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Sample records for films passive microwave

  1. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, F. A.; Chorey, C. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and spacebased systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory's High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment 2 (HTSSE-2). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  2. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B.

    1994-12-31

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory`s High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  3. HTS Thin Films: Passive Microwave Components and Systems Integration Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, F. A.; Chorey, C. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems, improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper, we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory's High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  4. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The AgRISTARS Soil Moisture Project has made significant progress in the quantification of microwave sensor capabilities for soil moisture remote sensing. The 21-cm wavelength has been verified to be the best single channel for radiometric observations of soil moisture. It has also been found that other remote sensing approaches used in conjunction with L-band passive data are more successful than multiple wavelength microwave radiometry in this application. AgRISTARS studies have also improved current understanding of noise factors affecting the interpretability of microwave emission data. The absorption of soil emission by vegetation has been quantified, although this effect is less important than absorption effects for microwave radiometry.

  5. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.; Entekhabi, Dara

    1994-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing provides a unique capability for direct observation of soil moisture... This Paper outlines the basic principles of the passive microwave technique for soil moisture sensing, and reviews briefly the status of current retrieval methods.

  6. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.; Entekhabi, Dara

    1996-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing provides a unique capability for direct observation of soil moisture. Remote measurements from space afford the possibility of obtaining frequent, global sampling of soil moisture over a large fraction of the Earth's land surface. Microwave measurements have the benefit of being largely unaffected by cloud cover and variable surface solar illumination, but accurate soil moisture estimates are limited to regions that have either bare soil or low to moderate amounts of vegetation cover. A particular advantage of passive microwave sensors is that in the absence of significant vegetation cover soil moisture is the dominant effect on the received signal. The spatial resolutions of passive Microwave soil moisture sensors currently considered for space operation are in the range 10-20 km. The most useful frequency range for soil moisture sensing is 1-5 GHz. System design considerations include optimum choice of frequencies, polarizations, and scanning configurations, based on trade-offs between requirements for high vegetation penetration capability, freedom from electromagnetic interference, manageable antenna size and complexity, and the requirement that a sufficient number of information channels be available to correct for perturbing geophysical effects. This paper outlines the basic principles of the passive microwave technique for soil moisture sensing, and reviews briefly the status of current retrieval methods. Particularly promising are methods for optimally assimilating passive microwave data into hydrologic models. Further studies are needed to investigate the effects on microwave observations of within-footprint spatial heterogeneity of vegetation cover and subsurface soil characteristics, and to assess the limitations imposed by heterogeneity on the retrievability of large-scale soil moisture information from remote observations.

  7. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    During the four years of the AgRISTARS Program, significant progress was made in quantifying the capabilities of microwave sensors for the remote sensing of soil moisture. In this paper, a discussion is provided of the results of numerous field and aircraft experiments, analysis of spacecraft data, and modeling activities which examined the various noise factors such as roughness and vegetation that affect the interpretability of microwave emission measurements. While determining that a 21-cm wavelength radiometer was the best single sensor for soil moisture research, these studies demonstrated that a multisensor approach will provide more accurate soil moisture information for a wider range of naturally occurring conditions.

  8. Passive Polarimetric Microwave Signatures Observed Over Antarctica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WindSat satellite-based fully polarimetric passive microwave observations, expressed in the form of the Stokes vector, were analyzed over the Antarctic ice sheet. The vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (first two Stokes components) from WindSat are shown to be consistent w...

  9. Passive microwave algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Grant W.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific objectives of this grant are: (1) thoroughly evaluate, both theoretically and empirically, all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) retrieval algorithms for column water vapor, column liquid water, and surface wind speed; (2) where both appropriate and feasible, develop, validate, and document satellite passive microwave retrieval algorithms that offer significantly improved performance compared with currently available algorithms; and (3) refine and validate a novel physical inversion scheme for retrieving rain rate over the ocean. This report summarizes work accomplished or in progress during the first year of a three year grant. The emphasis during the first year has been on the validation and refinement of the rain rate algorithm published by Petty and on the analysis of independent data sets that can be used to help evaluate the performance of rain rate algorithms over remote areas of the ocean. Two articles in the area of global oceanic precipitation are attached.

  10. Passive microwave studies of frozen lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1978-01-01

    Lakes of various sizes, depths and ice thicknesses in Alaska, Utah and Colorado were overflown with passive microwave sensors providing observations at several wavelengths. A layer model is used to calculate the microwave brightness temperature, T sub B (a function of the emissivity and physical temperatures of the object), of snowcovered ice underlain with water. Calculated T sub B's are comparable to measured T sub B's. At short wavelengths, e.g., 0.8 cm, T sub B data provide information on the near surface properties of ice covered lakes where the long wavelength, 21.0 cm, observations sense the entire thickness of ice including underlying water. Additionally, T sub B is found to increase with ice thickness. 1.55 cm observations on Chandalar Lake in Alaska show a T sub B increase of 38 K with an approximate 124 cm increase in ice thickness.

  11. Super-resolution analysis for passive microwave images using FIPOCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jin; Adjouadi, Malek

    2013-03-01

    improve application of passive microwave imaging for object detection. In this study, we propose the FIPOCS (Fractal interpolation with Improved Projection onto Convex Sets) technique to enhance resolution. The experimental result shows that the resolution of passive microwave image is improved when utilizing the fractal interpolation to the LR image before applying the IPOCS technique.

  12. Arctic sea-ice variations from time-lapse passive microwave imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.J.; Ramseier, R.O.; Zwally, H.J.; Gloersen, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents: (1) a short historical review of the passive microwave research on sea ice which established the observational and theoretical base permitting the interpretation of the first passive microwave images of Earth obtained by the Nimbus-5 ESMR; (2) the construction of a time-lapse motion picture film of a 16-month set of serial ESMR images to aid in the formidable data analysis task; and (3) a few of the most significant findings resulting from an early analysis of these data, using selected ESMR images to illustrate these findings. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  13. Some comments on passive microwave measurement of rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, Thomas T.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that because microwave radiation interacts much more strongly with hydrometeors than with cloud particles, microwave measurements from space offer a significant chance of making global precipitation estimates. Over oceans, passive microwave measurements are essentially attenuation measurements that can be very closely related to the rain rate independently of the details of the drop-size distribution. Over land, scattering of microwave radiation by the hydrometeors, especially in the ice phase, can be used to estimate rainfall. In scattering, the details of the drop-size distribution are very important and it is therefore more difficult to achieve a high degree of accuracy. The SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager), a passive microwave imaging sensor that will be launched soon, will have dual-polarized channels at 85.5 GHz that will be very sensitive to scattering by frozen hydrometeors. Other sensors being considered for the future space missions would extend the ability to estimate rain rates from space. The ideal spaceborne precipitation-measurement system would use the complementary strengths of passive microwave, radar, and visible/infrared measurements.

  14. Utilization of active microwave roughness measurements to improve passive microwave soil moisture estimates over bare soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theis, S. W.; Blanchard, B. J.; Blanchard, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Multisensor aircraft data were used to establish the potential of the active microwave sensor response to be used to compensate for roughness in the passive microwave sensor's response to soil moisture. Only bare fields were used. It is found that the L-band radiometer's capability to estimate soil moisture significantly improves when surface roughness is accounted for with the scatterometers.

  15. Utilization of active microwave roughness measurements to improve passive microwave soil moisture estimates over bare soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theis, S. W.; Blanchard, A. J.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    Multisensor aircraft data were used to establish the potential of the active microwave sensor response to be used to compensate for roughness in the passive microwave sensor's response to soil moisture. Only bare fields were used. It is found that the L-band radiometer's capability to estimate soil moisture significantly improves when surface roughness is accounted for with the scatterometers.

  16. Passive silicon photonic devices for microwave photonic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiayang; Peng, Jizong; Liu, Boyu; Pan, Ting; Zhou, Huanying; Mao, Junming; Yang, Yuxing; Qiu, Ciyuan; Su, Yikai

    2016-08-01

    We present our recent progress on microwave signal processing (MSP) using on-chip passive silicon photonic devices, including tunable microwave notch filtering/millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation based on self-coupled micro-resonators (SCMRs), and tunable radio-frequency (RF) phase shifting implemented by a micro-disk resonator (MDR). These schemes can provide improved flexibility and performances of MSP. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  17. Analysis of interference to remote passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Douglas; Tillotson, Tom

    1986-01-01

    The final acts of the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) were analyzed to determine potential interference to remote passive microwave sensors. Using interferer populations determined from the U.S. Government and FCC Master File Lists and assuming uniform geographical distribution of interferers, the level of interference from shared services and active services in adjacent and subharmonic bands was calculated for each of the 22 passive sensing bands. In addition, due to the theoretically large antennas required for passive sensing, an analysis was performed to determine if smaller antennas, i.e., relaxed resolution requirements, would have an effect on interference and to what extent.

  18. Assessment of a passive microwave sensor for detecting land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, Andrew C.; Heberlein, David C.; Rosen, Erik M.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.

    2000-08-01

    Passive IR sensors have been demonstrated to be effective for detecting surface landmines. For shallow buried landmines, detection rates and false-alarms rates are poorer and highly dependent on environmental conditions such as time of day and cloud cover. An advantage touted by advocates of passive microwave sensors is that their performance does not depend on the time of day and the inherent soil-mine temperature differences. To assess the complementary detection potential of passive microwave sensors, data was collected on a Thomson-Thorne microwave sensor at a test site in England. This sensor was mounted on a scanning rack apparatus and operated at a frequency of 10 Ghz. The test included investigations of both antitank and antipersonnel miens at the surface and to depths of 2 inches. Analysis of the raw data shows that surface and buried targets produce signals that are significantly higher than background clutter. In this paper, we present a brief description of the passive-microwave detection apparatus and the data-collection exercises that were completed. Analysis of the raw sensor data is then presented with an emphasis on comparing signal strengths of mines with signals reflected from the soil in the absence of mines. Particular attention is paid to the effects of varied incident sensor angles, sensor polarizations, and system scan speeds on sensor performance. Signal-to-noise as well as signal-to-clutter ratios are calculated as a function of these different variables.

  19. Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondratyev, K. Y.; Melentyev, V. V.; Rabinovich, Y. I.; Shulgina, E. M.

    1977-01-01

    The theory and calculations of microwave emission from the medium with the depth-dependent physical properties are discussed; the possibility of determining the vertical profiles of temperature and humidity is considered. Laboratory and aircraft measurements of the soil moisture are described; the technique for determining the productive-moisture content in soil, and the results of aircraft measurements are given.

  20. Microwave bonding of thin film metal coated substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Bonding of materials such as MEMS materials is carried out using microwaves. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity containing other less microwave absorbing materials, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin depth of the films. This causes heating in one place more than another. This thereby minimizes unwanted heating effects during the microwave bonding process.

  1. Magnetostrictive thin films for microwave spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, D. E.; Shelford, L. R.; Wadley, P.; Holý, V.; Wang, M.; Hindmarch, A. T.; van der Laan, G.; Campion, R. P.; Edmonds, K. W.; Cavill, S. A.; Rushforth, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Multiferroic composite materials, consisting of coupled ferromagnetic and piezoelectric phases, are of great importance in the drive towards creating faster, smaller and more energy efficient devices for information and communications technologies. Such devices require thin ferromagnetic films with large magnetostriction and narrow microwave resonance linewidths. Both properties are often degraded, compared to bulk materials, due to structural imperfections and interface effects in the thin films. We report the development of epitaxial thin films of Galfenol (Fe81Ga19) with magnetostriction as large as the best reported values for bulk material. This allows the magnetic anisotropy and microwave resonant frequency to be tuned by voltage-induced strain, with a larger magnetoelectric response and a narrower linewidth than any previously reported Galfenol thin films. The combination of these properties make epitaxial thin films excellent candidates for developing tunable devices for magnetic information storage, processing and microwave communications. PMID:23860685

  2. Magnetostrictive thin films for microwave spintronics.

    PubMed

    Parkes, D E; Shelford, L R; Wadley, P; Holý, V; Wang, M; Hindmarch, A T; van der Laan, G; Campion, R P; Edmonds, K W; Cavill, S A; Rushforth, A W

    2013-01-01

    Multiferroic composite materials, consisting of coupled ferromagnetic and piezoelectric phases, are of great importance in the drive towards creating faster, smaller and more energy efficient devices for information and communications technologies. Such devices require thin ferromagnetic films with large magnetostriction and narrow microwave resonance linewidths. Both properties are often degraded, compared to bulk materials, due to structural imperfections and interface effects in the thin films. We report the development of epitaxial thin films of Galfenol (Fe81Ga19) with magnetostriction as large as the best reported values for bulk material. This allows the magnetic anisotropy and microwave resonant frequency to be tuned by voltage-induced strain, with a larger magnetoelectric response and a narrower linewidth than any previously reported Galfenol thin films. The combination of these properties make epitaxial thin films excellent candidates for developing tunable devices for magnetic information storage, processing and microwave communications.

  3. Near field 3D scene simulation for passive microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Ji

    2006-10-01

    Scene simulation is a necessary work in near field passive microwave remote sensing. A 3-D scene simulation model of microwave radiometric imaging based on ray tracing method is present in this paper. The essential influencing factors and general requirements are considered in this model such as the rough surface radiation, the sky radiation witch act as the uppermost illuminator in out door circumstance, the polarization rotation of the temperature rays caused by multiple reflections, and the antenna point spread function witch determines the resolution of the model final outputs. Using this model we simulate a virtual scene and analyzed the appeared microwave radiometric phenomenology, at last two real scenes of building and airstrip were simulated for validating the model. The comparison between the simulation and field measurements indicates that this model is completely feasible in practice. Furthermore, we analyzed the signatures of model outputs, and achieved some underlying phenomenology of microwave radiation witch is deferent with that in optical and infrared bands.

  4. Assimilation of Passive and Active Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, C. S.; Reichle, R. H.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Liu, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Root-zone soil moisture is an important control over the partition of land surface energy and moisture, and the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture has been shown to improve model profile soil moisture [1]. To date, efforts to assimilate remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture at large scales have focused on soil moisture derived from the passive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the active Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT; together with its predecessor on the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS. The assimilation of passive and active microwave soil moisture observations has not yet been directly compared, and so this study compares the impact of assimilating ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture data, both separately and together. Since the soil moisture retrieval skill from active and passive microwave data is thought to differ according to surface characteristics [2], the impact of each assimilation on the model soil moisture skill is assessed according to land cover type, by comparison to in situ soil moisture observations.

  5. Passive microwave precipitation detection biases: Relationship to cloud morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marter, R. E.; Rapp, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the Earth's hydrologic cycle requires a more precise understanding of precipitation accumulation and intensity on a global scale. While there is a long record of passive microwave satellite measurements, passive microwave rainfall retrievals often fail to detect light precipitation or have light rain intensity biases because they cannot differentiate between emission from cloud and rain water. Previous studies have shown that AMSR-E significantly underestimates rainfall occurrence and volume compared to CloudSat. This underestimation totals just below 0.6 mm/day quasi-globally (60S-60N), but there are larger regional variations related to the dominant cloud regime. This study aims to use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the 94-GHz CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), which has a high sensitivity to light rain, with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations, to help better characterize the properties of clouds that lead to passive microwave rainfall detection biases. CPR cloud and precipitation retrievals. AMSR-E Level-2B Goddard Profiling 2010 Algorithm (GPROF 2010) rainfall retrievals, and MODIS cloud properties were collocated and analyzed for 2008. Results are consistent with past studies and show large passive microwave precipitation detection biases compared to CloudSat in stratocumulus and shallow cumulus regimes. A preliminary examination of cases where AMSR-E failed to detect precipitation detected by CloudSat shows that over 50% of missed warm precipitation occurs in clouds with top heights below 2 km. MODIS cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties, such as optical thickness, particle effective radius, and liquid water path will be analyzed when precipitation is detected by CloudSat and missed by AMSR-E. The overall goal is to understand how cloud morphology relates to detection biases.

  6. Using Passive Microwaves for Open Water Monitoring and Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, R.; Johnson, F.; Sharma, A.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    One of the biggest and severest natural disasters that society faces is floods. An important component that can help in reducing the impact of floods is satellite remote sensing as it allows for consistent monitoring and obtaining catchment information in absence of physical contact. Nowadays, passive microwave remote sensing observations are available in near real time (NRT) with a couple of hours delay from the actual sensing. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is a multi-frequency passive microwave sensor onboard the Global Change Observation Mission 1 - Water that was launched in May 2012. Several of these frequencies have a high sensitivity to the land surface and they also have the capacity to penetrate clouds. These advantages come at the cost of the relatively coarse spatial resolution (footprints range from ~5 to ~50 km) which in turn allows for global monitoring. A relatively simple methodology to monitor the fraction of open water from AMSR2 observations is presented here. Low frequency passive microwave observations have sensitivity to the land surface but are modulated by overlying signals from physical temperature and vegetation cover. We developed a completely microwave based artificial neural network supported by physically based components to monitor the fraction of open water. Three different areas, located in China, Southeast Asia and Australia, were selected for testing purposes and several different characteristics were examined. First, the overall performance of the methodology was evaluated against the NASA NRT Global Flood Mapping system. Second, the skills of the various different AMSR2 frequencies were tested and revealed that artificial contamination is a factor to consider. The different skills of the tested frequencies are of interest to apply the methodology to alternative passive microwave sensors. This will be of benefit in using the numerous multi-frequency passive microwaves sensors currently observing our Earth

  7. Passive Microwave Observation of Soil Water Infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Rawls, Walter J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Parlange, Marc B.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration is a time varying process of water entry into soil. Experiments were conducted here using truck based microwave radiometers to observe small plots during and following sprinkler irrigation. Experiments were conducted on a sandy loam soil in 1994 and a silt loam in 1995. Sandy loam soils typically have higher infiltration capabilities than clays. For the sandy loam the observed brightness temperature (TB) quickly reached a nominally constant value during irrigation. When the irrigation was stopped the TB began to increase as drainage took place. The irrigation rates in 1995 with the silt loam soil exceeded the saturated conductivity of the soil. During irrigation the TB values exhibited a pattern that suggests the occurrence of coherent reflection, a rarely observed phenomena under natural conditions. These results suggested the existence of a sharp dielectric boundary (wet over dry soil) that was increasing in depth with time.

  8. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 1 - Microwave remote sensing fundamentals and radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The three components of microwave remote sensing (sensor-scene interaction, sensor design, and measurement techniques), and the applications to geoscience are examined. The history of active and passive microwave sensing is reviewed, along with fundamental principles of electromagnetic wave propagation, antennas, and microwave interaction with atmospheric constituents. Radiometric concepts are reviewed, particularly for measurement problems for atmospheric and terrestrial sources of natural radiation. Particular attention is given to the emission by atmospheric gases, clouds, and rain as described by the radiative transfer function. Finally, the operation and performance characteristics of radiometer receivers are discussed, particularly for measurement precision, calibration techniques, and imaging considerations.

  9. Technology advances in active and passive microwave sensing through 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    As a result of a growing awareness by the remote sensing community of the unique capabilities of passive and active microwave sensors, these instruments are expected to grow in the next decade in numbers, versatility and complexity. The Nimbus-G and Seasat-A Scanning Multichannel Microwave Spectrometer (SMMR), the Seasat-A radar altimeter, scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar represent the first systematic attempt at exploring a wide variety of applications utilizing microwave sensing techniques and are indicators of the directions in which the pertinent technology is likely to evolve. The trend is toward high resolution multi-frequency imagers spanning wide frequency ranges and wide swaths requiring sophisticated receivers, real-time data processors and most importantly, complex antennas.

  10. Satellite Remote Sensing: Passive-Microwave Measurements of Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite passive-microwave measurements of sea ice have provided global or near-global sea ice data for most of the period since the launch of the Nimbus 5 satellite in December 1972, and have done so with horizontal resolutions on the order of 25-50 km and a frequency of every few days. These data have been used to calculate sea ice concentrations (percent areal coverages), sea ice extents, the length of the sea ice season, sea ice temperatures, and sea ice velocities, and to determine the timing of the seasonal onset of melt as well as aspects of the ice-type composition of the sea ice cover. In each case, the calculations are based on the microwave emission characteristics of sea ice and the important contrasts between the microwave emissions of sea ice and those of the surrounding liquid-water medium.

  11. Report from the Passive Microwave Data Set Management Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Ed; Conover, Helen; Goodman, Michael; Krupp, Brian; Liu, Zhong; Moses, John; Ramapriyan, H. K.; Scott, Donna; Smith, Deborah; Weaver, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Passive microwave data sets are some of the most important data sets in the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), providing data as far back as the early 1970s. The widespread use of passive microwave (PM) radiometer data has led to their collection and distribution over the years at several different Earth science data centers. The user community is often confused by this proliferation and the uneven spread of information about the data sets. In response to this situation, a Passive Microwave Data Set Management Workshop was held 17 ]19 May 2011 at the Global Hydrology Resource Center, sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The workshop attendees reviewed all primary (Level 1 ]3) PM data sets from NASA and non ]NASA sensors held by NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), as well as high ]value data sets from other NASA ]funded organizations. This report provides the key findings and recommendations from the workshop as well as detailed tabluations of the datasets considered.

  12. Microwave Vegetation Indices for Short Vegetation Covers from Satellite Passive Microwave Sensor AMSR-E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation indices are valuable in many fields of geosciences. Conventional, visible-near infrared, indices are often limited by the effects of atmosphere, background soil conditions, and saturation at high levels of vegetation. In this study, the theoretical basis for a new passive microwave vegeta...

  13. Passive Microwave Spectral Imaging of Amospheric Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Rosenkranz, Philip W.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to improve the scientific foundation necessary to full realization of the meteorological potential of the NOAA Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) recently first launched on the NOAA-15 satellite in May, 1998. These advances were made in four main areas: (1) improvements, based on aircraft observations, in the atmospheric transmittance expressions used for interpreting AMSU and similar data; (2) development of neural network retrieval methods for cloud top altitude estimates of approximately 1-km accuracy under cirrus shields--the altitude is that of the larger ice particles aloft, which is related to precipitation rate; (3) analysis of early AMSU flight data with respect to its precipitation sensitivity and fine-scale thermal structure; and (4) improvements to the 54-GHz and 118-GHz MTS aircraft imaging spectrometer now operating on the NASA ER-2 aircraft. More specifically, the oxygen transmittance expressions near 118 GHz were in better agreement with aircraft data when the temperature dependence exponent of the 118.75-GHz linewidth was increased from the MPM92 value (Liebe et al., 1992) of 0.8 to 0.97+/-0.03. In contrast, the observations 52.5-55.8 GHz were consistent with the MPM92 model. Neural networks trained on comparisons of 118-GHz spectral data and coincident stereoscopic video images of convective cells observed from 20-km altitude yielded agreement in their peak altitudes within as little as 1.36 km rms, much of which is stereoscopic error. Imagery using these methods produced useful characterizations for Cyclone Oliver in 1993 and other storms (Schwartz et al., 1996; Spina et al., 1998). Similar neural network techniques yielded simulated rms errors in relative humidity retrievals of 6-14 percent over ocean and 6-15 percent over land at pressure levels from 1013 to 131 mbar (Cabrera-Mercader and Staelin, 1995).

  14. Electrolyte and Electrode Passivation for Thin Film Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, W.; Whitacre, J.; Ratnakumar, B.; Brandon, E.; Blosiu, J.; Surampudi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Passivation films for thin film batteries have been prepared and the conductivity and voltage stability window have been measured. Thin films of Li2CO3 have a large voltage stability window of 4.8V, which facilitates the use of this film as a passivation at both the lithium anode-electrolyte interface at high cathodic potentials.

  15. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  16. Snowfall Rate Retrieval using NPP ATMS Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua; Zhao, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2014). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The ATMS SFR product is validated against radar and gauge snowfall data and shows that the ATMS algorithm outperforms the AMSU/MHS SFR.

  17. Passive Microwave Precipitation Detection Biases: Relationship to Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viramontez, A.; Rapp, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate satellite precipitation estimates are essential for understanding the long-term variability in the global hydrologic cycle and for constraining global climate models. Spaceborne precipitation estimates depend heavily on passive microwave remote sensors due to the large spatial coverage and long record of observations available from such sensors; however, light precipitation is frequently undetected or underestimated by passive microwave rainfall retrievals. Observations from the CloudSat Profiling Radar (CPR) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) provide a unique opportunity for long-term collocated precipitation measurements from passive microwave sensors and an active radar with sensitivity to very light precipitation that can be used to assess the precipitation detection biases. For this study, collocated measurements from AMSR-E and CloudSat during 2008 will be used to identify environments where AMSR-E underestimates precipitation. Environmental variables from the ECMWF Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) will be used to understand the characteristics of the large-scale and thermodynamic environments associated with AMSR-E precipitation biases. A preliminary comparison of CPR rain rates and AMSR-E Level-2B rain rates show a large fraction of rain missed by AMSR-E, with nearly 80% of missed light rain in regions with SSTs below 25°C. This is consistent with prior studies showing large detection biases in regions of large-scale subsidence. The relationship between precipitation biases and other factors such as 2 m air temperature, column water vapor, lower tropospheric stability, and vertical velocity will be explored.

  18. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  19. Assimilation of passive and active microwave soil moisture retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, C. S.; Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J. M.; Liu, Q.

    2012-02-01

    Near-surface soil moisture observations from the active microwave ASCAT and the passive microwave AMSR-E satellite instruments are assimilated, both separately and together, into the NASA Catchment land surface model over 3.5 years using an ensemble Kalman filter. The impact of each assimilation is evaluated using in situ soil moisture observations from 85 sites in the US and Australia, in terms of the anomaly time series correlation-coefficient, R. The skill gained by assimilating either ASCAT or AMSR-E was very similar, even when separated by land cover type. Over all sites, the mean root-zone R was significantly increased from 0.45 for an open-loop, to 0.55, 0.54, and 0.56 by the assimilation of ASCAT, AMSR-E, and both, respectively. Each assimilation also had a positive impact over each land cover type sampled. For maximum accuracy and coverage it is recommended that active and passive microwave observations be assimilated together.

  20. [Atmospheric Influences Analysis on the Satellite Passive Microwave Remote Sensing].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu-bao; Shi, Li-juan; Shi, Jian-cheng; Zhao, Shao-jie

    2016-02-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing offers its all-weather work capabilities, but atmospheric influences on satellite microwave brightness temperature were different under different atmospheric conditions and environments. In order to clarify atmospheric influences on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), atmospheric radiation were simulated based on AMSR-E configuration under clear sky and cloudy conditions, by using radiative transfer model and atmospheric conditions data. Results showed that atmospheric water vapor was the major factor for atmospheric radiation under clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances were almost above 0.98 at AMSR-E's low frequencies (< 18.7 GHz) and the microwave brightness temperature changes caused by atmosphere can be ignored in clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances at 36.5 and 89 GHz were 0.896 and 0.756 respectively. The effects of atmospheric water vapor needed to be corrected when using microwave high-frequency channels to inverse land surface parameters in clear sky condition. But under cloud cover or cloudy conditions, cloud liquid water was the key factor to cause atmospheric radiation. When sky was covered by typical stratus cloud, atmospheric transmittances at 10.7, 18.7 and 36.5 GHz were 0.942, 0.828 and 0.605 respectively. Comparing with the clear sky condition, the down-welling atmospheric radiation caused by cloud liquid water increased up to 75.365 K at 36.5 GHz. It showed that the atmospheric correction under different clouds covered condition was the primary work to improve the accuracy of land surface parameters inversion of passive microwave remote sensing. The results also provided the basis for microwave atmospheric correction algorithm development. Finally, the atmospheric sounding data was utilized to calculate the atmospheric transmittance of Hailaer Region, Inner Mongolia province, in July 2013. The results indicated that atmospheric transmittances were close to 1

  1. [Atmospheric Influences Analysis on the Satellite Passive Microwave Remote Sensing].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu-bao; Shi, Li-juan; Shi, Jian-cheng; Zhao, Shao-jie

    2016-02-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing offers its all-weather work capabilities, but atmospheric influences on satellite microwave brightness temperature were different under different atmospheric conditions and environments. In order to clarify atmospheric influences on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), atmospheric radiation were simulated based on AMSR-E configuration under clear sky and cloudy conditions, by using radiative transfer model and atmospheric conditions data. Results showed that atmospheric water vapor was the major factor for atmospheric radiation under clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances were almost above 0.98 at AMSR-E's low frequencies (< 18.7 GHz) and the microwave brightness temperature changes caused by atmosphere can be ignored in clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances at 36.5 and 89 GHz were 0.896 and 0.756 respectively. The effects of atmospheric water vapor needed to be corrected when using microwave high-frequency channels to inverse land surface parameters in clear sky condition. But under cloud cover or cloudy conditions, cloud liquid water was the key factor to cause atmospheric radiation. When sky was covered by typical stratus cloud, atmospheric transmittances at 10.7, 18.7 and 36.5 GHz were 0.942, 0.828 and 0.605 respectively. Comparing with the clear sky condition, the down-welling atmospheric radiation caused by cloud liquid water increased up to 75.365 K at 36.5 GHz. It showed that the atmospheric correction under different clouds covered condition was the primary work to improve the accuracy of land surface parameters inversion of passive microwave remote sensing. The results also provided the basis for microwave atmospheric correction algorithm development. Finally, the atmospheric sounding data was utilized to calculate the atmospheric transmittance of Hailaer Region, Inner Mongolia province, in July 2013. The results indicated that atmospheric transmittances were close to 1

  2. Passive Microwave Studies of Atmospheric Precipitation and State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Rosenkranz, Philip W.; Shiue, James C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The principal contributions of this research on novel passive microwave spectral techniques are in the areas of: (1) global precipitation mapping using the opaque spectral bands on research and operational weather satellites, (2) development and analysis of extensive aircraft observational imaging data sets obtained using the MIT instrument NAST-M near 54 and 118 GHz over hurricanes and weather ranging from tropical to polar; simultaneous data from the 8500-channel infrared spectrometer NAST-I was obtained and analyzed separately, (3) estimation of hydrometeor diameters in cell tops using data from aircraft and spacecraft, (4) continued improvement of expressions for atmospheric transmittance at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths, (5) development and airborne use of spectrometers operating near 183- and 425-GHz bands, appropriate to practical systems in geosynchronous orbit, and (6) preliminary studies of the design and performance of future geosynchronous microwave sounders for temperature and humidity profiles and for continuous monitoring of regional precipitation through most clouds. This work was a natural extension of work under NASA Grant NAG5-2545 and its predecessors. This earlier work had developed improved airborne imaging microwave spectrometers and had shown their sensitivity to precipitation altitude and character. They also had prepared the foundations for precipitation estimation using the opaque microwave bands. The field demonstration and improvement of these capabilities was then a central part of the present research reported here, during which period the first AMSU data became available and several hurricanes were overflown by NAST-M, yielding unique data about their microwave signatures. This present work has in turn helped lay the foundation for future progress in incorporating the opaque microwave channels in systems for climatologically precise global precipitation mapping from current and future operational satellites. Extension of

  3. A Comparison between Lightning Activity and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kevin, Driscoll T.; Hugh, Christian J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    1999-01-01

    A recent examination of data from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) suggests that storm with the highest frequency of lightning also possess the most pronounced microwave scattering signatures at 37 and 85 GHz. This study demonstrates a clear dependence between lightning and the passive microwave measurements, and accentuates how direct the relationship really is between cloud ice and lightning activity. In addition, the relationship between the quantity of ice content and the frequency of lightning (not just the presence of lightning) , is consistent throughout the seasons in a variety of regimes. Scatter plots will be presented which show the storm-averaged brightness temperatures as a function of the lightning density of the storms (L/Area) . In the 85 GHz and 37 GHz scatter plots, the brightness temperature is presented in the form Tb = k1 x log10(L/Area) + k2, where the slope of the regression, k1, is 58 for the 85 GHz relationship and 30.7 for the 37 GHz relationship. The regression for both these fits showed a correlation of 0.76 (r2 = 0.58), which is quite promising considering the simple procedure used to make the comparisons, which have not yet even been corrected for the view angle differences between the instruments, or the polarization corrections in the microwave imager.

  4. Determination of precipitation profiles from airborne passive microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Pierce, Harold F.; Weinman, James A.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of precipitation derived from multispectral passive microwave radiometry. Measurements of microwave brightness temperature (Tb) obtained by a NASA high-altitude research aircraft are related to profiles of rainfall rate through a multichannel piecewise-linear statistical regression procedure. Statistics for Tb are obtained from a set of cloud radiative models representing a wide variety of convective, stratiform, and anvil structures. The retrieval scheme itself determines which cloud model best fits the observed meteorological conditions. Retrieved rainfall rate profiles are converted to equivalent radar reflectivity for comparison with observed reflectivities from a ground-based research radar. Results for two case studies, a stratiform rain situation and an intense convective thunderstorm, show that the radiometrically derived profiles capture the major features of the observed vertical structure of hydrometer density.

  5. Passive microwave remote sensing for sea ice research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for gathering data by remote sensors on satellites utilized for sea ice research are summarized. Measurement of brightness temperatures by a passive microwave imager converted to maps of total sea ice concentration and to the areal fractions covered by first year and multiyear ice are described. Several ancillary observations, especially by means of automatic data buoys and submarines equipped with upward looking sonars, are needed to improve the validation and interpretation of satellite data. The design and performance characteristics of the Navy's Special Sensor Microwave Imager, expected to be in orbit in late 1985, are described. It is recommended that data from that instrument be processed to a form suitable for research applications and archived in a readily accessible form. The sea ice data products required for research purposes are described and recommendations for their archival and distribution to the scientific community are presented.

  6. Orbiting passive microwave sensor simulation applied to soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W. (Principal Investigator); Clark, B. V.; Pitchford, W. M.; Paris, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A sensor/scene simulation program was developed and used to determine the effects of scene heterogeneity, resolution, frequency, look angle, and surface and temperature relations on the performance of a spaceborne passive microwave system designed to estimate soil water information. The ground scene is based on classified LANDSAT images which provide realistic ground classes, as well as geometries. It was determined that the average sensitivity of antenna temperature to soil moisture improves as the antenna footprint size increased. Also, the precision (or variability) of the sensitivity changes as a function of resolution.

  7. Passive microwave tags : LDRD 52709, FY04 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-10-01

    This report describes both a general methodology and specific examples of completely passive microwave tags. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices were used to make tags for both identification and sensing applications at different frequencies. SAW correlators were optimized for wireless identification, and SAW filters were developed to enable wireless remote sensing of physical properties. Identification tag applications and wireless remote measurement applications are discussed. Significant effort went into optimizing the SAW devices used for this work, and the lessons learned from that effort are reviewed.

  8. Passive Microwave Measurements of Salinity: The Gulf Stream Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Koblinsky, C.; Haken, M.; Howden, S.; Bingham, F.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Passive microwave sensors at L-band (1.4 GHz) operating from aircraft have demonstrated that salinity can be measured with sufficient accuracy (I psu) to be scientifically meaningful in coastal waters. However, measuring salinity in the open ocean presents unresolved issues largely because of the much greater accuracy (approximately 0.2 psu) required of global maps to be scientifically viable. The development of a satellite microwave instrument to make global measurements of SSS (Sea Surface Salinity) is the focus of a joint JPL/GSFC/NASA ocean research program called Aquarius. In the summer of 1999 a series of measurements called, The Gulf Stream Experiment, were conducted as part of research at the Goddard Space Flight Center to test the potential for passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in the open ocean. The measurements consisted of airborne microwave instruments together with ships and drifters for surface truth. The study area was a 200 km by 100 km rectangle about 250 km east of Delaware Bay between the continental shelf waters and north wall of the Gulf Stream. The primary passive instruments were the ESTAR radiometer (L-band, H-pol) and the SLFMR radiometer (L-band, V-pol). In addition, the instruments on the aircraft included a C-band radiometer (ACMR), an ocean wave scatterometer (ROWS) and an infrared radiometer (for surface temperature). These instruments were mounted on the NASA P-3 Orion aircraft. Sea surface measurements consisted of thermosalinograph data provided by the R/V Cape Henlopen and the MN Oleander, and data from salinity and temperature sensors on three surface drifters deployed from the R/V Cape Henlopen. The primary experiment period was August 26-September 2, 1999. During this period the salinity field within the study area consisted of a gradient on the order of 2-3 psu in the vicinity of the shelf break and a warm core ring with a gradient of 1-2 psu. Detailed maps were made with the airborne sensors on August 28 and 29 and

  9. General Corrosion and Passive Film Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, C; Gray, J; Hayes, J; Wong, L; Rebak, R; Carroll, S; Harper, J; Gdowski, G

    2005-07-19

    This report summarizes both general corrosion of Alloy 22 from 60 to 220 C and the stability of the passive (oxide) film from 60 to 90 C over a range of solution compositions that are relevant to the in-drift chemical environment at the waste package surface. The general corrosion rates were determined by weight-loss measurements in a range of complex solution compositions representing the products of both the evaporation of seepage water and also the deliquescence of dust previously deposited on the waste canisters. These data represent the first weight-loss measurements performed by the program at temperatures above 90 C. The low corrosion rates of Alloy 22 are attributed to the protective oxide film that forms at the metal surface. In this report, changes in the oxide film composition are correlated with weight loss at the higher temperatures (140-220 C) where film characterization had not been previously performed. The stability of the oxide film was further analyzed by conducting a series of electrochemical tests in progressively more acidic solutions to measure the general corrosion rates in solutions that mimic crevice or pit environments.

  10. Satellite remote sensing of global rainfall using passive microwave radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ferriday, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    Global rainfall over land and ocean is estimated using measurements of upwelling microwaves by a satellite passive microwave radiometer. Radiative transfer calculations through a cloud model are used to parameterize an inversion technique for retrieving rain rates from brightness temperatures measured by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). The rainfall retrieval technique is based on the interaction between multi-spectral microwave radiances and millimeter sized liquid and frozen hydrometeors distributed in the satellite`s field of view. The rain rate algorithm is sensitive to both hydrometeor emission and scattering while being relatively insensitive to extraneous atmospheric and surface effects. Separate formulations are used over ocean and land to account for different background microwave characteristics and the algorithm corrects for inhomogeneous distributions of rain rates within the satellite`s field of view. Estimates of instantaneous and climate scale rainfall are validated through comparisons with modeled clouds, surface radars, rain gauges and alternative satellite estimates. The accuracy of the rainfall estimates is determined from a combination of validation comparisons, theoretical sampling error calculations, and modeled sensitivity to variations in atmospheric and surface radiative properties. An error budget is constructed for both instantaneous rain rates and climate scale global estimates. At a one degree resolution, the root mean square errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates are 13% over ocean and 20% over land. The root mean square errors in global rainfall totals over a four month period are found to be 46% over ocean and 63% over land. Global rainfall totals are computed on a monthly scale for a three year period from 1987 to 1990. The time series is analyzed for climate scale rainfall distribution and variability.

  11. Assimilation of passive microwave-based soil moisture and snow depth retrievals for drought estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article examines the influence of passive microwave based soil moisture and snow depth retrievals towards improving estimates of drought through data assimilation. Passive microwave based soil moisture and snow depth retrievals from a variety of sensors are assimilated separately into the Noah ...

  12. In situ XANES study of the cathodic reduction behavior of the passive film on iron and artificial passive films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmuki, P.; Virtanen, S.; Boehni, H.; Isaacs, H.S.; Ryan, M.P.; Oblonsky, L.J.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to compare the behavior of the passive film on iron with artificial passive films (thin sputter-deposited films of iron oxides on inert substrates). In situ XANES measurements were used to monitor both dissolution and changes in the valence state of passive films on iron during cathodic reduction in borate buffer and in NaOH. Reductive dissolution of the passive film on iron proceeds by a very similar mechanism as has been found for artificial passive films (thin, sputter-deposited films of iron oxides on inert substrates)--i.e. including a conversion step of the passive film to a lower-valent oxide. With low reduction current densities, the dissolution process does not stop when the metal is exposed but can proceed as active metal dissolution. In NaOH, no or very minor material loss takes place during reduction due to the insolubility of Fe(2+) species in the alkaline solution. By potential stepping of a thin film iron sample between reduction and oxidation range of the passive film, a conversion of the whole sample from metallic film into an oxide film can be achieved.

  13. Microwave properties of high transition temperature superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive studies of the interaction of microwaves with YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), Bi-based, and Tl-based superconducting thin films deposited in several microwave substrates were performed. The data were obtained by measuring the microwave power transmitted through the film in the normal and the superconducting state and by resonant cavity techniques. The main motives were to qualify and understand the physical parameters such as the magnetic penetration depth, the complex conductivity, and the surface impedance, of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials at microwave frequencies. Based on these parameters, the suitability of these HTS thin films is discussed for microwave applications.

  14. General Corrosion and Passive Film Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Roberts, S; Evans, K; Wolery, T; Carroll, S

    2005-11-29

    We have studied Alloy 22 corrosion and passive film stability in nitrogen-purged Na-K-Cl-NO{sub 3} brines having NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios of 7.4 at 160 C and NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios of 0.5 and 7.4 at 220 C in autoclave experiments under a slight pressure. The experiments were done to show the effect of high nitrate brines on the durability of the Alloy 22 outer barrier of the waste canisters. Ratios of NO{sub 3}:Cl used in this study were lower than expected ratios for the repository environment at these temperatures and atmospheric pressures (NO{sub 3}:Cl > 25), however they were thought to be high enough to inhibit localized corrosion. Localized corrosion occurred on the liquid-immersed and vapor-exposed creviced specimens under all conditions studied. Crevice penetration depths were difficult to quantify due to the effects of deformation and surface deposits. Further characterization is needed to evaluate the extent of localized corrosion. The bulk of the surface precipitates were derived from the partial dissolution of ceramic crevice formers used in the study. At this time we do not know if the observed localized corrosion reflects the corrosiveness of Na-K-Cl-NO{sub 3} solutions at elevated temperature over nine months or if it was an artifact of the experimental protocol. Nor do we know if much more concentrated brines with higher NO{sub 3}:Cl ratios formed by dust deliquescence will initiate localized corrosion on Alloy 22 at 160 and 220 C. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that nitrate concentrations greater than 18.5 molal may be required to offset localized corrosion of Alloy 22 at 160 and 220 C. Stability of the passive film and general corrosion were evaluated on the liquid-immersed and vapor-exposed non-creviced specimens. Elemental depth profiles of the vapor-exposed specimens are consistent with the development of a protective Cr-rich oxide near the base metal. The combined passive film and alloy oxide of the immersed specimens was much thicker

  15. Active and passive microwave measurements of soil moisture in FIFE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.R. ); Gogineni, S.P.; Ampe, J. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on the application of active and passive microwave measurement systems to the simultaneous determination of soil moisture. These systems have been tested on common targets very few times. Here C and X band scatterometer data from a helicopter base is compared with L band push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR) data taken from the NASA C-130 aircraft. The regions sampled over FIFE encompass areas with different surface treatments. The scatterometers proved to be sensitive to soil moisture over most of the areas studied, while the radiometer lost sensitivity in regions which had been unburned for years, and which thus had substantial dead organic accumulation. The correlation of soil moisture and backscattered signal was observed to increase with off normal angles.

  16. Feasibility of detecting aircraft wake vortices using passive microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of detecting the cold core of the wake vortex from the wingtips of an aircraft using a passive microwave radiometer was investigated. It was determined that there is a possibility that a cold core whose physical temperature drop is 10 C or greater and which has a diameter of 5 m or greater can be detected by a microwave radiometer. The radiometer would be a noise injection balanced Dicke radiometer operating at a center frequency of 60 GHz. It would require a noise figure of 5 dB, a predetection bandwidth of 6 GHz, and an integration time of 2 seconds resulting in a radiometric sensitivity of 0.018 K. However, three additional studies are required. The first would determine what are the fluctuations in the radiometric antenna temperature due to short-term fluctuations in atmospheric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity. Second, what is the effect of the pressure and temperature drop within the cold core of the wake vortex on its opacity. The third area concerns the possibility of developing a 60 GHz radiometer with a radio metric sensitivity an order of magnitude improvement over the existing state of the art.

  17. Observations of Land Surface Variability Using Passive Microwave Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the global variability of land surface wetness (soil moisture), skin temperature, and related surface fluxes of heat and moisture is key to assessing the importance of the land surface in influencing climate. The feasibility of producing model estimates of these quantities is being studied as part of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP). In the GSWP approach, meteorological observations and analyses are used to drive global circulation models. Satellite measurements can provide independent estimates of key land surface parameters that are needed for initializing and validating the climate models and for monitoring long-term change. Satellite observations of the land surface can also be assimilated into soil models to estimate moisture in the root zone. In our research, passive microwave satellite data recorded during 1978-1987 from the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) are being used to examine spatial and temporal trends in surface soil moisture, vegetation, and temperature. These data include observations at C and X bands (6.6 and 10.7 GHz), which are not available on the current Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and are precursors to data that will become available from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) on Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS-II) and Earth Observing System (EOS) PM1 in the year 2000. A chart shows a time-series of SMMR-derived surface temperature, T-e and surface soil moisture M, retrieved on a 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg grid and further averaged over a 4 deg x 10 deg study region in the African Sahel. Also shown are National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) model outputs of surface temperature, T-sfc, and soil wetness, Soil-w. The variables have been scaled to have similar dynamic ranges on the plots. The NCEP data from the NCEP Reanalysis Project are monthly averages on a 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg grid averaged over

  18. Microwave applications and characterization of the microwave properties of high temperature superconducting films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Bautista, J. J.; Riley, A. L.; Dick, G. J.; Housley, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The development by NASA JPL of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) for use in microwave circuit elements is discussed. The synthesis of HTS films and characterization of their microwave absorption are reviewed. Applications to cryogenic low-noise receivers, spacecraft microwave systems, and low-noise oscillators are considered.

  19. Patterned Ferroelectric Films for Tunable Microwave Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Mueller, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable microwave devices based on metal terminals connected by thin ferroelectric films can be made to perform better by patterning the films to include suitably dimensioned, positioned, and oriented constrictions. The patterns can be formed during fabrication by means of selective etching processes. If the width of the ferroelectric film in such a device is reduced at one or more locations, then both the microwave field and any applied DC bias (tuning) electric field become concentrated at those locations. The magnitudes of both the permittivity and the dielectric loss of a ferroelectric material are reduced by application of a DC field. Because the concentration of the DC field in the constriction(s) magnifies the permittivity- and loss-reducing effects of the applied DC voltage, the permittivity and dielectric loss in the constriction(s) are smaller in the constriction(s) than they are in the wider parts of the ferroelectric film. Furthermore, inasmuch as displacement current must flow through either the constriction(s) or the low-loss dielectric substrate, the net effect of the constriction(s) is equivalent to that of incorporating one or more low-loss, low-permittivity region(s) in series with the high-loss, high-permittivity regions. In a series circuit, the properties of the low-capacitance series element (in this case, the constriction) dominate the overall performance. Concomitantly, the capacitance between the metal terminals is reduced. By making the capacitance between the metal terminals small but tunable, a constriction increases the upper limit of the frequency range amenable to ferroelectric tuning. The present patterning concept is expected to be most advantageous for devices and circuits that must operate at frequencies from about 4 to about 60 GHz. A constriction can be designed such that the magnitude of the microwave electric field and the effective width of the region occupied by the microwave electric field become functions of the applied DC

  20. High-Temperature-Superconductor Films In Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Chorey, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses recent developments in continuing research on fabrication and characterization of thin films of high-temperature superconducting material and incorporation of such films into microwave circuits. Research motivated by prospect of exploiting superconductivity to reduce electrical losses and thereby enhancing performance of such critical microwave components as ring resonators, filters, transmission lines, phase shifters, and feed lines in phased-array antennas.

  1. Environmental Influence on Passive Films Formed on Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Szmodis, A W; Anderson, K L; Farmer, J C; Lian, T; Orme, C A

    2002-10-07

    The passive corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is exceptionally low in a wide range of aqueous solutions, temperatures and electrochemical potentials, Alloy 22 contains approximately 22% chromium (Cr) by weight; thus, it forms a Cr-rich passive film in most environments. Very little is known about the composition, thickness and other properties of this passive film. The aim of this research was to determine the general characteristics of the oxide film that forms on Alloy 22, as a function of solution pH, temperature and applied electrochemical potential.

  2. Evolution of the Passive Microwave Signature of Thin Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensnahn, Mark Robert

    1995-11-01

    Thin sea ice regulates heat exchange between the ocean and atmosphere, salt fluxes into the ocean and the exchange of shortwave radiation at the ocean surface. The degree of regulation depends critically on the ice thickness for ice less than 50 cm thick. It was found from a statistical study of SSM/I satellite data of the Bering Sea that thin ice has its own unique passive microwave signature differentiable from open water and mature, thick ice. Further, the Horizontal polarization brightness temperature at 19 and 37 GHz steadily increased downwind of land with the signature changing or evolving as the ice aged and thickened. Field observations indicate that thin ice with a bare surface can produce only part of this evolution and that the signature of mature first-year ice ultimately is the result of frost flower formation or snow deposition. A theoretical model of emission from sea was developed and simulations of emission corroborated the observations and further indicated that the evolution of the thin ice signature can be explained either by the gradual drying out of a surface slush layer or by the slow, steady formation of frost flowers in combination with brine wicking. Time sequences of passive microwave satellite data were then compared with meteorological data. It was determined that the thin ice signature near land was, at times, sensitive to changes in windspeed, air temperature, and shortwave radiation, but, away from land, that sensitivity was substantially reduced. Snow also had a dramatic effect on emission from thin ice, increasing H polarization brightness temperature by as much as 50K. Finally, a theoretical model of ice dynamics was developed from which fields of ice age and thickness calculated. Relationships between brightness temperature and ice age and thickness were calculated from a regression analysis of these fields and SSM/I data. It was shown that 37 GHz, H pol brightness temperature provides a reasonable estimate of ice age and

  3. Increased carrier mobility and lifetime in CdSe quantum dot thin films through surface trap passivation and doping.

    PubMed

    Straus, Daniel B; Goodwin, E D; Gaulding, E Ashley; Muramoto, Shin; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2015-11-19

    Passivating surface defects and controlling the carrier concentration and mobility in quantum dot (QD) thin films is prerequisite to designing electronic and optoelectronic devices. We investigate the effect of introducing indium in CdSe QD thin films on the dark mobility and the photogenerated carrier mobility and lifetime using field-effect transistor (FET) and time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements. We evaporate indium films ranging from 1 to 11 nm in thickness on top of approximately 40 nm thick thiocyanate-capped CdSe QD thin films and anneal the QD films at 300 °C to densify and drive diffusion of indium through the films. As the amount of indium increases, the FET and TRMC mobilities and the TRMC lifetime increase. The increase in mobility and lifetime is consistent with increased indium passivating midgap and band-tail trap states and doping the films, shifting the Fermi energy closer to and into the conduction band. PMID:26536065

  4. The Passive Film on Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, C A

    2005-09-09

    This report describes oxide (passive film) formation on Alloy 22 surfaces when aged in air (25-750 C) and in solutions (90-110 C) over times ranging from days to 5 years. Most zero-valent metals (and their alloys) are thermodynamically unstable on the earth's surface and in its upper crust. Most will therefore convert to oxides when exposed to a surficial or underground environment. Despite the presence of thermodynamic driving forces, metals and their alloys may persist over lengthy timescales, even under normal atmospheric oxidizing conditions. One reason for this is that as metal is converted to metal oxide, the oxide forms a film on the surface that limits diffusion of chemical components between the environment and the metal. The formation of surface oxide is integral to understanding corrosion rates and processes for many of the more ''resistant'' metals and alloys. This report describes the correlation between oxide composition and oxide stability for Alloy 22 under a range of relevant repository environments. In the case in which the oxide itself is thermodynamically stable, the growth of the oxide film is a self-limiting process (i.e., as the film thickens, the diffusion across it slows, and the metal oxidizes at an ever-diminishing rate). In the case where the oxide is not thermodynamically stable, it dissolves at the oxide--solution interface as the metal oxidizes at the metal--oxide interface. The system achieves a steady state with a particular oxide thickness when the oxide dissolution and the metal oxidation rates are balanced. Once sufficient metal has transferred to solution, the solution may become saturated with respect to the oxide, which is then thermodynamically stable. The driving force for dissolution at the oxide--solution interface then ceases, and the first case is obtained. In the case of a complex alloy such as Alloy 22 (Haynes International 1997), the development and behavior of the oxide layer is complicated by the fact that different

  5. Microwave solitons in magnetic films (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, A. D.; Xie, K.; Mehta, H.; Nikitov, S. A.

    1996-04-01

    Nonlinear waves in the form of solitons in magnetic films are attracting attention because of the interesting possibility of making novel spatial, and temporal, soliton devices that will operate in the technologically important microwave (GHz) frequency window. Some fascinating pioneering experimental work has been performed in this area and there is now every possibility that manipulation of solitonlike microwave pulses will be the basis of an entirely new range of devices. Both theory and experiment show that solitons are extremely robust and behave rather like particles. Magnetic films look set to become as successful as optical fibers in supporting bright envelope solitons; yet soliton behavior can often seem hard to comprehend. While they are subtle in their behavior they can be understood from many points of view that are physically, or mathematically, based. This presentation will explain what bright microwave envelope solitons are, drawing upon as much physical insight and analogy as possible. The necessary and sufficient conditions for soliton existence will be carefully set out, especially with respect to their relationship to the input conditions of a device. A substantial number of numerical examples will be used and the prospects for major expansion in the experimental area will be assessed. In the latter part of the presentation some important applications for solitons will be addressed. These will include the analysis of a switching device but logic devices, and various forms of pump-probe arrangements, will also be retrieved. Finally, the optimistic view that solitons in magnetic materials are now realistic tools will be expressed and the opportunities provided by dark and higher-dimensional solitons will be discussed.

  6. Influence of ultrasonic cavitation on passive film of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Cheng; Zhu, Jin-hua

    2008-03-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of passive film of stainless steel 0Cr13Ni5Mo under the condition of static state (quiescence) and ultrasonic cavitation in the HCl solution have been studied by means of polarization curve, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and capacitance potential measurement. The results indicate that the passive film shows a multi layer structure distribution, and presents a p-type semiconductor property under the condition of quiescence. The stability of passive film decreases, the semiconducting property changes to an n-type semiconductor in the presence of cavitation. The amount of transition electrons from valence band because of cavitation is related to the height of Fermi level of passive film semiconductor. PMID:17584517

  7. Arctic Sea ice studies with passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to improve sea ice concentration determinations from passive microwave space observations; (2) to study the role of Arctic polynyas in the production of sea ice and the associated salinization of Arctic shelf water; and (3) to study large scale sea ice variability in the polar oceans. The strategy is to analyze existing data sets and data acquired from both the DMSP SSM/I and recently completed aircraft underflights. Special attention will be given the high resolution 85.5 GHz SSM/I channels for application to thin ice algorithms and processes studies. Analysis of aircraft and satellite data sets is expected to provide a basis for determining the potential of the SSM/I high frequency channels for improving sea ice algorithms and for investigating oceanic processes. Improved sea ice algorithms will aid the study of Arctic coastal polynyas which in turn will provide a better understanding of the role of these polynyas in maintaining the Arctic watermass structure. Analysis of satellite and archived meteorological data sets will provide improved estimates of annual, seasonal and shorter-term sea ice variability.

  8. Large scale evaluation of soil moisture retrievals from passive microwave observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture from the Earth’s surface. Several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and WindSat have been used for this purpose using multi-channel observations. Large sc...

  9. Potential of bias correction for downscaling passive microwave and soil moisture data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Passive microwave satellites such as SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) or SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) observe brightness temperature (TB) and retrieve soil moisture at a spatial resolution greater than most hydrological processes. Bias correction is proposed as a simple method to disag...

  10. Tactical Approaches for Making a Successful Satellite Passive Microwave ESDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardman, M.; Brodzik, M. J.; Gotberg, J.; Long, D. G.; Paget, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Our NASA MEaSUREs project is producing a new, enhanced resolution gridded Earth System Data Record for the entire satellite passive microwave (SMMR, SSM/I-SSMIS and AMSR-E) time series. Our project goals are twofold: to produce a well-documented, consistently processed, high-quality historical record at higher spatial resolutions than have previously been available, and to transition the production software to the NSIDC DAAC for ongoing processing after our project completion. In support of these goals, our distributed team at BYU and NSIDC faces project coordination challenges to produce a high-quality data set that our user community will accept as a replacement for the currently available historical versions of these data. We work closely with our DAAC liaison on format specifications, data and metadata plans, and project progress. In order for the user community to understand and support our project, we have solicited a team of Early Adopters who are reviewing and evaluating a prototype version of the data. Early Adopter feedback will be critical input to our final data content and format decisions. For algorithm transparency and accountability, we have released an Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) and detailed supporting technical documentation, with rationale for all algorithm implementation decisions. For distributed team management, we are using collaborative tools for software revision control and issue tracking. For reliably transitioning a research-quality image reconstruction software system to production-quality software suitable for use at the DAAC, we have adopted continuous integration methods for running automated regression testing. Our presentation will summarize bothadvantages and challenges of each of these tactics in ensuring production of a successful ESDR and an enduring production software system.

