterometers and probing systems, the passive microwave sensing of the atmosphere, the passive microwave sensing of the ocean, the passive microwave sensing of land, the active microwave sensing of land, and radar remote sensing applications. Attention is given to inversion techniques, atmospheric attenuation and emission, a temperature profile retrieval from ground-based observations, mapping rainfall rates, the apparent temperature of the sea, the emission behavior of bare soil surfaces, the emission behavior of vegetation canopies, the emission behavior of snow, wind-vector radar scatterometry, radar measurements of sea ice, and the back-scattering behavior of cultural vegetation canopies.

  12. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 3 - From theory to applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of volume scattering and emission theory are discussed, taking into account a weakly scattering medium, the Born approximation, first-order renormalization, the radiative transfer method, and the matrix-doubling method. Other topics explored are related to scatterometers and probing systems, the passive microwave sensing of the atmosphere, the passive microwave sensing of the ocean, the passive microwave sensing of land, the active microwave sensing of land, and radar remote sensing applications. Attention is given to inversion techniques, atmospheric attenuation and emission, a temperature profile retrieval from ground-based observations, mapping rainfall rates, the apparent temperature of the sea, the emission behavior of bare soil surfaces, the emission behavior of vegetation canopies, the emission behavior of snow, wind-vector radar scatterometry, radar measurements of sea ice, and the back-scattering behavior of cultural vegetation canopies.

  13. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2010-01-01

    Physically-based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite observed brightness temperatures (TB) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are typically non-linear, such that inversions are ill-posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to better understand these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using brightness temperature weighting functions to quantify the percentage of the TB resulting from absorption/emission/reflection from the surface, absorption/emission/scattering by liquid and frozen hydrometeors in the cloud, the emission from atmospheric water vapor, and other contributors. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz and for several individual precipitation profiles as well as for three cloud resolving model simulations of falling snow. As expected, low frequency channels (<89 GHz) respond to liquid hydrometeors and the surface, while the higher frequency channels become increasingly sensitive to ice hydrometeors and the water vapor sounding channels react to water vapor in the atmosphere. Low emissivity surfaces (water and snow-covered land) permit energy downwelling from clouds to be reflected at the surface thereby increasing the percentage of the TB resulting from the hydrometeors. The slant path at a 53deg viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels and show sensitivity to surface polarization effects. The TB percentage information presented in this paper answers questions about the relative contributions to the brightness temperatures and provides a key piece of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  14. Advanced Passive Microwave Radiometer Technology for GPM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Kummerow, Christian; Principe, Caleb; Ruf, Christoper; Wilheit, Thomas; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An interferometer-type passive microwave radiometer based on MMIC receiver technology and a thinned array antenna design is being developed under the Instrument Incubator Program (TIP) on a project entitled the Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer (LRR). The prototype single channel aircraft instrument will be ready for first testing in 2nd quarter 2003, for deployment on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and in a ground configuration manner; this version measures at 10.7 GHz in a crosstrack imaging mode. The design for a two (2) frequency preliminary space flight model at 19 and 35 GHz (also in crosstrack imaging mode) has also been completed, in which the design features would enable it to fly in a bore-sighted configuration with a new dual-frequency space radar (DPR) under development at the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) in Tokyo, Japan. The DPR will be flown as one of two primary instruments on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's core satellite in the 2007 time frame. The dual frequency space flight design of the ERR matches the APR frequencies and will be proposed as an ancillary instrument on the GPM core satellite to advance space-based precipitation measurement by enabling better microphysical characterization and coincident volume data gathering for exercising combined algorithm techniques which make use of both radar backscatter and radiometer attenuation information to constrain rainrate solutions within a physical algorithm context. This talk will discuss the design features, performance capabilities, applications plans, and conical/polarametric imaging possibilities for the LRR, as well as a brief summary of the project status and schedule.

  15. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  16. WFL: Microwave Applications of Thin Ferroelectric Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a family of tunable microwave circuits, operating from X- through Ka-band, based on laser ablated BaxSr1-xTiO films on lanthanum aluminate and magnesium oxide substrates. Circuits include voltage controlled oscillators, filters, phase shifters and antennas. A review of the basic theory of operation of these devices will be presented along with measured performance. Emphasis has been on low-loss phase shifters to enable a new phased array architecture. The critical role of phase shifter loss and transient response in reflectarray antennas will be discussed. The Ferroelectric Reflectarray Critical Components Space Experiment was launched on the penultimate Space Shuttle, STS-134, in May of 2011. It included a bank of ferroelectric phase shifters with two different stoichiometries as well as ancillary electronics. The experiment package and status will be reported. In addition, unusual results of a Van der Pauw measurement involving a ferroelectric film grown on buffered high resisitivity silicon will be discussed.

  17. Why different passive microwave algorithms give different soil moisture retrievals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several algorithms have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture from brightness temperature observations provided by low frequency microwave satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on NASA EOS satellite Aqua (AMSR-E). Most of these algorithms have originated from the...

  18. Land surface dynamics monitoring using microwave passive satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guijarro, Lizbeth Noemi

    Soil moisture, surface temperature and vegetation are variables that play an important role in our environment. There is growing demand for accurate estimation of these geophysical parameters for the research of global climate models (GCMs), weather, hydrological and flooding models, and for the application to agricultural assessment, land cover change, and a wide variety of other uses that meet the needs for the study of our environment. The different studies covered in this dissertation evaluate the capabilities and limitations of microwave passive sensors to monitor land surface dynamics. The first study evaluates the 19 GHz channel of the SSM/I instrument with a radiative transfer model and in situ datasets from the Illinois stations and the Oklahoma Mesonet to retrieve land surface temperature and surface soil moisture. The surface temperatures were retrieved with an average error of 5 K and the soil moisture with an average error of 6%. The results show that the 19 GHz channel can be used to qualitatively predict the spatial and temporal variability of surface soil moisture and surface temperature at regional scales. In the second study, in situ observations were compared with sensor observations to evaluate aspects of low and high spatial resolution at multiple frequencies with data collected from the Southern Great Plains Experiment (SGP99). The results showed that the sensitivity to soil moisture at each frequency is a function of wavelength and amount of vegetation. The results confirmed that L-band is more optimal for soil moisture, but each sensor can provide soil moisture information if the vegetation water content is low. The spatial variability of the emissivities reveals that resolution suffers considerably at higher frequencies. The third study evaluates C- and X-bands of the AMSR-E instrument. In situ datasets from the Soil Moisture Experiments (SMEX03) in South Central Georgia were utilized to validate the AMSR-E soil moisture product and to

  19. Assessing Scale Effects on Snow Water Equivalent Retrievals Using Airborne and Spaceborne Passive Microwave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derksen, C.; Walker, A.; Goodison, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Climate Research Branch (CRB) of the Meteorological Service of Canada (MSC) has a long-standing research program focused on the development of methods to retrieve snow cover information from passive microwave satellite data for Canadian regions. Algorithms that derive snow water equivalent (SWE) have been developed by CRB and are used to operationally generate SWE information over landscape regions including prairie, boreal forest, and taiga. New multi-scale research datasets were acquired in Saskatchewan, Canada during February 2003 to quantify the impact of spatially heterogeneous land cover and snowpack properties on passive microwave SWE retrievals. MSC microwave radiometers (6.9, 19, 37, and 85 GHz) were flown on the National Research Council (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft at two flying heights along a grid of flight lines, covering a 25 by 25 km study area centered on the Old Jack Pine Boreal Ecosystem Research and Monitoring Site (BERMS). Spaceborne Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures were also acquired for this region. SWE was derived for all passive microwave datasets using the CRB land cover sensitive algorithm suite. An intensive, coincident ground sampling program characterized in situ snow depth, density, water equivalent and pack structure using a land cover based sampling scheme to isolate the variability in snow cover parameters within and between forest stands and land cover types, and within a single spaceborne passive microwave grid cell. The passive microwave data sets that are the focus of this investigation cover a range of spatial resolutions from 100-150 m for the airborne data to 10 km (AMSR-E) and 25 km (SSM/I) for the satellite data, providing the opportunity to investigate and compare microwave emission characteristics, SWE retrievals and land cover effects at different spatial scales. Initial analysis shows that the small footprint airborne passive microwave

  20. Snow cover of the Upper Colorado River Basin from satellite passive microwave and visual imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, E.G.; Beauvillain, E.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison of passive microwave images from the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and visual images from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) of the Upper Colorado River Basin shows that passive microwave satellite imagery can be used to determine the extent of the snow cover. Eight cloud-free DMSP images throughout the winter of 1985-1986 show the extent of the snowpack, which, when compared to the corresponding SMMR images, determine the threshold microwave characteristics for snow-covered pixels. With these characteristics, the 27 sequential SMMR images give a unique view of the temporal history of the snow cover extent through the first half of the water year. -from Authors

  1. Hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, L.-P.; Weizman, M.; Simon, P.; Fehr, M.; Nickel, N. H.

    2012-09-01

    The influence of post-hydrogenation on the electrical and optical properties of solid phase crystallized polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) was examined. The passivation of grain-boundary defects was measured as a function of the passivation time. The silicon dangling-bond concentration decreases with increasing passivation time due to the formation of Si-H complexes. In addition, large H-stabilized platelet-like clusters are generated. The influence of H on the electrical properties was investigated using temperature dependent conductivity and Hall-effect measurements. For poly-Si on Corning glass, the dark conductivity decreases upon hydrogenation, while it increases when the samples are fabricated on silicon-nitride covered Borofloat glass. Hall-effect measurements reveal that for poly-Si on Corning glass the hole concentration and the mobility decrease upon post-hydrogenation, while a pronounced increase is observed for poly-Si on silicon-nitride covered Borofloat glass. This indicates the formation of localized states in the band gap, which is supported by sub band-gap absorption measurments. The results are discussed in terms of hydrogen-induced defect passivation and generation mechanisms.

  2. Peformance evaluation of a passive microwave imaging system. [for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallum, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the passive microwave imaging system for possible application in the NASA Earth Resources Program. In addition to test data analysis, the report gives a brief description of the radiometer, its software, and the ground support equipment. The microwave image quality is adequate for remote sensing applications studies. Instrument problems are described, and suggestions are given for possible improvements and potential applications.

  3. A multifrequency evaluation of active and passive microwave sensors for oil spill detection and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenner, R. G.; Reid, S. C.; Solie, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation is given of how active and passive microwave sensors can best be used in oil spill detection and assessment. Radar backscatter curves taken over oil spills are presented and their effect on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are discussed. Plots of microwave radiometric brightness variations over oil spills are presented and discussed. Recommendations as to how to select the best combination of frequency, viewing angle, and sensor type for evaluation of various aspects of oil spills are also discussed.

  4. Graphene radio frequency and microwave passive components for low cost wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianjun; Leng, Ting; Hsin Chang, Kuo; Cing Chen, Jia; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Hu, Zhirun

    2016-06-01

    Graphene RF and microwave passive components such as coplanar waveguide transmission lines, open/short-circuited resonators and wideband antenna on paper substrate were designed, screen printed and characterized in this work. The experimental results demonstrate that the screen printed graphene passive components can be used for RF signal transmitting, processing and radiating/receiving; revealing that graphene ink can be a low cost alternative to much more expensive metal nanoparticle inks, such as silver nanoparticle ink. The screen printed graphene is processed at low temperature so that it is compatible with heat-sensitive flexible materials like papers, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) and textiles. The screen printed graphene passive components reported here are of high conductivity, high flexibility, light weight and low cost, making them ideal candidate for low cost wearable electronics. This work makes it prospective to manufacture RF and microwave passive components in mass production by screen printing in much lower cost to any other known techniques.

  5. Thin-Film Ferroelectric Tunable Microwave Devices Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanKeuls, Frederick W.

    1999-01-01

    Electronically tunable microwave components have become the subject of intense research efforts in recent years. Many new communications systems would greatly benefit from these components. For example, planned low Earth orbiting satellite networks have a need for electronically scanned antennas. Thin ferroelectric films are one of the major technologies competing to fill these applications. When a direct-current (dc) voltage is applied to ferroelectric film, the dielectric constant of the film can be decreased by nearly an order of magnitude, changing the high-frequency wavelength in the microwave device. Recent advances in film growth have demonstrated high-quality ferroelectric thin films. This technology may allow microwave devices that have very low power and are compact, lightweight, simple, robust, planar, voltage tunable, and affordable. The NASA Lewis Research Center has been designing, fabricating, and testing proof-of-concept tunable microwave devices. This work, which is being done in-house with funding from the Lewis Director's Discretionary Fund, is focusing on introducing better microwave designs to utilize these materials. We have demonstrated Ku- and K-band phase shifters, tunable local oscillators, tunable filters, and tunable diplexers. Many of our devices employ SrTiO3 as the ferroelectric. Although it is one of the more tunable and easily grown ferroelectrics, SrTiO3 must be used at cryogenic temperatures, usually below 100 K. At these temperatures, we frequently use high-temperature superconducting thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-8 to carry the microwave signals. However, much of our recent work has concentrated on inserting room-temperature ferroelectric thin films, such as BaxSr1- xTiO3 into these devices. The BaxSr1-xTiO3 films are used in conjuction with normal metal conductors, such as gold.

  6. Ab initio studies of the passive film formed on iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, S.; Walker, B.; Laycock, N.; Ryan, M.

    2003-02-01

    Passive metals are protected from the environment by a thin (3 5 nm) oxide film that forms on their surface. The corrosion rate of these materials is typically of the order of 0.1 μm/year, and depends on the electronic structure of the oxide layer. Here we present ab initio total-energy calculations of the passive oxide film that forms on iron at anodic potentials in weakly alkaline solutions. Surface x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that this nanocrystalline passive film has a spinel structure with a fully occupied oxygen lattice [M. F. Toney, A. J. Davenport, L. J. Oblonsky, M. P. Ryan, and C. M. Vitus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4282 (1997)]. However, the octahedral and tetrahedral iron site occupancies are found to be reduced (approximately 80% and 66%, respectively) and partial occupancy of octahedral interstitial sites is also observed (approximately 12%). We have used total-energy pseudopotential calculations to study the energetics and electronic structure of these defects and the interrelationships between site occupancies. The calculations suggest that film is metastable and may be semi-conducting. The calculations also suggest a correlation between octahedral interstitials and tetrahedral vacancies. Finally, an estimation of energy barriers in the film suggests that cation migration through the tetrahedral sublattice dominates film growth.

  7. The 4-8 GHz Microwave Active and Passive Spectrometer (MAPS). Volume 1: Radar section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    The performance characteristics of the radar section of the prototype 4-8 GHz Microwave Active and Passive Spectrometer system are reported. Active and passive spectral responses were measured of natural, cultivated, and human-made surfaces over the 4-18 GHz region of frequencies for look angles between zero and 70 degrees and for all possible linear polarization combinations. Soil and plant samples were collected to measure their dielectric properties and moisture content. The FORTRAN program for area calculation is provided.

  8. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  9. Bias correction for rainrate retrievals from satellite passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Rainrates retrieved from past and present satellite-borne microwave sensors are affected by a fundamental remote sensing problem. Sensor fields-of-view are typically large enough to encompass substantial rainrate variability, whereas the retrieval algorithms, based on radiative transfer calculations, show a non-linear relationship between rainrate and microwave brightness temperature. Retrieved rainrates are systematically too low. A statistical model of the bias problem shows that bias correction factors depend on the probability distribution of instantaneous rainrate and on the average thickness of the rain layer.

  10. Passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in coastal zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Calvin T.; Blume, Hans-Juergen C.; Kendall, Bruce M.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of measuring coastal-zone salinity from airborne microwave radiometers is developed. The theory, as presented, shows that precision measurements of salinity favor the lower microwave frequencies. To this end, L- and S-Band systems were built, and the flight results have shown that accuracies of at least one part per thousand were achieved.The aircraft results focus on flights conducted over the Chesapeake Bay and the mouth of the Savanna River off the Georgia Coast. This paper presents no new work, but rather summarizes the capabilities of the remote sensing technique.

  11. Multifunctional ferrimagnetic-ferroelectric thin films for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindl, R.; Srikanth, H.; Witanachchi, S.; Mukherjee, P.; Heim, A.; Matthews, G.; Balachandran, S.; Natarajan, S.; Weller, T.

    2007-06-01

    Ferrimagnetic and ferroelectric structures based on barium strontium titanate and barium hexaferrite are investigated for potential applications in tunable microwave devices. Thin film bilayers were grown on MgO and sapphire, and their underlying crystallographic, microstructural, and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. Microcircuits were fabricated using optical lithography, and microwave properties and electrical tunability were measured in the range of 1-50GHz. Overall, the studies demonstrate the possibility of realizing high quality multifunctional microwave materials that combine tunable magnetic and dielectric properties.

  12. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  13. Assimilation of active and passive microwave observations for improved estimates of soil moisture and crop growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An Ensemble Kalman Filter-based data assimilation framework that links a crop growth model with active and passive (AP) microwave models was developed to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation biomass over a growing season of soybean. Complementarities in AP observations were incorpo...

  14. Passive microwave soil moisture downscaling using vegetation index and skin surface temperature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil moisture satellite estimates are available from a variety of passive microwave satellite sensors, but their spatial resolution is frequently too coarse for use by land managers and other decision makers. In this paper, a soil moisture downscaling algorithm based on a regression relationship bet...

  15. Online Vegetation Parameter Estimation in Passive Microwave Regime for Soil Moisture Estimation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Remote sensing observations in the passive microwave regime can be used to estimate surface soil moisture over land at global and regional scales. Soil moisture is important to applications such as weather forecasting, climate and agriculture. One approach to estimating soil moisture from remote sen...

  16. Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at Microwave Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    This report summarizes research activities and results obtained under grant N000l4-99-1-0627 "Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at...Measurements were completed during April 1999 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts.

  17. The Measurement of Oil Spill Volume by a Passive Microwave Imager.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    An airborne passive microwave system has been developed and used in a test program to detect a marine oil spill and to determine its thickness and...approximately 0.6 mm in the thick region which was located on the downwind side of the visible slick. The oil spill volume was determined by integrating the oil thickness over area in the computer.

  18. Soil Moisture Active and Passive Microwave Products: Intercomparison and Evaluation over a Sahelian Site

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper presents a comparison and an evaluation of five soil moisture products based on satellite-based passive and active microwave measurements. Products are evaluated for 2005-2006 against ground measurements obtained from the soil moisture network deployed in Mali (Sahel) in the framework of ...

  19. Active and passive microwave measurements in Hurricane Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, V. E.; Bahn, G. S.; Grantham, W. L.; Harrington, R. F.; Jones, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center analysis of the airborne microwave remote sensing measurements of Hurricane Allen obtained on August 5 and 8, 1980 is summarized. The instruments were the C-band stepped frequency microwave radiometer and the Ku-band airborne microwave scatterometer. They were carried aboard a NOAA aircraft making storm penetrations at an altitude of 3000 m and are sensitive to rain rate, surface wind speed, and surface wind vector. The wind speed is calculated from the increase in antenna brightness temperature above the estimated calm sea value. The rain rate is obtained from the difference between antenna temperature increases measured at two frequencies, and wind vector is determined from the sea surface normalized radar cross section measured at several azimuths. Comparison wind data were provided from the inertial navigation systems aboard both the C-130 aircraft at 3000 m and a second NOAA aircraft (a P-3) operating between 500 and 1500 m. Comparison rain rate data were obtained with a rain radar aboard the P-3. Evaluation of the surface winds obtained with the two microwave instruments was limited to comparisons with each other and with the flight level winds. Two important conclusions are drawn from these comparisons: (1) the radiometer is accurate when predicting flight level wind speeds and rain; and (2) the scatterometer produces well behaved and consistent wind vectors for the rain free periods.

  20. The Passive Film Characteristics of Cold Deformed Pure Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Naseri, Majid; Imantalab, Omid; Gholami, Davood; Haghshenas, Meysam

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the effect of cold deformation on the electrochemical and passive behaviors of pure copper in 0.01 M NaOH solution was investigated. The dislocation density in cold deformation was calculated using a recently developed JAVA-based software, materials analysis using diffraction, based on Rietveld's whole x-ray pattern fitting methodology. At the thickness reduction of 70%, the microhardness measured as 125.30 HV, which is 1.56 times than that in the annealed pure copper (80.25 HV). Potentiodynamic polarization plots and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that increasing the cold deformation offers better conditions for forming the passive films. In the Mott-Schottky analysis, no evidence for n-type behavior was obtained which indicates that the oxygen vacancies and the copper interstitials did not have any significant population density in the passive films. Also, this analysis revealed that with increasing cold deformation, the acceptor density of the passive films decreased.

  1. Linking changes in dynamic cotton canopy to passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Kai-Jen Calvin

    Soil moisture is one of the most important variables in land-atmosphere processes. It determines how precipitation partitions into infiltration, surface runoff, and groundwater recharge. Additionally, soil moisture is important in partitioning the available energy into the latent and sensible heat fluxes at the land surface. The control of soil moisture is the key mechanism for the feedback mechanisms between land and atmospheric fluxes. Accurate estimates of these land surface fluxes are essential for understanding and quantifying the global, regional, and local hydrological cycles. Even though the biophysics of moisture and energy transport is captured in most current Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) models that provide estimates of soil moisture, the computational errors accumulate over time and the model estimates diverge from reality. One promising way to significantly improve model estimates of soil moisture is by assimilating remotely sensed data that are sensitive to soil moisture, for example, microwave brightness temperatures, and updating the model state variables. The microwave brightness at low frequencies is very sensitive to soil moisture in the top few centimeters in most vegetated surfaces. Most of the passive microwave brightness experiments for soil moisture retrieval conducted in agricultural terrains have been short-term experiments that captured only parts of the growing season. Knowledge for the interactions between microwave brightness signatures and changes in soil moisture and temperatures for a dynamic agricultural canopy, such as cotton, is very important during the whole growing season. Microwave brightness (MB) models simulating the terrain emission provide the opportunity to relate microwave signatures to soil moisture information. An integrated SVAT and MB model provides the opportunity to direct assimilate microwave remote sensing observations. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a MB model that can be used to

  2. Surface corrosion enhancement of passive films on NiTi shape memory alloy in different solutions.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The corrosion behaviors of NiTi shape memory alloy in NaCl solution, H2SO4 solution and borate buffer solution were investigated. It was found that TiO2 in passive film improved the corrosion resistance of NiTi shape memory. However, low corrosion resistance of passive film was observed in low pH value acidic solution due to TiO2 dissolution. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of NiTi shape memory alloy decreased with the increasing of passivated potential in the three solutions. The donor density in passive film increased with the increasing of passivated potential. Different solutions affect the semiconductor characteristics of the passive film. The reducing in the corrosion resistance was attributed to the more donor concentrations in passive film and thinner thickness of the passive film. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Passive microwave in situ observations of winter Weddell Sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, J. C.; Grenfell, T. C.; Bell, D. L.; Lange, M. A.; Ackley, S. F.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the microwave radiative characteristics of Antarctic sea ice measured during the 1986 Winter Weddell Sea Project with a set of portable radiometers. Radiometer measurements at 6, 10, 18, 37, and 90 GHz in vertical and horizontal polarizations were supplemented by near-simultaneous measurements of the ice physical characteristics (including ice thickness, salinity, temperature, snow cover, and density) made during two cruises, lasting 3 months each. Measurements were obtained on various types of sea ice over a large portion of the Weddell-Sea ice cover, including four transects across the entire ice pack. Data analysis shows a large variability in the multispectral microwave emissivities of different ice types, especially at 90 GHz, demonstrating a strong potential of the use of the 90-GHz channel, in combination with lower-frequency channels, for detailed characterizations of the ice cover.

  4. A passive microwave algorithm for tropical oceanic rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Barry B.; Olson, William S.; Martin, David W.; Auvine, Brian

    1992-01-01

    This study discusses a rainfall algorithm utilizing six channels of microwave radiance data from the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer. The algorithm is intended for short-term climate studies over the ocean at low latitudes. To find a set of functional relationships, rain rates are regressed on brightness temperatures for each channel. Next, these functions are integrated over a class of rain-rate distributions to find relations between mean brightness temperatures and mean rain rates. This step accounts for beam filling. Finally, weights are obtained for combining the rain rates from the individual channels. The weights vary with the rain rates, so that the optimum combination of channels is always used. Results are stored in a database grid 1 deg latitude x 1 deg longitude by one month. To test the algorithm, three years (1979-81) of data from the Indian Ocean are processed.

  5. Passive microwave in situ observations of winter Weddell Sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, J. C.; Grenfell, T. C.; Bell, D. L.; Lange, M. A.; Ackley, S. F.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the microwave radiative characteristics of Antarctic sea ice measured during the 1986 Winter Weddell Sea Project with a set of portable radiometers. Radiometer measurements at 6, 10, 18, 37, and 90 GHz in vertical and horizontal polarizations were supplemented by near-simultaneous measurements of the ice physical characteristics (including ice thickness, salinity, temperature, snow cover, and density) made during two cruises, lasting 3 months each. Measurements were obtained on various types of sea ice over a large portion of the Weddell-Sea ice cover, including four transects across the entire ice pack. Data analysis shows a large variability in the multispectral microwave emissivities of different ice types, especially at 90 GHz, demonstrating a strong potential of the use of the 90-GHz channel, in combination with lower-frequency channels, for detailed characterizations of the ice cover.

  6. Global Snow Extent Climate Data Records and Trends Derived from Satellite Passive Microwave and Visible Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzik, M. J.; Savoie, M. H.; Armstrong, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    The extent and variability of seasonal snow cover are important parameters in climate and hydrologic systems due to effects on energy and moisture budgets. Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent, comprising about 98 percent of global seasonal snow cover, is the largest single spatial component of the cryosphere, with a mean maximum extent of 47 million square kilometers, nearly 50 percent of the land surface area. During the past four decades much important information on Northern Hemisphere snow extent has been provided by the NOAA weekly snow extent charts derived from visible-wavelength polar-orbiting and geostationary satellite imagery. NSIDC distributes these data as the Northern Hemisphere EASE-Grid Weekly Snow Cover and Sea Ice Extent Version 3. Since 1978, satellite passive microwave sensors have provided an independent source for snow monitoring, with the ability to penetrate clouds, provide data during darkness and the potential to provide an index of snow water equivalent. The historic microwave record spans a thirty year period and data are available from NSIDC as the Global EASE-Grid Monthly Snow Water Equivalent Climatology Product. Both data sets have been updated through spring, 2008. Trend analysis on the passive microwave record is complicated by the short overlap period of SMMR and SSM/I in 1987. To derive a consistent map of passive microwave snow cover, we examined the temporally closest overpasses from each sensor at selected targets and derived regression equations to cross-calibrate the sensors. Passive microwave snow algorithms have also consistently overestimated snow cover on the Tibet Plateau. We attribute the overmeasure to the use of algorithms that have assumed a thick atmosphere. These algorithms overmeasure snow extent when applied to very high elevation surfaces. We have derived an atmospheric correction to compensate for the influence of the reduced atmospheric thickness on snow extent estimates. Using the latest improvements to

  7. Snow Crystal Orientation Effects on the Scattering of Passive Microwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Barton, J. S.; Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.

    1999-01-01

    For this study, consideration is given to the role crystal orientation plays in scattering and absorbing microwave radiation. A discrete dipole scattering model is used to measure the passive microwave radiation, at two polarizations (horizontal and vertical), scattered by snow crystals oriented in random and non random positions, having various sizes (ranging between 1 micrometers to 10,000 micrometers in radius), and shapes (including spheroids, cylinders, hexagons). The model results demonstrate that for the crystal sizes typically found in a snowpack, crystal orientation is insignificant compared to crystal size in terms of scattering microwave energy in the 8,100 gm (37 GHz) region of the spectrum. Therefore, the assumption used in radiative transfer approaches, where snow crystals are modeled as randomly oriented spheres, is adequate to account for the transfer of microwave energy emanating from the ground and passing through a snowpack.

  8. Characterization of non-stoichiometric co-sputtered Ba0.6Sr0.4(Ti (1-x)Fe(x))(1+x)O(3-δ) thin films for tunable passive microwave applications.

    PubMed

    Stemme, F; Geßwein, H; Drahus, M D; Holländer, B; Azucena, C; Binder, J R; Eichel, R-A; Haußelt, J; Bruns, M

    2012-05-01

    The fabrication of novel iron-doped barium strontium titanate thin films by means of radio frequency (RF) magnetron co-sputtering is shown. Investigations of the elemental composition and the dopant distribution in the thin films obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy reveal a homogeneous dopant concentration throughout the thin film. The incorporation of the iron dopant and the temperature-dependent evolution of the crystal structure and morphology are analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In summary, these results emphasize the RF magnetron co-sputter process as a versatile way to fabricate doped thin films.

  9. Passive films on magnesium anodes in primary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the passive films over Mg anodes, which essentially govern the voltage delay of the latter, have been determined nondestructively from an analysis of the transient and steady-state response of the electrode potential to low amplitude galvanostatic polarization under various experimental conditions viz., with different corrosion inhibitor coatings on Mg, after various periods of ageing of anode in solutions containing corrosion inhibitors, at various low temperatures etc. Using these parameters, the kinetics of film build-up or dissolution under these conditions have been monitored. The morphology of the anode film has been verified with scanning electron microscopy. Similar transients at low temperatures point out a steep rise in the film resistivity which is essentially responsible for the severe voltage delay. Finally, possible application of this technique in secondary Li batteries to improve cycling characteristics of the Li anode has been pointed out.

  10. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  11. Chemical composition of passive films on AISI 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lorang, G.; Da Cunha Belo, M. ); Simoes, A.M.P.; Ferreira, M.G.S. . Dept. de Engenharia Quimica)

    1994-12-01

    Chemical characterization of passive films formed on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel, in a borate/boric acid solution at pH 9.2, under various conditions of potential, temperature, and polarizations time, was made by Auger electron spectroscopy combined with ion sputtering, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The depth chemical composition, thickness, and duplex character of the passive layers were determined after processing AES sputter profiles by their quantitative approach based on the sequential layer sputtering model. Moreover, separated contributions of elements in their oxidized and unoxidized state could be disclosed from part to part of the oxide-alloy interface. The XPS study specified the chemical bondings which take placed inside the film, between Fe and oxygen (and water).

  12. Detecting ice lenses and melt-refreeze crusts using satellite passive microwaves (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montpetit, B.; Royer, A.; Roy, A.

    2013-12-01

    With recent winter climate warming in high latitude regions, rain-on-snow and melt-refreeze events are more frequent creating ice lenses or ice crusts at the surface or even within the snowpack through drainage. These ice layers create an impermeable ice barrier that reduces vegetation respiration and modifies snow properties due to the weak thermal diffusivity of ice. Winter mean soil temperatures increase due to latent heat being released during the freezing process. When ice layers freeze at the snow-soil interface, they can also affect the feeding habits of the northern wild life. Ice layers also significantly affect satellite passive microwave signals that are widely used to monitor the spatial and temporal evolution of snow. Here we present a method using satellite passive microwave brightness temperatures (Tb) to detect ice lenses and/or ice crusts within a snowpack. First the Microwave Emission Model for Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) was validated to model Tb at 10.7, 19 and 37 GHz using in situ measurements taken in multiple sub-arctic environments where ice layers where observed. Through validated modeling, the effects of ice layer insertion were studied and an ice layer index was developed using the polarization ratio (PR) at all three frequencies. The developed ice index was then applied to satellite passive microwave signals for reported ice layer events.

  13. Passive Microwave Detection of Snowmelt and Runoff in Connecticut River Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogonko, M. N.; Vuyovich, C.; Jacobs, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Snow cover, snow water equivalent (SWE) and spring snow melt are a significant source of water in many mountainous parts of the world and plays a significant role in climate systems. Because snow cover and SWE plays a vital role in watershed hydrologic ecosystems, it is important to map accurately snow covered areas and to quantify snow characteristics such as SWE and snow depth. This can be achieved by using passive microwave remote sensing that provides alternatives to field snow monitoring in remote locations. This study will use the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) Snow Water Equivalent EASE-Grids V002 data products for the winter periods between 2002 and 2011. AMSR-E snow data will be compared with the available multi-year field observational data to understand the utility of passive microwave data to forecast and capture significant hydrologic states and snow patterns. A temperature index model will be used to simulate snow accumulation and melt in the Connecticut River Watershed and compared with observations within the watershed. Preliminary results shows that AMSR-E passive microwave sensor gives a signal when the snow is on the ground, but consistently underestimates magnitude of SWE for all seasons. This inconsistency can be improved by using multiple observation datasets, accounting for variation in land use types, and using appropriate SWE retrieval algorithms.

  14. An Orbital "Virtual Radar" from TRMM Passive Microwave and Lightning Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.

    2004-01-01

    The retrieval of vertical structure from joint passive microwave and lightning observations is demonstrated. Three years of data from the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) are used as a training dataset for regression and classification neural networks; the TMI (TRMM Microwave Imager) and LIS (Lightning Imaging Sensor) provide the inputs, the PR (Precipitation Radar) provides the training targets. Both vertical reflectivity profile categorization (into 9 convective, 7 stratiform, 2 mixed and 6 anvil types) and geophysical parameters (surface rainfall, vertically integrated liquid (VIL), ice water content (IWC) and echo tops) are retrieved. Retrievals are successful over both land and ocean surfaces. The benefit of using lightning observations as inputs to these retrievals is quantitatively demonstrated; lightning essentially provides an additional convective/stratiform discriminator, and is most important for isolation of midlevel (tops in the mixed phase region) convective profile types (this is because high frequency passive microwave observations already provide good convective/stratiform discrimination for deep convective profiles). This is highly relevant as midlevel convective profiles account for an extremely large fraction of tropical rainfall, and yet are most difficult to discriminate from comparable-depth stratiform profile types using passive microwave observations alone.

  15. Investigation of the effects of summer melt on the calculation of sea ice concentration using active and passive microwave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Burns, Barbara A.; Onstott, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of ice surface melt on microwave signatures and errors in the calculation of sea ice concentration are examined, using active and passive microwave data sets from the Marginal Ice Zone Experiment aircraft flights in the Fram Strait region. Consideration is given to the possibility of using SAR to supplement passive microwave data to unambiguously discriminate between open water areas and ponded floes. Coincident active multichannel microwave radiometer and SAR measurements of individual floes are used to describe the effects of surface melt on sea ice concentration calculations.

  16. Two passive microwave prototype methods for hail detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laviola, Sante; Beauchamp, Jim; Ferraro, Ralph; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    During previous decades, relationships between many geophysical variables and the radiometric measurements in the microwave bands were translated into several satellite-based algorithms. Recently, several studies have revealed a high correlation between the occurrence of hail and the microwave brightness temperature depression in convective clouds. In this work, we propose two independent prototype methods for the detection of hail on the basis of the AMSU-B/MHS brightness temperature variation. The first method was developed through the use of collocated satellite and surface hail reports over the continental US for a 10-year period (2000-2009). Compared with the surface observations, the algorithm detects approximately nearly 40% of hail occurrences. The simple threshold algorithms are then used to generate a hail climatology based on all available AMSU observations during 2000-2011 and stratified in several ways, including total hail occurrence on a daily (diurnal cycle), monthly, and total annual basis. The second hail detection algorithm is an improvement of the preexistent MicroWave Cloud Classification (MWCC) method, which exploits the properties of the water vapor channels on board the AMSU-B/MHS to classify the cloud type (stratiform/convection) by estimating the cloud top altitude. Using the results of the MWCC, deep convections were correlated with selected hailstorm events over Europe, South America and the US. The 10-year AMSU-B/MHS observations used for the first method were also employed to refine the algorithm criteria. The hail detector of the MWCC is based on a probabilistic model, which calculates the probability associated with each pixel by following the growth law of the hailstones. The validation results over the US have demonstrated the high correlation between the two methods and the surface hail reports showing a remarkable agreement in terms of POD and FAR. Reference Ferraro, R., Beauchamp J., Cecil D., Heymsfield G., 2014: A prototype

  17. Global atmospheric temperature anomaly monitoring with passive microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Christy, John R.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of microwave sounding units (MSU) for augmenting the surface-based thermometer record by providing a measurement representing a significant depth of the troposphere is considered. These radiometers measure the thermal emission by molecular oxygen in the atmosphere at different spectral intervals in the oxygen absorption complex near 60 GHz. Brightness temperature variations measured by NOAA-6 and NOAA-7 MSUs during a near-two year period are analyzed and compared with monthly averaged surface air temperature data. It is demonstrated that MSUs, while of limited use for vertical profiling of the atmosphere, provide stable measurements of vertically average atmospheric temperatures, centered at a constant pressure level.

  18. On direct passive microwave remote sensing of sea spray aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.; Frick, G. M.; Dowgiallo, D. J.; Hwang, P. A.; Caffrey, P. F.; Bobak, J. P.

    2014-11-01

    This study addresses and attempts to mitigate persistent uncertainty and scatter among existing approaches for determining the rate of sea spray aerosol production by breaking waves in the open ocean. The new approach proposed here utilizes passive microwave emissions from the ocean surface, which are known to be sensitive to surface roughness and foam. Direct, simultaneous, and collocated measurements of the aerosol production and microwave emissions were collected aboard the FLoating Instrument Platform (FLIP) in deep water ~ 150 km off the coast of California over a period of ~ 4 days. Vertical profiles of coarse-mode aerosol (0.25-23.5 μm) concentrations were measured with a forward-scattering spectrometer and converted to surface flux using dry deposition and vertical gradient methods. Back-trajectory analysis of eastern North Pacific meteorology verified the clean marine origin of the sampled air mass over at least 5 days prior to measurements. Vertical and horizontal polarization surface brightness temperature were measured with a microwave radiometer at 10.7 GHz frequency. Data analysis revealed a strong sensitivity of the brightness temperature polarization difference to the rate of aerosol production. An existing model of microwave emission from the ocean surface was used to determine the empirical relationship and to attribute its underlying physical basis to microwave emissions from surface roughness and foam within active and passive phases of breaking waves. A possibility of and initial steps towards satellite retrievals of the sea spray aerosol production are briefly discussed in concluding remarks.

  19. On direct passive microwave remote sensing of sea spray aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.; Frick, G. M.; Dowgiallo, D. J.; Hwang, P. A.; Caffrey, P. F.; Bobak, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    This study addresses and attempts to mitigate persistent uncertainty and scatter among existing approaches for determining the rate of sea spray aerosol production by breaking waves in the open ocean. The new approach proposed here utilizes passive microwave emissions from the ocean surface, which are known to be sensitive to surface roughness and foam. Direct, simultaneous, and collocated measurements of the aerosol production and microwave emissions were collected on-board FLoating Instrument Platform (FLIP) in deep water ∼150 km off the coast of California over a period of ∼4 days. Vertical profiles of coarse-mode aerosol (0.25-23.5 μm) concentrations were measured with a forward scattering spectrometer and converted to surface flux using dry deposition and vertical gradient methods. Back trajectory analysis of Northeast Pacific meteorology verified the clean marine origin of the sampled air mass over at least 5 days prior to measurements. Vertical and horizontal polarization surface brightness temperatures were measured with a microwave radiometer at 10.7 GHz frequency. Data analysis revealed a strong sensitivity of the brightness temperature polarization difference to the rate of aerosol production. An existing model of microwave emission from the ocean surface was used to determine the empirical relationship and to attribute its underlying physical basis to microwave emissions from surface roughness and foam within active and passive phases of breaking waves. A possibility of and initial steps towards satellite retrievals of the sea spray aerosol production are briefly discussed in concluding remarks.

  20. Mapping surface soil moisture using an aircraft-based passive microwave instrument: algorithm and example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Le Vine, David E.

    1996-10-01

    Microwave remote sensing at L-band (21 cm wavelength) can provide a direct measurement of the surface soil moisture for a range of cover conditions and within reasonable error bounds. Surface soil moisture observations are rare and, therefore, the use of these data in hydrology and other disciplines has not been fully explored or developed. Without satellite-based observing systems, the only way to collect these data in large-scale studies is with an aircraft platform. Recently, aircraft systems such as the push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR) and the electronically scanned thinned array radiometer (ESTAR) have been developed to facilitate such investigations. In addition, field experiments have attempted to collect the passive microwave data as part of an integrated set of hydrologic data. One of the most ambitious of these investigations was the Washita'92 experiment. Preliminary analysis of these data has shown that the microwave observations are indicative of deterministic spatial and temporal variations in the surface soil moisture. Users of these data should be aware of a number of issues related to using aircraft-based systems and practical approaches to applying soil moisture estimation algorithms to large data sets. This paper outlines the process of mapping surface soil moisture from an aircraft-based passive microwave radiometer system for the Washita'92 experiment.

  1. Advances in Assimilation of Satellite-Based Passive Microwave Observations for Soil-Moisture Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Pauwels, Valentijn; Reichle, Rolf H.; Draper, Clara; Koster, Randy; Liu, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Satellite-based microwave measurements have long shown potential to provide global information about soil moisture. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, [1]) mission as well as the future National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP, [2]) mission measure passive microwave emission at L-band frequencies, at a relatively coarse (40 km) spatial resolution. In addition, SMAP will measure active microwave signals at a higher spatial resolution (3 km). These new L-band missions have a greater sensing depth (of -5cm) compared with past and present C- and X-band microwave sensors. ESA currently also disseminates retrievals of SMOS surface soil moisture that are derived from SMOS brightness temperature observations and ancillary data. In this research, we address two major challenges with the assimilation of recent/future satellite-based microwave measurements: (i) assimilation of soil moisture retrievals versus brightness temperatures for surface and root-zone soil moisture estimation and (ii) scale-mismatches between satellite observations, models and in situ validation data.

  2. Microwave study of superconducting Sn films above and below percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Manfred H.; Ebensperger, Nikolaj G.; Thiemann, Markus; Untereiner, Gabriele; Fritz, Vincent; Javaheri, Mojtaba; Nägele, Jonathan; Rösslhuber, Roland; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of superconducting Sn films ({T}{{c}}≈ 3.8 {{K}}) change significantly when reducing the film thickness down to a few {nm}, in particular close to the percolation threshold. The low-energy electrodynamics of such Sn samples can be probed via microwave spectroscopy, e.g. with superconducting stripline resonators. Here we study Sn thin films, deposited via thermal evaporation—ranging in thickness between 38 and 842 {nm}—which encompasses the percolation transition. We use superconducting Pb stripline resonators to probe the microwave response of these Sn films in a frequency range between 4 and 20 {GHz} at temperatures from 7.2 down to 1.5 {{K}}. The measured quality factor of the resonators decreases with rising temperature due to enhanced losses. As a function of the sample thickness we observe three regimes with significantly different properties: samples below percolation, i.e. ensembles of disconnected superconducting islands, exhibit dielectric properties with negligible losses, demonstrating that macroscopic current paths are required for appreciable dynamical conductivity of Sn at GHz frequencies. Thick Sn films, as the other limit, lead to low-loss resonances both above and below T c of Sn, as expected for bulk conductors. But in an intermediate thickness regime, just above percolation and with labyrinth-like morphology of the Sn, we observe a quite different behavior: the superconducting state has a microwave response similar to the thicker, completely covering films with low microwave losses; but the metallic state of these Sn films is so lossy that resonator operation is suppressed completely.

  3. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  4. Synergistic use of active and passive microwave in soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Chauhan, N.; Jackson, T.; Saatchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    Data gathered during the MACHYDRO experiment in central Pennsylvania in July 1990 have been utilized to study the synergistic use of active and passive microwave systems for estimating soil moisture. These data sets were obtained during an eleven-day period with NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) and Push-Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over an instrumented watershed which included agricultural fields with a number of different crop covers. Simultaneous ground truth measurements were also made in order to characterize the state of vegetation and soil moisture under a variety of meteorological conditions. A combination algorithm is presented as applied to a representative corn field in the MACHYDRO watershed.

  5. Estimating sea ice concentration from satellite passive microwave data and a physical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, D. A.; Thomas, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sea ice remote sensing and estimation of concentrations of each of several ice types from passive microwave satellite data is described. The approach is based on the Kalman filter; it incorporates surface temperature, ice advection, and ice deformation data derived from drifting buoys and uses the whole temporal microwave record to make a smoothed estimate of ice concentration. The method allows resolution of previously ambiguous surface types. An example using time histories of two SMMR measurements to resolve the fractional areas of four surface types: open water, first-year, second-year and older multiyear ice is shown.

  6. Passive microwave characteristics of the Bering Sea ice cover during Marginal Ice Zone Experiment (MIZEX) West

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Calhoon, C.

    1984-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements of the Bering Sea were made with the NASA CV-990 airborne laboratory during February. Microwave data were obtained with imaging and dual-polarized, fixed-beam radiometers in a range of frequencies from 10 to 183 GHz. The high resolution imagery at 92 GHz provides a particularly good description of the marginal ice zone delineating regions of open water, ice compactness, and ice-edge structure. Analysis of the fixed-beam data shows that spectral differences increase with a decrease in ice thickness. Polarization at 18 and 37 GHz distinguishes among new, young, and first-year sea ice types.

  7. Antartic sea ice, 1973 - 1976: Satellite passive-microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. J.; Comiso, J. C.; Parkinson, C. L.; Campbell, W. J.; Carsey, F. D.; Gloersen, P.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) on the Nimbus 5 satellite are used to determine the extent and distribution of Antarctic sea ice. The characteristics of the southern ocean, the mathematical formulas used to obtain quantitative sea ice concentrations, the general characteristics of the seasonal sea ice growth/decay cycle and regional differences, and the observed seasonal growth/decay cycle for individual years and interannual variations of the ice cover are discussed. The sea ice data from the ESMR are presented in the form of color-coded maps of the Antarctic and the southern oceans. The maps show brightness temperatures and concentrations of pack ice averaged for each month, 4-year monthly averages, and month-to-month changes. Graphs summarizing the results, such as areas of sea ice as a function of time in the various sectors of the southern ocean are included. The images demonstrate that satellite microwave data provide unique information on large-scale sea ice conditions for determining climatic conditions in polar regions and possible global climatic changes.

  8. Studies of snowpack properties by passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    Research involving the microwave characteristics of snow was undertaken in order to expand the information content currently available from remote sensing, namely the measurement of snowcovered area. Microwave radiation emitted from beneath the snow surface can be sensed and thus permits information on internal snowpack properties to be inferred. The intensity of radiation received is a function of the average temperature and emissivity of the snow layers and is commonly referred to as the brightness temperature (T sub B). The T sub B varies with snow grain and crystal sizes, liquid water content, and snowpack temperature. The T sub B of the 0.8 cm wavelength channel was found to decrease more so with increasing snow depth than the 1.4 cm channel. More scattering of the shorter wavelength radiation occurs thus resulting in a lower T sub B for shorter wavelengths in a dry snowpack. The longer 21.0 cm wavelength was used to assess the condition of the underlying ground.

  9. Studies of snowpack properties by passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Research involving the microwave characteristics of snow was undertaken in order to expand the information content currently available from remote sensing, namely the measurement of snowcovered area. Microwave radiation emitted from beneath the snow surface can be sensed and thus permits information on internal snowpack properties to be inferred. The intensity of radiation received is a function of the average temperature and emissivity of the snow layers and is commonly referred to as the brightness temperature (T sub b). The T sub b varies with snow grain and crystal sizes, liquid water content and snowpack temperature. The T sub b of the 0.8 cm wavelength channel was found to decrease moreso with increasing snow depth than the 1.4 cm channel. More scattering of the shorter wavelength radiation occurs thus resulting in a lower T sub b for shorter wavelengths in a dry snowpack. The longer 21.0 cm wavelength was used to assess the condition of the underlying ground. Ultimately it may be possible to estimate snow volume over large areas using calibrated brightness temperatures and consequently improve snowmelt runoff predictions.

  10. High-spatial-resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Barrett, J. W.; Bonanni, Pierino Gianni; Chiarchiaro, W. J., II; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1991-01-01

    During this period the emphasis was on the following: (1) further design, construction, and testing of the improved 54-GHz portion of the 54-118 GHz microwave temperature sounder (MTS) aircraft radiometer system in preparation for ER-2 observations in July 1991; and (2) final analysis and documentation of procedures for detecting and analyzing thermal waves in our 118-GHz MTS imagery. In addition, we have new unpublished measurements of dry-air attenuation at frequencies of 54 to 66 GHz and over a temperature range of 280K to 326K; these measurements should enable us to improve further our atmospheric transmittance models. It was further noted that the proposed SSMIS conical-scanning microwave spectrometer on the military DMSP Block 5D-3 spacecraft designed to measure stratospheric and mesospheric temperature profiles will be observing the Zeeman-split oxygen lines with sufficient spectral resolution that the changing Doppler shifts with view angle will substantially degrade the potential system performance unless remedied; this was briefly studied and documented.

  11. Diamond film deposition using microwave plasmas under low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave plasma depositions of diamond films have been investigated under low pressures of 10 mTorr to 10 Torr, at low substrate temperatures of 400 to 750 C, using high methane concentrations of 5 to 15 percent and oxygen concentrations of 5 to 10 percent in hydrogen plasmas. The deposition system consists of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and a RF induction-heated sample stage. The deposition system can be operated in either high-pressure microwave or electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) modes by varying the sample stage position. Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies on diamond films deposited at 10 Torr pressure show that CL emissions at 430, 480, 510, 530, 560, 570 and 740 nm can be employed to characterize the quality of diamond films. High-quality, well-faceted diamond films have been deposited at 10 Torr and 600 C using 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas; CL measurements on these films show very low N impurities and no detectable Si impurities. Diamond nucleation on SiC has been demonstrated by depositing well-faceted diamond crystallites on SiC-coated Si substrates.

  12. Diamond film deposition using microwave plasmas under low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave plasma depositions of diamond films have been investigated under low pressures of 10 mTorr to 10 Torr, at low substrate temperatures of 400 to 750 C, using high methane concentrations of 5 to 15 percent and oxygen concentrations of 5 to 10 percent in hydrogen plasmas. The deposition system consists of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and a RF induction-heated sample stage. The deposition system can be operated in either high-pressure microwave or electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) modes by varying the sample stage position. Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies on diamond films deposited at 10 Torr pressure show that CL emissions at 430, 480, 510, 530, 560, 570 and 740 nm can be employed to characterize the quality of diamond films. High-quality, well-faceted diamond films have been deposited at 10 Torr and 600 C using 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas; CL measurements on these films show very low N impurities and no detectable Si impurities. Diamond nucleation on SiC has been demonstrated by depositing well-faceted diamond crystallites on SiC-coated Si substrates.

  13. Deposition of diamond-like films by ECR microwave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor); Pool, Frederick S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Hard amorphous hydrogenated carbon, diamond-like films are deposited using an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma with a separate radio frequency power bias applied to a substrate stage. The electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma yields low deposition pressure and creates ion species otherwise unavailable. A magnetic mirror configuration extracts special ion species from a plasma chamber. Different levels of the radio frequency power bias accelerate the ion species of the ECR plasma impinging on a substrate to form different diamond-like films. During the deposition process, a sample stage is maintained at an ambient temperature of less than 100.degree. C. No external heating is applied to the sample stage. The deposition process enables diamond-like films to be deposited on heat-sensitive substrates.

  14. Passive microwave signature of sea spray aerosol production.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, I.; Frick, G.; Anguelova, M. D.; Dowgiallo, D. J.; Bobak, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    This ongoing study explores the relationship between passive radiometric signature of the ocean surface and the sea spray source function (SSSF). The study primarily relies on open ocean experimental data obtained in April 2012 during a research cruise onboard of RP FLIP. Within ~7 days of useful measurements wind speed U10 varied in ~3 - 18 m/s range with significant wave height reaching up to ~5 m. Three-point vertical profiles (7.3, 6.0, and 4.9 m) of sea spray aerosol size-dependent concentrations were measured for particles in ~0.5 - 47 micron range. Similarly, smaller particles (i.e., ~0.01 - 0.8 micron) were measured at a fixed height of 9 m above the mean water level. A passive radiometer was installed onboard at a 45° incidence angle to observe ocean surface emissivity at frequencies of 10 and 37 GHz. Additional instruments include collocated visible and infrared cameras and a vertical hydrophone array, as well as standard meteorological stations and wave gauges. Acquired data are used to estimate SSSF and to identify its features. These are then linked to the surface emissivity. The long-term goal is to enable more accurate SSSF estimates using WINDSAT retrievals.

  15. Passive microwave applications to snowpack monitoring using satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.

    1979-01-01

    Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanned Microwave Radiometer data were analyzed for the fall of 1975 and winter and summer of 1976 over the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska to determine the applicability of those data to snowpack monitoring. It was found that when the snow depth remained constant at 12.7 cm, the brightness temperatures T sub B varied with air temperature. During April and May the production of ice lenses and layers within the snow, and possibly wet ground beneath the snow contribute to the T sub B variations also. Comparison of March T sub B values of three areas with the same (12.7 cm) snow depth showed that air temperature is the predominant factor controlling the T sub B differences among the three areas, but underlying surface conditions and individual snowpack characteristics are also significant factors.

  16. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Galdi, M. R. Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D. Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L.

    2015-12-17

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  17. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galdi, M. R.; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D.; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  18. Investigation of antenna pattern constraints for passive geosynchronous microwave imaging radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Skofronick, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress by investigators at Georgia Tech in defining the requirements for large space antennas for passive microwave Earth imaging systems is reviewed. In order to determine antenna constraints (e.g., the aperture size, illumination taper, and gain uncertainty limits) necessary for the retrieval of geophysical parameters (e.g., rain rate) with adequate spatial resolution and accuracy, a numerical simulation of the passive microwave observation and retrieval process is being developed. Due to the small spatial scale of precipitation and the nonlinear relationships between precipitation parameters (e.g., rain rate, water density profile) and observed brightness temperatures, the retrieval of precipitation parameters are of primary interest in the simulation studies. Major components of the simulation are described as well as progress and plans for completion. The overall goal of providing quantitative assessments of the accuracy of candidate geosynchronous and low-Earth orbiting imaging systems will continue under a separate grant.

  19. Superstrong coupling of thin film magnetostatic waves with microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xufeng; Tang, Hong X.; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang

    2016-01-14

    We experimentally demonstrated the strong coupling between a microwave cavity and standing magnetostatic magnon modes in a yttrium iron garnet film. Such strong coupling can be observed for various spin wave modes under different magnetic field bias configurations, with a coupling strength inversely proportional to the transverse mode number. A comb-like spectrum can be obtained from these high order modes. The collectively enhanced magnon-microwave photon coupling strength is comparable with the magnon free spectral range and therefore leads to the superstrong coupling regime. Our findings pave the road towards designing a new type of strongly hybridized magnon-photon system.

  20. Digital Processing of Passive Ka-Band Microwave Images for Sea-Ice Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Development Activity »’ NSTL, Mississippi 39529 Foreword Field trials of an airborne passive-microwave imaging system (MICRAD) in April 1976 demonstrated...Ross Williams). Engineering field tests of the KRMS were completed in December 1982. First use of the KRMS in support of an Arctic research...brightness temperature 6 Numerical approach to image classification 11 Field data 13 Histograms 14 Training regions 14 Open water 14 Old ice 15 First

  1. Modeling approaches to assimilating L band passive microwave observations over land surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Chanzy, André; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Olioso, Albert; Kerr, Yann

    2002-07-01

    L band passive microwave remotely sensed data have great potential for providing estimates of soil moisture with high temporal sampling and on a regional scale. Several studies have shown the possibility of assessing the hydrological conditions deep down in soil (in the top 1 or 2 m) from these repetitive estimates of surface soil moisture. Water availability for plants, which is related to soil moisture in the root zone, is a key variable for estimating the evapotranspiration fluxes over land surfaces. This estimation is an important issue for meteorological and hydrological modeling, since it is a basic term of land surface forcing in mesoscale atmospheric circulations. However, at the present time the assimilation approach of remotely sensed brightness temperature data for operational use in the fields of meteorology and hydrology is poorly defined and important issues remain to be addressed in order to develop an operational assimilation approach. Two important issues are to identify (1) how vegetation variables describing vegetation development can be accounted for and (2) how the attenuation effects of L band microwave radiation within the canopy layer can be computed on large spatial scales. On the basis of an exhaustive data set including multiangular and dual-polarization passive microwave measurements acquired over a wheat crop during a 3-month period in 1993, two main modeling approaches are tested in this study. The principle of both approaches was based on the use of dual-polarization and multiangular observations to discriminate between the effects of soil and vegetation on the crop microwave signature. For the two approaches, both the initial soil water reservoir R2 (at the beginning of the crop development) and parameterizations of the crop development could be retrieved simultaneously from the assimilation of the passive microwave measurements. From these results, promising assimilation strategies can be expected from the multiangular Soil Moisture

  2. High-performance passive microwave survey on Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, A.G.; Radzikhovsky, V.N.; Kudeliya, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The quasi-optical generations of image of objects with their internal structure in millimeter (MM) and submillimeter (SMM) bands is one of the prime problems of modern radioelectronics. The main advantage of passive MM imaging systems in comparison with visible and infrared (IR) systems is small attenuation of signals in fog, cloud, smoke, dust and other obscurants. However at a panoramic scanning of space the observation time lengthens and thereby the information processing rate becomes restricted. So that single-channel system cannot image in real time. Therefore we must use many radiometers in parallel to reduce the observation time. Such system must contain receiving sensors as pixels in multibeam antenna. The use of Josephson Junctions (JJ) for this purpose together with the cryoelectronic devices like GaAs FET or SQUIDS for signal amplifications after JJ is of particular interest in this case.

  3. High-performance passive microwave survey on Josephson Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denisov, A. G.; Radzikhovsky, V. N.; Kudeliya, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    The quasi-optical generations of images of objects with their internal structure in millimeter (MM) and submillimeter (SMM) bands is one of prime problems of modern radioelectronics. The main advantage of passive MM imaging systems in comparison with visible and infrared (IR) systems is small attenuation of signals in fog, cloud, smoke, dust and other obscurants. However, at a panoramic scanning of space the observation time lengthens and thereby the information processing rate becomes restricted so that single-channel system cannot image in real time. Therefore we must use many radiometers in parallel to reduce the observation time. Such system must contain receiving sensors as pixels in multibeam antenna. The use of Josephson Junctions (JJ) for this purpose together with the cryoelectronic devices like GaAs FET (field effect transistors) or SQUIDS for signal amplifications after JJ is of particular interest in this case.

  4. Estimation of Snow Parameters Based on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing and Meteorological Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Leung; Hwang, Jenq-Neng

    1996-01-01

    A method to incorporate passive microwave remote sensing measurements within a spatially distributed snow hydrology model to provide estimates of the spatial distribution of Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) as a function of time is implemented. The passive microwave remote sensing measurements are at 25 km resolution. However, in mountain regions the spatial variability of SWE over a 25 km footprint is large due to topographic influences. On the other hand, the snow hydrology model has built-in topographic information and the capability to estimate SWE at a 1 km resolution. In our work, the snow hydrology SWE estimates are updated and corrected using SSM/I passive microwave remote sensing measurements. The method is applied to the Upper Rio Grande River Basin in the mountains of Colorado. The change in prediction of SWE from hydrology modeling with and without updating is compared with measurements from two SNOTEL sites in and near the basin. The results indicate that the method incorporating the remote sensing measurements into the hydrology model is able to more closely estimate the temporal evolution of the measured values of SWE as a function of time.

  5. NSIDC's passive microwave satellite record: The story behind 30 years of data across multiple satellite platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. J.; Brandt, M.; Savoie, M. H.; Stewart, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has been producing and distributing passive microwave snow and ice data sets from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) for over two decades. Aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) platforms, SSM/I and SSMIS have been operating across eight different orbiting DMSP satellites since 1987, providing an invaluable 30 year record for snow and ice climate data studies. Each sensor has performed within or beyond its expected life cycle, ultimately resulting in a transition across platforms to continue the data record. On occasion the satellites have failed unexpectedly, requiring an unplanned need for science and data management to come together and adjust production code and services to get the data back online in a timely fashion. In recent years, this has become a greater importance as climate blogging sites have increased the visibility of near-real-time passive microwave products to communicate the current changes in the Polar Regions. This presentation summarizes the history and most recent activities surrounding satellite transitions, including the scientific assessment and development required in maintaining a streamlined data record across multiple sensors. In addition, we examine challenges in long-term provenance as well as the considerations and decisions made based on value added products utilizing these data, as well as cryospheric research and general public needs.

  6. Microwave sintering of sol-gel composite films using a domestic microwave oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makiko; Matsumoto, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Feasibility study of sol-gel composite microwave sintering using a domestic microwave oven was carried out. Two kinds of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) powders were mixed with PZT sol-gel solution and the mixture was sprayed onto 3-mm-thick titanium substrate. The films were sintered by 700 W domestic oven for 10 min. Ultrasonic measurement was carried out in pulse-echo mode and clear multiple echoes were confirmed. It would be suitable method to fabricate high frequency broadband focused ultrasonic transducers. Further research is required to improve sintering degree.

  7. Freshwater ice thickness observations using passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.

    1981-01-01

    Walden Reservoir, a freshwater lake in north-central Colorado, was overflown six times by a NASA C-130 aircraft between January 1977 and April 1980. The aircraft was equipped with four microwave radiometers operating between 0.81 and 6.0 cm in wavelength (37.0 to 5.0 GHz). The 6.0-cm radiometer data showed a good relationship with ice thickness based on a sample of four ice thickness values. The 1.67- and 1.35-cm radiometer data showed weaker relationships with ice thickness. The 0.81-cm sensor data showed no positive relationship with ice thickness. None of the relationships was statistically significant because of the small sample size. The 6.0-cm sensor data in the nadir-viewing mode was found to have the most potential of all the wavelengths studied, for use in remotely determining ice thickness. The 6.0-cm radiometer probably sensed the entire thickness of the ice on the reservoir (ranging from 25.4 to 67.3 cm in thickness) and was apparently not significantly affected by the snow overlying the ice. The shorter wavelengths are scattered by the snow overlying the ice and are more suitable for snow studies than for ice thickness studies.

  8. Passive microwave remote sensing of forests: A model investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrazzoli, P.; Guerriero, L.

    1996-03-01

    In the recent years, several studies have been carried out to investigate the potential of microwave sensors in forest parameter monitoring. A stimulus has been given by the increasing impact of some environmental problems, like desertification, climatic change, and carbon dioxide concentration. These problems have some connections with forests extension and health; on the other hand, optical systems, which proved their effectiveness in sensing leaf parameters, are not able to sense the woody biomass. A model, based on the radiative transfer theory and the matrix doubling algorithm, is described and used to compute the emissivity e of forests. According to model simulations, the L-band emissivity trend versus forest biomass is more gradual than that of the backscatter coefficient. This gradual behavior is observed, in absence of leaves, also at C and X bands, while leaves anticipate saturation and make e higher in coniferous forests and lower in deciduous forests. Model results are successfully validated by some available experimental data. Operational aspects, concerning the potential of airborne and spaceborne radiometers in identifying forest type and estimating biomass, are discussed.

  9. Improvement of Passive Microwave Rainfall Retrieval Algorithm over Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shige, S.; Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    The microwave radiometer (MWR) algorithms underestimate heavy rainfall associated with shallow orographic rainfall systems owing to weak ice scattering signatures. Underestimation of the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) MWR has been mitigated by an orographic/nonorographic rainfall classification scheme (Shige et al. 2013, 2015; Taniguchi et al. 2013; Yamamoto and Shige 2015). The orographic/nonorographic rainfall classification scheme is developed on the basis of orographically forced upward vertical motion and the convergence of surface moisture flux estimated from ancillary data. Lookup tables derived from orographic precipitation profiles are used to estimate rainfall for an orographic rainfall pixel, whereas those derived from original precipitation profiles are used to estimate rainfall for a nonorographic rainfall pixel. The orographic/nonorographic rainfall classification scheme has been used by the version of GSMaP products, which are available in near real time (about 4 h after observation) via the Internet (http://sharaku.eorc.jaxa.jp/GSMaP/index.htm). The current version of GSMaP MWR algorithm with the orographic/nonorographic rainfall classification scheme improves rainfall estimation over the entire tropical region, but there is still room for improvement. In this talk, further improvement of orographic rainfall retrievals will be shown.

  10. Freshwater ice thickness observations using passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.

    1981-01-01

    Walden Reservoir, a freshwater lake in north-central Colorado, was overflown six times by a NASA C-130 aircraft between January 1977 and April 1980. The aircraft was equipped with four microwave radiometers operating between 0.81 and 6.0 cm in wavelength (37.0 to 5.0 GHz). The 6.0-cm radiometer data showed a good relationship with ice thickness based on a sample of four ice thickness values. The 1.67- and 1.35-cm radiometer data showed weaker relationships with ice thickness. The 0.81-cm sensor data showed no positive relationship with ice thickness. None of the relationships was statistically significant because of the small sample size. The 6.0-cm sensor data in the nadir-viewing mode was found to have the most potential of all the wavelengths studied, for use in remotely determining ice thickness. The 6.0-cm radiometer probably sensed the entire thickness of the ice on the reservoir (ranging from 25.4 to 67.3 cm in thickness) and was apparently not significantly affected by the snow overlying the ice. The shorter wavelengths are scattered by the snow overlying the ice and are more suitable for snow studies than for ice thickness studies.

  11. Microwave permeability of composites filled with thin Fe films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakubov, Igor T.; Lagarkov, Andrey N.; Maklakov, Sergey A.; Osipov, Alexey V.; Rozanov, Konstantin N.; Ryzhikov, Ilya A.; Starostenko, Sergey N.

    2006-05-01

    The microwave permeability of regular composites filled with thin ferromagnetic discs with in-plane anisotropy is studied. The samples are made of patterned, multi-layered Fe films stacked together to comprise a bulk composite. The permeability is measured in the frequency range of 0.1-10 GHz, and is discussed in terms of constraints to the microwave performance of such composites. The technology suggested allows a composite sample to be produced with the permeability of 2.8, and low magnetic loss at frequencies below 1 GHz, the volume fraction of Fe is as low as 0.77%. Such composites can be useful in the design of microwave inductors, miniaturized wideband antennas, etc.

  12. Passive/Active Microwave Soil Moisture Disaggregation Using SMAPVEX12 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.; Colliander, A.

    2015-12-01

    The SMAPVEX12 experiment was conducted during June-July 2012 in Manitoba, Canada with the goal of collecting remote sensing data and ground measurements for the development and testing of soil moisture retrieval algorithms under different vegetation and soil conditions for the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite launched in January 2015. The aircraft based soil moisture data provided by the passive/active microwave sensor PALS (Passive and Active L and S band System) has a nominal spatial resolution of 1500 m. In this study, a change detection algorithm is used for disaggregation of coarse passive microwave soil moisture retrievals with radar backscatter coefficients obtained with the higher spatial resolution UAVSAR (Unmanned Air Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar). The accuracy of the disaggregated change in soil moisture was evaluated using ground based soil moisture measurements. Results show that the disaggregation products are well correlated to in situ measurements. Based on the R2, the highest resolution disaggregated product at 5 m exhibits soil moisture heterogeneity that reflects the distribution of the crops. The difference of spatial standard deviation between the disaggregated and in situ soil moisture ranges from <0.001-0.131 m3/m3 also proves the spatial capability of the change detection algorithm at 5 m scale.

  13. High-spatial-resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    The principal contributions of this combined theoretical and experimental effort were to advance and demonstrate new and more accurate techniques for sounding atmospheric temperature, humidity, and precipitation profiles at millimeter wavelengths, and to improve the scientific basis for such soundings. Some of these techniques are being incorporated in both research and operational systems. Specific results include: (1) development of the MIT Microwave Temperature Sounder (MTS), a 118-GHz eight-channel imaging spectrometer plus a switched-frequency spectrometer near 53 GHz, for use on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft, (2) conduct of ER-2 MTS missions in multiple seasons and locations in combination with other instruments, mapping with unprecedented approximately 2-km lateral resolution atmospheric temperature and precipitation profiles, atmospheric transmittances (at both zenith and nadir), frontal systems, and hurricanes, (3) ground based 118-GHz 3-D spectral images of wavelike structure within clouds passing overhead, (4) development and analysis of approaches to ground- and space-based 5-mm wavelength sounding of the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, which supported the planning of improvements to operational weather satellites, (5) development of improved multidimensional and adaptive retrieval methods for atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles, (6) development of combined nonlinear and statistical retrieval techniques for 183-GHz humidity profile retrievals, (7) development of nonlinear statistical retrieval techniques for precipitation cell-top altitudes, and (8) numerical analyses of the impact of remote sensing data on the accuracy of numerical weather predictions; a 68-km gridded model was used to study the spectral properties of error growth.

  14. Reprocessing the Historical Satellite Passive Microwave Record at Enhanced Spatial Resolutions using Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardman, M.; Brodzik, M. J.; Long, D. G.; Paget, A. C.; Armstrong, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Beginning in 1978, the satellite passive microwave data record has been a mainstay of remote sensing of the cryosphere, providing twice-daily, near-global spatial coverage for monitoring changes in hydrologic and cryospheric parameters that include precipitation, soil moisture, surface water, vegetation, snow water equivalent, sea ice concentration and sea ice motion. Currently available global gridded passive microwave data sets serve a diverse community of hundreds of data users, but do not meet many requirements of modern Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) or Climate Data Records (CDRs), most notably in the areas of intersensor calibration, quality-control, provenance and consistent processing methods. The original gridding techniques were relatively primitive and were produced on 25 km grids using the original EASE-Grid definition that is not easily accommodated in modern software packages. Further, since the first Level 3 data sets were produced, the Level 2 passive microwave data on which they were based have been reprocessed as Fundamental CDRs (FCDRs) with improved calibration and documentation. We are funded by NASA MEaSUREs to reprocess the historical gridded data sets as EASE-Grid 2.0 ESDRs, using the most mature available Level 2 satellite passive microwave (SMMR, SSM/I-SSMIS, AMSR-E) records from 1978 to the present. We have produced prototype data from SSM/I and AMSR-E for the year 2003, for review and feedback from our Early Adopter user community. The prototype data set includes conventional, low-resolution ("drop-in-the-bucket" 25 km) grids and enhanced-resolution grids derived from the two candidate image reconstruction techniques we are evaluating: 1) Backus-Gilbert (BG) interpolation and 2) a radiometer version of Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (SIR). We summarize our temporal subsetting technique, algorithm tuning parameters and computational costs, and include sample SSM/I images at enhanced resolutions of up to 3 km. We are actively

  15. Passive Films Formed on Stainless Steels in Phosphate Buffer Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Claudia Marcela; Burgos, Rodrigo Elvio; Bruera, Florencia; Ares, Alicia Esther

    The behaviour of passive films formed on directionally solidified stainless steels, 18Cr10N2Mo0.08C, 18Cr14N8Mo0.03C and 18Cr10Ni8Mo0.08C, in different areas that were formed during solidification (columnar, columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) and equiaxed) was studied using electrochemical testing in Na2HPO4 with / without NaCl. The behavior of stainless steel in the presence of phosphate chlorides is the best compared to non-chloride phosphate.

  16. Microwave excitation of spin wave beams in thin ferromagnetic films

    PubMed Central

    Gruszecki, P.; Kasprzak, M.; Serebryannikov, A. E.; Krawczyk, M.; Śmigaj, W.

    2016-01-01

    An inherent element of research and applications in photonics is a beam of light. In magnonics, which is the magnetic counterpart of photonics, where spin waves are used instead of electromagnetic waves to transmit and process information, the lack of a beam source limits exploration. Here, we present an approach enabling generation of narrow spin wave beams in thin homogeneous nanosized ferromagnetic films by microwave current. We show that the desired beam-type behavior can be achieved with the aid of a properly designed coplanar waveguide transducer generating a nonuniform microwave magnetic field. We test this idea using micromagnetic simulations, confirming numerically that the resulting spin wave beams propagate over distances of several micrometers. The proposed approach requires neither inhomogeneity of the ferromagnetic film nor nonuniformity of the biasing magnetic field. It can be generalized to different magnetization configurations and yield multiple spin wave beams of different width at the same frequency. PMID:26971711

  17. Evaluation of Soil Moisture Derived from Passive Microwave Remote Sensing Over Agricultural Sites in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, C.; McNairn, H.; Berg, A.

    2008-12-01

    Spatial information on soil moisture conditions is a critical agri-environmental variable and can be used alone as a decision support tool for a number of land management decisions, including soil trafficability, seeding options and pesticide applications. Large-area estimations of soil moisture derived from passive microwave sensors are available over Canada from AMSR-E and SSM/I sensors, and in some instances are being used as decision-support tools (AAFC, 2008). These coarse spatial estimates can be used to assess overall conditions on a daily or weekly basis, and potentially be used as a monitoring tool to trigger assessment using higher spatial resolution active microwave sensors. Retrieval algorithms to derive soil moisture from passive microwave brightness temperature produce variable results depending on input frequency and the reliance on ancillary data to estimate vegetation water content and land surface temperature. There is a need to characterize regional errors in these data sets to contextualize their operational use and facilitate integration of these data sets into land surface models. Several soil moisture information products derived from passive microwave remote sensing were evaluated for their potential use in assessing moisture conditions over agricultural regions in Canada. Soil wetness maps derived from SSM/I (Basist et al., 2001), AMSR-E NASA soil moisture products (Njoku, 2008) and two AMSR-E soil moisture products derived using C and X band frequencies using an alternative retrieval algorithm (Owe et al., 2008) were evaluated over agricultural regions in Canada. Evaluations were based on in-situ measurements from sites in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario for spring and fall periods in 2007 and 2008. Differences in the satellite climatology relative to surface soil moisture observations in Canada will be discussed.

  18. Microwave assisted antibacterial chitosan-silver nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Gownolla Malegowd; Jung, Jeyoung; Kim, Dowan; Seo, Jongchul

    2016-03-01

    In the current approach, antibacterial chitosan-silver nanocomposite films were fabricated through microwave irradiation. During the process, by utilizing chitosan as reducing agent, silver nanoparticles were synthesized within 11 min by microwave irradiation. Further, films were fabricated within 90 min. It involved an energy consumption of just 0.146 kWh to synthesize silver nanoparticles. This is many times less than the energy consumed during conventional methods. The silver nanoparticles were examined through UV-vis spectrum and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fabricated films were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and contact angle (CA) measurements. The films exhibited antibacterial properties against both Gram-negative micro-organisms (Escherichia coli; E. coli) and Gram-positive micro-organisms (Staphylococcus aureus; S. aureus). In overall, the procedure adopted for fabricating these antibacterial films is environmental friendly, time-saving and energy-saving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced absorption of microwaves within cylindrical holes in Teflon film.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Stanislav I; Fesenko, Evgeny E; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2010-10-01

    Earlier publications demonstrated that 0.9 GHz microwave exposure induced notable changes of the conductivity of modified bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) formed in holes in thin Teflon film (TF). The aims of this study were: 1) to perform detailed calculations of the microwave field distributions in holes formed in TF, using the finite-difference time-domain technique and 2) to model microwave heating of the hole under the conditions used in the BLM experiments but in the absence of BLM in the hole. We found that with the E-field oriented perpendicular to the TF plane the local-specific absorption rate in holes increased significantly. The increase became larger with increasing electrolyte concentration and with decreasing diameter of the hole and frequency. The calculated temperature elevations in the hole were in good agreement with those determined experimentally. These findings allowed us to conclude that the microwave effects on BLM conductivity reported previously resulted mostly from the enhanced absorption of microwave energy by the membrane-forming holes and subsequent local temperature elevation in the holes.

  20. Sea ice effective microwave emissivities from satellite passive microwave and infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Near-simultaneous images from the temperature-humidity IR radiometer and dual-polarization scanning multichannel microwave radiometer of the Nimbus 7 satellite are used to investigate microwave sea ice emissivities on a global scale. Emissivities in several Arctic region study areas are found to be approximately constant during a nine-month pereiod covering the fall, winter and spring months, in the cases of both first-year and multiyear ice. During the onset of summer, emissivity increases of about 30 percent are observed at 37 GHz in multiyear ice. A multichannel cluster analysis over very large study areas during winter indicates considerable variability in emissivities of consolidated ice clusters at 37 GHz, and only 1/3 as much variability at 18 GHz. If the variability within each cluster is quantified and taken into account by means of multispectral analysis, data on ice thickness and surface characteristics may also be obtained.

  1. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) in the root zone is a key factor governing water and energy fluxes at the land surface and its accurate knowledge is critical to predictions of weather and near-term climate, nutrient cycles, crop-yield, and ecosystem productivity. Microwave observations, such as those at L-band, are highly sensitive to soil moisture in the upper few centimeters (near-surface). The two satellite-based missions dedicated to soil moisture estimation include, the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) [4] mission. The SMAP mission will include active and passive sensors at L-band to provide global observations of SM, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. These observations can significantly improve root zone soil moisture estimates through data assimilation into land surface models (LSMs). Both the active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave sensors measure radiation quantities that are functions of soil dielectric constant and exhibit similar sensitivities to SM. In addition to the SM sensitivity, radar backscatter is highly sensitive to roughness of soil surface and scattering within the vegetation. These effects may produce a much larger dynamic range in backscatter than that produced due to SM changes alone. In this study, we discuss the field observations of active and passive signatures of growing corn at L-band from several seasons during the tenth Microwave, Water and Energy Balance Experiment (MicroWEX-10) conducted in North Central Florida, and to understand the sensitivity of these signatures to soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions. The MicroWEXs are a series of season-long field experiments conducted during the growing seasons of sweet corn, cotton, and energy cane over the past six years (for example, [22]). The corn was planted on July 5 and harvested on September 23, 2011 during MicroWEX-10. The size of the field was 0.04 km2 and the soils

  2. Comparison of active and passive microwave signatures of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Crawford, J. P.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Holt, B.; Carsey, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    In March 1988, overlapping active and passive microwave instrument data were acquired over Arctic sea ice using the NASA DC-8 aircraft equipped with multifrequency, variable polarization SAR and radiometer. Flights were conducted as a series of coordinated underflights of the DMSP SSM/I satellite radiometer in order to validate ice products derived from the SSM/I radiances. Subsequent flights by an NRL P-3 aircraft enabled overlapping high-resolution, single frequency image data to be acquired over the same regions using a Ka-band scanning microwave radiometer. In this paper, techniques are discussed for the accurate coregistration of the three aircraft datasets. Precise coregistration to an accuracy of 100 m plus or minus 25 m has, for the first time, enabled the detailed comparison of temporally and spatially coincident active and passive airborne microwave datasets. Preliminary results from the intercomparisons indicate that the SAR has highly frequency- and polarization-dependent signatures, which at 5.3 GHz (C-band) show an extremely high correlation with the 37 GHz radiometric temperatures.

  3. On the determination of atmospheric path length by passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave radiometer techniques were evaluated for use in atmospheric path length correction of Pacific Plate Motion Experiment interferometer measurements. It is shown that passive microwave radiometry allows precise measurement of the brightness temperature of the sky. It is also noted that the technological requirements of radiometers are very different from the requirements of radio astronomy. The technology was used in the construction of radiometers which are sufficient for use in the path length correction problem. A simulation study shows that, when combined with surface meteorology data, passive microwave radiometer data would allow a determination of the path length correction to better than 2 cm at the zenith. By a careful choice of frequencies, a dual frequency system would allow a measurement of the path length correction to better than 4 cm at zenith angles as great as 60 deg. Because of the wide range of weather conditions to be expected for the PPME sites (which include Alaska, Hawaii and Massachusetts), it will probably be necessary to use a separate correction algorithm for each site.

  4. A Comparison of Satellite-Based Radar and Passive Microwave Estimates of Global Wilson Current Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M. J.; Deierling, W.; Liu, C.; Mach, D. M.; Kalb, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    A passive microwave algorithm for estimating the electrical footprint of charged clouds has been developed and applied to satellite observations taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), which has a domain spanning the entire tropics up to 36 degrees latitude, and compared with lightning-based estimates of global electricity and the Carnegie curve. While these results show considerable agreement with historical observations for convective storms, this method has difficulty characterizing electricity in stratiform clouds and storms at different stages of the convective lifecycle. The algorithm also does not take advantage of the full suite of observations available in the 16-year TRMM dataset, which also includes Precipitation Radar (PR) observations of the structure of storms overflown by the satellite. As a first step towards building an algorithm that can characterize electrical input to the Global Electric Circuit (GEC) from a wide variety of storms across the globe, this study compares passive microwave-based approximations of global electricity with precipitation radar-based approximations in order to determine the relative skill each platform has in describing the "battery" of the GEC and to identify a possible pathway towards a combined metric that can use the strengths of both instruments to better describe electrified clouds.

  5. Thin Sea-Ice Thickness as Inferred from Passive Microwave and In Situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naoki, Kazuhiro; Ukita, Jinro; Nishio, Fumihiko; Nakayama, Masashige; Comiso, Josefino C.; Gasiewski, Al

    2007-01-01

    Since microwave radiometric signals from sea-ice strongly reflect physical conditions of a layer near the ice surface, a relationship of brightness temperature with thickness is possible especially during the early stages of ice growth. Sea ice is most saline during formation stage and as the salinity decreases with time while at the same time the thickness of the sea ice increases, a corresponding change in the dielectric properties and hence the brightness temperature may occur. This study examines the extent to which the relationships of thickness with brightness temperature (and with emissivity) hold for thin sea-ice, approximately less than 0.2 -0.3 m, using near concurrent measurements of sea-ice thickness in the Sea of Okhotsk from a ship and passive microwave brightness temperature data from an over-flying aircraft. The results show that the brightness temperature and emissivity increase with ice thickness for the frequency range of 10-37 GHz. The relationship is more pronounced at lower frequencies and at the horizontal polarization. We also established an empirical relationship between ice thickness and salinity in the layer near the ice surface from a field experiment, which qualitatively support the idea that changes in the near-surface brine characteristics contribute to the observed thickness-brightness temperature/emissivity relationship. Our results suggest that for thin ice, passive microwave radiometric signals contain, ice thickness information which can be utilized in polar process studies.

  6. Passive microwave (SSM/I) satellite predictions of valley glacier hydrology, Matanuska Glacier, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopczynski, S.E.; Ramage, J.; Lawson, D.; Goetz, S.; Evenson, E.; Denner, J.; Larson, G.

    2008-01-01

    We advance an approach to use satellite passive microwave observations to track valley glacier snowmelt and predict timing of spring snowmelt-induced floods at the terminus. Using 37 V GHz brightness temperatures (Tb) from the Special Sensor Microwave hnager (SSM/I), we monitor snowmelt onset when both Tb and the difference between the ascending and descending overpasses exceed fixed thresholds established for Matanuska Glacier. Melt is confirmed by ground-measured air temperature and snow-wetness, while glacier hydrologic responses are monitored by a stream gauge, suspended-sediment sensors and terminus ice velocity measurements. Accumulation area snowmelt timing is correlated (R2 = 0.61) to timing of the annual snowmelt flood peak and can be predicted within ??5 days. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. ASPECTS OF ARCTIC SEA ICE OBSERVABLE BY SEQUENTIAL PASSIVE MICROWAVE OBSERVATIONS FROM THE NIMBUS-5 SATELLITE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, William J.; Gloersen, Per; Zwally, H. Jay; ,

    1984-01-01

    Observations made from 1972 to 1976 with the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer on board the Nimbus-5 satellite provide sequential synoptic information of the Arctic sea ice cover. This four-year data set was used to construct a fairly continuous series of three-day average 19-GHz passive microwave images which has become a valuable source of polar information, yielding many anticipated and unanticipated discoveries of the sea ice canopy observed in its entirety through the clouds and during the polar night. Short-term, seasonal, and annual variations of key sea ice parameters, such as ice edge position, ice types, mixtures of ice types, ice concentrations, and snow melt on the ice, are presented for various parts of the Arctic.

  8. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas.

  9. Estimation of ice thickness on large lakes from passive microwave and radar altimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, Claude; Kang, Kyung-Kuk; Kouraev, Alexei; Mercier, Franck

    2010-05-01

    Lake ice grows steadily between the end of freeze-up period and the onset of break-up period as a result of the thermodynamics of freezing water as well as dynamic ice motion on the surface. In thermodynamic thickening, the conductive heat flow controls the ice growth rate and the ice thickness, and the ice thickens downward as a result of heat loss at the top of the ice cover. There has been some demonstration of the potential of brightness temperature from passive microwave airborne radiometers to estimate ice thickness. The value of passive microwave and radar altimeter data from current satellite missions merits to be examined in this respect. The major objective of this study was estimate ice thickness from brightness temperature (TB) at 10.65 and 18.70 GHz from AMSR-E channels and the 19.35 GHz frequency channel from SSM/I on large lakes of the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. Great Bear Lake, Great Slave Lake, Lake Baikal). The evolution of horizontally and vertically polarized TB derived from AMSR-E level 2A raw brightness temperature and EASE Grid Level-3 SSM/I products was compared with ice thicknesses obtained with a previously validated thermodynamic lake ice model and in situ observations over the course of seven winter seasons (2002 and 2009), as well as with recent estimates from the Jason-2 Ku-band radar altimeter data (since 2008). Results show that both passive microwave and radar altimeter data acquired in the 10-19 GHz frequency range offer a promising means for estimating ice thickness from large northern lakes.

  10. An Evaluation of Antarctica as a Calibration Target for Passive Microwave Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing at L-band (1.4 GHz) is sensitive to soil moisture and sea surface salinity, both important climate variables. Science studies involving these variables can now take advantage of new satellite L-band observations. The first mission with regular global passive microwave observations at L-band is the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), launched November, 2009. A second mission, NASA's Aquarius, was launched June, 201l. A third mission, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is scheduled to launch in 2014. Together, these three missions may provide a decade-long data record -- provided that they are intercalibrated. The intercalibration is best performed at the radiance (brightness temperature) level, and Antarctica is proving to be a key calibration target. However, Antarctica has thus far not been fully characterized as a potential target. This paper will present evaluations of Antarctica as a microwave calibration target for the above satellite missions. Preliminary analyses have identified likely target areas, such as the vicinity of Dome-C and larger areas within East Antarctica. Physical sources of temporal and spatial variability of polar firn are key to assessing calibration uncertainty. These sources include spatial variability of accumulation rate, compaction, surface characteristics (dunes, micro-topography), wind patterns, and vertical profiles of density and temperature. Using primarily SMOS data, variability is being empirically characterized and attempts are being made to attribute observed variability to physical sources. One expected outcome of these studies is the potential discovery of techniques for remotely sensing--over all of Antarctica--parameters such as surface temperature.

  11. PolarCube: A High Resolution Passive Microwave Satellite for Sounding and Imaging at 118 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, R. L.; Gallaher, D. W.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Sanders, B.; Periasamy, L.; Hwang, K.; Alvarenga, G.; Hickey, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    PolarCube is a 3U CubeSat hosting an eight-channel passive microwave spectrometer operating at the 118.7503 GHz oxygen resonance that is currently in development. The project has an anticipated launch date in early 2015. It is currently being designed to operate for approximately12 months on orbit to provide the first global 118-GHz spectral imagery of the Earth over full seasonal cycle and to sound Arctic vertical temperature structure. The principles used by PolarCube for temperature sounding are well established in number of peer-reviewed papers going back more than two decades, although the potential for sounding from a CubeSat has never before been demonstrated in space. The PolarCube channels are selected to probe atmospheric emission over a range of vertical levels from the surface to lower stratosphere. This capability has been available operationally for over three decades, but at lower frequencies and higher altitudes that do not provide the spatial resolution that will be achieved by PolarCube. While the NASA JPSS ATMS satellite sensor provides global coverage at ~32 km resolution, the PolarCube will improve on this resolution by a factor of two, thus facilitating the primary science goal of determining sea ice concentration and extent while at the same time collecting profile data on atmospheric temperature. Additionally, we seek to correlate freeze-thaw line data from SMAP with our near simultaneously collected atmospheric temperature data. In addition to polar science, PolarCube will provide a first demonstration of a very low cost passive microwave sounder that if operated in a fleet configuration would have the potential to fulfill the goals of the Precipitation Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity (PATH) mission, as defined in the NRC Decadal Survey. PolarCube 118-GHz passive microwave spectrometer in deployed configuration

  12. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 1; Method and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Petty, Grant W.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Bell, Thomas L.; Braun, Scott A.; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Johnson, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    A revised Bayesian algorithm for estimating surface rain rate, convective rain proportion, and latent heating/drying profiles from satellite-borne passive microwave radiometer observations over ocean backgrounds is described. The algorithm searches a large database of cloud-radiative model simulations to find cloud profiles that are radiatively consistent with a given set of microwave radiance measurements. The properties of these radiatively consistent profiles are then composited to obtain best estimates of the observed properties. The revised algorithm is supported by an expanded and more physically consistent database of cloud-radiative model simulations. The algorithm also features a better quantification of the convective and non-convective contributions to total rainfall, a new geographic database, and an improved representation of background radiances in rain-free regions. Bias and random error estimates are derived from applications of the algorithm to synthetic radiance data, based upon a subset of cloud resolving model simulations, and from the Bayesian formulation itself. Synthetic rain rate and latent heating estimates exhibit a trend of high (low) bias for low (high) retrieved values. The Bayesian estimates of random error are propagated to represent errors at coarser time and space resolutions, based upon applications of the algorithm to TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. Errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates at 0.5 deg resolution range from approximately 50% at 1 mm/h to 20% at 14 mm/h. These errors represent about 70-90% of the mean random deviation between collocated passive microwave and spaceborne radar rain rate estimates. The cumulative algorithm error in TMI estimates at monthly, 2.5 deg resolution is relatively small (less than 6% at 5 mm/day) compared to the random error due to infrequent satellite temporal sampling (8-35% at the same rain rate).

  13. A passive microwave snow depth algorithm with a proxy for snow metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, E.G.; Mognard, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    Passive microwave brightness temperatures of snowpacks depend not only on the snow depth, but also on the internal snowpack properties, particularly the grain size, which changes through the winter. Algorithms that assume a constant grain size can yield erroneous estimates of snow depth or water equivalent. For snowpacks that are subject to temperatures well below freezing, the bulk temperature gradient through the snowpack controls the metamorphosis of the snow grains. This study used National Weather Service (NWS) station measurements of snow depth and air temperature from the Northern US Great Plains to determine temporal and spatial variability of the snow depth and bulk snowpack temperature gradient. This region is well suited for this study because it consists primarily of open farmland or prairie, has little relief, is subject to very cold temperatures, and has more than 280 reporting stations. A geostatistical technique called Kriging was used to grid the randomly spaced snow depth measurements. The resulting snow depth maps were then compared with the passive microwave observations from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). Two snow seasons were examined: 1988-89, a typical snow year, and 1996-97, a record year for snow that was responsible for extensive flooding in the Red River Basin. Inspection of the time series of snow depth and microwave spectral gradient (the difference between the 19 and 37 GHz bands) showed that while the snowpack was constant, the spectral gradient continued to increase. However, there was a strong correlation (0.6 < R2 < 0.9) between the spectral gradient and the cumulative bulk temperature gradient through the snowpack (TGI). Hence, TGI is an index of grain size metamorphism that has occurred within the snowpack. TGI time series from 21 representative sites across the region and the corresponding SSM/I observations were used to develop an algorithm for snow depth that requires daily air temperatures. Copyright ?? 2002

  14. Signatures of Hydrometeor Species from Airborne Passive Microwave Data for Frequencies 10-183 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Leppert, Kenneth, II

    2014-01-01

    There are 2 basic precipitation retrieval methods using passive microwave measurements: (1) Emission-based: Based on the tendency of liquid precipitation to cause an increase in brightness temperature (BT) primarily at frequencies below 22 GHz over a radiometrically cold background, often an ocean background (e.g., Spencer et al. 1989; Adler et al. 1991; McGaughey et al. 1996); and (2) Scattering-based: Based on the tendency of precipitation-sized ice to scatter upwelling radiation, thereby reducing the measured BT over a relatively warmer (usually land) background at frequencies generally 37 GHz (e.g., Spencer et al. 1989; Smith et al. 1992; Ferraro and Marks 1995). Passive microwave measurements have also been used to detect intense convection (e.g., Spencer and Santek 1985) and for the detection of hail (e.g., Cecil 2009; Cecil and Blankenship 2012; Ferraro et al. 2014). The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission expands upon the successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission program to provide global rainfall and snowfall observations every 3 hours (Hou et al. 2014). One of the instruments on board the GPM Core Observatory is the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) which is a conically-scanning microwave radiometer with 13 channels ranging from 10-183 GHz. Goal of this study: Determine the signatures of various hydrometeor species in terms of BTs measured at frequencies used by GMI by using data collected on 3 case days (all having intense/severe convection) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment conducted over Oklahoma in 2011.

  15. A Blended Global Snow Product using Visible, Passive Microwave and Scatterometer Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James L.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Eylander, John B.; Riggs, George A.; Nghiem, Son V.; Tedesco, Marco; Kim, Edward; Montesano, Paul M.; Kelly, Richard E. J.; Casey, Kimberly A.; hide

    2009-01-01

    A joint U.S. Air Force/NASA blended, global snow product that utilizes Earth Observation System (EOS) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) and QuikSCAT (Quick Scatterometer) (QSCAT) data has been developed. Existing snow products derived from these sensors have been blended into a single, global, daily, user-friendly product by employing a newly-developed Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Snow Algorithm (ANSA). This initial blended-snow product uses minimal modeling to expeditiously yield improved snow products, which include snow cover extent, fractional snow cover, snow water equivalent (SWE), onset of snowmelt, and identification of actively melting snow cover. The blended snow products are currently 25-km resolution. These products are validated with data from the lower Great Lakes region of the U.S., from Colorado during the Cold Lands Processes Experiment (CLPX), and from Finland. The AMSR-E product is especially useful in detecting snow through clouds; however, passive microwave data miss snow in those regions where the snow cover is thin, along the margins of the continental snowline, and on the lee side of the Rocky Mountains, for instance. In these regions, the MODIS product can map shallow snow cover under cloud-free conditions. The confidence for mapping snow cover extent is greater with the MODIS product than with the microwave product when cloud-free MODIS observations are available. Therefore, the MODIS product is used as the default for detecting snow cover. The passive microwave product is used as the default only in those areas where MODIS data are not applicable due to the presence of clouds and darkness. The AMSR-E snow product is used in association with the difference between ascending and descending satellite passes or Diurnal Amplitude Variations (DAV) to detect the onset of melt, and a QSCAT product will be used to

  16. Sensitivity of Passive Microwave Snow Depth Retrievals to Weather Effects and Snow Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Thorsten; Powell, Dylan C.; Wang, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Snow fall and snow accumulation are key climate parameters due to the snow's high albedo, its thermal insulation, and its importance to the global water cycle. Satellite passive microwave radiometers currently provide the only means for the retrieval of snow depth and/or snow water equivalent (SWE) over land as well as over sea ice from space. All algorithms make use of the frequency-dependent amount of scattering of snow over a high-emissivity surface. Specifically, the difference between 37- and 19-GHz brightness temperatures is used to determine the depth of the snow or the SWE. With the availability of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System Aqua satellite (launched in May 2002), a wider range of frequencies can be utilized. In this study we investigate, using model simulations, how snow depth retrievals are affected by the evolution of the physical properties of the snow (mainly grain size growth and densification), how they are affected by variations in atmospheric conditions and, finally, how the additional channels may help to reduce errors in passive microwave snow retrievals. The sensitivity of snow depth retrievals to atmospheric water vapor is confirmed through the comparison with precipitable water retrievals from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-B). The results suggest that a combination of the 10-, 19-, 37-, and 89-GHz channels may significantly improve retrieval accuracy. Additionally, the development of a multisensor algorithm utilizing AMSR-E and AMSU-B data may help to obtain weather-corrected snow retrievals.

  17. High-resolution passive microwave imaging of the surface of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    The physics of passive microwave observations of the Earth and the system requirements for high-resolution imaging within this spectral band are summarized. High resolution is achieved in a straightforward manner by increasing the size of the primary antenna. However, with a single receiver, it is shown that the combination of high resolution and crosstrack scanning cannot produce images which have valuable geophysical content. The concept of a multiple receiver array located in the focal plane is presented as the only practical solution to the dilemma. Exploring this concept, system requirements are generated which, for the first order, appear to offer solutions to the problem.

  18. Probing a dielectric resonator acting as passive sensor through a wireless microwave link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedt, J.-M.; Boudot, R.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.

    2014-09-01

    Dielectric resonators, generally used for frequency filtering in oscillator loops, can be used as passive cooperative targets for wireless sensor applications. In the present work, we demonstrate such an approach by probing their spectral characteristics using a microwave RADAR system. The unique spectral response and energy storage capability of resonators provide unique responses allowing to separate the sensor response from clutter. Although the dielectric resonator is not designed for high temperature sensitivity, the accurate determination of the resonance frequency allows for a remote estimate of the temperature with Kelvin resolution.

  19. Modeling the Effect of Vegetation on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y. P.; Inguva, R.; Crosson, W. L.; Coleman, T. L.; Laymon, C.; Fahsi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of vegetation on passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture is studied. The radiative transfer modeling work of Njoku and Kong is applied to a stratified medium of which the upper layer is treated as a layer of vegetation. An effective dielectric constant for this vegetation layer is computed using estimates of the dielectric constant of individual components of the vegetation layer. The horizontally-polarized brightness temperature is then computed as a function of the incidence angle. Model predictions are used to compare with the data obtained in the Huntsville '96, remote sensing of soil moisture experiment, and with predictions obtained using a correction procedure of Jackson and Schmugge.

  20. Mapping the spatial distribution and time evolution of snow water equivalent with passive microwave measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, J.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.; Wood, A.W.; Hwang, J.-N.; Lettenmaier, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm that estimates the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of snow water equivalent and snow depth based on passive remote sensing measurements. It combines the inversion of passive microwave remote sensing measurements via dense media radiative transfer modeling results with snow accumulation and melt model predictions to yield improved estimates of snow depth and snow water equivalent, at a pixel resolution of 5 arc-min. In the inversion, snow grain size evolution is constrained based on pattern matching by using the local snow temperature history. This algorithm is applied to produce spatial snow maps of Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado. The simulation results are compared with that of the snow accumulation and melt model and a linear regression method. The quantitative comparison with the ground truth measurements from four Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites in the basin shows that this algorithm is able to improve the estimation of snow parameters.

  1. Activation of Al2O3 passivation layers on silicon by microwave annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Johannes; Otto, Martin; Sprafke, Alexander N.; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2013-11-01

    Thin aluminum oxide layers deposited on silicon by thermal atomic layer deposition can be used to reduce the electronic recombination losses by passivating the silicon surfaces. To activate the full passivation ability of such layers, a post-deposition annealing step at moderate temperatures (≈400 ∘C, duration≈30 min) is required. Such an annealing step is commonly done in an oven in air, nitrogen, or forming gas atmosphere. In this work, we investigate the ability to reduce the duration of the annealing step by heating the silicon wafer with a microwave source. The annealing time is significantly reduced to durations below 1 min while achieving effective minority carrier lifetimes similar or higher to that of conventionally oven-annealed samples.

  2. Passive Film Properties and Electrochemical Behavior of Co-Cr-Mo Stainless Steel in Chloride Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hong; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-05-01

    The electrochemical behavior and passive film properties of Co-Cr-Mo ultrahigh-strength stainless steel in neutral and acidic chloride solution were evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that the steel exhibited good passivation behavior in neutral NaCl solution. Both the film formation potential and the applied potential time showed great effects on the open-circuit potential value and stability of the passive film. Furthermore, the oxides and hydroxides of Fe, Co, Mo and Cr were the primary components of the passive film, and the composition of the passive film was changed with a change of pH environment.