  11. Advanced Passive Microwave Radiometer Technology for GPM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Kummerow, Christian; Principe, Caleb; Ruf, Christoper; Wilheit, Thomas; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An interferometer-type passive microwave radiometer based on MMIC receiver technology and a thinned array antenna design is being developed under the Instrument Incubator Program (TIP) on a project entitled the Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer (LRR). The prototype single channel aircraft instrument will be ready for first testing in 2nd quarter 2003, for deployment on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and in a ground configuration manner; this version measures at 10.7 GHz in a crosstrack imaging mode. The design for a two (2) frequency preliminary space flight model at 19 and 35 GHz (also in crosstrack imaging mode) has also been completed, in which the design features would enable it to fly in a bore-sighted configuration with a new dual-frequency space radar (DPR) under development at the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) in Tokyo, Japan. The DPR will be flown as one of two primary instruments on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's core satellite in the 2007 time frame. The dual frequency space flight design of the ERR matches the APR frequencies and will be proposed as an ancillary instrument on the GPM core satellite to advance space-based precipitation measurement by enabling better microphysical characterization and coincident volume data gathering for exercising combined algorithm techniques which make use of both radar backscatter and radiometer attenuation information to constrain rainrate solutions within a physical algorithm context. This talk will discuss the design features, performance capabilities, applications plans, and conical/polarametric imaging possibilities for the LRR, as well as a brief summary of the project status and schedule.

  12. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2010-01-01

    Physically-based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite observed brightness temperatures (TB) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are typically non-linear, such that inversions are ill-posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to better understand these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using brightness temperature weighting functions to quantify the percentage of the TB resulting from absorption/emission/reflection from the surface, absorption/emission/scattering by liquid and frozen hydrometeors in the cloud, the emission from atmospheric water vapor, and other contributors. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz and for several individual precipitation profiles as well as for three cloud resolving model simulations of falling snow. As expected, low frequency channels (<89 GHz) respond to liquid hydrometeors and the surface, while the higher frequency channels become increasingly sensitive to ice hydrometeors and the water vapor sounding channels react to water vapor in the atmosphere. Low emissivity surfaces (water and snow-covered land) permit energy downwelling from clouds to be reflected at the surface thereby increasing the percentage of the TB resulting from the hydrometeors. The slant path at a 53deg viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels and show sensitivity to surface polarization effects. The TB percentage information presented in this paper answers questions about the relative contributions to the brightness temperatures and provides a key piece of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  13. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  14. WFL: Microwave Applications of Thin Ferroelectric Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a family of tunable microwave circuits, operating from X- through Ka-band, based on laser ablated BaxSr1-xTiO films on lanthanum aluminate and magnesium oxide substrates. Circuits include voltage controlled oscillators, filters, phase shifters and antennas. A review of the basic theory of operation of these devices will be presented along with measured performance. Emphasis has been on low-loss phase shifters to enable a new phased array architecture. The critical role of phase shifter loss and transient response in reflectarray antennas will be discussed. The Ferroelectric Reflectarray Critical Components Space Experiment was launched on the penultimate Space Shuttle, STS-134, in May of 2011. It included a bank of ferroelectric phase shifters with two different stoichiometries as well as ancillary electronics. The experiment package and status will be reported. In addition, unusual results of a Van der Pauw measurement involving a ferroelectric film grown on buffered high resisitivity silicon will be discussed.

  15. A new method to inverse soil moisture based on thermal infrared and passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuang; Kou, Xiaokang; Zhao, Shaojie; Jiang, Lingmei

    2014-11-01

    Soil moisture is one of the main factors in the water, energy and carbon cycles. It constitutes a major uncertainty in climate and hydrological models. By now, passive microwave remote sensing and thermal infrared remote sensing technology have been used to obtain and monitor soil moisture. However, as the resolution of passive microwave remote sensing is very low and the thermal infrared remote sensing method fails to provide soil temperature on cloudy days, it is hard to monitor the soil moisture accurately. To solve the problem, a new method has been tried in this research. Thermal infrared remote sensing and passive microwave remote sensing technology have been combined based on the delicate experiment. Since the soil moisture retrieved by passive microwave in general represents surface centimeters deep, which is different from deeper soil moisture estimated by thermal inertia method, a relationship between the two depths soil moisture has been established based on the experiment. The results show that there is a good relationship between the soil moisture estimated by passive microwave and thermal infrared remote sensing method. The correlation coefficient is 0.78 and RMSE (root mean square error) is 0.0195 · ?. This research provides a new possible method to inverse soil moisture.

  16. An Assessment of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Products at the NSIDC DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. J.; Stroeve, J.; Marquis, M.

    2002-12-01

    Sea ice coverage and variability are predominately studied using satellite data. Because of substantial cloud cover and long periods of darkness during polar winters, passive microwave instruments are most commonly used. Passive microwave sensors have evolved from the early Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR), with one spectral band, to the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), each of which provides multiple spectral bands and higher resolution than ESMR instruments. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) instrument aboard NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite will offer a sea ice concentration product with unprecedented spatial resolution. The AMSR-E improves upon SMMR and SSM/I with its greater spatial resolution and with its combination of both low and high frequency spectral channels. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) archives sea ice data beginning with ESMR in 1973 through today's SSM/I products. We will archive and distribute sea ice data from AMSR-E in 2003. The capabilities and limitations of the passive microwave instruments will be highlighted in several comparisons between the existing and future sea ice products from NSIDC. In addition to the data we support, numerous tools and ancillary products have stemmed from the data currently available. Various products will be demonstrated in the context of cryospheric research, namely sea ice applications.

  17. WindSat Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: WindSat is a spaceborne fully polarimetric conical scanning microwave radiometer. It operates at frequencies and polarizations that match other radiometers such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and in addition it acquires additional polarimetric measurements...

  18. Assessing Scale Effects on Snow Water Equivalent Retrievals Using Airborne and Spaceborne Passive Microwave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derksen, C.; Walker, A.; Goodison, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Climate Research Branch (CRB) of the Meteorological Service of Canada (MSC) has a long-standing research program focused on the development of methods to retrieve snow cover information from passive microwave satellite data for Canadian regions. Algorithms that derive snow water equivalent (SWE) have been developed by CRB and are used to operationally generate SWE information over landscape regions including prairie, boreal forest, and taiga. New multi-scale research datasets were acquired in Saskatchewan, Canada during February 2003 to quantify the impact of spatially heterogeneous land cover and snowpack properties on passive microwave SWE retrievals. MSC microwave radiometers (6.9, 19, 37, and 85 GHz) were flown on the National Research Council (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft at two flying heights along a grid of flight lines, covering a 25 by 25 km study area centered on the Old Jack Pine Boreal Ecosystem Research and Monitoring Site (BERMS). Spaceborne Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures were also acquired for this region. SWE was derived for all passive microwave datasets using the CRB land cover sensitive algorithm suite. An intensive, coincident ground sampling program characterized in situ snow depth, density, water equivalent and pack structure using a land cover based sampling scheme to isolate the variability in snow cover parameters within and between forest stands and land cover types, and within a single spaceborne passive microwave grid cell. The passive microwave data sets that are the focus of this investigation cover a range of spatial resolutions from 100-150 m for the airborne data to 10 km (AMSR-E) and 25 km (SSM/I) for the satellite data, providing the opportunity to investigate and compare microwave emission characteristics, SWE retrievals and land cover effects at different spatial scales. Initial analysis shows that the small footprint airborne passive microwave

  19. Design and characteristics of L-C thin films filter at microwave frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-Sung; Min, Bok-Ki; Song, Jae-Sung

    2005-12-01

    Multifunction corresponding to multimedia age has furthermore required high integration to the devices at microwave band, so more evolution for multi-layer integration like system on chip(SoC) becomes to be necessary. In wireless mobile communication, portable mobile phones grew up to a huge market. Microwave devices have played an important role in the wireless communication systems. One challenge in the implementation of circuit integration is in the design of micro wave band pass filter with thin film MOM capacitor and spiral inductor. In this paper, Cu and TaO thin film with RF sputtering was deposited for inductor and capacitor on the SiO II/Si(100) substrate. MIM capacitor and spiral inductor was fabricated for L-C band pass filter by sputtering and lift-off. We are analyzed and designed thin films L-C passive components for band pass filter at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz, an important devices for mobile communication. Based on the high-Q values of passive components, MIM capacitor and spiral inductors for L-C band pass filter, a low insertion loss of L-C passive components can be realized with a minimized chip area. The insertion loss was 3 dB for a 1.8 GHz filter, and was 5 dB for a 900 MHz filter. This paper also discusses a theoretical analysis and practical design to L-C band pass filter.

  20. Snow cover of the Upper Colorado River Basin from satellite passive microwave and visual imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, E.G.; Beauvillain, E.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison of passive microwave images from the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and visual images from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) of the Upper Colorado River Basin shows that passive microwave satellite imagery can be used to determine the extent of the snow cover. Eight cloud-free DMSP images throughout the winter of 1985-1986 show the extent of the snowpack, which, when compared to the corresponding SMMR images, determine the threshold microwave characteristics for snow-covered pixels. With these characteristics, the 27 sequential SMMR images give a unique view of the temporal history of the snow cover extent through the first half of the water year. -from Authors

  1. Constitutive response of passivated copper films to thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.-L.; Ramamurty, U.

    2003-02-01

    The thermomechanical behavior of passivated thin copper films is studied. Stresses in copper films of thickness ranging from 125 to 1000 nm, deposited on quartz or silicon substrates and passivated with silicon oxide, were measured using the curvature method. The thermal cycling spans a temperature range from -196 to 600 °C. The measured mechanical behavior was found to be rate insensitive within the heating/cooling rate range of 5-25 °C/min. It was observed that the passivated films do not exhibit a significant stress relaxation at elevated temperatures that is normally found in unpassivated films. Furthermore, a significant strain hardening during the course of thermal loading was noted. Simple continuum plasticity analyses show that the experimentally measured stress-temperature response can only be rationalized with a kinematic hardening model. Analytical procedures for extracting the constitutive properties of the films that were developed on the basis of such a model are presented. The initial yield strength is higher and tends to be less temperature dependent in thinner films. The strain hardening rate is found to increase with decreasing film thickness.

  2. A multifrequency evaluation of active and passive microwave sensors for oil spill detection and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenner, R. G.; Reid, S. C.; Solie, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation is given of how active and passive microwave sensors can best be used in oil spill detection and assessment. Radar backscatter curves taken over oil spills are presented and their effect on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are discussed. Plots of microwave radiometric brightness variations over oil spills are presented and discussed. Recommendations as to how to select the best combination of frequency, viewing angle, and sensor type for evaluation of various aspects of oil spills are also discussed.

  3. Graphene radio frequency and microwave passive components for low cost wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianjun; Leng, Ting; Hsin Chang, Kuo; Cing Chen, Jia; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Hu, Zhirun

    2016-06-01

    Graphene RF and microwave passive components such as coplanar waveguide transmission lines, open/short-circuited resonators and wideband antenna on paper substrate were designed, screen printed and characterized in this work. The experimental results demonstrate that the screen printed graphene passive components can be used for RF signal transmitting, processing and radiating/receiving; revealing that graphene ink can be a low cost alternative to much more expensive metal nanoparticle inks, such as silver nanoparticle ink. The screen printed graphene is processed at low temperature so that it is compatible with heat-sensitive flexible materials like papers, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) and textiles. The screen printed graphene passive components reported here are of high conductivity, high flexibility, light weight and low cost, making them ideal candidate for low cost wearable electronics. This work makes it prospective to manufacture RF and microwave passive components in mass production by screen printing in much lower cost to any other known techniques.

  4. Thin-Film Ferroelectric Tunable Microwave Devices Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanKeuls, Frederick W.

    1999-01-01

    Electronically tunable microwave components have become the subject of intense research efforts in recent years. Many new communications systems would greatly benefit from these components. For example, planned low Earth orbiting satellite networks have a need for electronically scanned antennas. Thin ferroelectric films are one of the major technologies competing to fill these applications. When a direct-current (dc) voltage is applied to ferroelectric film, the dielectric constant of the film can be decreased by nearly an order of magnitude, changing the high-frequency wavelength in the microwave device. Recent advances in film growth have demonstrated high-quality ferroelectric thin films. This technology may allow microwave devices that have very low power and are compact, lightweight, simple, robust, planar, voltage tunable, and affordable. The NASA Lewis Research Center has been designing, fabricating, and testing proof-of-concept tunable microwave devices. This work, which is being done in-house with funding from the Lewis Director's Discretionary Fund, is focusing on introducing better microwave designs to utilize these materials. We have demonstrated Ku- and K-band phase shifters, tunable local oscillators, tunable filters, and tunable diplexers. Many of our devices employ SrTiO3 as the ferroelectric. Although it is one of the more tunable and easily grown ferroelectrics, SrTiO3 must be used at cryogenic temperatures, usually below 100 K. At these temperatures, we frequently use high-temperature superconducting thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-8 to carry the microwave signals. However, much of our recent work has concentrated on inserting room-temperature ferroelectric thin films, such as BaxSr1- xTiO3 into these devices. The BaxSr1-xTiO3 films are used in conjuction with normal metal conductors, such as gold.

  5. Passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in coastal zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Calvin T.; Blume, Hans-Juergen C.; Kendall, Bruce M.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of measuring coastal-zone salinity from airborne microwave radiometers is developed. The theory, as presented, shows that precision measurements of salinity favor the lower microwave frequencies. To this end, L- and S-Band systems were built, and the flight results have shown that accuracies of at least one part per thousand were achieved.The aircraft results focus on flights conducted over the Chesapeake Bay and the mouth of the Savanna River off the Georgia Coast. This paper presents no new work, but rather summarizes the capabilities of the remote sensing technique.

  6. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  7. Passivation of thin film oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Josefowicz, J.Y.; Rensch, D.B.; Nieh, K.W.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a passivation coating for oxide superconductors. It comprises a first layer of a Group II oxide encapsulating the oxide superconductor, the Group II having a substantially amorphous structure and having a thickness ranging from about 500 {Angstrom} to 2 {mu}m; and a second layer of a polymer covering the Group II oxide, the polymer comprising a composition selected from the group consisting of polyimide, polybenzyl methacrylate, polybutyl methacrylate, polybutyl styrene, polybutadiene, styrenes, polyamide resins, polyacrylics, polyacrylamides, polystyrenes, polyethylene, polyisoprene, polymethyl pentenes, polymethyl methacrylates, and polyvinyls.

  8. Passive microwave soil moisture downscaling using vegetation index and skin surface temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil moisture satellite estimates are available from a variety of passive microwave satellite sensors, but their spatial resolution is frequently too coarse for use by land managers and other decision makers. In this paper, a soil moisture downscaling algorithm based on a regression relationship bet...

  9. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  10. Assimilation of active and passive microwave observations for improved estimates of soil moisture and crop growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Ensemble Kalman Filter-based data assimilation framework that links a crop growth model with active and passive (AP) microwave models was developed to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation biomass over a growing season of soybean. Complementarities in AP observations were incorpo...

  11. The Passive Film Characteristics of Cold Deformed Pure Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Naseri, Majid; Imantalab, Omid; Gholami, Davood; Haghshenas, Meysam

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the effect of cold deformation on the electrochemical and passive behaviors of pure copper in 0.01 M NaOH solution was investigated. The dislocation density in cold deformation was calculated using a recently developed JAVA-based software, materials analysis using diffraction, based on Rietveld's whole x-ray pattern fitting methodology. At the thickness reduction of 70%, the microhardness measured as 125.30 HV, which is 1.56 times than that in the annealed pure copper (80.25 HV). Potentiodynamic polarization plots and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that increasing the cold deformation offers better conditions for forming the passive films. In the Mott-Schottky analysis, no evidence for n-type behavior was obtained which indicates that the oxygen vacancies and the copper interstitials did not have any significant population density in the passive films. Also, this analysis revealed that with increasing cold deformation, the acceptor density of the passive films decreased.

  12. Passive-Microwave Precipitation Estimation over Land using a Physical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, M.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2006-05-01

    The precipitation estimates from ground radars are more accurate than those from space-borne passive observations. However, there are various instances when passive-microwave precipitation estimates over land are extremely valuable. These include: precipitation estimation in areas not covered by ground radars, and precipitation estimation over complex terrain. Statistical procedures to estimate precipitation over land from passive-microwave have been developed and applied in the past. These procedures were derived from coincident satellite passive-microwave observations and ground (or space) active-microwave observations and were proven to be reliable. Given the limited amount of information existent in passive-microwave observations, it is not likely that physical-based approaches (which are more laborious) are necessarily more accurate in terms of precipitation estimation. However, physical-based retrievals have the advantage that they provide more information, physically-consistent, information that can be used in short term precipitation (and consequently hydrologic) forecasting. In this study, a priori cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations over land (filtered by the TRMM PR observations) are used to create a database of vertical profiles of hydrometeors, cloud, vertical velocities and latent heating, and their associated brightness temperatures. In the retrieval phase, cloud structures are selected from the database such that their brightness temperatures match the observed brightness temperatures. A Poisson equation is solved to make the velocity field kinematically consistent. An ensemble of perturbations of these initial estimates are run forward using a CRM, and, based on these runs, a dynamically consistent solution is derived, using a Kalman ensemble formulation.

  13. High-performance flexible microwave passives on plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhenqiang; Seo, Jung-Hun; Cho, Sang June; Zhou, Weidong

    2014-06-01

    We report the demonstration of bendable inductors, capacitors and switches fabricated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate that can operate at high microwave frequencies. By employing bendable dielectric and single crystalline semiconductor materials, spiral inductors and metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors with high quality factors and high resonance frequencies and single-pole, single-throw (SPST) switches were archived. The effects of mechanical bending on the performance of inductors, capacitors and switches were also measured and analyzed. We further investigated the highest possible resonance frequencies and quality factors of inductors and capacitors and, high frequency responses and insertion loss. These demonstrations will lead to flexible radio-frequency and microwave systems in the future.

  14. Passive microwave remote and in situ measurements of Arctic and subarctic snow covers in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Sturm, M.; Chacho, E.; Benson, C. S.; Garbeil, H.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne and satellite passive microwave measurements acquired simultaneously with ground measurements of depth, density, and stratigraphy of the snow in central and northern Alaska between March 11 and 19, 1988, are reported. A good correspondence in brightness temperature (TB) trends between the aircraft and satellite data was found. An expected inverse correlation between depth hoar thickness and TB was not found to be strong. A persistent TB minimum in both the aircraft and the satellite data was detected along the northern foothills of the Brooks Range. In an area located at about 68 deg 60 min N, 149 deg 20 min W, the TB as recorded from the aircraft microwave sensor dropped by 55 K. Satellite microwave measurements showed a TB decrease of up to 45 K at approximately the same location. An examination of microwave satellite data from 1978 to 1987 revealed that similar low late-winter values were found in approximately the same locations as those observed in March 1988.

  15. Snow Crystal Orientation Effects on the Scattering of Passive Microwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Barton, J. S.; Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.

    1999-01-01

    For this study, consideration is given to the role crystal orientation plays in scattering and absorbing microwave radiation. A discrete dipole scattering model is used to measure the passive microwave radiation, at two polarizations (horizontal and vertical), scattered by snow crystals oriented in random and non random positions, having various sizes (ranging between 1 micrometers to 10,000 micrometers in radius), and shapes (including spheroids, cylinders, hexagons). The model results demonstrate that for the crystal sizes typically found in a snowpack, crystal orientation is insignificant compared to crystal size in terms of scattering microwave energy in the 8,100 gm (37 GHz) region of the spectrum. Therefore, the assumption used in radiative transfer approaches, where snow crystals are modeled as randomly oriented spheres, is adequate to account for the transfer of microwave energy emanating from the ground and passing through a snowpack.

  16. Surface corrosion enhancement of passive films on NiTi shape memory alloy in different solutions.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The corrosion behaviors of NiTi shape memory alloy in NaCl solution, H2SO4 solution and borate buffer solution were investigated. It was found that TiO2 in passive film improved the corrosion resistance of NiTi shape memory. However, low corrosion resistance of passive film was observed in low pH value acidic solution due to TiO2 dissolution. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of NiTi shape memory alloy decreased with the increasing of passivated potential in the three solutions. The donor density in passive film increased with the increasing of passivated potential. Different solutions affect the semiconductor characteristics of the passive film. The reducing in the corrosion resistance was attributed to the more donor concentrations in passive film and thinner thickness of the passive film.

  17. [Spectroscopic study on film formation mechanism and structure of composite silanes-V-Zr passive film].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Chang-sheng; Shi, Lei; An, Cheng-qiang

    2015-02-01

    A composite silanes-V-Zr passive film was overlayed on hot-dip galvanized steel. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and radio frequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (rf-GD-OES) were used to characterize the molecular structure of the silanes-V-Zr passive film. The mechanism of film formation was discussed: The results show that the silane molecules are crosslinked as the main film former and inorganic inhibitor is even distributed in the film. The fitting peak of 100.7 eV in XPS single Si2p energy range spectra of the composite silanes-V-Zr passive film and the widening and strengthening of the Si--O infrared absorption peak at 1100 cm(-1) indicate that the silanes were adsorbed on the surface of zinc with chemical bond of Si--O--Zn, and the silane molecules were connected with each other by bond of Si--O--Si. Two characteristic absorption peaks of amide at 1650 and 1560 cm(-1) appear in the infrared spectroscopy of the composite silanes-V-Zr passive film, and a characteristic absorption peak of epoxy groups at 910 cm(-1) disappears in the infrared spectroscopy of the passive film. The results indicate that gamma-APT can be prepared through nucleophilic ring-opening of ethylene oxide in gamma-GPT molecule to form C--N covalent bonds. The rf-GD-OES results indicate that there is a oxygen enriched layer in 0.3 microm depth of the composite silanes-V-Zr passive film. Moreover, ZrF4, ZrO2 and some inorganic matter obtained by the reaction during the forming processof the composite silanes-V-Zr passive film are distributed evenly throughout the film. According to the film composition, the physical processes and chemical reactions during the film forming process were studied by using ATR-FTIR. Based on this, the film forming mechanism was proposed. PMID:25970911

  18. [Spectroscopic study on film formation mechanism and structure of composite silanes-V-Zr passive film].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Chang-sheng; Shi, Lei; An, Cheng-qiang

    2015-02-01

    A composite silanes-V-Zr passive film was overlayed on hot-dip galvanized steel. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and radio frequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (rf-GD-OES) were used to characterize the molecular structure of the silanes-V-Zr passive film. The mechanism of film formation was discussed: The results show that the silane molecules are crosslinked as the main film former and inorganic inhibitor is even distributed in the film. The fitting peak of 100.7 eV in XPS single Si2p energy range spectra of the composite silanes-V-Zr passive film and the widening and strengthening of the Si--O infrared absorption peak at 1100 cm(-1) indicate that the silanes were adsorbed on the surface of zinc with chemical bond of Si--O--Zn, and the silane molecules were connected with each other by bond of Si--O--Si. Two characteristic absorption peaks of amide at 1650 and 1560 cm(-1) appear in the infrared spectroscopy of the composite silanes-V-Zr passive film, and a characteristic absorption peak of epoxy groups at 910 cm(-1) disappears in the infrared spectroscopy of the passive film. The results indicate that gamma-APT can be prepared through nucleophilic ring-opening of ethylene oxide in gamma-GPT molecule to form C--N covalent bonds. The rf-GD-OES results indicate that there is a oxygen enriched layer in 0.3 microm depth of the composite silanes-V-Zr passive film. Moreover, ZrF4, ZrO2 and some inorganic matter obtained by the reaction during the forming processof the composite silanes-V-Zr passive film are distributed evenly throughout the film. According to the film composition, the physical processes and chemical reactions during the film forming process were studied by using ATR-FTIR. Based on this, the film forming mechanism was proposed.

  19. Passive films on magnesium anodes in primary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the passive films over Mg anodes, which essentially govern the voltage delay of the latter, have been determined nondestructively from an analysis of the transient and steady-state response of the electrode potential to low amplitude galvanostatic polarization under various experimental conditions viz., with different corrosion inhibitor coatings on Mg, after various periods of ageing of anode in solutions containing corrosion inhibitors, at various low temperatures etc. Using these parameters, the kinetics of film build-up or dissolution under these conditions have been monitored. The morphology of the anode film has been verified with scanning electron microscopy. Similar transients at low temperatures point out a steep rise in the film resistivity which is essentially responsible for the severe voltage delay. Finally, possible application of this technique in secondary Li batteries to improve cycling characteristics of the Li anode has been pointed out.

  20. Novel Snow Depth Retrieval Method Using Time Series Ssmi Passive Microwave Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikraftar, Z.; Hasanlou, M.; Esmaeilzadeh, M.

    2016-06-01

    The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSM/IS) are satellites that work in passive microwave range. The SSM/I has capability to measure geophysical parameters which these parameters are key to investigate the climate and hydrology condition in the world. In this research the SSMI passive microwave data is used to study the feasibility of monitoring snow depth during snowfall month from 2010 to 2015 using an algorithm in conjunction with ground depth measured at meteorological stations of the National Centre for Environmental Information (NCEI). The previous procedures for snow depth retrieval algorithms uses only one or two passive bands for modelling snow depth. This study enable us to use of a nonlinear multidimensional regression algorithm which incorporates all channels and their related weighting coefficients for each band. Higher value of these coefficients are indicator of the importance of each band in the regression model. All channels and their combination were used in support of the vector algorithm combined with genetic algorithm (GA) for feature selection to estimate snow depth. The results were compared with those algorithms developed by recent researchers and the results clearly shows the superiority of proposed method (R2 = 0.82 and RMSE = 6.3 cm).

  1. An Orbital "Virtual Radar" from TRMM Passive Microwave and Lightning Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.

    2004-01-01

    The retrieval of vertical structure from joint passive microwave and lightning observations is demonstrated. Three years of data from the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) are used as a training dataset for regression and classification neural networks; the TMI (TRMM Microwave Imager) and LIS (Lightning Imaging Sensor) provide the inputs, the PR (Precipitation Radar) provides the training targets. Both vertical reflectivity profile categorization (into 9 convective, 7 stratiform, 2 mixed and 6 anvil types) and geophysical parameters (surface rainfall, vertically integrated liquid (VIL), ice water content (IWC) and echo tops) are retrieved. Retrievals are successful over both land and ocean surfaces. The benefit of using lightning observations as inputs to these retrievals is quantitatively demonstrated; lightning essentially provides an additional convective/stratiform discriminator, and is most important for isolation of midlevel (tops in the mixed phase region) convective profile types (this is because high frequency passive microwave observations already provide good convective/stratiform discrimination for deep convective profiles). This is highly relevant as midlevel convective profiles account for an extremely large fraction of tropical rainfall, and yet are most difficult to discriminate from comparable-depth stratiform profile types using passive microwave observations alone.

  2. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  3. Two passive microwave prototype methods for hail detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laviola, Sante; Beauchamp, Jim; Ferraro, Ralph; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    During previous decades, relationships between many geophysical variables and the radiometric measurements in the microwave bands were translated into several satellite-based algorithms. Recently, several studies have revealed a high correlation between the occurrence of hail and the microwave brightness temperature depression in convective clouds. In this work, we propose two independent prototype methods for the detection of hail on the basis of the AMSU-B/MHS brightness temperature variation. The first method was developed through the use of collocated satellite and surface hail reports over the continental US for a 10-year period (2000-2009). Compared with the surface observations, the algorithm detects approximately nearly 40% of hail occurrences. The simple threshold algorithms are then used to generate a hail climatology based on all available AMSU observations during 2000-2011 and stratified in several ways, including total hail occurrence on a daily (diurnal cycle), monthly, and total annual basis. The second hail detection algorithm is an improvement of the preexistent MicroWave Cloud Classification (MWCC) method, which exploits the properties of the water vapor channels on board the AMSU-B/MHS to classify the cloud type (stratiform/convection) by estimating the cloud top altitude. Using the results of the MWCC, deep convections were correlated with selected hailstorm events over Europe, South America and the US. The 10-year AMSU-B/MHS observations used for the first method were also employed to refine the algorithm criteria. The hail detector of the MWCC is based on a probabilistic model, which calculates the probability associated with each pixel by following the growth law of the hailstones. The validation results over the US have demonstrated the high correlation between the two methods and the surface hail reports showing a remarkable agreement in terms of POD and FAR. Reference Ferraro, R., Beauchamp J., Cecil D., Heymsfield G., 2014: A prototype

  4. Advances in Assimilation of Satellite-Based Passive Microwave Observations for Soil-Moisture Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Pauwels, Valentijn; Reichle, Rolf H.; Draper, Clara; Koster, Randy; Liu, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Satellite-based microwave measurements have long shown potential to provide global information about soil moisture. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, [1]) mission as well as the future National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP, [2]) mission measure passive microwave emission at L-band frequencies, at a relatively coarse (40 km) spatial resolution. In addition, SMAP will measure active microwave signals at a higher spatial resolution (3 km). These new L-band missions have a greater sensing depth (of -5cm) compared with past and present C- and X-band microwave sensors. ESA currently also disseminates retrievals of SMOS surface soil moisture that are derived from SMOS brightness temperature observations and ancillary data. In this research, we address two major challenges with the assimilation of recent/future satellite-based microwave measurements: (i) assimilation of soil moisture retrievals versus brightness temperatures for surface and root-zone soil moisture estimation and (ii) scale-mismatches between satellite observations, models and in situ validation data.

  5. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  6. Studies of snowpack properties by passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Research involving the microwave characteristics of snow was undertaken in order to expand the information content currently available from remote sensing, namely the measurement of snowcovered area. Microwave radiation emitted from beneath the snow surface can be sensed and thus permits information on internal snowpack properties to be inferred. The intensity of radiation received is a function of the average temperature and emissivity of the snow layers and is commonly referred to as the brightness temperature (T sub b). The T sub b varies with snow grain and crystal sizes, liquid water content and snowpack temperature. The T sub b of the 0.8 cm wavelength channel was found to decrease moreso with increasing snow depth than the 1.4 cm channel. More scattering of the shorter wavelength radiation occurs thus resulting in a lower T sub b for shorter wavelengths in a dry snowpack. The longer 21.0 cm wavelength was used to assess the condition of the underlying ground. Ultimately it may be possible to estimate snow volume over large areas using calibrated brightness temperatures and consequently improve snowmelt runoff predictions.

  7. Studies of snowpack properties by passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    Research involving the microwave characteristics of snow was undertaken in order to expand the information content currently available from remote sensing, namely the measurement of snowcovered area. Microwave radiation emitted from beneath the snow surface can be sensed and thus permits information on internal snowpack properties to be inferred. The intensity of radiation received is a function of the average temperature and emissivity of the snow layers and is commonly referred to as the brightness temperature (T sub B). The T sub B varies with snow grain and crystal sizes, liquid water content, and snowpack temperature. The T sub B of the 0.8 cm wavelength channel was found to decrease more so with increasing snow depth than the 1.4 cm channel. More scattering of the shorter wavelength radiation occurs thus resulting in a lower T sub B for shorter wavelengths in a dry snowpack. The longer 21.0 cm wavelength was used to assess the condition of the underlying ground.

  8. Passive Microwave Observation of Diurnal Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Swift, Calvin T.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave radiometers operating at low frequencies are sensitive to surface soil moisture changes. Few studies have been conducted that have involved multifrequency observations at frequencies low enough to measure a significant soil depth and not be attenuated by the vegetation cover. Another unexplored aspect of microwave observations at low frequencies has been the impact of diurnal variations of the soil moisture and temperature on brightness temperature. In this investigation, observations were made using a dual frequency radiometer (1.4 and 2.65 GHz) over bare soil and corn for extended periods in 1994. Comparisons of emissivity and volumetric soil moisture at four depths for bare soils showed that there was a clear correspondence between the 1 cm soil moisture and the 2.65-GHz emissivity and between the 3-5 cm soil moisture and the 1.4-GHZ emissivity, which confirms previous studies. Observations during drying and rainfall demonstrate that new and unique information for hydrologic and energy balance studies can be extracted from these data.

  9. Antartic sea ice, 1973 - 1976: Satellite passive-microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. J.; Comiso, J. C.; Parkinson, C. L.; Campbell, W. J.; Carsey, F. D.; Gloersen, P.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) on the Nimbus 5 satellite are used to determine the extent and distribution of Antarctic sea ice. The characteristics of the southern ocean, the mathematical formulas used to obtain quantitative sea ice concentrations, the general characteristics of the seasonal sea ice growth/decay cycle and regional differences, and the observed seasonal growth/decay cycle for individual years and interannual variations of the ice cover are discussed. The sea ice data from the ESMR are presented in the form of color-coded maps of the Antarctic and the southern oceans. The maps show brightness temperatures and concentrations of pack ice averaged for each month, 4-year monthly averages, and month-to-month changes. Graphs summarizing the results, such as areas of sea ice as a function of time in the various sectors of the southern ocean are included. The images demonstrate that satellite microwave data provide unique information on large-scale sea ice conditions for determining climatic conditions in polar regions and possible global climatic changes.

  10. Synergistic use of active and passive microwave in soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Chauhan, N.; Jackson, T.; Saatchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    Data gathered during the MACHYDRO experiment in central Pennsylvania in July 1990 have been utilized to study the synergistic use of active and passive microwave systems for estimating soil moisture. These data sets were obtained during an eleven-day period with NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) and Push-Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over an instrumented watershed which included agricultural fields with a number of different crop covers. Simultaneous ground truth measurements were also made in order to characterize the state of vegetation and soil moisture under a variety of meteorological conditions. A combination algorithm is presented as applied to a representative corn field in the MACHYDRO watershed.

  11. Estimating sea ice concentration from satellite passive microwave data and a physical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, D. A.; Thomas, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sea ice remote sensing and estimation of concentrations of each of several ice types from passive microwave satellite data is described. The approach is based on the Kalman filter; it incorporates surface temperature, ice advection, and ice deformation data derived from drifting buoys and uses the whole temporal microwave record to make a smoothed estimate of ice concentration. The method allows resolution of previously ambiguous surface types. An example using time histories of two SMMR measurements to resolve the fractional areas of four surface types: open water, first-year, second-year and older multiyear ice is shown.

  12. Microwave study of superconducting Sn films above and below percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Manfred H.; Ebensperger, Nikolaj G.; Thiemann, Markus; Untereiner, Gabriele; Fritz, Vincent; Javaheri, Mojtaba; Nägele, Jonathan; Rösslhuber, Roland; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of superconducting Sn films ({T}{{c}}≈ 3.8 {{K}}) change significantly when reducing the film thickness down to a few {nm}, in particular close to the percolation threshold. The low-energy electrodynamics of such Sn samples can be probed via microwave spectroscopy, e.g. with superconducting stripline resonators. Here we study Sn thin films, deposited via thermal evaporation—ranging in thickness between 38 and 842 {nm}—which encompasses the percolation transition. We use superconducting Pb stripline resonators to probe the microwave response of these Sn films in a frequency range between 4 and 20 {GHz} at temperatures from 7.2 down to 1.5 {{K}}. The measured quality factor of the resonators decreases with rising temperature due to enhanced losses. As a function of the sample thickness we observe three regimes with significantly different properties: samples below percolation, i.e. ensembles of disconnected superconducting islands, exhibit dielectric properties with negligible losses, demonstrating that macroscopic current paths are required for appreciable dynamical conductivity of Sn at GHz frequencies. Thick Sn films, as the other limit, lead to low-loss resonances both above and below T c of Sn, as expected for bulk conductors. But in an intermediate thickness regime, just above percolation and with labyrinth-like morphology of the Sn, we observe a quite different behavior: the superconducting state has a microwave response similar to the thicker, completely covering films with low microwave losses; but the metallic state of these Sn films is so lossy that resonator operation is suppressed completely.

  13. Passive microwave measurements of temperature and salinity in coastal zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H.-J. C.; Kendall, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental methods and results from the maritime remote sensing (MARSEN) experiments using dual frequency microwave radiometer detecting systems on board aircraft are described. The radiometers were operated at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz and flown above U.S. Atlantic coastal areas, Chesapeake Bay, around Puerto Rico, and over the German Bight. The advanced switched radiometers used were configured to be independent of gain variations and errors originating from front-end losses and determined the absolute brightness temperatures to within a few tenths Kelvin. Corrections to the observed brightness temperature of the ocean are analytically defined, including accounts made for roughness, the cosmic background radiation, and the solar radio source. The coastal flight data for salinity gradients and surface temperatures were compared with sea truth measured from ships and found to be accurate to within 1 C and 1 pph.

  14. Passive microwave in situ observations of Winter Weddell Sea Ica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiso, J. C.; Grenfell, T. C.; Bell, D. L.; Lange, M. A.; Ackley, S. F.

    1989-08-01

    The microwave radiative characteristics of Antarctic sea ice during a winter period were investigated continuously from R/V Polarstern during the 1986 Winter Weddell Sea Project while the ship went through about 3000 km of ice from the marginal ice zone to the coastal region and back. Radiometer measurements at 6, 10, 18, 37, and 90 GHz in vertical and horizontal polarizations were complemented by visual and video observations and measurements at 60 stations of ice thickness, salinity, temperature, snow cover, density, and other physical characteristics. Two distinct types of ice cover were observed in the marginal ice zone: small pancakes evenly distributed during the southbound leg, and ice bands with wet pancakes during the northbound leg. Other ice types observed were first-year ice covered by varying thicknesses and states of snow cover, and new and young ice found mainly in leads and polynyas. Analysis of the data shows a large variability in the multispectral microwave emissivities of these ice types, especially at 90 GHz. Over newly refrozen lead or polynya regions, several forms of new ice appear radiometrically distinct, while over thick consolidated ice with snow cover, the brightness temperatures observed at 90 GHz varied by as much as 100 K. Overall, however, at 18 GHz and lower frequencies, the emissivities of thick and cold first-year ice are relatively stable with standard deviations of about ±0.02. At the marginal ice zone, the emissivity of the ice cover is a lot less predictable and could cause large uncertainties in ice concentration estimates. The use of the 90-GHz channel in combination with a lower-frequency channel shows strong potential for more detailed characterization of the ice cover including the identification of various forms of new ice and the quantification of varying snow cover and roughness.

  15. Deposition of diamond-like films by ECR microwave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor); Pool, Frederick S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Hard amorphous hydrogenated carbon, diamond-like films are deposited using an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma with a separate radio frequency power bias applied to a substrate stage. The electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma yields low deposition pressure and creates ion species otherwise unavailable. A magnetic mirror configuration extracts special ion species from a plasma chamber. Different levels of the radio frequency power bias accelerate the ion species of the ECR plasma impinging on a substrate to form different diamond-like films. During the deposition process, a sample stage is maintained at an ambient temperature of less than 100.degree. C. No external heating is applied to the sample stage. The deposition process enables diamond-like films to be deposited on heat-sensitive substrates.

  16. Investigation of antenna pattern constraints for passive geosynchronous microwave imaging radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Skofronick, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress by investigators at Georgia Tech in defining the requirements for large space antennas for passive microwave Earth imaging systems is reviewed. In order to determine antenna constraints (e.g., the aperture size, illumination taper, and gain uncertainty limits) necessary for the retrieval of geophysical parameters (e.g., rain rate) with adequate spatial resolution and accuracy, a numerical simulation of the passive microwave observation and retrieval process is being developed. Due to the small spatial scale of precipitation and the nonlinear relationships between precipitation parameters (e.g., rain rate, water density profile) and observed brightness temperatures, the retrieval of precipitation parameters are of primary interest in the simulation studies. Major components of the simulation are described as well as progress and plans for completion. The overall goal of providing quantitative assessments of the accuracy of candidate geosynchronous and low-Earth orbiting imaging systems will continue under a separate grant.

  17. High-performance passive microwave survey on Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, A.G.; Radzikhovsky, V.N.; Kudeliya, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The quasi-optical generations of image of objects with their internal structure in millimeter (MM) and submillimeter (SMM) bands is one of the prime problems of modern radioelectronics. The main advantage of passive MM imaging systems in comparison with visible and infrared (IR) systems is small attenuation of signals in fog, cloud, smoke, dust and other obscurants. However at a panoramic scanning of space the observation time lengthens and thereby the information processing rate becomes restricted. So that single-channel system cannot image in real time. Therefore we must use many radiometers in parallel to reduce the observation time. Such system must contain receiving sensors as pixels in multibeam antenna. The use of Josephson Junctions (JJ) for this purpose together with the cryoelectronic devices like GaAs FET or SQUIDS for signal amplifications after JJ is of particular interest in this case.

  18. High-performance passive microwave survey on Josephson Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denisov, A. G.; Radzikhovsky, V. N.; Kudeliya, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    The quasi-optical generations of images of objects with their internal structure in millimeter (MM) and submillimeter (SMM) bands is one of prime problems of modern radioelectronics. The main advantage of passive MM imaging systems in comparison with visible and infrared (IR) systems is small attenuation of signals in fog, cloud, smoke, dust and other obscurants. However, at a panoramic scanning of space the observation time lengthens and thereby the information processing rate becomes restricted so that single-channel system cannot image in real time. Therefore we must use many radiometers in parallel to reduce the observation time. Such system must contain receiving sensors as pixels in multibeam antenna. The use of Josephson Junctions (JJ) for this purpose together with the cryoelectronic devices like GaAs FET (field effect transistors) or SQUIDS for signal amplifications after JJ is of particular interest in this case.

  19. Microwave surface resistance of high Tc superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Prakash R.; Pinto, R.; Kumar, Dhananjay; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    1995-09-01

    The surface resistance, Rs, at microwave frequencies has been an important qualification parameter for high temperature superconductor (HTS) thin films. HTS thin films with low Rs have been realized on many substrates, and many groups have realized Rs values in the range 300 - 400 (mu) (Omega) at 10 GHz at 77 K with YBa2Cu3O7-(delta ) (YBCO) films on <100> LaAlO3 substrates. Both microstrip resonator and parallel plate resonator techniques are being used to measure Rs values of HTS thin films. It has been observed that the value of Rs at given frequency and temperature critically depends upon the epitaxial quality and granularity of the films. For example, YBCO films grown on <100> MgO have been found to be granular and weak link limited with a significant microwave power dependence of Rs. On the other hand, YBCO films insitu grown on <100> LaAlO3 have shown better epitaxy with low Rs. This is obviously due to the much better lattice match of YBCO with <100> LaAlO3 if the targets used for laser deposition are doped with Ag. Extensive work carried out in our laboratory has shown that a Ag-doping level of around 5 wt.% in YBCO is the optimum which results in YBCO films of much improved quality. We have realized Ag-doped YBCO films with Jc values of 6 - 8 X 106 Acm-2 at 77 K and a low Rs value of 210 (mu) (Omega) at 10 GHz at 77 K on <100> LaAlO3. Both these values are the best realized on LaAlO3 to date. What is equally important is the fact that with Ag-doping the reproducibility of the epitaxial quality of the films improves significantly. This has been found to be due to the enhanced oxygenation of films during growth and the surfactant effect of Ag. Experiments have shown that even the optimum temperature for insitu growth in reduced considerably by Ag-doping. It must be mentioned, however, that the only negative aspect of Ag-doping is the higher microwave residual surface resistance, Rres, observed in these films at (very) low temperatures. This is obviously due

  20. Modeling approaches to assimilating L band passive microwave observations over land surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Chanzy, André; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Olioso, Albert; Kerr, Yann

    2002-07-01

    L band passive microwave remotely sensed data have great potential for providing estimates of soil moisture with high temporal sampling and on a regional scale. Several studies have shown the possibility of assessing the hydrological conditions deep down in soil (in the top 1 or 2 m) from these repetitive estimates of surface soil moisture. Water availability for plants, which is related to soil moisture in the root zone, is a key variable for estimating the evapotranspiration fluxes over land surfaces. This estimation is an important issue for meteorological and hydrological modeling, since it is a basic term of land surface forcing in mesoscale atmospheric circulations. However, at the present time the assimilation approach of remotely sensed brightness temperature data for operational use in the fields of meteorology and hydrology is poorly defined and important issues remain to be addressed in order to develop an operational assimilation approach. Two important issues are to identify (1) how vegetation variables describing vegetation development can be accounted for and (2) how the attenuation effects of L band microwave radiation within the canopy layer can be computed on large spatial scales. On the basis of an exhaustive data set including multiangular and dual-polarization passive microwave measurements acquired over a wheat crop during a 3-month period in 1993, two main modeling approaches are tested in this study. The principle of both approaches was based on the use of dual-polarization and multiangular observations to discriminate between the effects of soil and vegetation on the crop microwave signature. For the two approaches, both the initial soil water reservoir R2 (at the beginning of the crop development) and parameterizations of the crop development could be retrieved simultaneously from the assimilation of the passive microwave measurements. From these results, promising assimilation strategies can be expected from the multiangular Soil Moisture

  1. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galdi, M. R.; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D.; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  2. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Galdi, M. R. Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D. Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L.

    2015-12-17

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  3. Estimation of Snow Parameters Based on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing and Meteorological Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Leung; Hwang, Jenq-Neng

    1996-01-01

    A method to incorporate passive microwave remote sensing measurements within a spatially distributed snow hydrology model to provide estimates of the spatial distribution of Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) as a function of time is implemented. The passive microwave remote sensing measurements are at 25 km resolution. However, in mountain regions the spatial variability of SWE over a 25 km footprint is large due to topographic influences. On the other hand, the snow hydrology model has built-in topographic information and the capability to estimate SWE at a 1 km resolution. In our work, the snow hydrology SWE estimates are updated and corrected using SSM/I passive microwave remote sensing measurements. The method is applied to the Upper Rio Grande River Basin in the mountains of Colorado. The change in prediction of SWE from hydrology modeling with and without updating is compared with measurements from two SNOTEL sites in and near the basin. The results indicate that the method incorporating the remote sensing measurements into the hydrology model is able to more closely estimate the temporal evolution of the measured values of SWE as a function of time.

  4. Improving the instantaneous vertical profiling of precipitation for passive-microwave retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacimi, S.; Haddad, Z. S.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    Current passive-microwave retrieval approaches that are based on the a-priori knowledge provided by a representative database of columns of atmospheric variables and their corresponding microwave signatures, depend crucially on the realism of the representation of the cloud and precipitation in the column. Most approaches rely on columns produced by cloud-permitting model simulations, which suffer from oversimplifications of the very variables to which the microwave brightness temperatures are most sensitive, namely the type, concentration and relative sizes of the hydrometeors. Others rely on retrieved descriptions obtained from imperfect remotely-sensed measurements. The TRMM radar being a single-channel instrument cannot, by itself identify the phase of the condensation. The GPM radar that offers an additional Ka-band frequency should be slightly better. This presentation will summarize our approach of using higher-sensitivity ground-based measurements to address these shortcomings. During the CINDY-DYNAMO experiment (2011-2012), the dual-wavelength polarimetric radar SPolKa was deployed, providing a unique set of observations. This allows insight into rainfall characteristics for different species. Using a Bayesian approach with Mie-scattering calculations, the rainfall rate, cloud liquid water, mean diameter and other parameters can be retrieved from SPolKa data. Different assumptions (on hydrometeor habit and size distributions) for those simulations were used, and their impact on the retrievals evaluated. This preliminary study will eventually enable the elaboration of a passive-microwave retrievals' database, accounting for the quantitative vertical distribution of precipitation.

  5. The advanced microwave precipitation radiometer: A new aircraft radiometer for passive precipitation remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Spencer, Roy W.; James, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    Past studies of passive microwave measurements of precipitating systems have yielded broad empirical relationships between hydrometeors and microwave transmission. In general, these relationships fall into two categories of passive microwave precipitation retrievals rely upon the observed effect of liquid precipitation to increase the brightness temperature of a radiometrically cold background such as an ocean surface. A scattering-based method is based upon the effect that frozen hydrometeors tend to decrease the brightness temperature of a radiometrically warm background such as land. One step toward developing quantitative brightness temperature-rain rate relationships is the recent construction of a new aircraft instrument sponsored by National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC). This instrument is the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) designed and built by Georgia Tech Research Institute to fly aboard high altitude research aircraft such as the NASA ER-2. The AMPR and its accompanying data acquisition system are mounted in the Q-bay compartment of the NASA ER-2.

  6. Improvement of Passive Microwave Rainfall Retrieval Algorithm over Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shige, S.; Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    The microwave radiometer (MWR) algorithms underestimate heavy rainfall associated with shallow orographic rainfall systems owing to weak ice scattering signatures. Underestimation of the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) MWR has been mitigated by an orographic/nonorographic rainfall classification scheme (Shige et al. 2013, 2015; Taniguchi et al. 2013; Yamamoto and Shige 2015). The orographic/nonorographic rainfall classification scheme is developed on the basis of orographically forced upward vertical motion and the convergence of surface moisture flux estimated from ancillary data. Lookup tables derived from orographic precipitation profiles are used to estimate rainfall for an orographic rainfall pixel, whereas those derived from original precipitation profiles are used to estimate rainfall for a nonorographic rainfall pixel. The orographic/nonorographic rainfall classification scheme has been used by the version of GSMaP products, which are available in near real time (about 4 h after observation) via the Internet (http://sharaku.eorc.jaxa.jp/GSMaP/index.htm). The current version of GSMaP MWR algorithm with the orographic/nonorographic rainfall classification scheme improves rainfall estimation over the entire tropical region, but there is still room for improvement. In this talk, further improvement of orographic rainfall retrievals will be shown.

  7. Microwave sintering of sol–gel composite films using a domestic microwave oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makiko; Matsumoto, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Feasibility study of sol–gel composite microwave sintering using a domestic microwave oven was carried out. Two kinds of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) powders were mixed with PZT sol–gel solution and the mixture was sprayed onto 3-mm-thick titanium substrate. The films were sintered by 700 W domestic oven for 10 min. Ultrasonic measurement was carried out in pulse–echo mode and clear multiple echoes were confirmed. It would be suitable method to fabricate high frequency broadband focused ultrasonic transducers. Further research is required to improve sintering degree.

  8. Remote detection and ecological monitoring of the industrial and natural nuclei activity of radioactive elements based on passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, Liliya K.; Chistyakov, Vyacheslav Y.; Losev, Dmitry V.; Penin, Sergei T.; Tarabrin, Yurij K.; Yakubov, Vladimir P.; Yurjev, Igor A.

    1998-12-01

    The passive remote method of microwave radiometry and its instrumental realization for express diagnostics of radioactive elements in the atmosphere have been discussed. Analysis of the microwave radiation due to ionization and dissociation of atmospheric components interacting with radioactive elements is carried out. The photochemical processes resulting in background microwave radiation power have been discussed. As an example, the results of natural experiment of detecting the atomic hydrogen radiation in the plume of emissions of nuclear cycle processing plants have been presented.

  9. Passive microwave response to vegetation and soil moisture on agricultural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B.; Bullock, Paul R.

    2014-10-01

    The SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active/Passive Validation Experiment) was carried out over the summer of 2012 in Manitoba, Canada. The goal of the project was to improve the accuracy of satellite based remote sensing of soil moisture. Data were gathered during a 42-day field campaign with surface measurements on 55 different agricultural fields in south-western Manitoba. The extended duration of the campaign, contrast in soil textures, and variety of crop types over the study region provided an excellent range of soil moisture and vegetation conditions. The study fields ranged from bare to fully vegetated, with volumetric soil moisture levels spanning almost 50%. Remotely sensed data were collected on 17 days by aircraft at 1.4 Ghz with a microwave radiometer at two different resolutions. Observed brightness temperatures from the radiometer showed a typical inverse relationship to the near simultaneous soil moisture measurements from the field. This study will focus on improving existing models for passive microwave retrieval of soil moisture using a more extensive data set of field-measured soil temperature, soil moisture and vegetation biomass from a wider range of crops than has been available in previous studies. The extensive ground data collected will allow for both a validation of the high-resolution passive soil moisture estimate, as well as an analysis on the effect of scaling to a lower resolution passive measurement.

  10. Passive/Active Microwave Soil Moisture Disaggregation Using SMAPVEX12 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.; Colliander, A.

    2015-12-01

    The SMAPVEX12 experiment was conducted during June-July 2012 in Manitoba, Canada with the goal of collecting remote sensing data and ground measurements for the development and testing of soil moisture retrieval algorithms under different vegetation and soil conditions for the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite launched in January 2015. The aircraft based soil moisture data provided by the passive/active microwave sensor PALS (Passive and Active L and S band System) has a nominal spatial resolution of 1500 m. In this study, a change detection algorithm is used for disaggregation of coarse passive microwave soil moisture retrievals with radar backscatter coefficients obtained with the higher spatial resolution UAVSAR (Unmanned Air Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar). The accuracy of the disaggregated change in soil moisture was evaluated using ground based soil moisture measurements. Results show that the disaggregation products are well correlated to in situ measurements. Based on the R2, the highest resolution disaggregated product at 5 m exhibits soil moisture heterogeneity that reflects the distribution of the crops. The difference of spatial standard deviation between the disaggregated and in situ soil moisture ranges from <0.001-0.131 m3/m3 also proves the spatial capability of the change detection algorithm at 5 m scale.

  11. Reprocessing the Historical Satellite Passive Microwave Record at Enhanced Spatial Resolutions using Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardman, M.; Brodzik, M. J.; Long, D. G.; Paget, A. C.; Armstrong, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Beginning in 1978, the satellite passive microwave data record has been a mainstay of remote sensing of the cryosphere, providing twice-daily, near-global spatial coverage for monitoring changes in hydrologic and cryospheric parameters that include precipitation, soil moisture, surface water, vegetation, snow water equivalent, sea ice concentration and sea ice motion. Currently available global gridded passive microwave data sets serve a diverse community of hundreds of data users, but do not meet many requirements of modern Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) or Climate Data Records (CDRs), most notably in the areas of intersensor calibration, quality-control, provenance and consistent processing methods. The original gridding techniques were relatively primitive and were produced on 25 km grids using the original EASE-Grid definition that is not easily accommodated in modern software packages. Further, since the first Level 3 data sets were produced, the Level 2 passive microwave data on which they were based have been reprocessed as Fundamental CDRs (FCDRs) with improved calibration and documentation. We are funded by NASA MEaSUREs to reprocess the historical gridded data sets as EASE-Grid 2.0 ESDRs, using the most mature available Level 2 satellite passive microwave (SMMR, SSM/I-SSMIS, AMSR-E) records from 1978 to the present. We have produced prototype data from SSM/I and AMSR-E for the year 2003, for review and feedback from our Early Adopter user community. The prototype data set includes conventional, low-resolution ("drop-in-the-bucket" 25 km) grids and enhanced-resolution grids derived from the two candidate image reconstruction techniques we are evaluating: 1) Backus-Gilbert (BG) interpolation and 2) a radiometer version of Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (SIR). We summarize our temporal subsetting technique, algorithm tuning parameters and computational costs, and include sample SSM/I images at enhanced resolutions of up to 3 km. We are actively

  12. Influence of passive potential on the electronic property of the passive film formed on Ti in 0.1 M HCl solution during ultrasonic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Li, D G; Wang, J D; Chen, D R; Liang, P

    2016-03-01

    The influence of the applied passive potential on the electronic property of the passive film formed on Ti at different potentials in 0.1M HCl solution during ultrasonic cavitation, was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and Mott-Schottky plot. The influence of the applied passive potential on the structure and composition of the passive film was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results showed that the applied passive potential can obviously affect the electronic property of the passive film formed on Ti during ultrasonic cavitation. The resistance of the passive film increased, and the donor density of the passive film decreased with increasing the potential. The flat band potential moved to positive direction and the band gap of the passive film moved to negative direction with increasing potential. AES and XPS results indicated that the thickness of the passive film increased evidently with applying passive potential. The passive film was mainly composed of the mixture of TiO and TiO2. While the TiO2 content increased with increasing the applied passive potential, and the crystallization of the passive film increased with the increased potential.