  3. Microwave-assisted Low-temperature Growth of Thin Films in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Reeja-Jayan, B.; Harrison, Katharine L.; Yang, K.; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yilmaz, A. E.; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2012-01-01

    Thin films find a variety of technological applications. Assembling thin films from atoms in the liquid phase is intrinsically a non-equilibrium phenomenon, controlled by the competition between thermodynamics and kinetics. We demonstrate here that microwave energy can assist in assembling atoms into thin films directly on a substrate at significantly lower temperatures than conventional processes, potentially enabling plastic-based electronics. Both experimental and electromagnetic simulation results show microwave fields can selectively interact with a conducting layer on the substrate despite the discrepancy between the substrate size and the microwave wavelength. The microwave interaction leads to localized energy absorption, heating, and subsequent nucleation and growth of the desired films. Electromagnetic simulations show remarkable agreement with experiments and are employed to understand the physics of the microwave interaction and identify conditions to improve uniformity of the films. The films can be patterned and grown on various substrates, enabling their use in widespread applications. PMID:23256037

  4. Evaluation of multichannel Wiener filters applied to fine resolution passive microwave images of first-year sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Full, William E.; Eppler, Duane T.

    1993-01-01

    The effectivity of multichannel Wiener filters to improve images obtained with passive microwave systems was investigated by applying Wiener filters to passive microwave images of first-year sea ice. Four major parameters which define the filter were varied: the lag or pixel offset between the original and the desired scenes, filter length, the number of lines in the filter, and the weight applied to the empirical correlation functions. The effect of each variable on the image quality was assessed by visually comparing the results. It was found that the application of multichannel Wiener theory to passive microwave images of first-year sea ice resulted in visually sharper images with enhanced textural features and less high-frequency noise. However, Wiener filters induced a slight blocky grain to the image and could produce a type of ringing along scan lines traversing sharp intensity contrasts.

  5. Formation conditions, chloride content, and stability of passive films on an iron-chromium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hubschmid, C.; Landolt, D. . Dept. des Materiaux)

    1993-07-01

    Passive films were formed on a high purity Fe-23 Cr alloy in acid sulfate solutions in the presence and absence of chloride ion. The resulting film composition was investigated by Auger depth profiling. The passivated samples were exposed to a 1M NaCl solution at a constant potential slightly above the critical pitting potential, and the current-time transient was measured in order to compare the relative stability of the different films. The results obtained suggest that the formation conditions influence the chloride content of the passive film and the breakdown behavior. Passive films formed in the presence of chloride contain and are slightly less stable towards breakdown. No chloride was found in films formed in sulfate and subsequently exposed to chloride well below the pitting potential.

  6. Uniformity and passivation research of Al2O3 film on silicon substrate prepared by plasma-enhanced atom layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Endong; Zhou, Chunlan; Wang, Wenjing

    2015-03-01

    Plasma-enhanced atom layer deposition (PEALD) can deposit denser films than those prepared by thermal ALD. But the improvement on thickness uniformity and the decrease of defect density of the films deposited by PEALD need further research. A PEALD process from trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) and oxygen plasma was investigated to study the influence of the conditions with different plasma powers and deposition temperatures on uniformity and growth rate. The thickness and refractive index of films were measured by ellipsometry, and the passivation effect of alumina on n-type silicon before and after annealing was measured by microwave photoconductivity decay method. Also, the effects of deposition temperature and annealing temperature on effective minority carrier lifetime were investigated. Capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage measurements were used to investigate the interface defect density of state ( D it) of Al2O3/Si. Finally, Al diffusion P+ emitter on n-type silicon was passivated by PEALD Al2O3 films. The conclusion is that the condition of lower substrate temperature accelerates the growth of films and that the condition of lower plasma power controls the films' uniformity. The annealing temperature is higher for samples prepared at lower substrate temperature in order to get the better surface passivation effects. Heavier doping concentration of Al increased passivation quality after annealing by the effective minority carrier lifetime up to 100 μs.

  7. High temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits: Fabrication, characterization, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Chorey, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 films were grown on several microwave substrates. Surface resistance and penetration depth measurements were performed to determine the quality of these films. Here the properties of these films on key microwave substrates are described. The fabrication and characterization of a microwave ring resonator circuit to determine transmission line losses are presented. Lower losses than those observed in gold resonator circuits were observed at temperatures lower than critical transition temperature. Based on these results, potential applications of microwave superconducting circuits such as filters, resonators, oscillators, phase shifters, and antenna elements in space communication systems are identified.

  8. Verification of a New NOAA/NSIDC Passive Microwave Sea-Ice Concentration Climate Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Walter N.; Peng, Ge; Scott, Donna J.; Savoie, Matt H.

    2014-01-01

    A new satellite-based passive microwave sea-ice concentration product developed for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)Climate Data Record (CDR) programme is evaluated via comparison with other passive microwave-derived estimates. The new product leverages two well-established concentration algorithms, known as the NASA Team and Bootstrap, both developed at and produced by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The sea ice estimates compare well with similar GSFC products while also fulfilling all NOAA CDR initial operation capability (IOC) requirements, including (1) self describing file format, (2) ISO 19115-2 compliant collection-level metadata,(3) Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant file-level metadata, (4) grid-cell level metadata (data quality fields), (5) fully automated and reproducible processing and (6) open online access to full documentation with version control, including source code and an algorithm theoretical basic document. The primary limitations of the GSFC products are lack of metadata and use of untracked manual corrections to the output fields. Smaller differences occur from minor variations in processing methods by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (for the CDR fields) and NASA (for the GSFC fields). The CDR concentrations do have some differences from the constituent GSFC concentrations, but trends and variability are not substantially different.

  9. Impact of Uncertainty in the Drop Size Distribution on Oceanic Rainfall Retrievals From Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, Thomas T.; Chandrasekar, V.; Li, Wanyu

    2007-01-01

    The variability of the drop size distribution (DSD) is one of the factors that must be considered in understanding the uncertainties in the retrieval of oceanic precipitation from passive microwave observations. Here, we have used observations from the Precipitation Radar on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission spacecraft to infer the relationship between the DSD and the rain rate and the variability in this relationship. The impact on passive microwave rain rate retrievals varies with the frequency and rain rate. The total uncertainty for a given pixel can be slightly larger than 10% at the low end (ca. 10 GHz) of frequencies commonly used for this purpose and smaller at higher frequencies (up to 37 GHz). Since the error is not totally random, averaging many pixels, as in a monthly rainfall total, should roughly halve this uncertainty. The uncertainty may be lower at rain rates less than about 30 mm/h, but the lack of sensitivity of the surface reference technique to low rain rates makes it impossible to tell from the present data set.

  10. Annual Snow Assessments Using Multi-spectral and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, S. F.; Vuyovich, C. M.; Deeb, E. J.; Newman, S. D.; Baldwin, T. B.

    2010-12-01

    Since the winter season of 2004-2005, annual snow assessments have been conducted for regions across the Middle East (including Eastern Turkey, Afghanistan, and Pakistan) using multispectral (AVHRR and MODIS) and passive microwave (SSM/I and AMSR-E) remote sensing technologies. Due to limited ground-based observations of precipitation and snow pack conditions, remote sensing provides a unique opportunity to assess these conditions at different scales and offer an appraisal of the current conditions in an historical context. During each winter season, bi-weekly snow products and assessments are produced including: current Snow Covered Area (SCA) at regional and watershed scales; estimation of SCA by elevation band; current snowpack total Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) for each watershed with an historical perspective (1987-present); snow condition outlook by watershed; general summary of snow conditions based on remote sensing products and limited ground-based observations; and if warranted, a snow melt flooding advisory. Most recently, the winter 2009-2010 season provided interesting aspects that are further investigated: comparison of reported drought conditions, SCA extents, and passive microwave SWE estimates in Afghanistan; flooding event in Northeastern Afghanistan perhaps due to late season snow fall and subsequent snow melt; lower SCA in Eastern Turkey throughout winter despite heavy precipitation perhaps explained by warmer regional temperatures.

  11. Combining Passive Microwave and Optical Data to Estimate Snow Water Equivalent in Afghanistan's Hindu Kush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozier, J.; Bair, N.; Calfa, A. A.; Skalka, C.; Tolle, K.; Bongard, J.

    2015-12-01

    The task is to estimate spatiotemporally distributed estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) in snow-dominated mountain environments, including those that lack on-the-ground measurements such as the Hindu Kush range in Afghanistan. During the snow season, we can use two measurements: (1) passive microwave estimates of SWE, which generally underestimate in the mountains; (2) fractional snow-covered area from MODIS. Once the snow has melted, we can reconstruct the accumulated SWE back to the last significant snowfall by calculating the energy used in melt. The reconstructed SWE values provide a training set for predictions from the passive microwave SWE and snow-covered area. We examine several machine learning methods—regression-boosted decision trees, bagged trees, neural networks, and genetic programming—to estimate SWE. All methods work reasonably well, with R2 values greater than 0.8. Predictors built with multiple years of data reduce the bias that usually appears if we predict one year from just one other year's training set. Genetic programming tends to produce results that additionally provide physical insight. Adding precipitation estimates from the Global Precipitation Measurements mission is in progress.

  12. Using image reconstruction methods to enhance gridded resolutionfor a newly calibrated passive microwave climate data record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paget, A. C.; Brodzik, M. J.; Gotberg, J.; Hardman, M.; Long, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Spanning over 35 years of Earth observations, satellite passive microwave sensors have generated a near-daily, multi-channel brightness temperature record of observations. Critical to describing and understanding Earth system hydrologic and cryospheric parameters, data products derived from the passive microwave record include precipitation, soil moisture, surface water, vegetation, snow water equivalent, sea ice concentration and sea ice motion. While swath data are valuable to oceanographers due to the temporal scales of ocean phenomena, gridded data are more valuable to researchers interested in derived parameters at fixed locations through time and are widely used in climate studies. We are applying recent developments in image reconstruction methods to produce a systematically reprocessed historical time series NASA MEaSUREs Earth System Data Record, at higher spatial resolutions than have previously been available, for the entire SMMR, SSM/I-SSMIS and AMSR-E record. We take advantage of recently released, recalibrated SSM/I-SSMIS swath format Fundamental Climate Data Records. Our presentation will compare and contrast the two candidate image reconstruction techniques we are evaluating: Backus-Gilbert (BG) interpolation and a radiometer version of Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (SIR). Both BG and SIR use regularization to trade off noise and resolution. We discuss our rationale for the respective algorithm parameters we have selected, compare results and computational costs, and include prototype SSM/I images at enhanced resolutions of up to 3 km. We include a sensitivity analysis for estimating sensor measurement response functions critical to both methods.

  13. Passive microwave data for snow and ice research - Planned products from the DMSP SSM/I system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weawer, Ronald; Barry, Roger G.; Morris, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Recommendations which have been made for processing and distributing passive microwave data for snow and ice research obtained with the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) are discussed. The general objectives for SSM/I data are reviewed, and the sensor and data flow are described. The SSM/I sea ice products are discussed, and algorithm/product validation is addressed. Proposed services and implementation after SSM/I launch are summarized.

  14. Disaggregation Of Passive Microwave Soil Moisture For Use In Watershed Hydrology Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bin

    In recent years the passive microwave remote sensing has been providing soil moisture products using instruments on board satellite/airborne platforms. Spatial resolution has been restricted by the diameter of antenna which is inversely proportional to resolution. As a result, typical products have a spatial resolution of tens of kilometers, which is not compatible for some hydrological research applications. For this reason, the dissertation explores three disaggregation algorithms that estimate L-band passive microwave soil moisture at the subpixel level by using high spatial resolution remote sensing products from other optical and radar instruments were proposed and implemented in this investigation. The first technique utilized a thermal inertia theory to establish a relationship between daily temperature change and average soil moisture modulated by the vegetation condition was developed by using NLDAS, AVHRR, SPOT and MODIS data were applied to disaggregate the 25 km AMSR-E soil moisture to 1 km in Oklahoma. The second algorithm was built on semi empirical physical models (NP89 and LP92) derived from numerical experiments between soil evaporation efficiency and soil moisture over the surface skin sensing depth (a few millimeters) by using simulated soil temperature derived from MODIS and NLDAS as well as AMSR-E soil moisture at 25 km to disaggregate the coarse resolution soil moisture to 1 km in Oklahoma. The third algorithm modeled the relationship between the change in co-polarized radar backscatter and the remotely sensed microwave change in soil moisture retrievals and assumed that change in soil moisture was a function of only the canopy opacity. The change detection algorithm was implemented using aircraft based the remote sensing data from PALS and UAVSAR that were collected in SMPAVEX12 in southern Manitoba, Canada. The PALS L-band h-polarization radiometer soil moisture retrievals were disaggregated by combining them with the PALS and UAVSAR L

  15. Abnormal Winter Melting of the Arctic Sea Ice Cap Observed by the Spaceborne Passive Microwave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seongsuk; Yi, Yu

    2016-12-01

    The spatial size and variation of Arctic sea ice play an important role in Earth’s climate system. These are affected by conditions in the polar atmosphere and Arctic sea temperatures. The Arctic sea ice concentration is calculated from brightness temperature data derived from the Defense Meteorological Satellite program (DMSP) F13 Special Sensor Microwave/Imagers (SSMI) and the DMSP F17 Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) sensors. Many previous studies point to significant reductions in sea ice and their causes. We investigated the variability of Arctic sea ice using the daily sea ice concentration data from passive microwave observations to identify the sea ice melting regions near the Arctic polar ice cap. We discovered the abnormal melting of the Arctic sea ice near the North Pole during the summer and the winter. This phenomenon is hard to explain only surface air temperature or solar heating as suggested by recent studies. We propose a hypothesis explaining this phenomenon. The heat from the deep sea in Arctic Ocean ridges and/ or the hydrothermal vents might be contributing to the melting of Arctic sea ice. This hypothesis could be verified by the observation of warm water column structure below the melting or thinning arctic sea ice through the project such as Coriolis dataset for reanalysis (CORA).

  16. Global Snow-Cover Evolution from Twenty Years of Satellite Passive Microwave Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mognard, N.M.; Kouraev, A.V.; Josberger, E.G.

    2003-01-01

    Starting in 1979 with the SMMR (Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer) instrument onboard the satellite NIMBUS-7 and continuing since 1987 with the SSMI (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) instrument on board the DMSP (Defence Meteorological Satellite Program) series, more then twenty years of satellite passive microwave data are now available. This dataset has been processed to analyse the evolution of the global snow cover. This work is part of the AICSEX project from the 5th Framework Programme of the European Community. The spatio-temporal evolution of the satellite-derived yearly snow maximum extent and the timing of the spring snow melt were estimated and analysed over the Northern Hemisphere. Significant differences between the evolution of the yearly maximum snow extent in Eurasia and in North America were found. A positive correlation between the maximum yearly snow cover extent and the ENSO index was obtained. High interannual spatio-temporal variability characterises the timing of snow melt in the spring. Twenty-year trends in the timing of spring snow melt have been computed and compared with spring air temperature trends for the same period and the same area. In most parts of Eurasia and in the central and western parts of North America the tendency has been for earlier snow melt. In northeastern Canada, a large area of positive trends, where snow melt timing starts later than in the early 1980s, corresponds to a region of positive trends of spring air temperature observed over the same period.

  17. A Prototype Physical Database for Passive Microwave Retrievals of Precipitation over the US Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringerud, S.; Kummerow, C. D.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    An accurate understanding of the instantaneous, dynamic land surface emissivity is necessary for a physically based, multi-channel passive microwave precipitation retrieval scheme over land. In an effort to assess the feasibility of the physical approach for land surfaces, a semi-empirical emissivity model is applied for calculation of the surface component in a test area of the US Southern Great Plains. A physical emissivity model, using land surface model data as input, is used to calculate emissivity at the 10GHz frequency, combining contributions from the underlying soil and vegetation layers, including the dielectric and roughness effects of each medium. An empirical technique is then applied, based upon a robust set of observed channel covariances, extending the emissivity calculations to all channels. For calculation of the hydrometeor contribution, reflectivity profiles from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR) are utilized along with coincident brightness temperatures (Tbs) from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), and cloud-resolving model profiles. Ice profiles are modified to be consistent with the higher frequency microwave Tbs. Resulting modeled top of the atmosphere Tbs show correlations to observations of 0.9, biases of 1K or less, root-mean-square errors on the order of 5K, and improved agreement over the use of climatological emissivity values. The synthesis of these models and data sets leads to the creation of a simple prototype Tb database that includes both dynamic surface and atmospheric information physically consistent with the land surface model, emissivity model, and atmospheric information.

  18. A Prototype Physical Database for Passive Microwave Retrievals of Precipitation over the US Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringerud, S.; Kummerow, C. D.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    An accurate understanding of the instantaneous, dynamic land surface emissivity is necessary for a physically based, multi-channel passive microwave precipitation retrieval scheme over land. In an effort to assess the feasibility of the physical approach for land surfaces, a semi-empirical emissivity model is applied for calculation of the surface component in a test area of the US Southern Great Plains. A physical emissivity model, using land surface model data as input, is used to calculate emissivity at the 10GHz frequency, combining contributions from the underlying soil and vegetation layers, including the dielectric and roughness effects of each medium. An empirical technique is then applied, based upon a robust set of observed channel covariances, extending the emissivity calculations to all channels. For calculation of the hydrometeor contribution, reflectivity profiles from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR) are utilized along with coincident brightness temperatures (Tbs) from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), and cloud-resolving model profiles. Ice profiles are modified to be consistent with the higher frequency microwave Tbs. Resulting modeled top of the atmosphere Tbs show correlations to observations of 0.9, biases of 1K or less, root-mean-square errors on the order of 5K, and improved agreement over the use of climatological emissivity values. The synthesis of these models and data sets leads to the creation of a simple prototype Tb database that includes both dynamic surface and atmospheric information physically consistent with the land surface model, emissivity model, and atmospheric information.

  19. Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Concentrations from Multichannel Passive-Microwave Satellite Data Sets: User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Gloersen, Per; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    Satellite multichannel passive-microwave sensors have provided global radiance measurements with which to map, monitor, and study the Arctic and Antarctic polar sea ice covers. The data span over 18 years (as of April 1997), starting with the launch of the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on NASA's SeaSat A and Nimbus 7 in 1978 and continuing with the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) series beginning in 1987. It is anticipated that the DMSP SSMI series will continue into the 21st century. The SSMI series will be augmented by new, improved sensors to be flown on Japanese and U.S. space platforms. This User's Guide provides a description of a new sea ice concentration data set generated from observations made by three of these multichannel sensors. The data set includes gridded daily ice concentrations (every-other-day for the SMMR data) for both the north and south polar regions from October 26, 1978 through September 30, 1995, with the one exception of a 6-week data gap from December 3, 1987 through January 12, 1988. The data have been placed on two CD-ROMs that include a ReadMeCD file giving the technical details on the file format, file headers, north and south polar grids, ancillary data sets, and directory structure of the CD-ROM. The CD-ROMS will be distributed by the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, CO.

  20. Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Concentrations from Multichannel Passive-Microwave Satellite Data Sets: User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Gloersen, Per; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    Satellite multichannel passive-microwave sensors have provided global radiance measurements with which to map, monitor, and study the Arctic and Antarctic polar sea ice covers. The data span over 18 years (as of April 1997), starting with the launch of the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on NASA's SeaSat A and Nimbus 7 in 1978 and continuing with the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) series beginning in 1987. It is anticipated that the DMSP SSMI series will continue into the 21st century. The SSMI series will be augmented by new, improved sensors to be flown on Japanese and U.S. space platforms. This User's Guide provides a description of a new sea ice concentration data set generated from observations made by three of these multichannel sensors. The data set includes gridded daily ice concentrations (every-other-day for the SMMR data) for both the north and south polar regions from October 26, 1978 through September 30, 1995, with the one exception of a 6-week data gap from December 3, 1987 through January 12, 1988. The data have been placed on two CD-ROMs that include a ReadMeCD file giving the technical details on the file format, file headers, north and south polar grids, ancillary data sets, and directory structure of the CD-ROM. The CD-ROMS will be distributed by the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, CO.

  1. A joint active/passive physical model of sea surface microwave signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.; Irisov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    Active and passive microwave signatures of the ocean can only depend on the ocean wave spectrum if bound and breaking waves are neglected. However, history has not been kind to attempts to explain both radiometer brightness temperatures (Tb) and normalized radar cross sections (σo) of the sea using the same ocean wave spectrum without bound and breaking waves. In this paper, we show that if bound and breaking waves are included in physical models of radiometer and scatterometer microwave signatures of the ocean, a single wave spectrum can explain both Tb and σo to reasonable accuracy. Bound waves are the roughness produced by gently breaking, or crumpling, waves that travel near the speed of the parent wave. Bound wave modeling is based on earlier work by Plant (1997) but using additional information about the slope probability distributions of the bound waves' parents. Breaking wave and foam modeling both build on the function Λ(cb) introduced by Phillips (1985), which describes the average length of breaking wavefronts on the ocean per unit area as a function of breaker velocity, cb. We model Λ(cb) as documented in Irisov and Plant (2016) where we show that the wave spectrum completely determines Λ(cb). We thus show here that the result of including bound and breaking waves in radiometer and scatterometer models of oceanic signatures is a much closer fit to data over a wide range of microwave frequencies and incidence angles using a single wave spectrum.

  2. Global long-term passive microwave satellite-based retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi Y.; de Jeu, Richard A. M.; McCabe, Matthew F.; Evans, Jason P.; van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.

    2011-09-01

    Vegetation optical depth (VOD) retrievals from three satellite-based passive microwave instruments were merged to produce the first long-term global microwave-based vegetation product. The resulting VOD product spans more than two decades and shows seasonal cycles and inter-annual variations that generally correspond with those observed in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Some notable differences exist in the long-term trends: the NDVI, operating in the optical regime, is sensitive to chlorophyll abundance and photosynthetically active biomass of the leaves, whereas the microwave-based VOD is an indicator of the vegetation water content in total above-ground biomass, i.e., including wood and leaf components. Preliminary analyses indicate that the fluctuations in VOD typically correlated to precipitation variations, and that the mutually independent VOD and NDVI do not necessarily respond in identical manners. Considering both products together provides a more robust structural characterization and assessment of long-term vegetation dynamics at the global scale.

  3. Inversion of Airborne Passive Microwave Data for Snow Properties using the Metropolis Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Jagt, B.; Durand, M. T.; Margulis, S. A.; Molotch, N. P.; Kim, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    Passive microwave (PM) remote sensing of snow is based on the fact that microwave brightness temperatures contain information about different snow properties, some of which include depth, grain size, and density. These different snow properties are highly spatially heterogeneous, and often prove difficult to invert using traditional algorithms. This is mainly due the dynamic, many-to-one nature of the relationship between the PM signal and the different snow properties, the coarse resolution of the observations as compared to the fine spatial scale at which snow properties vary, and the masking of the PM signal by varying amounts and types of vegetation. While multi-frequency PM observations can help reduce the many-to-one nature associated with the snow states by constraining the amount of potential solutions, the vertical heterogeneity and layering of snow properties often leads to errors in the inversion process when little a priori information exists on the vertical structure of the snowpack. Using a new algorithm, specifically a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme solved using the Metropolis algorithm, we attempt to invert the airborne passive microwave data collected during the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) to estimate the spatial snow properties within the different study areas, with virtually no a priori information. We allowed the number of snowpack layers itself to be unknown by generating different chains for each possible number of layers (up to a maximum of four), then selecting the optimal chain using a model selection criterion. We then evaluate our accuracy using real datasets, specifically the measured in-situ snow properties that were collected from snow pits during CLPX, and compare our results across a large range of different snow and climactic environments. Synthetic results show that an accurate solution to number of layers, layer thickness, density, grain size, snow temperature and ground temperature from microwave measurements

  4. Detection of Severe Rain on Snow events using passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Putkonen, J.

    2007-12-01

    Severe wintertime rain-on-snow (ROS) events create a strong ice layer or layers in the snow on arctic tundra that act as a barrier to ungulate grazing. These events are linked with large-scale ungulate herd declines via starvation and reduced calf production rate when the animals are unable to penetrate through the resulting ice layer. ROS events also produce considerable perturbation in the mean wintertime soil temperature beneath the snow pack. ROS is a sporadic but well-known and significant phenomenon that is currently very poorly documented. Characterization of the distribution and occurrence of severe rain-on-snow events is based only on anecdotal evidence, indirect observations of carcasses found adjacent to iced snow packs, and irregular detection by a sparse observational weather network. We have analyzed in detail a particular well-identified ROS event that took place on Banks Island in early October 2003 that resulted in the death of 20,000 musk oxen. We make use of multifrequency passive microwave imagery from the special sensing microwave imager satellite sensor suite (SSM/I) in conjunction with a strong-fluctuation-theory (SFT) emissivity model. We show that a combination of time series analysis and cluster analysis based on microwave spectral gradients and polarization ratios provides a means to detect the stages of the ROS event resulting from the modification of the vertical structure of the snow pack, specifically wetting the snow, the accumulation of liquid water at the base of the snow during the rain event, and the subsequent modification of the snowpack after refreezing. SFT model analysis provides quantitative confirmation of our interpretation of the evolution of the microwave properties of the snowpack as a result of the ROS event. In particular, in addition to the grain coarsening due to destructive metamorphism, we detect the presence of the internal water and ice layers, directly identifying the physical properties producing the

  5. Comparison of Kriging and LOCFIT methods for interpolating gridded passive microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzik, M. J.; Savoie, M. H.; Armstrong, R. L.

    2007-12-01

    Satellite passive microwave brightness temperatures (TBs) are used as the basis for measuring various land surface properties, including soil moisture and snow water equivalent. The current satellite record of brightness temperatures includes data from the SMMR, SSM/I and AMSR-E instruments, beginning in 1978 and continuing to the present day. These sensors fly on satellite platforms in sun-synchronous, polar orbits, providing near-daily global coverage of the Earth. Due to the satellite geometry, surface locations at high latitudes receive better than daily coverage, while locations at lower latitudes are observed less frequently. We have compiled a nearly 30- year record of daily, gridded passive microwave temperatures, but the lack of daily coverage from the respective sensors makes the compilation of daily derived products complicated. Techniques we have used in the past have been performed after deriving the desired geophysical parameter, and have included last-in compilations and piecewise, linear interpolation of missing snow water equivalent between days with legitimate observations. The advantages of these methods are that they are relatively simple to implement, but they suffer from not making use of any known physical spatial correlations at the brightness temperature level with neighboring locations for the data being interpolated. Our study will compare two spatial interpolation methods at the gridded brightness temperature level that take advantage of spatial and temporal correlation: kriging methods and local polynomial (LOCFIT) fitting. Our study area includes a subset of Equal-Area Scalable Earth Grid (EASE-Grid) brightness temperatures, for a region that includes portions of the Western United States and Canada, for two weeks in both January and July, for the period of record. Results of this analysis will ultimately increase our skill in filling in the gaps in microwave coverage, thus improving existing gridded brightness temperature data sets

  6. Infrared and Passive Microwave Radiometric Sea Surface Temperatures and Their Relationships to Atmospheric Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Sandra L.

    2004-01-01

    The current generation of infrared (IR) and passive microwave (MW) satellite sensors provides highly complementary information for monitoring sea surface temperature (SST). On the one hand, infrared sensors provide high resolution and high accuracy but are obscured by clouds. Microwave sensors on the other hand, provide coverage through non-precipitating clouds but have coarser resolution and generally poorer accuracy. Assuming that the satellite SST measurements do not have spatially variable biases, they can be blended combining the merits of both SST products. These factors have motivated recent work in blending the MW and IR data in an attempt to produce high-accuracy SST products with improved coverage in regions with persistent clouds. The primary sources of retrieval uncertainty are, however, different for the two sensors. The main uncertainty in the MW retrievals lies in the effects of wind-induced surface roughness and foam on emissivity, whereas the IR retrievals are more sensitive to the atmospheric water vapor and aerosol content. Average nighttime differences between the products for the month periods of January 1999 and June 2000 are shown. These maps show complex spatial and temporal differences as indicated by the strong spatially coherent features in the product differences and the changes between seasons. Clearly such differences need to be understood and accounted for if the products are to be combined. The overall goals of this project are threefold: (1) To understand the sources of uncertainty in the IR and MW SST retrievals and to characterize the errors affecting the two types of retrieval as a fiction of atmospheric forcing; (2) To demonstrate how representative the temperature difference between the two satellite products is of Delta T; (3) To apply bias adjustments and to device a comprehensive treatment of the behavior of the temperature difference across the oceanic skin layer to determine the best method for blending thermal infrared

  7. Annual South American Forest Loss Estimates (1989-2011) Based on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marle, M.; van der Werf, G.; de Jeu, R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation dynamics, such as forest loss, are an important factor in global climate, but long-term and consistent information on these dynamics on continental scales is lacking. We have quantified large-scale forest loss over the 90s and 00s in the tropical biomes of South America using a passive-microwave satellite-based vegetation product. Our forest loss estimates are based on remotely sensed vegetation optical depth (VOD), which is an indicator of vegetation water content simultaneously retrieved with soil moisture. The advantage of low-frequency microwave remote sensing is that aerosols and clouds do not affect the observations. Furthermore, the longer wavelengths of passive microwaves penetrate deeper into vegetation than other products derived from optical and thermal sensors. This has the consequence that both woody parts of vegetation and leaves can be observed. The merged VOD product of AMSR-E and SSM/I observations, which covers over 23 years of daily observations, is used. We used this data stream and an outlier detection algorithm to quantify spatial and temporal variations in forest loss dynamics. Qualitatively, our results compared favorably to the newly developed Global Forest Change (GFC) maps based on Landsat data (r2=0.96), and this allowed us to convert the VOD outlier count to forest loss. Our results are spatially explicit with a 0.25-degree resolution and annual time step and we will present our estimates on country level. The added benefit of our results compared to GFC is the longer time period. The results indicate a relatively steady increase in forest loss in Brazil from 1989 until 2003, followed by two high forest loss years and a declining trend afterwards. This contrasts with other South American countries such as Bolivia and Peru, where forest losses increased in almost the whole 00s in comparison with the 90s.

  8. Frequency/phase agile microwave circuits on ferroelectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanofsky, Robert Raymond

    This work describes novel microwave circuits that can be tuned in either frequency or phase through the use of nonlinear dielectrics, specifically thin ferroelectric films. These frequency and phase agile circuits in many cases provide a new capability or offer the potential for lower cost alternatives in satellite and terrestrial communications and sensor applications. A brief introduction to nonlinear dielectrics and a summary of some of the special challenges confronting the practical insertion of ferroelectric technology into commercial systems is provided. A theoretical solution for the propagation characteristics of the multi-layer structures, with emphasis on a new type of phase shifter based on coupled microstrip, lines, is developed. The quasi-TEM analysis is based on a variational solution for line capacitance and an extension of coupled transmission line theory. It is shown that the theoretical model is applicable to a broad class of multi-layer transmission lines. The critical role that ferroelectric film thickness plays in loss and phase-shift is closely examined. Experimental data for both thin film BaxSr1-xTiO 3 phase shifters near room temperature and SMO3 phase shifters at cryogenic temperatures on MgO and LaAlO3 substrates is included. Some of these devices demonstrated an insertion loss of less than 5 dB at Ku-band with continuously variable phase shift in excess of 360 degrees. The performance of these devices is superior to the state-of-the-art semiconductor counterparts. Frequency and phase agile antenna prototypes including a microstrip patch that can operate at multiple microwave frequency bands and a new type of phased array antenna concept called the ferroelectric reflectarray are introduced. Modeled data for tunable microstrip patch antennas is presented for various ferroelectric film thickness. A prototype linear phased array, with a conventional beam-forming manifold, and an electronic controller is described. This is the first

  9. Fast and Controllable Crystallization of Perovskite Films by Microwave Irradiation Process.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qipeng; Yang, Songwang; Gao, Qianqian; Lei, Lei; Yu, Yu; Shao, Jun; Liu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    The crystal growth process significantly influences the properties of organic-inorganic halide perovskite films along with the performance of solar cell devices. In this paper, we adopted the microwave irradiation to treat perovskite films through a one-step deposition method for several minutes at a fixed output power. It is found that the specific microwave irradiation process can evaporate the solvent directly and heat perovskite film quickly. In comparison with the conventional thermal annealing process, a microwave irradiation process assisted fast and controllable crystallization of perovskite films with less energy-loss and time-consumption and therefore resulted in the enhancement in the photovoltaic performance of the corresponding solar cells.

  10. Resonant microwave absorption in thermally deposited au nanoparticle films near percolation coverage.

    PubMed

    Obrzut, Jan; Douglas, Jack F; Kirillov, Oleg; Sharifi, Fred; Liddle, J Alexander

    2013-07-16

    We observe a resonant transition in the microwave absorption of thin thermally deposited Au nanoparticle films near the geometrical percolation transition pc where the films exhibit a 'fractal' heterogeneous geometry. Absorption of incident microwave radiation increases sharply near pc, consistent with effective medium theory predictions. Both the theory and our experiments indicate that the hierarchical structure of these films makes their absorption insensitive to the microwave radiation wavelength λ, so that this singular absorption of microwave radiation is observed over a broad frequency range between 100 MHz and 20 GHz. The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with randomly distributed conductive scattering particles gives rise to localized resonant modes, and our measurements indicate that this adsorption process is significantly enhanced for microwaves in comparison to ordinary light. In particular, above the percolation transition a portion of the injected microwave power is stored within the film until dissipated. Finally, we find that the measured surface conductivity can be quantitatively described at all Au concentrations by generalized effective medium theory, where the fitted conductivity percolation exponents and pc itself are consistent with known two-dimensional estimates. Our results demonstrate that microwave measurements provide a powerful means of remotely measuring the electromagnetic properties of highly heterogeneous conducting films, enabling purposeful engineering of the electromagnetic properties of thin films in the microwave frequency range through fabrication of 'disordered' films of conducting particles such as metal nanoparticles or carbon nanotubes.

  11. A multi-sensor data-driven methodology for all-sky passive microwave inundation retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takbiri, Zeinab; Ebtehaj, Ardeshir M.; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2017-06-01

    We present a multi-sensor Bayesian passive microwave retrieval algorithm for flood inundation mapping at high spatial and temporal resolutions. The algorithm takes advantage of observations from multiple sensors in optical, short-infrared, and microwave bands, thereby allowing for detection and mapping of the sub-pixel fraction of inundated areas under almost all-sky conditions. The method relies on a nearest-neighbor search and a modern sparsity-promoting inversion method that make use of an a priori dataset in the form of two joint dictionaries. These dictionaries contain almost overlapping observations by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder (SSMIS) on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F17 satellite and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Aqua and Terra satellites. Evaluation of the retrieval algorithm over the Mekong Delta shows that it is capable of capturing to a good degree the inundation diurnal variability due to localized convective precipitation. At longer timescales, the results demonstrate consistency with the ground-based water level observations, denoting that the method is properly capturing inundation seasonal patterns in response to regional monsoonal rain. The calculated Euclidean distance, rank-correlation, and also copula quantile analysis demonstrate a good agreement between the outputs of the algorithm and the observed water levels at monthly and daily timescales. The current inundation products are at a resolution of 12.5 km and taken twice per day, but a higher resolution (order of 5 km and every 3 h) can be achieved using the same algorithm with the dictionary populated by the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) products.

  12. Atmospheric Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics Derived from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometer Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Hong, Ye; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    1999-06-01

    A method for the remote sensing of three-dimensional latent heating distributions in precipitating tropical weather systems from satellite passive microwave observations is presented. In this method, cloud model simulated hydrometeor/latent heating vertical profiles that have radiative characteristics consistent with a given set of multispectral microwave radiometric observations are composited to create a best estimate of the observed profile. An estimate of the areal coverage of convective precipitation within the radiometer footprint is used as an additional constraint on the contributing model profiles. This constraint leads to more definitive retrieved profiles of precipitation and latent heating in synthetic data tests.The remote sensing method is applied to Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) observations of tropical systems that occurred during the TOGA COARE Intensive Observing Period, and to observations of Hurricane Andrew (1992). Although instantaneous estimates of rain rates are high-biased with respect to coincident radar rain estimates, precipitation patterns are reasonably correlated with radar patterns, and composite rain rate and latent heating profiles show respectable agreement with estimates from forecast models and heat and moisture budget calculations. Uncertainties in the remote sensing estimates of precipitation/latent heating may be partly attributed to the relatively low spatial resolution of the SSM/I and a lack of microwave sensitivity to tenuous anvil cloud, for which upper-tropospheric latent heating rates may be significant. Estimated latent heating distributions in Hurricane Andrew exhibit an upper-level heating maximum that strengthens as the storm undergoes a period of intensification.

  13. In-situ sputtering of YBCO films for microwave applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballentine, P. H.; Kadin, A. M.; Mallory, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    RF magnetron sputtering from a single YBCO target onto a heated substrate (700 C) was used to obtain c-axis-oriented 1-2-3 films that are superconducting without a subsequent annealing or oxygenation step, with Tc(R = 0) as high as 88 K on MgO and LaAlO3 substrates. This process uses an 8-in-diameter target in the sputter-up configuration, with a central grounded shield to eliminate negative ion bombardment. It can reproducibly and uniformly cover substrates as large as 3-in across at rates exceeding 1 A/s. Maintaining film composition very close to stoichiometry is essential for obtaining films with good superconducting properties and surface morphology. Optimum films have critical currents of 1 MA/sq cm at 77 K. Measurements of microwave surface resistance based on a stripline resonator indicate low surface resistance for unpatterned YBCO ground planes, but excess loss and a strong power dependence in a patterned center strip.

  14. Towards a climatology of tropical cyclone morphometric structures using a newly standardized passive microwave satellite dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossuth, J.; Hart, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    storm's rainband and eyewall organization. Ultimately, this project develops a consistent climatology of TC structures using a new database of research-quality historical TC satellite microwave observations. Not only can such data sets more accurately study TC structural evolution, but they may facilitate automated TC intensity estimates and provide methods to enhance current operational and research products, such as at the NRL TC webpage (http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/TC.html). The process of developing the dataset and possible objective definitions of TC structures using passive microwave imagery will be described, with preliminary results suggesting new methods to identify TC structures that may interrogate and expand upon physical and dynamical theories. Structural metrics such as threshold analysis of the outlines of the TC shape as well as methods to diagnose the inner-core size, completion, and magnitude will be introduced.

  15. Microwave conductivity of laser ablated YBaCuO superconducting films and its relation to microstrip transmission line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Chorey, C. M.; Ebihara, B. T.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of high temperature superconductor oxides has raised the possibility of a new class of millimeter and microwave devices operating at temperatures considerably higher than liquid helium temperatures. Therefore, materials properties such as conductivity, current density, and sheet resistance as a function of temperature and frequency, possible anisotropies, moisture absorption, thermal expansion, and others, have to be well characterized and understood. The millimeter wave response was studied of laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x)/LaAlO3 thin films as a function of temperature and frequency. In particular, the evaluation of their microwave conductivity was emphasized, since knowledge of this parameter provides a basis for the derivation of other relevant properties of these superconducting oxides, and for using them in the fabrication of actual passive circuits. The microwave conductivity for these films was measured at frequencies from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz, in the temperature range from 20 to 300 K. The values of the conductivity are obtained from the millimeter wave power transmitted through the films, using a two fluid model.

  16. Solid state microwave synthesis of highly crystalline ordered mesoporous hausmannite Mn3O4 films

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yanfeng; Qiang, Zhe; Lee, Byeongdu; ...

    2017-08-14

    Soft templating using block copolymers provides a generalized synthetic strategy to fabricate mesoporous materials, but it is generally challenging to obtain highly crystalline frameworks without significant deformation or loss of the mesoporous structure. Here, we demonstrate that a simple route to generate ordered mesoporous crystalline manganese oxide films by block copolymer templating through microwave processing to convert carbonate precursors to the oxides, remove the polymeric template and crystallize the Mn3O4, all within 1 min. The microwave heating in this case is driven primarily by the high microwave cross-section of the substrate (silicon wafer), but manganese oxide also absorbs microwaves tomore » provide energy locally for promoting nucleation/crystalliation. Conversely, simple heating in a muffle furnace at an analogous surface temperature leads to either significant residual copolymer or nanostructure collapse with low crystallinity in both cases. This difference in behavior is attributed to the rapid and local heating of the manganese oxide by microwaves to crystallize the oxide. The microwave rapidly generates the crystals as evidenced by the invariance in the refractive index of the films after 45 s on further microwave heating. Additionally, the microwave processing leads to nearly twice the specific surface area for the films when compared to mesoporous films fabricated by calcination in the furnace. Microwave energy appears to be an attractive alternative to enable the fabrication of highly crystalline framework in soft-templated ordered mesoporous materials when the microwaves can be absorbed by the framework of interest.« less

  17. Diurnal Variability of Vertical Structure from a TRMM Passive Microwave "Virtual Radar" Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Cecil, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Robust description of the diurnal cycle from TRMM observations is complicated by the limitations of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) sampling; from a 'climatological' perspective, sufficient sampling must exist to control for both spatial and seasonal variability, before tackling an additional diurnal component (e.g., with 8 additional 3-hourly or 24 1-hourly bins). For documentation of vertical structure, the narrow sample swath of the TRMM Precipitation Radar limits the resolution of any of these components. A neural-network based 'virtual radar" retrieval has been trained and internally validated, using multifrequency / multipolarization passive microwave(TM1) brightness temperatures and textures parameters and lightning (LIS) observations, as inputs, and PR volumetric reflectivity as targets (outputs). By training the algorithms (essentially highly multivariate, nonlinear regressions) on a very large sample of high-quality co-located data from the center of the TRMM swath, 3D radar reflectivity and derived parameters (VIL, IWC, Echo Tops, etc.) can be retrieved across the entire TMI swath, good to 8-9% over the dynamic range of parameters. As a step in the retrieval (and as an output of the process), each TMI multifrequency pixel (at 85 GHz resolution) is classified into one of the 25 archetypal radar profile vertical structure "types", previously identified using cluster analysis. The dynamic range of retrieved vertical structure appears to have higher fidelity than the current (Version 6) experimental GPROF hydrometeor vertical structure retrievals. This is attributable to correct representation of the prior probabilities of vertical structure variability in the neural network training data, unlike the GPROF cloud-resolving model training dataset used in the V6 algorithms. The LIS lightning inputs are supplementary inputs, and a separate offline neural network has been trained to impute (predict) LIS lightning from passive-microwave-only data. The virtual radar

  18. Coupling DMRT-ML to a Multi-Scale Passive Microwave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi, N.; Kelly, R. E. J.; Derksen, C.; Toose, P.

    2015-12-01

    Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory (DMRT) for multi layered snowpack (Picard et al., 2012), a physically based numerical model for microwave emission from snow, is coupled to passive microwave brightness temperature (Tb) observations to retrieve snow depth and snow water equivalent. Passive microwave data obtained from space-based and airborne radiometry were coordinated with intense snow-survey campaigns in the sub-Arctic Eureka tundra snow cover region during April 2011. The airborne Tb observations were made across a 50 x 50 km grid using two sampling approaches: high altitude, low spatial resolution observations with footprint dimensions of ~550 x 850 m and low altitude, high spatial resolution observations at ~70 x 110m. The Tb observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), covering the study area in four pixels of 25 x 25 km, were also used to compare with the airborne observations. A preliminary step in retrieval via physical modeling is parameterizing model inputs in the forward mode to assure an inverse model will result an accurate measure of the unknown variable (snow depth). Measurements of snowpack stratigraphy from snow-pits and interpolated snow depth data from magna probe measurements are used to force the DMRT model. While the optical grain size (D0) is used in DMRT, observed grain diameter (Dmax) was measured in the field. In this study, a method based on a practical approach that classifies SSA for each type of snow layer is used and optical grain size is then calculated using reported field data. Furthermore, we report on simple approaches to parameterize stickiness factor and snowpack physical temperature. Using forward DMRT model simulations of snow from different field observations, the sensitivity of the DMRT model to snowpack properties is evaluated at two scales: airborne and spaceborne. For instance, results indicate that 1 K change in snowpack physical temperature of 265 K results in ~1 K

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Surface Characteristics on the Greenland Ice Sheet as Derived from Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark; Rowe, Clinton; Kuivinen, Karl; Mote, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The primary goals of this research were to identify and begin to comprehend the spatial and temporal variations in surface characteristics of the Greenland ice sheet using passive microwave observations, physically-based models of the snowpack and field observations of snowpack and firn properties.

  20. Error characterisation of global active and passive microwave soil moisture datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigo, W. A.; Scipal, K.; Parinussa, R. M.; Liu, Y. Y.; Wagner, W.; de Jeu, R. A. M.; Naeimi, V.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the error structures of remotely sensed soil moisture observations is essential for correctly interpreting observed variations and trends in the data or assimilating them in hydrological or numerical weather prediction models. Nevertheless, a spatially coherent assessment of the quality of the various globally available datasets is often hampered by the limited availability over space and time of reliable in-situ measurements. As an alternative, this study explores the triple collocation error estimation technique for assessing the relative quality of several globally available soil moisture products from active (ASCAT) and passive (AMSR-E and SSM/I) microwave sensors. The triple collocation is a powerful statistical tool to estimate the root mean square error while simultaneously solving for systematic differences in the climatologies of a set of three linearly related data sources with independent error structures. Prerequisite for this technique is the availability of a sufficiently large number of timely corresponding observations. In addition to the active and passive satellite-based datasets, we used the ERA-Interim and GLDAS-NOAH reanalysis soil moisture datasets as a third, independent reference. The prime objective is to reveal trends in uncertainty related to different observation principles (passive versus active), the use of different frequencies (C-, X-, and Ku-band) for passive microwave observations, and the choice of the independent reference dataset (ERA-Interim versus GLDAS-NOAH). The results suggest that the triple collocation method provides realistic error estimates. Observed spatial trends agree well with the existing theory and studies on the performance of different observation principles and frequencies with respect to land cover and vegetation density. In addition, if all theoretical prerequisites are fulfilled (e.g. a sufficiently large number of common observations is available and errors of the different datasets are

  1. A Experimental Study of the Correlation of Process Parameters with YTTRIUM(1) BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXIDE(7 - Thin Film Properties Relevant to Microwave Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihsan, Mojeeb Bin

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting {rm Y_1Ba _2Cu_3O_{7-x}} thin films were deposited by off-axis reactive planar magnetron sputtering for use in passive microwave devices. The effect of process parameters on thin film properties was studied. Targets of two different stoichiometries, viz. { rm Y_1Ba_2Cu_3O_{7 -x}} and {rm Y_1Ba _2Cu_{4.5}O_{y} } were used and thin films were deposited on MgO, SrTiO_3, and LaAlO _3. These films were characterized by four probe dc transport measurement, microwave absorption measurement, SEM, EDS, RBS, and x-ray diffraction. High quality films on all substrates were obtained with in-situ heating. All in-situ films were highly textured with a high degree of c-axis orientation perpendicular to the substrate plane and with a substantial amount of crystallographic and structural order. The dc transport properties of in-situ films were found to be relatively insensitive to target stoichiometry, for a given substrate. Whereas, the surface morphology and microwave properties were found to be dependent upon the target stoichiometry, substrate material and film thickness. Basket weave structure (a-axis grains oriented at 90^ circ with respect to each other) was found to grow on top of c-axis oriented film exhibiting good microwave characteristics in terms of phase purity and weak link behavior. Microwave absorption measurement was found to be a better probe of the uniformity of film properties, and it was possible to detect low Tc phases that were undetectable by dc transport measurement and x-ray diffraction analysis. To test the application of these materials in microwave devices and to study the fundamental aspect of superconductivity, linear microstrip resonators were designed (for lambda_{rm g} /2 resonance near 10 GHz), fabricated from the deposited films and characterized. The best superconducting resonator shows, an unloaded Q of ~1650 at 9.6275 GHz and 35 K. The Q measurements on the microstrip resonators were used to calculate the surface resistivities

  2. Large area mapping of soil moisture using the ESTAR passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Levine, D. M.; Swift, C. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations designed to study land surface hydrologic-atmospheric interactions, showing the potential of L band passive microwave radiometry for measuring surface soil moisture over large areas, are discussed. Satisfying the data needs of these investigations requires the ability to map large areas rapidly. With aircraft systems this means a need for more beam positions over a wider swath on each flightline. For satellite systems the essential problem is resolution. Both of these needs are currently being addressed through the development and verification of Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) technology. The ESTAR L band radiometer was evaluated for soil moisture mapping applications in two studies. The first was conducted over the semiarid rangeland Walnut Gulch watershed located in south eastern Arizona (U.S.). The second was performed in the subhumid Little Washita watershed in south west Oklahoma (U.S.). Both tests showed that the ESTAR is capable of providing soil moisture with the same level of accuracy as existing systems.

  3. NASA's Potential Contributions to Avalanche Forecasting Using Active and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution is based on using active and passive microwave measurements acquired from NASA satellites to improve USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Forest Service forecasting of avalanche danger. Regional Avalanche Centers prepare avalanche forecasts using ground measurements of snowpack and mountain weather conditions. In this Solution, range of the in situ observations is extended by adding remote sensing measurements of snow depth, snow water equivalent, and snowfall rate acquired by satellite missions that include Aqua, CloudSat, future GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement), and the proposed SCLP (Snow and Cold Land Processes). Measurements of snowpack conditions and time evolution are improved by combining the in situ and satellite observations with a snow model. Recurring snow observations from NASA satellites increase accuracy of avalanche forecasting, which helps the public and the managers of public facilities make better avalanche safety decisions.

  4. CDRD and PNPR passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms: verification study over Africa and Southern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panegrossi, Giulia; Casella, Daniele; Cinzia Marra, Anna; Petracca, Marco; Sanò, Paolo; Dietrich, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing NASA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) requires the full exploitation of the complete constellation of passive microwave (PMW) radiometers orbiting around the globe for global precipitation monitoring. In this context the coherence of the estimates of precipitation using different passive microwave radiometers is a crucial need. We have developed two different passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms: one is the Cloud Dynamics Radiation Database algorithm (CDRD), a physically ¬based Bayesian algorithm for conically scanning radiometers (i.e., DMSP SSMIS); the other one is the Passive microwave Neural network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR) algorithm for cross¬-track scanning radiometers (i.e., NOAA and MetOp¬A/B AMSU-¬A/MHS, and NPP Suomi ATMS). The algorithms, originally created for application over Europe and the Mediterranean basin, and used operationally within the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF, http://hsaf.meteoam.it), have been recently modified and extended to Africa and Southern Atlantic for application to the MSG full disk area. The two algorithms are based on the same physical foundation, i.e., the same cloud-radiation model simulations as a priori information in the Bayesian solver and as training dataset in the neural network approach, and they also use similar procedures for identification of frozen background surface, detection of snowfall, and determination of a pixel based quality index of the surface precipitation retrievals. In addition, similar procedures for the screening of not ¬precipitating pixels are used. A novel algorithm for the detection of precipitation in tropical/sub-tropical areas has been developed. The precipitation detection algorithm shows a small rate of false alarms (also over arid/desert regions), a superior detection capability in comparison with other widely used screening algorithms, and it is applicable

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of snow depth derived from passive microwave remote sensing data in Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashtayeva, Shamshagul; Dai, Liyun; Che, Tao; Sagintayev, Zhanay; Sadvakasova, Saltanat; Kussainova, Marzhan; Alimbayeva, Danara; Akynbekkyzy, Meerzhan

    2016-12-01

    Snow cover plays an important role in the hydrological cycle and water management in Kazakhstan. However, traditional observations do not meet current needs. In this study, a snow depth retrieval equation was developed based on passive microwave remote sensing data. The average snow depth in winter (ASDW), snow cover duration (SCD), monthly maximum snow depth (MMSD), and annual average snow depth (AASD) were derived for each year to monitor the spatial and temporal snow distributions. The SCD exhibited significant spatial variations from 30 to 250 days. The longest SCD was found in the mountainous area in eastern Kazakhstan, reaching values between 200 and 250 days in 2005. The AASD increased from the south to the north and maintained latitudinal zonality. The MMSD in most areas ranged from 20 to 30 cm. The ASDW values ranged from 15 to 20 cm in the eastern region and were characterized by spatial regularity of latitudinal zonality. The ASDW in the mountainous area often exceeded 20 cm.

  6. Estimation of oceanic rainfall using passive and active measurements from SeaWinds spaceborne microwave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Khalil Ali

    The Ku band microwave remote sensor, SeaWinds, was developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Two identical SeaWinds instruments were launched into space. The first was flown onboard NASA QuikSCAT satellite which has been orbiting the Earth since June 1999, and the second instrument flew onboard the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite II (ADEOS-II) from December 2002 till October 2003 when an irrecoverable solar panel failure caused a premature end to the ADEOS-II satellite mission. SeaWinds operates at a frequency of 13.4 GHz, and was originally designed to measure the speed and direction of the ocean surface wind vector by relating the normalized radar backscatter measurements to the near surface wind vector through a geophysical model function (GMF). In addition to the backscatter measurement capability, SeaWinds simultaneously measures the polarized radiometric emission from the surface and atmosphere, utilizing a ground signal processing algorithm known as the QuikSCAT/ SeaWinds Radiometer (QRad/SRad). This dissertation presents the development and validation of a mathematical inversion algorithm that combines the simultaneous active radar backscatter and the passive microwave brightness temperatures observed by the SeaWinds sensor to retrieve the oceanic rainfall. The retrieval algorithm is statistically based, and has been developed using collocated measurements from SeaWinds, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) rain rates, and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) wind fields from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The oceanic rain is retrieved on a spacecraft wind vector cell (WVC) measurement grid that has a spatial resolution of 25 km. To evaluate the accuracy of the retrievals, examples of the passive-only, as well as the combined active/passive rain estimates from SeaWinds are presented, and comparisons are made with the standard

  7. Localized electrical fine tuning of passive microwave and radio frequency devices

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.

    2001-04-10

    A method and apparatus for the localized electrical fine tuning of passive multiple element microwave or RF devices in which a nonlinear dielectric material is deposited onto predetermined areas of a substrate containing the device. An appropriate electrically conductive material is deposited over predetermined areas of the nonlinear dielectric and the signal line of the device for providing electrical contact with the nonlinear dielectric. Individual, adjustable bias voltages are applied to the electrically conductive material allowing localized electrical fine tuning of the devices. The method of the present invention can be applied to manufactured devices, or can be incorporated into the design of the devices so that it is applied at the time the devices are manufactured. The invention can be configured to provide localized fine tuning for devices including but not limited to coplanar waveguides, slotline devices, stripline devices, and microstrip devices.

  8. Snow-cover environmental monitoring and assessment in Northeast China using passive microwave emission models.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaishan; Zhang, Yuanzhi

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we present the application of the passive microwave emission models to snow-cover environment monitoring and assessment in Northeast China. The study employs the radiative transfer function and strong fluctuation theory to develop the models. We used the exponential form of a spherical symmetric correlation function to describe random permittivity fluctuations. From strong fluctuation, we then obtained the phase matrix and extinction coefficients of snow-packs for the spherical symmetric correlation function. We also used the vector radiative transfer formula for the layer of a random medium by solving Gaussian quadrature and eigen analysis. By comparing the brightness temperatures at 5, 10.7, 18, and 37 GHz, the modelling results agreed with experimental data of dry-snow physical parameters as measured in the fieldwork.

  9. Recent changes in pan-Arctic melt onset from satellite passive microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Derksen, C.; Brown, R.; Markus, T.

    2013-02-01

    A new satellite passive microwave (PMW) melt onset retrieval algorithm based on temporal variations in the differences of the brightness temperature between 19 and 37 GHz is shown to be as effective as radar (e.g., QuikScat) measurements. The PMW technique shows improved melt estimates that are more closely linked to observed snow-off dates than previous studies. An integrated pan-Arctic (north of 50°N) melt onset date (MOD) dataset is produced by combining estimates on land and sea ice for the entire satellite PMW record. During the 1979-2011 period, significant trends of 2~3 days (decade)-1 to earlier MOD are mainly concentrated over the Eurasian land sector of the Arctic, consistent with changes in spring snow cover extent observed with visible satellite data. The variability and change in melt onset are largely driven by spring surface air temperature, with insignificant influence from low-frequency modes of atmospheric circulation.

  10. Synthesis of passive microwave and radar altimeter data for estimating accumulation rates of polar snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we compare dry-snow extinction coefficients derived from radar altimeter data with brightness temperature data from passive microwave measurements over a portion of the East Antarctic plateau. The comparison between the extinction coefficients and the brightness temperatures shows a strong negative correlation, where the correlation coefficients ranged from -0.87 to -0.95. The extinction coefficient of the dry polar snow decreases with increasing surface elevation, while the average brightness temperature increases with surface elevation. Our analysis shows that the observed trends are related to geographic variations in scattering coefficient of snow, which in turn are controlled by variations in surface temperature and snow accumulation rate. By combining information present in the extinction coefficient and brightness temperature data sets, we develop a model that can be used to obtain quantitative estimates of the accumulation rate of dry polar snow.

  11. Arctic Ocean Snowmelt Onset Dates Derived from Passive Microwave for 1979- 2005.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. R.; Molthan, A. L.; Jackson, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is an integral part of the global climate system and an area that is observing record breaking seasonal fluctuations. This study investigates the spring snowmelt onset conditions in the Arctic sea ice cover from 1979 to 2005. Snowmelt onset over Arctic sea ice is defined as the point in time when liquid water appears in the snowpack. Physically, the timing of snowmelt onset is important because surface energy absorption increases rapidly at snowmelt onset, owing to changes in surface albedo values. Monitoring the timing of snowmelt onset over Arctic sea ice is facilitated by using passive microwave data, because surface microwave emission changes rapidly when liquid water appears in the snowpack, and data acquisitions are relatively unaffected by cloud cover or solar illumination. The Advanced Horizontal Range Algorithm (AHRA) exploits the changes in passive microwave brightness temperatures between 18GHz (19GHz on SSM/I) and 37GHz brightness temperatures to derive snow melt onset dates over Arctic sea ice from 1979-2005. Comparison between AHRA-derived melt onset dates and temperatures from International Arctic Buoy Program/Polar Exchange at the Sea Surface (IABP/POLES) and NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis-2 illustrates melt onset typically occurs when air temperatures near 0oC. The objective of this paper is to examine the melt onset dates for the Arctic region and discuss the trends in the dates over the period studied. In addition, ice reduction dates are calculated and compared to the melt onset dates to further understand the melt characteristics during the spring. The ice reduction date is when the ice concentration drops below 80%. Both the melt onset and ice reduction dates are derived from passive microwave remote sensing. There is a notable period of time, delta t, between the melt onset and ice reduction. Analysis of delta t for the Arctic over the microwave record provides explanations for changes in sea ice cover over time. For instance, an

  12. Investigation of the deterioration of passive films in H2S-containing solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Lei; Tang, Xian; Cui, Zhao-yang; Xue, Jun-peng; Lu, Min-xu

    2017-08-01

    The effect of H2S on the corrosion behavior of 316L stainless steel was investigated using electrochemical methods by changing the gas condition from CO2 to H2S and then back to CO2. The presence of H2S showed an acceleration effect on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in comparison with CO2. The acceleration effect remained even after the complete removal of H2S by CO2, indicating that the passive film was irreversibly damaged. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the passive film was composed of Cr2O3, Fe2O3, and FeS2 after being immersed in H2S-containing solutions. The semiconducting property of the passive film was then investigated by using the Mott-Schottky approach. The presence of sulfides resulted in higher acceptor and donor densities and thus was responsible for the deterioration of passive films.

  13. Multi-Frequency Radar/Passive Microwave retrievals of Cold Season Precipitation from OLYMPEX data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tridon, Frederic; Battaglia, Alessandro; Turk, Joe; Tanelli, Simone; Kneifel, Stefan; Leinonen, Jussi; Kollias, Pavlos

    2017-04-01

    Due to the large natural variability of its microphysical properties, the characterization of solid precipitation over the variety of Earth surface conditions remain a longstanding open issue for space-based radar and passive microwave (MW) observing systems, such those on board the current NASA-JAXA Global Precipitation measurement (GPM) core and constellation satellites. Observations from the NASA DC-8 including radar profiles from the triple frequency Advanced Precipitation Radar (APR-3) and brightness temperatures from PMW radiometers with frequencies ranging from 89 to 183 GHz were collected during November-December 2015 as part of the OLYMPEX-RADEX campaign in western Washington state. Observations cover orographically-driven precipitation events with flight transects over ocean, coastal areas, vegetated and snow-covered surfaces. This study presents results obtained by a retrieval optimal estimation technique capable of combining the various radar and radiometer measurements in order to retrieve the snow properties such as equivalent water mass and characteristic size. The retrieval is constrained by microphysical a-priori defined by in situ measurements whilst the most recent ice scattering models are used in the forward modelling. The vast dataset collected during OLYMPEX is particular valuable because it can provide very strong tests for the fidelity of ice scattering models deep in the non-Rayleigh regime. In addition, the various scattering tables of snow aggregates with different degrees of riming can be exploited to assess the potential of multi-wavelength active and passive microwave systems in identifying the primary ice growth process (i.e. aggregation vs riming vs deposition). First comparisons with in-situ observations from the coordinated flights of the Citation aircraft will also be presented.

  14. Comparison of Passive Microwave-Derived Early Melt Onset Records on Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Angela C.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Meier, Walter N.

    2017-01-01

    Two long records of melt onset (MO) on Arctic sea ice from passive microwave brightness temperatures (Tbs) obtained by a series of satellite-borne instruments are compared. The Passive Microwave (PMW) method and Advanced Horizontal Range Algorithm (AHRA) detect the increase in emissivity that occurs when liquid water develops around snow grains at the onset of early melting on sea ice. The timing of MO on Arctic sea ice influences the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the ice-ocean system throughout the melt season by reducing surface albedos in the early spring. This work presents a thorough comparison of these two methods for the time series of MO dates from 1979through 2012. The methods are first compared using the published data as a baseline comparison of the publically available data products. A second comparison is performed on adjusted MO dates we produced to remove known differences in inter-sensor calibration of Tbs and masking techniques used to develop the original MO date products. These adjustments result in a more consistent set of input Tbs for the algorithms. Tests of significance indicate that the trends in the time series of annual mean MO dates for the PMW and AHRA are statistically different for the majority of the Arctic Ocean including the Laptev, E. Siberian, Chukchi, Beaufort, and central Arctic regions with mean differences as large as 38.3 days in the Barents Sea. Trend agreement improves for our more consistent MO dates for nearly all regions. Mean differences remain large, primarily due to differing sensitivity of in-algorithm thresholds and larger uncertainties in thin-ice regions.

  15. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations and it is based on models that simulate high-resolution brightness temperatures as functions of observed reflectivity profiles and a parameter related to the rain drop-size-distribution. The modeled high-resolution brightness temperatures are used to determine normalized brightness temperature polarizations at the microwave radiometer resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is employed to minimize the differences between the simulated and observed normalized polarizations by adjusting the drop-size-distribution parameter. The impact of other unknowns that are not independent variables in the optimal estimation but affect the retrievals is minimized through statistical parameterizations derived from cloud model simulations. The retrieval technique is investigated using TRMM observations collected during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). These observations cover an area extending from 5 deg to deg N latitude and 166 deg to 172 deg E longitude from July to September 1999, and are coincident with various ground-based observations, facilitating a detailed analysis of the retrieved precipitation. Using the method developed in this study, precipitation estimates consistent with both the passive and active TRMM observations are obtained. Various parameters characterizing these estimates, i.e. the rain rate, the precipitation water content, the drop-size-distribution intercept, and the mass weighted mean drop diameter, are in good qualitative agreement with independent experimental and theoretical estimates. Combined rain estimates are in general higher than the official TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) only estimates for the area and the period considered in the study. Ground-based precipitation estimates

  16. Passive Microwave Algorithms for Sea Ice Concentration: A Comparison of Two Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Gloersen, Per

    1997-01-01

    The most comprehensive large-scale characterization of the global sea ice cover so far has been provided by satellite passive microwave data. Accurate retrieval of ice concentrations from these data is important because of the sensitivity of surface flux(e.g. heat, salt, and water) calculations to small change in the amount of open water (leads and polynyas) within the polar ice packs. Two algorithms that have been used for deriving ice concentrations from multichannel data are compared. One is the NASA Team algorithm and the other is the Bootstrap algorithm, both of which were developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The two algorithms use different channel combinations, reference brightness temperatures, weather filters, and techniques. Analyses are made to evaluate the sensitivity of algorithm results to variations of emissivity and temperature with space and time. To assess the difference in the performance of the two algorithms, analyses were performed with data from both hemispheres and for all seasons. The results show only small differences in the central Arctic in but larger disagreements in the seasonal regions and in summer. In some ares in the Antarctic, the Bootstrap technique show ice concentrations higher than those of the Team algorithm by as much as 25%; whereas, in other areas, it shows ice concentrations lower by as much as 30%. The The differences in the results are caused by temperature effects, emissivity effects, and tie point differences. The Team and the Bootstrap results were compared with available Landsat, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. AVHRR, Landsat, and SAR data sets all yield higher concentrations than the passive microwave algorithms. Inconsistencies among results suggest the need for further validation studies.

  17. Passive Microwave Algorithms for Sea Ice Concentration: A Comparison of Two Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Gloersen, Per

    1997-01-01

    The most comprehensive large-scale characterization of the global sea ice cover so far has been provided by satellite passive microwave data. Accurate retrieval of ice concentrations from these data is important because of the sensitivity of surface flux(e.g. heat, salt, and water) calculations to small change in the amount of open water (leads and polynyas) within the polar ice packs. Two algorithms that have been used for deriving ice concentrations from multichannel data are compared. One is the NASA Team algorithm and the other is the Bootstrap algorithm, both of which were developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The two algorithms use different channel combinations, reference brightness temperatures, weather filters, and techniques. Analyses are made to evaluate the sensitivity of algorithm results to variations of emissivity and temperature with space and time. To assess the difference in the performance of the two algorithms, analyses were performed with data from both hemispheres and for all seasons. The results show only small differences in the central Arctic in but larger disagreements in the seasonal regions and in summer. In some ares in the Antarctic, the Bootstrap technique show ice concentrations higher than those of the Team algorithm by as much as 25%; whereas, in other areas, it shows ice concentrations lower by as much as 30%. The The differences in the results are caused by temperature effects, emissivity effects, and tie point differences. The Team and the Bootstrap results were compared with available Landsat, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. AVHRR, Landsat, and SAR data sets all yield higher concentrations than the passive microwave algorithms. Inconsistencies among results suggest the need for further validation studies.

  18. River gauging at global scale using optical and passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Brakenridge, G. Robert; Kettner, Albert J.; Beck, Hylke E.; De Groeve, Tom; Schellekens, Jaap

    2016-08-01

    Recent discharge observations are lacking for most rivers globally. Discharge can be estimated from remotely sensed floodplain and channel inundation area, but there is currently no method that can be automatically extended to many rivers. We examined whether automated monitoring is feasible by statistically relating inundation estimates from moderate to coarse (>0.05°) resolution remote sensing to monthly station discharge records. Inundation extents were derived from optical MODIS data and passive microwave sensors, and compared to monthly discharge records from over 8000 gauging stations and satellite altimetry observations for 442 reaches of large rivers. An automated statistical method selected grid cells to construct "satellite gauging reaches" (SGRs). MODIS SGRs were generally more accurate than passive microwave SGRs, but there were complementary strengths. The rivers widely varied in size, regime, and morphology. As expected performance was low (R < 0.7) for many (86%), often small or regulated, rivers, but 1263 successful SGRs remained. High monthly discharge variability enhanced performance: a standard deviation of 100-1000 m3 s-1 yielded ca. 50% chance of R > 0.6. The best results (R > 0.9) were obtained for large unregulated lowland rivers, particularly in tropical and boreal regions. Relatively poor results were obtained in arid regions, where flow pulses are few and recede rapidly, and in temperate regions, where many rivers are modified and contained. Provided discharge variations produce clear changes in inundated area and gauge records are available for part of the satellite record, SGRs can retrieve monthly river discharge values back to around 1998 and up to present.

  19. Machine Learning on Images: Combining Passive Microwave and Optical Data to Estimate Snow Water Equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozier, J.; Tolle, K.; Bair, N.

    2014-12-01

    We have a problem that may be a specific example of a generic one. The task is to estimate spatiotemporally distributed estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) in snow-dominated mountain environments, including those that lack on-the-ground measurements. Several independent methods exist, but all are problematic. The remotely sensed date of disappearance of snow from each pixel can be combined with a calculation of melt to reconstruct the accumulated SWE for each day back to the last significant snowfall. Comparison with streamflow measurements in mountain ranges where such data are available shows this method to be accurate, but the big disadvantage is that SWE can only be calculated retroactively after snow disappears, and even then only for areas with little accumulation during the melt season. Passive microwave sensors offer real-time global SWE estimates but suffer from several issues, notably signal loss in wet snow or in forests, saturation in deep snow, subpixel variability in the mountains owing to the large (~25 km) pixel size, and SWE overestimation in the presence of large grains such as depth and surface hoar. Throughout the winter and spring, snow-covered area can be measured at sub-km spatial resolution with optical sensors, with accuracy and timeliness improved by interpolating and smoothing across multiple days. So the question is, how can we establish the relationship between Reconstruction—available only after the snow goes away—and passive microwave and optical data to accurately estimate SWE during the snow season, when the information can help forecast spring runoff? Linear regression provides one answer, but can modern machine learning techniques (used to persuade people to click on web advertisements) adapt to improve forecasts of floods and droughts in areas where more than one billion people depend on snowmelt for their water resources?

  20. Microwave assisted growth of copper germanide thin films at very low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sayantan; Alford, T. L.

    2013-08-26

    Herein the synthesis of Cu{sub 3}Ge films by exposing Cu-Ge alloy films to microwave radiation is reported. It is shown that microwave radiation led to the formation of copper germanide at temperatures ca. 80 °C. The electrical properties of the Cu{sub 3}Ge films are presented and compared for various annealing times. X-ray diffraction shows that the Cu{sub 3}Ge films formed after microwave annealing is crystalline in the orthorhombic phase. Rutherford backscattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the formation of copper oxide encapsulation layer. Despite the slight oxidation of Cu during the microwave anneal the lowest resistivity of Cu{sub 3}Ge films obtained is 14 μΩ-cm.

  1. Snowmelt on the Greenland Ice Sheet as Derived From Passive Microwave Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalati, Waleed; Steffen, Konrad

    1997-01-01

    The melt extent of the snow on the Greenland ice sheet is of considerable importance to the ice sheet's mass and energy balance, as well as Arctic and global climates. By comparing passive microwave satellite data to field observations, variations in melt extent have been detected by establishing melt thresholds in the cross-polarized gradient ratio (XPGR). The XPGR, defined as the normalized difference between the 19-GHz horizontal channel and the 37-GHz vertical channel of the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), exploits the different effects of snow wetness on different frequencies and polarizations and establishes a distinct melt signal. Using this XPGR melt signal, seasonal and interannual variations in snowmelt extent of the ice sheet are studied. The melt is found to be most extensive on the western side of the ice sheet and peaks in late July. Moreover, there is a notable increasing trend in melt area between the years 1979 and 1991 of 4.4% per year, which came to an abrupt halt in 1992 after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. A similar trend is observed in the temperatures at six coastal stations. The relationship between the warming trend and increasing melt trend between 1979 and 1991 suggests that a 1 C temperature rise corresponds to an increase in melt area of 73000 sq km, which in general exceeds one standard deviation of the natural melt area variability.

  2. Spatio-temporal evaluation of resolution enhancement for passive microwave soil moisture and vegetation optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, A. I.; Parinussa, R. M.; Renzullo, L. J.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; de Jeu, R. A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Space-borne passive microwave radiometers are used to derive land surface parameters such as surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth (VOD). However, the value of such products in regional hydrology is limited by their coarse resolution. In this study, the land parameter retrieval model (LPRM) is used to derive enhanced resolution (∼10 km) soil moisture and VOD from advanced microwave scanning radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures sharpened by a modulation technique based on high-frequency observations. A precipitation mask based on brightness temperatures was applied to remove precipitation artefacts in the sharpened LPRM products. The spatial and temporal patterns in the resulting products are evaluated against field-measured and modeled soil moisture as well as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) over mainland Australia. Results show that resolution enhancement accurately sharpens the boundaries of different vegetation types, lakes and wetlands. Significant changes in temporal agreement between LPRM products and related datasets are limited to specific areas, such as lakes and coastal areas. Spatial correlations, on the other hand, increase over most of Australia. In addition, hydrological signals from irrigation and water bodies that were absent in the low-resolution soil moisture product become clearly visible after resolution enhancement. The increased information detail in the high-resolution LPRM products should benefit hydrological studies at regional scales.

  3. Seasonal Snow Extent and Snow Volume in South America Using SSM/I Passive Microwave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James L.; Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.; Kelly, R.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in South America was examined in this study using passive microwave satellite data from the Special Sensor Microwave Imagers (SSM/I) on board Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. For the period from 1992-1998, both snow cover extent and snow depth (snow mass) were investigated during the winter months (May-August) in the Patagonia region of Argentina. Since above normal temperatures in this region are typically above freezing, the coldest winter month was found to be not only the month having the most extensive snow cover but also the month having the deepest snows. For the seven-year period of this study, the average snow cover extent (May-August) was about 0.46 million sq km and the average monthly snow mass was about 1.18 x 10(exp 13) kg. July 1992 was the month having the greatest snow extent (nearly 0.8 million sq km) and snow mass (approximately 2.6 x 10(exp 13) kg).

  4. Multifrequency airborne passive microwave assimilation to estimate snow water equivalent: a particle filter approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R. S.; Durand, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents and illustrates improved retrieval method of snow water equivalent (SWE) from airborne passive microwave (PM) measurements. A particle filter approach is proposed to assimilate PM brightness temperature (Tb) data in order to update snowpack states in a land surface model and demonstrates compared to ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method. The methods were applied over the Yampa river basin in the Colorado Rockies within the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) area of 2002-2003. Forcing data is derived from the North American Land Data Assimilation v2 (NLDAS-2) dataset and Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) is used to convert the snow state variables to Tb. The effects of vegetation and atmosphere are included in the radiative transfer model (RTM). Multifrequency measurements of PSR (Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer) are used and assimilated into model predictions of SWE at 120-m spatial resolution. The contributions of each channel to recover the true SWE are computed and analyzed. The SWE estimation is validated against SNOTEL and snow course observations.

  5. Potential Application of Airborne Passive Microwave Observations for Monitoring Inland Flooding Caused by Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Radley, C.D.; LaFontaine, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Inland flooding from tropical cyclones can be a significant factor in storm-related deaths in the United States and other countries. Information collected during NASA tropical cyclone field studies suggest surface water and flooding induced by tropical cyclone precipitation can be detected and therefore monitored using passive microwave airborne radiometers. In particular, the 10.7 GHz frequency of the NASA Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) flown on the NASA ER-2 has demonstrated high resolution detection of anomalous surface water and flooding in numerous situations. This presentation will highlight the analysis of three cases utilizing primarily satellite and airborne radiometer data. Radiometer data from the 1998 Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) are utilized to detect surface water during landfalling Hurricane Georges in both the Dominican Republic and Louisiana. A third case is landfalling Tropical Storm Gert in Eastern Mexico during the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment in 2005. AMPR data are compared to topographic data and vegetation indices to evaluate the significance of the surface water signature visible in the 10.7 GHz information. The results of this study suggest the benefit of an aircraft 10 GHz radiometer to provide real-time observations of surface water conditions as part of a multi-sensor flood monitoring network.

  6. Evaluating melt onset date in the United States using remotely sensed passive microwave derived brightness temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Douglas J.

    The timing and magnitude of spring snowmelt events impact riverine flooding and inform reservoir operations. This study evaluates the ability of the Diurnal Amplitude Variation (DAV), Frequency Difference (FD) and Polarization Ratio (PR) melt onset detection algorithms to determine melt onset dates (MOD) in the mid-latitudes of the United States. The methods are evaluated using satellite remotely sensed passive microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - EOS (AMSR-E) sensor and compare against in situ snow measurements from 763 Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) and Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) stations. The DAV method performs best in Alaska, predicting the MOD with a mean absolute error of 9.4 days, while the Frequency Difference and Polarization Ratio methods produce mean absolute errors of 12.5 and 11.9 days, respectively. The DAV method also clearly produced the best results in Vermont, the FD method worked best in South Dakota and the PR method performed best in Arizona. None of the study's methods are recommended for California, Minnesota, Oregon and Washington. The remaining states did not have an algorithm that worked notably better than the others and it was discovered that the methods do not work for a shallow snowpack. Tree cover was also found to have little effect on the performance of the melt onset detection methods for pixels having less than 50% tree cover.

  7. Snowmelt on the Greenland Ice Sheet as Derived From Passive Microwave Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalati, Waleed; Steffen, Konrad

    1997-01-01

    The melt extent of the snow on the Greenland ice sheet is of considerable importance to the ice sheet's mass and energy balance, as well as Arctic and global climates. By comparing passive microwave satellite data to field observations, variations in melt extent have been detected by establishing melt thresholds in the cross-polarized gradient ratio (XPGR). The XPGR, defined as the normalized difference between the 19-GHz horizontal channel and the 37-GHz vertical channel of the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), exploits the different effects of snow wetness on different frequencies and polarizations and establishes a distinct melt signal. Using this XPGR melt signal, seasonal and interannual variations in snowmelt extent of the ice sheet are studied. The melt is found to be most extensive on the western side of the ice sheet and peaks in late July. Moreover, there is a notable increasing trend in melt area between the years 1979 and 1991 of 4.4% per year, which came to an abrupt halt in 1992 after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. A similar trend is observed in the temperatures at six coastal stations. The relationship between the warming trend and increasing melt trend between 1979 and 1991 suggests that a 1 C temperature rise corresponds to an increase in melt area of 73000 sq km, which in general exceeds one standard deviation of the natural melt area variability.

  8. Potential Application of Airborne Passive Microwave Observations for Monitoring Inland Flooding Caused by Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Radley, C.D.; LaFontaine, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Inland flooding from tropical cyclones can be a significant factor in storm-related deaths in the United States and other countries. Information collected during NASA tropical cyclone field studies suggest surface water and flooding induced by tropical cyclone precipitation can be detected and therefore monitored using passive microwave airborne radiometers. In particular, the 10.7 GHz frequency of the NASA Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) flown on the NASA ER-2 has demonstrated high resolution detection of anomalous surface water and flooding in numerous situations. This presentation will highlight the analysis of three cases utilizing primarily satellite and airborne radiometer data. Radiometer data from the 1998 Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) are utilized to detect surface water during landfalling Hurricane Georges in both the Dominican Republic and Louisiana. A third case is landfalling Tropical Storm Gert in Eastern Mexico during the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment in 2005. AMPR data are compared to topographic data and vegetation indices to evaluate the significance of the surface water signature visible in the 10.7 GHz information. The results of this study suggest the benefit of an aircraft 10 GHz radiometer to provide real-time observations of surface water conditions as part of a multi-sensor flood monitoring network.

  9. Ice surface temperature retrieval from AVHRR, ATSR, and passive microwave satellite data: Algorithm development and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Jeff; Maslanik, James; Steffen, Konrad

    1995-01-01

    During the second phase project year we have made progress in the development and refinement of surface temperature retrieval algorithms and in product generation. More specifically, we have accomplished the following: (1) acquired a new advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data set for the Beaufort Sea area spanning an entire year; (2) acquired additional along-track scanning radiometer(ATSR) data for the Arctic and Antarctic now totalling over eight months; (3) refined our AVHRR Arctic and Antarctic ice surface temperature (IST) retrieval algorithm, including work specific to Greenland; (4) developed ATSR retrieval algorithms for the Arctic and Antarctic, including work specific to Greenland; (5) developed cloud masking procedures for both AVHRR and ATSR; (6) generated a two-week bi-polar global area coverage (GAC) set of composite images from which IST is being estimated; (7) investigated the effects of clouds and the atmosphere on passive microwave 'surface' temperature retrieval algorithms; and (8) generated surface temperatures for the Beaufort Sea data set, both from AVHRR and special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I).

  10. Behavior of multitemporal and multisensor passive microwave indices in Southern Hemisphere ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza, Veronica; Grings, Francisco; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Huete, Alfredo; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Beringer, Jason; Van Gorsel, Eva; Karszenbaum, Haydee

    2014-12-01

    This study focused on the time series analysis of passive microwave and optical satellite data collected from six Southern Hemisphere ecosystems in Australia and Argentina. The selected ecosystems represent a wide range of land cover types, including deciduous open forest, temperate forest, tropical and semiarid savannas, and grasslands. We used two microwave indices, the frequency index (FI) and polarization index (PI), to assess the relative contributions of soil and vegetation properties (moisture and structure) to the observations. Optical-based satellite vegetation products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer were also included to aid in the analysis. We studied the X and Ka bands of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS and Wind Satellite, resulting in up to four observations per day (1:30, 6:00, 13:30, and 18:00 h). Both the seasonal and hourly variations of each of the indices were examined. Environmental drivers (precipitation and temperature) and eddy covariance measurements (gross ecosystem productivity and latent energy) were also analyzed. It was found that in moderately dense forests, FI was dependent on canopy properties (leaf area index and vegetation moisture). In tropical woody savannas, a significant regression (R2) was found between FI and PI with precipitation (R2 > 0.5) and soil moisture (R2 > 0.6). In the areas of semiarid savanna and grassland ecosystems, FI variations found to be significantly related to soil moisture (R2 > 0.7) and evapotranspiration (R2 > 0.5), while PI varied with vegetation phenology. Significant differences (p < 0.01) were found among FI values calculated at the four local times.

  11. Development and evaluation of a global long-term passive microwave vegetation product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Y.; Van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; de Jeu, R. A. M.; McCabe, M. F.; Evans, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Vegetation optical depth (VOD) retrievals from three satellite-based passive microwave instruments were merged to produce the first long-term global microwave-based vegetation product, spanning from 1988 through 2008. The resulting VOD product shows seasonal cycles and inter-annual variations that generally correspond with those observed in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Some notable differences exist in the long-term trends: the NDVI, operating in the optical regime, is sensitive to chlorophyll abundance and photosynthetically active biomass of the leaves, whereas the microwave-based VOD is an indicator of the vegetation water content in total above-ground biomass, i.e. including wood and leaf components. A global analysis is undertaken to evaluate global VOD trends over 1988-2008. We conduct Mann-Kendall linear trend tests on annual average VOD to identify regions of significant change. Patterns for these regions were evaluated against independent datasets to diagnose the underlying cause of the observed trends. Results indicate that: (1) VOD patterns correspond strongly to temporal precipitation patterns over water limited regions; (2) over croplands, annual average VOD shows a similar temporal pattern with reported crop production; (3) over forest, the spatial pattern of VOD decline agrees well with patterns of deforestation, fires and clear cutting. We conclude that VOD can be used to estimate and interpret global changes in total above ground vegetation. We expect that this new observation source will be of considerable interest to hydrological, agricultural, climate change and carbon cycle studies, and provide new insights into these and related process investigations.

  12. Loss mechanisms in superconducting thin film microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Jan Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Friedrich; Zollitsch, Christoph W.; Meier, Sebastian; Fischer, Michael; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Menzel, Edwin P.; Deppe, Frank; Eder, Peter; Xie, Edwar; Gross, Rudolf; Marx, Achim

    2016-01-07

    We present a systematic analysis of the internal losses of superconducting coplanar waveguide microwave resonators based on niobium thin films on silicon substrates. In particular, we investigate losses introduced by Nb/Al interfaces in the center conductor, which is important for experiments where Al based Josephson junctions are integrated into Nb based circuits. We find that these interfaces can be a strong source for two-level state (TLS) losses, when the interfaces are not positioned at current nodes of the resonator. In addition to TLS losses, for resonators including Al, quasiparticle losses become relevant above 200 mK. Finally, we investigate how losses generated by eddy currents in conductive material on the backside of the substrate can be minimized by using thick enough substrates or metals with high conductivity on the substrate backside.

  13. Microwave absorption of free carriers in doped conjugated polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbles, Garry

    Flash photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (fp-TRMC) is a powerful spectroscopic tool for the detection of mobile charges in organic systems, such as conjugated polymers. We will report on a study of charge carrier generation in a number of polymer systems where the solid-state microstructure (SSM) of the thin films can be controlled using both molecular structure and processing conditions. By incorporating a low concentration of molecular acceptors, such as metallo-phthalocyanines, as well as substituted fullerenes and perylenes, the driving force for photoinduced electron transfer can be controlled through the excited state energy and the reduction potential. Our results indicate the importance of the crystalline phase of the polymer to stabilise and reduce the rate of recombination of the holes with the electrons that remain trapped on the acceptor. In addition, the role that the SSM plays on the stabilization of bound electron-hole pairs, or charge-transfer (CT) states will be examined.

  14. Measuring and Simulating Passive C-band Microwave Relief Effects over Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.; Jiang, L.; Zhao, S.

    2010-12-01

    Spaceborne microwave radiometers have established the superiority of global climate change and hydrographic monitoring in global coverage, day and night, all weather, and strong transmission. For passive microwave remote sensing, topography serves as one of perturbing effects in respect that it represents surface roughness larger than microwave wavelength. The lower frequencies used by C band perform more strongly in comparison with both higher microwave frequencies (>10GHz) under adverse weather, and L band (1to2GHz) at an advantage of relatively elaborate spatial resolution. A numerical simulation of satellite microwave radiometric observations of topographic scenes has been developed. Nerveless, the scarcity of field experiments on relief effects constitutes a major impediment to the further progress in the investigation of rough terrain correction at microwave frequencies. In the interest of simulating brightness temperatures exactly in mountainous area well combined with topographic experiments, Tibetan Plateau in China regarded as our study area, the research carried into execution as the following: (1) Analyzing relief effects for passive C band, and extracting topographic features quantificationally in order to satisfy microwave radiative transfer model in mountainous areas; (2) Referring to the configuration in AMSR-E, by the method of spatial convolution statistic analysis, in accordance with the estimation of the sensitivity for topographic features, selecting efficiency relief factors at C-band ; (3)Building various shapes of artifactitious hills to measure relief effects in the ground experiment based on the observation of Truck-mounted Multi-frequency Microwave Radiometer (TMMR); (4) According to the observation of relief effects validated in the field measurement, reworking the microwave radiative transfer model in rough terrain, and then simulating brightness temperatures in the configuration of AMSR-E. From the result of the comparison between our

  15. a Structural Investigation of the Passive Film on Iron and Iron/chromium Alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkar, Moussa

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The Electrochemical Polarisation, Photocurrent Spectroscopy and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) techniques have been used to study the passive film on pure iron and iron alloy samples containing up to 25% chromium. The material used in this work was prepared both as bulk and thin films. The bulk samples were passivated electrochemically at various anodic potentials whereas the film ones were either fully converted into passive films by simple immersion in various solutions for one week or electrochemically at various anodic potentials. The Fe and Fe/Cr film samples used in the electrochemical passivation were deposited onto gold substrate and those passivated by immersion were deposited directly onto mylar. Polarisation curves for both the bulk and film materials were recorded. They suggest that the electrochemical behaviour of the two materials is similar. The wavelength and potential dependence of the photocurrent spectra were also recorded for the bulk and film samples of Fe and Fe/Cr alloys. The data were analysed to obtain the effective optical band gaps and flat band potentials of the passive films respectively. These results also show that the two materials are similar. Furthermore, the photocurrent data suggest that the passive film on Fe/Cr alloys consists of Fe(III) and Cr(III) phases. The fluorescence EXAFS above the Fe and Cr K-absorption edges of the passive film on Fe and Fe/Cr alloy films has been recorded both in-situ and ex-situ. The spectra obtained in these studies were analysed to obtain average Fe-O and Fe-Fe separations as well as Cr-O and Cr-Cr ones. These results together with a detailed examination of the XANES suggest that the passive film on iron in the absence of chromium is best described as a disordered gamma -FeOOH-like structure and that on Fe/Cr alloys as well as on pure Fe passivated in chromate solution contains two simultaneous

  16. Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, III, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures.

  17. Effects of the Ionosphere on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Ocean Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Abaham, Saji; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Among the remote sensing applications currently being considered from space is the measurement of sea surface salinity. The salinity of the open ocean is important for understanding ocean circulation and for modeling energy exchange with the atmosphere. Passive microwave remote sensors operating near 1.4 GHz (L-band) could provide data needed to fill the gap in current coverage and to complement in situ arrays being planned to provide subsurface profiles in the future. However, the dynamic range of the salinity signal in the open ocean is relatively small and propagation effects along the path from surface to sensor must be taken into account. In particular, Faraday rotation and even attenuation/emission in the ionosphere can be important sources of error. The purpose or this work is to estimate the magnitude of these effects in the context of a future remote sensing system in space to measure salinity in L-band. Data will be presented as a function of time location and solar activity using IRI-95 to model the ionosphere. The ionosphere presents two potential sources of error for the measurement of salinity: Rotation of the polarization vector (Faraday rotation) and attenuation/emission. Estimates of the effect of these two phenomena on passive remote sensing over the oceans at L-band (1.4 GHz) are presented.

  18. [Effect of Helium on Diamond Films Deposited Using Microwave PCVD].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Zhi-bin; Tao, Li-ping; Gao, Pan; Li, Yi-cheng; Fu, Qiu-ming

    2015-03-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to in situ diagnose the CH4-H2-He plasma in order to know the effect of helium on the diamond growth by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma as a function of helium addition was studied. The diamond films deposited in different helium volume fraction were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the spectra intensity of radicals of H(α), H(β), H(γ), CH and C2 increases with the increasing of helium volume fraction, especially, that of radical H(α) has the most improvement. The spectrum space diagnosis results show that the uniformity of C2, CH radicals in the plasma tends to poor due to the helium addition and resulted in a different thickness along the radial direction The measurement of deposition rate shows that the addition of helium is useful for the improvement of the growth rate of diamond films, due to relative concentration of carbon radicals was increased. The deposition rate increases by 24% when the volume fraction of He was increased from 0 vol. % to 4.7 vol.%. The micrographs of SEM reveal that with the increasing of helium volume fraction, the diamond films' crystallite orientation changes from (111) to disorder and a twins growth becomes obvious. The secondary nucleation density during growth increases because the high relatively concentration of C2 radicals under higher helium volume fraction (4.7 vol. %). In addition, the substrate was etched and sputtered by the plasma, which introduced metallic atoms into the plasma during the deposition of diamond films. Eventually, the existing of secondary nucleation and impurity atoms lead to the appearance of twins and results in the compressive dress.

  19. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Olson, William S.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated using both simulated and airborne data. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite multi-frequency active and passive observations. These observations are characterized by various spatial and sampling resolutions. This makes the retrieval problem mathematically more difficult and ill-determined because the quality of information decreases with decreasing resolution. A model that, given reflectivity profiles and a small set of parameters (including the cloud water content, the intercept drop size distribution, and a variable describing the frozen hydrometeor properties), simulates high-resolution brightness temperatures is used. The high-resolution simulated brightness temperatures are convolved at the real sensor resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is used to minimize the differences between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. The retrieval technique is investigated using cloud model synthetic and airborne data from the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment. Simulated high-resolution brightness temperatures and reflectivities and airborne observation strong are convolved at the resolution of the TRMM instruments and retrievals are performed and analyzed relative to the reference data used in observations synthesis. An illustration of the possible use of the technique in satellite rainfall estimation is presented through an application to TRMM data. The study suggests improvements in combined active and passive retrievals even when the instruments resolutions are significantly different. Future work needs to better quantify the retrievals performance, especially in connection with satellite applications, and the uncertainty of the models used in retrieval.

  20. Error characterisation of global active and passive microwave soil moisture data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigo, W. A.; Scipal, K.; Parinussa, R. M.; Liu, Y. Y.; Wagner, W.; de Jeu, R. A. M.; Naeimi, V.

    2010-08-01

    Understanding the error structures of remotely sensed soil moisture products is essential for correctly interpreting observed variations and trends in the data or assimilating them in hydrological or numerical weather prediction models. Nevertheless, a spatially coherent assessment of the quality of the various globally available data sets is often hampered by the limited availability over space and time of reliable in-situ measurements. This study explores the triple collocation error estimation technique for assessing the relative quality of several globally available soil moisture products from active (ASCAT) and passive (AMSR-E and SSM/I) microwave sensors. The triple collocation technique is a powerful tool to estimate the root mean square error while simultaneously solving for systematic differences in the climatologies of a set of three independent data sources. In addition to the scatterometer and radiometer data sets, we used the ERA-Interim and GLDAS-NOAH reanalysis soil moisture data sets as a third, independent reference. The prime objective is to reveal trends in uncertainty related to different observation principles (passive versus active), the use of different frequencies (C-, X-, and Ku-band) for passive microwave observations, and the choice of the independent reference data set (ERA-Interim versus GLDAS-NOAH). The results suggest that the triple collocation method provides realistic error estimates. Observed spatial trends agree well with the existing theory and studies on the performance of different observation principles and frequencies with respect to land cover and vegetation density. In addition, if all theoretical prerequisites are fulfilled (e.g. a sufficiently large number of common observations is available and errors of the different data sets are uncorrelated) the errors estimated for the remote sensing products are hardly influenced by the choice of the third independent data set. The results obtained in this study can help us in

  1. A new algorithm to measure sea ice concentration from passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Sharkov, Evgeniy; Komarova, Nataliya; Raev, Mikhail; Tikhonov, Vasilii; Boyarskiy, Dmitriy

    Studies of spatial and temporal properties of sea ice distribution in polar regions help to monitor global environmental changes and reveal their natural and anthropogenic factors, as well as make forecasts of weather, marine transportation and fishing conditions, assess perspectives of mineral mining on the continental shelf, etc. Contact methods of observation are often insufficient to meet the goals, very complicated technically and organizationally and not always safe for people involved. Remote sensing techniques are believed to be the best alternative. Its include monitoring of polar regions by means of passive microwave sensing with the aim to determine spatial distribution, types, thickness and snow cover of ice. However, the algorithms employed today to retrieve sea ice characteristics from passive microwave sensing data for different reasons give significant errors, especially in summer period and also near ice edges and in cases of open ice. One of the error sources is the current practice of using empirical dependencies and adjustment coefficients for the retrieval of ice characteristics and neglecting the physics of the process. We discuss an electrodynamic model of the sea surface - sea ice - snow cover - atmosphere system developed with account taken of physical and structural properties of the ambient. Model calculations of ice brightness temperature in different concentrations and snow covers are in good agreement with SSM/I measurement data. On the base of this model we develop a new algorithm for the retrieval of sea ice concentration from passive microwave sensing data - Variation Arctic Sea Ice Algorithm (VASIA). In contrast to the well-known techniques (NASA TEAM, Bootstrap, ASI, NORSEX et al), it takes into account the real physical parameters of ice, snow and open water rather than empirical and adjustment coefficients. Satellite data were provided by the POLE-RT-Fields SSM/I and SSMIS data collection for polar regions retrieved from the

  2. Bayesian Estimation of Precipitation from Satellite Passive Microwave Observations Using Combined Radar-Radiometer Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation estimation from satellite passive microwave radiometer observations is a problem that does not have a unique solution that is insensitive to errors in the input data. Traditionally, to make this problem well posed, a priori information derived from physical models or independent, high-quality observations is incorporated into the solution. In the present study, a database of precipitation profiles and associated brightness temperatures is constructed to serve as a priori information in a passive microwave radiometer algorithm. The precipitation profiles are derived from a Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) combined radar radiometer algorithm, and the brightness temperatures are TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) observed. Because the observed brightness temperatures are consistent with those derived from a radiative transfer model embedded in the combined algorithm, the precipitation brightness temperature database is considered to be physically consistent. The database examined here is derived from the analysis of a month-long record of TRMM data that yields more than a million profiles of precipitation and associated brightness temperatures. These profiles are clustered into a tractable number of classes based on the local sea surface temperature, a radiometer-based estimate of the echo-top height (the height beyond which the reflectivity drops below 17 dBZ), and brightness temperature principal components. For each class, the mean precipitation profile, brightness temperature principal components, and probability of occurrence are determined. The precipitation brightness temperature database supports a radiometer-only algorithm that incorporates a Bayesian estimation methodology. In the Bayesian framework, precipitation estimates are weighted averages of the mean precipitation values corresponding to the classes in the database, with the weights being determined according to the similarity between the observed brightness temperature principal

  3. Bayesian Estimation of Precipitation from Satellite Passive Microwave Observations Using Combined Radar-Radiometer Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation estimation from satellite passive microwave radiometer observations is a problem that does not have a unique solution that is insensitive to errors in the input data. Traditionally, to make this problem well posed, a priori information derived from physical models or independent, high-quality observations is incorporated into the solution. In the present study, a database of precipitation profiles and associated brightness temperatures is constructed to serve as a priori information in a passive microwave radiometer algorithm. The precipitation profiles are derived from a Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) combined radar radiometer algorithm, and the brightness temperatures are TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) observed. Because the observed brightness temperatures are consistent with those derived from a radiative transfer model embedded in the combined algorithm, the precipitation brightness temperature database is considered to be physically consistent. The database examined here is derived from the analysis of a month-long record of TRMM data that yields more than a million profiles of precipitation and associated brightness temperatures. These profiles are clustered into a tractable number of classes based on the local sea surface temperature, a radiometer-based estimate of the echo-top height (the height beyond which the reflectivity drops below 17 dBZ), and brightness temperature principal components. For each class, the mean precipitation profile, brightness temperature principal components, and probability of occurrence are determined. The precipitation brightness temperature database supports a radiometer-only algorithm that incorporates a Bayesian estimation methodology. In the Bayesian framework, precipitation estimates are weighted averages of the mean precipitation values corresponding to the classes in the database, with the weights being determined according to the similarity between the observed brightness temperature principal

  4. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  5. Error Characterisation and Merging of Active and Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Gruber, Alexander; de Jeu, Richard; Parinussa, Robert; Chung, Daniel; Dorigo, Wouter; Reimer, Christoph; Kidd, Richard

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA) a data fusion system has been developed which is capable of ingesting surface soil moisture data derived from active and passive microwave sensors (ASCAT, AMSR-E, etc.) flown on different satellite platforms and merging them to create long and consistent time series of soil moisture suitable for use in climate change studies. The so-created soil moisture data records (latest version: ESA CCI SM v02.1 released on 5/12/2014) are freely available and can be obtained from http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/. As described by Wagner et al. (2012) the principle steps of the data fusion process are: 1) error characterisation, 2) matching to account for data set specific biases, and 3) merging. In this presentation we present the current data fusion process and discuss how new error characterisation methods, such as the increasingly popular triple collocation method as discussed for example by Zwieback et al. (2012) may be used to improve it. The main benefit of an improved error characterisation would be a more reliable identification of the best performing microwave soil moisture retrieval(s) for each grid point and each point in time. In case that two or more satellite data sets provides useful information, the estimated errors can be used to define the weights with which each satellite data set are merged, i.e. the lower its error the higher its weight. This is expected to bring a significant improvement over the current data fusion scheme which is not yet based on quantitative estimates of the retrieval errors but on a proxy measure, namely the vegetation optical depth (Dorigo et al., 2015): over areas with low vegetation passive soil moisture retrievals are used, while over areas with moderate vegetation density active retrievals are used. In transition areas, where both products correlate well, both products are being used in a synergistic way: on time steps where only one of

  6. Microwave sintering of Ag-nanoparticle thin films on a polyimide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, S.; Kawamura, S.; Maitani, M. M.; Suzuki, E.; Wada, Y.; Mochizuki, D.