  13. Microwave excitation of spin wave beams in thin ferromagnetic films

    PubMed Central

    Gruszecki, P.; Kasprzak, M.; Serebryannikov, A. E.; Krawczyk, M.; Śmigaj, W.

    2016-01-01

    An inherent element of research and applications in photonics is a beam of light. In magnonics, which is the magnetic counterpart of photonics, where spin waves are used instead of electromagnetic waves to transmit and process information, the lack of a beam source limits exploration. Here, we present an approach enabling generation of narrow spin wave beams in thin homogeneous nanosized ferromagnetic films by microwave current. We show that the desired beam-type behavior can be achieved with the aid of a properly designed coplanar waveguide transducer generating a nonuniform microwave magnetic field. We test this idea using micromagnetic simulations, confirming numerically that the resulting spin wave beams propagate over distances of several micrometers. The proposed approach requires neither inhomogeneity of the ferromagnetic film nor nonuniformity of the biasing magnetic field. It can be generalized to different magnetization configurations and yield multiple spin wave beams of different width at the same frequency. PMID:26971711

  14. Low-nickel stainless steel passive film in simulated concrete pore solution: A SIMS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, S.; Bastidas, D. M.; Ryan, M. P.; Criado, M.; McPhail, D. S.; Bastidas, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    Low-nickel and AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel (SS) passive films were studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). An alkaline Ca(OH) 2 saturated test solution containing different chloride additions was used at room temperature. The passive film formed consists mainly of an inner chromium-rich oxide layer and an outer iron-rich oxide layer. The chemistry of the passive film depends strongly on the chloride content in the alkaline solution. Under these exposure conditions nickel was detected in the outer part of the oxide, whereas chloride ions were not found in the passive film for either the low-nickel or AISI 304 SS alloys.

  15. Microwave Absorption in Graphene Films: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, K. G.; Paddubskaya, A. G.; Valynets, N. I.; Voronovich-Solonevich, S. P.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Kaplas, T.; Svirko, Yu.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of Kα microwave radiation with ultrathin graphene films is studied. Although the thickness of these films is thousands of times smaller than the skin depth, they can absorb a significant fraction of the incident radiation. The possibility of controlling the amount of absorption and reflection of waves incident on graphene is demonstrated. In particular, by choosing the substrate parameters and the angle of incidence, it is possible to increase the absorption in graphene to >50%. For certain angles of incidence it is possible to have the TE-wave reflected, while the TM-wave is transmitted. These effects can be used to create ultrathin (atomic thicknesses) absorbers and polarizers.

  16. High-frequency characterization and modeling of paraelectric/superconductor resonators for high power-handling microwave passive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seron, D.; Guyard, S.; Bouzehouane, K.; Lemaitre, Y.; Marcilhac, B.; Mage, J. C.

    2007-10-01

    The theoretical conditions required to observe reduced nonlinearities in passive microwave devices made of a paraelectric (PE) thin layer and a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) thin film are presented. In a transmission line (TL) combining both materials, the nonlinear permittivity ɛr(Vrf) of the PE generates a nonlinear capacitive contribution Cd(Vrf), whereas the nonlinear penetration depth λ(Irf) of the HTS produces a nonlinear inductive contribution Ld(Irf). These contributions act in opposite ways. Under determined conditions that will be defined, they may fully compensate or at least lead to the reduction of the spurious signal level. The HTS nonlinearities may be lowered by employing very thin layers of PE. In this case, the high dielectric loss tangent (tanδ ) of PE should not be such an issue. Based on experimental results obtained with superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-δ resonators integrating different thicknesses of paraelectric SrTiO3 (STO) deposited on LaAlO3 substrates, the loss level could then be considered in the simulation of the proposed compensation effect. The results show that the reduction of the unloaded quality factor (Q0) as the thickness of STO increases also impacts the level of spurious signals. Then, an analytic expression for the Q0 of a resonant TL that integrates a PE and a HTS thin layer is proposed. It specifies the conditions for reducing the total nonlinear response. These results could then be applied to realize high power handling HTS passive microwave devices.

  17. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) in the root zone is a key factor governing water and energy fluxes at the land surface and its accurate knowledge is critical to predictions of weather and near-term climate, nutrient cycles, crop-yield, and ecosystem productivity. Microwave observations, such as those at L-band, are highly sensitive to soil moisture in the upper few centimeters (near-surface). The two satellite-based missions dedicated to soil moisture estimation include, the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) [4] mission. The SMAP mission will include active and passive sensors at L-band to provide global observations of SM, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. These observations can significantly improve root zone soil moisture estimates through data assimilation into land surface models (LSMs). Both the active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave sensors measure radiation quantities that are functions of soil dielectric constant and exhibit similar sensitivities to SM. In addition to the SM sensitivity, radar backscatter is highly sensitive to roughness of soil surface and scattering within the vegetation. These effects may produce a much larger dynamic range in backscatter than that produced due to SM changes alone. In this study, we discuss the field observations of active and passive signatures of growing corn at L-band from several seasons during the tenth Microwave, Water and Energy Balance Experiment (MicroWEX-10) conducted in North Central Florida, and to understand the sensitivity of these signatures to soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions. The MicroWEXs are a series of season-long field experiments conducted during the growing seasons of sweet corn, cotton, and energy cane over the past six years (for example, [22]). The corn was planted on July 5 and harvested on September 23, 2011 during MicroWEX-10. The size of the field was 0.04 km2 and the soils

  18. Comparison of active and passive microwave signatures of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Crawford, J. P.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Holt, B.; Carsey, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    In March 1988, overlapping active and passive microwave instrument data were acquired over Arctic sea ice using the NASA DC-8 aircraft equipped with multifrequency, variable polarization SAR and radiometer. Flights were conducted as a series of coordinated underflights of the DMSP SSM/I satellite radiometer in order to validate ice products derived from the SSM/I radiances. Subsequent flights by an NRL P-3 aircraft enabled overlapping high-resolution, single frequency image data to be acquired over the same regions using a Ka-band scanning microwave radiometer. In this paper, techniques are discussed for the accurate coregistration of the three aircraft datasets. Precise coregistration to an accuracy of 100 m plus or minus 25 m has, for the first time, enabled the detailed comparison of temporally and spatially coincident active and passive airborne microwave datasets. Preliminary results from the intercomparisons indicate that the SAR has highly frequency- and polarization-dependent signatures, which at 5.3 GHz (C-band) show an extremely high correlation with the 37 GHz radiometric temperatures.

  19. Thin Sea-Ice Thickness as Inferred from Passive Microwave and In Situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naoki, Kazuhiro; Ukita, Jinro; Nishio, Fumihiko; Nakayama, Masashige; Comiso, Josefino C.; Gasiewski, Al

    2007-01-01

    Since microwave radiometric signals from sea-ice strongly reflect physical conditions of a layer near the ice surface, a relationship of brightness temperature with thickness is possible especially during the early stages of ice growth. Sea ice is most saline during formation stage and as the salinity decreases with time while at the same time the thickness of the sea ice increases, a corresponding change in the dielectric properties and hence the brightness temperature may occur. This study examines the extent to which the relationships of thickness with brightness temperature (and with emissivity) hold for thin sea-ice, approximately less than 0.2 -0.3 m, using near concurrent measurements of sea-ice thickness in the Sea of Okhotsk from a ship and passive microwave brightness temperature data from an over-flying aircraft. The results show that the brightness temperature and emissivity increase with ice thickness for the frequency range of 10-37 GHz. The relationship is more pronounced at lower frequencies and at the horizontal polarization. We also established an empirical relationship between ice thickness and salinity in the layer near the ice surface from a field experiment, which qualitatively support the idea that changes in the near-surface brine characteristics contribute to the observed thickness-brightness temperature/emissivity relationship. Our results suggest that for thin ice, passive microwave radiometric signals contain, ice thickness information which can be utilized in polar process studies.

  20. On the determination of atmospheric path length by passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave radiometer techniques were evaluated for use in atmospheric path length correction of Pacific Plate Motion Experiment interferometer measurements. It is shown that passive microwave radiometry allows precise measurement of the brightness temperature of the sky. It is also noted that the technological requirements of radiometers are very different from the requirements of radio astronomy. The technology was used in the construction of radiometers which are sufficient for use in the path length correction problem. A simulation study shows that, when combined with surface meteorology data, passive microwave radiometer data would allow a determination of the path length correction to better than 2 cm at the zenith. By a careful choice of frequencies, a dual frequency system would allow a measurement of the path length correction to better than 4 cm at zenith angles as great as 60 deg. Because of the wide range of weather conditions to be expected for the PPME sites (which include Alaska, Hawaii and Massachusetts), it will probably be necessary to use a separate correction algorithm for each site.

  1. High Resolution UAV-based Passive Microwave L-band Imaging of Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Stachura, M.; Elston, J.; McIntyre, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Due to long electrical wavelengths and aperture size limitations the scaling of passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture from spaceborne low-resolution applications to high resolution applications suitable for precision agriculture requires use of low flying aerial vehicles. This presentation summarizes a project to develop a commercial Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hosting a precision microwave radiometer for mapping of soil moisture in high-value shallow root-zone crops. The project is based on the use of the Tempest electric-powered UAV and a compact digital L-band (1400-1427 MHz) passive microwave radiometer developed specifically for extremely small and lightweight aerial platforms or man-portable, tractor, or tower-based applications. Notable in this combination are a highly integrated UAV/radiometer antenna design and use of both the upwelling emitted signal from the surface and downwelling cold space signal for precise calibration using a lobe-correlating radiometer architecture. The system achieves a spatial resolution comparable to the altitude of the UAV above the ground while referencing upwelling measurements to the constant and well-known background temperature of cold space. The radiometer incorporates digital sampling and radio frequency interference mitigation along with infrared, near-infrared, and visible (red) sensors for surface temperature and vegetation biomass correction. This NASA-sponsored project is being developed both for commercial application in cropland water management, L-band satellite validation, and estuarian plume studies.

  2. Analysis of passive microwave signatures over snow-covered mountainous area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R. S.; Durand, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of snow distribution over mountainous area is critical for climate studies and the passive microwave(PM) measurements have been widely used and invested in order to obtain information about snowpack properties. Understanding and analyzing the signatures for the explicit inversion of the remote sensing data from land surfaces is required for successful using of passive microwave sensors but this task is often ambiguous due to the large variability of physical conditions and object types. In this paper, we discuss the pattern of measured brightness temperatures and emissivities at vertical and horizontal polarization over the frequency range of 10.7 to 89 GHz of land surfaces under various snow and vegetation conditions. The Multiband polarimetric Scanning Radiometer(PSR) imagery is used over NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment(CLPX) study area with ground-based measurements of snow depth and snow properties. Classification of snow under various conditions in mountainous area is implemented based on different patterns of microwave signatures.

  3. Spectra of Microwave Oscillations in Ferrospinel Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badrtdinov, G. S.; Mitlina, L. A.; Meleshko, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The absorption spectra of ferrospinel single crystal films obtained by the method of chemical transport reactions are considered. It is demonstrated that along with a homogeneous resonance, additional absorption peaks corresponding to exchange spin modes localized in the surface layer are observed in the absorption spectrum investigated with an EPR spectrometer in the case of perpendicular orientation of the film with respect to an external static magnetic field. Resonant interaction of magnetostatic oscillations with exchange spin modes in the surface layer is detected in the case of tangent magnetization. The width of the magnetostatic layer and the ranges of existence of the surface and volume modes depend on the relationship between the constants of uniaxial surface anisotropy and crystallographic magnetic anisotropy. The wave numbers of the magnetostatic and exchange spin modes, the parameters of inhomogeneous exchange, and the effective magnon masses are calculated.

  4. Passive film growth on titanium alloys: physicochemical and biologic considerations.

    PubMed

    Eliades, T

    1997-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen derivatives (hydroxy peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and singlet oxygen) on the precipitation of inorganic and organic complexes onto the surface of titanium implant alloys is discussed in this review. In addition, the effect of possible implication of several biologic entities surrounding the implant on the implant-tissue interface constituents is described. Evidence from relevant studies suggests that local microenvironmental byproducts and factors associated with the inflammatory response resulting from the implant-induced tissue insult may enhance the expressivity of the inherent, clinically important property of titanium to form oxides. Growth of titanium oxide may be explained through several processes derived from biologic, thermodynamic, and electrochemical approaches. The models proposed to interpret this phenomenon are often contradictory, demonstrating inward or outward from the bulk material passive film growth, with increasing or self-limiting levels of oxide formation as a function of time. However, in vivo observations are consistent with aging-induced thickening of the complexes precipitated on the implant material surface. This review attempts to clarify several critical issues pertaining to passive film formation and kinetics on titanium-alloy surfaces.

  5. Microwave response of high transition temperature superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix Antonio

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the microwave response of YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta), Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O high transition temperature superconducting (HTS) thin films by performing power transmission measurements. These measurements were carried out in the temperature range of 300 K to 20 K and at frequencies within the range of 30 to 40 GHz. Through these measurements we have determined the magnetic penetration depth (lambda), the complex conductivity (sigma(sup *) = sigma(sub 1) - j sigma(sub 2)) and the surface resistance (R(sub s)). An estimate of the intrinsic penetration depth (lambda approx. 121 nm) for the YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta) HTS has been obtained from the film thickness dependence of lambda. This value compares favorably with the best values reported so far (approx. 140 nm) in single crystals and high quality c-axis oriented thin films. Furthermore, it was observed that our technique is sensitive to the intrinsic anisotropy of lambda in this superconductor. Values of lambda are also reported for Bi-based and Tl-based thin films. We observed that for the three types of superconductors, both sigma(sub 1) and sigma(sub 2) increased when cooling the films below their transition temperature. The measured R(sub s) are in good agreement with other R(sub S) values obtained using resonant activity techniques if we assume a quadratic frequency dependence. Our analysis shows that, of the three types of HTS films studied, the YBa2Cu3O(7 - delta) thin film, deposited by laser ablation and off-axis magnetron sputtering are the most promising for microwave applications.

  6. ASPECTS OF ARCTIC SEA ICE OBSERVABLE BY SEQUENTIAL PASSIVE MICROWAVE OBSERVATIONS FROM THE NIMBUS-5 SATELLITE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, William J.; Gloersen, Per; Zwally, H. Jay; ,

    1984-01-01

    Observations made from 1972 to 1976 with the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer on board the Nimbus-5 satellite provide sequential synoptic information of the Arctic sea ice cover. This four-year data set was used to construct a fairly continuous series of three-day average 19-GHz passive microwave images which has become a valuable source of polar information, yielding many anticipated and unanticipated discoveries of the sea ice canopy observed in its entirety through the clouds and during the polar night. Short-term, seasonal, and annual variations of key sea ice parameters, such as ice edge position, ice types, mixtures of ice types, ice concentrations, and snow melt on the ice, are presented for various parts of the Arctic.

  7. Multifrequency passive microwave observations of soil moisture in an arid rangeland environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Parry, R.; Kustas, W. P.; Ritchie, J. C.; Shutko, A. M.; Khaldin, A.; Reutov, E.; Novichikhin, E.; Liberman, B.

    1992-01-01

    A cooperative experiment was conducted by teams from the U.S. and U.S.S.R. to evaluate passive microwave instruments and algorithms used to estimate surface soil moisture. Experiments were conducted as part of an interdisciplinary experiment in an arid rangeland watershed located in the southwest United States. Soviet microwave radiometers operating at wavelengths of 2.25, 21 and 27 cm were flown on a U.S. aircraft. Radio frequency interference limited usable data to the 2.25 and 21 cm systems. Data have been calibrated and compared to ground observations of soil moisture. These analyses showed that the 21 cm system could produce reliable and useful soil moisture information and that the 2.25 cm system was of no value for soil moisture estimation in this experiment.

  8. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas.

  9. Passive microwave (SSM/I) satellite predictions of valley glacier hydrology, Matanuska Glacier, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopczynski, S.E.; Ramage, J.; Lawson, D.; Goetz, S.; Evenson, E.; Denner, J.; Larson, G.

    2008-01-01

    We advance an approach to use satellite passive microwave observations to track valley glacier snowmelt and predict timing of spring snowmelt-induced floods at the terminus. Using 37 V GHz brightness temperatures (Tb) from the Special Sensor Microwave hnager (SSM/I), we monitor snowmelt onset when both Tb and the difference between the ascending and descending overpasses exceed fixed thresholds established for Matanuska Glacier. Melt is confirmed by ground-measured air temperature and snow-wetness, while glacier hydrologic responses are monitored by a stream gauge, suspended-sediment sensors and terminus ice velocity measurements. Accumulation area snowmelt timing is correlated (R2 = 0.61) to timing of the annual snowmelt flood peak and can be predicted within ??5 days. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. An Evaluation of Antarctica as a Calibration Target for Passive Microwave Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing at L-band (1.4 GHz) is sensitive to soil moisture and sea surface salinity, both important climate variables. Science studies involving these variables can now take advantage of new satellite L-band observations. The first mission with regular global passive microwave observations at L-band is the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), launched November, 2009. A second mission, NASA's Aquarius, was launched June, 201l. A third mission, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is scheduled to launch in 2014. Together, these three missions may provide a decade-long data record -- provided that they are intercalibrated. The intercalibration is best performed at the radiance (brightness temperature) level, and Antarctica is proving to be a key calibration target. However, Antarctica has thus far not been fully characterized as a potential target. This paper will present evaluations of Antarctica as a microwave calibration target for the above satellite missions. Preliminary analyses have identified likely target areas, such as the vicinity of Dome-C and larger areas within East Antarctica. Physical sources of temporal and spatial variability of polar firn are key to assessing calibration uncertainty. These sources include spatial variability of accumulation rate, compaction, surface characteristics (dunes, micro-topography), wind patterns, and vertical profiles of density and temperature. Using primarily SMOS data, variability is being empirically characterized and attempts are being made to attribute observed variability to physical sources. One expected outcome of these studies is the potential discovery of techniques for remotely sensing--over all of Antarctica--parameters such as surface temperature.

  11. Sensitivity of Passive Microwave Snow Depth Retrievals to Weather Effects and Snow Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Thorsten; Powell, Dylan C.; Wang, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Snow fall and snow accumulation are key climate parameters due to the snow's high albedo, its thermal insulation, and its importance to the global water cycle. Satellite passive microwave radiometers currently provide the only means for the retrieval of snow depth and/or snow water equivalent (SWE) over land as well as over sea ice from space. All algorithms make use of the frequency-dependent amount of scattering of snow over a high-emissivity surface. Specifically, the difference between 37- and 19-GHz brightness temperatures is used to determine the depth of the snow or the SWE. With the availability of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System Aqua satellite (launched in May 2002), a wider range of frequencies can be utilized. In this study we investigate, using model simulations, how snow depth retrievals are affected by the evolution of the physical properties of the snow (mainly grain size growth and densification), how they are affected by variations in atmospheric conditions and, finally, how the additional channels may help to reduce errors in passive microwave snow retrievals. The sensitivity of snow depth retrievals to atmospheric water vapor is confirmed through the comparison with precipitable water retrievals from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-B). The results suggest that a combination of the 10-, 19-, 37-, and 89-GHz channels may significantly improve retrieval accuracy. Additionally, the development of a multisensor algorithm utilizing AMSR-E and AMSU-B data may help to obtain weather-corrected snow retrievals.

  12. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 1; Method and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Petty, Grant W.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Bell, Thomas L.; Braun, Scott A.; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Johnson, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    A revised Bayesian algorithm for estimating surface rain rate, convective rain proportion, and latent heating/drying profiles from satellite-borne passive microwave radiometer observations over ocean backgrounds is described. The algorithm searches a large database of cloud-radiative model simulations to find cloud profiles that are radiatively consistent with a given set of microwave radiance measurements. The properties of these radiatively consistent profiles are then composited to obtain best estimates of the observed properties. The revised algorithm is supported by an expanded and more physically consistent database of cloud-radiative model simulations. The algorithm also features a better quantification of the convective and non-convective contributions to total rainfall, a new geographic database, and an improved representation of background radiances in rain-free regions. Bias and random error estimates are derived from applications of the algorithm to synthetic radiance data, based upon a subset of cloud resolving model simulations, and from the Bayesian formulation itself. Synthetic rain rate and latent heating estimates exhibit a trend of high (low) bias for low (high) retrieved values. The Bayesian estimates of random error are propagated to represent errors at coarser time and space resolutions, based upon applications of the algorithm to TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. Errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates at 0.5 deg resolution range from approximately 50% at 1 mm/h to 20% at 14 mm/h. These errors represent about 70-90% of the mean random deviation between collocated passive microwave and spaceborne radar rain rate estimates. The cumulative algorithm error in TMI estimates at monthly, 2.5 deg resolution is relatively small (less than 6% at 5 mm/day) compared to the random error due to infrequent satellite temporal sampling (8-35% at the same rain rate).

  13. A passive microwave snow depth algorithm with a proxy for snow metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, E.G.; Mognard, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    Passive microwave brightness temperatures of snowpacks depend not only on the snow depth, but also on the internal snowpack properties, particularly the grain size, which changes through the winter. Algorithms that assume a constant grain size can yield erroneous estimates of snow depth or water equivalent. For snowpacks that are subject to temperatures well below freezing, the bulk temperature gradient through the snowpack controls the metamorphosis of the snow grains. This study used National Weather Service (NWS) station measurements of snow depth and air temperature from the Northern US Great Plains to determine temporal and spatial variability of the snow depth and bulk snowpack temperature gradient. This region is well suited for this study because it consists primarily of open farmland or prairie, has little relief, is subject to very cold temperatures, and has more than 280 reporting stations. A geostatistical technique called Kriging was used to grid the randomly spaced snow depth measurements. The resulting snow depth maps were then compared with the passive microwave observations from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). Two snow seasons were examined: 1988-89, a typical snow year, and 1996-97, a record year for snow that was responsible for extensive flooding in the Red River Basin. Inspection of the time series of snow depth and microwave spectral gradient (the difference between the 19 and 37 GHz bands) showed that while the snowpack was constant, the spectral gradient continued to increase. However, there was a strong correlation (0.6 < R2 < 0.9) between the spectral gradient and the cumulative bulk temperature gradient through the snowpack (TGI). Hence, TGI is an index of grain size metamorphism that has occurred within the snowpack. TGI time series from 21 representative sites across the region and the corresponding SSM/I observations were used to develop an algorithm for snow depth that requires daily air temperatures. Copyright ?? 2002

  14. A Blended Global Snow Product using Visible, Passive Microwave and Scatterometer Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James L.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Eylander, John B.; Riggs, George A.; Nghiem, Son V.; Tedesco, Marco; Kim, Edward; Montesano, Paul M.; Kelly, Richard E. J.; Casey, Kimberly A.; Choudhury, Bhaskar

    2009-01-01

    A joint U.S. Air Force/NASA blended, global snow product that utilizes Earth Observation System (EOS) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) and QuikSCAT (Quick Scatterometer) (QSCAT) data has been developed. Existing snow products derived from these sensors have been blended into a single, global, daily, user-friendly product by employing a newly-developed Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Snow Algorithm (ANSA). This initial blended-snow product uses minimal modeling to expeditiously yield improved snow products, which include snow cover extent, fractional snow cover, snow water equivalent (SWE), onset of snowmelt, and identification of actively melting snow cover. The blended snow products are currently 25-km resolution. These products are validated with data from the lower Great Lakes region of the U.S., from Colorado during the Cold Lands Processes Experiment (CLPX), and from Finland. The AMSR-E product is especially useful in detecting snow through clouds; however, passive microwave data miss snow in those regions where the snow cover is thin, along the margins of the continental snowline, and on the lee side of the Rocky Mountains, for instance. In these regions, the MODIS product can map shallow snow cover under cloud-free conditions. The confidence for mapping snow cover extent is greater with the MODIS product than with the microwave product when cloud-free MODIS observations are available. Therefore, the MODIS product is used as the default for detecting snow cover. The passive microwave product is used as the default only in those areas where MODIS data are not applicable due to the presence of clouds and darkness. The AMSR-E snow product is used in association with the difference between ascending and descending satellite passes or Diurnal Amplitude Variations (DAV) to detect the onset of melt, and a QSCAT product will be used to

  15. Signatures of Hydrometeor Species from Airborne Passive Microwave Data for Frequencies 10-183 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Leppert, Kenneth, II

    2014-01-01

    There are 2 basic precipitation retrieval methods using passive microwave measurements: (1) Emission-based: Based on the tendency of liquid precipitation to cause an increase in brightness temperature (BT) primarily at frequencies below 22 GHz over a radiometrically cold background, often an ocean background (e.g., Spencer et al. 1989; Adler et al. 1991; McGaughey et al. 1996); and (2) Scattering-based: Based on the tendency of precipitation-sized ice to scatter upwelling radiation, thereby reducing the measured BT over a relatively warmer (usually land) background at frequencies generally 37 GHz (e.g., Spencer et al. 1989; Smith et al. 1992; Ferraro and Marks 1995). Passive microwave measurements have also been used to detect intense convection (e.g., Spencer and Santek 1985) and for the detection of hail (e.g., Cecil 2009; Cecil and Blankenship 2012; Ferraro et al. 2014). The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission expands upon the successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission program to provide global rainfall and snowfall observations every 3 hours (Hou et al. 2014). One of the instruments on board the GPM Core Observatory is the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) which is a conically-scanning microwave radiometer with 13 channels ranging from 10-183 GHz. Goal of this study: Determine the signatures of various hydrometeor species in terms of BTs measured at frequencies used by GMI by using data collected on 3 case days (all having intense/severe convection) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment conducted over Oklahoma in 2011.

  16. Modeling the Effect of Vegetation on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y. P.; Inguva, R.; Crosson, W. L.; Coleman, T. L.; Laymon, C.; Fahsi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of vegetation on passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture is studied. The radiative transfer modeling work of Njoku and Kong is applied to a stratified medium of which the upper layer is treated as a layer of vegetation. An effective dielectric constant for this vegetation layer is computed using estimates of the dielectric constant of individual components of the vegetation layer. The horizontally-polarized brightness temperature is then computed as a function of the incidence angle. Model predictions are used to compare with the data obtained in the Huntsville '96, remote sensing of soil moisture experiment, and with predictions obtained using a correction procedure of Jackson and Schmugge.

  17. Mapping the spatial distribution and time evolution of snow water equivalent with passive microwave measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, J.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.; Wood, A.W.; Hwang, J.-N.; Lettenmaier, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm that estimates the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of snow water equivalent and snow depth based on passive remote sensing measurements. It combines the inversion of passive microwave remote sensing measurements via dense media radiative transfer modeling results with snow accumulation and melt model predictions to yield improved estimates of snow depth and snow water equivalent, at a pixel resolution of 5 arc-min. In the inversion, snow grain size evolution is constrained based on pattern matching by using the local snow temperature history. This algorithm is applied to produce spatial snow maps of Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado. The simulation results are compared with that of the snow accumulation and melt model and a linear regression method. The quantitative comparison with the ground truth measurements from four Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites in the basin shows that this algorithm is able to improve the estimation of snow parameters.

  18. Technology advances in active and passive microwave sensing through 1985. [microwave technology for the Seasat-A and Nimbus-G satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    The capabilities of passive and active microwave sensors are discussed. The Nimbus-G and Seasat-A scanning multichannel microwave spectrometer, the Seasat-A radar altimeter, scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar represent the first systematic attempt at exploring a wide variety of applications utilizing microwave sensing techniques and are indicators of the directions in which the pertinent technology is likely to evolve. The trend is toward high resolution multi-frequency imagers spanning wide frequency ranges and wide swaths requiring sophisticated receivers, real-time data processors and most importantly, complex antennas.

  19. Properties of passive nano films on zircaloy-4 affected by defects induced by hydrogen permeation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jun-Ji; Ling, Yun-Han; Zhang, Rui-Qian; Dai, Xun; Bai, Xin-De

    2014-08-01

    In this work, hydrogen absorption and the permeation behavior of the passive layer formed on zircaloy-4 are investigated. Potentiodynamic polarization, Mott—Schottky analysis, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Raman scattering spectroscopy are employed to characterize the passive defects before and after hydrogen permeation. It is found that the nanoscale passive ZrO2 films play an important role in the resistance against corrosion; hydrogen impingement, however, reduces the passive impedance towards hydrothermal oxidation. The increase of defects (vacancies) in passive film is probably attributed to the degradation. We believe that this finding will provide valuable insight into the understanding of the corrosion mechanism of zircaloys used in light water reactors.

  20. Microwave-assisted Low-temperature Growth of Thin Films in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Reeja-Jayan, B.; Harrison, Katharine L.; Yang, K.; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yilmaz, A. E.; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2012-01-01

    Thin films find a variety of technological applications. Assembling thin films from atoms in the liquid phase is intrinsically a non-equilibrium phenomenon, controlled by the competition between thermodynamics and kinetics. We demonstrate here that microwave energy can assist in assembling atoms into thin films directly on a substrate at significantly lower temperatures than conventional processes, potentially enabling plastic-based electronics. Both experimental and electromagnetic simulation results show microwave fields can selectively interact with a conducting layer on the substrate despite the discrepancy between the substrate size and the microwave wavelength. The microwave interaction leads to localized energy absorption, heating, and subsequent nucleation and growth of the desired films. Electromagnetic simulations show remarkable agreement with experiments and are employed to understand the physics of the microwave interaction and identify conditions to improve uniformity of the films. The films can be patterned and grown on various substrates, enabling their use in widespread applications. PMID:23256037

  1. Evaluation of multichannel Wiener filters applied to fine resolution passive microwave images of first-year sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Full, William E.; Eppler, Duane T.

    1993-01-01

    The effectivity of multichannel Wiener filters to improve images obtained with passive microwave systems was investigated by applying Wiener filters to passive microwave images of first-year sea ice. Four major parameters which define the filter were varied: the lag or pixel offset between the original and the desired scenes, filter length, the number of lines in the filter, and the weight applied to the empirical correlation functions. The effect of each variable on the image quality was assessed by visually comparing the results. It was found that the application of multichannel Wiener theory to passive microwave images of first-year sea ice resulted in visually sharper images with enhanced textural features and less high-frequency noise. However, Wiener filters induced a slight blocky grain to the image and could produce a type of ringing along scan lines traversing sharp intensity contrasts.

  2. Using image reconstruction methods to enhance gridded resolutionfor a newly calibrated passive microwave climate data record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paget, A. C.; Brodzik, M. J.; Gotberg, J.; Hardman, M.; Long, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Spanning over 35 years of Earth observations, satellite passive microwave sensors have generated a near-daily, multi-channel brightness temperature record of observations. Critical to describing and understanding Earth system hydrologic and cryospheric parameters, data products derived from the passive microwave record include precipitation, soil moisture, surface water, vegetation, snow water equivalent, sea ice concentration and sea ice motion. While swath data are valuable to oceanographers due to the temporal scales of ocean phenomena, gridded data are more valuable to researchers interested in derived parameters at fixed locations through time and are widely used in climate studies. We are applying recent developments in image reconstruction methods to produce a systematically reprocessed historical time series NASA MEaSUREs Earth System Data Record, at higher spatial resolutions than have previously been available, for the entire SMMR, SSM/I-SSMIS and AMSR-E record. We take advantage of recently released, recalibrated SSM/I-SSMIS swath format Fundamental Climate Data Records. Our presentation will compare and contrast the two candidate image reconstruction techniques we are evaluating: Backus-Gilbert (BG) interpolation and a radiometer version of Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (SIR). Both BG and SIR use regularization to trade off noise and resolution. We discuss our rationale for the respective algorithm parameters we have selected, compare results and computational costs, and include prototype SSM/I images at enhanced resolutions of up to 3 km. We include a sensitivity analysis for estimating sensor measurement response functions critical to both methods.

  3. Verification of a New NOAA/NSIDC Passive Microwave Sea-Ice Concentration Climate Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Walter N.; Peng, Ge; Scott, Donna J.; Savoie, Matt H.

    2014-01-01

    A new satellite-based passive microwave sea-ice concentration product developed for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)Climate Data Record (CDR) programme is evaluated via comparison with other passive microwave-derived estimates. The new product leverages two well-established concentration algorithms, known as the NASA Team and Bootstrap, both developed at and produced by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The sea ice estimates compare well with similar GSFC products while also fulfilling all NOAA CDR initial operation capability (IOC) requirements, including (1) self describing file format, (2) ISO 19115-2 compliant collection-level metadata,(3) Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant file-level metadata, (4) grid-cell level metadata (data quality fields), (5) fully automated and reproducible processing and (6) open online access to full documentation with version control, including source code and an algorithm theoretical basic document. The primary limitations of the GSFC products are lack of metadata and use of untracked manual corrections to the output fields. Smaller differences occur from minor variations in processing methods by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (for the CDR fields) and NASA (for the GSFC fields). The CDR concentrations do have some differences from the constituent GSFC concentrations, but trends and variability are not substantially different.

  4. Combining Passive Microwave and Optical Data to Estimate Snow Water Equivalent in Afghanistan's Hindu Kush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozier, J.; Bair, N.; Calfa, A. A.; Skalka, C.; Tolle, K.; Bongard, J.

    2015-12-01

    The task is to estimate spatiotemporally distributed estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) in snow-dominated mountain environments, including those that lack on-the-ground measurements such as the Hindu Kush range in Afghanistan. During the snow season, we can use two measurements: (1) passive microwave estimates of SWE, which generally underestimate in the mountains; (2) fractional snow-covered area from MODIS. Once the snow has melted, we can reconstruct the accumulated SWE back to the last significant snowfall by calculating the energy used in melt. The reconstructed SWE values provide a training set for predictions from the passive microwave SWE and snow-covered area. We examine several machine learning methods—regression-boosted decision trees, bagged trees, neural networks, and genetic programming—to estimate SWE. All methods work reasonably well, with R2 values greater than 0.8. Predictors built with multiple years of data reduce the bias that usually appears if we predict one year from just one other year's training set. Genetic programming tends to produce results that additionally provide physical insight. Adding precipitation estimates from the Global Precipitation Measurements mission is in progress.

  5. Impact of Uncertainty in the Drop Size Distribution on Oceanic Rainfall Retrievals From Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, Thomas T.; Chandrasekar, V.; Li, Wanyu

    2007-01-01

    The variability of the drop size distribution (DSD) is one of the factors that must be considered in understanding the uncertainties in the retrieval of oceanic precipitation from passive microwave observations. Here, we have used observations from the Precipitation Radar on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission spacecraft to infer the relationship between the DSD and the rain rate and the variability in this relationship. The impact on passive microwave rain rate retrievals varies with the frequency and rain rate. The total uncertainty for a given pixel can be slightly larger than 10% at the low end (ca. 10 GHz) of frequencies commonly used for this purpose and smaller at higher frequencies (up to 37 GHz). Since the error is not totally random, averaging many pixels, as in a monthly rainfall total, should roughly halve this uncertainty. The uncertainty may be lower at rain rates less than about 30 mm/h, but the lack of sensitivity of the surface reference technique to low rain rates makes it impossible to tell from the present data set.

  6. Annual Snow Assessments Using Multi-spectral and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, S. F.; Vuyovich, C. M.; Deeb, E. J.; Newman, S. D.; Baldwin, T. B.

    2010-12-01

    Since the winter season of 2004-2005, annual snow assessments have been conducted for regions across the Middle East (including Eastern Turkey, Afghanistan, and Pakistan) using multispectral (AVHRR and MODIS) and passive microwave (SSM/I and AMSR-E) remote sensing technologies. Due to limited ground-based observations of precipitation and snow pack conditions, remote sensing provides a unique opportunity to assess these conditions at different scales and offer an appraisal of the current conditions in an historical context. During each winter season, bi-weekly snow products and assessments are produced including: current Snow Covered Area (SCA) at regional and watershed scales; estimation of SCA by elevation band; current snowpack total Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) for each watershed with an historical perspective (1987-present); snow condition outlook by watershed; general summary of snow conditions based on remote sensing products and limited ground-based observations; and if warranted, a snow melt flooding advisory. Most recently, the winter 2009-2010 season provided interesting aspects that are further investigated: comparison of reported drought conditions, SCA extents, and passive microwave SWE estimates in Afghanistan; flooding event in Northeastern Afghanistan perhaps due to late season snow fall and subsequent snow melt; lower SCA in Eastern Turkey throughout winter despite heavy precipitation perhaps explained by warmer regional temperatures.

  7. Disaggregation Of Passive Microwave Soil Moisture For Use In Watershed Hydrology Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bin

    In recent years the passive microwave remote sensing has been providing soil moisture products using instruments on board satellite/airborne platforms. Spatial resolution has been restricted by the diameter of antenna which is inversely proportional to resolution. As a result, typical products have a spatial resolution of tens of kilometers, which is not compatible for some hydrological research applications. For this reason, the dissertation explores three disaggregation algorithms that estimate L-band passive microwave soil moisture at the subpixel level by using high spatial resolution remote sensing products from other optical and radar instruments were proposed and implemented in this investigation. The first technique utilized a thermal inertia theory to establish a relationship between daily temperature change and average soil moisture modulated by the vegetation condition was developed by using NLDAS, AVHRR, SPOT and MODIS data were applied to disaggregate the 25 km AMSR-E soil moisture to 1 km in Oklahoma. The second algorithm was built on semi empirical physical models (NP89 and LP92) derived from numerical experiments between soil evaporation efficiency and soil moisture over the surface skin sensing depth (a few millimeters) by using simulated soil temperature derived from MODIS and NLDAS as well as AMSR-E soil moisture at 25 km to disaggregate the coarse resolution soil moisture to 1 km in Oklahoma. The third algorithm modeled the relationship between the change in co-polarized radar backscatter and the remotely sensed microwave change in soil moisture retrievals and assumed that change in soil moisture was a function of only the canopy opacity. The change detection algorithm was implemented using aircraft based the remote sensing data from PALS and UAVSAR that were collected in SMPAVEX12 in southern Manitoba, Canada. The PALS L-band h-polarization radiometer soil moisture retrievals were disaggregated by combining them with the PALS and UAVSAR L

  8. High temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits: Fabrication, characterization, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Chorey, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 films were grown on several microwave substrates. Surface resistance and penetration depth measurements were performed to determine the quality of these films. Here the properties of these films on key microwave substrates are described. The fabrication and characterization of a microwave ring resonator circuit to determine transmission line losses are presented. Lower losses than those observed in gold resonator circuits were observed at temperatures lower than critical transition temperature. Based on these results, potential applications of microwave superconducting circuits such as filters, resonators, oscillators, phase shifters, and antenna elements in space communication systems are identified.

  9. Global Snow-Cover Evolution from Twenty Years of Satellite Passive Microwave Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mognard, N.M.; Kouraev, A.V.; Josberger, E.G.

    2003-01-01

    Starting in 1979 with the SMMR (Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer) instrument onboard the satellite NIMBUS-7 and continuing since 1987 with the SSMI (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) instrument on board the DMSP (Defence Meteorological Satellite Program) series, more then twenty years of satellite passive microwave data are now available. This dataset has been processed to analyse the evolution of the global snow cover. This work is part of the AICSEX project from the 5th Framework Programme of the European Community. The spatio-temporal evolution of the satellite-derived yearly snow maximum extent and the timing of the spring snow melt were estimated and analysed over the Northern Hemisphere. Significant differences between the evolution of the yearly maximum snow extent in Eurasia and in North America were found. A positive correlation between the maximum yearly snow cover extent and the ENSO index was obtained. High interannual spatio-temporal variability characterises the timing of snow melt in the spring. Twenty-year trends in the timing of spring snow melt have been computed and compared with spring air temperature trends for the same period and the same area. In most parts of Eurasia and in the central and western parts of North America the tendency has been for earlier snow melt. In northeastern Canada, a large area of positive trends, where snow melt timing starts later than in the early 1980s, corresponds to a region of positive trends of spring air temperature observed over the same period.

  10. Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Concentrations from Multichannel Passive-Microwave Satellite Data Sets: User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Gloersen, Per; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    Satellite multichannel passive-microwave sensors have provided global radiance measurements with which to map, monitor, and study the Arctic and Antarctic polar sea ice covers. The data span over 18 years (as of April 1997), starting with the launch of the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on NASA's SeaSat A and Nimbus 7 in 1978 and continuing with the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) series beginning in 1987. It is anticipated that the DMSP SSMI series will continue into the 21st century. The SSMI series will be augmented by new, improved sensors to be flown on Japanese and U.S. space platforms. This User's Guide provides a description of a new sea ice concentration data set generated from observations made by three of these multichannel sensors. The data set includes gridded daily ice concentrations (every-other-day for the SMMR data) for both the north and south polar regions from October 26, 1978 through September 30, 1995, with the one exception of a 6-week data gap from December 3, 1987 through January 12, 1988. The data have been placed on two CD-ROMs that include a ReadMeCD file giving the technical details on the file format, file headers, north and south polar grids, ancillary data sets, and directory structure of the CD-ROM. The CD-ROMS will be distributed by the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, CO.

  11. A Prototype Physical Database for Passive Microwave Retrievals of Precipitation over the US Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringerud, S.; Kummerow, C. D.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    An accurate understanding of the instantaneous, dynamic land surface emissivity is necessary for a physically based, multi-channel passive microwave precipitation retrieval scheme over land. In an effort to assess the feasibility of the physical approach for land surfaces, a semi-empirical emissivity model is applied for calculation of the surface component in a test area of the US Southern Great Plains. A physical emissivity model, using land surface model data as input, is used to calculate emissivity at the 10GHz frequency, combining contributions from the underlying soil and vegetation layers, including the dielectric and roughness effects of each medium. An empirical technique is then applied, based upon a robust set of observed channel covariances, extending the emissivity calculations to all channels. For calculation of the hydrometeor contribution, reflectivity profiles from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR) are utilized along with coincident brightness temperatures (Tbs) from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), and cloud-resolving model profiles. Ice profiles are modified to be consistent with the higher frequency microwave Tbs. Resulting modeled top of the atmosphere Tbs show correlations to observations of 0.9, biases of 1K or less, root-mean-square errors on the order of 5K, and improved agreement over the use of climatological emissivity values. The synthesis of these models and data sets leads to the creation of a simple prototype Tb database that includes both dynamic surface and atmospheric information physically consistent with the land surface model, emissivity model, and atmospheric information.

  12. Detection of Severe Rain on Snow events using passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Putkonen, J.

    2007-12-01

    Severe wintertime rain-on-snow (ROS) events create a strong ice layer or layers in the snow on arctic tundra that act as a barrier to ungulate grazing. These events are linked with large-scale ungulate herd declines via starvation and reduced calf production rate when the animals are unable to penetrate through the resulting ice layer. ROS events also produce considerable perturbation in the mean wintertime soil temperature beneath the snow pack. ROS is a sporadic but well-known and significant phenomenon that is currently very poorly documented. Characterization of the distribution and occurrence of severe rain-on-snow events is based only on anecdotal evidence, indirect observations of carcasses found adjacent to iced snow packs, and irregular detection by a sparse observational weather network. We have analyzed in detail a particular well-identified ROS event that took place on Banks Island in early October 2003 that resulted in the death of 20,000 musk oxen. We make use of multifrequency passive microwave imagery from the special sensing microwave imager satellite sensor suite (SSM/I) in conjunction with a strong-fluctuation-theory (SFT) emissivity model. We show that a combination of time series analysis and cluster analysis based on microwave spectral gradients and polarization ratios provides a means to detect the stages of the ROS event resulting from the modification of the vertical structure of the snow pack, specifically wetting the snow, the accumulation of liquid water at the base of the snow during the rain event, and the subsequent modification of the snowpack after refreezing. SFT model analysis provides quantitative confirmation of our interpretation of the evolution of the microwave properties of the snowpack as a result of the ROS event. In particular, in addition to the grain coarsening due to destructive metamorphism, we detect the presence of the internal water and ice layers, directly identifying the physical properties producing the

  13. Infrared and Passive Microwave Radiometric Sea Surface Temperatures and Their Relationships to Atmospheric Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Sandra L.

    2004-01-01

    The current generation of infrared (IR) and passive microwave (MW) satellite sensors provides highly complementary information for monitoring sea surface temperature (SST). On the one hand, infrared sensors provide high resolution and high accuracy but are obscured by clouds. Microwave sensors on the other hand, provide coverage through non-precipitating clouds but have coarser resolution and generally poorer accuracy. Assuming that the satellite SST measurements do not have spatially variable biases, they can be blended combining the merits of both SST products. These factors have motivated recent work in blending the MW and IR data in an attempt to produce high-accuracy SST products with improved coverage in regions with persistent clouds. The primary sources of retrieval uncertainty are, however, different for the two sensors. The main uncertainty in the MW retrievals lies in the effects of wind-induced surface roughness and foam on emissivity, whereas the IR retrievals are more sensitive to the atmospheric water vapor and aerosol content. Average nighttime differences between the products for the month periods of January 1999 and June 2000 are shown. These maps show complex spatial and temporal differences as indicated by the strong spatially coherent features in the product differences and the changes between seasons. Clearly such differences need to be understood and accounted for if the products are to be combined. The overall goals of this project are threefold: (1) To understand the sources of uncertainty in the IR and MW SST retrievals and to characterize the errors affecting the two types of retrieval as a fiction of atmospheric forcing; (2) To demonstrate how representative the temperature difference between the two satellite products is of Delta T; (3) To apply bias adjustments and to device a comprehensive treatment of the behavior of the temperature difference across the oceanic skin layer to determine the best method for blending thermal infrared

  14. Annual South American Forest Loss Estimates (1989-2011) Based on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marle, M.; van der Werf, G.; de Jeu, R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation dynamics, such as forest loss, are an important factor in global climate, but long-term and consistent information on these dynamics on continental scales is lacking. We have quantified large-scale forest loss over the 90s and 00s in the tropical biomes of South America using a passive-microwave satellite-based vegetation product. Our forest loss estimates are based on remotely sensed vegetation optical depth (VOD), which is an indicator of vegetation water content simultaneously retrieved with soil moisture. The advantage of low-frequency microwave remote sensing is that aerosols and clouds do not affect the observations. Furthermore, the longer wavelengths of passive microwaves penetrate deeper into vegetation than other products derived from optical and thermal sensors. This has the consequence that both woody parts of vegetation and leaves can be observed. The merged VOD product of AMSR-E and SSM/I observations, which covers over 23 years of daily observations, is used. We used this data stream and an outlier detection algorithm to quantify spatial and temporal variations in forest loss dynamics. Qualitatively, our results compared favorably to the newly developed Global Forest Change (GFC) maps based on Landsat data (r2=0.96), and this allowed us to convert the VOD outlier count to forest loss. Our results are spatially explicit with a 0.25-degree resolution and annual time step and we will present our estimates on country level. The added benefit of our results compared to GFC is the longer time period. The results indicate a relatively steady increase in forest loss in Brazil from 1989 until 2003, followed by two high forest loss years and a declining trend afterwards. This contrasts with other South American countries such as Bolivia and Peru, where forest losses increased in almost the whole 00s in comparison with the 90s.

  15. Frequency/phase agile microwave circuits on ferroelectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanofsky, Robert Raymond

    This work describes novel microwave circuits that can be tuned in either frequency or phase through the use of nonlinear dielectrics, specifically thin ferroelectric films. These frequency and phase agile circuits in many cases provide a new capability or offer the potential for lower cost alternatives in satellite and terrestrial communications and sensor applications. A brief introduction to nonlinear dielectrics and a summary of some of the special challenges confronting the practical insertion of ferroelectric technology into commercial systems is provided. A theoretical solution for the propagation characteristics of the multi-layer structures, with emphasis on a new type of phase shifter based on coupled microstrip, lines, is developed. The quasi-TEM analysis is based on a variational solution for line capacitance and an extension of coupled transmission line theory. It is shown that the theoretical model is applicable to a broad class of multi-layer transmission lines. The critical role that ferroelectric film thickness plays in loss and phase-shift is closely examined. Experimental data for both thin film BaxSr1-xTiO 3 phase shifters near room temperature and SMO3 phase shifters at cryogenic temperatures on MgO and LaAlO3 substrates is included. Some of these devices demonstrated an insertion loss of less than 5 dB at Ku-band with continuously variable phase shift in excess of 360 degrees. The performance of these devices is superior to the state-of-the-art semiconductor counterparts. Frequency and phase agile antenna prototypes including a microstrip patch that can operate at multiple microwave frequency bands and a new type of phased array antenna concept called the ferroelectric reflectarray are introduced. Modeled data for tunable microstrip patch antennas is presented for various ferroelectric film thickness. A prototype linear phased array, with a conventional beam-forming manifold, and an electronic controller is described. This is the first

  16. Satellite and aircraft passive microwave observations during the Marginal Ice Zone Experiment in 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloersen, Per; Campbell, William J.

    1988-06-01

    During the Marginal Ice Zone Experiment in the Fram Strait in June-July 1984, a number of aircraft with microwave sensors and the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus 7 satellite were used to acquire large-scale and mesoscale ice-ocean observations in conjunction with local surface measurements made by experimenters based on helicopter-equipped ice-strengthened vessels. An analysis of the data acquired during six flights of one such aircraft, the NASA CV-990 airborne laboratory, is discussed in this paper. Included in the instrument complement of the CV-990 were two passive microwave imagers operating at wavelengths of 0.33 and 1.55 cm and the airborne multichannel microwave radiometer (AMMR) operating at wavelengths of 0.81, 1.4, and 1.7 cm for both horizontal and vertical polarizations. Total and multiyear sea ice concentrations calculated from the AMMR data were found to agree with similar calculations using SMMR data. This is the first check of the performance of the SMMR Team ice algorithm for near-melting point conditions. The temperature dependence of the multiyear sea ice concentration determination near the melting point was found to be the same for both airborne and spacecraft instrument data and to be correlated with presence or absence of clouds. Finally, it was found that a spectral gradient ratio using the data from both the 0.33- and 1.55-cm radiometers provides more reliable distinctions between low total ice concentrations and open water storm effects near the ice edge than does either singly.

  17. Towards a climatology of tropical cyclone morphometric structures using a newly standardized passive microwave satellite dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossuth, J.; Hart, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    storm's rainband and eyewall organization. Ultimately, this project develops a consistent climatology of TC structures using a new database of research-quality historical TC satellite microwave observations. Not only can such data sets more accurately study TC structural evolution, but they may facilitate automated TC intensity estimates and provide methods to enhance current operational and research products, such as at the NRL TC webpage (http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/TC.html). The process of developing the dataset and possible objective definitions of TC structures using passive microwave imagery will be described, with preliminary results suggesting new methods to identify TC structures that may interrogate and expand upon physical and dynamical theories. Structural metrics such as threshold analysis of the outlines of the TC shape as well as methods to diagnose the inner-core size, completion, and magnitude will be introduced.

  18. Characterization of passive film on 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium thiosulphate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Dong, C. F.; Xiao, K.; Li, X. G.

    2011-10-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of passive film formed on 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.1 M Na 2S 2O 3 solutions was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, EIS, Mott-Schottky analysis and the compositions of oxide film in different passive regions were carried out by XPS. The results indicated that the impedance is dependent on the applied potential indicating the occurrence of a charge transfer reaction in a porous film. The doping densities evaluated from Mott-Schottky plots demonstrated that there existence of two donor levels in the space charge layer of the passive films. The donor density ( ND1 and ND2 ) values are in the range of 10 20-10 21 cm 3, and decreases exponentially with increasing film formation potential, which is in good agreement with the theoretical consequences of the PDM. The polarization curve and XPS results shows that in the passive regions the 2205 duplex stainless steel exhibits different electrochemical and semiconductor properties.

  19. Estimation of surface melt and absorbed radiation on the Greenland ice sheet using passive microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Maneesha D.

    1999-09-01

    Passive microwave data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMPS) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) were used to estimate the extent of melt, melt duration and length of melt season on the Greenland ice sheet for the years 1979--1997. Three techniques---a maximum likelihood classification (MLC), a spectral technique and an edge detection method---were implemented. The MLC and spectral techniques provided estimates of the melt extent, while estimates of the melt extent, the length of the melt season and the duration of melt were obtained from the edge method. Comparisons of the surface melt results with global and coastal (Greenland) temperature data indicated that melt extents were better related to global than coastal temperatures. The reverse was noted for melt season and duration trends. The results suggest an overall increase in warmer spells in summer for the period 1979--1997, as indicated by increasing maximum melt extent on the ice sheet. However, there was no corresponding increase in the overall total melt season and total duration of melt. The annual melt extent and the total melt season/duration showed a sharp drop in 1992, due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June, 1991. The results indicated that melt extents alone cannot be used to estimate warming or cooling on the ice sheet and that melt duration and season trends should also be examined. These surface melt results were then extended to obtain the absorbed radiation flux on the Greenland ice sheet. The monthly albedo on the ice sheet was estimated by assigning an albedo value that was a function of the length of the melt season. The monthly albedo was used with a solar radiation model to estimate the monthly and annual absorbed shortwave flux on the ice sheet. The computation of absorbed radiation on the Greenland ice sheet gave results consistent with those derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE

  20. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Surface Characteristics on the Greenland Ice Sheet as Derived from Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark; Rowe, Clinton; Kuivinen, Karl; Mote, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The primary goals of this research were to identify and begin to comprehend the spatial and temporal variations in surface characteristics of the Greenland ice sheet using passive microwave observations, physically-based models of the snowpack and field observations of snowpack and firn properties.

  1. Snowfall estimation from space-borne active and passive microwave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, M.

    2006-12-01

    In this study, an algorithm to estimate snowfall from passive and active microwave observations is formulated and analyzed using both simulated and real observations. A high resolution cloud resolving model (CRM) is used to simulate a snowfall event and space-borne radar and radiometer observations similar to those of the future Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) are synthesized from the CRM data. Then a combined radar- radiometer similar to that of Grecu et al. (2004) is applied to the synthetic data. It is found that in spite of dual-frequency radar and millimeter-wave radiometer observations, snow retrievals from GPM-like observations are subject to various uncertainties. Simple parameterizations are devised to minimize these uncertainties. The combined radar-radiometer, modified to account for differences between the instruments deployed in Wakasa Bay Experiment and the GPM instruments, is applied to real data from the Wakasa Bay Experiment. Results show the algorithm's feasibility.

  2. Large area mapping of soil moisture using the ESTAR passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Levine, D. M.; Swift, C. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations designed to study land surface hydrologic-atmospheric interactions, showing the potential of L band passive microwave radiometry for measuring surface soil moisture over large areas, are discussed. Satisfying the data needs of these investigations requires the ability to map large areas rapidly. With aircraft systems this means a need for more beam positions over a wider swath on each flightline. For satellite systems the essential problem is resolution. Both of these needs are currently being addressed through the development and verification of Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) technology. The ESTAR L band radiometer was evaluated for soil moisture mapping applications in two studies. The first was conducted over the semiarid rangeland Walnut Gulch watershed located in south eastern Arizona (U.S.). The second was performed in the subhumid Little Washita watershed in south west Oklahoma (U.S.). Both tests showed that the ESTAR is capable of providing soil moisture with the same level of accuracy as existing systems.

  3. NASA's Potential Contributions to Avalanche Forecasting Using Active and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution is based on using active and passive microwave measurements acquired from NASA satellites to improve USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Forest Service forecasting of avalanche danger. Regional Avalanche Centers prepare avalanche forecasts using ground measurements of snowpack and mountain weather conditions. In this Solution, range of the in situ observations is extended by adding remote sensing measurements of snow depth, snow water equivalent, and snowfall rate acquired by satellite missions that include Aqua, CloudSat, future GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement), and the proposed SCLP (Snow and Cold Land Processes). Measurements of snowpack conditions and time evolution are improved by combining the in situ and satellite observations with a snow model. Recurring snow observations from NASA satellites increase accuracy of avalanche forecasting, which helps the public and the managers of public facilities make better avalanche safety decisions.

  4. Localized electrical fine tuning of passive microwave and radio frequency devices

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.

    2001-04-10

    A method and apparatus for the localized electrical fine tuning of passive multiple element microwave or RF devices in which a nonlinear dielectric material is deposited onto predetermined areas of a substrate containing the device. An appropriate electrically conductive material is deposited over predetermined areas of the nonlinear dielectric and the signal line of the device for providing electrical contact with the nonlinear dielectric. Individual, adjustable bias voltages are applied to the electrically conductive material allowing localized electrical fine tuning of the devices. The method of the present invention can be applied to manufactured devices, or can be incorporated into the design of the devices so that it is applied at the time the devices are manufactured. The invention can be configured to provide localized fine tuning for devices including but not limited to coplanar waveguides, slotline devices, stripline devices, and microstrip devices.