    2015-12-15

    Ag-nanoparticle thin films on a polyimide substrate were subjected to microwave sintering by use of a single-mode waveguide applicator. A two-step sintering process was employed. First, at low conductivities of the film, the film sample was placed at the site of the maximum electric field and subjected to microwave irradiation. Second, when the conductivity of the film increased, the film sample was placed at the site of the maximum magnetic field and again subjected to microwave irradiation. The microwave sintering process was completed within 1.5 min, which is significantly lower than the time required for the oven heating process. The resulting conductivity of the film, albeit only 30% of that of the bulk material, was seven times that of a film annealed at the same temperature in a furnace. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the nanoparticles underwent both grain necking and grain growth during microwave sintering. In addition, this sintering process was equivalent to the oven heating process performed at a 50 °C higher annealing temperature. An electromagnetic wave simulation and a heat transfer simulation of the microwave sintering process were performed to gain a thorough understanding of the process.

  7. Microwave sintering of Ag-nanoparticle thin films on a polyimide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, S.; Kawamura, S.; Mochizuki, D.; Maitani, M. M.; Suzuki, E.; Wada, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Ag-nanoparticle thin films on a polyimide substrate were subjected to microwave sintering by use of a single-mode waveguide applicator. A two-step sintering process was employed. First, at low conductivities of the film, the film sample was placed at the site of the maximum electric field and subjected to microwave irradiation. Second, when the conductivity of the film increased, the film sample was placed at the site of the maximum magnetic field and again subjected to microwave irradiation. The microwave sintering process was completed within 1.5 min, which is significantly lower than the time required for the oven heating process. The resulting conductivity of the film, albeit only 30% of that of the bulk material, was seven times that of a film annealed at the same temperature in a furnace. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the nanoparticles underwent both grain necking and grain growth during microwave sintering. In addition, this sintering process was equivalent to the oven heating process performed at a 50 °C higher annealing temperature. An electromagnetic wave simulation and a heat transfer simulation of the microwave sintering process were performed to gain a thorough understanding of the process.

  8. Passive L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E. J.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (TB's) measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These TB measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly TB's could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly TB. Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, hr, on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on TB simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent hr parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of TB simulations in the early growth cycle. A.T. Joseph, R. Van der Velde, P.E. O'Neill, R.H. Lang, and T. Gish, "Soil moisture retrieval during a corn growth cycle using L-band (1.6 GHz) radar observations", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 46, DOI:10.1109/TGRS.2008.917214, Aug. 2008. M.C. Dobson, F.T. Ulaby, M

  9. Snow depth and snow cover retrieval from FengYun3B microwave radiation imagery based on a snow passive microwave unmixing method in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lingjia; Ren, Ruizhi; Zhao, Kai; Li, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The precision of snow parameter retrieval is unsatisfactory for current practical demands. The primary reason is because of the problem of mixed pixels that are caused by low spatial resolution of satellite passive microwave data. A snow passive microwave unmixing method is proposed in this paper, based on land cover type data and the antenna gain function of passive microwaves. The land cover type of Northeast China is partitioned into grass, farmland, bare soil, forest, and water body types. The component brightness temperatures (CBT), namely unmixed data, with 1 km data resolution are obtained using the proposed unmixing method. The snow depth determined by the CBT and three snow depth retrieval algorithms are validated through field measurements taken in forest and farmland areas of Northeast China in January 2012 and 2013. The results show that the overall of the retrieval precision of the snow depth is improved by 17% in farmland areas and 10% in forest areas when using the CBT in comparison with the mixed pixels. The snow cover results based on the CBT are compared with existing MODIS snow cover products. The results demonstrate that more snow cover information can be obtained with up to 86% accuracy.

  10. Disaggregation of Active/Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Under All-sky Condition Using Machine learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongkyun; Kim, Hyunglok; Choi, Minha

    2017-04-01

    Remotely sensed soil moisture products measured from the active/passive microwave sensors on-board satellite platforms have a great impact on many hydro-meteorological analyses at a global scale. However, its coarse spatial resolution interrupts local scale soil moisture applications. Moreover, most downscaling methods using optical and thermal dataset, are applicable only in cloud-free conditions; thus developed downscaling method under all sky condition is essential for the construction of spatio-temporal continuity of datasets at fine resolution. In present study Support Vector Machine (SVM) regression model was utilized to downscale the satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. The 12.5 km spatial resolution of active microwave soil moisture datasets from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and the 40 km resolution of passive microwave soil moisture datasets from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) passive soil moisture were disaggregated to 1 km high resolution products over Northeast Asia in 2016. Optically derived estimates of surface temperature (LST), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and its cloud products were obtained from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the purpose of downscaling soil moisture in finer resolution under all sky condition. Furthermore, a comparison analysis between in situ and downscaled soil moisture products was also conducted for quantitatively assessing its accuracy.

  11. Buckyball microwave plasmas: Fragmentation and diamond-film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Liu, Shengzhong; Krauss, A.R.; Pan, Xianzheng

    1993-08-01

    Microwave discharges (2.45 GHz) have been generated in C{sub 60}-containing Ar produced by flowing Ar over fullerene-containing soot. Optical spectroscopy shows that the spectrum is dominated by the d{sup 3}{Pi}g-a{sup 3}{Pi}u Swan bands of C{sub 2} and particularly the {Delta}v = {minus}2, {minus}1, 0, +1, and +2 sequences. These results give direct evidence that C{sub 2} is one of the products of C{sub 60} fragmentation brought about, at least in part, by collisionally induced dissociation (CID). C{sub 60} has been used as a precursor in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) experiment to grow diamond-thin films. The films, grown in an Ar/H{sub 2} gas mixture (0.14% carbon content, 100 Torr, 20 sccm Ar, 4 sccm H{sub 2}, 1500 W, 850{degree}C substrate temperature), were characterized with SEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. Growth rate was found to be {approx} 0.6 {mu}/hr. Assuming a linear dependence on carbon concentration, a growth rate at least six times higher than commonly observed using methane as a precursor, would be predicted at a carbon content of 1% based on C{sub 60}. Energetic and mechanistic arguments are advanced to rationalize this result based on C{sub 2} as the growth species.

  12. Microwave Conductivity Spectroscopy for Fe(Se,Te) Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabeshima, Fuyuki; Nagasawa, Kosuke; Asami, Daisuke; Sawada, Yuichi; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    Iron chalcogenide superconductors Fe(Se,Te) have very small ɛF and are considered to be in the BCS-BEC crossover regime. Since Ginzburg number, Gi =(kBTc /ɛF) 4 , which is the relative temperature width of the superconducting fluctuation region, is large for materials in the BCS-BEC crossover regime, large superconducting fluctuations are expected in Fe(Se,Te). In order to investigate superconducting fluctuations in these materials we have performed microwave conductivity spectroscopy on Fe(Se,Te) thin films. Superfluid density of an Fe(Se,Te) film with Tczero =17 K took finite values above 25 K. This temperature is much higher than Tc estimated by the dc measurement, suggesting strong superconducting fluctuations in Fe(Se,Te). A dynamic scaling analysis of complex fluctuation conductivity revealed that the superconducting fluctuations of Fe(Se,Te) exhibit a 2-dimensional behavior, while BKT transition was not observed. We will also report on the thickness dependence and the Te content dependence of the superconducting fluctuation Partially supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Research Fellowship for Young Scientists and by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 15K17697.

  13. Solid state microwave synthesis of highly crystalline ordered mesoporous hausmannite Mn 3 O 4 films

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yanfeng; Qiang, Zhe; Lee, Byeongdu; ...

    2017-06-23

    Microwave calcination of ordered micelle templated manganese carbonate films leads to highly crystalline, ordered mesoporous manganese oxide, while similar temperatures in a furnace lead to disordered, amorphous manganese oxide.

  14. Snow stratigraphic heterogeneity within ground-based passive microwave radiometer footprints: implications for emission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandells, M.; Rutter, N.; Derksen, C.; Langlois, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Montpetit, B.; Pulliainen, J. T.; Royer, A.; Toose, P.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing of snow mass remains a challenging area of research. Scattering of electromagnetic radiation is sensitive to snow mass, but is also affected by contrasts in the dielectric properties of the snow. Although the argument that errors from simple algorithms average out at large scales has been used to justify current retrieval methods, it is not obvious why this should be the case. This hypothesis needs to be tested more rigorously. A ground-based field experiment was carried out to assess the impact of sub-footprint snow heterogeneity on microwave brightness temperature, in Churchill, Canada in winter in early 2010. Passive microwave measurements of snow were made using sled-mounted radiometers at 75cm intervals over a 5m transect. Measurements were made at horizontal and vertical polarizations at frequencies of 19 and 37 GHz. Snow beneath the radiometer footprints was subsequently excavated, creating a snow trench wall along the centrepoints of adjacent footprints. The trench wall was carefully smoothed and photographed with a near-infrared camera in order to determine the positions of stratigraphic snow layer boundaries. Three one-dimensional vertical profiles of snowpack properties (density and snow specific surface area) were taken at 75cm, 185cm and 355cm from the left hand side of the trench. These profile measurements were used to derive snow density and grain size for each of the layers identified from the NIR image. Microwave brightness temperatures for the 2-dimensional map of snow properties was simulated with the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) model at 1cm intervals horizontally across the trench. Where each of five ice lenses was identified in the snow stratigraphy, a decrease in brightness temperature was simulated. However, the median brightness temperature simulated across the trench was substantially higher than the observations, of the order of tens of Kelvin, dependent on frequency and polarization. In order to understand and

  15. Processing, electrical and microwave properties of sputtered Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanyam, G.; Kapoor, V. J.; Chorey, C. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    A reproducible fabrication process has been established for TlCaBaCuO thin films on LaAlO3 substrates by RF magnetron sputtering and post-deposition processing methods. Electrical transport properties of the thin films were measured on patterned four-probe test devices. Microwave properties of the films were obtained from unloaded Q measurements of all-superconducting ring resonators. This paper describes the processing, electrical and microwave properties of Tl2Ca1Ba2Cu2O(x) 2122-plane phase thin films.

  16. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  17. Investigation of passive films on {alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} titanium aluminides by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Su, W.; Covino, B.S. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Passive films on {alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} titanium aluminide formed potentiostatically in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solutions were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In NaOH, potentiostatic experiments showed that titanium aluminides had very similar passive current densities to that of Ti. XPS sputter depth profile showed nearly no Al present in the outer layer of the passive films. In H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, passive current densities increased for specimens with increasing Al content. XPS sputter depth profile showed that Al was enriched in outer layers of the passive films. These results indicated that the passive film dissolution rates increased with increasing amounts of Al in the passive film for titanium aluminides.

  18. Investigation of passive films on alpha2 and gamma titanium aluminides by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Su, W.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Passive films on alpha2 and gamma titanium aluminide formed potentiostatically in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) solutions were studied by x-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). In NaOH, potentiostatic experiments showed that titanium aluminides had very similar passive current densities to that of Ti. XPS sputter depth profile showed nearly no Al present in the outer layer of the passive films. In H2SO4, passive current densities increased for specimens with increasing Al content. XPS sputter depth profile showed that Al was enriched in outer layers of the passive films. These results indicated that the passive film dissolution rate increased with increasing amounts of Al in the passive film for titanium aluminides.

  19. Effect of Cr on the passive film formation mechanism of steel rebar in saturated calcium hydroxide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Pan, Yue; Li, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Passive films grow on the surface of Cr-modified steels subjected to saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. Electrochemical techniques, such as measurement of open circuit potentials, polarization curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy combined with X-ray photoelectron spectrometer and auger electron spectroscopy, were applied to study the influence of low Cr content on the passive film formation mechanism of steel rebar in saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. Results show that Cr inhibits the formation of passive film at the beginning of its formation. Corrosion current density decreases and polarization resistance increases with the extension of the immersion time. A stable passive film takes at least three days to form. The passive film resistance of HRB400 carbon steel is higher than that of Cr-modified steels in the early stage of immersion (<72 h). The polarization resistance of Cr-modified steel is larger after a stable passive film is formed (>72 h), and Cr promotes the formation of a denser and more compact passive film. The stable passive film is primarily made up of iron oxides with a thickness of 5-6 nm. Cr are involved in the formation of passive films, thereby resulting in a film that consists of an inner layer that contains Cr-Fe oxides and an outer layer that contains Fe oxides, whose thickness presents a slight increase as the content of Cr increases.

  20. Snow stratigraphic heterogeneity within ground-based passive microwave radiometer footprints: Implications for emission modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Nick; Sandells, Mel; Derksen, Chris; Toose, Peter; Royer, Alain; Montpetit, Benoit; Langlois, Alex; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional measurements of snowpack properties (stratigraphic layering, density, grain size, and temperature) were used as inputs to the multilayer Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) microwave emission model at a centimeter-scale horizontal resolution, across a 4.5 m transect of ground-based passive microwave radiometer footprints near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. Snowpack stratigraphy was complex (between six and eight layers) with only three layers extending continuously throughout the length of the transect. Distributions of one-dimensional simulations, accurately representing complex stratigraphic layering, were evaluated using measured brightness temperatures. Large biases (36 to 68 K) between simulated and measured brightness temperatures were minimized (-0.5 to 0.6 K), within measurement accuracy, through application of grain scaling factors (2.6 to 5.3) at different combinations of frequencies, polarizations, and model extinction coefficients. Grain scaling factors compensated for uncertainty relating optical specific surface area to HUT effective grain size inputs and quantified relative differences in scattering and absorption properties of various extinction coefficients. The HUT model required accurate representation of ice lenses, particularly at horizontal polarization, and large grain scaling factors highlighted the need to consider microstructure beyond the size of individual grains. As variability of extinction coefficients was strongly influenced by the proportion of large (hoar) grains in a vertical profile, it is important to consider simulations from distributions of one-dimensional profiles rather than single profiles, especially in sub-Arctic snowpacks where stratigraphic variability can be high. Model sensitivity experiments suggested that the level of error in field measurements and the new methodological framework used to apply them in a snow emission model were satisfactory. Layer amalgamation showed that a three

  1. Synthetic tests of passive microwave brightness temperature assimilation over snow covered land using machine learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    A novel data assimilation framework is evaluated that assimilates passive microwave (PMW) brightness temperature (Tb) observations into an advanced land surface model for the purpose of improving snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates across regional- and continental-scales. The multifrequency, multipolarization framework employs machine learning algorithms to predict PMW Tb as a function of land surface model state information and subsequently merges the predicted PMW Tb with observed PMW Tb from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). The merging procedure is predicated on conditional probabilities computed within a Bayesian statistical framework using either an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) or an Ensemble Kalman Smoother (EnKS). The data assimilation routine produces a conditioned (updated) estimate of modeled SWE that is more accurate and contains less uncertainty than the model without assimilation. A synthetic case study is presented for select locations in North America that compares model results with and without assimilation against synthetic observations of snow depth and SWE. It is shown that the data assimilation framework improves modeled estimates of snow depth and SWE during both the accumulation and ablation phases of the snow season. Further, it is demonstrated that the EnKS outperforms the EnKF implementation due to its ability to better modulate high frequency noise into the conditioned estimates. The overarching findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility of machine learning algorithms for use as an observation model operator within a data assimilation framework in order to improve model estimates of snow depth and SWE across regional- and continental-scales.

  2. The Effects of Rainfall Inhomogeneity on Climate Variability of Rainfall Estimated from Passive Microwave Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Poyner, Philip; Berg, Wesley; Thomas-Stahle, Jody

    2007-01-01

    Passive microwave rainfall estimates that exploit the emission signal of raindrops in the atmosphere are sensitive to the inhomogeneity of rainfall within the satellite field of view (FOV). In particular, the concave nature of the brightness temperature (T(sub b)) versus rainfall relations at frequencies capable of detecting the blackbody emission of raindrops cause retrieval algorithms to systematically underestimate precipitation unless the rainfall is homogeneous within a radiometer FOV, or the inhomogeneity is accounted for explicitly. This problem has a long history in the passive microwave community and has been termed the beam-filling error. While not a true error, correcting for it requires a priori knowledge about the actual distribution of the rainfall within the satellite FOV, or at least a statistical representation of this inhomogeneity. This study first examines the magnitude of this beam-filling correction when slant-path radiative transfer calculations are used to account for the oblique incidence of current radiometers. Because of the horizontal averaging that occurs away from the nadir direction, the beam-filling error is found to be only a fraction of what has been reported previously in the literature based upon plane-parallel calculations. For a FOV representative of the 19-GHz radiometer channel (18 km X 28 km) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the mean beam-filling correction computed in this study for tropical atmospheres is 1.26 instead of 1.52 computed from plane-parallel techniques. The slant-path solution is also less sensitive to finescale rainfall inhomogeneity and is, thus, able to make use of 4-km radar data from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) in order to map regional and seasonal distributions of observed rainfall inhomogeneity in the Tropics. The data are examined to assess the expected errors introduced into climate rainfall records by unresolved changes in rainfall inhomogeneity. Results show that global

  3. The Effects of Rainfall Inhomogeneity on Climate Variability of Rainfall Estimated from Passive Microwave Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Poyner, Philip; Berg, Wesley; Thomas-Stahle, Jody

    2007-01-01

    Passive microwave rainfall estimates that exploit the emission signal of raindrops in the atmosphere are sensitive to the inhomogeneity of rainfall within the satellite field of view (FOV). In particular, the concave nature of the brightness temperature (T(sub b)) versus rainfall relations at frequencies capable of detecting the blackbody emission of raindrops cause retrieval algorithms to systematically underestimate precipitation unless the rainfall is homogeneous within a radiometer FOV, or the inhomogeneity is accounted for explicitly. This problem has a long history in the passive microwave community and has been termed the beam-filling error. While not a true error, correcting for it requires a priori knowledge about the actual distribution of the rainfall within the satellite FOV, or at least a statistical representation of this inhomogeneity. This study first examines the magnitude of this beam-filling correction when slant-path radiative transfer calculations are used to account for the oblique incidence of current radiometers. Because of the horizontal averaging that occurs away from the nadir direction, the beam-filling error is found to be only a fraction of what has been reported previously in the literature based upon plane-parallel calculations. For a FOV representative of the 19-GHz radiometer channel (18 km X 28 km) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the mean beam-filling correction computed in this study for tropical atmospheres is 1.26 instead of 1.52 computed from plane-parallel techniques. The slant-path solution is also less sensitive to finescale rainfall inhomogeneity and is, thus, able to make use of 4-km radar data from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) in order to map regional and seasonal distributions of observed rainfall inhomogeneity in the Tropics. The data are examined to assess the expected errors introduced into climate rainfall records by unresolved changes in rainfall inhomogeneity. Results show that global

  4. An Inter-calibrated Passive Microwave Brightness Temperature Data Record and Ocean Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, K. A.; Wentz, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Inter-calibration of passive microwave sensors has been the subject of on-going activity at Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) since 1974. RSS has produced a brightness temperature TB data record that spans the last 28 years (1987-2014) from inter-calibrated passive microwave sensors on 14 satellites: AMSR-E, AMSR2, GMI, SSMI F08-F15, SSMIS F16-F18, TMI, WindSat. Accompanying the TB record are a suite of ocean products derived from the TBs that provide a 28-year record of wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid, and rain rate; and 18 years (1997-2014) of sea surface temperatures, corresponding to the period for which 6 and/or 10 GHz measurements are available. Crucial to the inter-calibration and ocean product retrieval are a highly accurate radiative transfer model RTM. The RSS RTM has been continually refined for over 30 years and is arguably the most accurate model in the 1-100 GHz spectrum. The current generation of TB and ocean products, produced using the latest version of the RTM, is called Version-7. The accuracy of the Version-7 inter-calibration is estimated to be 0.1 K, based on inter-satellite comparisons and validation of the ocean products against in situ measurements. The data record produced by RSS has had a significant scientific impact. Over just the last 14 years (2000-2013) RSS data have been used in 743 peer-reviewed journal articles. This is an average of 4.5 peer-reviewed papers published every month made possible with RSS data. Some of the most important scientific contributions made by RSS data have been to the study of the climate. The AR5 Report "Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis" by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the internationally accepted authority on climate change, references 20 peer-reviewed journal papers from RSS scientists. The report makes direct use of RSS water vapor data, RSS atmospheric temperatures from MSU/AMSU, and 9 other datasets that are derived from RSS data. The RSS TB data record is

  5. Assessing Applications of GPM and IMERG Passive Microwave Rain Rates in Modeling and Operational Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodsky, B.; Le Roy, A.; Smith, M. R.; Case, J.

    2016-12-01

    In support of NASA's recently launched GPM `core' satellite, the NASA-SPoRT project is leveraging experience in research-to-operations transitions and training to provide feedback on the operational utility of GPM products. Thus far, SPoRT has focused on evaluating the Level 2 GPROF passive microwave and IMERG rain rate estimates. Formal evaluations with end-users have occurred, as well as internal evaluations of the datasets. One set of end users for these products is National Weather Service Forecast Offices (WFOs) and National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (RFCs), comprising forecasters and hydrologists. SPoRT has hosted a series of formal assessments to determine uses and utility of these datasets for NWS operations at specific offices. Forecasters primarily have used Level 2 swath rain rates to observe rainfall in otherwise data-void regions and to confirm model QPF for their nowcasting or short-term forecasting. Hydrologists have been evaluating both the Level 2 rain rates and the IMERG rain rates, including rain rate accumulations derived from IMERG; hydrologists have used these data to supplement gauge data for post-event analysis as well as for longer-term forecasting. Results from specific evaluations will be presented. Another evaluation of the GPM passive microwave rain rates has been in using the data within other products that are currently transitioned to end-users, rather than as stand-alone observations. For example, IMERG Early data is being used as a forcing mechanism in the NASA Land Information System (LIS) for real-time soil moisture product over eastern Africa. IMERG is providing valuable precipitation information to LIS in an otherwise data-void region. Results and caveats will briefly be discussed. A third application of GPM data is using the IMERG Late and Final products for model verification in remote regions where high-quality gridded precipitation fields are not readily available. These datasets can now be used to verify NWP

  6. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Falling Snow and Associated GPM Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Retrievals of falling snow from space represent one of the next important challenges for the atmospheric, hydrological, and energy budget scientific communities. Historically, retrievals of falling snow have been difficult due to the relative insensitivity of satellite rain-based channels as used in the past. We emphasize the use of high frequency passive microwave channels (85-200 GHz) since these are more sensitive to the ice in clouds and have been used to estimate falling snow from space. While satellite-based remote sensing provides global coverage of falling snow events and the science is relatively new, retrievals are still undergoing development with challenges remaining. There are several current satellite sensors, though not specifically designed for estimating falling snow, are capable of measuring snow from space. These include NOAA's AMSU-B, the MHS sensors, and CloudSat radar. They use high frequency (greater than 85 GHz) passive and active microwave and millimeter-wave channels that are sensitive to the scattering from ice and snow particles in the atmosphere. Sensors with water vapor channels near 183 GHz center line provide opaqueness to the Earth's surface features that can contaminate the falling snow signatures, especially over snow covered surface. In addition, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission scheduled for launch in 2013 is specifically designed to measure both liquid rain and frozen snow precipitation. Since falling snow from space is the next precipitation measurement challenge from space, information must be determined in order to guide retrieval algorithm development for these current and future missions. This information includes thresholds of detection for various sensor channel configurations, snow event system characteristics, and surface types. For example, can a lake effect snow system with low cloud tops having an ice water content (IWC) at the surface of 1.0 gram per cubic meter be detected? If this information is

  7. Seasonally Frozen Soil Monitoring Using Passive Microwave Satellite Data and Simulation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, D. L.; Owe, M.; Levine, E.

    1998-01-01

    Satellite data and simulation modeling were used to assess seasonally frozen soils in the central US - Canada borders area (46-53 degrees N and 96-108 degrees). We used Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) satellite data to delineate the top layer of frozen soils. SMMR is a passive microwave sensor having five channels (6.6, 10, 18, 21 and 37 GHz) with a horizontal and vertical polarization. SMRR data are available between 1978-1987 with noon and midnight overpass and footprint sizes between 25 km and 150 km. SMMR data were processed from resampled 1/4 degree grid cells during fall freeze-up and spring thaw (fall 1985 - spring 1987). The dielectric properties of a target may directly affect the satellite signal. The dielectric value is an order of magnitude smaller for frozen soil water. There are other significant changes to the emitted microwave signal from changes to the surface physical temperature, attenuation of the soil signal from plant water and soil moisture. We further characterized the temporal and spatial dynamic of frozen soils using the FroST (Frozen Soil Temperature) simulation model. The FroST model was used to further predict soil water and ice content, and soil temperature. SMMR results were compared versus 5-cm soil temperature data from available weather stations (14 in Canada and 11 for available months in the US). SMMR data were analyzed as a function of frequency, polarization, polarization difference, and "frequency gradient". In addition, vegetation density, physical temperature and snow depth were also considered. Preliminary analysis of SMMR derived frozen soil/thaw classification using a simple threshold classification indicates a mean overall classification accuracy by season of 85 percent. A sensitivity analysis for different soils with varying amounts of snow was conducted with FroST, which showed that the amount of snow, and the time of snow fall and melt affected the ice and water content, and depth of thaw. These

  8. Annual South American forest loss estimates based on passive microwave remote sensing (1990-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marle, M. J. E.; van der Werf, G. R.; de Jeu, R. A. M.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Consistent forest loss estimates are important to understand the role of forest loss and deforestation in the global carbon cycle, for biodiversity studies, and to estimate the mitigation potential of reducing deforestation. To date, most studies have relied on optical satellite data and new efforts have greatly improved our quantitative knowledge on forest dynamics. However, most of these studies yield results for only a relatively short time period or are limited to certain countries. We have quantified large-scale forest loss over a 21-year period (1990-2010) in the tropical biomes of South America using remotely sensed vegetation optical depth (VOD). This passive microwave satellite-based indicator of vegetation water content and vegetation density has a much coarser spatial resolution than optical data but its temporal resolution is higher and VOD is not impacted by aerosols and cloud cover. We used the merged VOD product of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) observations, and developed a change detection algorithm to quantify spatial and temporal variations in forest loss dynamics. Our results compared reasonably well with the newly developed Landsat-based Global Forest Change (GFC) maps, available for the 2001 onwards period (r2 = 0.90 when comparing annual country-level estimates). This allowed us to convert our identified changes in VOD to forest loss area and compute these from 1990 onwards. We also compared these calibrated results to PRODES (r2 = 0.60 when comparing annual state-level estimates). We found that South American forest exhibited substantial interannual variability without a clear trend during the 1990s, but increased from 2000 until 2004. After 2004, forest loss decreased again, except for two smaller peaks in 2007 and 2010. For a large part, these trends were driven by changes in Brazil, which was responsible for 56 % of the total South American forest loss area over our study

  9. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 1; Improved Method and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Petty, Grant W.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Bell, Thomas L.; Braun, Scott A.; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Johnson, Daniel E.; hide

    2006-01-01

    A revised Bayesian algorithm for estimating surface rain rate, convective rain proportion, and latent heating profiles from satellite-borne passive microwave radiometer observations over ocean backgrounds is described. The algorithm searches a large database of cloud-radiative model simulations to find cloud profiles that are radiatively consistent with a given set of microwave radiance measurements. The properties of these radiatively consistent profiles are then composited to obtain best estimates of the observed properties. The revised algorithm is supported by an expanded and more physically consistent database of cloud-radiative model simulations. The algorithm also features a better quantification of the convective and nonconvective contributions to total rainfall, a new geographic database, and an improved representation of background radiances in rain-free regions. Bias and random error estimates are derived from applications of the algorithm to synthetic radiance data, based upon a subset of cloud-resolving model simulations, and from the Bayesian formulation itself. Synthetic rain-rate and latent heating estimates exhibit a trend of high (low) bias for low (high) retrieved values. The Bayesian estimates of random error are propagated to represent errors at coarser time and space resolutions, based upon applications of the algorithm to TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. Errors in TMI instantaneous rain-rate estimates at 0.5 -resolution range from approximately 50% at 1 mm/h to 20% at 14 mm/h. Errors in collocated spaceborne radar rain-rate estimates are roughly 50%-80% of the TMI errors at this resolution. The estimated algorithm random error in TMI rain rates at monthly, 2.5deg resolution is relatively small (less than 6% at 5 mm day.1) in comparison with the random error resulting from infrequent satellite temporal sampling (8%-35% at the same rain rate). Percentage errors resulting from sampling decrease with increasing rain rate, and sampling errors in

  10. Seasonally Frozen Soil Monitoring Using Passive Microwave Satellite Data and Simulation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, D. L.; Owe, M.; Levine, E.

    1998-01-01

    Satellite data and simulation modeling were used to assess seasonally frozen soils in the central US - Canada borders area (46-53 degrees N and 96-108 degrees). We used Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) satellite data to delineate the top layer of frozen soils. SMMR is a passive microwave sensor having five channels (6.6, 10, 18, 21 and 37 GHz) with a horizontal and vertical polarization. SMRR data are available between 1978-1987 with noon and midnight overpass and footprint sizes between 25 km and 150 km. SMMR data were processed from resampled 1/4 degree grid cells during fall freeze-up and spring thaw (fall 1985 - spring 1987). The dielectric properties of a target may directly affect the satellite signal. The dielectric value is an order of magnitude smaller for frozen soil water. There are other significant changes to the emitted microwave signal from changes to the surface physical temperature, attenuation of the soil signal from plant water and soil moisture. We further characterized the temporal and spatial dynamic of frozen soils using the FroST (Frozen Soil Temperature) simulation model. The FroST model was used to further predict soil water and ice content, and soil temperature. SMMR results were compared versus 5-cm soil temperature data from available weather stations (14 in Canada and 11 for available months in the US). SMMR data were analyzed as a function of frequency, polarization, polarization difference, and "frequency gradient". In addition, vegetation density, physical temperature and snow depth were also considered. Preliminary analysis of SMMR derived frozen soil/thaw classification using a simple threshold classification indicates a mean overall classification accuracy by season of 85 percent. A sensitivity analysis for different soils with varying amounts of snow was conducted with FroST, which showed that the amount of snow, and the time of snow fall and melt affected the ice and water content, and depth of thaw. These

  11. Annual South American forest loss estimates based on passive microwave remote sensing (1990-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marle, M. J. E.; van der Werf, G. R.; de Jeu, R. A. M.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Consistent forest loss estimates are important to understand the role of forest loss and deforestation in the global carbon cycle, for biodiversity studies, and to estimate the mitigation potential of reducing deforestation. To date, most studies have relied on optical satellite data and new efforts have greatly improved our quantitative knowledge on forest dynamics. However, most of these studies yield results for only a relatively short time period or are limited to certain countries. We have quantified large-scale forest losses over a 21 year period (1990-2010) in the tropical biomes of South America using remotely sensed vegetation optical depth (VOD). This passive microwave satellite-based indicator of vegetation water content and vegetation density has a much coarser spatial resolution than optical but its temporal resolution is higher and VOD is not impacted by aerosols and cloud cover. We used the merged VOD product of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) observations, and developed a change detection algorithm to quantify spatial and temporal variations in forest loss dynamics. Our results compared favorably to the newly developed Global Forest Change (GFC) maps based on Landsat data and available for the 2001 onwards period (r2 = 0.90 when comparing annual country-level estimates), which allowed us to convert our results to forest loss area and compute these from 1990 onwards. We found that South American forest exhibited substantial interannual variability without a clear trend during the 1990s, but increased from 2000 until 2004. After 2004, forest loss decreased again, except for two smaller peaks in 2007 and 2010. For a large part, these trends were driven by changes in Brazil, which was responsible for 56 % of the total South American forest loss over our study period according to our results. One of the key findings of our study is that while forest losses decreased in Brazil after 2005

  12. Passive microwave observations of the Wedell Sea during austral winter and early spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Comiso, J. C.; Lange, M. A.; Eicken, H.; Wensnahan, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The results of multispectral passive microwave observations (6.7 to 90-GHz) are presented from the cruises of the FS Polarstern in the Weddell Sea from July to December 1986. This paper includes primarily the analysis of radiometric observations taken at ice station sites. Averaged emissivity spectra for first-year (FY) ice were relatively constant throughout the experiment and were not statistically different from FY ice signatures in the Arctic. Detailed ice characterization was carried out at each site to compare the microwave signatures of the ice with the physical properties. Absorption optical depths of FY ice were found to be sufficiently high that only the structure in the upper portions of the ice contributed significantly to interstation emissivity variations. The emissivities at 90-GHz, e(90), had the greatest variance. Both e(90) at vertical polarization and GR(sub e)(90, 18.7)(defined as (e(sub V)(90)-e(sub V)(18.7))/e(sub V)(90 + e(sub V)(18.7)) depended on the scattering optical depth which is a function of the snow grain diameter and layer thickness. The variance showed a latitude dependence and is probably due to an increase in the strength of snow metamorphism nearer the northern edge of the ice pack. The contribution of variations of near-surface brine volume to the emissivity was not significant over the range of values encountered at the station sites. Emissivity spectra are presented for a range of thin ice types. Unsupervised principal component analysis produced three significant eigenvectors and showed a separation among four different surface types: open water, thin ice, FY ice, and FY ice with a thick snow cover. A comparison with SMMR satellite data showed that average ice concentrations derived from the ship's ice watch log were consistent with the satellite concentrations. The surface based emissivities for FY ice were also compared with emissivities calculated from scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) satellite radiances

  13. Sea Ice Variability in the Sea of Okhotsk from Passive Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Sea of Okhotsk, located between 50 and 60 N, is bounded by the Kamchatka Peninsula, Siberia, Sakhalin Island, and the Kuril Island chain and is the largest midlatitude seasonal sea ice zone in the Northern Hemisphere. The winter sea ice cover begins to form in November and expands to cover most of the sea by March. Over the following three months, the ice retreats with only small ice-covered areas remaining by the beginning of June. The sea is ice free or nearly ice free on average for six months of the year, from June through November. The recent compilation of a consistent, long-term record of Northern Hemisphere sea ice extents based on passive microwave satellite observations from the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer and from four Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave Imagers provides the basis for assessing long-term sea ice extent variability in the Sea of Okhotsk. Analysis of this 20-year data record (1979-1998) shows that based on yearly averages the overall extent of the Sea of Okhotsk ice cover is decreasing at the rate of -8.1+/-2.1x10(exp 3) sq km/yr (-17.2%/decade), in contrast to the rate of decrease of -33.3+/-0.7x10(exp 3) sq km/yr (-2.7%/decade) for the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. There is large regional sea ice extent variability of the Arctic ice cover. Two of the nine Arctic regions analyzed, the Bering Sea and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, show increases of 0.8+/-1.4xl0(exp 3) sq km/yr (2.7%/decade) and 1.2+/-0.5xl0(exp 3) sq km/yr (17.1%/decade), respectively. Interestingly, the Sea of Okhotsk and the Gulf of St. Lawrence show about equal percentage changes, but of opposite sign. The Sea of Okhotsk exhibits its greatest percent decrease (-24.3%/decade) during spring (April-June). The year of maximum winter sea ice extent for the Sea of Okhotsk was 1979, whereas the minimum winter sea ice extent occurred in 1984.

  14. Investigating the value of passive microwave observations for monitoring volcanic eruption source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Cimini, Domenico; Marzano, Frank

    2016-04-01

    the dispersal fine-ash cloud, but tend to saturate near the source due to the strong optical extinction of ash cloud top layers. Conversely, observations at microwave (MW) channels from LEO satellites have demonstrated to carry additional information near the volcano source due to the relative lower opacity. This feature makes satellite MW complementary to IR radiometry for estimating source parameters close to the volcano emission, at the cost of coarser spatial resolution. The presentation shows the value of passive MW observations for the detection and quantitative retrieval of volcanic emission source parameters through the investigation of notable case studies, such as the eruptions of Grímsvötn (Iceland, May 2011) and Calbuco (Cile, April 2015), observed by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder.

  15. Measurement and simulation of topographic effects on passive microwave remote sensing over mountain areas: a case study from Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. X.; Zhang, L. X.; Jiang, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Mountain areas, occupying one quarter proportion of terrene area on the earth, characterize topography as the diversity of the mountain ecosystem and the hill-scale climate change, and also provide resource and services for equivalent to the one fourth global populations, among which Tibetan Plateau is known as the world famous mountain plateau. Because of topography land-surface hydraulic energy and thermal energy over mountain areas are redistributed, characterizing the diversity of mountain ecosystem and spatial heterogeneity under coarse-scale microwave pixels. A ground-based experiment performed to measure relief effects on microwave radiation for C band. Relief effects we observed were dived into two parts, one is the primary terms varied with topographic geometry features (i.e. slope, orientation, elevation) with ±12K bias against flat terrain, and the other is secondary terms caused by surface scattering from circumambient elevated terrain arisen 4K brightness temperature bias. It is much more important to prove relief effects, especially the primary effects, still have radiative influence in microwave pixels underlying the method of spatial convolution statistic analysis. The statistic analysis of the primary effects for normality indicates the presence of relief effects in the Tibetan Plateau in the tens of kilometers microwave pixel scale. Based on the microwave radiative transfer over the Tibetan Plateau mountain area the brightness temperature (TB) simulation described the impact of topography including terrain geometrical properties and the complexity of terrain related to topographic roughness, on the microwave radiation of uncovered land surface at passive C-band. According to the statistic analysis results, relief effects cannot be counteracted by the interaction from different topographic geometrical features in one microwave pixel. The simulated results correlated relevantly with TB from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E), for

  16. Classification methods for monitoring Arctic sea ice using OKEAN passive/active two-channel microwave data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, Gennady I.; Douglas, David C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents methods for classifying Arctic sea ice using both passive and active (2-channel) microwave imagery acquired by the Russian OKEAN 01 polar-orbiting satellite series. Methods and results are compared to sea ice classifications derived from nearly coincident Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) image data of the Barents, Kara, and Laptev Seas. The Russian OKEAN 01 satellite data were collected over weekly intervals during October 1995 through December 1997. Methods are presented for calibrating, georeferencing and classifying the raw active radar and passive microwave OKEAN 01 data, and for correcting the OKEAN 01 microwave radiometer calibration wedge based on concurrent 37 GHz horizontal polarization SSM/I brightness temperature data. Sea ice type and ice concentration algorithms utilized OKEAN's two-channel radar and passive microwave data in a linear mixture model based on the measured values of brightness temperature and radar backscatter, together with a priori knowledge about the scattering parameters and natural emissivities of basic sea ice types. OKEAN 01 data and algorithms tended to classify lower concentrations of young or first-year sea ice when concentrations were less than 60%, and to produce higher concentrations of multi-year sea ice when concentrations were greater than 40%, when compared to estimates produced from SSM/I data. Overall, total sea ice concentration maps derived independently from OKEAN 01, SSM/I, and AVHRR satellite imagery were all highly correlated, with uniform biases, and mean differences in total ice concentration of less than four percent (sd<15%).

  17. Synergistic method for boreal soil moisture and soil freeze retrievals using active and passive microwave instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, Tuomo; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Schwank, Mike; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture and soil freezing are important for diverse hydrological, biogeochemical, and climatological applications. They affect surface energy balance, surface and subsurface water flow, and exchange rates of carbon with the atmosphere. Soil freezing controls important biogeochemical processes, like photosynthetic activity of plants and microbial activity within soils. Permafrost covers approximately 24% of the land surface in the Northern Hemisphere and seasonal freezing occurs on approximately 51% of the area. The retrieval method presented is based on an inversion technique and applies a semiempirical backscattering model that describes the dependence of radar backscattering of forest as a function of stem volume, soil permittivity, the extinction coefficient of forest canopy, surface roughness, incidence angle, and radar frequency. It gives an estimate of soil permittivity using active microwave measurements. Applying a Bayesian assimilation scheme, it is also possible to use other soil permittivity retrievals to regulate this estimate to combine for example low resolution passive observations with high resolution active observations for a synergistic retrieval. This way the higher variance in the active retrieval can be constricted with the passive retrieval when at the same time the spatial resolution of the product is improved compared to the passive-only retrieval. The retrieved soil permittivity estimate can be used to detect soil freeze/thaw state by considering the soil to be frozen when the estimate is below a threshold value. The permittivity retrieval can also be used to estimate the relative moisture of the soil. The method was tested using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) measurements from ENVISAT ASAR instrument for the years 2010-2012 and from Sentinel-1 satellite for the years 2015-2016 in Sodankylä area in Northern Finland. The synergistic method was tested combining the SAR measurements with a SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity) radiometer

  18. Capability of passive microwave and SNODAS SWE estimates for hydrologic predictions in selected U.S. watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuyovich, C.; Jacobs, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, a dedicated system of snow measurement stations (SNOTEL) and snowpack modeling products (SNODAS) are available to estimate the snow water equivalent (SWE) throughout the winter seasons. Even in the U.S., water resource management is hampered by limited snow data in certain regions, as evident by the 2011 Missouri Basin flooding due in large part to the significant Plains snowpack. In other regions of the world that depend on snowmelt for water resources, snow data can be scarce, and these regions are vulnerable to drought or flood conditions. Satellite data could potentially provide important information in under-sampled areas. Passive microwave data have shown some skill in estimating SWE in several regions of the United States, as compared with the SNODAS spatially distributed estimates. However, the SNODAS product contains greater uncertainty in regions with limited observations or that experience wind redistribution of snow. This study evaluates SWE estimates from AMSR-E and SSM/I satellites, and the SNODAS product, in several watersheds throughout the United States by comparison with discharge data. Watersheds large enough to be appropriate for passive microwave resolution were selected from the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN), which identifies watersheds with minimal human impacts to stream flow. A water balance analysis was conducted to determine the predictive capability of passive microwave for hydrological applications.

  19. A study on the use of passive microwave radiometry for the detection of buried objects and their associated hydrological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Robbert; de Jeu, Richard; Haarbrink, Roland

    2014-10-01

    The detection of buried objects with remote sensing techniques mainly relies on thermal infrared, ground penetrating radar, and metal detectors. However, nowadays people also start to use low frequency passive microwave radiometry for the same purpose. The detection performance of passive microwave radiometry is influenced by the depth and size of the object, environmental factors, and soil properties. Soil moisture is a key variable here, due to its strong influence on the observed dielectric constant. Through digging activities will the hydrological conditions of the soil change significantly that can be detected by remotely sensing systems. A study was designed to examine the influence of the hydrological changes caused by the direct placement of an object in the ground. Simulations in a soil moisture model and field observations revealed the development of a wetter part above and a drier part underneath an object. The observations were converted to brightness temperatures with a coherent model in combination with a dielectric mixing model. Development of a drier area underneath an object generally increases the brightness temperature after a precipitation event. As a results are brightness temperature anomalies of low dielectric constant objects raised during the first 36 hours after a rain event. Ground observations of soil moisture and porosity revealed an increase in porosity and loss in soil moisture for the part that was excavated. Knowledge of past weather conditions could therefore improve buried object detection by passive microwave sensors.

  20. Titanium dioxide thin films deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition for OLED passivation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woong-Sun; Ko, Myoung-Gyun; Kim, Tae-Sub; Park, Sang-Kyun; Moon, Yeon-Keon; Lee, Su-Hwan; Park, Jae-Gun; Park, Jong-Wan

    2008-09-01

    Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of titanium dioxide thin films was conducted using Tetrakis dimethylamino titanium (TDMATi) and an oxygen plasma on a polyethersulfon (PES) substrate at a deposition temperature of 90 degrees C. The effects of the induced plasma power on passivation properties were investigated according to film thickness. The growth rate of the titanium dioxide film was 0.8 A/cycle, and the water vapor transmission rate (WTVR) for a 80 nm titanium dioxide film was 0.023 g/m2 day. The passivation performance of the titanium dioxide film was investigated using an organic light-emitting diode (OLED). The coated OLED lifetime was 90 h, 15 times longer than that of an uncoated sample.

  1. Development of a Passive Microwave Surface Melt Record for Antarctica and Antarctic Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmosky, C. C.; Reasons, J.; Morgan, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctica contains the largest mass of ice in the world and much time and energy has gone into researching the ice-ocean-atmosphere-land dynamics that, in a warming climate, have the potential to significantly affect sea levels throughout the world. While there are many datasets currently available to researchers examining sea ice extent and volume, glacier thickness, ice shelf retreat and expansion, and atmospheric variables such as temperature and wind speeds, there is not currently a dataset that offers surface melt extent of land ice in the southern hemisphere. The database outlined here uses the Cross-Polarized Gradient Ratio (XPGR) to show surface melt extent on a daily basis for all of Antarctica. XPGR utilizes passive microwave satellite imagery in the 19 GHz and 37GHz frequencies to determine the presence or absence of greater than 1% liquid water in the top layers of ice. Daily XPGR melt occurrence (1987-2014) was calculated for both the ice sheet as well as ice shelves on Antarctica, and is available as a GIS shapefile or asci text file.

  2. Skillful Spring Forecasts of September Arctic Sea Ice Extent Using Passive Microwave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, A. A.; Schroder, D.; Stroeve, J. C.; Markus, Thorsten; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Kurtz, Nathan Timothy; Feltham, D. L.; Flocco, D.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate skillful spring forecasts of detrended September Arctic sea ice extent using passive microwave observations of sea ice concentration (SIC) and melt onset (MO). We compare these to forecasts produced using data from a sophisticated melt pond model, and find similar to higher skill values, where the forecast skill is calculated relative to linear trend persistence. The MO forecasts shows the highest skill in March-May, while the SIC forecasts produce the highest skill in June-August, especially when the forecasts are evaluated over recent years (since 2008). The high MO forecast skill in early spring appears to be driven primarily by the presence and timing of open water anomalies, while the high SIC forecast skill appears to be driven by both open water and surface melt processes. Spatial maps of detrended anomalies highlight the drivers of the different forecasts, and enable us to understand regions of predictive importance. Correctly capturing sea ice state anomalies, along with changes in open water coverage appear to be key processes in skillfully forecasting summer Arctic sea ice.

  3. Wind Retrievals under Rain for Passive Satellite Microwave Radiometers and its Applications to Hurricane Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm that retrieves wind speed under rain using C-hand and X-band channels of passive microwave satellite radiometers. The spectral difference of the brightness temperature signals due to wind or rain allows to find channel combinations that are sufficiently sensitive to wind speed but little or not sensitive to rain. We &ve trained a statistical algorithm that applies under hurricane conditions and is able to measure wind speeds in hurricanes to an estimated accuracy of about 2 m/s. We have also developed a global algorithm, that is less accurate but can be applied under all conditions. Its estimated accuracy is between 2 and 5 mls, depending on wind speed and rain rate. We also extend the wind speed region in our model for the wind induced sea surface emissivity from currently 20 m/s to 40 mls. The data indicate that the signal starts to saturate above 30 mls. Finally, we make an assessment of the performance of wind direction retrievals from polarimetric radiometers as function of wind speed and rain rate

  4. Bias adjustment of infrared-based rainfall estimation using Passive Microwave satellite rainfall data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbalaee, Negar; Hsu, Kuolin; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Braithwaite, Dan

    2017-04-01

    This study explores using Passive Microwave (PMW) rainfall estimation for spatial and temporal adjustment of Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). The PERSIANN-CCS algorithm collects information from infrared images to estimate rainfall. PERSIANN-CCS is one of the algorithms used in the Integrated Multisatellite Retrievals for GPM (Global Precipitation Mission) estimation for the time period PMW rainfall estimations are limited or not available. Continued improvement of PERSIANN-CCS will support Integrated Multisatellite Retrievals for GPM for current as well as retrospective estimations of global precipitation. This study takes advantage of the high spatial and temporal resolution of GEO-based PERSIANN-CCS estimation and the more effective, but lower sample frequency, PMW estimation. The Probability Matching Method (PMM) was used to adjust the rainfall distribution of GEO-based PERSIANN-CCS toward that of PMW rainfall estimation. The results show that a significant improvement of global PERSIANN-CCS rainfall estimation is obtained.

  5. Soil Moisture Retrieval Through Changing Corn Using Active/Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. E.; Joseph, A.; DeLannoy, G.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Kim, E.; Houser, P.; Gish, T.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive field experiment was conducted from May-early October, 2002 at the heavily instrumented USDA-ARS (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service) OPE3 (Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement) test site in Beltsville, MD to acquire data needed to address active/passive microwave algorithm, modeling, and ground validation issues for accurate soil moisture retrieval. During the experiment, a tower-mounted 1.4 GHz radiometer (Lrad) and a truck-mounted dual-frequency (1.6 and 4.75 GHz) radar system were deployed on the northern edge of the site. The soil in this portion of the field is a sandy loam (silt 23.5%, sand 60.3%, clay 16.1%) with a measured bulk density of 1.253 g/cu cm. Vegetation cover in the experiment consisted of a corn crop which was measured from just after planting on April 17, 2002 through senescence and harvesting on October 2. Although drought conditions prevailed during the summer, the corn yield was near average, with peak biomass reached in late July.

  6. Soil Moisture Retrieval Through Changing Corn Using Active/Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. E.; Joseph, A.; DeLannoy, G.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Kim, E.; Houser, P.; Gish, T.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive field experiment was conducted from May-early October, 2002 at the heavily instrumented USDA-ARS (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service) OPE3 (Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement) test site in Beltsville, MD to acquire data needed to address active/passive microwave algorithm, modeling, and ground validation issues for accurate soil moisture retrieval. During the experiment, a tower-mounted 1.4 GHz radiometer (Lrad) and a truck-mounted dual-frequency (1.6 and 4.75 GHz) radar system were deployed on the northern edge of the site. The soil in this portion of the field is a sandy loam (silt 23.5%, sand 60.3%, clay 16.1%) with a measured bulk density of 1.253 g/cu cm. Vegetation cover in the experiment consisted of a corn crop which was measured from just after planting on April 17, 2002 through senescence and harvesting on October 2. Although drought conditions prevailed during the summer, the corn yield was near average, with peak biomass reached in late July.