  5. Synthesis of passive microwave and radar altimeter data for estimating accumulation rates of polar snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we compare dry-snow extinction coefficients derived from radar altimeter data with brightness temperature data from passive microwave measurements over a portion of the East Antarctic plateau. The comparison between the extinction coefficients and the brightness temperatures shows a strong negative correlation, where the correlation coefficients ranged from -0.87 to -0.95. The extinction coefficient of the dry polar snow decreases with increasing surface elevation, while the average brightness temperature increases with surface elevation. Our analysis shows that the observed trends are related to geographic variations in scattering coefficient of snow, which in turn are controlled by variations in surface temperature and snow accumulation rate. By combining information present in the extinction coefficient and brightness temperature data sets, we develop a model that can be used to obtain quantitative estimates of the accumulation rate of dry polar snow.

  6. Progress in passive microwave remote sensing - Nonlinear retrieval techniques. [for meteorological parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of nonlinear retrieval methods have been applied to passive microwave remote sensing problems. These problems can be characterized in part by the degree to which their underlying physics and statistics can be understood and characterized in a simple way. Four examples of varying complexity are considered here; the simplest problem requires only analytic expressions for retrievals, whereas the most complex problem has been handled only with pattern classification techniques. The four examples are: (1) Doppler measurements of winds at 70 to 100 km, (2) retrieval of atmospheric water vapor profiles using the opaque 183-GHz water vapor resonance, (3) retrieval of snow accumulation rate by means of combined theoretical and empirical procedures, and (4) classification of diverse polar terrain by means of pattern recognition techniques.

  7. Passive microwave remote sensing of an anisotropic random-medium layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The principle of reciprocity is invoked to calculate the brightness temperatures for passive microwave remote sensing of a two-layer anisotropic random medium. The bistatic scattering coefficients are first computed with the Born approximation and then integrated over the upper hemisphere to be subtracted from unity, in order to obtain the emissivity for the random-medium layer. The theoretical results are illustrated by plotting the emissivities as functions of viewing angles and polarizations. They are used to interpret remote sgnsing data obtained from vegetation canopy where the anisotropic random-medium model applies. Field measurements with corn stalks arranged in various configurations with preferred azimuthal directions are successfully interpreted with this model.

  8. Mechanical behavior and structure of passive films on austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amr, Abdulaziz

    2005-07-01

    The Taguchi analysis method was used in conjunction with ex-situ and in-situ nanoindentation tests to study the effects of alloy chemistry, solution pH, and halide ion concentrations on the mechanical fracture of electrochemically grown passive films formed at passive and metastable pitting potentials. Three austenitic stainless steels, SS, 304, 316, and 904L were anodically polarized in hydrochloric acid solutions for this study. The ex-situ study indicated that the alloy chemistry is the dominant factor of the mechanical fracture of the film formed at a stable passive potential; the average load to fracture the films using a 450 nm radius diamond tip was 52 muN. The films formed on 904L were the strongest, while the films on 316 SS were the weakest. The fracture load of the films formed at a metastable pitting potential, on the other hand, was equally influenced by the chloride ion concentration and the alloy chemistry. The load at fracture of films formed in the metastable pitting region was 64% of the fracture load of passive films formed at a stable potential. The fracture load of the passive films was depended on the degree of crystallinity of the passive film. The passive film on 316SS with lower density of crystalline islands than that of 304 SS had the lowest fracture load. In contrast, when the film was epitaxial, the fracture load was the largest. The dichromate treatment results indicate that the increase in degree of crystallinity of the passive films is associated with the increase in the chromium content of the substrate. In-situ measurements during anodic polarization led to similar behavior and results. The measured strength of films measured in ambient conditions after removal from the electrolyte was greater than when the films were measured in situ. However, the trends in film strength as a function of environment are the same between in situ and ex situ testing, suggesting the two tests are both feasible methods of analyzing environmental

  9. The enrichment of surface passive film on stainless steel during biofilm development in coastal seawater.

    PubMed

    Eashwar, M; Sreedhar, G; Lakshman Kumar, A; Hariharasuthan, R; Kennedy, J

    2015-01-01

    The surface passive film on UNS S30400 alloy was characterized before and after biofilm development under different regimes of diurnal lighting in quiescent flowing coastal seawater. As exemplified by atomic force microscopy, the passive film grew under all test conditions with conspicuous variations in morphological features. X-ray photon spectroscopy illustrated an enrichment of the outer film by iron oxide and a progressive increase in the iron oxide/chromium oxide ratio with lighting. Mott-Schottky plots reflected the duplex nature of the film, comprising an outer n-type and an inner p-type configuration. The slopes of the plots showed a strong decrease in donor and acceptor densities with biofilm coverage and lighting, thus confirming passive film growth. These results provide new insights that passive film enrichment is an intrinsic process under practical marine conditions, and show that the evolution of the passive film is a key step to sustained passivity and/or its breakdown by microbial mechanisms. PMID:26222313

  10. Machine Learning on Images: Combining Passive Microwave and Optical Data to Estimate Snow Water Equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozier, J.; Tolle, K.; Bair, N.

    2014-12-01

    We have a problem that may be a specific example of a generic one. The task is to estimate spatiotemporally distributed estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) in snow-dominated mountain environments, including those that lack on-the-ground measurements. Several independent methods exist, but all are problematic. The remotely sensed date of disappearance of snow from each pixel can be combined with a calculation of melt to reconstruct the accumulated SWE for each day back to the last significant snowfall. Comparison with streamflow measurements in mountain ranges where such data are available shows this method to be accurate, but the big disadvantage is that SWE can only be calculated retroactively after snow disappears, and even then only for areas with little accumulation during the melt season. Passive microwave sensors offer real-time global SWE estimates but suffer from several issues, notably signal loss in wet snow or in forests, saturation in deep snow, subpixel variability in the mountains owing to the large (~25 km) pixel size, and SWE overestimation in the presence of large grains such as depth and surface hoar. Throughout the winter and spring, snow-covered area can be measured at sub-km spatial resolution with optical sensors, with accuracy and timeliness improved by interpolating and smoothing across multiple days. So the question is, how can we establish the relationship between Reconstruction—available only after the snow goes away—and passive microwave and optical data to accurately estimate SWE during the snow season, when the information can help forecast spring runoff? Linear regression provides one answer, but can modern machine learning techniques (used to persuade people to click on web advertisements) adapt to improve forecasts of floods and droughts in areas where more than one billion people depend on snowmelt for their water resources?

  11. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations and it is based on models that simulate high-resolution brightness temperatures as functions of observed reflectivity profiles and a parameter related to the rain drop-size-distribution. The modeled high-resolution brightness temperatures are used to determine normalized brightness temperature polarizations at the microwave radiometer resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is employed to minimize the differences between the simulated and observed normalized polarizations by adjusting the drop-size-distribution parameter. The impact of other unknowns that are not independent variables in the optimal estimation but affect the retrievals is minimized through statistical parameterizations derived from cloud model simulations. The retrieval technique is investigated using TRMM observations collected during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). These observations cover an area extending from 5 deg to deg N latitude and 166 deg to 172 deg E longitude from July to September 1999, and are coincident with various ground-based observations, facilitating a detailed analysis of the retrieved precipitation. Using the method developed in this study, precipitation estimates consistent with both the passive and active TRMM observations are obtained. Various parameters characterizing these estimates, i.e. the rain rate, the precipitation water content, the drop-size-distribution intercept, and the mass weighted mean drop diameter, are in good qualitative agreement with independent experimental and theoretical estimates. Combined rain estimates are in general higher than the official TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) only estimates for the area and the period considered in the study. Ground-based precipitation estimates

  12. Passive Microwave Algorithms for Sea Ice Concentration: A Comparison of Two Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Gloersen, Per

    1997-01-01

    The most comprehensive large-scale characterization of the global sea ice cover so far has been provided by satellite passive microwave data. Accurate retrieval of ice concentrations from these data is important because of the sensitivity of surface flux(e.g. heat, salt, and water) calculations to small change in the amount of open water (leads and polynyas) within the polar ice packs. Two algorithms that have been used for deriving ice concentrations from multichannel data are compared. One is the NASA Team algorithm and the other is the Bootstrap algorithm, both of which were developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The two algorithms use different channel combinations, reference brightness temperatures, weather filters, and techniques. Analyses are made to evaluate the sensitivity of algorithm results to variations of emissivity and temperature with space and time. To assess the difference in the performance of the two algorithms, analyses were performed with data from both hemispheres and for all seasons. The results show only small differences in the central Arctic in but larger disagreements in the seasonal regions and in summer. In some ares in the Antarctic, the Bootstrap technique show ice concentrations higher than those of the Team algorithm by as much as 25%; whereas, in other areas, it shows ice concentrations lower by as much as 30%. The The differences in the results are caused by temperature effects, emissivity effects, and tie point differences. The Team and the Bootstrap results were compared with available Landsat, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. AVHRR, Landsat, and SAR data sets all yield higher concentrations than the passive microwave algorithms. Inconsistencies among results suggest the need for further validation studies.

  13. Fusion of satellite active and passive microwave data for sea ice type concentration estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Beaven, S.G.; Gogineni, S.; Carsey, F.D.

    1996-09-01

    Young first-year sea ice is nearly as important as open water in modulating heat flux between the ocean and atmosphere in the Arctic. Just after the onset of freeze-up, first-year ice is in the early stages of growth and will consist of young first-year and thin ice. The distribution of sea ice in this thickness range impacts heat transfer in the Arctic. Therefore, improving the estimates of ice concentrations in this thickness range is significant. NASA Team Algorithm (NTA) for passive microwave data inaccurately classifies sea ice during the melt and freeze-up seasons because it misclassifies multiyear ice as first-year ice. The authors developed a hybrid fusion technique for incorporating multiyear ice information derived form synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images into a passive microwave algorithm to improve ice type concentration estimates. First, they classified SAR images using a dynamic thresholding technique and estimated the multiyear ice concentration. Then they used the SAR-derived multiyear ice concentration constrain the NTA and obtained an improved first-year ice concentration estimate. They computed multiyear and first-year ice concentration estimates over a region in the eastern-central Arctic in which field observations of ice and in situ radar backscatter measurements were performed. With the NTA alone, the first-year ice concentration in the study area varied between 0.11 and 0.40, while the multiyear ice concentration varied form 0.63 to 0.39. With the hybrid fusion technique, the first-year ice concentration varied between 0.08 and 0.23 and the multiyear ice concentration was between 0.62 and 0.66. The fused estimates of first-year and multiyear ice concentration appear to be more accurate than NTA, based on ice observations that were logged aboard the US Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Star in the study area during 1991.

  14. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency Active and Passive Microwave Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2004-04-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations, and it is based on models that simulate high-resolution brightness temperatures as functions of observed reflectivity profiles and a parameter related to the raindrop size distribution. The modeled high-resolution brightness temperatures are used to determine normalized brightness temperature polarizations at the microwave radiometer resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is employed to minimize the differences between the simulated and observed normalized polarizations by adjusting the drop size distribution parameter. The impact of other unknowns that are not independent variables in the optimal estimation, but affect the retrievals, is minimized through statistical parameterizations derived from cloud model simulations. The retrieval technique is investigated using TRMM observations collected during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). These observations cover an area extending from 5° to 12°N latitude and from 166° to 172°E longitude from July to September 1999 and are coincident with various ground-based observations, facilitating a detailed analysis of the retrieved precipitation. Using the method developed in this study, precipitation estimates consistent with both the passive and active TRMM observations are obtained. Various parameters characterizing these estimates, that is, the rain rate, precipitation water content, drop size distribution intercept, and the mass- weighted mean drop diameter, are in good qualitative agreement with independent experimental and theoretical estimates. Combined rain estimates are, in general, higher than the official TRMM precipitation radar (PR)-only estimates for the area and the period considered in the study. Ground-based precipitation estimates, derived

  15. Spatio-temporal evaluation of resolution enhancement for passive microwave soil moisture and vegetation optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, A. I.; Parinussa, R. M.; Renzullo, L. J.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; de Jeu, R. A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Space-borne passive microwave radiometers are used to derive land surface parameters such as surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth (VOD). However, the value of such products in regional hydrology is limited by their coarse resolution. In this study, the land parameter retrieval model (LPRM) is used to derive enhanced resolution (∼10 km) soil moisture and VOD from advanced microwave scanning radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures sharpened by a modulation technique based on high-frequency observations. A precipitation mask based on brightness temperatures was applied to remove precipitation artefacts in the sharpened LPRM products. The spatial and temporal patterns in the resulting products are evaluated against field-measured and modeled soil moisture as well as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) over mainland Australia. Results show that resolution enhancement accurately sharpens the boundaries of different vegetation types, lakes and wetlands. Significant changes in temporal agreement between LPRM products and related datasets are limited to specific areas, such as lakes and coastal areas. Spatial correlations, on the other hand, increase over most of Australia. In addition, hydrological signals from irrigation and water bodies that were absent in the low-resolution soil moisture product become clearly visible after resolution enhancement. The increased information detail in the high-resolution LPRM products should benefit hydrological studies at regional scales.

  16. Seasonal Snow Extent and Snow Volume in South America Using SSM/I Passive Microwave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James L.; Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.; Kelly, R.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in South America was examined in this study using passive microwave satellite data from the Special Sensor Microwave Imagers (SSM/I) on board Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. For the period from 1992-1998, both snow cover extent and snow depth (snow mass) were investigated during the winter months (May-August) in the Patagonia region of Argentina. Since above normal temperatures in this region are typically above freezing, the coldest winter month was found to be not only the month having the most extensive snow cover but also the month having the deepest snows. For the seven-year period of this study, the average snow cover extent (May-August) was about 0.46 million sq km and the average monthly snow mass was about 1.18 x 10(exp 13) kg. July 1992 was the month having the greatest snow extent (nearly 0.8 million sq km) and snow mass (approximately 2.6 x 10(exp 13) kg).

  17. Potential Application of Airborne Passive Microwave Observations for Monitoring Inland Flooding Caused by Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Radley, C.D.; LaFontaine, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Inland flooding from tropical cyclones can be a significant factor in storm-related deaths in the United States and other countries. Information collected during NASA tropical cyclone field studies suggest surface water and flooding induced by tropical cyclone precipitation can be detected and therefore monitored using passive microwave airborne radiometers. In particular, the 10.7 GHz frequency of the NASA Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) flown on the NASA ER-2 has demonstrated high resolution detection of anomalous surface water and flooding in numerous situations. This presentation will highlight the analysis of three cases utilizing primarily satellite and airborne radiometer data. Radiometer data from the 1998 Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) are utilized to detect surface water during landfalling Hurricane Georges in both the Dominican Republic and Louisiana. A third case is landfalling Tropical Storm Gert in Eastern Mexico during the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment in 2005. AMPR data are compared to topographic data and vegetation indices to evaluate the significance of the surface water signature visible in the 10.7 GHz information. The results of this study suggest the benefit of an aircraft 10 GHz radiometer to provide real-time observations of surface water conditions as part of a multi-sensor flood monitoring network.

  18. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K. K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (Dit) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  19. Behavior of multitemporal and multisensor passive microwave indices in Southern Hemisphere ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza, Veronica; Grings, Francisco; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Huete, Alfredo; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Beringer, Jason; Van Gorsel, Eva; Karszenbaum, Haydee

    2014-12-01

    This study focused on the time series analysis of passive microwave and optical satellite data collected from six Southern Hemisphere ecosystems in Australia and Argentina. The selected ecosystems represent a wide range of land cover types, including deciduous open forest, temperate forest, tropical and semiarid savannas, and grasslands. We used two microwave indices, the frequency index (FI) and polarization index (PI), to assess the relative contributions of soil and vegetation properties (moisture and structure) to the observations. Optical-based satellite vegetation products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer were also included to aid in the analysis. We studied the X and Ka bands of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS and Wind Satellite, resulting in up to four observations per day (1:30, 6:00, 13:30, and 18:00 h). Both the seasonal and hourly variations of each of the indices were examined. Environmental drivers (precipitation and temperature) and eddy covariance measurements (gross ecosystem productivity and latent energy) were also analyzed. It was found that in moderately dense forests, FI was dependent on canopy properties (leaf area index and vegetation moisture). In tropical woody savannas, a significant regression (R2) was found between FI and PI with precipitation (R2 > 0.5) and soil moisture (R2 > 0.6). In the areas of semiarid savanna and grassland ecosystems, FI variations found to be significantly related to soil moisture (R2 > 0.7) and evapotranspiration (R2 > 0.5), while PI varied with vegetation phenology. Significant differences (p < 0.01) were found among FI values calculated at the four local times.

  20. Analytical characterization of the passive film formed on steel in solutions simulating the concrete interstitial electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Montemor, M.F.; Simoes, A.M.P.; Ferreira, M.G.S.

    1998-05-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study the effect of chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) and fly ash on behavior of the passive film formed on steel in solutions simulating the concrete interstitial electrolyte. Results showed the presence of fly ash and of Cl{sup {minus}} led to an increase in the amount of iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) in outer layers of the film and to an increase in the thickness and water content of the passive film. Significant differences in composition and thickness were observed between the films formed in paste solutions and in calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]{sub 2}) solutions.

  1. Microwave assisted growth of copper germanide thin films at very low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sayantan; Alford, T. L.

    2013-08-26

    Herein the synthesis of Cu{sub 3}Ge films by exposing Cu-Ge alloy films to microwave radiation is reported. It is shown that microwave radiation led to the formation of copper germanide at temperatures ca. 80 °C. The electrical properties of the Cu{sub 3}Ge films are presented and compared for various annealing times. X-ray diffraction shows that the Cu{sub 3}Ge films formed after microwave annealing is crystalline in the orthorhombic phase. Rutherford backscattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the formation of copper oxide encapsulation layer. Despite the slight oxidation of Cu during the microwave anneal the lowest resistivity of Cu{sub 3}Ge films obtained is 14 μΩ-cm.

  2. Effects of the Ionosphere on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Ocean Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Abaham, Saji; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Among the remote sensing applications currently being considered from space is the measurement of sea surface salinity. The salinity of the open ocean is important for understanding ocean circulation and for modeling energy exchange with the atmosphere. Passive microwave remote sensors operating near 1.4 GHz (L-band) could provide data needed to fill the gap in current coverage and to complement in situ arrays being planned to provide subsurface profiles in the future. However, the dynamic range of the salinity signal in the open ocean is relatively small and propagation effects along the path from surface to sensor must be taken into account. In particular, Faraday rotation and even attenuation/emission in the ionosphere can be important sources of error. The purpose or this work is to estimate the magnitude of these effects in the context of a future remote sensing system in space to measure salinity in L-band. Data will be presented as a function of time location and solar activity using IRI-95 to model the ionosphere. The ionosphere presents two potential sources of error for the measurement of salinity: Rotation of the polarization vector (Faraday rotation) and attenuation/emission. Estimates of the effect of these two phenomena on passive remote sensing over the oceans at L-band (1.4 GHz) are presented.

  3. Application of HTSC-thin films in microwave integrated delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. R.

    This paper reveals unique capabilities of High-Temperature Superconducting Thin Films (HTSTF) for possible application in microwave integrated delay lines. HTSTF can be characterized as Thin Film Microstrip (TFMS) lines operating at superconducting temperatures. Low insertion loss, minimum signal delay, and small power dissipation are possible with HTSTF delay lines. The conductor loss, dielectric loss, signal distortion, signal delay, and instantaneous bandwidth are dependent on the film thickness, superconducting film material, and substrate properties. Thin films of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO), Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (BSCCO), and Thallium Calcium Barium Copper Oxide (TCBCO) appear to be most suitable for microwave integrated delay lines.

  4. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Olson, William S.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated using both simulated and airborne data. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite multi-frequency active and passive observations. These observations are characterized by various spatial and sampling resolutions. This makes the retrieval problem mathematically more difficult and ill-determined because the quality of information decreases with decreasing resolution. A model that, given reflectivity profiles and a small set of parameters (including the cloud water content, the intercept drop size distribution, and a variable describing the frozen hydrometeor properties), simulates high-resolution brightness temperatures is used. The high-resolution simulated brightness temperatures are convolved at the real sensor resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is used to minimize the differences between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. The retrieval technique is investigated using cloud model synthetic and airborne data from the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment. Simulated high-resolution brightness temperatures and reflectivities and airborne observation strong are convolved at the resolution of the TRMM instruments and retrievals are performed and analyzed relative to the reference data used in observations synthesis. An illustration of the possible use of the technique in satellite rainfall estimation is presented through an application to TRMM data. The study suggests improvements in combined active and passive retrievals even when the instruments resolutions are significantly different. Future work needs to better quantify the retrievals performance, especially in connection with satellite applications, and the uncertainty of the models used in retrieval.

  5. Bayesian Estimation of Precipitation from Satellite Passive Microwave Observations Using Combined Radar-Radiometer Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation estimation from satellite passive microwave radiometer observations is a problem that does not have a unique solution that is insensitive to errors in the input data. Traditionally, to make this problem well posed, a priori information derived from physical models or independent, high-quality observations is incorporated into the solution. In the present study, a database of precipitation profiles and associated brightness temperatures is constructed to serve as a priori information in a passive microwave radiometer algorithm. The precipitation profiles are derived from a Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) combined radar radiometer algorithm, and the brightness temperatures are TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) observed. Because the observed brightness temperatures are consistent with those derived from a radiative transfer model embedded in the combined algorithm, the precipitation brightness temperature database is considered to be physically consistent. The database examined here is derived from the analysis of a month-long record of TRMM data that yields more than a million profiles of precipitation and associated brightness temperatures. These profiles are clustered into a tractable number of classes based on the local sea surface temperature, a radiometer-based estimate of the echo-top height (the height beyond which the reflectivity drops below 17 dBZ), and brightness temperature principal components. For each class, the mean precipitation profile, brightness temperature principal components, and probability of occurrence are determined. The precipitation brightness temperature database supports a radiometer-only algorithm that incorporates a Bayesian estimation methodology. In the Bayesian framework, precipitation estimates are weighted averages of the mean precipitation values corresponding to the classes in the database, with the weights being determined according to the similarity between the observed brightness temperature principal

  6. A new algorithm to measure sea ice concentration from passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Sharkov, Evgeniy; Komarova, Nataliya; Raev, Mikhail; Tikhonov, Vasilii; Boyarskiy, Dmitriy

    Studies of spatial and temporal properties of sea ice distribution in polar regions help to monitor global environmental changes and reveal their natural and anthropogenic factors, as well as make forecasts of weather, marine transportation and fishing conditions, assess perspectives of mineral mining on the continental shelf, etc. Contact methods of observation are often insufficient to meet the goals, very complicated technically and organizationally and not always safe for people involved. Remote sensing techniques are believed to be the best alternative. Its include monitoring of polar regions by means of passive microwave sensing with the aim to determine spatial distribution, types, thickness and snow cover of ice. However, the algorithms employed today to retrieve sea ice characteristics from passive microwave sensing data for different reasons give significant errors, especially in summer period and also near ice edges and in cases of open ice. One of the error sources is the current practice of using empirical dependencies and adjustment coefficients for the retrieval of ice characteristics and neglecting the physics of the process. We discuss an electrodynamic model of the sea surface - sea ice - snow cover - atmosphere system developed with account taken of physical and structural properties of the ambient. Model calculations of ice brightness temperature in different concentrations and snow covers are in good agreement with SSM/I measurement data. On the base of this model we develop a new algorithm for the retrieval of sea ice concentration from passive microwave sensing data - Variation Arctic Sea Ice Algorithm (VASIA). In contrast to the well-known techniques (NASA TEAM, Bootstrap, ASI, NORSEX et al), it takes into account the real physical parameters of ice, snow and open water rather than empirical and adjustment coefficients. Satellite data were provided by the POLE-RT-Fields SSM/I and SSMIS data collection for polar regions retrieved from the

  7. Anisotropic metamaterials for microwave antennas and infrared nanostructured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Zhihao

    Wave-matter interactions have long been investigated to discover unknown physical phenomena and exploited to achieve improved device performance throughout the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from quasi-static limit to microwave frequencies, and even at infrared and optical wavelengths. As a nascent but fast growing field, metamaterial technology, which relies on clusters of artificially engineered subwavelength structures, has been demonstrated to provide a wide variety of exotic electromagnetic properties unattainable in natural materials. This dissertation presents the research on novel anisotropic metamaterials for tailoring microwave radiation and infrared scattering of nanostructured thin films. First, a new inversion algorithm is proposed for retrieving the anisotropic effective medium parameters of a slab of metamaterial. Secondly, low-loss anisotropic metamaterial lenses and coatings are introduced for improving the gain and/or bandwidth for a variety of antennas. In particular, a quad-beam high-gain lens for a quarter-wave monopole, a low-profile grounded leaky metamaterial coating for slot antenna, and an ultra-thin anisotropic metamaterial bandwidth-enhancing coating for a quarter-wave monopole are experimentally demonstrated. In the infrared regime, novel nanostructured metamaterial free-standing thin-films, which are inherently anisotropic, are introduced for achieving exotic index properties and further for practical photonic devices. In particular, a low-loss near-infrared fishnet zero-index metamaterial, a dispersionengineered optically-thin, low-loss broadband metamaterial filter with a suppressed group delay fluctuation in the mid-infrared, and a conformal dual-band near-perfectly absorbing coating in the mid-infrared are experimentally demonstrated. These explorations show the great promise anisotropic metamaterials hold for the flexible manipulation of electromagnetic waves and their broad applicability in a wide spectrum range.

  8. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  9. Soil moisture estimation by airborne active and passive microwave remote sensing: A test-bed for SMAP fusion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, Carsten; Bogena, Heye; Jagdhuber, Thomas; Hajnsek, Irena; Horn, Ralf; Reigber, Andreas; Hasan, Sayeh; Rüdiger, Christoph; Jaeger, Marc; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. The SMAP launch is currently planned for 2014-2015. The SMAP measurement approach is to integrate L-band radar and L-band radiometer as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. The radar and radiometer measurements can be effectively combined to derive soil moisture maps that approach the accuracy of radiometer-only retrievals, but with a higher resolution (being able to approach the radar resolution under some conditions). Aircraft and tower-based instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment in Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system DLR F-SAR were flown on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites. These data are used as a test-bed for the analysis of existing and development of new active-passive fusion techniques. A synergistic use of the two signals can help to decouple soil moisture effects from the effects of vegetation (or roughness) in a better way than in the case of a single instrument. In this study, we present and evaluate three approaches for the fusion of active and passive microwave records for an enhanced representation of the soil moisture status: i) estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter data, ii) disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, and iii) fusion of two single-source soil moisture products from radar and radiometer.

  10. Error Characterisation and Merging of Active and Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Gruber, Alexander; de Jeu, Richard; Parinussa, Robert; Chung, Daniel; Dorigo, Wouter; Reimer, Christoph; Kidd, Richard

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA) a data fusion system has been developed which is capable of ingesting surface soil moisture data derived from active and passive microwave sensors (ASCAT, AMSR-E, etc.) flown on different satellite platforms and merging them to create long and consistent time series of soil moisture suitable for use in climate change studies. The so-created soil moisture data records (latest version: ESA CCI SM v02.1 released on 5/12/2014) are freely available and can be obtained from http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/. As described by Wagner et al. (2012) the principle steps of the data fusion process are: 1) error characterisation, 2) matching to account for data set specific biases, and 3) merging. In this presentation we present the current data fusion process and discuss how new error characterisation methods, such as the increasingly popular triple collocation method as discussed for example by Zwieback et al. (2012) may be used to improve it. The main benefit of an improved error characterisation would be a more reliable identification of the best performing microwave soil moisture retrieval(s) for each grid point and each point in time. In case that two or more satellite data sets provides useful information, the estimated errors can be used to define the weights with which each satellite data set are merged, i.e. the lower its error the higher its weight. This is expected to bring a significant improvement over the current data fusion scheme which is not yet based on quantitative estimates of the retrieval errors but on a proxy measure, namely the vegetation optical depth (Dorigo et al., 2015): over areas with low vegetation passive soil moisture retrievals are used, while over areas with moderate vegetation density active retrievals are used. In transition areas, where both products correlate well, both products are being used in a synergistic way: on time steps where only one of

  11. [Effect of Helium on Diamond Films Deposited Using Microwave PCVD].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Zhi-bin; Tao, Li-ping; Gao, Pan; Li, Yi-cheng; Fu, Qiu-ming

    2015-03-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to in situ diagnose the CH4-H2-He plasma in order to know the effect of helium on the diamond growth by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma as a function of helium addition was studied. The diamond films deposited in different helium volume fraction were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the spectra intensity of radicals of H(α), H(β), H(γ), CH and C2 increases with the increasing of helium volume fraction, especially, that of radical H(α) has the most improvement. The spectrum space diagnosis results show that the uniformity of C2, CH radicals in the plasma tends to poor due to the helium addition and resulted in a different thickness along the radial direction The measurement of deposition rate shows that the addition of helium is useful for the improvement of the growth rate of diamond films, due to relative concentration of carbon radicals was increased. The deposition rate increases by 24% when the volume fraction of He was increased from 0 vol. % to 4.7 vol.%. The micrographs of SEM reveal that with the increasing of helium volume fraction, the diamond films' crystallite orientation changes from (111) to disorder and a twins growth becomes obvious. The secondary nucleation density during growth increases because the high relatively concentration of C2 radicals under higher helium volume fraction (4.7 vol. %). In addition, the substrate was etched and sputtered by the plasma, which introduced metallic atoms into the plasma during the deposition of diamond films. Eventually, the existing of secondary nucleation and impurity atoms lead to the appearance of twins and results in the compressive dress.

  12. [Effect of Helium on Diamond Films Deposited Using Microwave PCVD].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Zhi-bin; Tao, Li-ping; Gao, Pan; Li, Yi-cheng; Fu, Qiu-ming

    2015-03-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to in situ diagnose the CH4-H2-He plasma in order to know the effect of helium on the diamond growth by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma as a function of helium addition was studied. The diamond films deposited in different helium volume fraction were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the spectra intensity of radicals of H(α), H(β), H(γ), CH and C2 increases with the increasing of helium volume fraction, especially, that of radical H(α) has the most improvement. The spectrum space diagnosis results show that the uniformity of C2, CH radicals in the plasma tends to poor due to the helium addition and resulted in a different thickness along the radial direction The measurement of deposition rate shows that the addition of helium is useful for the improvement of the growth rate of diamond films, due to relative concentration of carbon radicals was increased. The deposition rate increases by 24% when the volume fraction of He was increased from 0 vol. % to 4.7 vol.%. The micrographs of SEM reveal that with the increasing of helium volume fraction, the diamond films' crystallite orientation changes from (111) to disorder and a twins growth becomes obvious. The secondary nucleation density during growth increases because the high relatively concentration of C2 radicals under higher helium volume fraction (4.7 vol. %). In addition, the substrate was etched and sputtered by the plasma, which introduced metallic atoms into the plasma during the deposition of diamond films. Eventually, the existing of secondary nucleation and impurity atoms lead to the appearance of twins and results in the compressive dress. PMID:26117884

  13. Passive L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E. J.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (TB's) measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These TB measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly TB's could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly TB. Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, hr, on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on TB simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent hr parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of TB simulations in the early growth cycle. A.T. Joseph, R. Van der Velde, P.E. O'Neill, R.H. Lang, and T. Gish, "Soil moisture retrieval during a corn growth cycle using L-band (1.6 GHz) radar observations", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 46, DOI:10.1109/TGRS.2008.917214, Aug. 2008. M.C. Dobson, F.T. Ulaby, M

  14. Snow depth and snow cover retrieval from FengYun3B microwave radiation imagery based on a snow passive microwave unmixing method in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lingjia; Ren, Ruizhi; Zhao, Kai; Li, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The precision of snow parameter retrieval is unsatisfactory for current practical demands. The primary reason is because of the problem of mixed pixels that are caused by low spatial resolution of satellite passive microwave data. A snow passive microwave unmixing method is proposed in this paper, based on land cover type data and the antenna gain function of passive microwaves. The land cover type of Northeast China is partitioned into grass, farmland, bare soil, forest, and water body types. The component brightness temperatures (CBT), namely unmixed data, with 1 km data resolution are obtained using the proposed unmixing method. The snow depth determined by the CBT and three snow depth retrieval algorithms are validated through field measurements taken in forest and farmland areas of Northeast China in January 2012 and 2013. The results show that the overall of the retrieval precision of the snow depth is improved by 17% in farmland areas and 10% in forest areas when using the CBT in comparison with the mixed pixels. The snow cover results based on the CBT are compared with existing MODIS snow cover products. The results demonstrate that more snow cover information can be obtained with up to 86% accuracy.

  15. Microwave sintering of Ag-nanoparticle thin films on a polyimide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, S.; Kawamura, S.; Maitani, M. M.; Suzuki, E.; Wada, Y.; Mochizuki, D.

    2015-12-15

    Ag-nanoparticle thin films on a polyimide substrate were subjected to microwave sintering by use of a single-mode waveguide applicator. A two-step sintering process was employed. First, at low conductivities of the film, the film sample was placed at the site of the maximum electric field and subjected to microwave irradiation. Second, when the conductivity of the film increased, the film sample was placed at the site of the maximum magnetic field and again subjected to microwave irradiation. The microwave sintering process was completed within 1.5 min, which is significantly lower than the time required for the oven heating process. The resulting conductivity of the film, albeit only 30% of that of the bulk material, was seven times that of a film annealed at the same temperature in a furnace. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the nanoparticles underwent both grain necking and grain growth during microwave sintering. In addition, this sintering process was equivalent to the oven heating process performed at a 50 °C higher annealing temperature. An electromagnetic wave simulation and a heat transfer simulation of the microwave sintering process were performed to gain a thorough understanding of the process.

  16. Buckyball microwave plasmas: Fragmentation and diamond-film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Liu, Shengzhong; Krauss, A.R.; Pan, Xianzheng

    1993-08-01

    Microwave discharges (2.45 GHz) have been generated in C{sub 60}-containing Ar produced by flowing Ar over fullerene-containing soot. Optical spectroscopy shows that the spectrum is dominated by the d{sup 3}{Pi}g-a{sup 3}{Pi}u Swan bands of C{sub 2} and particularly the {Delta}v = {minus}2, {minus}1, 0, +1, and +2 sequences. These results give direct evidence that C{sub 2} is one of the products of C{sub 60} fragmentation brought about, at least in part, by collisionally induced dissociation (CID). C{sub 60} has been used as a precursor in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) experiment to grow diamond-thin films. The films, grown in an Ar/H{sub 2} gas mixture (0.14% carbon content, 100 Torr, 20 sccm Ar, 4 sccm H{sub 2}, 1500 W, 850{degree}C substrate temperature), were characterized with SEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. Growth rate was found to be {approx} 0.6 {mu}/hr. Assuming a linear dependence on carbon concentration, a growth rate at least six times higher than commonly observed using methane as a precursor, would be predicted at a carbon content of 1% based on C{sub 60}. Energetic and mechanistic arguments are advanced to rationalize this result based on C{sub 2} as the growth species.

  17. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  18. Snow stratigraphic heterogeneity within ground-based passive microwave radiometer footprints: implications for emission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandells, M.; Rutter, N.; Derksen, C.; Langlois, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Montpetit, B.; Pulliainen, J. T.; Royer, A.; Toose, P.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing of snow mass remains a challenging area of research. Scattering of electromagnetic radiation is sensitive to snow mass, but is also affected by contrasts in the dielectric properties of the snow. Although the argument that errors from simple algorithms average out at large scales has been used to justify current retrieval methods, it is not obvious why this should be the case. This hypothesis needs to be tested more rigorously. A ground-based field experiment was carried out to assess the impact of sub-footprint snow heterogeneity on microwave brightness temperature, in Churchill, Canada in winter in early 2010. Passive microwave measurements of snow were made using sled-mounted radiometers at 75cm intervals over a 5m transect. Measurements were made at horizontal and vertical polarizations at frequencies of 19 and 37 GHz. Snow beneath the radiometer footprints was subsequently excavated, creating a snow trench wall along the centrepoints of adjacent footprints. The trench wall was carefully smoothed and photographed with a near-infrared camera in order to determine the positions of stratigraphic snow layer boundaries. Three one-dimensional vertical profiles of snowpack properties (density and snow specific surface area) were taken at 75cm, 185cm and 355cm from the left hand side of the trench. These profile measurements were used to derive snow density and grain size for each of the layers identified from the NIR image. Microwave brightness temperatures for the 2-dimensional map of snow properties was simulated with the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) model at 1cm intervals horizontally across the trench. Where each of five ice lenses was identified in the snow stratigraphy, a decrease in brightness temperature was simulated. However, the median brightness temperature simulated across the trench was substantially higher than the observations, of the order of tens of Kelvin, dependent on frequency and polarization. In order to understand and

  19. Processing, electrical and microwave properties of sputtered Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanyam, G.; Kapoor, V. J.; Chorey, C. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    A reproducible fabrication process has been established for TlCaBaCuO thin films on LaAlO3 substrates by RF magnetron sputtering and post-deposition processing methods. Electrical transport properties of the thin films were measured on patterned four-probe test devices. Microwave properties of the films were obtained from unloaded Q measurements of all-superconducting ring resonators. This paper describes the processing, electrical and microwave properties of Tl2Ca1Ba2Cu2O(x) 2122-plane phase thin films.

  20. Snow stratigraphic heterogeneity within ground-based passive microwave radiometer footprints: Implications for emission modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Nick; Sandells, Mel; Derksen, Chris; Toose, Peter; Royer, Alain; Montpetit, Benoit; Langlois, Alex; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional measurements of snowpack properties (stratigraphic layering, density, grain size, and temperature) were used as inputs to the multilayer Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) microwave emission model at a centimeter-scale horizontal resolution, across a 4.5 m transect of ground-based passive microwave radiometer footprints near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. Snowpack stratigraphy was complex (between six and eight layers) with only three layers extending continuously throughout the length of the transect. Distributions of one-dimensional simulations, accurately representing complex stratigraphic layering, were evaluated using measured brightness temperatures. Large biases (36 to 68 K) between simulated and measured brightness temperatures were minimized (-0.5 to 0.6 K), within measurement accuracy, through application of grain scaling factors (2.6 to 5.3) at different combinations of frequencies, polarizations, and model extinction coefficients. Grain scaling factors compensated for uncertainty relating optical specific surface area to HUT effective grain size inputs and quantified relative differences in scattering and absorption properties of various extinction coefficients. The HUT model required accurate representation of ice lenses, particularly at horizontal polarization, and large grain scaling factors highlighted the need to consider microstructure beyond the size of individual grains. As variability of extinction coefficients was strongly influenced by the proportion of large (hoar) grains in a vertical profile, it is important to consider simulations from distributions of one-dimensional profiles rather than single profiles, especially in sub-Arctic snowpacks where stratigraphic variability can be high. Model sensitivity experiments suggested that the level of error in field measurements and the new methodological framework used to apply them in a snow emission model were satisfactory. Layer amalgamation showed that a three

  1. An Inter-calibrated Passive Microwave Brightness Temperature Data Record and Ocean Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, K. A.; Wentz, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Inter-calibration of passive microwave sensors has been the subject of on-going activity at Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) since 1974. RSS has produced a brightness temperature TB data record that spans the last 28 years (1987-2014) from inter-calibrated passive microwave sensors on 14 satellites: AMSR-E, AMSR2, GMI, SSMI F08-F15, SSMIS F16-F18, TMI, WindSat. Accompanying the TB record are a suite of ocean products derived from the TBs that provide a 28-year record of wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid, and rain rate; and 18 years (1997-2014) of sea surface temperatures, corresponding to the period for which 6 and/or 10 GHz measurements are available. Crucial to the inter-calibration and ocean product retrieval are a highly accurate radiative transfer model RTM. The RSS RTM has been continually refined for over 30 years and is arguably the most accurate model in the 1-100 GHz spectrum. The current generation of TB and ocean products, produced using the latest version of the RTM, is called Version-7. The accuracy of the Version-7 inter-calibration is estimated to be 0.1 K, based on inter-satellite comparisons and validation of the ocean products against in situ measurements. The data record produced by RSS has had a significant scientific impact. Over just the last 14 years (2000-2013) RSS data have been used in 743 peer-reviewed journal articles. This is an average of 4.5 peer-reviewed papers published every month made possible with RSS data. Some of the most important scientific contributions made by RSS data have been to the study of the climate. The AR5 Report "Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis" by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the internationally accepted authority on climate change, references 20 peer-reviewed journal papers from RSS scientists. The report makes direct use of RSS water vapor data, RSS atmospheric temperatures from MSU/AMSU, and 9 other datasets that are derived from RSS data. The RSS TB data record is

  2. The Effects of Rainfall Inhomogeneity on Climate Variability of Rainfall Estimated from Passive Microwave Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Poyner, Philip; Berg, Wesley; Thomas-Stahle, Jody

    2007-01-01

    Passive microwave rainfall estimates that exploit the emission signal of raindrops in the atmosphere are sensitive to the inhomogeneity of rainfall within the satellite field of view (FOV). In particular, the concave nature of the brightness temperature (T(sub b)) versus rainfall relations at frequencies capable of detecting the blackbody emission of raindrops cause retrieval algorithms to systematically underestimate precipitation unless the rainfall is homogeneous within a radiometer FOV, or the inhomogeneity is accounted for explicitly. This problem has a long history in the passive microwave community and has been termed the beam-filling error. While not a true error, correcting for it requires a priori knowledge about the actual distribution of the rainfall within the satellite FOV, or at least a statistical representation of this inhomogeneity. This study first examines the magnitude of this beam-filling correction when slant-path radiative transfer calculations are used to account for the oblique incidence of current radiometers. Because of the horizontal averaging that occurs away from the nadir direction, the beam-filling error is found to be only a fraction of what has been reported previously in the literature based upon plane-parallel calculations. For a FOV representative of the 19-GHz radiometer channel (18 km X 28 km) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the mean beam-filling correction computed in this study for tropical atmospheres is 1.26 instead of 1.52 computed from plane-parallel techniques. The slant-path solution is also less sensitive to finescale rainfall inhomogeneity and is, thus, able to make use of 4-km radar data from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) in order to map regional and seasonal distributions of observed rainfall inhomogeneity in the Tropics. The data are examined to assess the expected errors introduced into climate rainfall records by unresolved changes in rainfall inhomogeneity. Results show that global

  3. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Falling Snow and Associated GPM Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Retrievals of falling snow from space represent one of the next important challenges for the atmospheric, hydrological, and energy budget scientific communities. Historically, retrievals of falling snow have been difficult due to the relative insensitivity of satellite rain-based channels as used in the past. We emphasize the use of high frequency passive microwave channels (85-200 GHz) since these are more sensitive to the ice in clouds and have been used to estimate falling snow from space. While satellite-based remote sensing provides global coverage of falling snow events and the science is relatively new, retrievals are still undergoing development with challenges remaining. There are several current satellite sensors, though not specifically designed for estimating falling snow, are capable of measuring snow from space. These include NOAA's AMSU-B, the MHS sensors, and CloudSat radar. They use high frequency (greater than 85 GHz) passive and active microwave and millimeter-wave channels that are sensitive to the scattering from ice and snow particles in the atmosphere. Sensors with water vapor channels near 183 GHz center line provide opaqueness to the Earth's surface features that can contaminate the falling snow signatures, especially over snow covered surface. In addition, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission scheduled for launch in 2013 is specifically designed to measure both liquid rain and frozen snow precipitation. Since falling snow from space is the next precipitation measurement challenge from space, information must be determined in order to guide retrieval algorithm development for these current and future missions. This information includes thresholds of detection for various sensor channel configurations, snow event system characteristics, and surface types. For example, can a lake effect snow system with low cloud tops having an ice water content (IWC) at the surface of 1.0 gram per cubic meter be detected? If this information is

  4. Annual South American forest loss estimates based on passive microwave remote sensing (1990-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marle, M. J. E.; van der Werf, G. R.; de Jeu, R. A. M.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Consistent forest loss estimates are important to understand the role of forest loss and deforestation in the global carbon cycle, for biodiversity studies, and to estimate the mitigation potential of reducing deforestation. To date, most studies have relied on optical satellite data and new efforts have greatly improved our quantitative knowledge on forest dynamics. However, most of these studies yield results for only a relatively short time period or are limited to certain countries. We have quantified large-scale forest loss over a 21-year period (1990-2010) in the tropical biomes of South America using remotely sensed vegetation optical depth (VOD). This passive microwave satellite-based indicator of vegetation water content and vegetation density has a much coarser spatial resolution than optical data but its temporal resolution is higher and VOD is not impacted by aerosols and cloud cover. We used the merged VOD product of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) observations, and developed a change detection algorithm to quantify spatial and temporal variations in forest loss dynamics. Our results compared reasonably well with the newly developed Landsat-based Global Forest Change (GFC) maps, available for the 2001 onwards period (r2 = 0.90 when comparing annual country-level estimates). This allowed us to convert our identified changes in VOD to forest loss area and compute these from 1990 onwards. We also compared these calibrated results to PRODES (r2 = 0.60 when comparing annual state-level estimates). We found that South American forest exhibited substantial interannual variability without a clear trend during the 1990s, but increased from 2000 until 2004. After 2004, forest loss decreased again, except for two smaller peaks in 2007 and 2010. For a large part, these trends were driven by changes in Brazil, which was responsible for 56 % of the total South American forest loss area over our study

  5. Sea Ice Variability in the Sea of Okhotsk from Passive Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Sea of Okhotsk, located between 50 and 60 N, is bounded by the Kamchatka Peninsula, Siberia, Sakhalin Island, and the Kuril Island chain and is the largest midlatitude seasonal sea ice zone in the Northern Hemisphere. The winter sea ice cover begins to form in November and expands to cover most of the sea by March. Over the following three months, the ice retreats with only small ice-covered areas remaining by the beginning of June. The sea is ice free or nearly ice free on average for six months of the year, from June through November. The recent compilation of a consistent, long-term record of Northern Hemisphere sea ice extents based on passive microwave satellite observations from the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer and from four Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave Imagers provides the basis for assessing long-term sea ice extent variability in the Sea of Okhotsk. Analysis of this 20-year data record (1979-1998) shows that based on yearly averages the overall extent of the Sea of Okhotsk ice cover is decreasing at the rate of -8.1+/-2.1x10(exp 3) sq km/yr (-17.2%/decade), in contrast to the rate of decrease of -33.3+/-0.7x10(exp 3) sq km/yr (-2.7%/decade) for the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. There is large regional sea ice extent variability of the Arctic ice cover. Two of the nine Arctic regions analyzed, the Bering Sea and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, show increases of 0.8+/-1.4xl0(exp 3) sq km/yr (2.7%/decade) and 1.2+/-0.5xl0(exp 3) sq km/yr (17.1%/decade), respectively. Interestingly, the Sea of Okhotsk and the Gulf of St. Lawrence show about equal percentage changes, but of opposite sign. The Sea of Okhotsk exhibits its greatest percent decrease (-24.3%/decade) during spring (April-June). The year of maximum winter sea ice extent for the Sea of Okhotsk was 1979, whereas the minimum winter sea ice extent occurred in 1984.

  6. Seasonally Frozen Soil Monitoring Using Passive Microwave Satellite Data and Simulation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, D. L.; Owe, M.; Levine, E.

    1998-01-01

    Satellite data and simulation modeling were used to assess seasonally frozen soils in the central US - Canada borders area (46-53 degrees N and 96-108 degrees). We used Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) satellite data to delineate the top layer of frozen soils. SMMR is a passive microwave sensor having five channels (6.6, 10, 18, 21 and 37 GHz) with a horizontal and vertical polarization. SMRR data are available between 1978-1987 with noon and midnight overpass and footprint sizes between 25 km and 150 km. SMMR data were processed from resampled 1/4 degree grid cells during fall freeze-up and spring thaw (fall 1985 - spring 1987). The dielectric properties of a target may directly affect the satellite signal. The dielectric value is an order of magnitude smaller for frozen soil water. There are other significant changes to the emitted microwave signal from changes to the surface physical temperature, attenuation of the soil signal from plant water and soil moisture. We further characterized the temporal and spatial dynamic of frozen soils using the FroST (Frozen Soil Temperature) simulation model. The FroST model was used to further predict soil water and ice content, and soil temperature. SMMR results were compared versus 5-cm soil temperature data from available weather stations (14 in Canada and 11 for available months in the US). SMMR data were analyzed as a function of frequency, polarization, polarization difference, and "frequency gradient". In addition, vegetation density, physical temperature and snow depth were also considered. Preliminary analysis of SMMR derived frozen soil/thaw classification using a simple threshold classification indicates a mean overall classification accuracy by season of 85 percent. A sensitivity analysis for different soils with varying amounts of snow was conducted with FroST, which showed that the amount of snow, and the time of snow fall and melt affected the ice and water content, and depth of thaw. These

  7. Annual South American forest loss estimates based on passive microwave remote sensing (1990-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marle, M. J. E.; van der Werf, G. R.; de Jeu, R. A. M.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Consistent forest loss estimates are important to understand the role of forest loss and deforestation in the global carbon cycle, for biodiversity studies, and to estimate the mitigation potential of reducing deforestation. To date, most studies have relied on optical satellite data and new efforts have greatly improved our quantitative knowledge on forest dynamics. However, most of these studies yield results for only a relatively short time period or are limited to certain countries. We have quantified large-scale forest losses over a 21 year period (1990-2010) in the tropical biomes of South America using remotely sensed vegetation optical depth (VOD). This passive microwave satellite-based indicator of vegetation water content and vegetation density has a much coarser spatial resolution than optical but its temporal resolution is higher and VOD is not impacted by aerosols and cloud cover. We used the merged VOD product of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) observations, and developed a change detection algorithm to quantify spatial and temporal variations in forest loss dynamics. Our results compared favorably to the newly developed Global Forest Change (GFC) maps based on Landsat data and available for the 2001 onwards period (r2 = 0.90 when comparing annual country-level estimates), which allowed us to convert our results to forest loss area and compute these from 1990 onwards. We found that South American forest exhibited substantial interannual variability without a clear trend during the 1990s, but increased from 2000 until 2004. After 2004, forest loss decreased again, except for two smaller peaks in 2007 and 2010. For a large part, these trends were driven by changes in Brazil, which was responsible for 56 % of the total South American forest loss over our study period according to our results. One of the key findings of our study is that while forest losses decreased in Brazil after 2005

  8. Passive microwave observations of the Wedell Sea during austral winter and early spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Comiso, J. C.; Lange, M. A.; Eicken, H.; Wensnahan, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The results of multispectral passive microwave observations (6.7 to 90-GHz) are presented from the cruises of the FS Polarstern in the Weddell Sea from July to December 1986. This paper includes primarily the analysis of radiometric observations taken at ice station sites. Averaged emissivity spectra for first-year (FY) ice were relatively constant throughout the experiment and were not statistically different from FY ice signatures in the Arctic. Detailed ice characterization was carried out at each site to compare the microwave signatures of the ice with the physical properties. Absorption optical depths of FY ice were found to be sufficiently high that only the structure in the upper portions of the ice contributed significantly to interstation emissivity variations. The emissivities at 90-GHz, e(90), had the greatest variance. Both e(90) at vertical polarization and GR(sub e)(90, 18.7)(defined as (e(sub V)(90)-e(sub V)(18.7))/e(sub V)(90 + e(sub V)(18.7)) depended on the scattering optical depth which is a function of the snow grain diameter and layer thickness. The variance showed a latitude dependence and is probably due to an increase in the strength of snow metamorphism nearer the northern edge of the ice pack. The contribution of variations of near-surface brine volume to the emissivity was not significant over the range of values encountered at the station sites. Emissivity spectra are presented for a range of thin ice types. Unsupervised principal component analysis produced three significant eigenvectors and showed a separation among four different surface types: open water, thin ice, FY ice, and FY ice with a thick snow cover. A comparison with SMMR satellite data showed that average ice concentrations derived from the ship's ice watch log were consistent with the satellite concentrations. The surface based emissivities for FY ice were also compared with emissivities calculated from scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) satellite radiances

  9. Investigating the value of passive microwave observations for monitoring volcanic eruption source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Cimini, Domenico; Marzano, Frank

    2016-04-01

    the dispersal fine-ash cloud, but tend to saturate near the source due to the strong optical extinction of ash cloud top layers. Conversely, observations at microwave (MW) channels from LEO satellites have demonstrated to carry additional information near the volcano source due to the relative lower opacity. This feature makes satellite MW complementary to IR radiometry for estimating source parameters close to the volcano emission, at the cost of coarser spatial resolution. The presentation shows the value of passive MW observations for the detection and quantitative retrieval of volcanic emission source parameters through the investigation of notable case studies, such as the eruptions of Grímsvötn (Iceland, May 2011) and Calbuco (Cile, April 2015), observed by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder.

  10. Classification methods for monitoring Arctic sea ice using OKEAN passive/active two-channel microwave data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, Gennady I.; Douglas, David C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents methods for classifying Arctic sea ice using both passive and active (2-channel) microwave imagery acquired by the Russian OKEAN 01 polar-orbiting satellite series. Methods and results are compared to sea ice classifications derived from nearly coincident Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) image data of the Barents, Kara, and Laptev Seas. The Russian OKEAN 01 satellite data were collected over weekly intervals during October 1995 through December 1997. Methods are presented for calibrating, georeferencing and classifying the raw active radar and passive microwave OKEAN 01 data, and for correcting the OKEAN 01 microwave radiometer calibration wedge based on concurrent 37 GHz horizontal polarization SSM/I brightness temperature data. Sea ice type and ice concentration algorithms utilized OKEAN's two-channel radar and passive microwave data in a linear mixture model based on the measured values of brightness temperature and radar backscatter, together with a priori knowledge about the scattering parameters and natural emissivities of basic sea ice types. OKEAN 01 data and algorithms tended to classify lower concentrations of young or first-year sea ice when concentrations were less than 60%, and to produce higher concentrations of multi-year sea ice when concentrations were greater than 40%, when compared to estimates produced from SSM/I data. Overall, total sea ice concentration maps derived independently from OKEAN 01, SSM/I, and AVHRR satellite imagery were all highly correlated, with uniform biases, and mean differences in total ice concentration of less than four percent (sd<15%).

  11. Capability of passive microwave and SNODAS SWE estimates for hydrologic predictions in selected U.S. watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuyovich, C.; Jacobs, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, a dedicated system of snow measurement stations (SNOTEL) and snowpack modeling products (SNODAS) are available to estimate the snow water equivalent (SWE) throughout the winter seasons. Even in the U.S., water resource management is hampered by limited snow data in certain regions, as evident by the 2011 Missouri Basin flooding due in large part to the significant Plains snowpack. In other regions of the world that depend on snowmelt for water resources, snow data can be scarce, and these regions are vulnerable to drought or flood conditions. Satellite data could potentially provide important information in under-sampled areas. Passive microwave data have shown some skill in estimating SWE in several regions of the United States, as compared with the SNODAS spatially distributed estimates. However, the SNODAS product contains greater uncertainty in regions with limited observations or that experience wind redistribution of snow. This study evaluates SWE estimates from AMSR-E and SSM/I satellites, and the SNODAS product, in several watersheds throughout the United States by comparison with discharge data. Watersheds large enough to be appropriate for passive microwave resolution were selected from the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN), which identifies watersheds with minimal human impacts to stream flow. A water balance analysis was conducted to determine the predictive capability of passive microwave for hydrological applications.

  12. A 10-Year Climatology of Amazonian Rainfall Derived from Passive Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Adler, Robert F.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we present and describe a satellite-derived precipitation climatology over northern South America using a passive microwave technique, the Goddard Profiling Algorithm. A period of data slightly longer than 10 years is examined. The climatologies take the form of the mean estimated (adjusted) rainfall for a 10-year (+) period, with sub-divisions by month and meteorological season. For the six-year period 1992-1997, when two satellites were in operation, diurnal variability (to the extent it is discerned by four unequally spaced observations) is presented. We find an alternating pattern of morning and maxima stretching from the northeast (Atlantic coast) clear across the continent to the Pacific. The effects of topography, coastlines and geography (river valleys) on the rainfall patterns are clear. Interannual variability is examined by computing the deviations of yearly and warm season (DJF) rainfall from their respective long-term means. Interannual variability of the diurnal nature of the rainfall is presented, and the strong El Nino event of 1997-1998 is discussed.