  7. Ice surface temperature retrieval from AVHRR, ATSR, and passive microwave satellite data: Algorithm development and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Jeff; Maslanik, James; Steffen, Konrad

    1994-01-01

    During the first half of our second project year we have accomplished the following: (1) acquired a new AVHRR data set for the Beaufort Sea area spanning an entire year; (2) acquired additional ATSR data for the Arctic and Antarctic now totaling over seven months; (3) refined our AVHRR Arctic and Antarctic ice surface temperature (IST) retrieval algorithm, including work specific to Greenland; (4) developed ATSR retrieval algorithms for the Arctic and Antarctic, including work specific to Greenland; (5) investigated the effects of clouds and the atmosphere on passive microwave 'surface' temperature retrieval algorithms; (6) generated surface temperatures for the Beaufort Sea data set, both from AVHRR and SSM/I; and (7) continued work on compositing GAC data for coverage of the entire Arctic and Antarctic. During the second half of the year we will continue along these same lines, and will undertake a detailed validation study of the AVHRR and ATSR retrievals using LEADEX and the Beaufort Sea year-long data. Cloud masking methods used for the AVHRR will be modified for use with the ATSR. Methods of blending in situ and satellite-derived surface temperature data sets will be investigated.

  8. Estimating vegetation optical depth using L-band passive microwave airborne data in HiWATER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Chai, Linna

    2014-11-01

    In this study, a relationship between polarization differences of soil emissivity at different incidence angles was constructed from a large quantity of simulated soil emissivity based on the Advanced Integrated Emission Model (AIEM) input parameters include: a frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band), incident angles varying from 1°to 60° at a 1° interval, a wide range of soil moisture content and land surface roughness parameters. Then, we used this relationship and the ω-τ zero-order radiation transfer model to develop an inversion method of low vegetation optical depth at L-band, this work were under the assumption that there was no significant polarization difference between the vegetation signals. Based on this inversion method of low vegetation optical depth, we used the land surface passive microwave brightness temperature of Heihe Watershed obtained by airborne Polarimetric L-band Multibeam Radiometer (PLMR) in 2012 Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) to retrieve the corn optical depth in the flight areas, then the results were compared with the measured corn LAI. Results show that the retrieved corn optical depths were consisted with the measured LAI of corn. It proved that the corn optical depth inversion method proposed in this study was feasible. Moreover, the method was promising to apply to the satellite observations.

  9. A 10-Year Climatology of Amazonian Rainfall Derived from Passive Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Adler, Robert F.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we present and describe a satellite-derived precipitation climatology over northern South America using a passive microwave technique, the Goddard Profiling Algorithm. A period of data slightly longer than 10 years is examined. The climatologies take the form of the mean estimated (adjusted) rainfall for a 10-year (+) period, with sub-divisions by month and meteorological season. For the six-year period 1992-1997, when two satellites were in operation, diurnal variability (to the extent it is discerned by four unequally spaced observations) is presented. We find an alternating pattern of morning and maxima stretching from the northeast (Atlantic coast) clear across the continent to the Pacific. The effects of topography, coastlines and geography (river valleys) on the rainfall patterns are clear. Interannual variability is examined by computing the deviations of yearly and warm season (DJF) rainfall from their respective long-term means. Interannual variability of the diurnal nature of the rainfall is presented, and the strong El Nino event of 1997-1998 is discussed.

  10. Estimating effective roughness parameters of the L-MEB model for soil moisture retrieval using passive microwave observations from SMAPVEX12

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although there have been efforts to improve existing soil moisture retrieval algorithms, the ability to estimate soil moisture from passive microwave observations is still hampered by problems in accurately modeling the observed microwave signal. This paper focuses on the estimation of effective sur...

  11. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using passive microwave-based technologies – theoretical basic and overview of selected algorithms for AMSR-E

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Satellite-based passive microwave remote sensing has been shown to be a valuable tool in mapping and monitoring global soil moisture. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on the Aqua platform (AMSR-E) has made significant contributions to this application. As the result of agency and individua...

  12. Characterizations of biodegradable epoxy-coated cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) thin film for flexible microwave applications

    Treesearch

    Hongyi Mi; Chien-Hao Liu; Tzu-Husan Chang; Jung-Hun Seo; Huilong Zhang; Sang June Cho; Nader Behdad; Zhenqiang Ma; Chunhua Yao; Zhiyong Cai; Shaoqin Gong

    2016-01-01

    Wood pulp cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) thin film is a novel recyclable and biodegradable material. We investigated the microwave dielectric properties of the epoxy coated-CNF thin film for potential broad applications in flexible high speed electronics. The characterizations of dielectric properties were carried out in a frequency range of 1–10 GHz. The dielectric...

  13. Suppression of twins in b-oriented MFI molecular sieve films under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Li, Yanshuo; Cai, Rui; Yang, Weishen

    2012-07-11

    Twin growth in the synthesis of b-oriented MFI films is successfully suppressed by applying microwave irradiation on a b-oriented MFI seed layer, relying on the nucleation-related bottleneck effect. Electrochemical oxidation experiments demonstrated the importance of twin suppression in enhancing the diffusion of guest molecules in MFI films.

  14. Surface Passivation for 3-5 Semiconductor Processing: Stable Gallium Sulphide Films by MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macinnes, Andrew N.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Power, Michael B.; Kang, Soon; Barron, Andrew R.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1994-01-01

    Gallium sulphide (GaS) has been deposited on GaAs to form stable, insulating, passivating layers. Spectrally resolved photoluminescence and surface recombination velocity measurements indicate that the GaS itself can contribute a significant fraction of the photoluminescence in GaS/GaAs structures. Determination of surface recombination velocity by photoluminescence is therefore difficult. By using C-V analysis of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures, passivation of the GaAs with GaS films is quantified.

  15. Field emission from bias-grown diamond thin films in a microwave plasma

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Ding, Ming Q.; Auciello, Orlando

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing diamond or diamond like films in which a negative bias is established on a substrate with an electrically conductive surface in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The atmosphere that is subjected to microwave energy includes a source of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The negative bias is maintained on the substrate through both the nucleation and growth phase of the film until the film is continuous. Biases between -100V and -200 are preferred. Carbon sources may be one or more of CH.sub.4, C.sub.2 H.sub.2 other hydrocarbons and fullerenes.

  16. A Method to Estimate Crop Effects in Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval Above C-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Xu, Y.; Shi, J.

    2009-12-01

    To remove vegetation effects in soil moisture retrieval by passive microwave technique at lower frequencies such as L- or C-band, the τ-ω model is often used, where ω is single scattering albedo of vegetation, and τ is its opacity (τ=exp(-t), t is transmissivity of vegetation). At frequencies above C-band, such as AMSR-E (the lowest frequency is 6.925GHz) or Chinese FY-3A (launched in 2008, the lowest frequency is 10.65GHz), both the scattering and transmission characteristics of short vegetation are not known exactly. In this paper, a Matrix-Doubling (thereafter M-D) microwave emission model was used to simulate emission of corn field at C (6.925GHz) and X (10.65GHz) bands. Total emission and vegetation layer emission contribution are verified by a microwave radiometer in a field experiment, respectively. The effective single scattering albedo and transmissivity of corn above C-band were derived by comparison the results of M-D model with those of τ-ω model at same environment, which were then verified by SMEX02 data. In τ-ω model the vegetation is treated as an uniform media. While the M-D model used in this paper is based on ray-tracing technique, which could account for multiple scattering inside vegetation layer, as well as that between vegetation and soil surface as frequency goes higher. The orientation and geometry parameters of vegetation could be considered in M-D. The ground surface emission model in M-D is AIEM. To verify the results by M-D model, we did a field experiment at QingYuan, Hebei Province of China in July 7, 2008 by a German-made truck-mounted microwave radiometer. At 6.925GHz, the simulated Brightness Temperature by M-D model vs. collected data were good. To verify the emission contribution from corn layer only, an Aluminum foil was placed on the ground below the corn, so as to mask the soil emission. The measured data vs. simulation were close. Since M-D model is very complicated, it’s difficult to relate the soil emission (soil

  17. Effect of hydrogen passivation on the photoluminescence of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatryb, G.; Klak, M. M.; Wojcik, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Mascher, P.; Podhorodecki, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, silicon-rich silicon oxide films containing terbium were prepared by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of hydrogen passivation on defects-mediated non-radiative recombination of excited Tb3+ ions was investigated by photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation, and photoluminescence decay measurements. Passivation was found to have no effect on shape and spectral position of the excitation spectra. In contrast, a gradual increase in photoluminescence intensity and photoluminescence decay time was observed upon passivation for the main 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb3+ ions. This observation was attributed to passivation of non-radiative recombination defects centers with hydrogen. It was found that the number of emitted photons increases upon passivation as a result of two effects: (1) longer Tb3+ lifetime in the 5D4 excited state and (2) optical activation of new Tb3+ emitters. The obtained results were discussed and compared with other experimental reports.

  18. Soil moisture from the recent AMSR2 and FY3B multi-frequency passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, Robert; Wang, Guojie; de Jeu, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Over the years several different multi-frequency passive microwave sensors were used to estimate surface soil moisture. An historical multi-frequency passive microwave database from these satellite platforms was already used to generate a long term (32 years) surface soil moisture dataset. The Land Parameter Retrieval Algorithm (LPRM) was applied to this historical multi-frequency passive microwave database, including the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), that plays a dominant role in the 2002-2011 period. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) shares a similar design with its predecessor, it was improved based on general technical development as well as the valuable heritage that AMSR-E left behind. Most recently, the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) started offering brightness temperature observations from the AMSR2 radiometer. In the recent years, China's National Satellite Meteorological Center (NSMC) developed meteorological satellites. The NSMC has polar orbiting sun-synchronized meteorological satellites in operation since 1988 in the so-called FengYun (FY) satellite series. FY3 is China's 2nd generation polar orbiting satellite series, its design was based on the previous polar orbiting satellite series and FY3 will ultimately become series of four satellites (FY3A to FY3D). The FY3B satellite is the 2nd satellite of the FY3 series and it's the 1st in the series to carry a microwave imager (MWRI) onboard observing the Earth's surface in 10 microwave channels. Brightness temperature observations of these recently developed sensors were compared to the existing database. An inter-calibration step was performed in order to overcome small difference in brightness temperature observations as a result of the different sensor calibration procedures. The LPRM was applied to observations made by the FY3B and AMSR2 sensors resulting in global soil moisture products. After the implementation of the

  19. In situ evolution of trivalent chromium process passive film on Al in a corrosive aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuecheng; Argekar, Sandip; Wang, Peng; Schaefer, Dale W

    2011-11-01

    In situ neutron reflectivity (NR) is used to observe the structure and evolution of a Trivalent Chromium Process (TCP) passive film on Al in a NaCl-D(2)O solution. Using a split liquid reflectivity cell we mimicked the corrosion process on the anodic sites in alloy AA 2024-T3 in a pitting scenario. The split cell separates the anodic and cathodic reactions, allowing NR observation of the corroding anodic surface under potential control. We observed the evolution of the TCP film on the Al anode and compared the degradation of the Al with and without TCP protection. When held at 100 mV above the open-circuit potential (OCP), unprotected aluminum dissolves at a rate of 120 Å/h. By contrast, TCP-coated Al is stable up to the pitting potential (200 mV above OCP). In the passive state D(2)O molecules penetrate the bulk TCP film by partially replacing the hydrate water. In spite of exchange of hydration water, the TCP film is stable and the underlying aluminum is fully protected. The passive character of the TCP film is due to a dense layer at the metal-TCP interface and/or to suppression of ion transport in the bulk film. As the pitting potential is approached the film swells and NaCl-D(2)O solution penetrates the TCP film. At this point, 50 vol % of the TCP film is occupied by bulk NaCl-D(2)O solution. Failure occurs by aluminum dissolution under the swollen TCP film as the imbibed solution contacts the Al metal. Further increase in potential leads to complete stripping of the TCP film.

  20. Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, J.J. III; Halpern, B.L.

    1993-10-26

    An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures. 5 figures.

  1. Passive Microwave Measurements Over Conifer Forests at L-Band and C-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Chauhan, N.; Kim, E.; Bidwell, S.; Goodberlet, M.; Haken, M.; deMatthaeis, P.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been made at L-band and C-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study the response of passive microwave instruments to biomass and soil moisture. A series of aircraft measurements were made in July, August and November, 1999 over relatively homogenous conifer forests of varying biomass. Three radiometers participated in these measurements. These were: 1) the L-band radiometer ESTAR, a horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer which has been used extensively in past measurements of soil moisture; 2) the L-band radiometer SLFMR, a vertically polarized cross-track scanner which has been used successfully in the past for mapping sea surface salinity; and 3) The ACMR, a new C-band radiometer which operates at V- and H-polarization and in the configuration for these experiments did not scan. All three radiometers were flown on the NASA P-3 aircraft based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The ESTAR and SLFMR were mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and imaged across track whereas the ACMR was mounted to look aft at 54 degrees up from nadir. Data was collected at altitudes of 915 meters and 457 meters. The forests consisted of relatively homogeneous "managed" stands of conifer located near Waverly, Virginia. This is a relatively flat area about 30 miles southeast of Richmond, VA with numerous stands of trees being grown for the forestry industry. The stands selected for study consisted of areas of regrowth and mature stands of pine. In addition, a small stand of very large trees was observed. Soil moisture sampling was done in each stand during the aircraft over flights. Data was collected on July 7, August 27, November 15 and November 30, 1999. Measurements were made with ESTAR on all days. The ACMR flew on the summer missions and the SLFMR was present only on the August 27 flight. Soil moisture varied from quite dry on July 7 to quite moist on November 30 (which was shortly after a period of rain). The microwave

  2. Microwave metamaterials—from passive to digital and programmable controls of electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-08-01

    Since 2004, my group at Southeast University has been carrying out research into microwave metamaterials, which are classified into three catagories: metamaterials based on the effective medium model, plasmonic metamaterials for spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and coding and programmable metamaterials. For effective-medium metamaterials, we have developed a general theory to accurately describe effective permittivity and permeability in semi-analytical forms, from which we have designed and realized a three dimensional (3D) wideband ground-plane invisibility cloak, a free-space electrostatic invisibility cloak, an electromagnetic black hole, optical/radar illusions, and radially anisotropic zero-index metamaterial for omni-directional radiation and a nearly perfect power combination of source array, etc. We have also considered the engineering applications of microwave metamaterials, such as a broadband and low-loss 3D transformation-optics lens for wide-angle scanning, a 3D planar gradient-index lens for high-gain radiations, and a random metasurface for reducing radar cross sections. In the area of plasmonic metamaterials, we proposed an ultrathin, narrow, and flexible corrugated metallic strip to guide SPPs with a small bending loss and radiation loss, from which we designed and realized a series of SPP passive devices (e.g. power divider, coupler, filter, and resonator) and active devices (e.g. amplifier and duplexer). We also showed a significant feature of the ultrathin SPP waveguide in overcoming the challenge of signal integrity in traditional integrated circuits, which will help build a high-performance SPP wireless communication system. In the area of coding and programmable metamaterials, we proposed a new measure to describe a metamaterial from the viewpoint of information theory. We have illustrated theoretically and experimentally that coding metamaterials composed of digital units can be controlled by coding sequences, leading to different

  3. Developing a dual assimilation approach for thermal infrared and passive microwave soil moisture retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, Christopher Ryan

    Soil moisture plays a vital role in the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface energy budget and the lack of a dense spatial and temporal network of ground-based observations provides a challenge to the initialization of the true soil moisture state in numerical weather prediction simulations. The retrieval of soil moisture using observations from both satellite-based thermal-infrared (TIR) and passive microwave (PM) sensors has been developed (Anderson et al., 2007; Hain et al., 2009; Jackson, 1993; Njoku et al., 2003). The ability of the TIR and microwave observations to diagnose soil moisture conditions within different layers of the soil profile provides an opportunity to use each in a synergistic data assimilation approach towards the goal of diagnosing the true soil moisture state from surface to root-zone. TIR and PM retrievals of soil moisture are compared to soil moisture estimates provided by a retrospective Land Information System (LIS) simulation using the NOAH LSM during the time period of 2003--2008. The TIR-based soil moisture product is provided by a retrieval of soil moisture associated with surface flux estimates from the Atmosphere-Land-Exchange-Inversion (ALEXI) model (Anderson et al., 1997; Mecikalski et al., 1999; Hain et al., 2009). The PM soil moisture retrieval is provided by the Vrijie Universiteit Amsterdam (VUA)-NASA surface soil moisture product. The VUA retrieval is based on the findings of Owe et al. (2001; 2008) using the Land Surface Parameter model (LPRM), which uses one dual polarized channel (6.925 or 10.65 GHz) for a dual-retrieval of surface soil moisture and vegetation water content. In addition, retrievals of ALEXI (TIR) and AMSR-E (PM) soil moisture are assimilated within the Land Information System using the NOAH LSM. A series of data assimilation experiments is completed with the following configuration: (a) no assimilation, (b) only ALEXI soil moisture, (c) only AMSR-E soil moisture, and (d) ALEXI

  4. Semi-distributed snowmelt modeling and regional snow mapping using passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Purushottam Raj

    2002-01-01

    Two semi-distributed snowmelt models (SDSM-MTI and SDSM-EBM) developed to model the basin-scale snow accumulation and ablation processes at sub-basin scale, were applied to the Paddle River Basin (PRB) of central Alberta. SDSM-MTI uses a modified temperature index approach that consists of a weighted average of near surface soil (Tg) and air temperature (Ta) data. SDSM-EBM, a relatively data intensive energy balance model accounts for snowmelt by considering (a) vertical energy exchange in open and forested area separately; (b) snowmelt in terms of liquid and ice phases separately, canopy interception, snow density, sublimation, refreezing, etc, and (c) the snow surface temperature. Other than the "regulatory" effects of beaver dams, both models simulated reasonably accurate snowmelt runoff, SWE and snow depth for PRB. For SDSM-MTI, the advantage of using both Ta and Tg is partly attributed to T g showing a stronger correlation with solar and net radiation at PRB than Ta. Existing algorithms for retrieving snow water equivalent (SWE) from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave brightness temperature data were assessed and new algorithms were developed for the Red River basin of North Dakota and Minnesota. The frequencies of SSM/I data used are 19 and 37 GHz in both horizontal and vertical polarization. The airborne gamma-ray measurements of SWE for 1989, 1988, and 1997 provided the ground truth for algorithm development and validation. Encouraging calibration results are obtained for the multivariate regression algorithms and dry snow cases of the 1989 and 1988 SSM/I data (from DMSP-F8). Similarly, validation results e.g., 1988 (1989 as calibration data), 1989 (1988 as calibration data), and 1997 (from DMSP-F10 and F13), are also encouraging. The non-parameric, Projection Pursuit Regression technique also gave good results in both stages. However, for the validation stage, adding a shift parameter to all retrieval algorithms was necessary

  5. Jointly Retrieving Surface Soil Moisture from Active and Passive Microwave Observations Using Cubist Data-Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, X.; Houser, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    With the successful launches of NASA's Earth Observing Satellites (e.g. Terra & Aqua) and several environmental satellites (e.g. NPOESS, NPP, SMOS and HYDROS) being planned to launch in the near future, huge amounts of satellite remote sensing data are being collected every day. Maximizing the use of this wealth of data sets is a pressing issue for the Earth system science community. Data mining is extracts patterns from large system data sets. These patterns provide insight into system characteristics that enable outcome prediction for future situations that aids decision-making. The Cubist data-mining algorithm is a powerful tool for generating rule-based models that balance the need for accurate prediction against the requirements of intelligibility. Cubist models generally give better results than those produced by simple techniques such as multivariate linear regression, and are generally easier to understand than neural networks. The NASA's Hydrosphere States (HYDROS) mission, an Earth System Science Pathfinder, will use both L-band microwave coarse resolution radiometer and fine-resolution radar to make the first space borne observations of global soil water availability. These new observations will enable new scientific investigations of atmospheric predictability and global change processes. To assess the potential accuracies of retrieving land surface soil moisture from the radiometer and radar observations, the HYDROS science team has created an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) that includes a complete land surface geophysical properties data set (soil moisture, surface temperature, vegetation temperature, etc), the associated atmospheric variables, and the simulated HYDROS radar and radiometer observations for the Red-Arkansas river basin. We have applied the Cubist data-mining algorithm to this OSSE data set to evaluate its soil moisture retrieval skill using the active and passive microwave observations simultaneously. The resulting

  6. Generation of acoustic waves by power microwave pulses with the use of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. G.; Vdovin, V. A.

    2005-10-01

    We study the features of excitation of acoustic waves by high-power microwave pulses in thin metal films bordering on liquid. Aluminum films with thicknesses 1 10 nm deposited onto a quartz substrate were used in experiments. It is shown theoretically that the absorption coefficient of microwaves is maximum for film thickness from 2 to 3 nm and the value of this maximum is determined by the dielectric permittivity of the bordering liquid. Theoretical calculations and experiments are performed for water and ethyl alcohol. The sound generation in a layered system quartz-aluminum film-liquid is analyzed with the help of the step-by-step approach. At the first step, microwave energy is absorbed in the film and heat is released. Then heat almost instantly diffuses into a liquid whose thermal expansion creates an acoustic signal. Profiles of acoustic signals excited in aluminum films by microwave pulses with a 5-ns duration and an energy of up to 1 mJ are experimentally detected. The most efficient transduction was observed for an aluminum film 3.5 nm thick.

  7. Microwave synthesis of calcium bismuth niobate thin films obtained by the polymeric precursor method

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, A.Z.; Ramirez, M.A. . E-mail: miganr@kenter.com; Ries, A.; Wang, F.; Longo, E.; Varela, J.A.

    2006-08-10

    The crystal structure, surface morphology and electrical properties of layered perovskite calcium bismuth niobate thin films (CaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}-CBN) deposited on platinum coated silicon substrates by the polymeric precursor method have been investigated. The films were crystallized in a domestic microwave and in a conventional furnace. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis confirms that the crystallinity and morphology of the films are affected by the different annealing routes. Ferroelectric properties of the films were determined with remanent polarization P {sub r} and a drive voltage V {sub c} of 4.2 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and 1.7 V for the film annealed in the conventional furnace and 1.0 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and 4.0 V for the film annealed in microwave furnace, respectively. A slight decay after 10{sup 8} polarization cycles was observed for the films annealed in the microwave furnace indicating a reduction of the domain wall mobility after interaction of the microwave energy with the bottom electrode.

  8. Germanium nitride and oxynitride films for surface passivation of Ge radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggioni, G.; Carturan, S.; Fiorese, L.; Pinto, N.; Caproli, F.; Napoli, D. R.; Giarola, M.; Mariotto, G.

    2017-01-01

    This work reports a detailed investigation of the properties of germanium nitride and oxynitride films to be applied as passivation layers to Ge radiation detectors. All the samples were deposited at room temperature by reactive RF magnetron sputtering. A strong correlation was found between the deposition parameters, such as deposition rate, substrate bias and atmosphere composition, and the oxygen and nitrogen content in the film matrix. We found that all the films were very poorly crystallized, consisting of very small Ge nitride and oxynitride nanocrystallites, and electrically insulating, with the resistivity changing from three to six orders of magnitude as a function of temperature. A preliminary test of these films as passivation layers was successfully performed by depositing a germanium nitride film on the intrinsic surface of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) diode and measuring the improved performance, in terms of leakage current, with respect to a reference passivated diode. All these interesting results allow us to envisage the application of this coating technology to the surface passivation of germanium-based radiation detectors.

  9. Characterization of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films using microwave non-destructive testing technique.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Nor Khaizan; Wui, Wong Tin; Ghodgaonkar, Deepak K; Taib, Mohd Nasir

    2007-01-17

    The applicability of microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique in characterization of matrix property of pharmaceutical films was investigated. Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and loratadine were selected as model matrix polymer and drug, respectively. Both blank and drug loaded hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films were prepared using the solvent-evaporation method and were conditioned at the relative humidity of 25, 50 and 75% prior to physicochemical characterization using microwave NDT technique as well as ultraviolet spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. The results indicated that blank hydroxypropylmethylcellulose film exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer interaction at the O-H and C-H domains of the polymer chains upon conditioned at a lower level of relative humidity. In the case of loratadine loaded films, a greater propensity of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction via the O-H moiety was mediated in samples conditioned at the lower level of relative humidity, and via the C-H moiety when 50% relative humidity was selected as the condition for sample storage. Apparently, the absorption and transmission characteristics of both blank and drug loaded films for microwave varied with the state of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction involving the O-H and C-H moieties. The measurement of microwave NDT test at 8GHz was sensitive to the chemical environment involving O-H moiety while it was greatly governed by the C-H moiety in test conducted at a higher frequency band of microwave. Similar observation was obtained with respect to the profiles of microwave NDT measurements against the state of polymer-polymer and/or drug-polymer interaction of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films containing chlorpheniramine maleate. The microwave NDT measurement is potentially suitable for use as an apparent indicator of the state of polymer-polymer and drug

  10. High temperature passive film on the surface of Co-Cr-Mo alloy and its tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feifei; Dong, Guangneng; Dong, Lishe

    2014-09-01

    For the artificial hip joints, passive film formed on the Co-Cr-Mo alloy acted as a highly protective barrier in the body fluid. But its stability, composition and structure always influenced the protection. In this work, passive film was obtained by high temperature treatment. The effect of passivation environment on the properties of the passive film was investigated. The film's surface roughness, micro-hardness and structure were analyzed. In order to study the tribological behavior of the passive film, pin-on-disk tribotest was carried out under bovine serum albumin (BSA) and saline solution. Results indicated the sample passivated in vacuum had friction coefficient of 0.18 under BSA solution and 0.53 under saline solution; the sample passivated in air had friction coefficient of 0.14 under BSA solution and 0.56 under saline solution. In addition, the reference sample without passivation was tested under the same condition. It showed friction of 0.22 under BSA solution and 0.45 under solution. The lubricating mechanism was attributed to BSA tribo-film absorption on the surface and high hardness passive film.

  11. Improved epitaxy of ultrathin praseodymia films on chlorine passivated Si(111) reducing silicate interface formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gevers, S.; Bruns, D.; Weisemoeller, T.; Wollschlaeger, J.; Flege, J. I.; Kaemena, B.; Falta, J.

    2010-12-13

    Ultrathin praseodymia films have been deposited on both Cl-passivated and nonpassivated Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Comparative studies on the crystallinity and stoichiometry are performed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray standing waves, and x-ray reflectometry. On nonpassivated Si(111) an amorphous silicate film is formed. In contrast, praseodymia deposited on Cl-passivated Si(111) form a well-ordered crystalline film with cubic-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (bixbyite) structure. The vertical lattice constant of the praseodymia film is increased by 1.4% compared to the bulk value. Furthermore, the formation of an extended amorphous silicate interface layers is suppressed and confined to only one monolayer.

  12. Development of radio frequency interference detection algorithms for passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sidharth

    Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) signals are man-made sources that are increasingly plaguing passive microwave remote sensing measurements. RFI is of insidious nature, with some signals low power enough to go undetected but large enough to impact science measurements and their results. With the launch of the European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite in November 2009 and the upcoming launches of the new NASA sea-surface salinity measuring Aquarius mission in June 2011 and soil-moisture measuring Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission around 2015, active steps are being taken to detect and mitigate RFI at L-band. An RFI detection algorithm was designed for the Aquarius mission. The algorithm performance was analyzed using kurtosis based RFI ground-truth. The algorithm has been developed with several adjustable location dependant parameters to control the detection statistics (false-alarm rate and probability of detection). The kurtosis statistical detection algorithm has been compared with the Aquarius pulse detection method. The comparative study determines the feasibility of the kurtosis detector for the SMAP radiometer, as a primary RFI detection algorithm in terms of detectability and data bandwidth. The kurtosis algorithm has superior detection capabilities for low duty-cycle radar like pulses, which are more prevalent according to analysis of field campaign data. Most RFI algorithms developed have generally been optimized for performance with individual pulsed-sinusoidal RFI sources. A new RFI detection model is developed that takes into account multiple RFI sources within an antenna footprint. The performance of the kurtosis detection algorithm under such central-limit conditions is evaluated. The SMOS mission has a unique hardware system, and conventional RFI detection techniques cannot be applied. Instead, an RFI detection algorithm for SMOS is developed and applied in the angular domain. This algorithm compares

  13. Global Evaporation Estimates from SMAP Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals Using Conditional Sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, M.; Entekhabi, D.; Konings, A. G.; Salvucci, G.; Hogan, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land yet even its climatology on global scale is not observed. Tower-based flux measurements are sparse and do not cover diverse biomes and climates. In the last decades, many strategies to derive evaporation based on remote sensing measurements have been developed. However, these methods are dependent on a variety of assumptions and auxiliary data, making them more prone to error propagation. A more data-driven method was developed by Salvucci (2001), who found that under statistical stationary conditions the expected change in soil moisture storage is zero when conditioned to a certain storage for a certain time interval. Consequently, using the water balance, precipitation conditionally averaged to the soil moisture storage is equal to the total loss: evaporation and drainage. Using only soil moisture and precipitation data as model inputs reduces the sources of uncertainty. In this presentation we provide the first estimates of global evaporation from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission by applying the conditional sampling method to passive microwave soil moisture time series and in situ precipitation data. The obtained evaporation estimates show a good correspondence to measured evaporation from eddy correlation towers over selected field sites. Subsequently, a simple approach is developed to directly estimate evaporation from SMAP soil moisture data. This approach enables the investigation of dynamics in evaporation during the dry-down after storms. The timing of the transition between the different stages of evaporation is assessed for different climates especially the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation; atmosphere limited evaporation to soil limited evaporation respectively. Investigations into the dynamics of unstressed evaporation and transpiration and the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation increases our understanding of water stress and soil desiccation. It also

  14. Incorporation mechanism for doping of metal ions into a passivating film at the lithium/thionyl chloride interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. G.; Shikin, V. I.

    1993-05-01

    Effects of iron and titanium ions on corrosion processes of lithium in thionyl chloride electrolytes have been studied. Laws for the growth of the passivating film on the type and concentration of doped ions have been established, and equations for these are suggested. A stepwise mechanism of dopant incorporation into passivating film structure is presented.

  15. Science requirements for passive microwave sensors on earth science geostationary platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Staelin, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested that the science requirements for passive geostationary microwave observations be met by near- and far-term sensors for each of two overlapping bands, with each band covering no more than a decade in frequency. The low-frequency band includes channels near 6, 10, 18, 22, 31 to 37, and possibly 50 to 60 GHz. The high-frequency band includes channels near 220 to 230, 183, 166, 118, 90 to 110, and possibly 50 to 60 and 31 to 37 GHz. The precise channel specifications will have to comply with international frequency allocations. The near-term goal is a high-frequency sensor based on a filled-aperture solid reflector antenna, which should rely on currently existing technology. The most critical issues for the near-term sensor are momentum compensation and the design of the feed assembly; these issues are coupled through the desired scan rate. The successful demonstration of the near-term (high-frequency) sensor will be essential for the continued development of far-term sensors satisfying the ideal science requirements. The far-term goal includes both a high-frequency sensor which meets the ideal science requirements, and a low-frequency sensor whose design will depend on advances in large antenna technology. The low-frequency (far-term) sensor might be based on one of several concepts: a deployable mesh reflector antenna of diameter at least 20 m, which shows promise for use at frequencies up to 30-GHz, a synthetic aperture interferometer of maximum baseline from 100 to 300 m, or a deployable phased-array bootlace lens, of diameter from 100 to 300 m. The first of these, a deployable mesh reflector antenna, will satisfy only the adequate spatial resolution requirements. The last two concepts meet the ideal spatial resolution science requirements, although they present significant structural and meteorological challenges.

  16. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures for Falling Snow Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2011-01-01

    Physically based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite -observed brightness temperatures (TBs) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are nonlinear, such that inversions are ill ]posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to elucidate these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using TB weighting functions to quantify the percentage influence of the TB resulting from absorption, emission, and/or reflection from the surface, as well as from frozen hydrometeors in clouds, from atmospheric water vapor, and from other contributors. The percentage analysis was also compared to Jacobians. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz, for individual snow profiles, and for averages over three cloud-resolving model simulations of falling snow. The bulk structure (e.g., ice water path and cloud depth) of the underlying cloud scene was found to affect the resultant TB and percentages, producing different values for blizzard, lake effect, and synoptic snow events. The slant path at a 53 viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels. Jacobians provide the magnitude and direction of change in the TB values due to a change in the underlying scene; however, the percentage analysis provides detailed information on how that change affected contributions to the TB from the surface, hydrometeors, and water vapor. The TB percentage information presented in this paper provides information about the relative contributions to the TB and supplies key pieces of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  17. Rain-on-snow and ice layer formation detection using passive microwave radiometry: An arctic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, A.; Royer, A.; Montpetit, B.; Johnson, C. A.; Brucker, L.; Dolant, C.; Richards, A.; Roy, A.

    2015-12-01

    With the current changes observed in the Arctic, an increase in occurrence of rain-on-snow (ROS) events has been reported in the Arctic (land) over the past few decades. Several studies have established that strong linkages between surface temperatures and passive microwaves do exist, but the contribution of snow properties under winter extreme events such as rain-on-snow events (ROS) and associated ice layer formation need to be better understood that both have a significant impact on ecosystem processes. In particular, ice layer formation is known to affect the survival of ungulates by blocking their access to food. Given the current pronounced warming in northern regions, more frequent ROS can be expected. However, one of the main challenges in the study of ROS in northern regions is the lack of meteorological information and in-situ measurements. The retrieval of ROS occurrence in the Arctic using satellite remote sensing tools thus represents the most viable approach. Here, we present here results from 1) ROS occurrence formation in the Peary caribou habitat using an empirically developed ROS algorithm by our group based on the gradient ratio, 2) ice layer formation across the same area using a semi-empirical detection approach based on the polarization ratio spanning between 1978 and 2013. A detection threshold was adjusted given the platform used (SMMR, SSM/I and AMSR-E), and initial results suggest high-occurrence years as: 1981-1982, 1992-1993; 1994-1995; 1999-2000; 2001-2002; 2002-2003; 2003-2004; 2006-2007; 2007-2008. A trend in occurrence for Banks Island and NW Victoria Island and linkages to caribou population is presented.

  18. High quality silicon-based substrates for microwave and millimeter wave passive circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belaroussi, Y.; Rack, M.; Saadi, A. A.; Scheen, G.; Belaroussi, M. T.; Trabelsi, M.; Raskin, J.-P.

    2017-09-01

    Porous silicon substrate is very promising for next generation wireless communication requiring the avoidance of high-frequency losses originating from the bulk silicon. In this work, new variants of porous silicon (PSi) substrates have been introduced. Through an experimental RF performance, the proposed PSi substrates have been compared with different silicon-based substrates, namely, standard silicon (Std), trap-rich (TR) and high resistivity (HR). All of the mentioned substrates have been fabricated where identical samples of CPW lines have been integrated on. The new PSi substrates have shown successful reduction in the substrate's effective relative permittivity to values as low as 3.7 and great increase in the substrate's effective resistivity to values higher than 7 kΩ cm. As a concept proof, a mm-wave bandpass filter (MBPF) centred at 27 GHz has been integrated on the investigated substrates. Compared with the conventional MBPF implemented on standard silicon-based substrates, the measured S-parameters of the PSi-based MBPF have shown high filtering performance, such as a reduction in insertion loss and an enhancement of the filter selectivity, with the joy of having the same filter performance by varying the temperature. Therefore, the efficiency of the proposed PSi substrates has been well highlighted. From 1994 to 1995, she was assistant of physics at (USTHB), Algiers . From 1998 to 2011, she was a Researcher at characterization laboratory in ionized media and laser division at the Advanced Technologies Development Center. She has integrated the Analog Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits team as Researcher since 2011 until now in Microelectronic and Nanotechnology Division at Advanced Technologies Development Center (CDTA), Algiers. She has been working towards her Ph.D. degree jointly at CDTA and Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, Algiers, since 2012. Her research interest includes fabrication and characterization of microwave passive devices on porous

  19. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures for Falling Snow Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2011-01-01

    Physically based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite -observed brightness temperatures (TBs) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are nonlinear, such that inversions are ill ]posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to elucidate these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using TB weighting functions to quantify the percentage influence of the TB resulting from absorption, emission, and/or reflection from the surface, as well as from frozen hydrometeors in clouds, from atmospheric water vapor, and from other contributors. The percentage analysis was also compared to Jacobians. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz, for individual snow profiles, and for averages over three cloud-resolving model simulations of falling snow. The bulk structure (e.g., ice water path and cloud depth) of the underlying cloud scene was found to affect the resultant TB and percentages, producing different values for blizzard, lake effect, and synoptic snow events. The slant path at a 53 viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels. Jacobians provide the magnitude and direction of change in the TB values due to a change in the underlying scene; however, the percentage analysis provides detailed information on how that change affected contributions to the TB from the surface, hydrometeors, and water vapor. The TB percentage information presented in this paper provides information about the relative contributions to the TB and supplies key pieces of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  20. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The better understanding of temporal variability and regional distribution of surface melt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interactions and the determination of mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Since large regions of Antarctic sea ice are covered with snow during most of the year, observed inter-annual and regional variations of surface melt mainly represents melt processes in the snow. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study we combine two approaches for observing both surface and volume snowmelt by means of passive microwave satellite data. The former is achieved by measuring diurnal differences of the brightness temperature TB at 37 GHz, the latter by analyzing the ratio TB(19GHz)/TB(37GHz). Moreover, we use both melt onset proxies to divide the Antarctic sea ice cover into characteristic surface melt patterns from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 43% of the ice-covered ocean shows diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, resulting in temporary melt (Type A), less than 1% shows continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, resulting in strong melt over a period of several days (Type B), 19% shows Type A and B taking place consecutively (Type C), and for 37% no melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous melt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 20 days after the onset of temporary melt. Considering the entire data set, snowmelt processes and onset do not show significant temporal trends. Instead, areas of increasing (decreasing) sea-ice extent have longer (shorter) periods of continuous snowmelt.

  1. Improvement of Precipitation Retrieval for Tropical Cyclones from Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitani, K. M.; Shige, S.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we improve a passive microwave precipitation algorithm, the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) algorithm [Aonashi et al., 2009, JMSJ]. GSMaP is available for many airborne microwave radiometers (MWRs) such as Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI). GSMaP comprises two parts: forward calculation and retrieval. In forward calculation, lookup tables (LUTs) or databases showing the relationship between rainfall and MWR brightness temperatures (TBs) are produced using radiative transfer models. Retrieval consists of a rain/no-rain classification and estimation of the rainfall rates with LUTs. The algorithm uses precipitation-related variable models (precipitation profiles, drop-size distribution, etc.). TRMM Precipitation Radar (TRMM/PR) profiles are classified into 10 types (six over land, four over ocean and coast) using the PR precipitation parameters (rain area, stratiform rain-area fraction, precipitation-top level, etc.) and the ratio between the PR precipitation rates and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) flash rates. GSMaP team produces convective and stratiform precipitation profiles for these types by averaging the PR convective and stratiform precipitation profiles over prescribed rainfall bins for each type. In this averaging they use profiles relative to freezing level height (FLH) in order to exclude the influence of atmospheric temperature variations. The LUTs are calculated with the precipitation profile of the dominant precipitation type for every 5 x 5 degree point and 3 month. Tropical cyclones (TCs) are not included in 10 types. In this study, we compared the profiles between TCs and current ocean precipitation types and applied to GSMaP algorithm to improve estimation of rainfall of TCs. We analyzed TCs from Sep. 2001 to Aug. 2010 after TRMM boost. We used JAXA/EORC Tropical Cyclone Database 2A25 produced and supplied by the Earth Observation Research and application Center, Japan Aerospace

  2. Passive Anti-Icing and Active Deicing Films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Zheng, Yonghao; Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Li, Yilun; Sikkema, William K A; Tour, James M

    2016-06-08

    Anti-icing and deicing are the two major pathways for suppressing adhesion of ice on surfaces, yet materials with dual capabilities are rare. In this work, we have designed a perfluorododecylated graphene nanoribbon (FDO-GNR) film that takes advantage of both the low polarizability of perfluorinated carbons and the intrinsic conductive nature of graphene nanoribbons. The FDO-GNR films are superhydrophobic with a sheet resistance below 8 kΩ·sq(-1) and then exhibit an anti-icing property that prevents freezing of incoming ice-cold water down to -14 °C. After that point, voltage can be applied to the films to resistively heat and deice the surface. Further a lubricating liquid can be employed to create a slippery surface to improve the film's deicing performance. The FDO-GNR films can be easily switched between the superhydrophobic anti-icing mode and the slippery deicing mode by applying the lubricant. A spray-coating method makes it suitable for large-scale applications. The anti-icing and deicing properties render the FDO-GNR films with promise for use in extreme environments.

  3. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  4. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  5. Magnetic and microwave properties of amorphous FeCoNbBCu thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Mei; Wang, Xin; Lu, Haipeng; Deng, Longjiang; Sunday, Katie Jo; Taheri, Mitra L.; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-01-01

    The soft magnetic and microwave properties of amorphous FeCoNbBCu thin films with thicknesses varying from 70 nm to 450 nm have been systematically investigated. Due to the amorphous structure, the coercivity is 1.5 Oe in thicker films. The thickness-dependent microwave characteristics of the films were measured over the range 0.5-6 GHz and analyzed using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Without applying magnetic field during deposition and measurement, an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy in amorphous thin films was obtained, ranging from 21 to 45 Oe. The interface interaction between substrate and film is confirmed to be the origin of the induced anisotropy, whereas the volume anisotropy contribution is more pronounced with increasing film thickness. For films possessing an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, the shift of resonance frequency with thickness is observed and verified by the Kittel equation. The demonstration of a controllable and tunable anisotropy suggests that the FeCoNbBCu thin films have potential application as magnetic materials for Spintronics-based microwave devices.

  6. Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films were investigated in the pressure range 10-mtorr to 10 torr, at substrate temperatures 400-750 C and with CH4 and O2 concentrations in H2 plasma of 2-15 percent and 2-10 percent, respectively. The experiments were performed in a microwave plasma system consisting of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and an RF induction heated sample stage. Scanning electron microscopy of diamond films deposited at 600 C with 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas showed high-quality well faceted crystallites of 1/2 micron size. Cathodoluminescence measurements of these films showed very few nitrogen impurities and no detectable silicon impurities.

  7. Highly conducting SrMoO{sub 3} thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Radetinac, Aldin Mani, Arzhang; Ziegler, Jürgen; Alff, Lambert; Komissinskiy, Philipp; Melnyk, Sergiy; Nikfalazar, Mohammad; Zheng, Yuliang; Jakoby, Rolf

    2014-09-15

    We have measured the microwave resistance of highly conducting perovskite oxide SrMoO{sub 3} thin film coplanar waveguides. The epitaxial SrMoO{sub 3} thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition and showed low mosaicity and smooth surfaces with a root mean square roughness below 0.3 nm. Layer-by-layer growth could be achieved for film thicknesses up to 400 nm as monitored by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and confirmed by X-ray diffraction. We obtained a constant microwave resistivity of 29 μΩ·cm between 0.1 and 20 GHz by refining the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficients. Our result shows that SrMoO{sub 3} is a viable candidate as a highly conducting electrode material for all-oxide microwave electronic devices.

  8. Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films were investigated in the pressure range 10-mtorr to 10 torr, at substrate temperatures 400-750 C and with CH4 and O2 concentrations in H2 plasma of 2-15 percent and 2-10 percent, respectively. The experiments were performed in a microwave plasma system consisting of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and an RF induction heated sample stage. Scanning electron microscopy of diamond films deposited at 600 C with 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas showed high-quality well faceted crystallites of 1/2 micron size. Cathodoluminescence measurements of these films showed very few nitrogen impurities and no detectable silicon impurities.

  9. Soft magnetism, magnetostriction, and microwave properties of FeGaB thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, J.; Insignares, R. E.; Cai, Z.; Ziemer, K. S.; Liu, M.; Sun, N. X.

    2007-10-29

    A series of (Fe{sub 100-y}Ga{sub y}){sub 1-x}B{sub x} (x=0-21 and y=9-17) films were deposited; their microstructure, soft magnetism, magnetostrictive behavior, and microwave properties were investigated. The addition of B changes the FeGaB films from polycrystalline to amorphous phase and leads to excellent magnetic softness with coercivity <1 Oe, high 4{pi}M{sub s}, self-biased ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency of 1.85 GHz, narrow FMR linewidth (X band) of 16-20 Oe, and a high saturation magnetostriction constant of 70 ppm. The combination of these properties makes the FeGaB films potential candidates for tunable magnetoelectric microwave devices and other rf/microwave magnetic device applications.

  10. Microwave non-destructive testing technique for characterization of HPMC-PEG 3000 films.

    PubMed

    Wong, T W; Deepak, K G; Taib, M N; Anuar, N K

    2007-10-01

    The capacity of microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique to characterize the matrix property of binary polymeric films for use as transdermal drug delivery system was investigated. Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3000 were the choice of polymeric matrix and plasticizer, respectively with loratadine as the model drug. Both blank and drug loaded HPMC-PEG 3000 films were prepared using the solvent-evaporation method. These films were conditioned at the relative humidity of 25, 50 and 75% prior to physicochemical characterization using the established methods of ultra-violet spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methods, as well as, novel microwave NDT technique. Blank films exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer interaction at the O-H domain upon storage at a lower level of relative humidity, whereas drug loaded films exhibited a greater propensity of polymer-polymer, polymer-plasticizer and/or drug-polymer interaction via the O-H, C-H and/or aromatic C=C functional groups when they were stored at a lower or moderate level of relative humidity. The absorption and transmission characteristics of both blank and drug loaded films for microwave varied with the state of polymer-polymer, polymer-plasticizer, and/or drug-polymer interaction of the matrix. The measurements of microwave NDT test at 8 and 12 GHz were sensitive to the polar fraction of film involving functional group such as O-H moiety and the less polar environment of matrix consisting of functional groups such as C-H and aromatic C=C moieties. The state of interaction between polymer, plasticizer and/or drug of a binary polymeric film can be elucidated through its absorption and transmission profiles of microwave.

  11. Stability of passivated 316L stainless steel oxide films for cardiovascular stents.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Che; Shih, Chun-Ming; Chou, Kuang-Yi; Lin, Shing-Jong; Su, Yea-Yang

    2007-03-15

    Passivated 316L stainless steel is used extensively in cardiovascular stents. The degree of chloride ion attack might increase as the oxide film on the implant degrades from exposure to physiological fluid. Stability of 316L stainless steel stent is a function of the concentration of hydrated and hydrolyated oxide concentration inside the passivated film. A high concentration of hydrated and hydrolyated oxide inside the passivated oxide film is required to maintain the integrity of the passivated oxide film, reduce the chance of chloride ion attack, and prevent any possible leaching of positively charged ions into the surrounding tissue that accelerate the inflammatory process. Leaching of metallic ions from corroded implant surface into surrounding tissue was confirmed by the X-ray mapping technique. The degree of thrombi weight percentage [W(ao): (2.1 +/- 0.9)%; W(ep): (12.5 +/- 4.9)%, p < 0.01] between the amorphous oxide (AO) and the electropolishing (EP) treatment groups was statistically significant in ex-vivo extracorporeal thrombosis experiment of mongrel dog. The thickness of neointima (T(ao): 100 +/- 20 microm; T(ep): 500 +/- 150 microm, p < 0.01) and the area ratio of intimal response at 4 weeks (AR(ao): 0.62 +/- 0.22; AR(ep): 1.15 +/- 0.42, p < 0.001) on the implanted iliac stents of New Zealand rabbit could be a function of the oxide properties.

  12. Monitoring snowpack properties by passive microwave sensors on board of aircraft and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Rango, A.

    1980-01-01

    Snowpack properties such as water equivalent and snow wetness may be inferred from variations in measured microwave brightness temperatures. This is because the emerged microwave radiation interacts directly with snow crystals within the snowpack. Using vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures obtained from the multifrequency microwave radiometer (MFMR) on board a NASA research aircraft and the electrical scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus 5, 6, and 7 satellites, linear relationships between snow depth or water equivalent and microwave brightness temperature were developed. The presence of melt water in the snowpack generally increases the brightness temperatures, which can be used to predict snowpack priming and timing of runoff.

  13. Monitoring snowpack properties by passive microwave sensors on board of aircraft and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Rango, A.

    1980-01-01

    Snowpack properties such as water equivalent and snow wetness may be inferred from variations in measured microwave brightness temperatures. This is because the emerged microwave radiation interacts directly with snow crystals within the snowpack. Using vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures obtained from the multifrequency microwave radiometer (MFMR) on board a NASA research aircraft and the electrical scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus 5, 6, and 7 satellites, linear relationships between snow depth or water equivalent and microwave brightness temperature were developed. The presence of melt water in the snowpack generally increases the brightness temperatures, which can be used to predict snowpack priming and timing of runoff.

  14. Spatial Variability of Barrow-Area Shore-Fast Sea Ice and Its Relationships to Passive Microwave Emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Rivas, M. Belmonte; Holmgren, J.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Heinrichs, J. F.; Stroeve, J. C.; Klein, M.; Markus, T.; Perovich, D. K.; Sonntag, J. G.; Tape, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aircraft-acquired passive microwave data, laser radar height observations, RADARSAT synthetic aperture radar imagery, and in situ measurements obtained during the AMSR-Ice03 experiment are used to investigate relationships between microwave emission and ice characteristics over several space scales. The data fusion allows delineation of the shore-fast ice and pack ice in the Barrow area, AK, into several ice classes. Results show good agreement between observed and Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)-derived snow depths over relatively smooth ice, with larger differences over ridged and rubbled ice. The PSR results are consistent with the effects on snow depth of the spatial distribution and nature of ice roughness, ridging, and other factors such as ice age. Apparent relationships exist between ice roughness and the degree of depolarization of emission at 10,19, and 37 GHz. This depolarization .would yield overestimates of total ice concentration using polarization-based algorithms, with indications of this seen when the NT-2 algorithm is applied to the PSR data. Other characteristics of the microwave data, such as effects of grounding of sea ice and large contrast between sea ice and adjacent land, are also apparent in the PSR data. Overall, the results further demonstrate the importance of macroscale ice roughness conditions such as ridging and rubbling on snow depth and microwave emissivity.