  13. Development of a Passive Microwave Surface Melt Record for Antarctica and Antarctic Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmosky, C. C.; Reasons, J.; Morgan, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctica contains the largest mass of ice in the world and much time and energy has gone into researching the ice-ocean-atmosphere-land dynamics that, in a warming climate, have the potential to significantly affect sea levels throughout the world. While there are many datasets currently available to researchers examining sea ice extent and volume, glacier thickness, ice shelf retreat and expansion, and atmospheric variables such as temperature and wind speeds, there is not currently a dataset that offers surface melt extent of land ice in the southern hemisphere. The database outlined here uses the Cross-Polarized Gradient Ratio (XPGR) to show surface melt extent on a daily basis for all of Antarctica. XPGR utilizes passive microwave satellite imagery in the 19 GHz and 37GHz frequencies to determine the presence or absence of greater than 1% liquid water in the top layers of ice. Daily XPGR melt occurrence (1987-2014) was calculated for both the ice sheet as well as ice shelves on Antarctica, and is available as a GIS shapefile or asci text file.

  14. Estimating vegetation optical depth using L-band passive microwave airborne data in HiWATER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Chai, Linna

    2014-11-01

    In this study, a relationship between polarization differences of soil emissivity at different incidence angles was constructed from a large quantity of simulated soil emissivity based on the Advanced Integrated Emission Model (AIEM) input parameters include: a frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band), incident angles varying from 1°to 60° at a 1° interval, a wide range of soil moisture content and land surface roughness parameters. Then, we used this relationship and the ω-τ zero-order radiation transfer model to develop an inversion method of low vegetation optical depth at L-band, this work were under the assumption that there was no significant polarization difference between the vegetation signals. Based on this inversion method of low vegetation optical depth, we used the land surface passive microwave brightness temperature of Heihe Watershed obtained by airborne Polarimetric L-band Multibeam Radiometer (PLMR) in 2012 Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) to retrieve the corn optical depth in the flight areas, then the results were compared with the measured corn LAI. Results show that the retrieved corn optical depths were consisted with the measured LAI of corn. It proved that the corn optical depth inversion method proposed in this study was feasible. Moreover, the method was promising to apply to the satellite observations.

  15. Soil Moisture Retrieval Through Changing Corn Using Active/Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. E.; Joseph, A.; DeLannoy, G.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Kim, E.; Houser, P.; Gish, T.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive field experiment was conducted from May-early October, 2002 at the heavily instrumented USDA-ARS (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service) OPE3 (Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement) test site in Beltsville, MD to acquire data needed to address active/passive microwave algorithm, modeling, and ground validation issues for accurate soil moisture retrieval. During the experiment, a tower-mounted 1.4 GHz radiometer (Lrad) and a truck-mounted dual-frequency (1.6 and 4.75 GHz) radar system were deployed on the northern edge of the site. The soil in this portion of the field is a sandy loam (silt 23.5%, sand 60.3%, clay 16.1%) with a measured bulk density of 1.253 g/cu cm. Vegetation cover in the experiment consisted of a corn crop which was measured from just after planting on April 17, 2002 through senescence and harvesting on October 2. Although drought conditions prevailed during the summer, the corn yield was near average, with peak biomass reached in late July.

  16. Wind Retrievals under Rain for Passive Satellite Microwave Radiometers and its Applications to Hurricane Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm that retrieves wind speed under rain using C-hand and X-band channels of passive microwave satellite radiometers. The spectral difference of the brightness temperature signals due to wind or rain allows to find channel combinations that are sufficiently sensitive to wind speed but little or not sensitive to rain. We &ve trained a statistical algorithm that applies under hurricane conditions and is able to measure wind speeds in hurricanes to an estimated accuracy of about 2 m/s. We have also developed a global algorithm, that is less accurate but can be applied under all conditions. Its estimated accuracy is between 2 and 5 mls, depending on wind speed and rain rate. We also extend the wind speed region in our model for the wind induced sea surface emissivity from currently 20 m/s to 40 mls. The data indicate that the signal starts to saturate above 30 mls. Finally, we make an assessment of the performance of wind direction retrievals from polarimetric radiometers as function of wind speed and rain rate

  17. Polarimetric passive microwave remote sensing of wind vectors with foam-covered rough ocean surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Tsang, Leung; Chen, Dong

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, polarimetric microwave emissions from wind-generated foam-covered ocean surfaces are investigated. The foam is treated as densely packed air bubbles coated with thin seawater coating. The absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients are calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of solutions of Maxwell equations of a collection of coated particles. The effects of boundary roughness of ocean surface are included by using the second-order small perturbation method (SPM) describing the reflection coefficients between foam and ocean. An empirical wavenumber spectrum is used to represent the small-scale wind-generated sea surfaces. The iterative method is employed to solve dense media radiative transfer (DMRT) equations, and is applied to calculate results of all four Stokes parameters of rough ocean surfaces. The theoretical results of four Stokes brightness temperatures with typical parameters of foam in passive remote sensing at 10.8 GHz, 19 GHz and 36.5 GHz are illustrated. The azimuth variations of polarimetric brightness temperature are calculated. Emission with various wind speed and foam layer thickness is studied. The results are also compared with those based on Quasi-Crystalline Approximation (QCA).

  18. Use of Passive Microwave Observations in a Radar Rainfall-Profiling Algorithm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2002-07-01

    A physically based methodology to incorporate passive microwave observations in a `rain-profiling algorithm' is developed for space- or airborne radars at frequencies exhibiting attenuation. The rain-profiling algorithm deploys a formulation for reflectivity attenuation correction that is mathematically equivalent to that of Hitschfeld and Bordan. In this formulation, the reflectivity-hydrometeor content (or rainfall rate) and reflectivity-attenuation relationships are expressed as a function of one variable in the drop size distribution parameterization, namely, the multiplicative factor in a normalized gamma distribution. The multiplicative factor parameter, mean cloud water content, and one parameter describing the precipitation phase are estimated in a Bayesian framework. This involves the minimization of differences between the 10-, 19-, 37-, and 85-GHz brightness temperature values predicted by a plane-parallel multilayer radiative transfer model and those observed by space- or airborne radiometers. A variational approach is devised to perform the minimization. The methodology is first tested using data simulated using a cloud model and is subsequently applied to coincident airborne brightness temperature and radar profile observations originating in the Kwajalein Experiment of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Results suggest improvements in rain estimation induced by the inclusion of the brightness temperature information in the retrieval framework if consistent modeling and quantification of errors are performed. Recommendations regarding the application of the method to TRMM satellite observations are formulated based on the findings of the study.

  19. Estimating effective roughness parameters of the L-MEB model for soil moisture retrieval using passive microwave observations from SMAPVEX12

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although there have been efforts to improve existing soil moisture retrieval algorithms, the ability to estimate soil moisture from passive microwave observations is still hampered by problems in accurately modeling the observed microwave signal. This paper focuses on the estimation of effective sur...

  20. Monitoring Precipitation Contents and Extinction By Using A Ground-based Passive Microwave Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzano, F. S.; Fionda, E.; Ciotti, P.; Consalvi, F.

    the forward models, by varying the model pa- rameters in a physically-based manner, it is derived a synthetic database made by the downwelling simulated brightness temperatures, the associated mean radiative tem- perature and the total path-attenuation. Non-linear inversion algorithms are developed for different sets of frequency channels, observation geometries, cloud types, and pre- cipitation intensities. Examined and compared inversion techniques are both statistical regression estimators and feed-forward neural networks. A special care is devoted to 1 set up robust estimators in presence of a random noise which can be attributed to various sources, first of all effects of possible water-films on the antenna reflector. A maximum a posteriori probability discrimination technique is applied to separate stratiform from convective raining clouds. Simulation results are shown to illustrate the potential of the proposed models by selecting, for this study, a wide range of fre- quencies from 13.0 to 50.2 GHz. As an experimental validation, rain events occurred in Central Italy and observed at the ground-station of ITALSAT geostationary satellite near Rome (Italy), are considered. The ITALSAT station is equipped with 3 satellite beacons at 19.7, 39.6, and 49.5 GHz together with a multichannel radiometer at 13.0, 23.8, and 31.6 GHz, a raingage and a meteorological instrumentation. Results in terms of comparison between measurements and predictions are finally discussed. References Marzano F.S., E. Fionda, and P. Ciotti, SSimulation of radiometric and & cedil;attenuation measurements along earth-satellite links in the 10- to 50- GHz band through horizontally-finite convective raincellsT, Radio Sci., vol. 34, pp. 841-858, 1999. Marzano F.S., E. Fionda, P. Ciotti, and A. Martellucci, SRainfall retrieval from & cedil;ground-based multichannel microwave radiometersT, in Microwave Radiometry and Remote Sensing of the Environment, P. Pampaloni Ed., VSP Intern. Sci. Publisher

  1. A Method to Estimate Crop Effects in Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval Above C-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Xu, Y.; Shi, J.

    2009-12-01

    To remove vegetation effects in soil moisture retrieval by passive microwave technique at lower frequencies such as L- or C-band, the τ-ω model is often used, where ω is single scattering albedo of vegetation, and τ is its opacity (τ=exp(-t), t is transmissivity of vegetation). At frequencies above C-band, such as AMSR-E (the lowest frequency is 6.925GHz) or Chinese FY-3A (launched in 2008, the lowest frequency is 10.65GHz), both the scattering and transmission characteristics of short vegetation are not known exactly. In this paper, a Matrix-Doubling (thereafter M-D) microwave emission model was used to simulate emission of corn field at C (6.925GHz) and X (10.65GHz) bands. Total emission and vegetation layer emission contribution are verified by a microwave radiometer in a field experiment, respectively. The effective single scattering albedo and transmissivity of corn above C-band were derived by comparison the results of M-D model with those of τ-ω model at same environment, which were then verified by SMEX02 data. In τ-ω model the vegetation is treated as an uniform media. While the M-D model used in this paper is based on ray-tracing technique, which could account for multiple scattering inside vegetation layer, as well as that between vegetation and soil surface as frequency goes higher. The orientation and geometry parameters of vegetation could be considered in M-D. The ground surface emission model in M-D is AIEM. To verify the results by M-D model, we did a field experiment at QingYuan, Hebei Province of China in July 7, 2008 by a German-made truck-mounted microwave radiometer. At 6.925GHz, the simulated Brightness Temperature by M-D model vs. collected data were good. To verify the emission contribution from corn layer only, an Aluminum foil was placed on the ground below the corn, so as to mask the soil emission. The measured data vs. simulation were close. Since M-D model is very complicated, it’s difficult to relate the soil emission (soil

  2. Conversion of microwave signals by superconducting films in the resistive state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeru, I. I.; Peskovatskiy, S. A.; Sulima, V. S.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of a superconducting thin film microwave mixer, i.e., conversion efficiency and bandwidth are analyzed. The optimum operating regime of the nonlinear element is determined. Results of calculations are compared with the experimental ones. Experimental data on the noise in the superconducting films in a wide frequency range are presented.

  3. A feasibility study using radiochromic films for fast neutron 2D passive dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Samuel L.; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Howell, Calvin R.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Fallin, Brent; Tonchev, Anton P.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) to establish sensitivity of XRQA and EBT radiochromic films to fast neutron exposure; (2) to develop a film response to radiation dose calibration curve and (3) to investigate a two-dimensional (2D) film dosimetry technique for use in establishing an experimental setup for a radiobiological irradiation of mice and to assess the dose to the mice in this setup. The films were exposed to a 10 MeV neutron beam via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. The XRQA film response was a factor of 1.39 greater than EBT film response to the 10 MeV neutron beam when exposed to a neutron dose of 165 cGy. A film response-to-soft tissue dose calibration function was established over a range of 0-10 Gy and had a goodness of fit of 0.9926 with the calibration data. The 2D film dosimetry technique estimated the neutron dose to the mice by measuring the dose using a mouse phantom and by placing a piece of film on the exterior of the experimental mouse setup. The film results were benchmarked using Monte Carlo and aluminum (Al) foil activation measurements. The radiochromic film, Monte Carlo and Al foil dose measurements were strongly correlated, and the film within the mouse phantom agreed to better than 7% of the externally mounted films. These results demonstrated the potential application of radiochromic films for passive 2D neutron dosimetry.

  4. Surface Passivation for 3-5 Semiconductor Processing: Stable Gallium Sulphide Films by MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macinnes, Andrew N.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Power, Michael B.; Kang, Soon; Barron, Andrew R.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1994-01-01

    Gallium sulphide (GaS) has been deposited on GaAs to form stable, insulating, passivating layers. Spectrally resolved photoluminescence and surface recombination velocity measurements indicate that the GaS itself can contribute a significant fraction of the photoluminescence in GaS/GaAs structures. Determination of surface recombination velocity by photoluminescence is therefore difficult. By using C-V analysis of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures, passivation of the GaAs with GaS films is quantified.

  5. RHEED, AES and XPS studies of the passive films formed on ion implanted stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, C.R.; Doss, K.G.K.; Wang, Y.F.; Warren, J.B.; Hubler, G.K.

    1981-12-01

    P-implantation (10/sup 17/ ions cm/sup -2/, 40 KeV) into 304 stainless steel (ss) has been carried out, and an amorphous surface alloy was formed. Polarization studies in deaerated 1N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/+ 2% NaCl showed that P-implantation improved both the general and localized corrosion resistance of 304 ss. A comparative study has been carried out between the implanted and unimplanted steel to determine what influence P-implantation has upon the properties of the passive film formed 1N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The influence of Cl ions on pre-formed passive films was also studied. RHEED, XPS and AES were used to evaluate the nature of the passive films formed in these studies.

  6. Soil moisture from the recent AMSR2 and FY3B multi-frequency passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, Robert; Wang, Guojie; de Jeu, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Over the years several different multi-frequency passive microwave sensors were used to estimate surface soil moisture. An historical multi-frequency passive microwave database from these satellite platforms was already used to generate a long term (32 years) surface soil moisture dataset. The Land Parameter Retrieval Algorithm (LPRM) was applied to this historical multi-frequency passive microwave database, including the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), that plays a dominant role in the 2002-2011 period. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) shares a similar design with its predecessor, it was improved based on general technical development as well as the valuable heritage that AMSR-E left behind. Most recently, the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) started offering brightness temperature observations from the AMSR2 radiometer. In the recent years, China's National Satellite Meteorological Center (NSMC) developed meteorological satellites. The NSMC has polar orbiting sun-synchronized meteorological satellites in operation since 1988 in the so-called FengYun (FY) satellite series. FY3 is China's 2nd generation polar orbiting satellite series, its design was based on the previous polar orbiting satellite series and FY3 will ultimately become series of four satellites (FY3A to FY3D). The FY3B satellite is the 2nd satellite of the FY3 series and it's the 1st in the series to carry a microwave imager (MWRI) onboard observing the Earth's surface in 10 microwave channels. Brightness temperature observations of these recently developed sensors were compared to the existing database. An inter-calibration step was performed in order to overcome small difference in brightness temperature observations as a result of the different sensor calibration procedures. The LPRM was applied to observations made by the FY3B and AMSR2 sensors resulting in global soil moisture products. After the implementation of the

  7. Field emission from bias-grown diamond thin films in a microwave plasma

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Ding, Ming Q.; Auciello, Orlando

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing diamond or diamond like films in which a negative bias is established on a substrate with an electrically conductive surface in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The atmosphere that is subjected to microwave energy includes a source of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The negative bias is maintained on the substrate through both the nucleation and growth phase of the film until the film is continuous. Biases between -100V and -200 are preferred. Carbon sources may be one or more of CH.sub.4, C.sub.2 H.sub.2 other hydrocarbons and fullerenes.

  8. Crystallization of amorphous Si film by microwave annealing with SiC susceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, S. C.; Wang, C. Y.; Chang, T. H.; Chin, T. S.

    2009-03-01

    Crystalline silicon film is extremely important for low-cost, high performance Si-based devices, such as thin film transistors and solar cells. This study employs an elliptical microwave applicator to process the material placing near the field maximum. It is demonstrated that microwave irradiation incorporating with SiC susceptors is able to crystallize amorphous silicon film on glass substrate at a low temperature below 600 °C in a short period of 600 s. The reasons for such a fast processing time and a low annealing temperature are not clear.

  9. Identifying the Influence of Variable Ice Types on Passive and Active Microwave Measurements for the Purpose of SWE Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, G. E.; Duguay, C. R.; Derksen, C.

    2010-12-01

    Dual polarized airborne passive microwave (PM) brightness temperatures (Tbs) at 6.9, 19 and 37 GHz H/V and satellite X-band (9.65 GHz VV/VH) active microwave backscatter measurements were combined with coincident in-situ measurements of snow and ice characteristics to determine the potential of unique emission/interaction caused by variable ice properties. Algorithms designed to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE) using the common brightness temperature difference approach (37GHz - 19 GHz) continually underestimate in-situ levels when applied to pure-ice pixels in the Canadian subarctic. Ice thickness measurements were positively correlated with 19 GHz vertically polarised (V pol) passive microwave emissions (R= 0.67), and negatively with 19 GHz horizontally polarised (H pol) emissions (R = -0.79), indicating that surface conditions at the ice/snow interface affect the emissivity at H pol. This study examines the effect of ice types on coincident passive and active microwave measurements for free-floating ice in two lakes (Sitidgi, Husky Lakes). Ice types are delineated using the SAR segmentation program MAGIC (MAp Guided Ice Classification) that has previously been used to characterize sea ice types. Based on output ice types produced by MAGIC, the relationship between active and passive microwave measurements is examined. Output ice classes corresponded well to those measured at coincident in-situ sampling sites. Emissions at 19 GHz H and cross-polarised X-band backscatter (9.65 GHz) increase coincident to ice types that exhibit more scattering potential. Clear ice exhibits the lowest return, followed by a transition zone between clear ice and grey ice. Grey ice exhibits higher returns as a result of the inclusion of spherical air bubbles, followed by rafted ice, which exhibits an excess of scattering potential. Concurrently, transects of dual polarized 6.9 and 19 GHz PM Tbs exhibited a positive relationship with cross-polarized active microwave backscatter (VH

  10. Effect of hydrogen passivation on the photoluminescence of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatryb, G.; Klak, M. M.; Wojcik, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Mascher, P.; Podhorodecki, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, silicon-rich silicon oxide films containing terbium were prepared by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of hydrogen passivation on defects-mediated non-radiative recombination of excited Tb3+ ions was investigated by photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation, and photoluminescence decay measurements. Passivation was found to have no effect on shape and spectral position of the excitation spectra. In contrast, a gradual increase in photoluminescence intensity and photoluminescence decay time was observed upon passivation for the main 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb3+ ions. This observation was attributed to passivation of non-radiative recombination defects centers with hydrogen. It was found that the number of emitted photons increases upon passivation as a result of two effects: (1) longer Tb3+ lifetime in the 5D4 excited state and (2) optical activation of new Tb3+ emitters. The obtained results were discussed and compared with other experimental reports.

  11. Passive Microwave Measurements Over Conifer Forests at L-Band and C-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Chauhan, N.; Kim, E.; Bidwell, S.; Goodberlet, M.; Haken, M.; deMatthaeis, P.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been made at L-band and C-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study the response of passive microwave instruments to biomass and soil moisture. A series of aircraft measurements were made in July, August and November, 1999 over relatively homogenous conifer forests of varying biomass. Three radiometers participated in these measurements. These were: 1) the L-band radiometer ESTAR, a horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer which has been used extensively in past measurements of soil moisture; 2) the L-band radiometer SLFMR, a vertically polarized cross-track scanner which has been used successfully in the past for mapping sea surface salinity; and 3) The ACMR, a new C-band radiometer which operates at V- and H-polarization and in the configuration for these experiments did not scan. All three radiometers were flown on the NASA P-3 aircraft based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The ESTAR and SLFMR were mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and imaged across track whereas the ACMR was mounted to look aft at 54 degrees up from nadir. Data was collected at altitudes of 915 meters and 457 meters. The forests consisted of relatively homogeneous "managed" stands of conifer located near Waverly, Virginia. This is a relatively flat area about 30 miles southeast of Richmond, VA with numerous stands of trees being grown for the forestry industry. The stands selected for study consisted of areas of regrowth and mature stands of pine. In addition, a small stand of very large trees was observed. Soil moisture sampling was done in each stand during the aircraft over flights. Data was collected on July 7, August 27, November 15 and November 30, 1999. Measurements were made with ESTAR on all days. The ACMR flew on the summer missions and the SLFMR was present only on the August 27 flight. Soil moisture varied from quite dry on July 7 to quite moist on November 30 (which was shortly after a period of rain). The microwave

  12. Global Evaporation Estimates from SMAP Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals Using Conditional Sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, M.; Entekhabi, D.; Konings, A. G.; Salvucci, G.; Hogan, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land yet even its climatology on global scale is not observed. Tower-based flux measurements are sparse and do not cover diverse biomes and climates. In the last decades, many strategies to derive evaporation based on remote sensing measurements have been developed. However, these methods are dependent on a variety of assumptions and auxiliary data, making them more prone to error propagation. A more data-driven method was developed by Salvucci (2001), who found that under statistical stationary conditions the expected change in soil moisture storage is zero when conditioned to a certain storage for a certain time interval. Consequently, using the water balance, precipitation conditionally averaged to the soil moisture storage is equal to the total loss: evaporation and drainage. Using only soil moisture and precipitation data as model inputs reduces the sources of uncertainty. In this presentation we provide the first estimates of global evaporation from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission by applying the conditional sampling method to passive microwave soil moisture time series and in situ precipitation data. The obtained evaporation estimates show a good correspondence to measured evaporation from eddy correlation towers over selected field sites. Subsequently, a simple approach is developed to directly estimate evaporation from SMAP soil moisture data. This approach enables the investigation of dynamics in evaporation during the dry-down after storms. The timing of the transition between the different stages of evaporation is assessed for different climates especially the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation; atmosphere limited evaporation to soil limited evaporation respectively. Investigations into the dynamics of unstressed evaporation and transpiration and the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation increases our understanding of water stress and soil desiccation. It also

  13. Microwave absorber based on silver nanoparticle-embedded polymer thin film.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, G V; Sudheendran, K; Raju, K C James; Sreedhar, B; Radhakrishnan, T P

    2009-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle-embedded poly(vinyl alcohol) films are fabricated through a simple in situ process. The nanocomposite films are a few hundred nanometers thick with silver concentrations below 10% and the nanoparticles 5-10 nm in diameter. These films are shown to exhibit appreciable microwave absorption in the 8-12 GHz range; the return and insertion losses are found to be sensitive to the nanoparticle content.

  14. Microwave synthesis of calcium bismuth niobate thin films obtained by the polymeric precursor method

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, A.Z.; Ramirez, M.A. . E-mail: miganr@kenter.com; Ries, A.; Wang, F.; Longo, E.; Varela, J.A.

    2006-08-10

    The crystal structure, surface morphology and electrical properties of layered perovskite calcium bismuth niobate thin films (CaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}-CBN) deposited on platinum coated silicon substrates by the polymeric precursor method have been investigated. The films were crystallized in a domestic microwave and in a conventional furnace. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis confirms that the crystallinity and morphology of the films are affected by the different annealing routes. Ferroelectric properties of the films were determined with remanent polarization P {sub r} and a drive voltage V {sub c} of 4.2 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and 1.7 V for the film annealed in the conventional furnace and 1.0 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and 4.0 V for the film annealed in microwave furnace, respectively. A slight decay after 10{sup 8} polarization cycles was observed for the films annealed in the microwave furnace indicating a reduction of the domain wall mobility after interaction of the microwave energy with the bottom electrode.

  15. A wafer-scale packaging structure with monolithic microwave integrated circuits and passives embedded in a silicon substrate for multichip modules for radio frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Fei; Ding, Xiao-yun; Xu, Gao-wei; Luo, Le

    2009-10-01

    A wafer-level packaging structure with chips and passive components embedded in a silicon substrate for multichip modules (MCM) is proposed for radio frequency (RF) applications. The packaging structure consists of two layers of benzocyclobutene (BCB) films and three layers of metalized films, in which the monolithic microwave ICs (MMICs), thin film resistors, striplines and microstrip lines are integrated. The low resistivity silicon wafer with etched cavities is used as a substrate. The BCB films serve as interlayer dielectrics (ILDs). Wirebonding gold bumps are used as electric interconnections between different layers, which eliminate the need of preparing vias by costly procedures including dry etching, metal sputtering and electroplating. The chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is used to uncover the gold bumps, and the BCB curing profile is optimized to obtain the appropriate BCB film for CMP process. In this work, the thermal, mechanical, electrical as well as RF properties of the packaging structure are investigated. The packaging thermal resistance can be controlled below 2 °C W-1. The average shear strength of the gold bumps on the BCB surface is about 70 MPa. In addition, a Kelvin test structure is fabricated for resistance testing of the vertical vias. The performances of MMIC and interconnection structure at high frequency are simulated and tested. The testing results reveal that the slight shifting of S-parameter curves of the packaged MMIC indicates perfect transmission characteristics at high frequency. For the transition structure of transmission line, the experimental results are compatible with the simulation results. The insertion loss (S21) is below 0.4 dB from 0 to 40 GHz and the return loss (S11) is less than -20 dB from 0 to 40 GHz. For a low noise amplifier (LNA) chip, the S21 shifting caused by the packaging structure is below 0.5 dB, and S11 is less than -10 dB from 8 GHz to 14 GHz.

  16. High temperature passive film on the surface of Co-Cr-Mo alloy and its tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feifei; Dong, Guangneng; Dong, Lishe

    2014-09-01

    For the artificial hip joints, passive film formed on the Co-Cr-Mo alloy acted as a highly protective barrier in the body fluid. But its stability, composition and structure always influenced the protection. In this work, passive film was obtained by high temperature treatment. The effect of passivation environment on the properties of the passive film was investigated. The film's surface roughness, micro-hardness and structure were analyzed. In order to study the tribological behavior of the passive film, pin-on-disk tribotest was carried out under bovine serum albumin (BSA) and saline solution. Results indicated the sample passivated in vacuum had friction coefficient of 0.18 under BSA solution and 0.53 under saline solution; the sample passivated in air had friction coefficient of 0.14 under BSA solution and 0.56 under saline solution. In addition, the reference sample without passivation was tested under the same condition. It showed friction of 0.22 under BSA solution and 0.45 under solution. The lubricating mechanism was attributed to BSA tribo-film absorption on the surface and high hardness passive film.

  17. Science requirements for passive microwave sensors on earth science geostationary platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Staelin, D. H.

    1989-07-01

    It is suggested that the science requirements for passive geostationary microwave observations be met by near- and far-term sensors for each of two overlapping bands, with each band covering no more than a decade in frequency. The low-frequency band includes channels near 6, 10, 18, 22, 31 to 37, and possibly 50 to 60 GHz. The high-frequency band includes channels near 220 to 230, 183, 166, 118, 90 to 110, and possibly 50 to 60 and 31 to 37 GHz. The precise channel specifications will have to comply with international frequency allocations. The near-term goal is a high-frequency sensor based on a filled-aperture solid reflector antenna, which should rely on currently existing technology. The most critical issues for the near-term sensor are momentum compensation and the design of the feed assembly; these issues are coupled through the desired scan rate. The successful demonstration of the near-term (high-frequency) sensor will be essential for the continued development of far-term sensors satisfying the ideal science requirements. The far-term goal includes both a high-frequency sensor which meets the ideal science requirements, and a low-frequency sensor whose design will depend on advances in large antenna technology. The low-frequency (far-term) sensor might be based on one of several concepts: a deployable mesh reflector antenna of diameter at least 20 m, which shows promise for use at frequencies up to 30-GHz, a synthetic aperture interferometer of maximum baseline from 100 to 300 m, or a deployable phased-array bootlace lens, of diameter from 100 to 300 m. The first of these, a deployable mesh reflector antenna, will satisfy only the adequate spatial resolution requirements. The last two concepts meet the ideal spatial resolution science requirements, although they present significant structural and meteorological challenges.

  18. Science requirements for passive microwave sensors on earth science geostationary platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Staelin, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested that the science requirements for passive geostationary microwave observations be met by near- and far-term sensors for each of two overlapping bands, with each band covering no more than a decade in frequency. The low-frequency band includes channels near 6, 10, 18, 22, 31 to 37, and possibly 50 to 60 GHz. The high-frequency band includes channels near 220 to 230, 183, 166, 118, 90 to 110, and possibly 50 to 60 and 31 to 37 GHz. The precise channel specifications will have to comply with international frequency allocations. The near-term goal is a high-frequency sensor based on a filled-aperture solid reflector antenna, which should rely on currently existing technology. The most critical issues for the near-term sensor are momentum compensation and the design of the feed assembly; these issues are coupled through the desired scan rate. The successful demonstration of the near-term (high-frequency) sensor will be essential for the continued development of far-term sensors satisfying the ideal science requirements. The far-term goal includes both a high-frequency sensor which meets the ideal science requirements, and a low-frequency sensor whose design will depend on advances in large antenna technology. The low-frequency (far-term) sensor might be based on one of several concepts: a deployable mesh reflector antenna of diameter at least 20 m, which shows promise for use at frequencies up to 30-GHz, a synthetic aperture interferometer of maximum baseline from 100 to 300 m, or a deployable phased-array bootlace lens, of diameter from 100 to 300 m. The first of these, a deployable mesh reflector antenna, will satisfy only the adequate spatial resolution requirements. The last two concepts meet the ideal spatial resolution science requirements, although they present significant structural and meteorological challenges.

  19. Rain-on-snow and ice layer formation detection using passive microwave radiometry: An arctic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, A.; Royer, A.; Montpetit, B.; Johnson, C. A.; Brucker, L.; Dolant, C.; Richards, A.; Roy, A.

    2015-12-01

    With the current changes observed in the Arctic, an increase in occurrence of rain-on-snow (ROS) events has been reported in the Arctic (land) over the past few decades. Several studies have established that strong linkages between surface temperatures and passive microwaves do exist, but the contribution of snow properties under winter extreme events such as rain-on-snow events (ROS) and associated ice layer formation need to be better understood that both have a significant impact on ecosystem processes. In particular, ice layer formation is known to affect the survival of ungulates by blocking their access to food. Given the current pronounced warming in northern regions, more frequent ROS can be expected. However, one of the main challenges in the study of ROS in northern regions is the lack of meteorological information and in-situ measurements. The retrieval of ROS occurrence in the Arctic using satellite remote sensing tools thus represents the most viable approach. Here, we present here results from 1) ROS occurrence formation in the Peary caribou habitat using an empirically developed ROS algorithm by our group based on the gradient ratio, 2) ice layer formation across the same area using a semi-empirical detection approach based on the polarization ratio spanning between 1978 and 2013. A detection threshold was adjusted given the platform used (SMMR, SSM/I and AMSR-E), and initial results suggest high-occurrence years as: 1981-1982, 1992-1993; 1994-1995; 1999-2000; 2001-2002; 2002-2003; 2003-2004; 2006-2007; 2007-2008. A trend in occurrence for Banks Island and NW Victoria Island and linkages to caribou population is presented.

  20. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures for Falling Snow Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2011-01-01

    Physically based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite -observed brightness temperatures (TBs) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are nonlinear, such that inversions are ill ]posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to elucidate these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using TB weighting functions to quantify the percentage influence of the TB resulting from absorption, emission, and/or reflection from the surface, as well as from frozen hydrometeors in clouds, from atmospheric water vapor, and from other contributors. The percentage analysis was also compared to Jacobians. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz, for individual snow profiles, and for averages over three cloud-resolving model simulations of falling snow. The bulk structure (e.g., ice water path and cloud depth) of the underlying cloud scene was found to affect the resultant TB and percentages, producing different values for blizzard, lake effect, and synoptic snow events. The slant path at a 53 viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels. Jacobians provide the magnitude and direction of change in the TB values due to a change in the underlying scene; however, the percentage analysis provides detailed information on how that change affected contributions to the TB from the surface, hydrometeors, and water vapor. The TB percentage information presented in this paper provides information about the relative contributions to the TB and supplies key pieces of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  1. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The better understanding of temporal variability and regional distribution of surface melt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interactions and the determination of mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Since large regions of Antarctic sea ice are covered with snow during most of the year, observed inter-annual and regional variations of surface melt mainly represents melt processes in the snow. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study we combine two approaches for observing both surface and volume snowmelt by means of passive microwave satellite data. The former is achieved by measuring diurnal differences of the brightness temperature TB at 37 GHz, the latter by analyzing the ratio TB(19GHz)/TB(37GHz). Moreover, we use both melt onset proxies to divide the Antarctic sea ice cover into characteristic surface melt patterns from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 43% of the ice-covered ocean shows diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, resulting in temporary melt (Type A), less than 1% shows continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, resulting in strong melt over a period of several days (Type B), 19% shows Type A and B taking place consecutively (Type C), and for 37% no melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous melt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 20 days after the onset of temporary melt. Considering the entire data set, snowmelt processes and onset do not show significant temporal trends. Instead, areas of increasing (decreasing) sea-ice extent have longer (shorter) periods of continuous snowmelt.

  2. Improved epitaxy of ultrathin praseodymia films on chlorine passivated Si(111) reducing silicate interface formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gevers, S.; Bruns, D.; Weisemoeller, T.; Wollschlaeger, J.; Flege, J. I.; Kaemena, B.; Falta, J.

    2010-12-13

    Ultrathin praseodymia films have been deposited on both Cl-passivated and nonpassivated Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Comparative studies on the crystallinity and stoichiometry are performed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray standing waves, and x-ray reflectometry. On nonpassivated Si(111) an amorphous silicate film is formed. In contrast, praseodymia deposited on Cl-passivated Si(111) form a well-ordered crystalline film with cubic-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (bixbyite) structure. The vertical lattice constant of the praseodymia film is increased by 1.4% compared to the bulk value. Furthermore, the formation of an extended amorphous silicate interface layers is suppressed and confined to only one monolayer.

  3. The Evolution of the Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) for Rainfall Estimation from Passive Microwave Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hong, Y.; Olson, W. S.; Yang, S.; Adler, R. F.; McCollum, J.; Ferraro, R.; Petty, G.; Shin, D.-B.; Wilheit, T. T.

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes the latest improvements applied to the Goddard profiling algorithm (GPROF), particularly as they apply to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Most of these improvements, however, are conceptual in nature and apply equally to other passive microwave sensors. The improvements were motivated by a notable overestimation of precipitation in the intertropical convergence zone. This problem was traced back to the algorithm's poor separation between convective and stratiform precipitation coupled with a poor separation between stratiform and transition regions in the a priori cloud model database. In addition to now using an improved convective-stratiform classification scheme, the new algorithm also makes use of emission and scattering indices instead of individual brightness temperatures. Brightness temperature indices have the advantage of being monotonic functions of rainfall. This, in turn, has allowed the algorithm to better define the uncertainties needed by the scheme's Bayesian inversion approach. Last, the algorithm over land has been modified primarily to better account for ambiguous classification where the scattering signature of precipitation could be confused with surface signals. All these changes have been implemented for both the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). Results from both sensors are very similar at the storm scale and for global averages. Surface rainfall products from the algorithm's operational version have been compared with conventional rainfall data over both land and oceans. Over oceans, GPROF results compare well with atoll gauge data. GPROF is biased negatively by 9% with a correlation of 0.86 for monthly 2.5° averages over the atolls. If only grid boxes with two or more atolls are used, the correlation increases to 0.91 but GPROF becomes positively biased by 6%. Comparisons with TRMM ground validation products from Kwajalein reveal that GPROF is negatively

  4. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  5. Passive Anti-Icing and Active Deicing Films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Zheng, Yonghao; Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Li, Yilun; Sikkema, William K A; Tour, James M

    2016-06-01

    Anti-icing and deicing are the two major pathways for suppressing adhesion of ice on surfaces, yet materials with dual capabilities are rare. In this work, we have designed a perfluorododecylated graphene nanoribbon (FDO-GNR) film that takes advantage of both the low polarizability of perfluorinated carbons and the intrinsic conductive nature of graphene nanoribbons. The FDO-GNR films are superhydrophobic with a sheet resistance below 8 kΩ·sq(-1) and then exhibit an anti-icing property that prevents freezing of incoming ice-cold water down to -14 °C. After that point, voltage can be applied to the films to resistively heat and deice the surface. Further a lubricating liquid can be employed to create a slippery surface to improve the film's deicing performance. The FDO-GNR films can be easily switched between the superhydrophobic anti-icing mode and the slippery deicing mode by applying the lubricant. A spray-coating method makes it suitable for large-scale applications. The anti-icing and deicing properties render the FDO-GNR films with promise for use in extreme environments. PMID:27192099

  6. MOCVD-SrTiO3 thin film microwave coplanar tunable devices: modelling of varactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensbittel, A.; Dégardin, A. F.; Kreisler, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    SrTiO3 (STO) ferroelectric (FE) thin films associated with High Temperature Superconductor (HTSC) is a good compromise to realize electronically tunable microwave devices combining tunable dielectric properties of FE films with low loss microwave conductivity in HTSC. STO, which exhibits a perovskite structure, is suitable for epitaxial growth of YBaCuO films and has been widely studied to realize tunable components around 77 K. Up to now, STO thin films were essentially deposited by sputtering and pulsed laser deposition. In the framework of this study, we have explored the feasibility of microwave devices made from STO thin films prepared by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). We have characterized Au/STO(250 nm thick)/MgO coplanar waveguide transmission lines and microwave variable capacitors (varactors) from 45 MHz up to 40 GHz, in the 300 K to 60 K temperature range. Dielectric characteristics of the STO films were extracted from measurements and studied as a function of frequency, electric field and temperature. The geometry of the interdigital capacitors (IDC) was chosen after evaluating their capacitances using an analytical theoretical model. We have used a de-embedding method to extract, from electromagnetic simulations using Sonnet® Software, the capacitance of the IDC alone.

  7. Microstrip ring resonator technique for measuring microwave attenuation in high-Tc superconducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, June H.; Oshita, Floyd K.; Fetterman, Harold R.; Kobrin, Paul; Sovero, Emilio

    1989-10-01

    Microwave attenuation of high-Tc superconducting (HTS) films sputtered on MgO and ZrO2 were measured using a microstrip ring resonator circuit. The results for Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O resonators were compared to those for gold-plated resonators of identical design. The losses of superconducting and gold-plated films were determined from unloaded Q-factor measurements. The attenuation of Y-Ba-Cu-O film on an MgO substrate is approximately 31 percent lower than that of gold films at 6.6 GHz and 33 percent lower at 19.2 GHz for temperatures below 50 K. The approach of using microstrips to characterize microwave losses shows the usefulness of HTS films in integrated circuit technology.

  8. Thick polymer-stabilized liquid crystal films for microwave phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Kuki, Takao; Nomoto, Toshihiro; Tsuchiya, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Yozo

    2001-05-01

    This article describes the use of thick polymer-stabilized liquid crystal films in a new design for microwave variable phase shifters. A fine μm-order sized polymer network was formed in a 100-μm-thick liquid crystal film, using a photopolymerization-induced phase-separation method to stabilize the molecular alignment of the liquid crystal. Measurement of the electro-optic properties of the liquid crystal film revealed that the relaxation response time of the liquid crystal alignment was drastically decreased by doping the polymer at a concentration of several wt %. A new variable phase shifter composed of a microstrip transmission line (length: 193 mm, width: 200 μm) was also fabricated by using the liquid crystal film as the dielectric material. This device exhibited a microwave phase shift of -80° at a frequency of 20 GHz, when a drive voltage of 70Vrms was applied vertically to the liquid crystal film.

  9. Monitoring snowpack properties by passive microwave sensors on board of aircraft and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Rango, A.

    1980-01-01

    Snowpack properties such as water equivalent and snow wetness may be inferred from variations in measured microwave brightness temperatures. This is because the emerged microwave radiation interacts directly with snow crystals within the snowpack. Using vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures obtained from the multifrequency microwave radiometer (MFMR) on board a NASA research aircraft and the electrical scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus 5, 6, and 7 satellites, linear relationships between snow depth or water equivalent and microwave brightness temperature were developed. The presence of melt water in the snowpack generally increases the brightness temperatures, which can be used to predict snowpack priming and timing of runoff.

  10. Magnetic and microwave properties of amorphous FeCoNbBCu thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Mei; Wang, Xin; Lu, Haipeng; Deng, Longjiang; Sunday, Katie Jo; Taheri, Mitra L.; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-01-01

    The soft magnetic and microwave properties of amorphous FeCoNbBCu thin films with thicknesses varying from 70 nm to 450 nm have been systematically investigated. Due to the amorphous structure, the coercivity is 1.5 Oe in thicker films. The thickness-dependent microwave characteristics of the films were measured over the range 0.5-6 GHz and analyzed using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Without applying magnetic field during deposition and measurement, an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy in amorphous thin films was obtained, ranging from 21 to 45 Oe. The interface interaction between substrate and film is confirmed to be the origin of the induced anisotropy, whereas the volume anisotropy contribution is more pronounced with increasing film thickness. For films possessing an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, the shift of resonance frequency with thickness is observed and verified by the Kittel equation. The demonstration of a controllable and tunable anisotropy suggests that the FeCoNbBCu thin films have potential application as magnetic materials for Spintronics-based microwave devices.

  11. Study of the microwave electrodynamic response of MgB 2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreone, A.; Cassinese, A.; Cantoni, C.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Maglione, M. G.; Paranthaman, M.; Salluzzo, M.; Vaglio, R.

    2002-08-01

    We present a study on the power dependence of the microwave surface impedance in thin films of the novel superconductor MgB 2. 500 nm thick samples exhibiting critical temperatures ranging between 26 and 38 K are synthesized by an ex situ post-anneal of e-beam evaporated boron in the presence of an Mg vapor at 900 °C. Preliminary results on films grown in situ by a high rate magnetron sputtering technique from stoichiometric MgB 2 and Mg targets are also reported. Microwave measurements have been carried out employing a dielectrically loaded niobium superconducting cavity operating at 19.8 GHz and 4 K. The study shows that the electrodynamic response of MgB 2 films is presently dominated by extrinsic sources of dissipation, appearing already at low microwave power, likely to be ascribed to the presence of grain boundaries and normal inclusions in the samples.

  12. Highly conducting SrMoO{sub 3} thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Radetinac, Aldin Mani, Arzhang; Ziegler, Jürgen; Alff, Lambert; Komissinskiy, Philipp; Melnyk, Sergiy; Nikfalazar, Mohammad; Zheng, Yuliang; Jakoby, Rolf

    2014-09-15

    We have measured the microwave resistance of highly conducting perovskite oxide SrMoO{sub 3} thin film coplanar waveguides. The epitaxial SrMoO{sub 3} thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition and showed low mosaicity and smooth surfaces with a root mean square roughness below 0.3 nm. Layer-by-layer growth could be achieved for film thicknesses up to 400 nm as monitored by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and confirmed by X-ray diffraction. We obtained a constant microwave resistivity of 29 μΩ·cm between 0.1 and 20 GHz by refining the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficients. Our result shows that SrMoO{sub 3} is a viable candidate as a highly conducting electrode material for all-oxide microwave electronic devices.

  13. Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films were investigated in the pressure range 10-mtorr to 10 torr, at substrate temperatures 400-750 C and with CH4 and O2 concentrations in H2 plasma of 2-15 percent and 2-10 percent, respectively. The experiments were performed in a microwave plasma system consisting of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and an RF induction heated sample stage. Scanning electron microscopy of diamond films deposited at 600 C with 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas showed high-quality well faceted crystallites of 1/2 micron size. Cathodoluminescence measurements of these films showed very few nitrogen impurities and no detectable silicon impurities.

  14. Quantitative scanning near-field microwave microscopy for thin film dielectric constant measurement.

    PubMed

    Karbassi, A; Ruf, D; Bettermann, A D; Paulson, C A; van der Weide, Daniel W; Tanbakuchi, H; Stancliff, R

    2008-09-01

    We combine a scanning near-field microwave microscope with an atomic force microscope for use in localized thin film dielectric constant measurement, and demonstrate the capabilities of our system through simultaneous surface topography and microwave reflection measurements on a variety of thin films grown on low resistivity silicon substrates. Reflection measurements clearly discriminate the interface between approximately 38 nm silicon nitride and dioxide thin films at 1.788 GHz. Finite element simulation was used to extract the dielectric constants showing the dielectric sensitivity to be Deltaepsilon(r)=0.1 at epsilon(r)=6.2, for the case of silicon nitride. These results illustrate the capability of our instrument for quantitative dielectric constant measurement at microwave frequencies.

  15. Quantitative scanning near-field microwave microscopy for thin film dielectric constant measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Karbassi, A.; Ruf, D.; Bettermann, A. D.; Paulson, C. A.; Weide, Daniel W. van der; Tanbakuchi, H.; Stancliff, R.

    2008-09-15

    We combine a scanning near-field microwave microscope with an atomic force microscope for use in localized thin film dielectric constant measurement, and demonstrate the capabilities of our system through simultaneous surface topography and microwave reflection measurements on a variety of thin films grown on low resistivity silicon substrates. Reflection measurements clearly discriminate the interface between {approx}38 nm silicon nitride and dioxide thin films at 1.788 GHz. Finite element simulation was used to extract the dielectric constants showing the dielectric sensitivity to be {delta}{epsilon}{sub r}=0.1 at {epsilon}{sub r}=6.2, for the case of silicon nitride. These results illustrate the capability of our instrument for quantitative dielectric constant measurement at microwave frequencies.

  16. Spatial Variability of Barrow-Area Shore-Fast Sea Ice and Its Relationships to Passive Microwave Emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Rivas, M. Belmonte; Holmgren, J.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Heinrichs, J. F.; Stroeve, J. C.; Klein, M.; Markus, T.; Perovich, D. K.; Sonntag, J. G.; Tape, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aircraft-acquired passive microwave data, laser radar height observations, RADARSAT synthetic aperture radar imagery, and in situ measurements obtained during the AMSR-Ice03 experiment are used to investigate relationships between microwave emission and ice characteristics over several space scales. The data fusion allows delineation of the shore-fast ice and pack ice in the Barrow area, AK, into several ice classes. Results show good agreement between observed and Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)-derived snow depths over relatively smooth ice, with larger differences over ridged and rubbled ice. The PSR results are consistent with the effects on snow depth of the spatial distribution and nature of ice roughness, ridging, and other factors such as ice age. Apparent relationships exist between ice roughness and the degree of depolarization of emission at 10,19, and 37 GHz. This depolarization .would yield overestimates of total ice concentration using polarization-based algorithms, with indications of this seen when the NT-2 algorithm is applied to the PSR data. Other characteristics of the microwave data, such as effects of grounding of sea ice and large contrast between sea ice and adjacent land, are also apparent in the PSR data. Overall, the results further demonstrate the importance of macroscale ice roughness conditions such as ridging and rubbling on snow depth and microwave emissivity.

  17. Spectral signatures of soil, snow and sea ice as observed by passive microwave and thermal infrared techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.

    1984-01-01

    There have been many passive microwave observations of soil, snow, and sea ice surfaces made during the past several years. These measurements have been from tower, aircraft, and spacecraft platforms covering the wavelength range from 0.8 cm to 50 cm. Based on these data it can be concluded that the longer wavelengths (greater than 5 cm) are more effective for soil moisture observations because of a greater capability to penetrate vegetation, while the shorter wavelengths (1 to 3 cm) are best for snow and sea ice observations since the dominant process is volume scattering by the ice grains in the snow and the brine cells in sea ice. Because it is the intensity of a thermal emission process that is being measured, thermal infrared measurements are necessary to separate the emissivity and temperature effects in the microwave emission.

  18. An Evaluation of Antarctica as a Calibration Target for Passive Microwave Satellite Missions with Climate Data Record Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing at L-band (1.4 GHz) is sensitive to soil moisture and sea surface salinity, both important climate variables. Science studies involving these variables can now take advantage of new satellite L-band observations. The first mission with regular global passive microwave observations at L-band is the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), launched November, 2009. A second mission, NASA's Aquarius, was launched June, 201 I. A third mission, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is scheduled to launch in 2014. Together, these three missions may provide a decade-long data record-provided that they are intercalibrated. The intercalibration is best performed at the radiance (brightness temperature) level, and Antarctica is proving to be a key calibration target. However, Antarctica has thus far not been fully characterized as a potential target. This paper will present evaluations of Antarctica as a microwave calibration target for the above satellite missions. Preliminary analyses have identified likely target areas, such as the vicinity of Dome-C and larger areas within East Antarctica. Physical sources of temporal and spatial variability of polar firn are key to assessing calibration uncertainty. These sources include spatial variability of accumulation rate, compaction, surface characteristics (dunes, micro-topography), wind patterns, and vertical profiles of density and temperature. Using primarily SMOS data, variability is being empirically characterized and attempts are being made to attribute observed variability to physical sources. One expected outcome of these studies is the potential discovery of techniques for remotely sensing--over all of Antarctica-parameters such as surface temperature.

  19. Joint Variability of Airborne Passive Microwave and Ground-based Radar Observations Obtained in the TRMM Kwajalein Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuter, S. E.; Kingsmill, D. E.

    2007-12-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) held July-September 1999 in the west Pacific was designed to obtain an empirical physical characterization of precipitating convective clouds over the tropical ocean. The majority of the precipitation was from mixed-phase clouds. Coordinated data sets were obtained from aircraft and ground-based sensors including passive microwave measurements by the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) instrument on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and S-band volumetric radar data by the KPOL radar. The AMPR and KPOL data sets were processed to yield a set of 25,049 matching observations at ~ 2 km x 2 km horizontal spatial resolution and within 6 min. The TRMM satellite Microwave Imager (TMI) has a similar set of channels to AMPR but coarser spatial resolution (19 GHz: 35 km, 85 GHz: 7.7 km). During KWAJEX, the 0 deg C level height was nearly constant at ~ 4800 m. Hence, two potential sources of uncertainty in relating passive microwave brightness temperatures (Tbs) to surface precipitation, inhomogeneous beam filling and variations in depth of the rain layer are much smaller sources of error in the KWAJEX data set than for TMI. TRMM was originally designed to yield monthly rainfall estimates over 5 deg x 5 deg grid boxes. The use of these data to yield instantaneous rainrate products at smaller spatial scales is more sensitive to the detailed characteristics of the joint distributions of passive microwave Tbs versus rain rate. KWAJEX data sets reveal poor correlations, very wide scatter, and weak modes in these distributions. The spread of emission Tb values for a given rain-layer reflectivity (e.g., 75 K at 30 dBZ for 19 GHz) is similar or larger within convective compared to stratiform precipitation regions. This result implies that the enhancement in emission Tbs associated with partially melted ice particles can occur whether the particles are concentrated within a thin layer in stratiform

  20. Microwave properties of RF- sputtered ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, T. Kulkarni, A. R.; Venkataramani, N.; Sahu, B. N.; Prasad, Shiva

    2014-04-24

    In this work, RF- magnetron sputtering technique has been employed to deposit nanocrystalline ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films at room temperature. The as grown films were ex-situ annealed in air for 2 h at temperatures from 150°C to 650°C. X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer and ferromagnetic resonance were used to analyze the phase formation, magnetic properties and microwave properties respectively. From the hysteresis loops and ferromagnetic resonance spectra taken at room temperature, a systematic study on the effect of O{sub 2} plasma on microwave properties with respect to processing temperature has been carried out.

  1. Evaluation of Precipitation Detection over Various Surfaces from Passive Microwave Imagers and Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munchak, S. Joseph; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    During the middle part of this decade a wide variety of passive microwave imagers and sounders will be unified in the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission to provide a common basis for frequent (3 hr), global precipitation monitoring. The ability of these sensors to detect precipitation by discerning it from non-precipitating background depends upon the channels available and characteristics of the surface and atmosphere. This study quantifies the minimum detectable precipitation rate and fraction of precipitation detected for four representative instruments (TMI, GMI, AMSU-A, and AMSU-B) that will be part of the GPM constellation. Observations for these instruments were constructed from equivalent channels on the SSMIS instrument on DMSP satellites F16 and F17 and matched to precipitation data from NOAA's National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) during 2009 over the continuous United States. A variational optimal estimation retrieval of non-precipitation surface and atmosphere parameters was used to determine the consistency between the observed brightness temperatures and these parameters, with high cost function values shown to be related to precipitation. The minimum detectable precipitation rate, defined as the lowest rate for which probability of detection exceeds 50%, and the detected fraction of precipitation, are reported for each sensor, surface type (ocean, coast, bare land, snow cover) and precipitation type (rain, mix, snow). The best sensors over ocean and bare land were GMI (0.22 mm/hr minimum threshold and 90% of precipitation detected) and AMSU (0.26 mm/hr minimum threshold and 81% of precipitation detected), respectively. Over coasts (0.74 mm/hr threshold and 12% detected) and snow-covered surfaces (0.44 mm/hr threshold and 23% detected), AMSU again performed best but with much lower detection skill, whereas TMI had no skill over these surfaces. The sounders (particularly over water) benefited from the use of re-analysis data (vs. climatology) to

  2. Ice surface temperature retrieval from AVHRR, ATSR, and passive microwave satellite data: Algorithm development and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Jeff; Maslanik, James; Steffen, Konrad

    1994-01-01

    surface temperature from passive microwave data (in conjunction with AVHRR clear sky samples) through the use of 'effective emissivities' and physical relationships between skin temperature and subsurface temperature. Use the general method outlined in MK93 to calculate a 12-year record of clear sky equivalent surface temperatures, or possibly all-sky snow-ice interface physical temperatures, from SMMR and SSM/I, compare these temperatures to climatologies, ECMWF modeled surface temperatures, and surface temperatures predicted by a 2-D ice model. And intercompare several ice surface retrieval methods and validate them against ground measurements from the Swiss Camp on the Greenland ice sheet. Additionally, we intend to develop a surface temperature product based on AVHRR data and possibly blended with drifting buoy and meteorological station temperatures.

  3. Tracking Snowmelt Events in Remote High Asia Using Passive Microwave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T.; Bookhagen, B.

    2015-12-01

    While snowfall can comprise a significant percentage of the yearly water budget in High Asia, Snow-Water Equivalent (SWE) is poorly constrained due to lack of in-situ measurements and complex terrain that limits the efficacy of modeling and observations. Over the past few decades, SWE has been estimated with the SSMI/S and AMSR passive microwave (PM) sensors, with low reliability in High Asia. Despite problematic SWE volume estimation, PM data contains information on the buildup and melt of snowpack, which is difficult to measure in-situ, particularly in remote areas. We present a new methodology for tracking the timing, frequency, and relative intensity of melt events across High Asia. To measure SWE, we use raw swath data from the SSMI/S (1987-2015, F08, F11, F13, F17), AMSR (2002-2011), and GPM (2014-2015) satellites. This allows us to improve both spatial and temporal resolution over daily gridded products by leveraging multiple overpasses per day in an imperfectly overlapping grid pattern. We then examine SWE estimates, intra-day PM variance, and the interacting impacts of satellite look angles and topography on measured PM at arbitrary point locations. We develop a more thorough understanding of the uncertainties in our SWE estimates by examining the impacts of aspect, relief, slope, and elevation across the Tibetan Plateau on Tb and SWE estimates. High Asia, with its large topographic gradients and low relief at high elevations provides an excellent context to examine a wide range of topographic settings and terrain complexities to better constrain our analysis of sensor bias. We find that slopes above ~10° have a strong impact on SWE variability. We also find a consistent intra- and inter-day variability within constant-SWE periods, as defined as periods without precipitation and with constant temperatures below 0°C. Using this measure of native sensor variability, we filter our SWE time series to identify events of snowmelt which are outside of the

  4. In situ XANES study of the passive film formed on iron in borate buffer and in sodium acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Oblonsky, L.J.; Ryan, M.P.; Isaacs, S.

    1996-12-31

    The passive film formed on Fe in pH 8.4 borate buffer (0. 1 36 M) over a broad potential range was characterized by in situ XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure). On stepping the potential to a value between -0.6 V and +0.4 V (MSE), a passive film forms without detectable dissolution. The edge position indicates that the valence state of Fe in the film is 10 {+-} 5% Fe{sup 2+} and 90 {+-} 5% Fe{sup 3+}. Formation of a passive film at potentials between -0.8 V and -0.65 V is associated with dissolution prior to passivation, and a lower average valence state of 17 {+-} 5% Fe{sup 2+} and 83 {+-} 5% Fe{sup 3+}. At -0.9 V, the Fe did not passivate. The passive film that forms in pH 8.2 sodium acetate (0.1 M) at +0.4 V gives an edge similar to the high potential passive film formed in borate buffer, but dissolution occurs prior to passivation.

  5. Snowmelt and Surface Freeze/Thaw Timings over Alaska derived from Passive Microwave Observations using a Wavelet Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, N.; McDonald, K. C.; Dinardo, S. J.; Miller, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic permafrost soils contain a vast amount of organic carbon that will be released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide or methane when thawed. Surface to air greenhouse gas fluxes are largely dependent on such surface controls as the frozen/thawed state of the snow and soil. Satellite remote sensing is an important means to create continuous mapping of surface properties. Advances in the ability to determine soil and snow freeze/thaw timings from microwave frequency observations improves upon our ability to predict the response of carbon gas emission to warming through synthesis with in-situ observation, such as the 2012-2015 Carbon in Arctic Reservoir Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Surface freeze/thaw or snowmelt timings are often derived using a constant or spatially/temporally variable threshold applied to time-series observations. Alternately, time-series singularity classifiers aim to detect discontinuous changes, or "edges", in time-series data similar to those that occur from the large contrast in dielectric constant during the freezing or thaw of soil or snow. We use multi-scale analysis of continuous wavelet transform spectral gradient brightness temperatures from various channel combinations of passive microwave radiometers, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E, AMSR2) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I F17) gridded at a 10 km posting with resolution proportional to the observational footprint. Channel combinations presented here aim to illustrate and differentiate timings of "edges" from transitions in surface water related to various landscape components (e.g. snow-melt, soil-thaw). To support an understanding of the physical basis of observed "edges" we compare satellite measurements with simple radiative transfer microwave-emission modeling of the snow, soil and vegetation using in-situ observations from the SNOw TELemetry (SNOTEL) automated weather stations. Results of freeze/thaw and snow-melt timings and trends are

  6. Optical and microwave detection using Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabow, B. E.; Sova, R. M.; Boone, B. G.; Moorjani, K.; Kim, B. F.; Bohandy, J.; Adrian, F.; Green, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) in the development of optical and microwave detectors using high temperature superconducting thin films is described. Several objectives of this work have been accomplished, including: deposition of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O thin films by laser abation processing (LAP); development of thin film patterning techniques, including in situ masking, wet chemical etching, and laser patterning; measurements of bolometric and non-bolometric signatures in patterned Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O films using optical and microwave sources, respectively; analysis and design of an optimized bolometer through computer simulation; and investigation of its use in a Fourier transform spectrometer. The focus here is primarily on results from the measurement of the bolometric and non-bolometric response.

  7. Microwave conductivity of laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) superconducting films and its relation to microstrip transmission line performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Chorey, C. M.; Ebihara, B. T.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of high temperature superconductor oxides has raised the possibility of a new class of millimeter and microwave devices operating at temperatures considerably higher than liquid helium temperatures. Therefore, materials properties such as conductivity, current density, and sheet resistance as a function of temperature and frequency, possible anisotropies, moisture absorption, thermal expansion, and others, have to be well characterized and understood. The millimeter wave response of laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-delta)/LaAlO3 thin films was studied as a function of temperature and frequency. In particular, the evaluation of their microwave conductivity was emphasized, since knowledge of this parameter provides a basis for the derivation of other relevant properties of these superconducting oxides, and for using them in the fabrication of actual passive circuits. The microwave conductivity for these films was measured at frequencies from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz, in the temperature range from 20 to 300 K. The values of the conductivity are obtained from the millimeter wave power transmitted through the films, using a two fluid model.

  8. Perpendicularly oriented barium ferrite thin films with low microwave loss, prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-Ming, Chen; Yuan-Xun, Li; Li-Kun, Han; Chao, Long; Huai-Wu, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Barium ferrite (BaM) thin films are deposited on platinum coated silicon wafers by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The effects of deposition substrate temperature on the microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of BaM thin films are investigated in detail. It is found that microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of BaM thin film are very sensitive to deposition substrate temperature, and excellent BaM thin film is obtained when deposition temperature is 910 °C and oxygen pressure is 300 mTorr (1 Torr = 1.3332 × 102 Pa). X-ray diffraction patterns and atomic force microscopy images show that the best thin film has perpendicular orientation and hexagonal morphology, and the crystallographic alignment degree can be calculated to be 0.94. Hysteresis loops reveal that the squareness ratio (M r/M s) is as high as 0.93, the saturated magnetization is 4004 Gs (1 Gs = 104 T), and the anisotropy field is 16.5 kOe (1 Oe = 79.5775 A·m‑1). Ferromagnetic resonance measurements reveal that the gyromagnetic ratio is 2.8 GHz/kOe, and the ferromagnetic resonance linewith is 108 Oe at 50 GHz, which means that this thin film has low microwave loss. These properties make the BaM thin films have potential applications in microwave devices. Project supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (Grant No. KFJJ201506), the Scientific Research Starting Foundation of Hainan University (Grant No. kyqd1539), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hainan Province (Grant No. 20165187).

  9. Passivation properties of aluminum oxide films deposited by mist chemical vapor deposition for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Shohei; Iguchi, Koji; Kitano, Sho; Hayakashi, Koki; Hotta, Yasushi; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Ogura, Atsushi; Satoh, Shin-ichi; Arafune, Koji

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum oxide (AlOx) films were deposited by mist chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) in air for p-type crystalline silicon, and the effects of the deposition temperature (Tdep) and AlOx film thickness on the maximum surface recombination velocities (Smax) were evaluated. It was found that Smax was improved with increasing Tdep. The AlOx film deposited at 400 °C exhibited the best Smax value of 2.8 cm/s, and the passivation quality was comparable to that of AlOx deposited by other vacuum-based techniques. Smax was also improved with increasing film thickness. When the film thickness was above 10 nm, Smax was approximately 10 cm/s. From the Fourier transform infrared spectra, it was found that the AlOx films deposited by MCVD consisted of an AlOx layer and a Si-diffused AlOx layer. In addition, it is important for the layers to be thick enough to obtain high-quality passivation.

  10. Snowpack monitoring in North America and Eurasia using passive microwave satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Hall, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Areas of the Canadian high plains, the Montana and North Dakota high plains, and the steppes of central Russia were studied in an effort to determine the utility of spaceborne electrical scanning microwave radiometers (ESMR) for monitoring snow depths in different geographic areas. Significant regression relationships between snow depth and microwave brightness temperatures were developed for each of these homogeneous areas. In the areas investigated, Nimbus 6 (.081 cm) ESMR data produced higher correlations than Nimbus 5 (1.55 cm) ESMR data in relating microwave brightness temperature and snow depth from one area to another because different geographic areas are likely to have different snowpack conditions.

  11. Preliminary results of passive microwave snow experiment during February and March 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Shiue, J. C.; Boyne, H.; Ellerbruch, D.; Counas, G.; Wittmann, R.; Jones, R.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to determine if remote microwave sensing of snowpack data could be used to predict runoff, thereby allowing more efficient management of the water supply. A four-frequency microwave radiometer system was attached to a truck-mounted aerial lift and was used to gather data on snowpacks at three different sites in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Ground truth data measurements (density, temperature, grain size, hardness, and free-liquid water content) were taken at each site corresponding to each microwave scan.

  12. A Long-Term and Reproducible Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Data Record for Climate Studies and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 km × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere polar regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The data set, along with detailed data processing steps and error source information, can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  13. A radio-frequency coil for the microwave characterization of vortex dynamics in thin film superconductors.

    PubMed

    Cuadra-Solís, Pedro-de-Jesús; Fernández-Martínez, Antoni; Hernàndez, Joan Manel; García-Santiago, Antoni; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2015-06-01

    A radio-frequency coil for the experimental investigation of the magnetic properties of thin superconducting films under microwave fields at different values of temperature and dc magnetic field has been developed. The system has been used for low-temperature microwave frequency-dependent magnetization measurements in a Pb thin film with an engineered periodical antidot array. The characteristic frequencies and the electric and magnetic fields of the resonant system formed by a multi-turn coil with a sample loaded in its core are estimated using the helical approach. A good agreement of the calculated values with those recorded in swept-frequency spectra is obtained. The relation between the characteristics of the resonant structure and the frequency-driven magnetic response of the sample at different nominal microwave powers documents the capability and sensitivity of the layout. PMID:26133852

  14. Effects of corn stalk orientation and water content on passive microwave sensing of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, P. E.; Blanchard, B. J.; Wang, J. R.; Gould, W. I.; Jackson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted utilizing artificial arrangements of plant components during the summer of 1982 to examine the effects of corn canopy structure and plant water content on microwave emission. Truck-mounted microwave radiometers at C (5 GHz) and L (1.4 GHz) band sensed vertically and horizontally polarized radiation concurrent with ground observations of soil moisture and vegetation parameters. Results indicate that the orientation of cut stalks and the distribution of their dielectric properties through the canopy layer can influence the microwave emission measured from a vegetation/soil scene. The magnitude of this effect varies with polarization and frequency and with the amount of water in the plant, disappearing at low levels of vegetation water content. Although many of the canopy structures and orientations studied in this experiment are somewhat artificial, they serve to improve understanding of microwave energy interactions within a vegetation canopy and to aid in the development of appropriate physically based vegetation models.

  15. Remote sensing of snow properties by passive microwave radiometry: GSFC truck experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.; Shiue, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recent results indicate that microwave radiometry has the potential for inferring the snow depth and water equivalent information from snowpacks. In order to assess this potential for determining the water equivalent of a snowpack, it is necessary to understand the microwave emission and scattering behavior of the snow at various wavelengths under carefully controlled conditions. Truck-mounted microwave instrumentation was used to study the microwave characteristics of the snowpack in the Colorado Rocky Mountain region during the winters of 1977 to 78 and 7978 to 79. The spectral signatures of C, X, K sub u, and K sub a band radiometers with dual polarization were used, together with measurements of snowpack density, temperature an ram profiles, liquid water content, and rough characterization of the crystal sizes. These data compared favorably with calculated results based on recent microscopic scattering models.

  16. Evaluating Snow Melt Onset Date in the United States using Satellite Observation of Passive Microwave Temperature Brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, D.; Hunsaker, A. G.; Jacobs, J. M.; Vuyovich, C.

    2015-12-01

    The timing and magnitude of Spring snowmelt events impact riverine flooding and inform reservoir operations. While the melt water volume is a primary concern, the timing of the snowmelt is also important. Melt timing determination is challenging because snowpack ripening observations are seldom available. Diurnal Amplitude Variation (DAV) is a method that uses remotely sensed passive microwave observations to determine snowpack ripening and snowmelt onset. Previous studies have successfully used the DAV method in northern latitudes. This study evaluates the ability of the DAV approach to be used to determine melt onset dates in mid-latitudes. The analysis is conducted for 675 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) and Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) stations in the United States. The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - EOS (AMSR-E) products are used to calculate the DAV signal at each location. Methods for determining the melt onset date at each station are presented and applied to all pixels in the United States. Preliminary results will also be presented which characterize the DAV derived melt onset timing for the United States using the long-term SSM/I record.

  17. Assimilating Spaceborne Passive Microwave Measurements into a Land Surface Model to Estimate Snow Water Equivalent in the Yampa River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R. S.; Li, D.; Durand, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Acquiring accurate spatiotemporal snow information over large areas for understanding snowcover in the global and regional water and energy balances is crucial and has motivated snow characterization via remote sensing. The passive microwave (PM) measurements have been widely used and invested in order to obtain information about snowpack properties. In this paper, we utilize a snow data assimilation system to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE) in the Yampa River basin in the Colorado Rockies within the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) area of 2002-2003. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations were used. Forcing data were derived from the North American Land Data Assimilation v2 (NLDAS-2) dataset. Also, the Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) was used to convert the snow state variables to brightness temperatures. The ensemble Kalman filter was directly employed to assimilate PM brightness temperature data into a land surface model snow scheme. Assimilation results are compared with SNOTEL and snow course observations.

  18. Thermal Processing and Microwave Processing of Mixed-Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadre, Mandar

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors are promising new materials for various optoelectronic applications. In this study, improved electrical and optical properties upon thermal and microwave processing of mixed-oxide semiconductors are reported. First, arsenic-doped silicon was used as a model system to understand susceptor-assisted microwave annealing. Mixed oxide semiconductor films of indium zinc oxide (IZO) and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) were deposited by room-temperature RF sputtering on flexible polymer substrates. Thermal annealing in different environments---air, vacuum and oxygen was done. Electrical and optical characterization was carried out before and after annealing. The degree of reversal in the degradation in electrical properties of the thin films upon annealing in oxygen was assessed by subjecting samples to subsequent vacuum anneals. To further increase the conductivity of the IGZO films, Ag layers of various thicknesses were embedded between two IGZO layers. Optical performance of the multilayer structures was improved by susceptor-assisted microwave annealing and furnace-annealing in oxygen environment without compromising on their electrical conductivity. The post-processing of the films in different environments was used to develop an understanding of mechanisms of carrier generation, transport and optical absorption. This study establishes IGZO as a viable transparent conductor, which can be deposited at room-temperature and processed by thermal and microwave annealing to improve electrical and optical performance for applications in flexible electronics and optoelectronics.

  19. Why are Radar and Passive Microwave Profiles Associated with Lightning Probability over Land and Ocean So Profoundly Different?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, S. D.; Zipser, E. J.; Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most striking aspects of the 16-year TRMM dataset is the contrast between continental and oceanic convection, particularly in their vertical structures, microphysics, and severity. It has become well known that oceanic storms have weaker convection, and far lower occurrence and frequency of lightning. Oceanic storms are also well known to have weaker ice scattering signatures and weaker radar profiles, in the sense that higher radar reflectivities do not extend as far into the upper troposphere. From this, a puzzling contrast between land and ocean storms has arisen that has yet to be explained: Given similar radar and passive microwave signatures, land storms have a far higher probability of lightning than the ocean storms that show the same traits. We posit here that either the remote sensing characteristics are not as sensitive to the known microphysics of electrification by non-inductive ice-ice collisions in the presence of supercooled liquid cloud water, or, that the research community has overlooked some property of the hydrometeors detected by these remote sensors that is masking their widely accepted applicability to diagnosing which convective storms should have lightning, or not. Using 16 years of TRMM data from 1997 to 2013, we examine the different radar profiles and ice scattering signatures of precipitation features in archetypes for mid-ocean and mid-continent regions (e.g. central Pacific and Congo). Using hypothesized idealized hydrometeor profiles, and simple radar and passive microwave simulators, we attempt to construct a metric, using measurements available from TRMM to determine the probability of lightning with fewer land-ocean differences than those we have used in the recent past. If successful, this relationship would apply to the radar and microwave data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite currently in orbit.

  20. Development of a High Resolution Passive Microwave 3U Cubesat for High Resolution Temperature Sounding and Imaging at 118 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Sanders, B. T.; Gallaher, D. W.; Periasamy, L.; Alvarenga, G.; Weaver, R.; Scambos, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    PolarCube is a 3U CubeSat based on the CU ALL-STAR bus hosting an eight-channel passive microwave scanning spectrometer operating at the 118.7503 GHz (1-) O2 resonance. The anticipated launch date is in late 2015. It is being designed to operate for 12 months on orbit to provide global 118-GHz spectral imagery of the Earth over a full seasonal cycle. The mission will focus on the study of Arctic vertical temperature structure and its relation to sea ice coverage, but include the secondary goals of assessing the potential for convective cloud mass detection and cloud top altitude measurement and hurricane warm core sounding. The principles used by PolarCube for sounding and cloud measurement have been well established in number of peer-reviewed papers, although measurements using the 118 GHz oxygen line over the dry polar regions (unaffected by water vapor) have never been demonstrated from space. The PolarCube channels are selected to probe clear-air emission over vertical levels from the surface to the lower stratosphere. Operational spaceborne microwave soundings have available for decades but using lower frequencies (50-57 GHz) and from higher altitudes. While the JPSS ATMS sensor provides global coverage at ~32 km resolution PolarCube will improve on this resolution by a factor of two (~16 km), thus facilitating a key science goal of mapping sea ice concentration and extent while obtaining temperature profile data. Additionally, we seek to correlate freeze-thaw line data from the NASA SMAP mission with atmospheric temperature structure to help understand the relationship between clouds, temperature, and surface energy fluxes during seasonal transitions. PolarCube will also provide the first demonstration of a very low cost passive microwave sounder that if operated in a fleet configuration would have the potential to fulfill the goals of the Precipitation Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity (PATH) mission, as defined in the NRC Decadal Survey.

  1. Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice, 1978-1987: Satellite Passive-Microwave Observations and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, Per; Campbell, William J.; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1992-01-01

    This book contains a description and analysis of the spatial and temporal variations in the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice covers from October 26, 1978 through August 20, 1987. It is based on data collected by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) onboard the NASA Nimbus 7 satellite. The 8.8-year period, together with the 4 years of the Nimbus 5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) observations presented in two earlier volumes, comprises a sea ice record spanning almost 15 years.

  2. Optical Relaxation Time Enhancement in Graphene-Passivated Metal Films

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Sunny; Mehta, Ruchit; Man, Mengren; Chen, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Due to the small skin depth in metals at optical frequencies, their plasmonic response is strongly dictated by their surface properties. Copper (Cu) is one of the standard materials of choice for plasmonic applications, because of its high conductivity and CMOS compatibility. However, being a chemically active material, it gets easily oxidized when left in ambient environment, causing an inevitable degradation in its plasmonic resonance. Here, for the first time, we report a strong enhancement in the optical relaxation time in Cu by direct growth of few-layer graphene that is shown to act as an excellent passivation layer protecting Cu surface from any deterioration. Spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements reveal a 40–50% reduction in the total scattering rate in Cu itself, which is attributed to an improvement in its surface properties. We also study the impact of graphene quality and show that high quality graphene leads to an even larger improvement in electron scattering rate. These findings are expected to provide a big push towards graphene-protected Cu plasmonics. PMID:27461968

  3. Optical Relaxation Time Enhancement in Graphene-Passivated Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Sunny; Mehta, Ruchit; Man, Mengren; Chen, Zhihong

    2016-07-01

    Due to the small skin depth in metals at optical frequencies, their plasmonic response is strongly dictated by their surface properties. Copper (Cu) is one of the standard materials of choice for plasmonic applications, because of its high conductivity and CMOS compatibility. However, being a chemically active material, it gets easily oxidized when left in ambient environment, causing an inevitable degradation in its plasmonic resonance. Here, for the first time, we report a strong enhancement in the optical relaxation time in Cu by direct growth of few-layer graphene that is shown to act as an excellent passivation layer protecting Cu surface from any deterioration. Spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements reveal a 40–50% reduction in the total scattering rate in Cu itself, which is attributed to an improvement in its surface properties. We also study the impact of graphene quality and show that high quality graphene leads to an even larger improvement in electron scattering rate. These findings are expected to provide a big push towards graphene-protected Cu plasmonics.

  4. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1986-09-01

    During this last (3rd) year of the program, efforts concentrated on SiN/sub x/ passivation studies. In particular, the key objectives were: relate the density of states at SiN/sub x//Si interfaces to the substrate dopant concentration; characterize the SiN/sub x//Si interface on high efficiency cells; and identify dominant current loss mechanisms in high efficiency cells. The interface state density (D/sub ss/) at the SiN/sub x//Si interface of Al/SiN/sub x//Si MIS structures was determined using high frequency and slow ramp capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Values of D/sub ss/ were obtained for a range of substrate resistivities, and for both N- and P-type material. The surfaces of high efficiency N/P and P/N solar cells were characterized by using a special structure which allows simultaneous measurement of the interface recombination velocity. Dominant current loss mechanisms were determined from temperature dependent I-V analyses. The remainder of this report consists of discussions of the following: surface characterization of homogeneously doped substrates and solar cells; studies of high efficiency cells; and conclusions concerning this year's effort.

  5. Changes in characteristics of gadolinium, titanium, and erbium oxide films on the SiC surface under microwave treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bacherikov, Yu. Yu.; Konakova, R. V.; Milenin, V. V.; Okhrimenko, O. B. Svetlichnyi, A. M.; Polyakov, V. V.

    2008-07-15

    The effect of microwaves on properties of Ti, Gd, and Er oxide films deposited on silicon carbide was studied using optical absorption and photoluminescence methods. The atomic composition of films was analyzed in relation to the microwave treatment time. It was shown that exposure to microwaves results in the appearance of an additional band in the photoluminescence spectra of the structures under study. It was shown that microwave treatment leads to an increase in the sample transmittance, which indicates an improvement in integrated characteristics of structures.

  6. The Satellite Passive-Microwave Record of Sea Ice in the Ross Sea Since Late 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    Satellites have provided us with a remarkable ability to monitor many aspects of the globe day-in and day-out and sea ice is one of numerous variables that by now have quite substantial satellite records. Passive-microwave data have been particularly valuable in sea ice monitoring, with a record that extends back to August 1987 on daily basis (for most of the period), to November 1970 on a less complete basis (again for most of the period), and to December 1972 on a less complete basis. For the period since November 1970, Ross Sea sea ice imagery is available at spatial resolution of approximately 25 km. This allows good depictions of the seasonal advance and retreat of the ice cover each year, along with its marked interannual variability. The Ross Sea ice extent typically reaches a minimum of approximately 0.7 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers in February, rising to a maximum of approximately 4.0 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers in September, with much variability among years for both those numbers. The Ross Sea images show clearly the day-by-day activity greatly from year to year. Animations of the data help to highlight the dynamic nature of the Ross Sea ice cover. The satellite data also allow calculation of trends in the ice cover over the period of the satellite record. Using linear least-squares fits, the Ross Sea ice extent increased at an average rate of 12,600 plus or minus 1,800 square kilometers per year between November 1978 and December 2007, with every month exhibiting increased ice extent and the rates of increase ranging from a low of 7,500 plus or minus 5,000 square kilometers per year for the February ice extents to a high of 20,300 plus or minus 6,100 kilometers per year for the October ice extents. On a yearly average basis, for 1979-2007 the Ross Sea ice extent increased at a rate of 4.8 plus or minus 1.6 % per decade. Placing the Ross Sea in the context of the Southern Ocean as a whole, over the November 1978-December 2007 period the Ross Sea had

  7. Passivation Effect of Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 Film on HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Sun, Chang-Hong; Chen, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Ning; Chen, Xin; Lin, Chun; Ding, Ring-Jun; He, Li

    2016-09-01

    The passivation effect of atomic layer deposition of (ALD) Al2O3 film on a HgCdTe infrared detector was investigated in this work. The passivation effect of Al2O3 film was evaluated by measuring the minority carrier lifetime, capacitance versus voltage ( C- V) characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, and resistance versus voltage ( R- V) characteristics of variable-area photodiodes. The minority carrier lifetime, C- V characteristics, and R- V characteristics of HgCdTe devices passivated by ALD Al2O3 film was comparable to those of HgCdTe devices passivated by e-beam evaporation of ZnS/CdTe film. However, the baking stability of devices passivated by Al2O3 film is inferior to that of devices passivated by ZnS/CdTe film. In future work, by optimizing the ALD Al2O3 film growing process and annealing conditions, it may be feasible to achieve both excellent electrical properties and good baking stability.

  8. Constituent phases of the passive film formed on 2205 stainless steel by dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xue-Qun; Li, Cheng-Tao; Dong, Chao-Fang; Li, Xiao-Gang

    2011-02-01

    The passive film formed on 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) in 0.5 M NaHCO3+0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution was characterized by electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic anodic polarization and dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (DEIS). The results demonstrate that there is a great difference between the passive film evolutions of ferrite and austenite. The impedance values of ferrite are higher than those of austenite. The impedance peaks of ferritic and austenitic phases correspond to the potential of 0.15 and 0.25 V in the low potential range and correspond to 0.8 and 0.75 V in the high potential range. The evolutions of the capacitance of both phases are reverse compared to the evolutions of impedance. The thickness variations obtained from capacitance agree well with those of impedance analysis. The results can be used to explain why pitting corrosion occurs more easily in austenite phase than in ferrite phase.

  9. A Texture-Polarization Method for Estimating Convective/Stratiform Precipitation Area Coverage from Passive Microwave Radiometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Hong, Ye; Kummerow, Christian D.; Turk, Joseph; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Observational and modeling studies have described the relationships between convective/stratiform rain proportion and the vertical distributions of vertical motion, latent heating, and moistening in mesoscale convective systems. Therefore, remote sensing techniques which can quantify the relative areal proportion of convective and stratiform, rainfall can provide useful information regarding the dynamic and thermodynamic processes in these systems. In the present study, two methods for deducing the convective/stratiform areal extent of precipitation from satellite passive microwave radiometer measurements are combined to yield an improved method. If sufficient microwave scattering by ice-phase precipitating hydrometeors is detected, the method relies mainly on the degree of polarization in oblique-view, 85.5 GHz radiances to estimate the area fraction of convective rain within the radiometer footprint. In situations where ice scattering is minimal, the method draws mostly on texture information in radiometer imagery at lower microwave frequencies to estimate the convective area fraction. Based upon observations of ten convective systems over ocean and nine systems over land, instantaneous 0.5 degree resolution estimates of convective area fraction from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TRMM TMI) are compared to nearly coincident estimates from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). The TMI convective area fraction estimates are slightly low-biased with respect to the PR, with TMI-PR correlations of 0.78 and 0.84 over ocean and land backgrounds, respectively. TMI monthly-average convective area percentages in the tropics and subtropics from February 1998 exhibit the greatest values along the ITCZ and in continental regions of the summer (southern) hemisphere. Although convective area percentages. from the TMI are systematically lower than those from the PR, monthly rain patterns derived from the TMI and PR rain algorithms are very similar

  10. Growth of diamond films from microwave plasma in CH 4-CO 2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrino, G.; Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Paoletti, A.; Paroli, P.; Pinter, I.; Tebano, A.; Luce, G.

    1993-04-01

    We have studied the growth of diamond films from microwave plasma using gas mixtures of CH 4-CO 2 (not previously reported in the literature) onto Si substrates. The diamond phase is obtained in the molar ratio range 0.7 ⩽ CO 2/ CH 4 ⩽ 1.38 ± 0.05, in close agreement with the empirical model of Bachmann et al., with relevant implications for the diamond precursor species. The film morphology varies appreciably in the above range, the best films being obtained just at the border with the no-growth region.

  11. Electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by thin films of atomic layer deposited gallium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. G. Cuevas, A.

    2014-07-21

    This paper proposes the application of gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films to crystalline silicon solar cells. Effective passivation of n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of very thin Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films prepared by atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ozone (O{sub 3}) as the reactants. Surface recombination velocities as low as 6.1 cm/s have been recorded with films less than 4.5 nm thick. A range of deposition parameters has been explored, with growth rates of approximately 0.2 Å/cycle providing optimum passivation. The thermal activation energy for passivation of the Si-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface has been found to be approximately 0.5 eV. Depassivation of the interface was observed for prolonged annealing at increased temperatures. The activation energy for depassivation was measured to be 1.9 eV.

  12. The role of passive surface films on corrosion fatigue crack initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing on commercially pure titanium with low and high oxygen contents, chosen to produce quite different slip behaviors, wavy and planar, respectively, was carried out in air and in 1M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solution, a strongly passivating environment for Ti. Goal was comparison of experimental fatigue data with a published model which rationalizes fatigue crack initiation under passive corrosion conditions. Although the general features of the experimental data were consistent with the tenets of the model, as was also the case in prior work using the stainless steel superalloy A-286, it appeared that the passivation conditions were so strong as to preclude the primary event proposed as the basis for the model, namely the emergence of slip steps through the passive film, thus permitting corrosive fatigue crack initiation. It is possible that choice of a less strong passivating environment would permit a better comparison of model and experiment for the CP Ti, an otherwise suitable experimental material.

  13. Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture: Results from HAPEX, FIFE, and MONSOON 90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, Thomas; Jackson, T. J.; Wang, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    HAPEX (Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment), FIFE (First ISLSCP Field Experiment) and MONSOON 90 which used an imaging microwave radiometer operating at a frequency of 1.42 GHz are reported. For FIFE and MONSOON 90, a wide range of moisture conditions were present and it was possible to observe the drydown of the soil following heavy rain and to map its spatial variation. The quantitive agreement of microwave observations and ground measurements was very good. In HAPEX there were no significant rains and conditions were generally rather dry, however, moisture variations due to irrigation were observed.

  14. Intercomparisons between passive and active microwave remote sensing, and hydrological modeling for soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. F.; Lin, D.-S.; Mancini, M.; Thongs, D.; Troch, P. A.; Jackson, T. J.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Engman, E. T.

    1993-01-01

    Soil moisture estimations from a distributed hydrological model and two microwave sensors were compared with ground measurements collected during the MAC-HYDRO'90 experiment. The comparison was done with the purpose of evaluating the performance of the hydrological model and examining the limitations of remote sensing techniques used in soil moisture estimation. An image integration technique was used to integrate and analyze rainfall, soil properties, land cover, topography, and remote sensing imagery. Results indicate that the hydrological model and microwave sensors successfully picked up temporal variations of soil moisture and that the spatial soil moisture pattern may be remotely sensed with reasonable accuracy using existing algorithms.

  15. Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture - Results from HAPEX, FIFE and MONSOON 90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.; Jackson, T. J.; Kustas, W. P.; Wang, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    HAPEX (Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment), FIFE (First ISLSCP Field Experiment) and MONSOON 90 which used an imaging microwave radiometer operating at a frequency of 1.42 GHz are reported. For FIFE and MONSOON 90, a wide range of moisture conditions were present and it was possible to observe the drydown of the soil following heavy rain and to map its spatial variation. The quantitative agreement of microwave observations and ground measurements was very good. In HAPEX there were no significant rains and conditions were generally rather dry, however, moisture variations due to irrigation were observed.

  16. Soil organic carbon as a factor in passive microwave retrievals of soil water content over agricultural croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Hida R.; Berg, Aaron A.; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Remote sensing has the potential to deliver global soil water content (SWC) on vast scales with frequent revisit times for progress in the fields of climate, weather forecasting, agriculture and hydrology. Although surface roughness, vegetation and soil texture have been established as sources of variability in passive microwave interpretation, soil organic carbon (SOC) has not typically been considered as a factor that affects SWC estimation during field sampling campaigns. SOC was observed along with soil texture and bulk density during the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment in 2012 (SMAPVEX12), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite algorithm development field sampling campaign held June 6 to July 19 in Southern Manitoba, Canada. Aerial measurements from the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) instrument were recorded over agricultural fields and forest areas from aircraft while SWC was measured simultaneously on the ground with resistance probes on 17 sampling dates. Additionally, fields were sampled for surface roughness, vegetation growth and water content, soil and vegetation temperature and soil physical characteristics. A soil core was collected on each field each sampling time to assess bulk density, soil particle size and SOC. SOC accounted for more variability in the anomalies between PALS and ground sampled SWC than sand, clay or bulk density, although all soil variables explained significant variability. With analysis by partial least squares multiple regression over 11 sampling dates and 39 fields where both ground and PALS data were well represented, only SOC contributed significantly to the regression of SWC beyond the variance all soil variables had in common. The significance of SOC in the relative SWC anomalies was highest in very wet and very dry conditions and in loam soil over all sampling dates, while bulk density was more significant in sand soils. This analysis suggests SOC is a simple variable that incorporates

  17. Structural, transport and microwave properties of 123/sapphire films: Thickness effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predtechensky, M. R.; Smal, A. N.; Varlamov, Yu. D.; Vatnik, S. M.; Tukhto, O. M.; Vasileva, I. G.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of thickness and growth conditions on the structure and microwave properties has been investigated for the 123/sapphire films. It has been shown that in the conditions of epitaxial growth the Al atoms do not diffuse from substrate into the film and the films with thickness up to 100 nm exhibit the excellent direct current (DC) properties. The increase of thickness of GdBaCuO films causes the formation of extended line-mesh defects and the increase of the surface resistance (R(sub S)). The low value of surface resistance R(sub S)(75 GHz, 77K) = 20 mOhm has been obtained for the two layer YBaCuO/CdBaCuO/sapphire films.

  18. Structural, transport and microwave properties of 123/sapphire films: Thickness effect

    SciTech Connect

    Predtechensky, MR.; Smal, A.N.; Varlamov, Y.D.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of thickness and growth conditions on the structure and microwave properties has been investigated for the 123/sapphire films. It has been shown that in the conditions of epitaxial growth and Al atoms do not diffuse from substrate into the film and the films with thickness up to 100nm exhibit the excellent DC properties. The increase of thickness of GdBaCuO films causes the formation of extended line-mesh defects and the increase of the surface resistance (R{sub S}). The low value of surface resistance R{sub S}(75GHz,77K)=20 mOhm has been obtained for the two layer YBaCuO/CdBaCuO/sapphire films.

  19. Soil temperature error propagation in passive microwave retrieval of soil moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the near future two dedicated soil moisture satellites will be launched (SMOS and SMAP), both carrying an L-band radiometer. It is well known that microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms must account for the physical temperature of the emitting surface. Solutions to this include: difference ...

  20. Passive microwave studies of snowpack properties. [Walden and Steamboat Spring, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Rango, A.; Schmugge, T.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave brightness temperatures were measured for the snowpacks at Walden and Steamboat Springs, Colorado during 1976 and 1977 aircraft experiments. Variations in measured brightness temperatures are attributed to snow grain and crystal sizes, liquid water content, and snowpack temperature. Results demonstrate that shorter wavelength radiation is scattered more strongly than longer wavelength radiation.

  1. Assimilation of a knowledge base and physical models to reduce errors in passive-microwave classifications of sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J.

    1992-01-01

    An expert system framework has been developed to classify sea ice types using satellite passive microwave data, an operational classification algorithm, spatial and temporal information, ice types estimated from a dynamic-thermodynamic model, output from a neural network that detects the onset of melt, and knowledge about season and region. The rule base imposes boundary conditions upon the ice classification, modifies parameters in the ice algorithm, determines a `confidence' measure for the classified data, and under certain conditions, replaces the algorithm output with model output. Results demonstrate the potential power of such a system for minimizing overall error in the classification and for providing non-expert data users with a means of assessing the usefulness of the classification results for their applications.

  2. Retrieval of soil moisture based on passive microwaves measurements from AMSR-E over a Sahelian region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruhier, C.; de Rosnay, P.; Wigneron, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial variable which influences the land surface processes. The feedback on precipitation is particularly strong over the Sahelian region. Access to soil moisture value is difficult because of its high spatial and temporal variability. Large scale measurements are of great importance for land surface modeling and numerical weather prediction. Remote sensing approaches are the more appropriated to provide land surface informations at continental scale and high temporal frequency. Among all channels available, passive microwaves are the most sensitive to soil moisture variations. This study proposed a retrieval of soil moisture based on AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System) measurements over a Sahelian region. The study area is located in Gourma region in Mali. This site has been instrumented in the context of the AMMA project (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). The soil moisture network was specifically designed to address the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture in the context of the SMOS mission (Soil Moisture an Ocean Salinity). AMSR-E is a passive microwaves sensor launched on AQUA in 2002. It provides brightness temperature at fives frequencies (6.9 to 89GHz) and two polarizations. Its high temporal frequency is particularly appropriated to the quick rainy events. Gruhier et al (2008-a) shows the great sensibility of the 6.9GHz channel over the study area. The goal of this study is to use the complete temporal series available from AMSR-E from 2002 to 2008 to provide soil moisture values. In a first time, a simple correction is applied to brightness temperature to correct the variations explained by instrument calibration. Secondly, the range of AMSR-E brightness temperatures values is used to identify the range of Soil Wetness Index values on each pixel. Finally, sample ground measurements are used to develop retrieval algorithm, which provide volumetric values. Retrieved soil moisture

  3. Dissolution of sputter-deposited iron oxide films used as a model for the passive film on iron

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, S.; Schmuki, P.; Davenport, A.J.; Vitus, C.M.

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports results from XANES (X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy) studies during polarization of thin sputter-deposited Fe-oxide films in acidic solutions. The dissolution rate of Fe-oxides in acidic solutions was found to be strongly increased by the presence of Fe(2+) in the oxide. During anodic polarization in acidic solutions, a deleterious effect of chloride anions is found compared with sulfates. In HCl solutions of increasing concentration, not only the pH decrease, but also the increasing anion concentration accelerates dissolution. On the other hand, the dissolution rate in sulfuric acid does not depend on the sulfate concentration. During cathodic polarization, the dissolution rate is not affected by the presence of chloride ions. This could be due to the negative surface charge of n-type oxides at potentials lower than the flat-band potential, retarding anion adsorption on the surface. These results suggest that the detrimental role of chloride anions on the stability of Fe oxide films is due to a surface complexation effect. The dissolution rate is fairly independent of the potential in the anodic range, except at very high anodic potentials. The XANES spectra reveal no changes in the average oxide valency during anodic polarization. Thus in the passive range, the dissolution that takes place is mostly chemical rather than electrochemical. The findings and their relevance to the stability of natural passive films are discussed.

  4. Accelerated Amidization of Branched Poly(ethylenimine)/Poly(acrylic acid) Multilayer Films by Microwave Heating.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kehua; Gu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Huan; Qiang, Zhe; Vogt, Bryan D; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-09-13

    Chemical cross-linking of layer-by-layer assembled films promotes mechanical stability and robustness in a wide variety of environments, which can be a challenge for polyelectrolyte multilayers in saline environments or for multilayers made from weak polyelectrolytes in environments with extreme pHs. Heating branched poly(ethylenimine)/poly(acrylic acid) (BPEI/PAA) multilayers at sufficiently high temperatures drives amidization and dehydration to covalently cross-link the film, but this reaction is rather slow, typically requiring heating for hours for appreciable cross-linking to occur. Here, a more than one order of magnitude increase in the amidization kinetics is realized through microwave heating of BPEI/PAA multilayers on indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass substrates. The cross-linking reaction is tracked using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry to monitor the development of the cross-linking products. For thick films (∼1500 nm), gradients in cross-link density can be readily identified by infrared ellipsometry. Such gradients in cross-link density are driven by the temperature gradient developed by the localized heating of ITO by microwaves. This significant acceleration of reactions using microwaves to generate a well-defined cross-link network as well as being a simple method for developing graded materials should open new applications for these polymer films and coatings. PMID:27548626

  5. Microwave plasma chemical synthesis of nanocrystalline carbon film structures and study their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushuev, N.; Yafarov, R.; Timoshenkov, V.; Orlov, S.; Starykh, D.

    2015-08-01

    The self-organization effect of diamond nanocrystals in polymer-graphite and carbon films is detected. The carbon materials deposition was carried from ethanol vapors out at low pressure using a highly non-equilibrium microwave plasma. Deposition processes of carbon film structures (diamond, graphite, graphene) is defined. Deposition processes of nanocrystalline structures containing diamond and graphite phases in different volume ratios is identified. The solid film was obtained under different conditions of microwave plasma chemical synthesis. We investigated the electrical properties of the nanocrystalline carbon films and identified it's from various factors. Influence of diamond-graphite film deposition mode in non-equilibrium microwave plasma at low pressure on emission characteristics was established. This effect is justified using the cluster model of the structure of amorphous carbon. It was shown that the reduction of bound hydrogen in carbon structures leads to a decrease in the threshold electric field of emission from 20-30 V/m to 5 V/m. Reducing the operating voltage field emission can improve mechanical stability of the synthesized film diamond-graphite emitters. Current density emission at least 20 A/cm2 was obtained. Nanocrystalline carbon film materials can be used to create a variety of functional elements in micro- and nanoelectronics and photonics such as cold electron source for emission in vacuum devices, photonic devices, cathodoluminescent flat display, highly efficient white light sources. The obtained graphene carbon net structure (with a net size about 6 μm) may be used for the manufacture of large-area transparent electrode for solar cells and cathodoluminescent light sources

  6. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured BSTO thin-films for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehl, Bonnie D.

    Nanophase synthesis of ferroelectric thin-films of Ba0.6Sr 0.4TiO3 (BSTO) was studied systematically for applications in tunable microwave components. Synthesis of nanostructured BSTO was performed using a pulsed-laser deposition system with real-time in-situ process control. The main research goal was to utilize the pulsed laser deposition parameters to control the grain growth for low microwave loss nanostructured BSTO thin-films on crystalline substrates such as LaAlO3. These parameters include the energy density of the laser pulses, wavelength, oxygen partial pressure, distance between the target and the substrate, and the substrate temperature. The nanostructural characterization was performed using XRD, SEM and AFM. Microwave characterization was done using coplanar waveguide lines to characterize the frequency dependent dielectric properties (ε r and tandelta). BSTO films were grown at the same measured temperature and energy density but in different oxygen ambient pressures from 19 mTorr through 300 mTorr. Using contact mode AFM, the grain size was found to decrease as the oxygen ambient pressure was reduced from 150 mTorr to 38 mTorr. The growth process changed when the pressure was increased above 150 mTorr. Nanocluster structures rather than nanoparticles were found at 225 mTorr. Average grain sizes less than 100 nm were obtained for oxygen pressures below 75 mTorr. The XRD spectra indicate the highly crystalline nature of the film. Microwave measurements, performed between 9--18 GHz, suggest the nano-structured BSTO thin-films on LaAlO3 (LAO) substrates are highly tunable (up to 25%). Surface potential imaging indicated that the surface potential of polarized areas to be the sum of contributions from the surface charge and from the vertical part of the oriented dipoles in the areas.

  7. A long-term and reproducible passive microwave sea ice concentration data record for climate studies and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-05-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere Polar Regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007 with an update through 2011 underway. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)'s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The dataset along with detailed data processing steps and error source information can be found at: doi:10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  8. A long-term and reproducible passive microwave sea ice concentration data record for climate studies and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-10-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 km × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere polar regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The data set, along with detailed data processing steps and error source information, can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  9. Temperature dependence dynamical permeability characterization of magnetic thin film using near-field microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Le Thanh; Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Wang, Xuan-Cong; Ong, C. K.

    2011-08-01

    A temperature dependence characterization system of microwave permeability of magnetic thin film up to 5 GHz in the temperature range from room temperature up to 423 K is designed and fabricated as a prototype measurement fixture. It is based on the near field microwave microscopy technique (NFMM). The scaling coefficient of the fixture can be determined by (i) calibrating the NFMM with a standard sample whose permeability is known; (ii) by calibrating the NFMM with an established dynamic permeability measurement technique such as shorted microstrip transmission line perturbation method; (iii) adjusting the real part of the complex permeability at low frequency to fit the value of initial permeability. The algorithms for calculating the complex permeability of magnetic thin films are analyzed. A 100 nm thick FeTaN thin film deposited on Si substrate by sputtering method is characterized using the fixture. The room temperature permeability results of the FeTaN film agree well with results obtained from the established short-circuited microstrip perturbation method. Temperature dependence permeability results fit well with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The temperature dependence of the static magnetic anisotropy H_K^{sta}, the dynamic magnetic anisotropy H_K^{dyn}, the rotational anisotropy Hrot, together with the effective damping coefficient αeff, ferromagnetic resonance fFMR, and frequency linewidth Δf of the thin film are investigated. These temperature dependent magnetic properties of the magnetic thin film are important to the high frequency applications of magnetic devices at high temperatures.

  10. Impacts of Different Assimilation Methodologies on Crop Yield Estimates Using Active and Passive Microwave Dataset at L-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Bongiovanni, T. E.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Bindlish, R.; Judge, J.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate estimates of crop yield are important for managing agricultural production and food security. Although the crop growth models, such as the Decision Support System Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT), have been used to simulate crop growth and development, the crop yield estimates still diverge from the reality due to different sources of errors in the models and computation. Auxiliary observations may be incorporated into such dynamic models to improve predictions using data assimilation. Active and passive (AP) microwave observations at L-band (1-2 GHz) are sensitive to dielectric and geometric properties of soil and vegetation, including soil moisture (SM), vegetation water content (VWC), surface roughness, and vegetation structure. Because SM and VWC are one of the governing factors in estimating crop yield, microwave observations may be used to improve crop yield estimates. Current studies have shown that active observations are more sensitive to the surface roughness of soil and vegetation structure during the growing season, while the passive observations are more sensitive to the SM. Backscatter and emission models linked with the DSSAT model (DSSAT-A-P) allow assimilation of microwave observations of backscattering coefficient (σ0) and brightness temperature (TB) may provide biophysically realistic estimates of model states and parameters. The present ESA Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission provides passive observations at 1.41 GHz at 25 km every 2-3 days, and the NASA/CNDAE Aquarius mission provides L-band AP observations at spatial resolution of 150 km with a repeat coverage of 7 days for global SM products. In 2014, the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive mission will provide AP observations at 1.26 and 1.41 GHz at the spatial resolutions of 3 and 30 km, respectively, with a repeat coverage of 2-3 days. The goal of this study is to understand the impacts of assimilation of asynchronous and synchronous AP observations on crop yield

  11. Sea ice concentration from satellite passive microwave algorithms: inter-comparison, validation and selection of an optimal algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Natalia; Pedersen, Leif T.; Lavergne, Thomas; Tonboe, Rasmus T.; Saldo, Roberto; Mäkynen, Marko; Heygster, Georg; Rösel, Anja; Kern, Stefan; Dybkjær, Gorm; Sørensen, Atle; Brucker, Ludovic; Shokr, Mohammed; Korosov, Anton; Hansen, Morten W.

    2015-04-01

    Sea ice concentration (SIC) has been derived globally from satellite passive microwave observations since the 1970s by a multitude of algorithms. However, existing datasets and algorithms, although agreeing in the large-scale picture, differ substantially in the details and have disadvantages in summer and fall due to presence of melt ponds and thin ice. There is thus a need for understanding of the causes for the differences and identifying the most suitable method to retrieve SIC. Therefore, during the ESA Climate Change Initiative effort 30 algorithms have been implemented, inter-compared and validated by a standardized reference dataset. The algorithms were evaluated over low and high sea ice concentrations and thin ice. Based on the findings, an optimal approach to retrieve sea ice concentration globally for climate purposes was suggested and validated. The algorithm was implemented with atmospheric correction and dynamical tie points in order to produce the final sea ice concentration dataset with per-pixel uncertainties. The issue of melt ponds was addressed in particular because they are interpreted as open water by the algorithms and thus SIC can be underestimated by up to 40%. To improve our understanding of this issue, melt-pond signatures in AMSR2 images were investigated based on their physical properties with help of observations of melt pond fraction from optical (MODIS and MERIS) and active microwave (SAR) satellite measurements.

  12. Analysis of ground-measured and passive-microwave-derived snow depth variations in midwinter across the Northern Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, A.T.C.; Kelly, R.E.J.; Josberger, E.G.; Armstrong, R.L.; Foster, J.L.; Mognard, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimation of snow mass is important for the characterization of the hydrological cycle at different space and time scales. For effective water resources management, accurate estimation of snow storage is needed. Conventionally, snow depth is measured at a point, and in order to monitor snow depth in a temporally and spatially comprehensive manner, optimum interpolation of the points is undertaken. Yet the spatial representation of point measurements at a basin or on a larger distance scale is uncertain. Spaceborne scanning sensors, which cover a wide swath and can provide rapid repeat global coverage, are ideally suited to augment the global snow information. Satellite-borne passive microwave sensors have been used to derive snow depth (SD) with some success. The uncertainties in point SD and areal SD of natural snowpacks need to be understood if comparisons are to be made between a point SD measurement and satellite SD. In this paper three issues are addressed relating satellite derivation of SD and ground measurements of SD in the northern Great Plains of the United States from 1988 to 1997. First, it is shown that in comparing samples of ground-measured point SD data with satellite-derived 25 ?? 25 km2 pixels of SD from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave Imager, there are significant differences in yearly SD values even though the accumulated datasets showed similarities. Second, from variogram analysis, the spatial variability of SD from each dataset was comparable. Third, for a sampling grid cell domain of 1?? ?? 1?? in the study terrain, 10 distributed snow depth measurements per cell are required to produce a sampling error of 5 cm or better. This study has important implications for validating SD derivations from satellite microwave observations. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  13. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without

  14. Performance enhancement of amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors by microwave annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; He, Jian; Li, Wei; Paine, David C.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of microwave annealing on the field effect mobility and threshold voltage of amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) is reported. A control device with traditional hotplate annealing at 200 °C for 1 h was applied for comparison. The results show that both microwave annealing and low-temperature hotplate annealing increase the field effect mobility from 12.3 cm2/V s in as-deposited state to ∼19 cm2/V s in annealed state. However, the negative shift in threshold voltage with microwave annealing (from 0.23 V to -2.86 V) is smaller than that with low-temperature hotplate annealing (to -9 V). A mechanism related with the electrical properties of a-IZO material is proposed. This rapid low-temperature annealing technology makes a-IZO TFTs promising for use in flexible, transparent electronics.

  15. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  16. Application of artificial neural networks for the soil moisture retrieval from active and passive microwave spaceborne sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santi, Emanuele; Paloscia, Simonetta; Pettinato, Simone; Fontanelli, Giacomo

    2016-06-01

    Among the algorithms used for the retrieval of SMC from microwave sensors (both active, such as Synthetic Aperture Radar-SAR, and passive, radiometers), the artificial neural networks (ANN) represent the best compromise between accuracy and computation speed. ANN based algorithms have been developed at IFAC, and adapted to several radar and radiometric satellite sensors, in order to generate SMC products at a resolution varying from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers according to the spatial scale of each sensor. These algorithms, which are based on the ANN techniques for inverting theoretical and semi-empirical models, have been adapted to the C- to Ka- band acquisitions from spaceborne radiometers (AMSR-E/AMSR2), SAR (Envisat/ASAR, Cosmo-SkyMed) and real aperture radar (MetOP ASCAT). Large datasets of co-located satellite acquisitions and direct SMC measurements on several test sites worldwide have been used along with simulations derived from forward electromagnetic models for setting up, training and validating these algorithms. An overall quality assessment of the obtained results in terms of accuracy and computational cost was carried out, and the main advantages and limitations for an operational use of these algorithms were evaluated. This technique allowed the retrieval of SMC from both active and passive satellite systems, with accuracy values of about 0.05 m3/m3 of SMC or better, thus making these applications compliant with the usual accuracy requirements for SMC products from space.

  17. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation: Initial On-Orbit Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Joel T.; Aksoy, Mustafa; Bringer, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched in January 2015, provides global measurements of soil moisture using a microwave radiometer. SMAPs radiometer passband lies within the passive frequency allocation. However, both unauthorized in-band transmitters as well as out-of-band emissions from transmitters operating at frequencies adjacent to this allocated spectrum have been documented as sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to the L-band radiometers on SMOS and Aquarius. The spectral environment consists of high RFI levels as well as significant occurrences of low level RFI equivalent to 0.1 to 10 K. The SMAP ground processor reports the antenna temperature both before and after RFI mitigation is applied. The difference between these quantities represents the detected RFI level. The presentation will review the SMAP RFI detection and mitigation procedure and discuss early on-orbit RFI measurements from the SMAP radiometer. Assessments of global RFI properties and source types will be provided, as well as the implications of these results for SMAP soil moisture measurements.

  18. Compact optical displacement sensing by detection of microwave signals generated from a monolithic passively mode-locked laser under feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Christos; Simos, Hercules; Nikas, Thomas; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2015-05-01

    A monolithic passively mode-locked laser is proposed as a compact optical sensor for displacements and vibrations of a reflecting object. The sensing principle relies on the change of the laser repetition frequency that is induced by optical feedback from the object under measurement. It has been previously observed that, when a semiconductor passively mode locked laser receives a sufficient level of optical feedback from an external reflecting surface it exhibits a repetition frequency that is no more determined by the mode-locking rule of the free-running operation but is imposed by the length of the external cavity. Therefore measurement of the resulting laser repetition frequency under self-injection permits the accurate and straightforward determination of the relative position of the reflecting object. The system has an inherent wireless capability since the repetition rate of the laser can be wirelessly detected by means of a simple antenna which captures the microwave signal generated by the saturable absorber and is emitted through the wiring of the laser. The sensor setup is very simple as it requires few optical components besides the laser itself. Furthermore, the deduction of the relative position of the reflecting object is straightforward and does not require any processing of the detected signal. The proposed sensor has a theoretical sub-wavelength resolution and its performance depends on the RF linewidth of the laser and the resolution of the repetition frequency measurement. Other physical parameters that induce phase changes of the external cavity could also be quantified.

  19. Satellite observations of snow and ice with an imaging passive microwave spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, A. D.; Ledsham, B. L.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Staelin, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The scanning microwave spectrometer (SCAMS) on the Nimbus-6 satellite continuously maps the terrestrial surface with a resolution of about 150 km at 22.235 and 31.400 GHz. SCAMS observes at six angles besides nadir, yielding brightness temperatures which are a function of the distribution and character of various types of snow and ice, including microstructure and subsurface profiles in refractive index, loss (moisture or salinity), and temperature. Spectral signatures exhibiting interesting topographical structure have been observed. To aid in the interpretation of these data, a model was developed to describe the propagation of microwave intensity in a scattering medium characterized by three-dimensional random fluctuations of refractive index in addition to nonrandom variations in permittivity, temperature, and loss. The model combines Maxwell's equations in the Born approximation with radiative-transfer theory; this approach yields the variation of intensity with polarization, direction, and position.

  20. Passive/active microwave soil moisture retrieval disaggregation using SMAPVEX12 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bin; Lakshmi, Venkat

    2014-11-01

    SMAPVEX12 is a pre-launch field campaign for evaluating and testing the soil moisture retrievals retrieved from the SMAP project. During this experiment, airborne microwave observations from PALS radiometer and radar: brightness temperature and radar backscatter, as well as ground measurements were acquired. In this study, the remote sensing soil moisture was retrieved from SMAPVEX12 PALS radiometer L-band (6GHz) brightness temperature at high altitude flight. The PALS soil moisture was then aggregated and compared with PALS radar backscatter coefficient to generate high spatial resolution microwave soil moisture in change. The R2 values of PALS soil moisture retrieval validation range from 0.407-0.881, indicating good accuracy of soil moisture retrieval. The R2 values of comparison between aggregated PALS Δ and PALS Δ range from 0.492-0.805, while the downscaled Δ validation range from 0.128- 0.383.

  1. Arctic Sea ice, 1973-1976: Satellite passive-microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Zwally, H. Jay; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Gloersen, Per; Campbell, William J.

    1987-01-01

    The Arctic region plays a key role in the climate of the earth. The sea ice cover affects the radiative balance of the earth and radically changes the fluxes of heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. The observations of the Arctic made by the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) on board the Nimbus 5 research satellite are summarized for the period 1973 through 1976.

  2. Multifrequency passive microwave observation of saline ice grown in a tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Bell, D. L.; Lohanick, A. W.; Swift, C. T.; St.germain, K.

    1988-01-01

    Microwave radiometers observed artificial sea ice formation. During initial ice growth, interference fringe effects can occur both from changing ice thickness and snow or frost which may prove useful in interpreting layer thicknesses. A simulation of multiyear ice was attempted by allowing the ice to desalinate, but the resulting emissivity spectrum was more characteristic of lake ice. A multiyearlike spectrum was obtained when rubble was deposited on the ice surface.

  3. Correlation of spacecraft passive microwave system data with soil moisture indices (API). [great plains corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S.; Richter, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical scanning microwave radiometer brightness temperature, meteorological data, climatological data, and winter wheat crop information were used to estimate that soil moisture content in the Great Plains region. Results over the predominant winter wheat areas indicate that the best potential to infer soil moisture occurs during fall and spring. These periods encompass the growth stages when soil moisture is most important to winter wheat yield. Other significant results are reported.

  4. Integration of microwave termination based on TaN thin films on ferrite substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dainan; Ji, Liang; Kolodzey, James

    2015-10-01

    Integration of microwave discrete devices such as isolators and circulators is highly desired for radar and communication platforms and in particular as components used in transmit and receive (T/R) modules. In those applications, Tantalum nitride (TaN) films are widely used as a surface mounted termination to improve the reliability and performance. In the current work, TaN thin films were directly deposited on polycrystalline ferrite substrate (Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4) to be integrated with isolators or circulators. The deposition conditions were first optimized to obtain suitable sheet resistance and near zero temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR). Next a 50 Ω microwave termination was designed and fabricated using standard photolithography techniques. Broadband measurements show that the terminator has a low voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) of less than 1.20 in the frequency range of DC-20 GHz. The measured resistance was between 48 and 54 Ω.

  5. Annealing effects on the microwave linewidth broadening of FeCuNbSiB ferromagnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, M. J. P.; Gonzalez-Chavez, D. E.; Sommer, R. L.; Bohn, F.

    2015-03-28

    We systematically investigate the annealing effects on the microwave linewidth broadening of FeCuNbSiB ferromagnetic films with thickness of 100 nm. We correlate the non-uniform residual stress obtained from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements with the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth due to effective field inhomogeneities measured from broadband ferromagnetic resonance absorption measurements. We also estimate the annealing temperature effect on the Gilbert and two-magnon scattering contributions to the total ferromagnetic resonance FMR linewidth. We show that the effective field inhomogeneities constitute the main contribution to the microwave linewidth, while this contribution is related to the non-uniform residual stress in the films which is reduced by thermal annealing.