  15. Estimating the Thickness of Sea Ice Snow Cover in the Weddell Sea from Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrigo, K. R.; vanDijken, G. L.; Comiso, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    Passive microwave satellite observations have frequently been used to observe changes in sea ice cover and concentration. Comiso et al. showed that there may also be a direct relationship between the thickness of snow cover (h(sub s)) on ice and microwave emissivity at 90 GHz. Because the in situ experiment of experiment of Comiso et al. was limited to a single station, the relationship is re-examined in this paper in a more general context and using more extensive in situ microwave observations and measurements of h from the Weddell Sea 1986 and 1989 winter cruises. Good relationships were found to exist between h(sub s) sand the emissivity at 90 GHz - 10 GHz and the emissivity at 90 GHz - 18.7 GHz when the standard deviation of h(sub s) was less than 50% of the mean and when h(sub s) was less than 0.25 m. The reliance of these relationships on h(sub s) is most likely caused by the limited penetration through the snow of radiation at 90 GHz. When the algorithm was applied to the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) satellite data from the Weddell Sea, the resulting mean h(sub s) agreed within 5% of the mean calculated from greater than 1400 in situ observations.

  16. Microwave properties of RF- sputtered ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, T. Kulkarni, A. R.; Venkataramani, N.; Sahu, B. N.; Prasad, Shiva

    2014-04-24

    In this work, RF- magnetron sputtering technique has been employed to deposit nanocrystalline ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films at room temperature. The as grown films were ex-situ annealed in air for 2 h at temperatures from 150°C to 650°C. X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer and ferromagnetic resonance were used to analyze the phase formation, magnetic properties and microwave properties respectively. From the hysteresis loops and ferromagnetic resonance spectra taken at room temperature, a systematic study on the effect of O{sub 2} plasma on microwave properties with respect to processing temperature has been carried out.

  17. An Evaluation of Antarctica as a Calibration Target for Passive Microwave Satellite Missions with Climate Data Record Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing at L-band (1.4 GHz) is sensitive to soil moisture and sea surface salinity, both important climate variables. Science studies involving these variables can now take advantage of new satellite L-band observations. The first mission with regular global passive microwave observations at L-band is the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), launched November, 2009. A second mission, NASA's Aquarius, was launched June, 201 I. A third mission, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is scheduled to launch in 2014. Together, these three missions may provide a decade-long data record-provided that they are intercalibrated. The intercalibration is best performed at the radiance (brightness temperature) level, and Antarctica is proving to be a key calibration target. However, Antarctica has thus far not been fully characterized as a potential target. This paper will present evaluations of Antarctica as a microwave calibration target for the above satellite missions. Preliminary analyses have identified likely target areas, such as the vicinity of Dome-C and larger areas within East Antarctica. Physical sources of temporal and spatial variability of polar firn are key to assessing calibration uncertainty. These sources include spatial variability of accumulation rate, compaction, surface characteristics (dunes, micro-topography), wind patterns, and vertical profiles of density and temperature. Using primarily SMOS data, variability is being empirically characterized and attempts are being made to attribute observed variability to physical sources. One expected outcome of these studies is the potential discovery of techniques for remotely sensing--over all of Antarctica-parameters such as surface temperature.

  18. Simulation of Melting Ice-Phase Precipitation Hydrometeors for Use in Passive and Active Microwave Remote-Sensing Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, with active and passive microwave remote-sensing instruments, was designed to be sensitive to precipitation-sized particles. The shape of these particles naturally influences the distribution of scattered microwaves. Therefore, we seek to simulate ice-phase precipitation using accurate models of the physical properties of individual snowflakes and aggregate ice crystals, similar to those observed in precipitating clouds. A number of researchers have examined the single-scattering properties of individual ice crystals and aggregates, but only a few have started to look at the properties of melting these particles. One of the key difficulties, from a simulation perspective, is characterizing the distribution of melt-water on a melting particle. Previous studies by the author and others have shown that even for spherical particles, the relative distribution of liquid water on an ice-particle can have significant effects on the computed scattering and absorption properties in the microwave regime. This, in turn, strongly influences forward model simulations of passive microwave TBs, radar reflectivities, and path-integrated attenuation. The present study examines the sensitivity of the single scattering properties of melting ice-crystals and aggregates to variations in the volume fraction of melt water, and the distribution of meltwater. We make some simple simulations 1-D vertical profiles having melting layers, and compute the radar reflectivities consistent with the GPM DPR at Ku- and Ka-band. We also compute the top-of-the-atmosphere brightness temperatures at GPM GMI channels for the same vertical profiles, and discuss the sensitivities to variances in the aforementioned physical properties.

  19. Ultrathin Passivation of P-type silicon Surface by Atomic Layer Deposited Gallium Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, J.; Guo, L. Q.; Tao, J.

    2017-02-01

    Surface passivation performances of Ga2O3 thin films deposited on p-type Czochralski Si wafers by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated as a function of post-deposition annealing conditions. Minority carrier lifetimes were characterized by Semilab WT-2000PVN lifetime tester. The average effective minority carrier lifetime can reduce to 218.09 μs after annealed treatment at the temperatures of 650 °C for 3 min. It found that the surface recombination velocities of Ga2O3 thin film (3.4 nm and 7.6 nm) decrease to ∼30 cm/s and are saturated with the annealing temperature of 600 °C ∼700 °C. Such results indicate that Ga2O3 thin film show the functions of surface passivation for photovoltaic applications.

  20. Determining melt regime patterns and changing melt dynamics for Alaskan glaciers and icefields using passive microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmens, K. A.; Ramage, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring and studying glacier melt dynamics is necessary for understanding how the cryosphere responds to climate variability and change. Surface melting is often a driver of enhanced glacier velocities and can affect glacial mass balance. Several decades of remotely sensed passive microwave data provides a means for characterizing and analyzing surface melt dynamics across wide spatial domains with temporal continuity. Specifically, brightness temperatures from passive microwave sensors, Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing Systems (AMSR-E), enable the detection of melt timing and dynamics over large icefields with relatively high temporal resolution (0.5 to 3 days). The ability to detect melt stems from the distinctness of the melt signal at 36-37 GHz vertical polarization. Further, the sensors collect data in all weather and both day and night providing a complete record. Utilizing these datasets, we focus on large icefields in Alaska including Juneau, St. Elias, and Stikine, as well as on individual glaciers such as the Malaspina, Hubbard, and Bering glaciers to investigate changing melt dynamics and relationships to larger atmospheric circulation patterns and temperatures. A 24 year time series of annual brightness temperature histograms is constructed to determine years that are anomalous from the average and to assess the general melt regime characteristics of the area along with temporal and spatial trends. Potential causative and correlative factors are explored including climate indices, temperature, elevation, distance from coast, and discharge. Diurnal amplitude variations (brightness temperature differences between the day and night) are also calculated to determine melt variability and melt-refreeze duration. Melt regime pattern and type are hypothesized to be largely controlled by distance from coast (maritime versus continental), elevation, and latitude. Melt dynamics and brightness

  1. Joint Variability of Airborne Passive Microwave and Ground-based Radar Observations Obtained in the TRMM Kwajalein Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuter, S. E.; Kingsmill, D. E.

    2007-12-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) held July-September 1999 in the west Pacific was designed to obtain an empirical physical characterization of precipitating convective clouds over the tropical ocean. The majority of the precipitation was from mixed-phase clouds. Coordinated data sets were obtained from aircraft and ground-based sensors including passive microwave measurements by the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) instrument on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and S-band volumetric radar data by the KPOL radar. The AMPR and KPOL data sets were processed to yield a set of 25,049 matching observations at ~ 2 km x 2 km horizontal spatial resolution and within 6 min. The TRMM satellite Microwave Imager (TMI) has a similar set of channels to AMPR but coarser spatial resolution (19 GHz: 35 km, 85 GHz: 7.7 km). During KWAJEX, the 0 deg C level height was nearly constant at ~ 4800 m. Hence, two potential sources of uncertainty in relating passive microwave brightness temperatures (Tbs) to surface precipitation, inhomogeneous beam filling and variations in depth of the rain layer are much smaller sources of error in the KWAJEX data set than for TMI. TRMM was originally designed to yield monthly rainfall estimates over 5 deg x 5 deg grid boxes. The use of these data to yield instantaneous rainrate products at smaller spatial scales is more sensitive to the detailed characteristics of the joint distributions of passive microwave Tbs versus rain rate. KWAJEX data sets reveal poor correlations, very wide scatter, and weak modes in these distributions. The spread of emission Tb values for a given rain-layer reflectivity (e.g., 75 K at 30 dBZ for 19 GHz) is similar or larger within convective compared to stratiform precipitation regions. This result implies that the enhancement in emission Tbs associated with partially melted ice particles can occur whether the particles are concentrated within a thin layer in stratiform

  2. A feasibility study using radiochromic films for fast neutron 2D passive dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Howell, Calvin R; Crowell, Alexander S; Fallin, Brent; Tonchev, Anton P; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) to establish sensitivity of XRQA and EBT radiochromic films to fast neutron exposure; (2) to develop a film response to radiation dose calibration curve and (3) to investigate a two-dimensional (2D) film dosimetry technique for use in establishing an experimental setup for a radiobiological irradiation of mice and to assess the dose to the mice in this setup. The films were exposed to a 10 MeV neutron beam via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. The XRQA film response was a factor of 1.39 greater than EBT film response to the 10 MeV neutron beam when exposed to a neutron dose of 165 cGy. A film response-to-soft tissue dose calibration function was established over a range of 0–10 Gy and had a goodness of fit of 0.9926 with the calibration data. The 2D film dosimetry technique estimated the neutron dose to the mice by measuring the dose using a mouse phantom and by placing a piece of film on the exterior of the experimental mouse setup. The film results were benchmarked using Monte Carlo and aluminum (Al) foil activation measurements. The radiochromic film, Monte Carlo and Al foil dose measurements were strongly correlated, and the film within the mouse phantom agreed to better than 7% of the externally mounted films. These results demonstrated the potential application of radiochromic films for passive 2D neutron dosimetry. PMID:20693612

  3. Tracking Snowmelt Events in Remote High Asia Using Passive Microwave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T.; Bookhagen, B.

    2015-12-01

    While snowfall can comprise a significant percentage of the yearly water budget in High Asia, Snow-Water Equivalent (SWE) is poorly constrained due to lack of in-situ measurements and complex terrain that limits the efficacy of modeling and observations. Over the past few decades, SWE has been estimated with the SSMI/S and AMSR passive microwave (PM) sensors, with low reliability in High Asia. Despite problematic SWE volume estimation, PM data contains information on the buildup and melt of snowpack, which is difficult to measure in-situ, particularly in remote areas. We present a new methodology for tracking the timing, frequency, and relative intensity of melt events across High Asia. To measure SWE, we use raw swath data from the SSMI/S (1987-2015, F08, F11, F13, F17), AMSR (2002-2011), and GPM (2014-2015) satellites. This allows us to improve both spatial and temporal resolution over daily gridded products by leveraging multiple overpasses per day in an imperfectly overlapping grid pattern. We then examine SWE estimates, intra-day PM variance, and the interacting impacts of satellite look angles and topography on measured PM at arbitrary point locations. We develop a more thorough understanding of the uncertainties in our SWE estimates by examining the impacts of aspect, relief, slope, and elevation across the Tibetan Plateau on Tb and SWE estimates. High Asia, with its large topographic gradients and low relief at high elevations provides an excellent context to examine a wide range of topographic settings and terrain complexities to better constrain our analysis of sensor bias. We find that slopes above ~10° have a strong impact on SWE variability. We also find a consistent intra- and inter-day variability within constant-SWE periods, as defined as periods without precipitation and with constant temperatures below 0°C. Using this measure of native sensor variability, we filter our SWE time series to identify events of snowmelt which are outside of the

  4. Use of TRMM Precipitation Radar for Calibrating Overland Passive Microwave Rain Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinku, T.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2006-05-01

    The precipitation radar (PR) on board the TRMM satellite provides definitive measurements of the 3D structure of precipitation. However, its narrow swath (215km) limits the use of this dataset. On the other hand, TMI and SSM/I provide wider swath coverage (760 km for TMI and 1400 km SSM/I) and higher sampling frequency. Thus, combining the higher accuracy of PR with the better spatial coverage and sampling frequency of TMI and SSM/I would be of great value in a number of applications in meteorology, hydrology, and water resources. One approach is to use PR to calibrate passive microwave (PM) rain retrieval algorithms. Relationship between PR rain estimates and PM observations may vary from one rainfall regime to another and from one season to another. Consequently, this research aims at developing a PR-calibrated TMI (PR-TMI) overland rain retrieval algorithm, investigating its regional and seasonal differences, and extending the PR-TMI algorithm to an SSM/I rain retrieval. Application of the PR-based calibration to SSM/I is particularly important because this sensor has long historical data going back to 1987 and a better sampling than TMI due to the more frequent overpasses and its wider swath. The algorithm developed here consists of rain/no-rain screening, convective/stratiform classification, and non-linear (linear) brightness temperature-rain rate relationship for stratiform (convective) rain type. Four geographic regions from Central Africa (AFC), Amazon (AMZ), continental US (USA), and South Asia (SAS) are selected for these investigations. The algorithm is shown to be associated with significant decrease in both random and systematic error relative to the TRMM-2A12 V6 product. Regional calibration is shown to introduce only moderate improvement compared to global calibration for the SAS region, while insignificant improvement for the other (AFC, AMZ and USA) regions. Seasonal calibration is significant only over USA. However, it was observed that the

  5. Ice surface temperature retrieval from AVHRR, ATSR, and passive microwave satellite data: Algorithm development and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Jeff; Maslanik, James; Steffen, Konrad

    1994-01-01

    surface temperature from passive microwave data (in conjunction with AVHRR clear sky samples) through the use of 'effective emissivities' and physical relationships between skin temperature and subsurface temperature. Use the general method outlined in MK93 to calculate a 12-year record of clear sky equivalent surface temperatures, or possibly all-sky snow-ice interface physical temperatures, from SMMR and SSM/I, compare these temperatures to climatologies, ECMWF modeled surface temperatures, and surface temperatures predicted by a 2-D ice model. And intercompare several ice surface retrieval methods and validate them against ground measurements from the Swiss Camp on the Greenland ice sheet. Additionally, we intend to develop a surface temperature product based on AVHRR data and possibly blended with drifting buoy and meteorological station temperatures.

  6. Evaluation of Precipitation Detection over Various Surfaces from Passive Microwave Imagers and Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munchak, S. Joseph; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    During the middle part of this decade a wide variety of passive microwave imagers and sounders will be unified in the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission to provide a common basis for frequent (3 hr), global precipitation monitoring. The ability of these sensors to detect precipitation by discerning it from non-precipitating background depends upon the channels available and characteristics of the surface and atmosphere. This study quantifies the minimum detectable precipitation rate and fraction of precipitation detected for four representative instruments (TMI, GMI, AMSU-A, and AMSU-B) that will be part of the GPM constellation. Observations for these instruments were constructed from equivalent channels on the SSMIS instrument on DMSP satellites F16 and F17 and matched to precipitation data from NOAA's National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) during 2009 over the continuous United States. A variational optimal estimation retrieval of non-precipitation surface and atmosphere parameters was used to determine the consistency between the observed brightness temperatures and these parameters, with high cost function values shown to be related to precipitation. The minimum detectable precipitation rate, defined as the lowest rate for which probability of detection exceeds 50%, and the detected fraction of precipitation, are reported for each sensor, surface type (ocean, coast, bare land, snow cover) and precipitation type (rain, mix, snow). The best sensors over ocean and bare land were GMI (0.22 mm/hr minimum threshold and 90% of precipitation detected) and AMSU (0.26 mm/hr minimum threshold and 81% of precipitation detected), respectively. Over coasts (0.74 mm/hr threshold and 12% detected) and snow-covered surfaces (0.44 mm/hr threshold and 23% detected), AMSU again performed best but with much lower detection skill, whereas TMI had no skill over these surfaces. The sounders (particularly over water) benefited from the use of re-analysis data (vs. climatology) to

  7. Optical and microwave detection using Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabow, B. E.; Sova, R. M.; Boone, B. G.; Moorjani, K.; Kim, B. F.; Bohandy, J.; Adrian, F.; Green, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) in the development of optical and microwave detectors using high temperature superconducting thin films is described. Several objectives of this work have been accomplished, including: deposition of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O thin films by laser abation processing (LAP); development of thin film patterning techniques, including in situ masking, wet chemical etching, and laser patterning; measurements of bolometric and non-bolometric signatures in patterned Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O films using optical and microwave sources, respectively; analysis and design of an optimized bolometer through computer simulation; and investigation of its use in a Fourier transform spectrometer. The focus here is primarily on results from the measurement of the bolometric and non-bolometric response.

  8. General solution for the complex frequency shift in microwave measurements of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peligrad, D.-N.; Nebendahl, B.; Mehring, M.; DulčiĆ, A.; Požek, M.; Paar, D.

    2001-12-01

    Perturbation of a microwave cavity by a small sample with variable dielectric, magnetic, or conducting properties is considered. The complex frequency shift is derived in terms of a volume integral, or equivalently, in terms of a surface integral. These are used to obtain a general formula for thin films in the microwave electric field maximum. The complex frequency shift depends on the depolarization factor of the film and on its thickness in a nontrivial way. The previously known expressions for the complex frequency shift are shown to be good approximations of the present solution in the low and high conductivity limits. Our formula is applied to calculate the signal shapes in superconducting films of various geometric parameters and conductivities. It is shown that a diversity of signal shapes can result, and experimental support of those shapes is provided. The role of the dielectric substrate on which the thin film is grown is simply reduced to an asymmetry effect.

  9. Microwave conductivity of laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) superconducting films and its relation to microstrip transmission line performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Chorey, C. M.; Ebihara, B. T.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of high temperature superconductor oxides has raised the possibility of a new class of millimeter and microwave devices operating at temperatures considerably higher than liquid helium temperatures. Therefore, materials properties such as conductivity, current density, and sheet resistance as a function of temperature and frequency, possible anisotropies, moisture absorption, thermal expansion, and others, have to be well characterized and understood. The millimeter wave response of laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-delta)/LaAlO3 thin films was studied as a function of temperature and frequency. In particular, the evaluation of their microwave conductivity was emphasized, since knowledge of this parameter provides a basis for the derivation of other relevant properties of these superconducting oxides, and for using them in the fabrication of actual passive circuits. The microwave conductivity for these films was measured at frequencies from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz, in the temperature range from 20 to 300 K. The values of the conductivity are obtained from the millimeter wave power transmitted through the films, using a two fluid model.

  10. Influence of external magnetic field on the microwave absorption properties of carbonyl iron and polychloroprene composites film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Li, Mingjie; Li, Xueai

    2016-12-01

    The carbonyl iron particles were dispersed in a polychloroprene rubber (CR) matrix under a magnetic field for a practical application as microwave absorption composites film. In comparison with the carbonyl iron particles (CIP)/CR composites film prepared by general route, such films made with external magnetic field exhibit excellent microwave absorption properties, strongly depending on the increment of anisotropy and rearrangement of magnetic particles. The film made under external magnetic field with a thickness of only 0.54 mm shows least reflection loss of -15.98 dB and the reflection loss value less than -10.0 dB over the frequency range of 11.4˜14.8 GHz. The results indicated the composite film made under external magnetic field have excellent microwave absorption properties, which suggest that the composites thin film could be used as a thinner and lighter microwave absorber.

  11. Snowmelt and Surface Freeze/Thaw Timings over Alaska derived from Passive Microwave Observations using a Wavelet Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, N.; McDonald, K. C.; Dinardo, S. J.; Miller, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic permafrost soils contain a vast amount of organic carbon that will be released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide or methane when thawed. Surface to air greenhouse gas fluxes are largely dependent on such surface controls as the frozen/thawed state of the snow and soil. Satellite remote sensing is an important means to create continuous mapping of surface properties. Advances in the ability to determine soil and snow freeze/thaw timings from microwave frequency observations improves upon our ability to predict the response of carbon gas emission to warming through synthesis with in-situ observation, such as the 2012-2015 Carbon in Arctic Reservoir Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Surface freeze/thaw or snowmelt timings are often derived using a constant or spatially/temporally variable threshold applied to time-series observations. Alternately, time-series singularity classifiers aim to detect discontinuous changes, or "edges", in time-series data similar to those that occur from the large contrast in dielectric constant during the freezing or thaw of soil or snow. We use multi-scale analysis of continuous wavelet transform spectral gradient brightness temperatures from various channel combinations of passive microwave radiometers, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E, AMSR2) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I F17) gridded at a 10 km posting with resolution proportional to the observational footprint. Channel combinations presented here aim to illustrate and differentiate timings of "edges" from transitions in surface water related to various landscape components (e.g. snow-melt, soil-thaw). To support an understanding of the physical basis of observed "edges" we compare satellite measurements with simple radiative transfer microwave-emission modeling of the snow, soil and vegetation using in-situ observations from the SNOw TELemetry (SNOTEL) automated weather stations. Results of freeze/thaw and snow-melt timings and trends are

  12. Perpendicularly oriented barium ferrite thin films with low microwave loss, prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-Ming, Chen; Yuan-Xun, Li; Li-Kun, Han; Chao, Long; Huai-Wu, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Barium ferrite (BaM) thin films are deposited on platinum coated silicon wafers by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The effects of deposition substrate temperature on the microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of BaM thin films are investigated in detail. It is found that microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of BaM thin film are very sensitive to deposition substrate temperature, and excellent BaM thin film is obtained when deposition temperature is 910 °C and oxygen pressure is 300 mTorr (1 Torr = 1.3332 × 102 Pa). X-ray diffraction patterns and atomic force microscopy images show that the best thin film has perpendicular orientation and hexagonal morphology, and the crystallographic alignment degree can be calculated to be 0.94. Hysteresis loops reveal that the squareness ratio (M r/M s) is as high as 0.93, the saturated magnetization is 4004 Gs (1 Gs = 104 T), and the anisotropy field is 16.5 kOe (1 Oe = 79.5775 A·m-1). Ferromagnetic resonance measurements reveal that the gyromagnetic ratio is 2.8 GHz/kOe, and the ferromagnetic resonance linewith is 108 Oe at 50 GHz, which means that this thin film has low microwave loss. These properties make the BaM thin films have potential applications in microwave devices. Project supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (Grant No. KFJJ201506), the Scientific Research Starting Foundation of Hainan University (Grant No. kyqd1539), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hainan Province (Grant No. 20165187).

  13. Investigation of frequency response of microwave active ring resonator based on ferrite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, M. I.; Nikitin, A. A.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2016-11-01

    The complex transmission coefficient of active ring resonators based on ferrite-film delay lines was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Influence of the parameters of the delay line on the transmission coefficients was investigated. It was shown that the resonant frequencies of the ring depend on the ferrite film thickness and the distance between spin-wave antennae. These dependences give possibility to control the shape of the transmission coefficient that in combination with magnetic tuning provide flexibility for microwave applications.

  14. Passive film formation on metals in thionyl-chloride electrolytes for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslak, W. R.; Delnick, F. M.; Peebles, D. E.; Rogers, J. W., Jr.

    We have studied the anodic behavior of Pt, Mo, Ni, and stainless steel (SS) electrodes in 1.5M LiAlCl/SOCl solution in order to determine the mechanisms by which these metals resist corrosion. Polarization and complex impedance indicate that Pt and Mo behave as inert electrodes, while Ni and SS form passive films in this electrolyte. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the lack of oxidized metal species on the Pt and Mo surfaces following anodic polarization. XPS results also show that the Ni and SS do form passive layers, and identifies these layers as predominantly metal chlorides.

  15. Structure, composition and microwave dielectric properties of bismuth zinc niobate pyrochlore thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao; Ren, Wei; Zhan, Xuelei; Shi, Peng; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-11-01

    (Bi1.5Zn0.5)(Zn0.5Nb1.5)O7 (BZN) pyrochlore thin films were deposited onto both Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si and polycrystalline alumina substrates using pulsed laser deposition technique and then post-annealed using rapid thermal processing. The deposition temperature varies from 300 °C to 600 °C, and all the BZN films showed cubic pyrochlore structure after annealing at 650 °C for 30 min in air. The influence of the substrate associated with crystal structure is significant in the as-deposited films and disappears after post-annealing. The dielectric properties as a function of frequency up to the microwave frequency in both films were measured by LCR meter and split-post dielectric resonator technique. It is found that the BZN film deposited at 400 °C and post-annealed at 650 °C shows excellent dielectric properties with low loss in the microwave frequency range. This result indicates that the BZN thin film is a potential microwave material.

  16. Snowpack monitoring in North America and Eurasia using passive microwave satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Hall, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Areas of the Canadian high plains, the Montana and North Dakota high plains, and the steppes of central Russia were studied in an effort to determine the utility of spaceborne electrical scanning microwave radiometers (ESMR) for monitoring snow depths in different geographic areas. Significant regression relationships between snow depth and microwave brightness temperatures were developed for each of these homogeneous areas. In the areas investigated, Nimbus 6 (.081 cm) ESMR data produced higher correlations than Nimbus 5 (1.55 cm) ESMR data in relating microwave brightness temperature and snow depth from one area to another because different geographic areas are likely to have different snowpack conditions.

  17. Preliminary results of passive microwave snow experiment during February and March 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Shiue, J. C.; Boyne, H.; Ellerbruch, D.; Counas, G.; Wittmann, R.; Jones, R.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to determine if remote microwave sensing of snowpack data could be used to predict runoff, thereby allowing more efficient management of the water supply. A four-frequency microwave radiometer system was attached to a truck-mounted aerial lift and was used to gather data on snowpacks at three different sites in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Ground truth data measurements (density, temperature, grain size, hardness, and free-liquid water content) were taken at each site corresponding to each microwave scan.

  18. A Long-Term and Reproducible Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Data Record for Climate Studies and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 km × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere polar regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The data set, along with detailed data processing steps and error source information, can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  19. Effects of weather on the retrieval of sea ice concentration and ice type from passive microwave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of wind, water vapor, and cloud liquid water on ice concentration and ice type calculated from passive microwave data are assessed through radiative transfer calculations and observations. These weather effects can cause overestimates in ice concentration and more substantial underestimates in multi-year ice percentage by decreasing polarization and by decreasing the gradient between frequencies. The effect of surface temperature and air temperature on the magnitudes of weather-related errors is small for ice concentration and substantial for multiyear ice percentage. The existing weather filter in the NASA Team Algorithm addresses only weather effects over open ocean; the additional use of local open-ocean tie points and an alternative weather correction for the marginal ice zone can further reduce errors due to weather. Ice concentrations calculated using 37 versus 18 GHz data show little difference in total ice covered area, but greater differences in intermediate concentration classes. Given the magnitude of weather-related errors in ice classification from passive microwave data, corrections for weather effects may be necessary to detect small trends in ice covered area and ice type for climate studies.

  20. An Evaluation of Antarctica as a Calibration Target for Passive Microwave Satellite Missions with Climate Data Record Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    surface salinity, both important climate variables. Science studies involving these variables can now take advantage of new satellite L-band observations. The first mission with regular global passive microwave observations at L-band is the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), launched November, 2009. A second mission, NASA's Aquarius, was launched June, 2011. A third mission, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is scheduled to launch in 2014. Together, these three missions may provide a decade-long data record-provided that they are intercalibrated. The intercalibration is best performed at the radiance (brightness temperature) level, and Antarctica is proving to be a key calibration target. However, Antarctica has thus far not been fully characterized as a potential target. This paper will present evaluations of Antarctica as a microwave calibration target for the above satellite missions. Preliminary analyses have identified likely target areas, such as the vicinity of Dome-C and larger areas within East Antarctica. Physical sources of temporal and spatial variability of polar firn are key to assessing calibration uncertainty. These sources include spatial variability of accumulation rate, compaction, surface characteristics (dunes, micro-topography), wind patterns, and vertical profiles of density and temperature. Using primarily SMOS data, variability is being empirically characterized and attempts are being made to attribute observed variability to physical sources. One expected outcome of these studies is the potential discovery of techniques for remotely sensing--over all of Antarctica-parameters such as surface temperature.

  1. On the disaggregation of satellite based passive microwave estimates of soil moisture: current status and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehbouni, A.; Merlin, O.

    2007-05-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental state variable that controls several earth surface related processes, i.e. hydrology, meteorology, climate modelling, and agricultural management. However, the spatial and temporal dynamic of soil moisture dynamic is very complex since it depends on several factors such as weather condition, land cover/land use, soil type, topography, geology. Capturing such dynamic requires a dense network of continuous observation of soil moisture which is not feasible. The only realistic possibility for derive continuous spatially distributed soil moisture is through satellite observations. In this regard Passive microwave sensors, especially those operating at low frequencies (L bands) present an interesting potential for monitoring soil moisture. However, the use of coarse spatial resolution of instrument such as SMOS in the field of hydrology is not straightforward. Indeed, the scale at which most hydrological processes occur is approximately 1km or less. It is thus of crucial importance to develop procedures to disaggregate passive microwave based soil moisture from its nominal scale to that needed for hydrological application and/or watershed management. The objective of this presentation is to provide an overview of existing and newly developed techniques for disaggregating soil moisture from coarse scale to scale relevant for hydrological application. Ground and aircraft data collected at the Walnut Gulch experimental watershed are used to discuss the performance and the limitation of these approaches.

  2. Snowpack monitoring in North America and Eurasia using passive microwave satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Allison, L. J.; Diesen, B. C., III

    1980-01-01

    Areas of the Canadian high plains, the Montana and North Dakota high plains, and the steppes of central Russia have been studied in an effort to determine the utility of spaceborne microwave radiometers for monitoring snow depths in different geographic areas. Significant regression relationships between snow depth and microwave brightness temperatures were developed for each of these homogeneous areas. In each of the study areas investigated in this paper, Nimbus-6 (0.81 cm) ESMR data produced higher correlations than Nimbus-5 (1.55 cm) ESMR data in relating microwave brightness temperature to snow depth. It is difficult to extrapolate relationships between microwave brightness temperature and snow depth from one area to another because different geographic areas are likely to have different snowpack conditions.

  3. Effects of corn stalk orientation and water content on passive microwave sensing of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, P. E.; Blanchard, B. J.; Wang, J. R.; Gould, W. I.; Jackson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted utilizing artificial arrangements of plant components during the summer of 1982 to examine the effects of corn canopy structure and plant water content on microwave emission. Truck-mounted microwave radiometers at C (5 GHz) and L (1.4 GHz) band sensed vertically and horizontally polarized radiation concurrent with ground observations of soil moisture and vegetation parameters. Results indicate that the orientation of cut stalks and the distribution of their dielectric properties through the canopy layer can influence the microwave emission measured from a vegetation/soil scene. The magnitude of this effect varies with polarization and frequency and with the amount of water in the plant, disappearing at low levels of vegetation water content. Although many of the canopy structures and orientations studied in this experiment are somewhat artificial, they serve to improve understanding of microwave energy interactions within a vegetation canopy and to aid in the development of appropriate physically based vegetation models.

  4. Effects of corn stalk orientation and water content on passive microwave sensing of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, P. E.; Blanchard, B. J.; Wang, J. R.; Gould, W. I.; Jackson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted utilizing artificial arrangements of plant components during the summer of 1982 to examine the effects of corn canopy structure and plant water content on microwave emission. Truck-mounted microwave radiometers at C (5 GHz) and L (1.4 GHz) band sensed vertically and horizontally polarized radiation concurrent with ground observations of soil moisture and vegetation parameters. Results indicate that the orientation of cut stalks and the distribution of their dielectric properties through the canopy layer can influence the microwave emission measured from a vegetation/soil scene. The magnitude of this effect varies with polarization and frequency and with the amount of water in the plant, disappearing at low levels of vegetation water content. Although many of the canopy structures and orientations studied in this experiment are somewhat artificial, they serve to improve understanding of microwave energy interactions within a vegetation canopy and to aid in the development of appropriate physically based vegetation models.

  5. Optical coefficients of nanometer-thick copper and gold films in microwave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorin, I.; Orlikovsky, N.; Rogozhin, A.; Tatarintsev, A.; Pronin, S.; Andreev, V.; Vdovin, V.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrathin (1-10 nm) Cu and Au films were prepared on the silicon and quartz substrates by magnetron sputtering at room temperature. We measured the transmission coefficient of the films at a wavelength of 3cm and analyzed a surface morphology of these films. It was shown that the films with thicknesses less than 7.5 nm (Au) and 3 nm (Cu) are almost transparent for microwaves. This effect is explained by quick oxidation of Cu and the complex surface morphology of nanometer thick films. The Au film morphology is evolved with increasing average Au thickness d from hemispherical islands initially (1.0 nm

  6. Development of a High Resolution Passive Microwave 3U Cubesat for High Resolution Temperature Sounding and Imaging at 118 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Sanders, B. T.; Gallaher, D. W.; Periasamy, L.; Alvarenga, G.; Weaver, R.; Scambos, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    PolarCube is a 3U CubeSat based on the CU ALL-STAR bus hosting an eight-channel passive microwave scanning spectrometer operating at the 118.7503 GHz (1-) O2 resonance. The anticipated launch date is in late 2015. It is being designed to operate for 12 months on orbit to provide global 118-GHz spectral imagery of the Earth over a full seasonal cycle. The mission will focus on the study of Arctic vertical temperature structure and its relation to sea ice coverage, but include the secondary goals of assessing the potential for convective cloud mass detection and cloud top altitude measurement and hurricane warm core sounding. The principles used by PolarCube for sounding and cloud measurement have been well established in number of peer-reviewed papers, although measurements using the 118 GHz oxygen line over the dry polar regions (unaffected by water vapor) have never been demonstrated from space. The PolarCube channels are selected to probe clear-air emission over vertical levels from the surface to the lower stratosphere. Operational spaceborne microwave soundings have available for decades but using lower frequencies (50-57 GHz) and from higher altitudes. While the JPSS ATMS sensor provides global coverage at ~32 km resolution PolarCube will improve on this resolution by a factor of two (~16 km), thus facilitating a key science goal of mapping sea ice concentration and extent while obtaining temperature profile data. Additionally, we seek to correlate freeze-thaw line data from the NASA SMAP mission with atmospheric temperature structure to help understand the relationship between clouds, temperature, and surface energy fluxes during seasonal transitions. PolarCube will also provide the first demonstration of a very low cost passive microwave sounder that if operated in a fleet configuration would have the potential to fulfill the goals of the Precipitation Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity (PATH) mission, as defined in the NRC Decadal Survey.

  7. Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice, 1978-1987: Satellite Passive-Microwave Observations and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, Per; Campbell, William J.; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1992-01-01

    This book contains a description and analysis of the spatial and temporal variations in the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice covers from October 26, 1978 through August 20, 1987. It is based on data collected by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) onboard the NASA Nimbus 7 satellite. The 8.8-year period, together with the 4 years of the Nimbus 5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) observations presented in two earlier volumes, comprises a sea ice record spanning almost 15 years.

  8. Passivation Effect of Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 Film on HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Sun, Chang-Hong; Chen, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Ning; Chen, Xin; Lin, Chun; Ding, Ring-Jun; He, Li

    2016-09-01

    The passivation effect of atomic layer deposition of (ALD) Al2O3 film on a HgCdTe infrared detector was investigated in this work. The passivation effect of Al2O3 film was evaluated by measuring the minority carrier lifetime, capacitance versus voltage ( C- V) characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, and resistance versus voltage ( R- V) characteristics of variable-area photodiodes. The minority carrier lifetime, C- V characteristics, and R- V characteristics of HgCdTe devices passivated by ALD Al2O3 film was comparable to those of HgCdTe devices passivated by e-beam evaporation of ZnS/CdTe film. However, the baking stability of devices passivated by Al2O3 film is inferior to that of devices passivated by ZnS/CdTe film. In future work, by optimizing the ALD Al2O3 film growing process and annealing conditions, it may be feasible to achieve both excellent electrical properties and good baking stability.

  9. Residual Stress Development in CU Thin Films with and Without AlN Passivation by Cyclic Plane Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Mitsuhiko; Hanabusa, Takao; Kusaka, Kazuya

    Since the thin film technology is applied to micro-machines, MEMS (micro electro-mechanical system), optical devices and others, the evaluation of mechanical properties in thin films becomes to be important. On the other hand, there are differences in mechanical properties between bulk materials and thin films, but studies in this field have not yet been made enough. The present paper reports on the evaluation of the mechanical properties of Cu thin films with and without AlN passivation layer. Specimens with different thickness of Cu film were subjected to cyclic plane bending fatigue test. Residual stresses developed in the Cu films were measured in a sequence of bending cycles using X-ray diffraction method in order to understand the effect of film thickness and passivation layer on mechanical properties of Cu thin films.

  10. Simultaneous phase and morphology controllable synthesis of copper selenide films by microwave-assisted nonaqueous approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Fa, Wenjun; Li, Yasi; Zhao, Hongxiao; Gao, Yuanhao; Zheng, Zhi

    2013-02-01

    Copper selenide films with different phase and morphology were synthesized on copper substrate through controlling reaction solvent by microwave-assisted nonaqueous approach. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result showed that the pure films could be obtained using cyclohexyl alcohol or benzyl alcohol as solvent. The cubic Cu2-xSe dendrites were synthesized in cyclohexyl alcohol reaction system and hexagonal CuSe flaky crystals were obtained with benzyl alcohol as solvent.

  11. Microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Shin

    Microwave plasma assisted ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition was investigated using hydrogen deficient, carbon containing argon plasma chemistries with MSU-developed microwave plasma reactors. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition on mechanically scratched silicon wafers was experimentally explored over the following input variables: (1) pressure: 60--240Torr, (2) total gas flow rate: 101--642 sccm, (3) input microwave power 732--1518W, (4) substrate temperature: 500°C--770°C, (5) deposition time: 2--48 hours, and (6) N2 impurities 5--2500 ppm. H2 concentrations were less than 9%, while CH 4 concentration was 0.17--1.85%. It was desired to grow films uniformly over 3″ diameter substrates and to minimize the grain size. Large, uniform, intense, and greenish-white discharges were sustained in contact with three inch silicon substrates over a 60--240 Torr pressure regime. At a given operating pressure, film uniformity was controlled by adjusting substrate holder geometry, substrate position, input microwave power, gas chemistries, and total gas flow rates. Film ultra-nanocrystallinity and smoothness required high purity deposition conditions. Uniform ultra-nanocrystalline films were synthesized in low leak-rate system with crystal sizes ranging from 3--30 nm. Films with 11--50 nm RMS roughness and respective thickness values of 1--23 mum were synthesized over 3″ wafers under a wide range of different deposition conditions. Film RMS roughness 7 nm was synthesized with thickness of 430 nm. Film uniformities of almost 100% were achieved over three inch silicon wafers. UV Raman and XRD characterization results indicated the presence of diamond in the synthesized films. Optical Emission Spectroscopy measurements showed that the discharge gas temperature was in excess of 2000 K. The synthesized films are uniformly smooth and the as grown ultra-nanocrystalline diamond can be used for a high frequency SAW device substrate material. IR measurements

  12. Passive Microwave Bad Scans and the Importance of Satellite Data Version Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    One of the most important considerations in scientific research is the quality of the data used for new and important findings. However, a problem with the data, even if it is un-denounced to the researcher can completely nullify the results, especially after it is published. Therefore a version number or another way of identifying the data is needed for all data sets used in research. In creating a climate data record, the quality of the input data also needs to be the best available data at that time with a version number. Several examples can be made where data used in research were not correct and a new and improved version was later released. In the world of satellite data, the need for a version number or build number is increasingly important since data are being released almost as fast as they are produced. An example of this can be made with the SSM/I passive microwave daily gridded data product, archived and available from NSIDC. A detection algorithm was run for each daily SSM/I grid from 1 March through 30 September in 1989. A count of all bad scans that were partially or fully detected was completed for the 19H and 37H grids. The 19H grids had 67 days with at least one bad scan while the 37H data contained 51 contaminated days. Those totals are 28% and 21% of the 19H and 37H days investigated, respectively. Bad scans may occur in multiple channels on the same day, and may also be co-located or partially overlapping. Algorithms and routines used to track changes in polar regions that are sensitive to channel differences or individual channels in the DMSP SSM/I daily gridded brightness temperatures will be affected by the bad scans present in the NSIDC data set. Although the effect of bad scans on individual days may be small, the cumulative effect of bad scans over multiple days or in small subset regions may be significant. Contact with NSIDC revealed that these bad scans are the result of at least two errors: bad data that were not flagged prior to

  13. The Satellite Passive-Microwave Record of Sea Ice in the Ross Sea Since Late 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    Satellites have provided us with a remarkable ability to monitor many aspects of the globe day-in and day-out and sea ice is one of numerous variables that by now have quite substantial satellite records. Passive-microwave data have been particularly valuable in sea ice monitoring, with a record that extends back to August 1987 on daily basis (for most of the period), to November 1970 on a less complete basis (again for most of the period), and to December 1972 on a less complete basis. For the period since November 1970, Ross Sea sea ice imagery is available at spatial resolution of approximately 25 km. This allows good depictions of the seasonal advance and retreat of the ice cover each year, along with its marked interannual variability. The Ross Sea ice extent typically reaches a minimum of approximately 0.7 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers in February, rising to a maximum of approximately 4.0 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers in September, with much variability among years for both those numbers. The Ross Sea images show clearly the day-by-day activity greatly from year to year. Animations of the data help to highlight the dynamic nature of the Ross Sea ice cover. The satellite data also allow calculation of trends in the ice cover over the period of the satellite record. Using linear least-squares fits, the Ross Sea ice extent increased at an average rate of 12,600 plus or minus 1,800 square kilometers per year between November 1978 and December 2007, with every month exhibiting increased ice extent and the rates of increase ranging from a low of 7,500 plus or minus 5,000 square kilometers per year for the February ice extents to a high of 20,300 plus or minus 6,100 kilometers per year for the October ice extents. On a yearly average basis, for 1979-2007 the Ross Sea ice extent increased at a rate of 4.8 plus or minus 1.6 % per decade. Placing the Ross Sea in the context of the Southern Ocean as a whole, over the November 1978-December 2007 period the Ross Sea had

  14. A Texture-Polarization Method for Estimating Convective/Stratiform Precipitation Area Coverage from Passive Microwave Radiometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Hong, Ye; Kummerow, Christian D.; Turk, Joseph; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Observational and modeling studies have described the relationships between convective/stratiform rain proportion and the vertical distributions of vertical motion, latent heating, and moistening in mesoscale convective systems. Therefore, remote sensing techniques which can quantify the relative areal proportion of convective and stratiform, rainfall can provide useful information regarding the dynamic and thermodynamic processes in these systems. In the present study, two methods for deducing the convective/stratiform areal extent of precipitation from satellite passive microwave radiometer measurements are combined to yield an improved method. If sufficient microwave scattering by ice-phase precipitating hydrometeors is detected, the method relies mainly on the degree of polarization in oblique-view, 85.5 GHz radiances to estimate the area fraction of convective rain within the radiometer footprint. In situations where ice scattering is minimal, the method draws mostly on texture information in radiometer imagery at lower microwave frequencies to estimate the convective area fraction. Based upon observations of ten convective systems over ocean and nine systems over land, instantaneous 0.5 degree resolution estimates of convective area fraction from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TRMM TMI) are compared to nearly coincident estimates from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). The TMI convective area fraction estimates are slightly low-biased with respect to the PR, with TMI-PR correlations of 0.78 and 0.84 over ocean and land backgrounds, respectively. TMI monthly-average convective area percentages in the tropics and subtropics from February 1998 exhibit the greatest values along the ITCZ and in continental regions of the summer (southern) hemisphere. Although convective area percentages. from the TMI are systematically lower than those from the PR, monthly rain patterns derived from the TMI and PR rain algorithms are very similar

  15. A Brightness-Temperature-Variance-Based Passive Microwave Algorithm for Monitoring Soil Freeze/Thaw State on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Yang, K.; Qin, J.; Jin, R.; Ma, Y.; Wen, J.; Chen, Y.; Zhao, L.; La, Z.; Tang, W.

    2014-12-01

    The land surface on the Tibetan Plateau experiences typical diurnal and seasonal freeze/thaw processes that play important roles in the regional water and energy exchanges, and recent passive microwave satellites provide opportunities to detect the soil state for the unique region. With the support of three soil moisture and temperature networks in the Tibetan Plateau, a dual-index microwave algorithm with AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System) data is developed for the detection of soil surface freeze/thaw state. One index is the standard deviation index (SDI) of brightness temperature (TB), which is defined as the standard deviation of horizontally polarized brightness temperatures at all AMSR-E frequencies. It is the major index and is used to reflect the reduction of liquid water content after soils get frozen. The other index is the 36.5 GHz vertically-polarized brightness temperature, which is linearly correlated with ground temperature and thus is utilized to detect it. The threshold values of the two indices (SDI and the brightness temperature at 36.5 GHz vertically-polarized) are determined based on a part of in situ data from the network located in a semi-arid climate, and the algorithm was validated against other in situ data from this network. Further validations were conducted based on the other two networks located in different climates (semi-humid and arid, respectively). Results show that this algorithm has accuracy of more than 90% for the semi-humid and semi-arid regions, and misclassifications mainly occur at the transition period between unfrozen and frozen seasons. Nevertheless, the microwave signals have limited capability in identifying the soil surface freeze/thaw state in the arid region, because they can penetrate deep dry soils and thus embody the bulk information beneath the surface.

  16. Electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by thin films of atomic layer deposited gallium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. G. Cuevas, A.

    2014-07-21

    This paper proposes the application of gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films to crystalline silicon solar cells. Effective passivation of n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of very thin Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films prepared by atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ozone (O{sub 3}) as the reactants. Surface recombination velocities as low as 6.1 cm/s have been recorded with films less than 4.5 nm thick. A range of deposition parameters has been explored, with growth rates of approximately 0.2 Å/cycle providing optimum passivation. The thermal activation energy for passivation of the Si-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface has been found to be approximately 0.5 eV. Depassivation of the interface was observed for prolonged annealing at increased temperatures. The activation energy for depassivation was measured to be 1.9 eV.

  17. The role of passive surface films on corrosion fatigue crack initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing on commercially pure titanium with low and high oxygen contents, chosen to produce quite different slip behaviors, wavy and planar, respectively, was carried out in air and in 1M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solution, a strongly passivating environment for Ti. Goal was comparison of experimental fatigue data with a published model which rationalizes fatigue crack initiation under passive corrosion conditions. Although the general features of the experimental data were consistent with the tenets of the model, as was also the case in prior work using the stainless steel superalloy A-286, it appeared that the passivation conditions were so strong as to preclude the primary event proposed as the basis for the model, namely the emergence of slip steps through the passive film, thus permitting corrosive fatigue crack initiation. It is possible that choice of a less strong passivating environment would permit a better comparison of model and experiment for the CP Ti, an otherwise suitable experimental material.

  18. Metastability of a-SiOx:H thin films for c-Si surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, L.; Martini, L.; Imbimbo, L.; Asquini, R.; Menchini, F.; Izzi, M.; Tucci, M.

    2017-01-01

    The adoption of a-SiOx:H films obtained by PECVD in heterojunction solar cells is a key to further increase their efficiency, because of its transparency in the UV with respect to the commonly used a-Si:H. At the same time this layer must guarantee high surface passivation of the c-Si to be suitable in high efficiency solar cell manufacturing. On the other hand the application of amorphous materials like a-Si:H and SiNx on the cell frontside expose them to the mostly energetic part of the sun spectrum, leading to a metastability of their passivation properties. Moreover as for amorphous silicon, thermal annealing procedures are considered as valuable steps to enhance and stabilize thin film properties, when performed at opportune temperature. In this work we explored the reliability of a-SiOx:H thin film layers surface passivation on c-Si substrates under UV exposition, in combination with thermal annealing steps. Both p- and n-type doped c-Si substrates were considered. To understand the effect of UV light soaking we monitored the minority carriers lifetime and Sisbnd H and Sisbnd O bonding, by FTIR spectra, after different exposure times to light coming from a deuterium lamp, filtered to UV-A region, and focused on the sample to obtain a power density of 50 μW/cm2. We found a certain lifetime decrease after UV light soaking in both p- and n-type c-Si passivated wafers according to a a-SiOx:H/c-Si/a-SiOx:H structure. The role of a thermal annealing, which usually enhances the as-deposited SiOx passivation properties, was furthermore considered. In particular we monitored the UV light soaking effect on c-Si wafers after a-SiOx:H coating by PECVD and after a thermal annealing treatment at 300 °C for 30 min, having selected these conditions on the basis of the study of the effect due to different temperatures and durations. We correlated the lifetime evolution and the metastability effect of thermal annealing to the a-SiOx:H/c-Si interface considering the evolution

  19. Precipitation estimation using passive microwave radiometry at 92 and 183 GHz - Aircraft results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Adler, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    The applications of satellite and aircraft sensors to precipitation estimation are discussed. The advanced microwave moisture sensor and imagery and the PPI photographs and digital radar data are described. The aircraft microwave sensor and radar imagery representing the relationships between patterns and gradients of brightness temperature, T(B), and echo intensities for three cases (evolution of an oceanic squall line, convection over land, and intense thunderstorms over land) are examined and compared. The observed T(B)s are also compared with the theoretical calculations of Wu and Weinman (1984) and Szejwach et al. (1986). The observations of convective precipitation from an aircraft microwave radiometer operating at 92 and 183 GHz reveal that the areas of T(B) much colder than atmospheric temperature are positively correlated with regions of higher radar reflectivity, and the patterns and gradients of T(B) are similar in appearance to the radar echoes.