  6. The Passive Microwave Neural Network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR) for AMSU/MHS and ATMS cross-track scanning radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano', Paolo; Casella, Daniele; Panegrossi, Giulia; Cinzia Marra, Anna; Dietrich, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Spaceborne microwave cross-track scanning radiometers, originally developed for temperature and humidity sounding, have shown great capabilities to provide a significant contribution in precipitation monitoring both in terms of measurement quality and spatial/temporal coverage. The Passive microwave Neural network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR) algorithm for cross-track scanning radiometers, originally developed for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit/Microwave Humidity Sounder (AMSU-A/MHS) radiometers (on board the European MetOp and U.S. NOAA satellites), was recently newly designed to exploit the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on board the Suomi-NPP satellite and the future JPSS satellites. The PNPR algorithm is based on the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach. The main PNPR-ATMS algorithm changes with respect to PNPR-AMSU/MHS are the design and implementation of a new ANN able to manage the information derived from the additional ATMS channels (respect to the AMSU-A/MHS radiometer) and a new screening procedure for not-precipitating pixels. In order to achieve maximum consistency of the retrieved surface precipitation, both PNPR algorithms are based on the same physical foundation. The PNPR is optimized for the European and the African area. The neural network was trained using a cloud-radiation database built upon 94 cloud-resolving simulations over Europe and the Mediterranean and over the African area and radiative transfer model simulations of TB vectors consistent with the AMSU-A/MHS and ATMS channel frequencies, viewing angles, and view-angle dependent IFOV sizes along the scan projections. As opposed to other ANN precipitation retrieval algorithms, PNPR uses a unique ANN that retrieves the surface precipitation rate for all types of surface backgrounds represented in the training database, i.e., land (vegetated or arid), ocean, snow/ice or coast. This approach prevents different precipitation estimates from being inconsistent with one

  7. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-12-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed. PMID:27644241

  8. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed.

  9. Thin Film Multilayer Conductor/Ferroelectric Tunable Microwave Components for Communication Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; VanKeuls, Frederick W.; Mueller, Carl H.; Treece, Randolph E.; Rivkin, Tania V.

    1997-01-01

    High Temperature Superconductor/Ferroelectric (HTS/FE ) thin film multilayered structures deposited onto dielectric substrates are currently being investigated for use in low loss, tunable microwave components for satellite and ground based communications. The main goal for this technology is to achieve maximum tunability while keeping the microwave losses as low as possible, so as to avoid performance degradation when replacing conventional technology (e.g., filters and oscillators) with HTS/FE components. Therefore, for HTS/FE components to be successfully integrated into current working systems, full optimization of the material and electrical properties of the ferroelectric films, without degrading those of the HTS film; is required. Hence, aspects such as the appropriate type of ferroelectric and optimization of the deposition conditions (e.g., deposition temperature) should be carefully considered. The tunability range as well as the microwave losses of the desired varactor (i.e., tunable component) are also dependent on the geometry chosen (e.g., parallel plate capacitor, interdigital capacitor, coplanar waveguide, etc.). In addition, the performance of the circuit is dependent on the location of the varactor in the circuit and the biasing circuitry. In this paper, we will present our results on the study of the SrTiO3/YBa2Cu3O(7-delta)/LaAl03 (STO/YBCO/LAO) and the Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3/YBa2Cu3O(7-delta)/LaAl03(BSTO/YBCO/ILAO) HTS/FE multilayered structures. We have observed that the amount of variation of the dielectric constant upon the application of a dc electric field is closely related to the microstructure of the film. The largest tuning of the STO/YBCO/LAO structure corresponded to single-phased, epitaxial STO films deposited at 800 C and with a thickness of 500 nm. Higher temperatures resulted in interfacial degradation and poor film quality, while lower deposition temperatures resulted in films with lower dielectric constants, lower tunabilities, and

  10. Optical properties of integrated multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allibe, J.; Bougot-Robin, K.; Jacquet, E.; Infante, I. C.; Fusil, S.; Carrétéro, C.; Reverchon, J.-L.; Marcilhac, B.; Creté, D.; Mage, J.-C.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.

    2010-05-01

    BiFeO3 is the prototypical multiferroic and one of the few with both (anti)ferroic ordering temperatures above 300 K. While its magnetic and ferroelectric properties and their coupling have been investigated intensely, offering opportunities in spintronics, little is known concerning its optical properties and their coupling to the ferroic orders. For applications in the microwave range, we report on the integration of BiFeO3 onto low permittivity substrates. Such integrated films show good ferroelectric and optical properties consistent with those of films grown on SrTiO3 substrates. Prospects for the use of BiFeO3 in optical applications are discussed.

  11. Quantitative measurement of piezoelectric coefficient of thin film using a scanning evanescent microwave microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenli; Luo, Zhenlin; Liu, Chihui; Wu, Wenbin; Gao, Chen; Lu, Yalin

    2008-06-01

    This article describes a new approach to quantitatively measure the piezoelectric coefficients of thin films at the microscopic level using a scanning evanescent microwave microscope. This technique can resolve 10pm deformation caused by the piezoelectric effect and has the advantages of high scanning speed, large scanning area, submicron spatial resolution, and a simultaneous accessibility to many other related properties. Results from the test measurements on the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of PZT thin film agree well with those from other techniques listed in literatures.

  12. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular Passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajachidambaram, Meena Suhanya; Pandey, Archana; Vilayur Ganapathy, Subramanian; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S.

    2013-10-21

    The role of back channel surface chemistry on amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) bottom gate thin film transistors (TFT) have been characterized by positive bias-stress measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Positive bias-stress turn-on voltage shifts for ZTO-TFTs were significantly reduced by passivation of back channel surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of n-hexylphosphonic acid (n-HPA) when compared to ZTO-TFTs with no passivation. These results indicate that adsorption of molecular species on exposed back channel of ZTO-TFTs strongly influence observed turn-on voltage shifts, as opposed to charge injection into the dielectric or trapping due to oxygen vacancies.

  13. Thin Film Interference: An Experiment with Microwaves and Paraffin Oil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Anna, Michele; Corridoni, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Thin film interference manifests itself in a wide range of visually pleasing situations in everyday life (in the colored effects caused by a drop of oil on water, in soap bubbles, etc.) and is also involved in important technical applications (semi-reflecting mirrors, anti-reflection lenses, etc.). Yet, despite its familiarity, high school…

  14. A study on the nonlinear microwave electrodynamic response of e-beam evaporated MgB2 superconducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreone, A.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Salluzzo, M.; Purnell, A.; Cohen, L. F.; Hao, L.; Gallop, J.; Cantoni, C.; Paranthaman, M.

    2003-02-01

    We present a study on the temperature and field dependence of the microwave surface impedance Zs in thin films of the superconducting MgB2 compound. Samples were prepared by e-beam evaporation of boron on r-plane sapphire followed by an ex situ annealing in Mg vapour. Critical temperature values range between 26 and 38 K. Surface impedance measurements (Zs = Rs + iXs) were performed from 2 K close to Tc in the microwave region up to 20 GHz via parallel plate or dielectrically loaded resonators in 'symmetric' (two MgB2 films) and asymmetric (an MgB2 film and a commercial YBCO control film) configurations. At high microwave power, frequency domain measurements show a characteristic signature associated with weak links and this appears to be the limiting factor governing the performance of these films.

  15. Migration of polyisobutylene from polyethylene/polyisobutylene films into foods during domestic and microwave oven use.

    PubMed

    Castle, L; Nichol, J; Gilbert, J

    1992-01-01

    Migration of polyisobutylene from polyethylene/polyisobutylene film into foods has been studied in domestic applications such as wrapping of foods and reheating in a microwave oven. The results of these migration studies were obtained by direct measurement using newly developed analytical methods utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infra-red (IR) spectroscopy as well as predictively from assessment of loss of polyisobutylene from the film. Total levels of polyisobutylene migration into cheese were found to be 8-10 mg/kg, into cake 1-5 mg/kg, and into sandwiches ranged from < 1 to 4 mg/kg. Reheating foods covered with film in the microwave oven, gave migration levels ranging from < 0.01 mg/kg for contact with steam only, up to 0.5 mg/kg for severe splashing of food onto the film and 4 mg/kg for reheated pizza. Migration of polyisobutylene was shown to be skewed towards the low molecular weight fraction of the additive. In typical films, the molecular weight range of polyisobutylene was shown to be 300-6000 daltons (95% limits) centred on 1300 daltons, whereas the additive that had migrated into cheese was found to range from 130-2200 daltons, centred on 520 daltons.

  16. The correlation of active and passive microwave data for the Skylab S-193 sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the correlation analysis of the Skylab S-193 13.9 GHz Radiometer/Scatterometer data. Computer analysis of the S-193 data shows more than 50 percent of the radiometer and scatterometer data are uncorrelated. The correlation coefficients computed for the data gathered over various ground scenes indicates the desirability of using both active and passive sensors for the determination of various Earth phenomena.

  17. The Correlation of Active and Passive Microwave Outputs for the Skylab S-193 Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, K.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the correlation analysis of the Skylab S-193 13.9 GHz Radiometer/Scatterometer data. Computer analysis of the S-193 data shows more than 50 percent of the radiometer and scatterometer data are uncorrelated. The correlation coefficients computed for the data gathered over various ground scenes indicates the desirability of using both active and passive sensors for the determination of various Earth phenomena.

  18. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth's surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  19. High temperature superconductive microwave technology for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.; Connolly, D. J.; Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress being made on space application technology research on film fabrication, passive microwave circuits, and semiconductor devices for cryogenic circuits is reviewed. Achievements in YBCO and TCBCO films are addressed along with circuit evaluations of microstrip resonators, phase shifters, microstrip filters, dielectric resonator filters, and superconducting antennas.

  20. Thin Film Interference: An Experiment with Microwaves and Paraffin Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, Michele; Corridoni, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    Thin film interference manifests itself in a wide range of visually pleasing situations in everyday life (in the colored effects caused by a drop of oil on water, in soap bubbles, etc.) and is also involved in important technical applications (semi-reflecting mirrors, anti-reflection lenses, etc.). Yet, despite its familiarity, high school students are rarely asked to consider this common phenomenon, in particular from an experimental point of view.

  1. Sequentially evaporated thin Y-Ba-Co-O superconducting films on microwave substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valco, G. J.; Rohrer, N. J.; Warner, J. D.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high T sub c superconducting thin films on various microwave substrates is of major interest in space electronic systems. Thin films of YBa2Cu3O(7-Delta) were formed on SrTiO3, MgO, ZrO2 coated Al2O3, and LaAlO3 substrates by multi-layer sequential evaporation and subsequent annealing in oxygen. The technique allows controlled deposition of Cu, BaF2 and Y layers, as well as the ZrO buffer layers, to achieve reproducibility for microwave circuit fabrication. The three layer structure of Cu/BaF2/Y is repeated a minimum of four times. The films were annealed in an ambient of oxygen bubbled through water at temperatures between 850 C and 900 C followed by slow cooling (-2 C/minute) to 450 C, a low temperature anneal, and slow cooling to room temperature. Annealing times ranged from 15 minutes to 5 hrs. at high temperature and 0 to 6 hr. at 450 C. Silver contacts for four probe electrical measurements were formed by evaporation followed with an anneal at 500 C. The films were characterized by resistance-temperature measurements, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. Critical transition temperatures ranged from 30 K to 87 K as a function of the substrate, composition of the film, thicknesses of the layers, and annealing conditions. Microwave ring resonator circuits were also patterned on these MgO and LaAlO3 substrates.

  2. Antarctic snow and sea ice processes: Effects on passive microwave emissions and AMSR-E sea ice products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Michael John, Jr.

    In this research, passive microwave remote sensing products generated for the Antarctic sea ice zone from the Advance Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) sensor were compared with various in situ field measurements, both from previous Antarctic campaigns in the published literature and as obtained during the Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA) project during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007--2008. Data gathered during the SIMBA project was used to understand the geophysical processes occurring in the sea ice and snow cover of the Bellingshausen Sea and to provide a physical basis for modeling of microwave emissions. In Chapter 2, the AMSR-E sea ice temperature product was compared with AMSR-E snow depth product and previous in situ field measurements. The comparisons were not intended to provide a strict validation of remote sensing products, but to evaluate the physical context of the remotely sensed data and examine potential trends. From examination of the data, it was found that the AMSR-E sea ice temperature product conflicted with several generally observed sea ice properties. The apparent contradictory behavior of the satellite data product is indicative of radiative temperature behavior related to changes in emissivity within the ice pack. Further comparisons of the AMSR-E sea ice temperature product with in situ temperature data from Ice Mass-balance Buoys (IMB) from two Antarctic field programs showed no correlation. However, apparent response of sea ice temperature product to snow/ice interface flooding events was noted. In Chapter 3, an important sea ice process related to the formation of "gap layers" within Antarctic sea ice was examined and modeled. Gap layers are horizontal voids that develop internally within the sea ice structure, often filled with decaying sea ice, saline slush, and a microbial biological community that thrives on the available nutrients. Gap layers are commonly observed in summer melt

  3. Passive Chemiresistor Sensor Based on Iron (II) Phthalocyanine Thin Films for Monitoring of Nitrogen Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, John Hungjen

    In this dissertation, an alternate, new approach was investigated to produce a nonreversible, passive, iron (II) phthalocyanine (FePc) thin film sensor that does not require continuous power for operation. The sensor was manufactured using standard microelectronics fabrication procedures, with emphasis on low cost and sensor consistency. The sensor substrate consists of a gold interdigitated electrode pattern deposited on an oxidized silicon or quartz wafer. The FePc thin film is then vacuum sublimed over the interdigitated electrodes to form the finalized sensor. Different thicknesses and morphologies of FePc thin films were fabricated. Once sensor fabrication was accomplished, the general response, temperature dependence, concentration dependence, specificity, and longevity of FePc thin film sensors were investigated. To evaluate general sensor reponse, sensors were exposed to 100 ppm nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen, with a flow rate of 0.25 liters per minute (L/min), at the temperatures of -46, 20, and 71 °C. For each case, the resistance of the sensor decreased exponentially as a function of exposure duration and reached saturation within 25 minutes. The resistance decrease was measured to be four, three, and two orders of magnitude for the exposure temperatures of -46, 20, and 71 .C respectively. In these experiments, sub-zero temperature detection of nitrogen dioxide with FePc thin films was reported for the first time. It was found that the response at -46 °C was greater than at 20 or 71 °C. To evaluate temperature dependence, sensors were thermal cycled in the range of -50 to 80 °C, first under ultra-high purity nitrogen gas at 0.25 L/min, and then under 100 ppm nitrogen dioxide gas at 0.25 L/min. Intrinsic FePc film conductivity was measured by thermal cycling sensors under nitrogen gas. Extrinsic FePc film conductivity was measured by thermal cycling sensors under nitrogen dioxide gas. Results from these tests indicated that the temperature dependence of

  4. The effect of row structure on soil moisture retrieval accuracy from passive microwave data.

    PubMed

    Xingming, Zheng; Kai, Zhao; Yangyang, Li; Jianhua, Ren; Yanling, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB) of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture and evaluate if there is a need to introduce this effect into the inversion model, two ground-based experiments were carried out in 2011. Based on the observed C-band TB, field soil and vegetation parameters, row structure rough surface assumption (Q p model and discrete model), including the effect of row structure, and flat rough surface assumption (Q p model), ignoring the effect of row structure, are used to model microwave TB of soil surface. Then, soil moisture can be retrieved, respectively, by minimizing the difference of the measured and modeled TB. The results show that soil moisture retrieval accuracy based on the row structure rough surface assumption is approximately 0.02 cm(3)/cm(3) better than the flat rough surface assumption for vegetated soil, as well as 0.015 cm(3)/cm(3) better for bare and wet soil. This result indicates that the effect of row structure cannot be ignored for accurately retrieving soil moisture of farmland surface when C-band is used.

  5. Active and Passive Microwave Determination of the Circulation and Characteristics of Weddell and Ross Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Liu, Xiang

    2000-01-01

    A combination of satellite microwave data sets are used in conjunction with ECMWF (Medium Range Weather Forecasts) and NCEP (National Center for Environment Prediction) meteorological analysis fields to investigate seasonal variability in the circulation and sea-ice dynamics of the Weddell and Ross Seas. Results of sea-ice tracking using SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager), Scatterometer and SAR images are combined with in-situ data derived from Argos buoys and GPS drifters to validate observed drift patterns. Seasonal 3-month climatologies of ice motion and drift speed variance illustrate the response of the sea-ice system to seasonal forcing. A melt-detection algorithm is used to track the onset of seasonal melt, and to determine the extent and duration of atmospherically-led surface melting during austral summer. Results show that wind-driven drift regulates the seasonal distribution and characteristics of sea-ice and the intensity of the cyclonic Gyre circulation in these two regions.

  6. Comparisons of Arctic In-Situ Snow and Ice Data with Airborne Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, T.; Cavalien, D. J.; Gasiewski, A.; Sturm, M.; Klein, M.; Maslanik, J.; Stroeve, J.; Heinrichs, J.; Holmgren, J.; Irisov, V.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the AMSR-E sea ice validation campaign in March 2003, aircraft flights over the Arctic sea ice were coordinated with ground measurements of snow and sea ice properties. The surface-based measurements were in the vicinity of Barrow, AK, and at a Navy ice camp located in the Beaufort Sea. The NASA P-3 aircraft was equipped with the NOAA ETL PSR microwave radiometer that has the same frequencies as the AMSR-E sensor. The goal was to validate the standard AMSR-E products ice temperature and snow depth on sea ice. Ground measurements are the only way to validate these parameters. The higher spatial resolution of the PSR instrument (between 30 and 500 m, depending on altitude) enables a better comparison between ground measurements and microwave data because of the expected smaller spatial variability. Maps of PSR data can then be used for further down-scaling to AMSR-E pixel areas. Initial results show a good qualitative agreement between the in-situ snow depths and the PSR data. Detailed studies are underway and latest results will be presented.

  7. Estimation of Soil Moisture Profile using a Simple Hydrology Model and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soman, Vishwas V.; Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles; Tsegaye, Teferi

    1998-01-01

    Soil moisture is an important component of analysis in many Earth science disciplines. Soil moisture information can be obtained either by using microwave remote sensing or by using a hydrologic model. In this study, we combined these two approaches to increase the accuracy of profile soil moisture estimation. A hydrologic model was used to analyze the errors in the estimation of soil moisture using the data collected during Huntsville '96 microwave remote sensing experiment in Huntsville, Alabama. Root mean square errors (RMSE) in soil moisture estimation increase by 22% with increase in the model input interval from 6 hr to 12 hr for the grass-covered plot. RMSEs were reduced for given model time step by 20-50% when model soil moisture estimates were updated using remotely-sensed data. This methodology has a potential to be employed in soil moisture estimation using rainfall data collected by a space-borne sensor, such as the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, if remotely-sensed data are available to update the model estimates.

  8. Passive amplification of the pyroelectric current in thin films on a heat-conducting substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonskii, S. V.; Soto-Bustamante, E. A.

    2010-11-15

    We show both theoretically and experimentally that passive amplification of the pyroelectric current takes place when modulated radiation is recorded by a pyroelectric detector in some range of modulation frequencies. The amplification effect manifests itself in the fact that the current generated by a thin pyroelectric film lying on a massive heat-conducting substrate exceeds that in a freely suspended film. We use a ferroelectric 70:30 P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer, a crystalline guanidine pyroelectric, and a 70:30 composition of an achiral liquid-crystal polymer and its monomer PM6R14n-M6R14n to illustrate the frequency dependence of the pyroelectric current.

  9. Atomic scale design and control of cation distribution in hexagonal ferrites for passive and tunable microwave magnetic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiler, Anton L.

    A vast body of knowledge on the structure and properties of hexagonal ferrites has been accumulated in the last sixty years driven in part by the technological significance of these materials in diverse applications, such as permanent magnets, microwave devices, and magnetic recording media. In this work, the Alternating Target Laser Ablation Deposition (ATLAD) technique is applied in the growth of epitaxial hexagonal ferrite films. As a result, unique magnetic properties, including 50 degrees increase in the Neel temperature and 20% increase in the saturation magnetization compared to conventionally prepared materials, are realized by controlling the cation distribution at the atomic scale. Lowest energy distributions resulting from the localization of Mn cations in the spinel block of the hexagonal M-type unit cell were theoretically determined by ab-initio calculations. ATLAD deposition routine was designed to deposit epitaxial thin films with the cation distribution identified by ab-initio calculations. The films were fully characterized in terms of composition, crystal structure, surface morphology, static and dynamic magnetic properties, and cation distribution. Enhanced magnetic moment (+20%) and Neel temperature (+50 K) were measured in the films. These improved magnetic properties were correlated with the occupation and valence of specific interstitial sites by Mn cations, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The localization of Mn cations in 4fIV and 12k sublattices has fundamentally modified superexchange interactions in the unit cell, as confirmed by spinwave resonance measurements. A novel approach to the design of tunable microwave devices based on hexagonal and cubic ferrites by taking advantage of the magnetoelectric effect is presented. The proposed planar and compact devices, including phase shifters and filters, were designed in microstrip geometry with low magnetic bias field requirements. The devices were designed and simulated using

  10. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  11. Differing morphologies of textured diamond films with electrical properties made with microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wen Chi; Wu, Yu-Shiang; Chang, Hou-Cheng; Lee, Yuan-Haun

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the orientation of textured diamond films produced through microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at 1200 W, 110 Torr, CH 4/H 2 = 1/20, with depositions times of 0.5-4.0 h. After a growth period of 2.0-4.0 h, this particular morphology revealed a rectangular structure stacked regularly on the diamond film. The orientation on {1 1 1}-textured diamond films grew a preferred orientation of {1 1 0} on the surface, as measured by XRD. The formation of the diamond epitaxial film formed textured octahedrons in ball shaped (or cauliflower-like) diamonds in the early stages (0.5 h), and the surface of the diamond film extended to pile the rectangular structure at 4.0 h. The width of the tier was approximately 200 nm at the 3.0 h point of deposition, according to TEM images. The results revealed that the textured diamond films showed two different morphological structures (typical ball shaped and rectangular diamonds), at different stages of the deposition period. The I- V characteristics of the oriented diamond films after 4.0 h of deposition time showed good conformity with the ohmic contact.

  12. Nondestructive microwave permittivity characterization of ferroelectric thin film using microstrip dual resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. Y.; Chen, Linfeng; Chong, K. B.; Ong, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the use of a microstrip dual resonator for nondestructive permittivity characterization of a ferroelectric thin film at microwave frequencies. The dual-resonator measurement fixture consists mainly of two capacitively coupled microstrip resonators, with the ferroelectric thin film covering the gap between the two resonators. The dielectric constant and loss tangent of the ferroelectric thin film are derived from the resonant frequencies and quality factors of the dual-resonator structure. To study the electric field dependence of the ferroelectric thin film, direct current bias voltage is applied through two electrode pads on the microstrip circuit. The temperature dependence of a ferroelectric thin film was also studied using the hermetic test fixture. The measurement uncertainty of this method comes mainly from the air gap between the microstrip circuit and the ferroelectric thin film. Calibration with a sample of known dielectric constant can be used to compensate for such an error. We demonstrated the use of this method on a piece of the Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 thin film deposited on a LaAlO3 substrate.

  13. Oxide perovskite crystals for HTSC film substrates microwave applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhalla, A. S.; Guo, Ruyan

    1995-01-01

    The research focused upon generating new substrate materials for the deposition of superconducting yttrium barium cuprate (YBCO) has yielded several new hosts in complex perovskites, modified perovskites, and other structure families. New substrate candidates such as Sr(Al(1/2)Ta(1/2))O3 and Sr(Al(1/2)Nb(1/2))O3, Ba(Mg(1/3)Ta(2/3))O3 in complex oxide perovskite structure family and their solid solutions with ternary perovskite LaAlO3 and NdGaO3 are reported. Conventional ceramic processing techniques were used to fabricate dense ceramic samples. A laser heated molten zone growth system was utilized for the test-growth of these candidate materials in single crystal fiber form to determine crystallographic structure, melting point, thermal, and dielectric properties as well as to make positive identification of twin free systems. Some of those candidate materials present an excellent combination of properties suitable for microwave HTSC substrate applications.

  14. Simulations of emissivity in passive microwave remote sensing with three-dimensional numerical solutions of Maxwell equations and fast algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin

    In the first part of the work, we developed coding for large-scale computation to solve 3-dimensional microwave scattering problem. Maxwell integral equations are solved by using MoM with RWG basis functions in conjunction with fast computation algorithms. The cost-effective solutions of parallel and distributed simulation were implemented on a low cost PC cluster, which consists of 32 processors connected to a fast Ethernet switch. More than a million of surface current unknowns were solved at unprecedented speeds. Accurate simulations of emissivities and bistatic coefficients from ocean and soil were achieved. Exponential correlation function and ocean spectrum are implementd for generating soil and ocean surfaces. They have fine scale features with large rms slope. The results were justified by comparison with numerical results from original code, which is based on pulse basis function, and from analytic methods like SPM, and also with experiments. In the second part of the work, fully polarimetric microwave emissions from wind-generated foam-covered ocean surfaces were investigated. The foam is treated as densely packed air bubbles coated with thin seawater coating. The absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of solutionsof Maxwell equations of a collection of coated particles. The effects of boundary roughness of ocean surfaces were included by using the second-order small perturbation method (SPM) describing the reflection coefficients between foam and ocean. An empirical wave-number spectrum was used to represent the small-scale wind-generated sea surfaces. The theoretical results of four Stokes brightness temperatures with typical parameters of foam in passive remote sensing at 10.8 GHz, 19.0 GHz and 36.5 GHz were illustrated. The azimuth variations of polarimetric brightness temperature were calculated. Emission with various wind speed and foam layer thickness was studied. The results were also compared

  15. Fiscal Year 2004 Summary Report: General Corrosion and Passive Film Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, C A; Gray, J; Hayes, J; Wong, L; Rebak, R; Carroll, S; Harper, J; Gdowski, G

    2004-12-09

    This report summarizes both general corrosion Alloy 22 from 60 to 220 C and the stability of the passive film from 60 to 90 C over a range of solution compositions that are relevant to the in in-drift chemical environment at the waste package surface. The general corrosion rates were determined by weightloss measurements in a range of complex solutions representing the evaporation of seepage water and more concentrated brines representing brines formed by the deliquescence of dust deposited on the canisters. These data represent the first weightloss measurements performed by the program at temperatures above 90 C. The low corrosion rates of Alloy 22 are attributed to the protective oxide film that forms at the metal surface. In this report, changes in the oxide composition are correlated with weightloss at the higher temperatures (140 related 140-220 C) where film characterization had not been previously performed. The stability of the oxide film was further analyzed by conducted a series of electrochemical tests in progressively more aggressive acid solutions to measure the general corrosion rates in solutions that mimic crevice or pit environments.

  16. Passive wireless strain and pH sensing using carbon nanotube-gold nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Lynch, Jerome P.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2007-04-01

    The recent development of wireless sensors for structural health monitoring has revealed their strong dependency on portable, limited battery supplies. Unlike current wireless sensors, passive radio frequency identification (RFID) systems based on inductive coupling can wirelessly receive power from a portable reader while transmitting collected data back. In this paper, preliminary results of a novel inductively coupled strain and corrosion sensor based upon material fabrication techniques from the nanotechnology field are presented. By varying polyelectrolyte species during a layer-by-layer fabrication process, carbon nanotube-polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film sensors sensitive to different mechanical (e.g. strain) and chemical (e.g. pH) stimuli can be produced. Validation studies conducted with different carbon nanotube thin films designed as either strain or pH sensors reveal high sensitivity and linear performance. When coupled with a copper inductive coil antenna, resulting RFID-based sensors exhibit wirelessly readable changes in resonant frequency and bandwidth. Furthermore, a carbon nanotube-gold nanocomposite thin film is fabricated and patterned into a highly conductive coil structure to realize a novel thin film inductive antenna. Preliminary results indicate that nanotube-gold nanocomposites exhibit resonance conditions, holding great promise for future RFID applications.

  17. Recent glacier surface snowpack melt in Novaya Zemlya and Severnaya Zemlya derived from active and passive microwave remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng

    The warming rate in the Russian High Arctic (RHA) (36˜158°E, 73˜82°N) is outpacing the pan-Arctic average, and its effect on the small glaciers across this region needs further examination. The temporal variation and spatial distribution of surface melt onset date (MOD) and total melt days (TMD) throughout the Novaya Zemlya (NovZ) and Severnaya Zemlya (SevZ) archipelagoes serve as good indicators of ice mass ablation and glacier response to regional climate change in the RHA. However, due to the harsh environment, long-term glaciological observations are limited, necessitating the application of remotely sensed data to study the surface melt dynamics. The high sensitivity to liquid water and the ability to work without solar illumination and penetrate non-precipitating clouds make microwave remote sensing an ideal tool to detect melt in this region. This work extracts resolution-enhanced passive and active microwave data from different periods and retrieves a decadal melt record for NovZ and SevZ. The high correlation among passive and active data sets instills confidence in the results. The mean MOD is June 20th on SevZ and June 10th on NovZ during the period of 1992-2012. The average TMDs are 47 and 67 days on SevZ and NovZ from 1995 to 2011, respectively. NovZ had large interannual variability in the MOD, but its TMD generally increased. SevZ MOD is found to be positively correlated to local June reanalysis air temperature at 850hPa geopotential height and occurs significantly earlier (˜0.73 days/year, p-value < 0.01) from 1992 to 2011. SevZ also experienced a longer TMD trend (˜0.75 days/year, p-value < 0.05) from 1995 to 2011. Annual mean TMD on both islands are positively correlated with regional summer mean reanalysis air temperature and negatively correlated to local sea ice extent. These strong correlations might suggest that the Russian High Arctic glaciers are vulnerable to the continuously diminishing sea ice extent, the associated air temperature

  18. Integrating passive microwave remotely sensed imagery and gridded atmospheric data: A study of North American Prairie snow cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derksen, Christopher Peter

    Terrestrial snow cover is an important climatological variable because of its influence on the surface radiative balance, and a significant hydrological variable as it acts as the frozen storage term in the water balance. Satellite passive-microwave imagery has been used as a source of snow cover information because of all-weather imaging capabilities, rapid scene revisit time, and the ability to derive quantitative estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE). In this study, ten winter seasons (December, January, February 1988/89 to 1997/98) of five day averaged (pentad) passive-microwave derived SWE imagery are utilized to examine the seasonal snow cover characteristics of a ground-validated North American Prairie study area. Four dominant patterns are identified within the DeltaSWE time series. The positive (negative) phase of PC1 captures a pattern of widespread SWE ablation (accumulation) in the south with accumulation (ablation) to the north. The positive (negative) phase of PC2 characterizes a meridional accumulation (ablation) zone oriented from the northwest to southeast of the study area. The positive (negative) phase of PC3 indicates a regional melt event (accumulation event) in the lee of the Rocky Mountains. Finally, the positive (negative) phase of PC4 characterizes increasing (decreasing) SWE in the vicinity of the Red River Valley. National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) gridded atmospheric data (500 mb geopotential height; 700 mb temperature) and model produced isentropic potential vorticity (IPV) fields are investigated in conjunction with the first four DeltaSWE principal components to identify whether consistency exists in the atmospheric patterns associated, at no time lag, with these dominant DeltaSWE modes. When a deep eastern Arctic low with an associated trough extends over the continental interior of North America, snow accumulation is the expected response (as characterized DeltaSWE PC1 positive, PC2 positive, and PC4 positive

  19. SAR and passive microwave observations of the Odden during Mizex '87

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Laura L.; Shuchman, Robert A.; Gloersen, Per; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Johannessen, Ola M.

    1989-01-01

    The Odden, a protuberance of sea ice in the Greenland Sea Basin, was studied using the NIMBUS-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) satellite and an X-band (3 cm) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) aircraft. The sea ice, meteorological, and oceanographic conditions within the northern portion of the Odden were also studied in March and April 1987. The SMMR data, which were first validated with in situ ship measurements and the SAR data, showed rapid 2-4 day oscillations of the Odden ice edge. The oscillations at 74-75 deg N were several hundred kilometers in extent. The rapid oscillation of the Odden does not appear to be a result of wind-induced ice drift, but rather results from the rapid formation of thin ice off the main ice edge.

  20. An extended Kalman-Bucy filter for atmospheric temperature profile retrieval with a passive microwave sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledsham, W. H.; Staelin, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    An extended Kalman-Bucy filter has been implemented for atmospheric temperature profile retrievals from observations made using the Scanned Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS) instrument carried on the Nimbus 6 satellite. This filter has the advantage that it requires neither stationary statistics in the underlying processes nor linear production of the observed variables from the variables to be estimated. This extended Kalman-Bucy filter has yielded significant performance improvement relative to multiple regression retrieval methods. A multi-spot extended Kalman-Bucy filter has also been developed in which the temperature profiles at a number of scan angles in a scanning instrument are retrieved simultaneously. These multi-spot retrievals are shown to outperform the single-spot Kalman retrievals.

  1. An Evaluation of Soil Moisture Retrievals Using Aircraft and Satellite Passive Microwave Observations during SMEX02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John D.; Lakshmi, Venkat

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Experiments conducted in Iowa in the summer of 2002 (SMEX02) had many remote sensing instruments that were used to study the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture. The sensors used in this paper (a subset of the suite of sensors) are the AQUA satellite-based AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- Earth Observing System) and the aircraft-based PSR (Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer). The SMEX02 design focused on the collection of near simultaneous brightness temperature observations from each of these instruments and in situ soil moisture measurements at field- and domain- scale. This methodology provided a basis for a quantitative analysis of the soil moisture remote sensing potential of each instrument using in situ comparisons and retrieved soil moisture estimates through the application of a radiative transfer model. To this end, the two sensors are compared with respect to their estimation of soil moisture.

  2. Calibration of Passive Microwave Polarimeters that Use Hybrid Coupler-Based Correlators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Four calibration algorithms are studied for microwave polarimeters that use hybrid coupler-based correlators: 1) conventional two-look of hot and cold sources, 2) three looks of hot and cold source combinations, 3) two-look with correlated source, and 4) four-look combining methods 2 and 3. The systematic errors are found to depend on the polarimeter component parameters and accuracy of calibration noise temperatures. A case study radiometer in four different remote sensing scenarios was considered in light of these results. Applications for Ocean surface salinity, Ocean surface winds, and soil moisture were found to be sensitive to different systematic errors. Finally, a standard uncertainty analysis was performed on the four-look calibration algorithm, which was found to be most sensitive to the correlated calibration source.

  3. The Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture: the Effect of Tilled Row Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Newton, R. W.; Rouse, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The tilled rowstructure is known to be one of the important factors affecting the observations of the microwave emission from a natural surface. Measurements of this effect were carried out with both I and X band radiometers mounted on a mobile truck on a bare 40 m x 45 m row tilled field. The soil moisture content during the measurements ranged from approximately 10 percent to approximately 30 percent by dry weight. The results of these measurements showed that the variations of the antenna temperatures with incident angle theta changed with the azimuthal angle a measured from the row direction. A numerical calculation based on a composite surface roughness was made and found to predict the observed features within the model's limit of accuracy. It was concluded that the difference between the horizontally and vertically polarized temperatures was due to the change in the local angle of field emission within the antenna field of view caused by the large scale row structure.

  4. Passive microwave mapping of ice thickness. Final Report. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apinis, J. J.; Peake, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    Basic calculations are presented for evaluating the feasibility of a scanning microwave radiometer system for mapping the thickness of lake ice. An analytical model for the apparent brightness temperature as a function of ice thickness has been developed, and elaborated to include such variables as galactic and atmospheric noise, aspect angle, polarization, temperature gradient in the ice, the presence of transition layers such as snow, slush, and water, increased loss due to air inclusions in the ice layer, and the presence of multiple ice thicknesses within the antenna footprint. It was found that brightness temperature measurements at six or seven frequencies in the range of 0.4 to 0.7 GHz were required to obtain unambiquous thickness estimates. A number of data processing methods were examined. The effects of antenna beamwidth, scanning rate, receiver bandwidth, noise figure, and integration time were studied.

  5. Topical cyclone rainfall characteristics as determined from a satellite passive microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Adler, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Data from the Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR-5) were used to calculate latent heat release and other rainfall parameters for over 70 satellite observations of 21 tropical cyclones in the tropical North Pacific Ocean. The results indicate that the ESMR-5 measurements can be useful in determining the rainfall characteristics of these storms and appear to be potentially useful in monitoring as well as predicting their intensity. The ESMR-5 derived total tropical cyclone rainfall estimates agree favorably with previous estimates for both the disturbance and typhoon stages. The mean typhoon rainfall rate (1.9 mm h(-1)) is approximately twice that of disturbances (1.1 mm h(-1)).

  6. Thermally evaporated SiO thin films as a versatile interlayer for plasma-based OLED passivation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Won Min; Jang, Jaeyoung; Nam, Sooji; Kim, Lae Ho; Seo, Sang Joon; Park, Chan Eon

    2012-06-27

    Silicon monoxide (SiO) thin films were introduced as an efficient interlayer for achieving plasma-based organic light-emitting diode (OLED) surface passivation. The SiO thin films could be consecutively formed via thermal evaporation, without breaking the vacuum, after deposition of the OLED cathode. The plasma resistivity and UV-blocking characteristics of the SiO interlayer protected the OLED devices against electrical and optical degradation during the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) passivation processes. In addition, the nonconformal deposition and hydroxyl group-rich surface characteristics of the SiO thin films yielded enhanced surface pinhole coverage and a higher initial film density in the subsequently deposited PEALD-based Al2O3 barrier film. As a result, the OLEDs with a SiO/Al2O3 bilayer passivation layer displayed a remarkably increased device shelf life compared to devices prepared using Al2O3-only passivation. A MOCON test showed that the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of the SiO/Al2O3 bilayer film was 0.0033 g/(m(2) day), 2.3 times lower than the rate of a single Al2O3 barrier film. The results of our study demonstrated the multipurpose role of a SiO interlayer in plasma-based OLED passivation. The layer acted as a damage-free protective layer for the underlying OLED devices and an assistant layer to improve the upper barrier film performance.

  7. Snowfall Rate Retrieval Using Passive Microwave Measurements and Its Applications in Weather Forecast and Hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Yan, Banghua; Zavodsky, Bradley; Zhao, Limin; Dong, Jun; Wang, Nai-Yu

    2015-01-01

    (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has also been developed. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. It employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derives the probability of snowfall. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model. A method adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The SFR products are being used mainly in two communities: hydrology and weather forecast. Global blended precipitation products traditionally do not include snowfall derived from satellites because such products were not available operationally in the past. The ATMS and AMSU/MHS SFR now provide the winter precipitation information for these blended precipitation products. Weather forecasters mainly rely on radar and station observations for snowfall forecast. The SFR products can fill in gaps where no conventional snowfall data are available to forecasters. The products can also be used to confirm radar and gauge snowfall data and increase forecasters' confidence in their prediction.

  8. Satellite passive microwave rain rate measurement over croplands during spring, summer and fall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Rain-rate algorithms for spring, summer and fall that have been developed from comparisons between the brightness temperatures measured by the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and rain rates derived from operational WSR-57 radars over land are described. Data were utilized from a total of 25 SMMR passes and 234 radars, resulting in about 12,000 observations of about 1600 sq/km areas. Multiple correlation coefficients of 0.63, 0.80 and 0.75 are achieved for the spring, summer and fall algorithms, respectively. Most of this information is in the form of multifrequency contrast in brightness temperature, which is interpreted as a measurement of the degree to which the land-emitted radiation is attenuated by the rain systems. The SMMR 37-GHz channel has more information on rain rate than any other channel. By combining the lower frequency channels with the 37-GHz observations, variations in land and precipitation thermometric temperatures can be removed, leaving rain attenuation as the major effect on brightness temperature. Polarization screening at 37 GHz is found to be sufficient to screen out cases of wet ground, which is only important when the ground is relatively vegetation free. Heavy rain cases are found to be significant part of the algorithms' success, because of the strong microwve signatures (low-brightness temperatures) that result from the presence of precipitation-sized ice in the upper portions of heavily precipitating storms. If IR data are combined with the summer microwave data, an improved (0.85) correlation with radar rain rates is achieved.

  9. Gradient-type modeling of the effects of plastic recovery and surface passivation in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxing; Kah Soh, Ai

    2016-08-01

    The elasto-plastic responses of thin films subjected to cyclic tension-compression loading and bending are studied, with a focus on Bauschinger and size effects. For this purpose, a model is established by incorporating plastic recovery into the strain gradient plasticity theory we proposed recently. Elastic and plastic parts of strain and strain gradient, which are determined by the elasto-plastic decomposition according to the associative rule, are assumed to have a degree of material-dependent reversibility. Based on the above assumption, a dislocation reversibility-dependent rule is built to describe evolutions of different deformation components under cyclic loadings. Furthermore, a simple strategy is provided to implement the passivated boundary effects by introducing a gradual change to relevant material parameters in the yield function. Based on this theory, both bulge and bending tests under cyclic loading conditions are investigated. By comparing the present predictions with the existing experimental data, it is found that the yield function is able to exhibit the size effect, the Bauschinger effect, the influence of surface passivation and the hysteresis-loop phenomenon. Thus, the proposed model is deemed helpful in studying plastic deformations of micron-scale films.

  10. Analytical and Electrochemical Study of Passive Films in Stainless Steels Subjected to Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiribabavi, Negin

    The objective of this research is to study the corrosion behavior of the stainless steel centrifugal contactor used in the spent nuclear fuel treatment process called UREX+ process. AISI type 304L stainless steel was suggested as the material of construction for this contactor. Corrosion of 304L stainless steel in three acidic aqueous solutions of 5.0M HNO3, 5.0M HNO 3 + 0.1M HF, and 5.0M HNO3 + 0.1M HF + 0.1M Zr4+ was studied. Immersion, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) corrosion tests were conducted at test temperatures of 25, 40, and 80°C and three different rotational speeds (0, 1000, 2000 rpm) in order to mimic the operating conditions of the centrifugal contactor. The results showed that the 5.0M HNO3 + 0.1M HF solution was the most corrosive environment as the fluoride ions dissolved the passive film present on the surface of the stainless steel. The addition of 0.1M Zr 4+ ions to this acidic mixture reduced the corrosion caused by HF to levels similar to those found in HNO3 solutions and allowed the stainless steel to preserve its passive film. Further addition of zirconium ion did not result in better corrosion resistance of the stainless steel. Besides, higher corrosion rates were obtained as the solutions temperatures increased while the hydrodynamic conditions had less significant effect on corrosion rates.

  11. Deconvoluting the mechanism of microwave annealing of block copolymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cong; Murphy, Jeffrey N; Harris, Kenneth D; Buriak, Jillian M

    2014-04-22

    The self-assembly of block copolymer (BCP) thin films is a versatile method for producing periodic nanoscale patterns with a variety of shapes. The key to attaining a desired pattern or structure is the annealing step undertaken to facilitate the reorganization of nanoscale phase-segregated domains of the BCP on a surface. Annealing BCPs on silicon substrates using a microwave oven has been shown to be very fast (seconds to minutes), both with and without contributions from solvent vapor. The mechanism of the microwave annealing process remains, however, unclear. This work endeavors to uncover the key steps that take place during microwave annealing, which enable the self-assembly process to proceed. Through the use of in situ temperature monitoring with a fiber optic temperature probe in direct contact with the sample, we have demonstrated that the silicon substrate on which the BCP film is cast is the dominant source of heating if the doping of the silicon wafer is sufficiently low. Surface temperatures as high as 240 °C are reached in under 1 min for lightly doped, high resistivity silicon wafers (n- or p-type). The influence of doping, sample size, and BCP composition was analyzed to rule out other possible mechanisms. In situ temperature monitoring of various polymer samples (PS, P2VP, PMMA, and the BCPs used here) showed that the polymers do not heat to any significant extent on their own with microwave irradiation of this frequency (2.45 GHz) and power (∼600 W). It was demonstrated that BCP annealing can be effectively carried out in 60 s on non-microwave-responsive substrates, such as highly doped silicon, indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass, glass, and Kapton, by placing a piece of high resistivity silicon wafer in contact with the sample-in this configuration, the silicon wafer is termed the heating element. Annealing and self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) and polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS

  12. Feasibility study of ferromagnetic/ferroelectric films for enhanced microwave devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ijiri, Yumi

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes exploratory work conducted to assess the feasibility of ferromagnetic/ferroelectric films for next-generation microwave devices. From literature review, it is established that while an increasing number of ferroelectric/ferromagnetic composites are being investigated, a number have transition temperatures that are too low and structures that are not robust enough for low cost, room temperature antenna arrays. On the other hand, several promising systems are identified, including the multiferroic BiFeO3 and a composite system of Ba/SrTiO3 and a related perovskite manganite. It is suggested that when the NASA pulsed laser deposition chamber is fully operational, thin films of these systems be investigated. In preparation for such work, we have reconfirmed several structural features of an existing Ba/SrTiO3 film using the x-ray diffractometer at Oberlin College.

  13. Hard boron oxide thin-film deposition using electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatkin, S. M.; Rhoades, R. L.; Tsui, T. Y.; Oliver, W. C.

    1994-11-01

    Hard boron suboxide thin films were deposited in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma system at substrate temperatures below 300 °C. A high-temperature effusion cell, operated at 2200°-2250 °C, was used for injection of boron downstream of an Ar/O2 ECR plasma. B ion bombardment is estimated to have been up to 6% of the total boron flux, and Ar ion bombardment is estimated to have contributed ˜100 eV/deposited atom. Boron suboxide films with oxygen concentrations of 11% exhibited hardnesses up to 30 GPa, equal to sapphire and near that of pure boron. The hardness/modulus ratio was 0.1, significantly better than that of sapphire (0.067) or solid boron (0.074), indicating these films may be of interest for a variety of tribological applications.

  14. Hard boron oxide thin-film deposition using electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatkin, S.M.; Rhoades, R.L.; Tsui, T.Y.; Oliver, W.C. )

    1994-11-21

    Hard boron suboxide thin films were deposited in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma system at substrate temperatures below 300 [degree]C. A high-temperature effusion cell, operated at 2200[degree]--2250 [degree]C, was used for injection of boron downstream of an Ar/O[sub 2] ECR plasma. B ion bombardment is estimated to have been up to 6% of the total boron flux, and Ar ion bombardment is estimated to have contributed [similar to]100 eV/deposited atom. Boron suboxide films with oxygen concentrations of 11% exhibited hardnesses up to 30 GPa, equal to sapphire and near that of pure boron. The hardness/modulus ratio was 0.1, significantly better than that of sapphire (0.067) or solid boron (0.074), indicating these films may be of interest for a variety of tribological applications.

  15. Nature of oxygen in the passive film on stainless steels in 0.1 M NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Atrens, A.

    1989-04-01

    Three different oxygen species, O2-, OH-, and H2O, are introduced into the deconvolution of the oxygen peaks measured in the prior study and their true concentrations are investigated in the depth profile. It is found that H2O exists mainly in the outermost part of the passive film at the interface of solution and the passive film. OH- and O2- are found throughout the passive film; they have a maximum concentration in the outer layer at around 10 to 20 Å depth, with a concentration of 40 at.% for the stainless steel 29-4-2 and 50 at.% for 18-12. After the maximum the concentrations are sharply reduced with increasing sputtering time and remain at a constant concentration of about 10 at.% at 35 Å depth. Both species still exist at this concentration even after long time sputtering.

  16. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part II: Evaluation of Estimates Using Independent Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Olson, William S.; Wang, Jian-Jian; Bell, Thomas L.; Smith, Eric A.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2006-05-01

    Rainfall rate estimates from spaceborne microwave radiometers are generally accepted as reliable by a majority of the atmospheric science community. One of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) facility rain-rate algorithms is based upon passive microwave observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). In Part I of this series, improvements of the TMI algorithm that are required to introduce latent heating as an additional algorithm product are described. Here, estimates of surface rain rate, convective proportion, and latent heating are evaluated using independent ground-based estimates and satellite products. Instantaneous, 0.5°-resolution estimates of surface rain rate over ocean from the improved TMI algorithm are well correlated with independent radar estimates (r ˜0.88 over the Tropics), but bias reduction is the most significant improvement over earlier algorithms. The bias reduction is attributed to the greater breadth of cloud-resolving model simulations that support the improved algorithm and the more consistent and specific convective/stratiform rain separation method utilized. The bias of monthly 2.5°-resolution estimates is similarly reduced, with comparable correlations to radar estimates. Although the amount of independent latent heating data is limited, TMI-estimated latent heating profiles compare favorably with instantaneous estimates based upon dual-Doppler radar observations, and time series of surface rain-rate and heating profiles are generally consistent with those derived from rawinsonde analyses. Still, some biases in profile shape are evident, and these may be resolved with (a) additional contextual information brought to the estimation problem and/or (b) physically consistent and representative databases supporting the algorithm. A model of the random error in instantaneous 0.5°-resolution rain-rate estimates appears to be consistent with the levels of error determined from TMI comparisons with collocated radar. Error

  17. Preparation and study of epitaxial Cr{sup 4+} : GGG films for passive Q switches in neodymium lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetova, G A; Gusev, M Yu; Ivanov, I A; Nikolaev, D A; Seregin, V F; Tsvetkov, V B; Shcherbakov, Ivan A E-mail: tsvetkov@lsk.gpi.r

    2006-07-31

    The efficient technology is developed for growing Cr- and Ca-doped gadolinium-gallium garnet single-crystal films of thickness up to 100 {mu}m on large substrates (76 mm) by the method of liquid-phase epitaxy from a solution-melt. The dependences of the absorption spectra of films and optical losses at 1 {mu}m on the growth conditions and the solution-melt composition are studied. It is shown that Cr{sup 4+} ions are formed in the films, and these films can be used as passive Q switches in lasers. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m. prokhorov)

  18. Galactic Noise and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing from Space At L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Hildebrand Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The spectral window at L-band (1.4 GHz) is important for passive remote sensing of soil moisture and ocean salinity from space, parameters that are needed to understand the hydrologic cycle and ocean circulation. At this frequency, radiation from extraterrestrial (mostly galactic) sources is strong and, unlike the constant cosmic background, this radiation is spatially variable. This paper presents a modern radiometric map of the celestial sky at L-band and a solution for the problem of determining what portion of the sky is seen by a radiometer in orbit. The data for the radiometric map is derived from recent radio astronomy surveys and is presented as equivalent brightness temperature suitable for remote sensing applications. Examples using orbits and antennas representative of those contemplated for remote sensing of soil moisture and sea surface salinity from space are presented to illustrate the signal levels to be expected. Near the galactic plane, the contribution can exceed several Kelvin.

  19. Using Smos Passive Microwave Data to Develop Smap Freeze/thaw Algorithms Adapted for the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, P.; Bernier, M.; McDonal, K. C.; Poulin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal terrestrial Freeze/Thaw cycle in Northern Quebec Tundra (Nunavik) was determined and evaluated with passive microwave observations. SMOS time series data were analyzed to examine seasonal variations of soil freezing, and to assess the impact of land cover on the Freeze/Thaw cycle. Furthermore, the soil freezing maps derived from SMOS observations were compared to field survey data in the region near Umiujaq. The objective is to develop algorithms to follow the seasonal cycle of freezing and thawing of the soil adapted to Canadian subarctic, a territory with a high complexity of land cover (vegetation, soil, and water bodies). Field data shows that soil freezing and thawing dates vary much spatially at the local scale in the Boreal Forest and the Tundra. The results showed a satisfactory pixel by pixel mapping for the daily soil state monitoring with a > 80% success rate with in situ data for the HH and VV polarizations, and for different land cover. The average accuracies are 80% and 84% for the soil freeze period, and soil thaw period respectively. The comparison is limited because of the small number of validation pixels.

  20. Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Retrieval Algorithm Using Combined Passive-Active L-Band Microwave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 kilometers and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units globally on a monthly basis. The measurement principle is based on the response of the L-band (1.413 gigahertz) sea surface brightness temperatures (T (sub B)) to sea surface salinity. To achieve the required 0.2 practical salinity units accuracy, the impact of sea surface roughness (e.g. wind-generated ripples and waves) along with several factors on the observed brightness temperature has to be corrected to better than a few tenths of a degree Kelvin. To the end, Aquarius includes a scatterometer to help correct for this surface roughness effect.

  1. Calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 3-5, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, Bruce W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on the calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation are presented. Individual topics addressed include: on-board calibration device for a wide field-of-view instrument, calibration for the medium-resolution imaging spectrometer, cryogenic radiometers and intensity-stabilized lasers for EOS radiometric calibrations, radiometric stability of the Shuttle-borne solar backscatter ultraviolet spectrometer, ratioing radiometer for use with a solar diffuser, requirements of a solar diffuser and measurements of some candidate materials, reflectance stability analysis of Spectralon diffuse calibration panels, stray light effects on calibrations using a solar diffuser, radiometric calibration of SPOT 23 HRVs, surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. Also addressed are: calibrated intercepts for solar radiometers used in remote sensor calibration, radiometric calibration of an airborne multispectral scanner, in-flight calibration of a helicopter-mounted Daedalus multispectral scanner, technique for improving the calibration of large-area sphere sources, remote colorimetry and its applications, spatial sampling errors for a satellite-borne scanning radiometer, calibration of EOS multispectral imaging sensors and solar irradiance variability.

  2. Calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 3-5, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Bruce W.

    Various papers on the calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation are presented. Individual topics addressed include: on-board calibration device for a wide field-of-view instrument, calibration for the medium-resolution imaging spectrometer, cryogenic radiometers and intensity-stabilized lasers for EOS radiometric calibrations, radiometric stability of the Shuttle-borne solar backscatter ultraviolet spectrometer, ratioing radiometer for use with a solar diffuser, requirements of a solar diffuser and measurements of some candidate materials, reflectance stability analysis of Spectralon diffuse calibration panels, stray light effects on calibrations using a solar diffuser, radiometric calibration of SPOT 23 HRVs, surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. Also addressed are: calibrated intercepts for solar radiometers used in remote sensor calibration, radiometric calibration of an airborne multispectral scanner, in-flight calibration of a helicopter-mounted Daedalus multispectral scanner, technique for improving the calibration of large-area sphere sources, remote colorimetry and its applications, spatial sampling errors for a satellite-borne scanning radiometer, calibration of EOS multispectral imaging sensors and solar irradiance variability. (For individual items see A93-23576 to A93-23603)

  3. Sensitivity of passive microwave sea ice concentration algorithms to the selection of locally and seasonally adjusted tie points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Schweiger, Axel

    1989-01-01

    The sensitivity of passive microwave sea-ice concentration (SIC) algorithms to the selection of tie points was analyzed. SICs were derived with the NASA Team ice algorithm for global tie points and for locally and seasonally adjusted tie points. The SSM/I SIC was then compared to Landsat-MSS-derived SICs. Preliminary results show a mean difference of SSM/I- and Landsat-derived SICs for 50 x 50 km grid cells of 2.7 percent along the ice edge of the Beaufort Sea during fall with local tie points. The accuracy decreased to 9.7 percent when global tie points were used. During freeze-up in the Beaufort Sea, with grey ice and nilas as dominant ice cover, the mean difference was 4.3 percent for local tie points and 13.9 percent for global tie points. For the spring ice cover in the Bering Sea a mean difference of 4.4 percent for local tie points and 15.7 percent for global tie points was found. This large difference reveals some limitations of the NASA-Team algorithm under freeze-up and spring conditions (thin ice areas).

  4. A passive microwave technique for estimating rainfall and vertical structure information from space. Part 1: Algorithm description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Giglio, Louis

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a multichannel physical approach for retrieving rainfall and vertical structure information from satellite-based passive microwave observations. The algorithm makes use of statistical inversion techniques based upon theoretically calculated relations between rainfall rates and brightness temperatures. Potential errors introduced into the theoretical calculations by the unknown vertical distribution of hydrometeors are overcome by explicity accounting for diverse hydrometeor profiles. This is accomplished by allowing for a number of different vertical distributions in the theoretical brightness temperature calculations and requiring consistency between the observed and calculated brightness temperatures. This paper will focus primarily on the theoretical aspects of the retrieval algorithm, which includes a procedure used to account for inhomogeneities of the rainfall within the satellite field of view as well as a detailed description of the algorithm as it is applied over both ocean and land surfaces. The residual error between observed and calculated brightness temperatures is found to be an important quantity in assessing the uniqueness of the solution. It is further found that the residual error is a meaningful quantity that can be used to derive expected accuracies from this retrieval technique. Examples comparing the retrieved results as well as the detailed analysis of the algorithm performance under various circumstances are the subject of a companion paper.