  20. Frequency and distribution of winter melt events from passive microwave satellite data in the pan-Arctic, 1988-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Toose, Peter; Brown, Ross; Derksen, Chris

    2016-11-01

    This study presents an algorithm for detecting winter melt events in seasonal snow cover based on temporal variations in the brightness temperature difference between 19 and 37 GHz from satellite passive microwave measurements. An advantage of the passive microwave approach is that it is based on the physical presence of liquid water in the snowpack, which may not be the case with melt events inferred from surface air temperature data. The algorithm is validated using in situ observations from weather stations, snow pit measurements, and a surface-based passive microwave radiometer. The validation results indicate the algorithm has a high success rate for melt durations lasting multiple hours/days and where the melt event is preceded by warm air temperatures. The algorithm does not reliably identify short-duration events or events that occur immediately after or before periods with extremely cold air temperatures due to the thermal inertia of the snowpack and/or overpass and resolution limitations of the satellite data. The results of running the algorithm over the pan-Arctic region (north of 50° N) for the 1988-2013 period show that winter melt events are relatively rare, totaling less than 1 week per winter over most areas, with higher numbers of melt days (around two weeks per winter) occurring in more temperate regions of the Arctic (e.g., central Québec and Labrador, southern Alaska and Scandinavia). The observed spatial pattern is similar to winter melt events inferred with surface air temperatures from the ERA-Interim (ERA-I) and Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis datasets. There was little evidence of trends in winter melt event frequency over 1988-2013 with the exception of negative trends over northern Europe attributed to a shortening of the duration of the winter period. The frequency of winter melt events is shown to be strongly correlated to the duration of winter period. This must be taken into

  1. Structural, transport and microwave properties of 123/sapphire films: Thickness effect

    SciTech Connect

    Predtechensky, MR.; Smal, A.N.; Varlamov, Y.D.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of thickness and growth conditions on the structure and microwave properties has been investigated for the 123/sapphire films. It has been shown that in the conditions of epitaxial growth and Al atoms do not diffuse from substrate into the film and the films with thickness up to 100nm exhibit the excellent DC properties. The increase of thickness of GdBaCuO films causes the formation of extended line-mesh defects and the increase of the surface resistance (R{sub S}). The low value of surface resistance R{sub S}(75GHz,77K)=20 mOhm has been obtained for the two layer YBaCuO/CdBaCuO/sapphire films.

  2. Structural, transport and microwave properties of 123/sapphire films: Thickness effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predtechensky, M. R.; Smal, A. N.; Varlamov, Yu. D.; Vatnik, S. M.; Tukhto, O. M.; Vasileva, I. G.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of thickness and growth conditions on the structure and microwave properties has been investigated for the 123/sapphire films. It has been shown that in the conditions of epitaxial growth the Al atoms do not diffuse from substrate into the film and the films with thickness up to 100 nm exhibit the excellent direct current (DC) properties. The increase of thickness of GdBaCuO films causes the formation of extended line-mesh defects and the increase of the surface resistance (R(sub S)). The low value of surface resistance R(sub S)(75 GHz, 77K) = 20 mOhm has been obtained for the two layer YBaCuO/CdBaCuO/sapphire films.

  3. STAR Concept for Passive Microwave Temperature Sounding from Middle Earth Orbit (MeoSTAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Doiron, Terence A.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Ruf, Chris S.

    2004-01-01

    A future mission for a new microwave atmospheric temperature sounder radiometer in a Middle Earth Orbit (MEO) at 11,000 km altitude is described. The MeoSTAR design uses a stationary l-dimensional Synthetic Thinned Array Radiometer in the 50-60 GHz microwave sounding band, to provide a 'pushbroom' image as the satellite orbits. The advantage of this concept is an image with a high spatial resolution and a wide swath with no scanning antenna to disturb the visual and IR sensors on the same satellite.

  4. Soil organic carbon as a factor in passive microwave retrievals of soil water content over agricultural croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Hida R.; Berg, Aaron A.; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Remote sensing has the potential to deliver global soil water content (SWC) on vast scales with frequent revisit times for progress in the fields of climate, weather forecasting, agriculture and hydrology. Although surface roughness, vegetation and soil texture have been established as sources of variability in passive microwave interpretation, soil organic carbon (SOC) has not typically been considered as a factor that affects SWC estimation during field sampling campaigns. SOC was observed along with soil texture and bulk density during the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment in 2012 (SMAPVEX12), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite algorithm development field sampling campaign held June 6 to July 19 in Southern Manitoba, Canada. Aerial measurements from the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) instrument were recorded over agricultural fields and forest areas from aircraft while SWC was measured simultaneously on the ground with resistance probes on 17 sampling dates. Additionally, fields were sampled for surface roughness, vegetation growth and water content, soil and vegetation temperature and soil physical characteristics. A soil core was collected on each field each sampling time to assess bulk density, soil particle size and SOC. SOC accounted for more variability in the anomalies between PALS and ground sampled SWC than sand, clay or bulk density, although all soil variables explained significant variability. With analysis by partial least squares multiple regression over 11 sampling dates and 39 fields where both ground and PALS data were well represented, only SOC contributed significantly to the regression of SWC beyond the variance all soil variables had in common. The significance of SOC in the relative SWC anomalies was highest in very wet and very dry conditions and in loam soil over all sampling dates, while bulk density was more significant in sand soils. This analysis suggests SOC is a simple variable that incorporates

  5. Clamping effect on the microwave properties of ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poplavko, Y.; Cho, N.-I.

    1999-11-01

    Ferroelectric and paraelectric films deposited on dielectric and semiconductor substrates were studied at the frequency range 0.3-100 GHz and temperature interval 300-700 K in comparison with chemically equivalent bulk materials. A dielectric spectroscopy method helps to trace the change of dielectric polarization and dielectric loss mechanisms when the free-stress volume (bulk) ferroelectric is transformed into a thin planar layer (film) that is stressed by its forced accommodation to a rigid substrate. The change in bulk-film properties could be either favourable or an adverse factor for electronic devices.

  6. Photoelectric and passivation properties of atomic layer deposited gradient AZO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Tang, Li-dan; Wang, Bing; Jia, Yi; Feng, Jia-heng

    2017-02-01

    Gradient Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were deposited at 150 °C by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with different Al concentration gradient, and their photoelectric and passivation properties were investigated. With increasing Al concentration gradient from 0.09 to 1.21%/nm, Hall-effect showed that the resistivity of gradient AZO thin films deteriorates. The minimal resistivity (2.81 × 10-3 Ω cm), the maximum mobility (9.03 cm2/Vs) and the maximum carrier concentration (2.46 × 1020 cm-3) were obtained at 0.09%/nm Al concentration gradient. The average transmittance of all the gradient AZO films can be more than 85% in the visible region. In addition, gradient AZO thin films demonstrated excellent passivation properties. The maximum minority carrier lifetime (120.6 μs) and the minimal surface recombination velocity (≤208.3 cm/s) were obtained at 0.71%/nm Al concentration gradient.

  7. Modelling the passive microwave signature from land surfaces: a review of recent results and application to the SMOS & SMAP soil moisture retrieval algorithms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two passive microwave missions are currently operating at L-band to monitor surface soil moisture (SM) over continental surfaces. The SMOS sensor, based on an innovative interferometric technology enabling multi-angular signatures of surfaces to be measured, was launched in November 2009....

  8. An intercomparison of available soil moisture estimates from thermal-infrared and passive microwave remote sensing and land-surface modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Remotely-sensed soil moisture studies have mainly focused on retrievals using active and passive microwave (MW) sensors whose measurements provided a direct relationship to soil moisture (SM). MW sensors present obvious advantages such as the ability to retrieve through non-precipitating cloud cover...

  9. Aircraft active and passive microwave validation of sea ice concentration from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Crawford, J. P.; Drinkwater, M. R.; Eppler, D. T.; Farmer, L. D.; Jentz, R. R.; Wackerman, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of coordinate special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) underflights that were carried out during March 1988 with NASA and Navy aircraft over portions of the Bering, Beaufort, and Chukchi seas. NASA DC-8 AMMR data from Bering Sea ice edge crossings were used to verify that the ice edge location, defined as the position of the initial ice bands encountered by the aircraft, corresponds to an SSM/I ice concentration of 15 percent. Direct comparison of SSM/I and aircraft ice concentrations for regions having at least 80 percent aircraft coverage reveals that the SSM/I total ice concentration is lower on average by 2.4 +/-2.4 percent. For multiyear ice, NASA and Navy flights across the Beaufort and Chukchi seas show that the SSM/I algorithm correctly maps the large-scale distribution of multiyear ice: the zone of first-year ice off the Alaskan coast, the large areas of mixed first-year and multiyear ice, and the region of predominantly multiyear ice north of the Canadian archipelago.

  10. Aircraft active and passive microwave validation of sea ice concentration from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Crawford, J. P.; Drinkwater, M. R.; Eppler, D. T.; Farmer, L. D.; Jentz, R. R.; Wackerman, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of coordinate special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) underflights that were carried out during March 1988 with NASA and Navy aircraft over portions of the Bering, Beaufort, and Chukchi seas. NASA DC-8 AMMR data from Bering Sea ice edge crossings were used to verify that the ice edge location, defined as the position of the initial ice bands encountered by the aircraft, corresponds to an SSM/I ice concentration of 15 percent. Direct comparison of SSM/I and aircraft ice concentrations for regions having at least 80 percent aircraft coverage reveals that the SSM/I total ice concentration is lower on average by 2.4 +/-2.4 percent. For multiyear ice, NASA and Navy flights across the Beaufort and Chukchi seas show that the SSM/I algorithm correctly maps the large-scale distribution of multiyear ice: the zone of first-year ice off the Alaskan coast, the large areas of mixed first-year and multiyear ice, and the region of predominantly multiyear ice north of the Canadian archipelago.

  11. Accelerated Amidization of Branched Poly(ethylenimine)/Poly(acrylic acid) Multilayer Films by Microwave Heating.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kehua; Gu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Huan; Qiang, Zhe; Vogt, Bryan D; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-09-13

    Chemical cross-linking of layer-by-layer assembled films promotes mechanical stability and robustness in a wide variety of environments, which can be a challenge for polyelectrolyte multilayers in saline environments or for multilayers made from weak polyelectrolytes in environments with extreme pHs. Heating branched poly(ethylenimine)/poly(acrylic acid) (BPEI/PAA) multilayers at sufficiently high temperatures drives amidization and dehydration to covalently cross-link the film, but this reaction is rather slow, typically requiring heating for hours for appreciable cross-linking to occur. Here, a more than one order of magnitude increase in the amidization kinetics is realized through microwave heating of BPEI/PAA multilayers on indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass substrates. The cross-linking reaction is tracked using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry to monitor the development of the cross-linking products. For thick films (∼1500 nm), gradients in cross-link density can be readily identified by infrared ellipsometry. Such gradients in cross-link density are driven by the temperature gradient developed by the localized heating of ITO by microwaves. This significant acceleration of reactions using microwaves to generate a well-defined cross-link network as well as being a simple method for developing graded materials should open new applications for these polymer films and coatings.

  12. Microwave plasma chemical synthesis of nanocrystalline carbon film structures and study their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushuev, N.; Yafarov, R.; Timoshenkov, V.; Orlov, S.; Starykh, D.

    2015-08-01

    The self-organization effect of diamond nanocrystals in polymer-graphite and carbon films is detected. The carbon materials deposition was carried from ethanol vapors out at low pressure using a highly non-equilibrium microwave plasma. Deposition processes of carbon film structures (diamond, graphite, graphene) is defined. Deposition processes of nanocrystalline structures containing diamond and graphite phases in different volume ratios is identified. The solid film was obtained under different conditions of microwave plasma chemical synthesis. We investigated the electrical properties of the nanocrystalline carbon films and identified it's from various factors. Influence of diamond-graphite film deposition mode in non-equilibrium microwave plasma at low pressure on emission characteristics was established. This effect is justified using the cluster model of the structure of amorphous carbon. It was shown that the reduction of bound hydrogen in carbon structures leads to a decrease in the threshold electric field of emission from 20-30 V/m to 5 V/m. Reducing the operating voltage field emission can improve mechanical stability of the synthesized film diamond-graphite emitters. Current density emission at least 20 A/cm2 was obtained. Nanocrystalline carbon film materials can be used to create a variety of functional elements in micro- and nanoelectronics and photonics such as cold electron source for emission in vacuum devices, photonic devices, cathodoluminescent flat display, highly efficient white light sources. The obtained graphene carbon net structure (with a net size about 6 μm) may be used for the manufacture of large-area transparent electrode for solar cells and cathodoluminescent light sources

  13. Modeling of Cardiac Muscle Thin Films: Pre-stretch, Passive and Active Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jongmin; Grosberg, Anna; Nawroth, Janna C.; Parker, Kevin Kit; Bertoldi, Katia

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue engineering has made it possible to build contractile bio-hybrid materials that undergo conformational changes by growing a layer of cardiac muscle on elastic polymeric membranes. Further development of such muscular thin films for building actuators and powering devices requires exploring several design parameters, which include the alignment of the cardiac myocytes and the thickness/Young’s modulus of elastomeric film. To more efficiently explore these design parameters, we propose a 3-D phenomenological constitutive model, which accounts for both the passive deformation including pre-stretch and the active behavior of the cardiomyocytes. The proposed 3-D constitutive model is implemented within a finite element framework, and can be used to improve the current design of bio-hybrid thin films and help developing bio-hybrid constructs capable of complex conformational changes. PMID:22236531

  14. Flux dependence of the morphology of a tetracene film on hydrogen-passivated Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J.; Qin, X. R.

    2006-03-15

    The initial stage of vacuum evaporated tetracene films on hydrogen-passivated Si(100) substrates has been investigated using ex situ atomic force microscopy. Three-dimensional (3D) islands and dendrites are obtained at low deposition rates near equilibrium growth conditions. By increasing the deposition rate to a proper range away from equilibrium conditions, terraced grains are formed with layers of standing molecules and good film connectivity. 3D grains with a high aspect ratio appear once the deposition rate is beyond the optimized range. These flux-dependent results indicate a kinetic path for the formation of uniform tetracene films. The initial growth patterns are discussed within the frame of the morphological instability theory.

  15. Modeling of cardiac muscle thin films: pre-stretch, passive and active behavior.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jongmin; Grosberg, Anna; Nawroth, Janna C; Parker, Kevin Kit; Bertoldi, Katia

    2012-03-15

    Recent progress in tissue engineering has made it possible to build contractile bio-hybrid materials that undergo conformational changes by growing a layer of cardiac muscle on elastic polymeric membranes. Further development of such muscular thin films for building actuators and powering devices requires exploring several design parameters, which include the alignment of the cardiac myocytes and the thickness/Young's modulus of elastomeric film. To more efficiently explore these design parameters, we propose a 3-D phenomenological constitutive model, which accounts for both the passive deformation including pre-stretch and the active behavior of the cardiomyocytes. The proposed 3-D constitutive model is implemented within a finite element framework, and can be used to improve the current design of bio-hybrid thin films and help developing bio-hybrid constructs capable of complex conformational changes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Passive microwave studies of snowpack properties. [Walden and Steamboat Spring, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Schmugge, T.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave brightness temperatures were measured for the snowpacks at Walden and Steamboat Springs, Colorado during 1976 and 1977 aircraft experiments. Variations in measured brightness temperatures are attributed to snow grain and crystal sizes, liquid water content, and snowpack temperature. Results demonstrate that shorter wavelength radiation is scattered more strongly than longer wavelength radiation.

  17. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) L-band microwave radiometer post-launch calibration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM / 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685-km altitude. Since April 2015, the radiometer has been under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibrat...

  18. Assimilation of a knowledge base and physical models to reduce errors in passive-microwave classifications of sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J.

    1992-01-01

    An expert system framework has been developed to classify sea ice types using satellite passive microwave data, an operational classification algorithm, spatial and temporal information, ice types estimated from a dynamic-thermodynamic model, output from a neural network that detects the onset of melt, and knowledge about season and region. The rule base imposes boundary conditions upon the ice classification, modifies parameters in the ice algorithm, determines a `confidence' measure for the classified data, and under certain conditions, replaces the algorithm output with model output. Results demonstrate the potential power of such a system for minimizing overall error in the classification and for providing non-expert data users with a means of assessing the usefulness of the classification results for their applications.

  19. Assimilation of a knowledge base and physical models to reduce errors in passive-microwave classifications of sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J.

    1992-01-01

    An expert system framework has been developed to classify sea ice types using satellite passive microwave data, an operational classification algorithm, spatial and temporal information, ice types estimated from a dynamic-thermodynamic model, output from a neural network that detects the onset of melt, and knowledge about season and region. The rule base imposes boundary conditions upon the ice classification, modifies parameters in the ice algorithm, determines a `confidence' measure for the classified data, and under certain conditions, replaces the algorithm output with model output. Results demonstrate the potential power of such a system for minimizing overall error in the classification and for providing non-expert data users with a means of assessing the usefulness of the classification results for their applications.

  20. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without

  1. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  2. Impacts of Different Assimilation Methodologies on Crop Yield Estimates Using Active and Passive Microwave Dataset at L-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Bongiovanni, T. E.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Bindlish, R.; Judge, J.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate estimates of crop yield are important for managing agricultural production and food security. Although the crop growth models, such as the Decision Support System Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT), have been used to simulate crop growth and development, the crop yield estimates still diverge from the reality due to different sources of errors in the models and computation. Auxiliary observations may be incorporated into such dynamic models to improve predictions using data assimilation. Active and passive (AP) microwave observations at L-band (1-2 GHz) are sensitive to dielectric and geometric properties of soil and vegetation, including soil moisture (SM), vegetation water content (VWC), surface roughness, and vegetation structure. Because SM and VWC are one of the governing factors in estimating crop yield, microwave observations may be used to improve crop yield estimates. Current studies have shown that active observations are more sensitive to the surface roughness of soil and vegetation structure during the growing season, while the passive observations are more sensitive to the SM. Backscatter and emission models linked with the DSSAT model (DSSAT-A-P) allow assimilation of microwave observations of backscattering coefficient (σ0) and brightness temperature (TB) may provide biophysically realistic estimates of model states and parameters. The present ESA Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission provides passive observations at 1.41 GHz at 25 km every 2-3 days, and the NASA/CNDAE Aquarius mission provides L-band AP observations at spatial resolution of 150 km with a repeat coverage of 7 days for global SM products. In 2014, the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive mission will provide AP observations at 1.26 and 1.41 GHz at the spatial resolutions of 3 and 30 km, respectively, with a repeat coverage of 2-3 days. The goal of this study is to understand the impacts of assimilation of asynchronous and synchronous AP observations on crop yield

  3. Fusion of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Create AN Essential Climate Variable Data Record on Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, W.; Dorigo, W.; de Jeu, R.; Fernandez, D.; Benveniste, J.; Haas, E.; Ertl, M.

    2012-07-01

    Soil moisture was recently included in the list of Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) that are deemed essential for IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) and UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) needs and considered feasible for global observation. ECVs data records should be as long, complete and consistent as possible, and in the case of soil moisture this means that the data record shall be based on multiple data sources, including but not limited to active (scatterometer) and passive (radiometer) microwave observations acquired preferably in the low-frequency microwave range. Among the list of sensors that can be used for this task are the C-band scatterometers on board of the ERS and METOP satellites and the multi-frequency radiometers SMMR, SSM/I, TMI, AMSR-E, and Windsat. Together, these sensors already cover a time period of more than 30 years and the question is how can observations acquired by these sensors be merged to create one consistent data record? This paper discusses on a high-level possible approaches for fusing the individual satellite data. It is argued that the best possible approach for the fusion of the different satellite data sets is to merge Level 2 soil moisture data derived from the individual satellite data records. This approach has already been demonstrated within the WACMOS project (http://wacmos.itc.nl/) funded by European Space Agency (ESA) and will be further improved within the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of ESA (http://www.esa-cci.org/).

  4. Analysis of ground-measured and passive-microwave-derived snow depth variations in midwinter across the Northern Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, A.T.C.; Kelly, R.E.J.; Josberger, E.G.; Armstrong, R.L.; Foster, J.L.; Mognard, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimation of snow mass is important for the characterization of the hydrological cycle at different space and time scales. For effective water resources management, accurate estimation of snow storage is needed. Conventionally, snow depth is measured at a point, and in order to monitor snow depth in a temporally and spatially comprehensive manner, optimum interpolation of the points is undertaken. Yet the spatial representation of point measurements at a basin or on a larger distance scale is uncertain. Spaceborne scanning sensors, which cover a wide swath and can provide rapid repeat global coverage, are ideally suited to augment the global snow information. Satellite-borne passive microwave sensors have been used to derive snow depth (SD) with some success. The uncertainties in point SD and areal SD of natural snowpacks need to be understood if comparisons are to be made between a point SD measurement and satellite SD. In this paper three issues are addressed relating satellite derivation of SD and ground measurements of SD in the northern Great Plains of the United States from 1988 to 1997. First, it is shown that in comparing samples of ground-measured point SD data with satellite-derived 25 ?? 25 km2 pixels of SD from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave Imager, there are significant differences in yearly SD values even though the accumulated datasets showed similarities. Second, from variogram analysis, the spatial variability of SD from each dataset was comparable. Third, for a sampling grid cell domain of 1?? ?? 1?? in the study terrain, 10 distributed snow depth measurements per cell are required to produce a sampling error of 5 cm or better. This study has important implications for validating SD derivations from satellite microwave observations. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  5. The Evolution of Convective Structure in Tropical Cyclones Undergoing Rapid Intensification as Observed by Passive Microwave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnos, D. S.; Nesbitt, S. W.

    2010-12-01

    Documentation of improvements in tropical cyclone (TC) track forecasting by nearly 50% have been noted by the National Hurricane Center since 1990 however a concurrent lack of improvement has been noted in intensity forecasting. Particularly troubling to predict have been episodes of rapid intensification (RI) that are poorly anticipated by forecast models, possibly due to the influence of microphysical processes driving TC intensity change. Passive microwave sensors such as the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TMI) are able to retrieve microphysical information about precipitation features through emission by liquid water at low frequency channels and ice-scattering at higher frequencies, which may detect key precursors to TC intensification. A dataset consisting of every SSM/I and TMI overpass of a tropical cyclone globally dating from the launch of each instrument through 2008 is used to examine the structural characteristics noted in storms undergoing varying degrees of intensity change. Composites of the RI class of storms show a distinct convective ring-like structure surrounding the system core not seen in the other classifications. In the 24-hour window after RI onset this ring shows a tendency to contract inwards towards the TC core and intensify. This methodology is also extended to 24 hours prior to the start of RI with an improvement in the convective organization seen as the vortex becomes increasingly axisymmetricized as the RI phase approaches. Potential asymmetric modes of RI are sought by stratifying the composites into classifications dependent on wind shear magnitude. The contribution and occurrence of convective bursts are also examined to evaluate whether they are typically a source or byproduct of the RI process.

  6. Integration of microwave termination based on TaN thin films on ferrite substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dainan; Ji, Liang; Kolodzey, James

    2015-10-01

    Integration of microwave discrete devices such as isolators and circulators is highly desired for radar and communication platforms and in particular as components used in transmit and receive (T/R) modules. In those applications, Tantalum nitride (TaN) films are widely used as a surface mounted termination to improve the reliability and performance. In the current work, TaN thin films were directly deposited on polycrystalline ferrite substrate (Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4) to be integrated with isolators or circulators. The deposition conditions were first optimized to obtain suitable sheet resistance and near zero temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR). Next a 50 Ω microwave termination was designed and fabricated using standard photolithography techniques. Broadband measurements show that the terminator has a low voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) of less than 1.20 in the frequency range of DC-20 GHz. The measured resistance was between 48 and 54 Ω.

  7. Graphene quantum dot incorporated perovskite films: passivating grain boundaries and facilitating electron extraction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiang; Ding, Jianning; Yuan, Ningyi; Sun, Peng; Lv, Minghang; Ding, Guqiao; Zhu, Chong

    2017-02-22

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskites have emerged as attractive materials for use in photovoltaic cells. Owing to the existence of dangling bonds at the grain boundaries between perovskite crystals, minimizing the charge recombination at the surface or grain boundaries by passivating these trap states has been identified to be one of the most important strategies for further optimization of device performance. Previous reports have mainly focused on surface passivation by inserting special materials such as graphene or fullerene between the electron transfer layer and the perovskite film. Here, we report an enhanced efficiency of mesoscopic perovskite solar cells by using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to passivate the grain boundaries of CH3NH3PbI3. The highest efficiency (17.62%) is achieved via decoration with 7% GQDs, which is an 8.2% enhancement with respect to a pure perovskite based device. Various analyses including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, time-resolved photoluminescence decay and open-circuit voltage decay measurements are employed in investigating the mechanism behind the improvement in device performance. The findings reveal two important roles played by GQDs in promoting the performance of perovskite solar cells - that GQDs are conducive to facilitating electron extraction and can effectively passivate the electron traps at the perovskite grain boundaries.

  8. Passivation effect on gate-bias stress instability of carbon nanotube thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Won Lee, Sang; Suh, Dongseok; Young Lee, Si; Hee Lee, Young

    2014-04-21

    A prior requirement of any developed transistor for practical use is the stability test. Random network carbon nanotube-thin film transistor (CNT-TFT) was fabricated on SiO{sub 2}/Si. Gate bias stress stability was investigated with various passivation layers of HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Compared to the threshold voltage shift without passivation layer, the measured values in the presence of passivation layers were reduced independent of gate bias polarity except HfO{sub 2} under positive gate bias stress (PGBS). Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capping layer was found to be the best passivation layer to prevent ambient gas adsorption, while gas adsorption on HfO{sub 2} layer was unavoidable, inducing surface charges to increase threshold voltage shift in particular for PGBS. This high performance in the gate bias stress test of CNT-TFT even superior to that of amorphous silicon opens potential applications to active TFT industry for soft electronics.

  9. Combined active and passive microwave remote sensing of vegetated surfaces at l-band

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In previous work the distorted Born approximation (DBA) of volume scattering was combined with the numerical solutions of Maxwell equations (NMM3D) for a rough surface to calculate the radar backscattering coefficient for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. The model results were valida...

  10. Derivation of a global soil moisture and vegetation database from passive microwave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jeu, Richard A. M.; Owe, Manfred

    2003-03-01

    A series of validation studies for a recently developed soil moisture retrieval algorithm is presented. The approach is largely theoretical, and uses a non-linear iterative optimisation procedure to solve for soil moisture and vegetation optical depth with a radiative transfer model from satellite microwave observations. The new theoretical approach is not dependent on field observations of soil moisture or canopy biophysical measurements and can be used at any wavelength in the microwave region. Details of the model and its development are discussed. Satellite retrievals were derived from 6.6 GHz Nimbus/SMMR brightness temperatures, and were validated with soil moisture data sets from the U.S., Mongolia, and Turkmenistan. Time series of the satellite-derived surface moisture compared well with the available ground observations and precipitation data. The vegetation optical depth showed similar seasonal patterns as the NDVI.

  11. Satellite observations of snow and ice with an imaging passive microwave spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, A. D.; Ledsham, B. L.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Staelin, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The scanning microwave spectrometer (SCAMS) on the Nimbus-6 satellite continuously maps the terrestrial surface with a resolution of about 150 km at 22.235 and 31.400 GHz. SCAMS observes at six angles besides nadir, yielding brightness temperatures which are a function of the distribution and character of various types of snow and ice, including microstructure and subsurface profiles in refractive index, loss (moisture or salinity), and temperature. Spectral signatures exhibiting interesting topographical structure have been observed. To aid in the interpretation of these data, a model was developed to describe the propagation of microwave intensity in a scattering medium characterized by three-dimensional random fluctuations of refractive index in addition to nonrandom variations in permittivity, temperature, and loss. The model combines Maxwell's equations in the Born approximation with radiative-transfer theory; this approach yields the variation of intensity with polarization, direction, and position.

  12. Can liquid water profiles be retrieved from passive microwave zenith observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crewell, Susanne; Ebell, Kerstin; Löhnert, Ulrich; Turner, D. D.

    2009-03-01

    The ability to determine the cloud boundaries and vertical distribution of cloud liquid water for single-layer liquid clouds using zenith-pointing microwave radiometers is investigated. Simulations are used to demonstrate that there is little skill in determining either cloud base or cloud thickness, especially when the cloud thickness is less than 500 m. It is also shown that the different distributions of liquid water content within a cloud with known cloud boundaries results in a maximum change in the brightness temperature of less than 1 K at the surface from 20 to 150 GHz, which is on the order of the instrument noise level. Furthermore, it is demonstrated using the averaging kernel that the number of degrees of freedom for signal (i.e., independent pieces of information) is approximately 1, which implies there is no information on vertical distribution of liquid water in the microwave observations.

  13. On the use of passive microwaves at 37 GHz in remote sensing of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Y. H.; Njoku, E. G.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a number of studies have investigated the use of the 37 GHz channels of the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) for vegetation monitoring and for studying synergisms between the SMMR and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The approaches are promising but raise a number of issues concerning interpretation of the results, specifically on the relative effects of vegetation and other surface and atmospheric characteristics on the observed signal. This article analyzes the 37 GHz Microwave Polarization Difference Temperature (MPDT) in terms of its sensitivity to surface and atmospheric parameters. For this, a radiative transfer model is used which indicates some limitations of the MPDT index and suggests the importance of accounting for atmospheric effects in the data analysis. An alternative approach to the MPDT, including lower SMMR frequencies than 37 GHz, is discussed.

  14. Model investigation of the effect of vegetation on passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongjun; Sun, Guoqing

    2003-04-01

    Many studies on soil moisture retrieval at vegetated area from microwave radiometry data assume a simple model of vegetation, which is characterized by vegetation volume fraction, effective dielectric constant, plant moisture content, etc. In this study, a radiative transfer model is used to model the emissivity and transmissivity of forest canopy, which is more realistically characterized as a volumetric medium consisting of discrete scatters (leaves, stems, tree branches, and trunks). To facilitate the soil moisture inversion from radiometry data, the unknown variables need to be reduced. The possibility of fitting the modeled emissivity and transmissivity of vegetation canopy into simple equations, and the relationships of these parameters between different microwave radiometry frequencies were studied and the results are presented in this paper.

  15. On the use of passive microwaves at 37 GHz in remote sensing of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Y. H.; Njoku, E. G.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a number of studies have investigated the use of the 37 GHz channels of the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) for vegetation monitoring and for studying synergisms between the SMMR and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The approaches are promising but raise a number of issues concerning interpretation of the results, specifically on the relative effects of vegetation and other surface and atmospheric characteristics on the observed signal. This article analyzes the 37 GHz Microwave Polarization Difference Temperature (MPDT) in terms of its sensitivity to surface and atmospheric parameters. For this, a radiative transfer model is used which indicates some limitations of the MPDT index and suggests the importance of accounting for atmospheric effects in the data analysis. An alternative approach to the MPDT, including lower SMMR frequencies than 37 GHz, is discussed.

  16. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation: Initial On-Orbit Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Joel T.; Aksoy, Mustafa; Bringer, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched in January 2015, provides global measurements of soil moisture using a microwave radiometer. SMAPs radiometer passband lies within the passive frequency allocation. However, both unauthorized in-band transmitters as well as out-of-band emissions from transmitters operating at frequencies adjacent to this allocated spectrum have been documented as sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to the L-band radiometers on SMOS and Aquarius. The spectral environment consists of high RFI levels as well as significant occurrences of low level RFI equivalent to 0.1 to 10 K. The SMAP ground processor reports the antenna temperature both before and after RFI mitigation is applied. The difference between these quantities represents the detected RFI level. The presentation will review the SMAP RFI detection and mitigation procedure and discuss early on-orbit RFI measurements from the SMAP radiometer. Assessments of global RFI properties and source types will be provided, as well as the implications of these results for SMAP soil moisture measurements.

  17. Compact optical displacement sensing by detection of microwave signals generated from a monolithic passively mode-locked laser under feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Christos; Simos, Hercules; Nikas, Thomas; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2015-05-01

    A monolithic passively mode-locked laser is proposed as a compact optical sensor for displacements and vibrations of a reflecting object. The sensing principle relies on the change of the laser repetition frequency that is induced by optical feedback from the object under measurement. It has been previously observed that, when a semiconductor passively mode locked laser receives a sufficient level of optical feedback from an external reflecting surface it exhibits a repetition frequency that is no more determined by the mode-locking rule of the free-running operation but is imposed by the length of the external cavity. Therefore measurement of the resulting laser repetition frequency under self-injection permits the accurate and straightforward determination of the relative position of the reflecting object. The system has an inherent wireless capability since the repetition rate of the laser can be wirelessly detected by means of a simple antenna which captures the microwave signal generated by the saturable absorber and is emitted through the wiring of the laser. The sensor setup is very simple as it requires few optical components besides the laser itself. Furthermore, the deduction of the relative position of the reflecting object is straightforward and does not require any processing of the detected signal. The proposed sensor has a theoretical sub-wavelength resolution and its performance depends on the RF linewidth of the laser and the resolution of the repetition frequency measurement. Other physical parameters that induce phase changes of the external cavity could also be quantified.

  18. Application of artificial neural networks for the soil moisture retrieval from active and passive microwave spaceborne sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santi, Emanuele; Paloscia, Simonetta; Pettinato, Simone; Fontanelli, Giacomo

    2016-06-01

    Among the algorithms used for the retrieval of SMC from microwave sensors (both active, such as Synthetic Aperture Radar-SAR, and passive, radiometers), the artificial neural networks (ANN) represent the best compromise between accuracy and computation speed. ANN based algorithms have been developed at IFAC, and adapted to several radar and radiometric satellite sensors, in order to generate SMC products at a resolution varying from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers according to the spatial scale of each sensor. These algorithms, which are based on the ANN techniques for inverting theoretical and semi-empirical models, have been adapted to the C- to Ka- band acquisitions from spaceborne radiometers (AMSR-E/AMSR2), SAR (Envisat/ASAR, Cosmo-SkyMed) and real aperture radar (MetOP ASCAT). Large datasets of co-located satellite acquisitions and direct SMC measurements on several test sites worldwide have been used along with simulations derived from forward electromagnetic models for setting up, training and validating these algorithms. An overall quality assessment of the obtained results in terms of accuracy and computational cost was carried out, and the main advantages and limitations for an operational use of these algorithms were evaluated. This technique allowed the retrieval of SMC from both active and passive satellite systems, with accuracy values of about 0.05 m3/m3 of SMC or better, thus making these applications compliant with the usual accuracy requirements for SMC products from space.

  19. Correlation of spacecraft passive microwave system data with soil moisture indices (API). [great plains corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S.; Richter, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical scanning microwave radiometer brightness temperature, meteorological data, climatological data, and winter wheat crop information were used to estimate that soil moisture content in the Great Plains region. Results over the predominant winter wheat areas indicate that the best potential to infer soil moisture occurs during fall and spring. These periods encompass the growth stages when soil moisture is most important to winter wheat yield. Other significant results are reported.

  20. Arctic Sea ice, 1973-1976: Satellite passive-microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Zwally, H. Jay; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Gloersen, Per; Campbell, William J.

    1987-01-01

    The Arctic region plays a key role in the climate of the earth. The sea ice cover affects the radiative balance of the earth and radically changes the fluxes of heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. The observations of the Arctic made by the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) on board the Nimbus 5 research satellite are summarized for the period 1973 through 1976.

  1. The Determination of Oil Slick Thickness By Means of Multifrequency Passive Microwave Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-30

    bility of detecting or recovering the oil. 128 Normal petroleum stocks contain less than 10 percent water. However oll-in-water emulsions ... emulsions would, in general, be expected to have a higher dielectric constant at microwave frequencies than the oil itself due to the higher...and Stability of Emulsions of Water in Crude Petroleum and Similar Stocks," J. Inst. Petroleum , Vol. 54, November 1968, pages 333-357. 25

  2. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-12-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed.

  3. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed.

  4. Measurements of attenuation and electromechanic coupling constant of piezoelectric films in microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, G. D.; Alekseev, S. G.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Polzikova, N. I.

    2010-11-01

    It was found that for arbitrary high overtone and thin film microwave resonators the results of the measurements of the difference between frequencies of resonance and antiresonance on any harmonic of the resonator together with the measurement of the frequency difference between the peculiarities on the frequency dependence of imagine part of the electric impedance of the resonator give a simple way of the evaluation of the losses in the materials composing resonator structures and of the evaluation of the electromechanical constant of the piezoelectric film exciting acoustic waves.

  5. Thin Film Multilayer Conductor/Ferroelectric Tunable Microwave Components for Communication Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; VanKeuls, Frederick W.; Mueller, Carl H.; Treece, Randolph E.; Rivkin, Tania V.

    1997-01-01

    High Temperature Superconductor/Ferroelectric (HTS/FE ) thin film multilayered structures deposited onto dielectric substrates are currently being investigated for use in low loss, tunable microwave components for satellite and ground based communications. The main goal for this technology is to achieve maximum tunability while keeping the microwave losses as low as possible, so as to avoid performance degradation when replacing conventional technology (e.g., filters and oscillators) with HTS/FE components. Therefore, for HTS/FE components to be successfully integrated into current working systems, full optimization of the material and electrical properties of the ferroelectric films, without degrading those of the HTS film; is required. Hence, aspects such as the appropriate type of ferroelectric and optimization of the deposition conditions (e.g., deposition temperature) should be carefully considered. The tunability range as well as the microwave losses of the desired varactor (i.e., tunable component) are also dependent on the geometry chosen (e.g., parallel plate capacitor, interdigital capacitor, coplanar waveguide, etc.). In addition, the performance of the circuit is dependent on the location of the varactor in the circuit and the biasing circuitry. In this paper, we will present our results on the study of the SrTiO3/YBa2Cu3O(7-delta)/LaAl03 (STO/YBCO/LAO) and the Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3/YBa2Cu3O(7-delta)/LaAl03(BSTO/YBCO/ILAO) HTS/FE multilayered structures. We have observed that the amount of variation of the dielectric constant upon the application of a dc electric field is closely related to the microstructure of the film. The largest tuning of the STO/YBCO/LAO structure corresponded to single-phased, epitaxial STO films deposited at 800 C and with a thickness of 500 nm. Higher temperatures resulted in interfacial degradation and poor film quality, while lower deposition temperatures resulted in films with lower dielectric constants, lower tunabilities, and

  6. Thermal treatment of superconductor thin film of the BSCCO system using domestic microwave oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, J. B.; Carvalho, C. L.; Torsoni, G. B.; Aquino, H. A.; Zadorosny, R.

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we report the preparation of a superconductor thin film of the BSCCO system using a good quality powder with nominal composition Bi1.8Pb0.4Sr2CaCu2Ox which was thermally treated using a domestic microwave oven (2.45 GHz, 800 W). This film was grew on a single crystal of LaAlO3 (1 0 0) substrate and exhibited a crystalline structure with the c-axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate. An onset superconducting transition temperature was measured at 80 K.

  7. Magnetic Sensor for Detection of Ground Vehicles Based on Microwave Spin Wave Generation in Ferrite Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    kPMHHkHf 042, ππ γ += , 2 where γ/2π = 2.8 MHz/Oe is the gyromagnetic ratio, M0 is the saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic material, and...measured by the frequency meter. Using typical values for high-quality magnetic films of yttrium-iron garnet ( YIG ) 4πM0 = 1750 Oe, H0 = 100 Oe... MAGNETIC SENSOR FOR DETECTION OF GROUND VEHICLES BASED ON MICROWAVE SPIN WAVE GENERATION IN FERRITE FILMS A. Slavin*, and V. Tiberkevich

  8. A Potential Role of Passive Microwave Remote Sensing in Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T.

    2002-05-01

    Large-scale soil moisture observations can be an important input variable in hydrological modeling. Satellite remote sensing, in general, and microwave radiometry in particular have the potential of providing reliable and repetitive surface soil moisture. Soil moisture as a state variable describes the hydrologic response of the watershed to a precipitation event. Current soil moisture conditions govern the separation of infiltration from overland flow. The potential of using satellite based microwave observations of soil moisture was explored using an available system during a major flood event. Data from the Multi-frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR) on board Indian Remote Sensing Satellite (IRS-P4) were used. MSMR has eight channels, 6.6 GHz, 10.65 GHz, 18 GHz and 21 GHz, with both horizontal and vertical polarization in each. The 6.6 GHz channel has a footprint of 150 km and a global coverage of 2 days. This instrument offers the opportunity to demonstrate the potential of future satellites (AMSR, AMSR-E, SMOS), which will have better products. The current study demonstrates potential of these observations to predict the floods in the north-central states (North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa) during spring 2001.

  9. Passive microwave remote sensing of cloud liquid water over land regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew S.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1990-09-01

    Techniques for cloud liquid water retrieval over land are developed using data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager 85.5 GHz (3.5 mm) channels. To minimize the effect of surface emittance variability on the calculations, the surface emittance was estimated with the aid of surface skin temperature retrievals from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer in geosynchronous orbit. The high sensitivity of the 85.5 GHz channels to cloud liquid water allows for the estimation of integrated cloud liquid water based on the microwave brightness temperature depression caused by attenuation and emission of microwave radiation at the colder ambient temperature of the cloud. The method assumes nonscattering radiative processes are dominant, therefore only nonprecipitating cloud liquid water is considered. Integrated cloud liquid water retrievals show good qualitative agreement with other available data sources. Numerical error sensitivity analysis show integrated cloud liquid water error estimates of 0.05-0.50 kg m-2 depending on the contrast of cloud over background.

  10. [XPS analysis of chromium element in chromate passivation film formed on tinplate in different surface state].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; An, Cheng-Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Zhong; Tan, Yong

    2009-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the content and chemical valence of chromium element, and the content of compounds in chromate passive film formed on commercial tinplate via a cathodic electrolytical treatment. The effect of the content and chemical valence for different surface state was studied by using ultrasonic process. From the results, it was shown that there existed Cr, O and Sn in the passivation film. The chromium element in the film was mainly in the forms of Cr(OH)3, Cr2O3, and Cr in the natural surface. The Cr(VI) changed to lower value in the process of cathodic electrolytical treatment. A small quantity of Cr(VI) was found in the defective surface besides Cr(OH)3 and Cr2O3. The content of chromium element in the defective surface was lower than that in the natural surface. When ultrasonic process was added, the content of chromium element in the defective surface was obviously lower than that when no ultrasonic process was added. When ultrasonic process was used, the small quantity of Cr(VI) originally adsorbed on the defective surface disappeared because of the strong elution produced by ultrasonic.

  11. Migration of polyisobutylene from polyethylene/polyisobutylene films into foods during domestic and microwave oven use.

    PubMed

    Castle, L; Nichol, J; Gilbert, J

    1992-01-01

    Migration of polyisobutylene from polyethylene/polyisobutylene film into foods has been studied in domestic applications such as wrapping of foods and reheating in a microwave oven. The results of these migration studies were obtained by direct measurement using newly developed analytical methods utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infra-red (IR) spectroscopy as well as predictively from assessment of loss of polyisobutylene from the film. Total levels of polyisobutylene migration into cheese were found to be 8-10 mg/kg, into cake 1-5 mg/kg, and into sandwiches ranged from < 1 to 4 mg/kg. Reheating foods covered with film in the microwave oven, gave migration levels ranging from < 0.01 mg/kg for contact with steam only, up to 0.5 mg/kg for severe splashing of food onto the film and 4 mg/kg for reheated pizza. Migration of polyisobutylene was shown to be skewed towards the low molecular weight fraction of the additive. In typical films, the molecular weight range of polyisobutylene was shown to be 300-6000 daltons (95% limits) centred on 1300 daltons, whereas the additive that had migrated into cheese was found to range from 130-2200 daltons, centred on 520 daltons.

  12. Hydrogen passivation of electron trap in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyu, Yuichiro; Domen, Kay; Nomura, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kumomi, Hideya; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental evidence that some hydrogens passivate electron traps in an amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO). The a-IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) annealed at 300 °C exhibit good operation characteristics; while those annealed at ≥400 °C show deteriorated ones. Thermal desorption spectra (TDS) of H2O indicate that this threshold annealing temperature corresponds to depletion of H2O desorption from the a-IGZO layer. Hydrogen re-doping by wet oxygen annealing recovers the good TFT characteristic. The hydrogens responsible for this passivation have specific binding energies corresponding to the desorption temperatures of 300-430 °C. A plausible structural model is suggested.

  13. Hydrogen passivation of electron trap in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hanyu, Yuichiro Domen, Kay; Nomura, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kamiya, Toshio; Kumomi, Hideya; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-11-11

    We report an experimental evidence that some hydrogens passivate electron traps in an amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO). The a-IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) annealed at 300 °C exhibit good operation characteristics; while those annealed at ≥400 °C show deteriorated ones. Thermal desorption spectra (TDS) of H{sub 2}O indicate that this threshold annealing temperature corresponds to depletion of H{sub 2}O desorption from the a-IGZO layer. Hydrogen re-doping by wet oxygen annealing recovers the good TFT characteristic. The hydrogens responsible for this passivation have specific binding energies corresponding to the desorption temperatures of 300–430 °C. A plausible structural model is suggested.

  14. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular Passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajachidambaram, Meena Suhanya; Pandey, Archana; Vilayur Ganapathy, Subramanian; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S.

    2013-10-21

    The role of back channel surface chemistry on amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) bottom gate thin film transistors (TFT) have been characterized by positive bias-stress measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Positive bias-stress turn-on voltage shifts for ZTO-TFTs were significantly reduced by passivation of back channel surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of n-hexylphosphonic acid (n-HPA) when compared to ZTO-TFTs with no passivation. These results indicate that adsorption of molecular species on exposed back channel of ZTO-TFTs strongly influence observed turn-on voltage shifts, as opposed to charge injection into the dielectric or trapping due to oxygen vacancies.

  15. Thin Film Interference: An Experiment with Microwaves and Paraffin Oil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Anna, Michele; Corridoni, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Thin film interference manifests itself in a wide range of visually pleasing situations in everyday life (in the colored effects caused by a drop of oil on water, in soap bubbles, etc.) and is also involved in important technical applications (semi-reflecting mirrors, anti-reflection lenses, etc.). Yet, despite its familiarity, high school…

  16. Thin Film Interference: An Experiment with Microwaves and Paraffin Oil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Anna, Michele; Corridoni, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Thin film interference manifests itself in a wide range of visually pleasing situations in everyday life (in the colored effects caused by a drop of oil on water, in soap bubbles, etc.) and is also involved in important technical applications (semi-reflecting mirrors, anti-reflection lenses, etc.). Yet, despite its familiarity, high school…

  17. The Passive Microwave Neural Network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR) for AMSU/MHS and ATMS cross-track scanning radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano', Paolo; Casella, Daniele; Panegrossi, Giulia; Cinzia Marra, Anna; Dietrich, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Spaceborne microwave cross-track scanning radiometers, originally developed for temperature and humidity sounding, have shown great capabilities to provide a significant contribution in precipitation monitoring both in terms of measurement quality and spatial/temporal coverage. The Passive microwave Neural network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR) algorithm for cross-track scanning radiometers, originally developed for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit/Microwave Humidity Sounder (AMSU-A/MHS) radiometers (on board the European MetOp and U.S. NOAA satellites), was recently newly designed to exploit the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on board the Suomi-NPP satellite and the future JPSS satellites. The PNPR algorithm is based on the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach. The main PNPR-ATMS algorithm changes with respect to PNPR-AMSU/MHS are the design and implementation of a new ANN able to manage the information derived from the additional ATMS channels (respect to the AMSU-A/MHS radiometer) and a new screening procedure for not-precipitating pixels. In order to achieve maximum consistency of the retrieved surface precipitation, both PNPR algorithms are based on the same physical foundation. The PNPR is optimized for the European and the African area. The neural network was trained using a cloud-radiation database built upon 94 cloud-resolving simulations over Europe and the Mediterranean and over the African area and radiative transfer model simulations of TB vectors consistent with the AMSU-A/MHS and ATMS channel frequencies, viewing angles, and view-angle dependent IFOV sizes along the scan projections. As opposed to other ANN precipitation retrieval algorithms, PNPR uses a unique ANN that retrieves the surface precipitation rate for all types of surface backgrounds represented in the training database, i.e., land (vegetated or arid), ocean, snow/ice or coast. This approach prevents different precipitation estimates from being inconsistent with one

  18. Multicomponent doped barium strontium titanate thin films for tunable microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alema, Fikadu Legesse

    In recent years there has been enormous progress in the development of barium strontium titanate (BST) films for tunable microwave applications. However, the properties of BST films still remain inferior compared to bulk materials, limiting their use for microwave technology. Understanding the film/substrate mismatch, microstructure, and stoichiometry of BST films and finding the necessary remedies are vital. In this work, BST films were deposited via radio frequency magnetron sputtering method and characterized both analytically and electrically with the aim of optimizing their properties. The stoichiometry, crystal structure, and phase purity of the films were studied by varying the oxygen partial pressure (OPP) and total gas pressure (TGP) in the chamber. A better stoichiometric match between film and target was achieved when the TGP is high (> 30 mTorr). However, the O2/Ar ratio should be adjusted as exceeding a threshold of 2 mTorr in OPP facilitates the formation of secondary phases. The growth of crystalline film on platinized substrates was achieved only with a lower temperature grown buffer layer, which acts as a seed layer by crystallizing when the temperature increases. Concurrent Mg/Nb doping has significantly improved the properties of BST thin films. The doped film has shown an average tunability of 53%, which is only ˜8 % lower than the value for the undoped film. This drop is associated with the Mg ions whose detrimental effects are partially compensated by Nb ions. Conversely, the doping has reduced the dielectric loss by ˜40 % leading to a higher figure of merit. Moreover, the two dopants ensure a charge neutrality condition which resulted in significant leakage current reduction. The presence of large amounts of empty shallow traps related to Nb Ti localize the free carriers injected from the contacts; thus increase the device control voltage substantially (>10 V). A combinatorial thin film synthesis method based on co-sputtering of two BST