  5. Extreme precipitation on the island of Madeira on 20 February 2010 as seen by satellite passive microwave sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levizzani, Vincenzo; Laviola, Sante; Cattani, Elsa; João Costa, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The extreme precipitation event on the Island of Madeira in the Atlantic Ocean on 20 February 2010 has triggered flash floods and mudslides in the southern slopes of the island. The frontal system moving towards the northeast and originating from a low-pressure center in the Madeira Archipelago is not unusual for the area, but its consequences on the island environment were rather extreme. Several studies demonstrated that the influence of the orography reinforced the precipitating system enhancing the transition from stratiform to convective precipitation. However, to date no studies are available in the literature on the structure of the clouds and precipitation structure as well as on its local patterns. This work is focused on the analysis of the precipitating event and its evolution using passive microwave sounding imagery from polar orbiting satellites for the retrieval of rainfall intensity and cloud property classification. The observations demonstrate that the heavy rainfall hitting the island at midday on 20 February was generated by a severe convective event whose very local character is due to orographic enhancement over the central mountain chain of the island. Precipitation was of convective type lasting for a few hours around noon and the observations confirm the numerical model results. Physically based cloud classification also reveals a powerful tool for the monitoring of these severe rainstorms. The results of the satellite observations show some potential for nowcasting in an island environment with orography perpendicular to the main flow from the ocean.

  6. Seasonal Snow Extent and Snow Mass in South America using SMMR and SSM/I Passive Microwave Data (1979-2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Kelly, R. E. J.; Chiu, L.

    2008-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in South America was examined in this study using passive microwave satellite data from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus-7 satellite and the Special Sensor Microwave Imagers (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. For the period from 1979-2006, both snow cover extent and snow water equivalent (snow mass) were investigated during the coldest months (May-September), primarily in the Patagonia area of Argentina and in the Andes of Chile, Argentina and Bolivia, where most of the seasonal snow is found. Since winter temperatures in this region are often above freezing, the coldest winter month was found to be the month having the most extensive snow cover and usually the month having the deepest snow cover as well. Sharp year-to-year differences were recorded using the passive microwave observations. The average snow cover extent for July, the month with the greatest average extent during the 28-year period of record, is 321,674 km(exp 2). In July of 1984, the average monthly snow cover extent was 701,250 km(exp 2) the most extensive coverage observed between 1979 and 2006. However, in July of 1989, snow cover extent was only 120,000 km(exp 2). The 28-year period of record shows a sinusoidal like pattern for both snow cover and snow mass, though neither trend is significant at the 95% level.

  7. In situ x-ray scattering study of the passive film on Ni(III) in sulfuric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Magnussen, O.M.; Scherer, J.; Ocko, B.M.; Behm, R.J.

    2000-02-17

    Results of an in situ X-ray scattering study of the passive film formed on Ni(111) electrodes by passivation in 0.05 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH 1.0) at 0.50 V{sub Ag/AgCl} are reported and compared with results on the film formed by oxidation in air at room temperature. In both cases, ultrathin, (111)-oriented NiO films are observed, which are aligned with the Ni substrate lattice and slightly expanded along the surface normal with respect to bulk NiO. However, two major structural differences are found: (1) while on the air-formed oxide parallel (NiO-[1{bar 1}0] {parallel} Ni[1{bar 1}0]) and antiparallel (NiO[1{bar 1}0] {parallel} Ni[{bar 1}10]) oriented domains coexist, the passive film exhibits a well-defined antiparallel orientation and (2) the lattice of the passive film is, in contrast to that of the air-formed oxide, tilted relative to the substrate with a broad angular dispersion of the tilt angle centered at about 3.3{degree}.

  8. Development of an early warning system of crop moisture conditions using passive microwave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, M. J.; Harder, P. H., II (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Emissivities were calculated from the Nimbus 5 electrically scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) over 25 km grid cells for the southern Great Plains includin the western two-thirds of Kansas and Oklahoma and northwest Texas. These emissivities, normalized for seasonal temperature changes, were in excellent agreement with theory and measurements made from aircraft and truck sensors at the 1.55 cm wavelength of ESMR. These emissivities were related to crop moisture conditions of the winter wheat in the major wheat producing counties of the three states. High correlations were noted between emissitivity and an antecedent precipitation index (API) used to infer soil moisture for periods when the soils were essentially bare. The emissivities from ESMR were related through API and actual crop condition reports to progress of fall planting, adequacy of crop moisture for stand establishment, and periods of excessive moisture that necessitated replanting. Periods of prolonged frozen soil in the winter were observable at several grid points. The average emissivities of the canopy/soil surface during the maximum canopy development times in the spring showed a good agreement with moisture stress inferred from rainfall and yield data.

  9. Principal component analysis of satellite passive microwave data over sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothrock, D. A.; Thomas, Donald R.; Thorndike, Alan S.

    1988-03-01

    The 10 channels of scanning multichannel microwave radiometer data for the Arctic are examined by correlation, multiple regression, and principal component analyses. Data from April, August, and December 1979 are analyzed separately. Correlations are greater than 0.8 for all pairs of channels except some of those involving the 37-GHz channels. Multiple regression shows a high degree of redundancy in the data; three channels can explain between 94.0 and 99.6% of the total variance. A principal component analysis of the covariance matrix shows that the first two eigenvalues contain 99.7% of the variance. Only the first two principal components contain variance due to the mixture of surface types. Three component mixtures (water, first-year ice, and multiyear ice) can be resolved in two dimensions. The presence of other ice types, such as second-year ice or wet ice, makes determination of ice age ambiguous in some geographic regions. Winds and surface temperature variations cause variations in the first three principal components. The confounding of these variables with mixture of surface types is a major source of error in resolving the mixture. The variance in principal components 3 through 10 is small and entirely due to variability in the pure type signatures. Determination of winds and surface temperature, as well as other variables, from this information is limited by instrument noise and presently unknown large-scale variability in the emissivity of sea ice.

  10. Atmospheric corrections of passive microwave data for estimating land surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeng-Lin; Wu, Hua; Tang, Bo-Hui; Qiu, Shi; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative analysis of the atmospheric effects on observations made by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) has been performed. The differences between observed brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere and at the bottom of the atmosphere were analyzed using a database of simulated observations, which were configured to replicate AMSR-E data. The differences between observed brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere and land surface-emitted brightness temperatures were also computed. Quantitative results show that the atmosphere has different effects on brightness temperatures in different AMSR-E channels. Atmospheric effects can be neglected at 6.925 and 10.65 GHz, when the standard deviation is less than 1 K. However, at other frequencies and polarizations, atmospheric effects on observations should not be neglected. An atmospheric correction algorithm was developed at 18.7 GHz vertical polarization, based on the classic split-window algorithm used in thermal remote sensing. Land surface emission can be estimated with RMSE = 0.99 K using the proposed method. Using the known land surface emissivity, Land Surface Temperature (LST) can be retrieved. The RMSE of retrieved LST is 1.17 K using the simulated data.

  11. Laboratory assessment of flexible thin-film membranes as a passive barrier to radon gas diffusion.

    PubMed

    Daoud, W Z; Renken, K J

    2001-05-14

    This paper presents the experimental results of utilizing a flexible thin-film membrane as a passive barrier to radon gas diffusion. Nine commercially available membranes of various compositions and thicknesses were evaluated as retardant to radon gas diffusion. The radon gas concentration ratios across the thin-film membranes alone and in combination with an adjacent concrete sample (effective diffusion coefficient) were measured in a laboratory system with state-of-the-art instrumentation. An 8.89-cm diameter, 10.2-cm thick concrete sample of standard composition (w/c = 0.5 and cement:sand:gravel = 1:2:4) was used to simulate a basement and slab-on-grade foundation typical of Wisconsin. The radon gas transport characteristics of this concrete sample (porosity, permeability and diffusion) are documented. The experimentation has identified two superior flexible thin-film membranes that may be employed as effective barriers to radon gas diffusion. These include: Polyethylene Naphthalate (7.62 x 10(-5) m) and Polyethylene Terephthalate Glycol, PETG (7.62 x 10(-5) and 1.27 x 10(-4) m) which had average diffusion coefficients, D, of 4.10 x 10(-14) and 1.66 x 10(-14) m2 s(-1), respectively. Measurements of the effective membrane/concrete diffusion coefficient yielded a further average reduction in D of 98% for the Polyethylene Naphthalate and 96% for the PETG. Details of the experimental set-ups and procedures are described. The results of this investigation have shown that the application of an effective thin-film membrane adjacent to an intact concrete slab can significantly reduce the diffusion of radon gas entry. Therefore, the employment of a flexible thin-film membrane should be considered as a viable radon reduction technology method for residential new construction.

  12. Thin film barium strontium titanate ferroelectric varactors for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Hailing; Spatz, Devin; Wang, Shu; Shin, Eunsung; Subramanyam, Guru

    2015-11-01

    Analog phase shifters are investigated with a periodic structure that includes Barium Strontium Titanate ferroelectric thin film varactors in shunt or serial connection to the coplanar waveguide transmission line. The phase shift is achieved by applying a DC bias to the varactors and changing the reactance in the circuit. The goal of this paper is to characterize the shunt capacitive varactors regarding the voltage dependence of the capacitance, loss tangent, and insertion losses at different bias voltages. Quality factor analysis is also conducted taking the parasitic effects into account. Repeated measurements show that the capacitance of a single cell is tuned from 0.8pF to 0.2pF under a DC bias of 0-10V while the loss tangent is kept under 0.01 in the frequency range of 0-40GHz. Insertion loss is tuned from -4dB to less than -0.6dB from 0 to 10V with a Figure of Merit of 14 degrees/dB at 10GHz and the total quality factor of the unit cell is around 6.7 to 10 at 10GHz with matched port impedance. By cascading 10-25 single unit cells, the phase shift is expected to reach 360 degrees with minimum insertion loss.

  13. Low-temperature deposition of transparent diamond films with a microwave cavity plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulczynski, Michael J.

    1998-10-01

    Low-temperature diamond deposition with Microwave Cavity Plasma Reactor (MCPR) technology was investigated for application to temperature sensitive substrates. The substrate temperature during most CVD diamond deposition processes is typically greater then 600 C; however, there are some applications where temperature sensitive materials are used and the deposition temperature must be maintained below 550 C. These applications include materials like boro-silicate glass, which has a relatively low strain-point temperature, and integrated circuits that contain low melting point components. Experiments were conducted in three areas. The first area was MCPR development, the second was benchmark deposition and characterization of diamond films on silicon substrates and the third was deposition and characterization of diamond films on boro-silicate glass substrates. MCPR development included an investigation of various MCPR configurations that were designed and adapted for uniform, low-temperature diamond deposition over areas as large as 80-cm2. Reactors were investigated with end-feed microwave excitation and side-feed microwave excitation for maximum deposition area and uniformity. Various substrate receptor configurations were also investigated including a substrate heater and cooler. From these investigations, deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, deposition rate, deposition area and deposition uniformity were characterized. The benchmark silicon diamond deposition experiments were conducted for comparison to previous high temperature, >550 C, MCPR research and growth models. Here deposition results such as deposition rate and film quality were compared with applications of diamond growth models by Harris-Goodwin and Bachmann. Additionally, characterization experiments were conducted to investigate film attributes that are critical to optical applications, such as film surface roughness and deposition uniformity. Included as variables in these

  14. Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval through Combined Radar/Radiometer Ground Based Simulator with Special Reference to Dielectric Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Prashant K., ,, Dr.; O'Neill, Peggy, ,, Dr.

    2014-05-01

    indicated a higher performance in terms of soil moisture retrieval accuracy for the Mironov dielectric model (RMSE of 0.035 m3/m3), followed by Dobson, Wang & Schmugge, and Hallikainen. This analysis indicates that Mironov dielectric model is promising for passive-only microwave soil moisture retrieval and could be a useful choice for SMAP satellite soil moisture retrieval. Keywords: Dielectric models; Single Channel Algorithm, Combined Radar/Radiometer, Soil moisture; L band References: Behari, J. (2005). Dielectric Behavior of Soil (pp. 22-40). Springer Netherlands O'Neill, P. E., Lang, R. H., Kurum, M., Utku, C., & Carver, K. R. (2006), Multi-Sensor Microwave Soil Moisture Remote Sensing: NASA's Combined Radar/Radiometer (ComRAD) System. In IEEE MicroRad, 2006 (pp. 50-54). IEEE. Srivastava, P. K., Han, D., Rico Ramirez, M. A., & Islam, T. (2013), Appraisal of SMOS soil moisture at a catchment scale in a temperate maritime climate. Journal of Hydrology, 498, 292-304. USDA OPE3 web site at http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/.

  15. Diamond thin films grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Leksono, M.

    1991-09-05

    Undoped and boron doped diamond thin films have been successfully grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, and B{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The films were characterized using x- ray diffraction techniques, Raman and infrared spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and various electrical measurements. The deposition rates of the diamond films were found to increase with the CH{sub 4} concentration, substrate temperature, and/or pressure, and at 1.0% methane, 900{degrees}C, and 35 Torr, the value was measured to be 0.87 {mu}m/hour. The deposition rate for boron doped diamond films, decreases as the diborane concentration increases. The morphologies of the undoped diamond films are strongly related to the deposition parameters. As the temperature increases from 840 to 925 C, the film morphology changes from cubo-octahedron to cubic structures, while as the CH{sub 4} concentration increases from 0.5 to 1.0%, the morphology changes from triangular (111) faces with a weak preferred orientation to square (100) faces. At 2.0% Ch{sub 4} or higher the films become microcrystalline with cauliflower structures. Scanning electron microscopy analyses also demonstrate that selective deposition of undoped diamond films has been successfully achieved using a lift-off process with a resolution of at least 2 {mu}m. The x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra demonstrate that high quality diamond films have been achieved. The concentration of the nondiamond phases in the films grown at 1.0% CH{sub 4} can be estimated from the Raman spectra to be at less than 0.2% and increases with the CH{sub 4} concentration. The Raman spectra of the boron doped diamond films also indicate that the presence of boron tends to suppress the nondiamond phases in the films. Infrared spectra of the undoped diamond films show very weak CH stretch peaks which suggest that the hydrogen concentration is very low.

  16. Galactic Noise and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing from Space at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Abraham, S.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The spectral window at L-band (1.4 GHz) is important for passive remote sensing of parameters such as soil moisture and ocean salinity best measured at long wavelengths. At L-band, radiation from extraterrestrial (galactic) sources is strong enough to warrant inclusion in calibration and retrieval algorithms and unlike the constant cosmic background is spatially variable. Previous estimates of the magnitude and distribution of this background radiation have been rather coarse, However, recent surveys of the radio sky at 1.4 GHz have made it possible to produce maps with sufficient spatial and radiometric accuracy to be relevant to remote sensing applications. This is of particular concern for remote sensing of sea surface salinity because the surface (water) is a good reflector and the salinity signal is relatively small. This paper presents a modem map of the radiometric sky at L-band and a solution to the problem of determining the portion of the sky seen by a radiometer in orbit. The data is derived from recent radio astronomy surveys and is presented as equivalent brightness temperature suitable for remote sensing applications. Examples using orbits and antennas representative of those contemplated for remote sensing of soil moisture and sea surface salinity from space are presented to illustrate the signal levels to be expected. Radiation near the galactic plane can exceed several kelvin.

  17. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, M.; Arndt, S.; Willmes, S.; Dierking, W.

    2015-12-01

    The timing and regional distribution of surface properties of Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the atmosphere-ocean interaction and characterizes the mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Therefore, it is important to map and analyze changes and trends of the related processes and parameters. Since Antarctic sea ice is covered with snow during most of the year, inter-annual and regional variations in summer surface melt can be described through the timing of snowmelt onset. So far, the melt onset was described through the amplitude of diurnal freeze-thaw cycles detected by microwave brightness temperatures using a fixed threshold. However, other studies reveal that the strength of the diurnal variations is differing between the perennial snowpack characterized by strong snow metamorphism and the thinner and less complex seasonal snow cover. Therefore, we present two complementary approaches to improve the existing melt onset algorithms: (1) We consider regional differences of the diurnal variations in the brightness temperature. (2) We combine brightness temperature measured at different polarizations and frequencies in order to describe also subsurface melt processes. Our analysis includes a comparison with autonomous measurements from snow buoys and previous studies on snow melt onset detection of Antarctic sea ice. In doing so, we derive a distinct latitudinal dependence of the surface and subsurface snow melt onset. The major part of the East-Antarctic sea ice is dominated by lateral and bottom melt with negligible diurnal surface variations. Although a positive trend in sea-ice extent and concentration of Antarctic sea ice is observed, our melt onset time series do not indicate a significant trend from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Instead its inter-annual variability is not changing over time. From the assumed dynamically induced sea-ice growth in the Southern Ocean we expect an increasing importance of surface freeze-thaw cycles.

  18. Passive microwave remote sensing of rainfall with SSM/I: Algorithm development and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferriday, James G.; Avery, Susan K.

    1994-01-01

    A physically based algorithm sensitive to emission and scattering is used to estimate rainfall using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The algorithm is derived from radiative transfer calculations through an atmospheric cloud model specifying vertical distributions of ice and liquid hydrometeors as a function of rain rate. The algorithm is structured in two parts: SSM/I brightness temperatures are screened to detect rainfall and are then used in rain-rate calculation. The screening process distinguishes between nonraining background conditions and emission and scattering associated with hydrometeors. Thermometric temperature and polarization thresholds determined from the radiative transfer calculations are used to detect rain, whereas the rain-rate calculation is based on a linear function fit to a linear combination of channels. Separate calculations for ocean and land account for different background conditions. The rain-rate calculation is constructed to respond to both emission and scattering, reduce extraneous atmospheric and surface effects, and to correct for beam filling. The resulting SSM/I rain-rate estimates are compared to three precipitation radars as well as to a dynamically simulated rainfall event. Global estimates from the SSM/I algorithm are also compared to continental and shipboard measurements over a 4-month period. The algorithm is found to accurately describe both localized instantaneous rainfall events and global monthly patterns over both land and ovean. Over land the 4-month mean difference between SSM/I and the Global Precipitation Climatology Center continental rain gauge database is less than 10%. Over the ocean, the mean difference between SSM/I and the Legates and Willmott global shipboard rain gauge climatology is less than 20%.

  19. Nonlinear behavior of thin film SrTiO3 capacitors at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, A. B.; Samoilova, T. B.; Golovkov, A. A.; Hollmann, E. K.; Kalinikos, D. A.; Loginov, V. E.; Prudan, A. M.; Soldatenkov, O. I.; Galt, D.; Mueller, C. H.; Rivkin, T. V.; Koepf, G. A.

    1998-09-01

    The voltage-dependent dielectric constant (ɛ) of SrTiO3 (STO) thin films is the basis for developing cryogenic capacitors for tunable microwave applications. In this study, the effect of microwave signal level on nonlinear response at 1.7-1.9 GHz was examined by measuring the level of the third order intermodulation distortion (IMD) signal relative to the input signal level. Small signal dielectric properties such as capacitance, tuning, and loss (tan δ) were also measured at 1 MHz, 3 GHz, and 10 GHz, at temperatures from 4.2 to 300 K. Planar capacitors were comprised of highly (100)-oriented, 1 μm thick STO films deposited via magnetron sputtering onto CeO2-buffered (11_02)-oriented sapphire substrates, with 10 μm gaps between the electrodes. Deviations from the anticipated cubic dependence of the third order IMD product on incident power, for incident power ranges from -10 to 22 dBm, were attributed to conductivity nonlinearity. At incident power levels of 22 dBm and with no dc bias applied to the capacitor, the level of the third order IMD product was 21 dB below the fundamental signal level. Application of a 107 V/m dc electric field bias across the capacitor suppressed the third order IMD by an additional 10 dB. The nonlinear properties of thin film STO capacitors as a function of microwave voltage were determined by comparing the experimental and theoretical dependencies of the IMD products.

  20. An XPS study of passive films on stainless steels and a high-grade Ni-base alloy in seawater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkiess, T.; Neville, A.

    1999-11-01

    In the present study an assessment has been made of the air-formed passive film and the passive film existing after a short exposure to a synthetic seawater environment on austenitic (UNS S31603), superaustenitic (UNS S31254 and UNS S32654) and superduplex (UNS S32760) stainless steels and a Ni-based alloy (UNS N06625) using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Assessment of their corrosion behavior has been made through use of electrochemical accelerated tests supported by post-test microscopy. The passive film on the Ni-base (low Fe) UNS N06625 alloy is remarkably similar to those formed on the high Cr and Mo stainless steels. It has been demonstrated that the Fe/Cr ratio in the passive film is dependent on alloy composition and on the conditions to which the material has been exposed and a general correlation between passive film constitution and corrosion resistance is evident.

  1. The effect of monomolecular surface films on the microwave brightness temperature of the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpers, W.; Blume, H.-J. C.; Garrett, W. D.; Huehnerfuss, H.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that monomolecular surface films of biological origin are often encountered on the ocean surface, especially in coastal regions. The thicknesses of the monomolecular films are of the order of 3 x 10 to the -9th m. Huehnerfuss et al. (1978, 1981) have shown that monomolecular surface films damp surface waves quite strongly in the centimeter to decimeter wavelength regime. Other effects caused by films are related to the reduction of the gas exchange at the air-sea interface and the decrease of the wind stress. The present investigation is concerned with experiments which reveal an unexpectedly large response of the microwave brightness temperature to a monomolecular oleyl alcohol slick at 1.43 GHz. Brightness temperature is a function of the complex dielectric constant of thy upper layer of the ocean. During six overflights over an ocean area covered with an artificial monomolecular alcohol film, a large decrease of the brightness temperature at the L-band was measured, while at the S-band almost no decrease was observed.

  2. Meter-Scale Microwave Plasma Production and its Application to Silicon Thin Film Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Hirotaka; Takanishi, Yudai; Endo, Hirotaka; Ishijima, Tatsuo

    2008-10-01

    There has been a great need for meter-scale plasma sources for giant materials processing, such as thin film transistor manufacturing for meter-size liquid crystal display (LCD), deposition of silicon thin films for photovoltaic power generation and so on. Recently, we have developed a new technology for production of surface wave excitation [1]. In this paper, we demonstrate production of meter-scale large-area plasma with multiple waveguide lines. In the experiment, microwave power (<30 kW) is coupled to the plasma through power divider, multiple waveguide lines and slot antennas. Optical and Langmuir probe measurements of Ar/H2 plasma show production of very uniform plasma at a plasma density of 3.4 x 10^11 cm-3 and a variance of 2% within an area of 0.9 m x 0.9 m. With use of carefully-designed gas manifold, microcrystalline silicon films are deposited on sample substrates. Deposition rate of ˜0.3 nm/s with a variance of less than 10 % is obtained within an area of 0.6 m x 0.7 m. Uniformity of film quality such as film crystallinity is also confirmed. [1] H. Sugai, Y. Nojiri, T. Ishijima and H. Toyoda, 6^th Int. Conf. on Reactive Plasmas and 23^rd Symp. on Plasma Processing, (Matsushima, 2006), p.17.

  3. Crystallographic texture, morphology, optical, and microwave dielectric properties of dc magnetron sputtered nanostructured zirconia thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Pamu, D.; Sudheendran, K.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.; James Raju, K. C.

    2008-03-15

    Nanocrystalline zirconia thin films have been deposited at ambient temperature by dc magnetron sputtering on glass and quartz substrates. The crystallite size as calculated from the x-ray diffraction patterns in the films varies between 10 and 25 nm and is dependent on oxygen percentage in the sputtering gas. Interestingly, the presence of monoclinic and cubic phase is observed for the films deposited on glass at 40%, 60%, and 80% of oxygen in the sputtering gas, while those deposited on quartz showed only the monoclinic phase. Refractive index decreased with increase in percentage of oxygen in the sputter gas. Significantly, even at 100% oxygen in the sputtering gas, films of thickness of the order of 500 nm have been grown starting from the metallic Zr target. The dielectric constants were measured using the extended cavity perturbation technique at X-band frequency (8-12 GHz). The dielectric constant and loss tangent showed a very small decrease with increase in frequency but exhibited a stronger dependence on processing parameters. The dielectric constants of the films at microwave frequencies ranged between 12.16 and 22.3.

  4. Use of Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) in Passive Microwave Algorithms for Soil Moisture Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlandson, T. L.; Berg, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will provide a unique opportunity for the estimation of soil moisture by having simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements available. As with the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite, the soil moisture algorithms will need to account for the contribution of vegetation to the brightness temperature. Global maps of vegetation volumetric water content (VWC) are difficult to obtain, and the SMOS mission has opted to estimate the optical depth of standing vegetation by using a relationship between the VWC and the leaf area index (LAI). LAI is estimated from optical remote sensing or through soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling. During the growing season, the VWC of agricultural crops can increase rapidly, and if cloud cover exists during an optical acquisition, the estimation of LAI may be delayed, resulting in an underestimation of the VWC and overestimation of the soil moisture. Alternatively, the radar vegetation index (RVI) has shown strong correlation and linear relationship with VWC for rice and soybeans. Using the SMAP radar to produce RVI values that are coincident to brightness temperature measurements may eliminate the need for LAI estimates. The SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) was a cal/val campaign for the SMAP mission held in Manitoba, Canada, during a 6-week period in June and July, 2012. During this campaign, soil moisture measurements were obtained for 55 fields with varying soil texture and vegetation cover. Vegetation was sampled from each field weekly to determine the VWC. Soil moisture measurements were taken coincident to overpasses by an aircraft carrying the Passive and Active L-band System (PALS) instrumentation. The aircraft flew flight lines at both high and low altitudes. The low altitude flight lines provided a footprint size approximately equivalent to the size of the SMAPVEX12 field sites. Of the 55 field sites, the low altitude flight lines provided

  5. Microwave-Accelerated Surface Modification of Plasmonic Gold Thin Films with Self-Assembled Monolayers of Alkanethiols

    PubMed Central

    Grell, Tsehai A.J.; Alabanza, Anginelle M.; Gaskell, Karen; Aslan, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    A rapid surface modification technique for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold thin films using microwave heating in less than 10 min is reported. In this regard, SAMs of two model alkanethiols, 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUDA, to generate a hydrophilic surface) and undecanethiol (UDET, a hydrophobic surface), were successfully formed on gold thin films using selective microwave heating in 1) a semi-continuous and 2) a continuous fashion and at room temperature (24 hours, control experiment, no microwave heating). The formation of SAMs of 11-MUDA and UDET were confirmed by contact angle measurements, Fourier–transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The contact angles for water on SAMs formed by the selective microwave heating and conventional room temperature incubation technique (24 hours) were measured to be similar for 11-MUDA and UDET. FT-IR spectroscopy results confirmed that the internal structure of SAMs prepared using both microwave heating and at room temperature were similar. XPS results revealed that the organic and sulfate contaminants found on bare gold thin films were replaced by SAMs after the surface modification process was carried out using both microwave heating and at room temperature. PMID:24083414

  6. Passivation mechanism of thermal atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 films on silicon at different annealing temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Thermal atomic layer-deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) acquires high negative fixed charge density (Qf) and sufficiently low interface trap density after annealing, which enables excellent surface passivation for crystalline silicon. Qf can be controlled by varying the annealing temperatures. In this study, the effect of the annealing temperature of thermal ALD Al2O3 films on p-type Czochralski silicon wafers was investigated. Corona charging measurements revealed that the Qf obtained at 300°C did not significantly affect passivation. The interface-trapping density markedly increased at high annealing temperature (>600°C) and degraded the surface passivation even at a high Qf. Negatively charged or neutral vacancies were found in the samples annealed at 300°C, 500°C, and 750°C using positron annihilation techniques. The Al defect density in the bulk film and the vacancy density near the SiOx/Si interface region decreased with increased temperature. Measurement results of Qf proved that the Al vacancy of the bulk film may not be related to Qf. The defect density in the SiOx region affected the chemical passivation, but other factors may dominantly influence chemical passivation at 750°C. PMID:23452508

  7. Preparation, characterization and dissolution of passive oxide film on the 400 series stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaseelan, V. S.; Rufus, A. L.; Chandramohan, P.; Subramanian, H.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Full system decontamination of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) resulted in low decontamination factors (DF) on stainless steel (SS) surfaces. Hence, studies were carried out with 403 SS and 410 SS that are the material of construction of "End-Fitting body" and "End-Fitting Liner tubes". Three formulations were evaluated for the dissolution of passive films formed over these alloys viz., i) Two-step process consisting of oxidation and reduction reactions, ii) Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) and iii) High Temperature Process. The two-step and high temperature processes could dissolve the oxide completely while the DCD process could remove only 60%. Various techniques like XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDX were used for assessing the dissolution process. The two-step process is time consuming, laborious while the high temperature process is less time consuming and is recommended for SS decontamination.

  8. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 2; Evaluation of Estimates Using Independent Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Olson, William S.; Wang, Jian-Jian; Bell, Thomas L.; Smith, Eric A.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall rate estimates from space-borne k&ents are generally accepted as reliable by a majority of the atmospheric science commu&y. One-of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRh4M) facility rain rate algorithms is based upon passive microwave observations fiom the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). Part I of this study describes improvements in the TMI algorithm that are required to introduce cloud latent heating and drying as additional algorithm products. Here, estimates of surface rain rate, convective proportion, and latent heating are evaluated using independent ground-based estimates and satellite products. Instantaneous, OP5resolution estimates of surface rain rate over ocean fiom the improved TMI algorithm are well correlated with independent radar estimates (r approx. 0.88 over the Tropics), but bias reduction is the most significant improvement over forerunning algorithms. The bias reduction is attributed to the greater breadth of cloud-resolving model simulations that support the improved algorithm, and the more consistent and specific convective/stratiform rain separation method utilized. The bias of monthly, 2.5 deg. -resolution estimates is similarly reduced, with comparable correlations to radar estimates. Although the amount of independent latent heating data are limited, TMI estimated latent heating profiles compare favorably with instantaneous estimates based upon dual-Doppler radar observations, and time series of surface rain rate and heating profiles are generally consistent with those derived from rawinsonde analyses. Still, some biases in profile shape are evident, and these may be resolved with: (a) additional contextual information brought to the estimation problem, and/or; (b) physically-consistent and representative databases supporting the algorithm. A model of the random error in instantaneous, 0.5 deg-resolution rain rate estimates appears to be consistent with the levels of error determined from TMI comparisons to collocated radar

  9. Synthesis and characterizations of microwave sintered ferrite powders and their composite films for practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannigrahi, S. R.; Pramoda, K. P.; Nugroho, F. A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase pure single phase ferrite powders of (NixR1-x)0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 (R=Mn, Co, Cu; x=0, 0.5) were manufactured using microwave sintering at 930 °C for 10 min in air atmosphere. The powders were characterized for their structure, microstructure, thermal, and magnetic properties. Selected powders were used as fillers to prepare their composite films using polymethyl methacrylate polymers as matrix. The composite films were prepared using the melt blending approach and were tested for their microstructure, thermal, and magnetic hysteresis loop as well as 3D magnetic field space mappings using an electromagnetic compatibility scanner. Among the studied ferrites, cobalt doped ferrites and their composites showed the best electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness value and have potential for practical EMI shielding applications.

  10. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Properties of Vertically-Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, K.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Hivin, Q.; Ducournau, G.; Teo, E.; Coquet, P.; Tay, B. K.; Lepilliet, S.; Avramovic, V.; Chazelas, J.; Decoster, D.

    2016-05-01

    We present the experimental determination of the complex permittivity of vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) films grown on quartz substrates in the microwave regime from 10 MHz up to 67 GHz, with the electrical field perpendicular to the main axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), based on coplanar waveguide transmission line approach together with the measurement of the microwave impedance of top metalized vertically—aligned SWCNTs grown on conductive silicon substrates up to 26 GHz. From coplanar waveguide measurements, we obtain a real part of the permittivity almost equal to unity, which is interpreted in terms of low carbon atom density (3 × 1019 at/cm3) associated with a very low imaginary part of permittivity (<10-3) in the frequency range considered due to a very small perpendicular conductivity. The microwave impedance of a vertically aligned CNTs bundle equivalent to a low resistance reveals a good conductivity (3 S/cm) parallel to the CNTs axis. From these two kinds of data, we experimentally demonstrate the tensor nature of the vertically grown CNTs bundles.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposited Thin Films for Dielectrics, Semiconductor Passivation, and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Runshen

    , ultra-thin layer of encapsulating ZnS is coated on the surface of GaSb and GaSb/InAs substrates. The 2 nm-thick ZnS film is found to provide a long-term protection against reoxidation for one order and a half longer times than prior reported passivation likely due to its amorphous structure without pinholes. Finally, a combination of binary ALD processes is developed and demonstrated for the growth of yttria-stabilized zirconia films using alkylamido-cyclopentadiengyls zirconium and tris(isopropyl-cyclopentadienyl)yttrium, as zirconium and yttrium precursors, respectively, with ozone being the oxidant. The desired cubic structure of YSZ films is apparently achieved after post-deposition annealing. Further, platinum is atomic layer deposited as electrode on YSZ (8 mol% of Yttria) within the same system. In order to control the morphology of as-deposited Pt thin structure, the nucleation behavior of Pt on amorphous and cubic YSZ is investigated. Three different morphologies of Pt are observed, including nanoparticle, porous and dense films, which are found to depend on the ALD cycle number and the structure and morphology of they underlying ALD YSZ films.

  12. Characterization of Hybrid Ferroelectric/HTS Thin Films for Tunable Microwave Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, M. D.; Mueller, C. H.; Bhasin, K. B.; Miranda, F. A.

    1996-01-01

    Since the discovery of High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) in 1986, a diversity of HTS-based microwave components has been demonstrated. Because of their low conductor losses, HTS-based components are very attractive for integration into microwave circuits for space communication systems. Recent advancements have made deposition of ferroelectric thin films onto HTS thin films possible. Due to the sensitivity of the ferroelectric's dielectric constant (epsilon(sub r)) to an externally applied electric field (E), ferroelectric/superconducting structures could be used in the fabrication of low loss, tunable microwave components. In this paper, we report on our study of Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)TiO3/YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) and Ba(0.08)Sr(0.92)TiO3/YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) ferroelectric/superconducting thin films on lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) substrates. For the (Ba:Sr, 0.50:0.50) epitaxial sample, a epsilon(sub r) of 425 and a loss tangent (tan delta) of 0.040 were measured at 298 K, 1.0 MHz, and zero applied E. For the same sample, a epsilon(sub r) of 360 and tan delta of 0.036 were obtained at 77 K, 1.0 MHz, and zero applied E. Variations in epsilon(sub r) from 180 to 360 were observed over an applied E range of 0V/cm less than or equal to E less than or equal to 5.62 x 10(exp 4) V/cm with little change in tan delta. However, the range of epsilon(sub r) variation for the polycrystalline (Ba:Sr, 0.08:0.92) sample over 0V/cm less than or equal to E less than or equal to 4.00 x 10(exp 4) V/cm was only 3.6 percent while tan delta increased markedly. These results indicate that a lack of epitaxy between the ferroelectric and superconducting layers decreases tuning and increases microwave losses.

  13. The effects of snowpack grain size on satellite passive microwave observations from the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, E.G.; Gloersen, P.; Chang, A.; Rango, A.

    1996-01-01

    Understanding the passive microwave emissions of a snowpack, as observed by satellite sensors, requires knowledge of the snowpack properties: water equivalent, grain size, density, and stratigraphy. For the snowpack in the Upper Colorado River Basin, measurements of snow depth and water equivalent are routinely available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, but extremely limited information is available for the other properties. To provide this information, a field program from 1984 to 1995 obtained profiles of snowpack grain size, density, and temperature near the time of maximum snow accumulation, at sites distributed across the basin. A synoptic basin-wide sampling program in 1985 showed that the snowpack exhibits consistent properties across large regions. Typically, the snowpack in the Wyoming region contains large amounts of depth hoar, with grain sizes up to 5 mm, while the snowpack in Colorado and Utah is dominated by rounded snow grains less than 2 mm in diameter. In the Wyoming region, large depth hoar crystals in shallow snowpacks yield the lowest emissivities or coldest brightness temperatures observed across the entire basin. Yearly differences in the average grain sizes result primarily from variations in the relative amount of depth hoar within the snowpack. The average grain size for the Colorado and Utah regions shows much less variation than do the grain sizes from the Wyoming region. Furthermore, the greatest amounts of depth hoar occur in the Wyoming region during 1987 and 1992, years with strong El Nin??o Southern Oscillation, but the Colorado and Utah regions do not show this behavior.

  14. Microwave-assisted oxidation of phosphite-type antioxidant additives in polyethylene film extracts.

    PubMed

    Garrido-López, Alvaro; Sancet, Idoia; Montaño, Patricia; González, Rosario; Tena, María Teresa

    2007-12-21

    Two oxidation methods for reducing the analysis time required to determine Irgafos 126 and Irgafos 168 by pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were optimised and compared. Analyte oxidation was performed using sodium peroxodisulphate (SPD) as oxidation agent and two different heating methods: with a hotplate and a reflux apparatus; and with a microwave oven. The influence of variables, such as oxidation time, temperature and sodium peroxodisulphate concentration was studied using a central composite design in order to optimise experimental conditions. A temperature of 68 degrees C for 2.5h and a SPD concentration of around 6 x 10(-4)M were required for conventional oxidation, while a temperature of 120 degrees C for 30 min and a SPD concentration of 4 x 10(-4)M were found to be the best for microwave-assisted oxidation. After optimising the methods, their repeatability values were calculated and the two methods were applied to a solution containing other additives in order to check that they were not affected by the oxidation treatment and thus confirm that the methods could be used for oxidation of I126 and I168 in pressurised liquid extracts of polyethylene film samples before their determination by HPLC. Finally, the methods were applied to the analysis of antioxidants in polyethylene film samples.

  15. Structure sensitive in situ Raman study of iron passive films using SERS-active Fe/Au(111) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allongue, P.; Joiret, S.

    2005-03-01

    This work describes the preparation of well-defined Fe/Au(111) /mica substrates for in situ Raman studies of the iron passive film with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It is a two-step technique in which a SERS active (111) epitaxial gold substrate is prepared by resistive evaporation on mica. An epitaxial Fe(110) film is then electrodeposited to serve as iron electrode. It is shown that the SERS enhancement factor depends primarily on the good matching between the gold film plasmon resonance wavelength λP and the excitation wavelength. The iron thickness is the second main parameter controlling the SERS enhancement factor with a maximum found for a thickness of 20 monolayers. Under optimized conditions an amplification factor of 5×104 is demonstrated with respect to the case of a bulk polycrystalline iron substrate. This technique allows the recording of Raman spectra of nm-thick passive films within a few seconds only, which opens up to nearly real-time bias-dependent investigations of the chemistry at the electrochemical interface. In addition, taking advantage of the well-defined structure of the Fe(110)/Au(111)/ mica substrates, we present a preliminary structure-sensitive in situ Raman study of the iron passive film formed in a borate solution of pH8.4 . It is thought that this simple approach of promoting SERS should find more general interest for the electrochemistry community.

  16. Glacier surface melt characterization and trend analysis (1992-2011) in the Russian High Arctic from combined resolution-enhanced scatterometer and passive microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Ramage, J. M.; Semmens, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Global warming has been pronounced in the remote glacierized archipelagoes (Severnaya Zemlya, Novaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land) of the Russian High Arctic (RHA) and its effect on the low altitude, high latitude small ice caps needs examination. The timing and spatial variability of snow melt onset, duration and intensity are key factors influencing mass balance and the ice marginal hydrological system as well as important indicators of glacial response to anthropogenic and natural forcings. Characterization and trend analysis of RHA glacier melt behaviors provide insight about assessing the mass loss rate under recent Arctic climate change. However, due to the harsh environment, long term records of glaciological data for RHA are limited, necessitating the application of remotely sensed data to accomplish the research. The high sensitivity to liquid water and the ability to penetrate non-precipitating clouds enables microwave remote sensing to detect glacier surface melt. The appearance of melt water in snow dramatically decreases the returned scatterometer radar signal from active microwave sensors and sharply augments passive microwave emission. Based on this feature, we combined resolution-enhanced ERS-1/2 C-band (1992-2000), QuickSCAT Ku-band (2000-2009), ASCAT C-band (2009-2011) scatterometer data and SSMI 37 GHz (1995-2007) vertically polarized passive microwave products from Brigham Young University and analyzed glacier surface melt trends from 1992 to 2011 with a spatial resolution downscaled to 4.45km. We concatenated scatterometer derived melt behaviors by overlapping years and refined the results based on passive microwave data. Cross-validation shows that melt timing to be consistent between the active and passive sensors. Trend analysis (α < 0.005) reveals that the average glacier surface melt onset date occurs earlier by approximately 0.85 days/year in Severnaya Zemlya which outpaced the mean advancing rate in the pan-Arctic. Surrounded by ocean

  17. Low temperature charge transport and microwave absorption of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polymer composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon coated Fe nanoparticle–PVC composite films were prepared by solution casting method. ► A low electrical percolation threshold of 2.2 was achieved. ► The low temperature electrical conductivity follows variable range hopping type conduction. ► An EMI shielding of 18 dB was achieved in 200 micron thick film. -- Abstract: In this paper, the low temperature electrical conductivity and microwave absorption properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polyvinyl chloride composite films are investigated for different filler fractions. The filler particles are prepared by the pyrolysis of ferrocene at 980 °C and embedded in polyvinyl chloride matrix. The high resolution transmission electron micrographs of the filler material have shown a 5 nm thin layer graphitic carbon covering over iron particles. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the composite film changes by 10 orders of magnitude with the increase of filler concentration. A percolation threshold of 2.2 and an electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI SE) of ∼18.6 dB in 26.5–40 GHz range are observed for 50 wt% loading. The charge transport follows three dimensional variable range hopping conduction.

  18. Crop moisture estimation over the southern Great Plains with dual polarization 1.66 centimeter passive microwave data from Nimbus 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, M. J.; Harder, P. H., II; Wilke, G. D.; Huebner, G. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Moisture content of snow-free, unfrozen soil is inferred using passive microwave brightness temperatures from the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus-7. Investigation is restricted to the two polarizations of the 1.66 cm wavelength sensor. Passive microwave estimates of soil moisture are of two basic categories; those based upon soil emissivity and those based upon the polarization of soil emission. The two methods are compared and contrasted through the investigation of 54 potential functions of polarized brightness temperatures and, in some cases, ground-based temperature measurements. Of these indices, three are selected for the estimated emissivity, the difference between polarized brightness temperatures, and the normalized polarization difference. Each of these indices is about equally effective for monitoring soil moisture. Using an antecedent precipitation index (API) as ground control data, temporal and spatial analyses show that emissivity data consistently give slightly better soil moisture estimates than depolarization data. The difference, however, is not statistically significant. It is concluded that polarization data alone can provide estimates of soil moisture in areas where the emissivity cannot be inferred due to nonavailability of surface temperature data.

  19. Aspects of passive magnetic levitation based on high-T(sub c) superconducting YBCO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenhuber, P.; Moon, F. C.

    1995-04-01

    Passive magnetic levitation systems reported in the past were mostly confined to bulk superconducting materials. Here we present fundamental studies on magnetic levitation employing cylindrical permanent magnets floating above high-T(sub c) superconducting YBCO thin films (thickness about 0.3 mu m). Experiments included free floating rotating magnets as well as well-established flexible beam methods. By means of the latter, we investigated levitation and drag force hysteresis as well as magnetic stiffness properties of the superconductor-magnet arrangement. In the case of vertical motion of the magnet, characteristic high symmetry of repulsive (approaching) and attractive (withdrawing) branches of the pronounced force-displacement hysteresis could be detected. Achievable force levels were low as expected but sufficient for levitation of permanent magnets. With regard to magnetic stiffness, thin films proved to show stiffness-force ratios about one order of magnitude higher than bulk materials. Phenomenological models support the measurements. Regarding the magnetic hysteresis of the superconductor, the Irie-Yamafuji model was used for solving the equation of force balance in cylindrical coordinates allowing for a macroscopic description of the superconductor magnetization. This procedure provided good agreement with experimental levitation force and stiffness data during vertical motion. For the case of (lateral) drag force basic qualitative characteristics could be recovered, too. It is shown that models, based on simple asymmetric magnetization of the superconductor, describe well asymptotic transition of drag forces after the change of the magnet motion direction. Virgin curves (starting from equilibrium, i.e. symmetric magnetization) are approximated by a linear approach already reported in literature only. This paper shows that basic properties of superconducting thin films allow for their application to magnetic levitation or - without need of levitation

  20. Aspects of passive magnetic levitation based on high-T(sub c) superconducting YBCO thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenhuber, P.; Moon, F. C.

    1995-01-01

    Passive magnetic levitation systems reported in the past were mostly confined to bulk superconducting materials. Here we present fundamental studies on magnetic levitation employing cylindrical permanent magnets floating above high-T(sub c) superconducting YBCO thin films (thickness about 0.3 mu m). Experiments included free floating rotating magnets as well as well-established flexible beam methods. By means of the latter, we investigated levitation and drag force hysteresis as well as magnetic stiffness properties of the superconductor-magnet arrangement. In the case of vertical motion of the magnet, characteristic high symmetry of repulsive (approaching) and attractive (withdrawing) branches of the pronounced force-displacement hysteresis could be detected. Achievable force levels were low as expected but sufficient for levitation of permanent magnets. With regard to magnetic stiffness, thin films proved to show stiffness-force ratios about one order of magnitude higher than bulk materials. Phenomenological models support the measurements. Regarding the magnetic hysteresis of the superconductor, the Irie-Yamafuji model was used for solving the equation of force balance in cylindrical coordinates allowing for a macroscopic description of the superconductor magnetization. This procedure provided good agreement with experimental levitation force and stiffness data during vertical motion. For the case of (lateral) drag force basic qualitative characteristics could be recovered, too. It is shown that models, based on simple asymmetric magnetization of the superconductor, describe well asymptotic transition of drag forces after the change of the magnet motion direction. Virgin curves (starting from equilibrium, i.e. symmetric magnetization) are approximated by a linear approach already reported in literature only. This paper shows that basic properties of superconducting thin films allow for their application to magnetic levitation or - without need of levitation

  1. Properties and durability of the passive films on a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy and an iron-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharkya, Pallavi

    Alloy 22, a Ni-Cr-Mo-W alloy, and SAM1651, an Fe-Cr-Mo-B-Y-C bulk metallic glass are highly corrosion-resistant alloys. The high corrosion resistance of these alloys is due to the formation of tenacious oxide films on their surfaces. This study examines the reformation behavior of the passive films as a function of the corrosion resistance of the alloys and the corrosivity of the environment. The main tasks of this study were (i) to determine the chemical durability of passive films on these highly corrosion-resistant alloys in aggressive environments, (ii) to investigate the durability after mechanically damaging the passive films either locally or over the entire surface area and to study the reformation kinetics, (iii) to compare the durability of the passive films of the aforementioned highly corrosion resistant alloys with an alloy of intermediate corrosion resistance, AL6XN, and an alloy of less corrosion resistance, 316L SS, (iv) to examine the evolution of the electronic properties of the passive films on alloy 22 and SAM1651 under different environmental conditions such as concentrated chloride solution, acidic solution, temperature, potential and oxyanions, and (v) to develop an understanding of the relationship between the passive films' composition, electronic and electrochemical properties and the performance. A combination of techniques was utilized to meet the above mentioned objectives. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) was used to determine the electrochemical parameters such as freely corroding, breakdown and repassivation potentials. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the electronic properties such as impedance, thickness and capacitance of the passive films. Mott-Schottky (M-S) analysis was used to determine the type and the density of the defects in the passive films. The mechanical durability and reformation kinetics of the passive films was investigated using a scratch-repassivation method. The quality

  2. Effects of passive films on corrosion resistance of uncoated SS316L bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Ning, Xiaohui; Tang, Hongsheng; Guo, Liejin; Liu, Hongtan

    2014-11-01

    The effects of passive films on the corrosion behaviors of uncoated SS316L in anode and cathode environments of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are studied. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarizations are employed to study the corrosion behavior; Mott-Schottky measurements are used to characterize the semiconductor properties of passive films; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses are used to identify the compositions and the depth profiles of passive films. The passive films formed in the PEMFC anode and cathode environments under corresponding conditions both behave as n-type semiconductor. The passive film formed in the anode environment has a single-layer structure, Cr is the major element (Cr/Fe atomic ratio > 1), and the Cr/Fe atomic ratio decreases from the surface to the bulk; while the passive film formed in the PEMFC cathode environment has a bi-layer structure, Fe is the major element (Cr/Fe atomic ratio < 0.5), and in the external layer of the bi-layer structure Fe content increases rapidly and gradually in the internal layer. SS316L shows better corrosion resistance owing to both the high content of Cr oxide in the passive film and low band bending in normal PEMFC anode environments.

  3. Induced conductivity in sol-gel ZnO films by passivation or elimination of Zn vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarski, D. J.; Anwand, W.; Wagner, A.; Saadatkia, P.; Selim, F. A.; Allen, M.; Wenner, B.; Leedy, K.; Allen, J.; Tetlak, S.; Look, D. C.

    2016-09-01

    Undoped and Ga- and Al- doped ZnO films were synthesized using sol-gel and spin coating methods and characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical spectroscopy and Hall-effect measurements. SEM measurements reveal an average grain size of 20 nm and distinct individual layer structure. Measurable conductivity was not detected in the unprocessed films; however, annealing in hydrogen or zinc environment induced significant conductivity (˜10-2 Ω .cm) in most films. Positron annihilation spectroscopy measurements provided strong evidence that the significant enhancement in conductivity was due to hydrogen passivation of Zn vacancy related defects or elimination of Zn vacancies by Zn interstitials which suppress their role as deep acceptors. Hydrogen passivation of cation vacancies is shown to play an important role in tuning the electrical conductivity of ZnO, similar to its role in passivation of defects at the Si/SiO2 interface that has been essential for the successful development of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. By comparison with hydrogen effect on other oxides, we suggest that hydrogen may play a universal role in oxides passivating cation vacancies and modifying their electronic properties.

  4. Observation of microwave conductivity in copper iodide films and relay effect in the dye molecules attached to CuI photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Sirimanne, Prasad M. . E-mail: psirimanne@ifs.ac.lk; Soga, Tetsuo; Kunst, Marinus

    2005-10-15

    Microwave conductivity and two channels of recombination process were observed in the CuI films. Spin orbital splitting resulted in split in the valence band of CuI. The dye molecules attached to the CuI film act as an electron mediator in addition to the sensitization process under back wall-mode illumination. - Graphical abstract: Transient microwave-photoconductivity of CuI film.

  5. Migration from plasticized films into foods. 1. Migration of di-(2-ethylhexyl)adipate from PVC films during home-use and microwave cooking.

    PubMed

    Startin, J R; Sharman, M; Rose, M D; Parker, I; Mercer, A J; Castle, L; Gilbert, J

    1987-01-01

    Migration of di-(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (DEHA) into a diverse range of foods arising from the domestic use of plasticized PVC films has been determined using a stable isotope dilution GC/MS procedure. Aspects of home use reported in this study include the wrapping and covering of foods such as cheese, cooked meats, sandwiches, cakes, fresh fruit and vegetables; the use of films during food preparation such as marinading; covering during microwave reheating of previously prepared foods, and covering during microwave cooking. Contact between film and foods was for differing temperatures and times, representative of the range of conditions likely to be experienced in practice in the home. Migration increased with both the length of contact time and temperature of exposure, with the highest levels observed where there was a direct contact between the film and food, and where the latter had a high fat content on the contact surface. Highest levels of migration were observed for cheese, cooked meats, cakes and for microwave-cooked foods, whilst lower levels were observed for wrapping of unfilled sandwiches, fruit and vegetables (except avocado), and for food preparation including microwave reheating where there was covering of the food in a container but little or no direct contact.

  6. Improving Scatterometry Retrievals of Wind in Hurricanes Using Non-Simultaneous Passive Microwave Estimates of Precipitation and a Split-Step Advection/Convection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fore, Alex; Haddad, Ziad S.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Rodgridez, Ernesto

    2012-03-01

    One of the current problems in the accurate estimation of over-ocean wind from scatterometry observations is the proper accounting for precipitation. Specific cases such as hurricanes are particularly difficult, because precipitation in the eye wall and rain bands can be quite heavy, and therefore, affect the scatterometer signatures so drastically that a category-4 hurricane can appear, to the scatterometer, to have category-1 winds. We have developed an approach to infer and account for the signature of the precipitation from non-simultaneous passive-microwave measurements of rain, with the help of geostationary IR measurements. In this note, we describe the basic approach, and the results of applying it to the data taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Microwave Imager measurements several hours before and after the QuikSCAT observation of Hurricane Rita in September 2005. We also describe how we are enhancing the approach with more realism in the assimilation of the IR information.

  7. Magnetic and microwave absorbing properties of Co-Fe thin films plated on hollow ceramic microspheres of low density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Seon-Tae; Ahn, Joon-Mo; Kim, Keun-Hong

    2004-04-01

    Conductive and magnetic microspheres are fabricated by plating of Co-Fe alloy thin films on hollow ceramic microspheres of low density for the application to lightweight microwave absorbers. Metal plating was carried out in a two-step electroless plating process (pre-treatment of sensitizing and subsequent plating). Uniform coating of the film with about 2 μm thickness was identified by SEM. High-frequency magnetic and microwave absorbing properties were determined in the rubber composites containing the metal-coated microspheres. Due to the conductive and ferromagnetic behavior of the Co-Fe thin films, high dielectric constant and magnetic loss can be obtained in the microwave frequencies. In particular, the magnetic loss increases with Fe content in the alloy films and its frequency dispersion can be explained by ferromagnetic resonance theory. Due to the electromagnetic properties, high absorption rate and thin matching thickness are predicted in the composite layers containing the metal-coated microspheres of low density (about 0.8 g/cc) for the electromagnetic radiation in microwave frequencies.

  8. Reaction Gas Ratio Effect on the Growth of a Diamond Film Using Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Joung, Y H; Kang, F S; Lee, S; Kang, H; Choi, W S; Choi, Y K; Song, B S; Lee, J; Hong, B

    2016-05-01

    In this study, diamond films were prepared using the microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system, which included a DC bias system to enhance the nucleation of the films. The films were synthesized on Si wafers with different ratios of methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases. We have studied the effects of the CH4-to-H2 ratio on the structural and optical properties of diamond films. The thickness and surface profile of the films were characterized via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Raman was used to investigate the structural properties of the diamond films. The refractive indexes as functions of the CH4-to-H2 ratio were measured using an ellipsometer. The FE-SEM analysis showed that the 3 and 5 sccm CH4 created diamond films. The Raman analysis indicated that a nanocrystalline diamond film was formed at 3 sccm; a general diamond film, at 5 sccm; and films similar to the a-C:H film, at 7 sccm. The ellipsometer measurement showed that the refractive index of the synthesized diamond film was around 2.42 at 3 sccm. This value decreased as the CH4 volume increased. PMID:27483918

  9. [Optical Spectroscopy for High-Pressure Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond Films].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Zhi-bin

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond growth by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at high-pressure (34.5 kPa) was investigated. The CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma was detected online by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and the spatial distribution of radicals in the CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma was studied. Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze the properties of the diamond films deposited in different oxygen volume fraction. The uniformity of diamond films quality was researched. The results indicate that the spectrum intensities of C₂, CH and Hα decrease with the oxygen volume fraction increasing. While the intensity ratios of C₂, CH to Hα also reduced as a function of increasing oxygen volume fraction. It is shown that the decrease of the absolute concentration of carbon radicals is attributed to the rise volume fraction of oxygen, while the relative concentration of carbon radicals to hydrogen atom is also reducing, which depressing the growth rate but improving the quality of diamond film. Furthermore, the OH radicals, role of etching, its intensities increase with the increase of oxygen volume fraction. Indicated that the improvement of OH concentration is also beneficial to reduce the content of amorphous carbon in diamond films. The spectrum space diagnosis results show that under high deposition pressure the distribution of the radicals in the CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma is inhomogeneous, especially, that of radical C₂ gathered in the central region. And causing a rapid increase of non-diamond components in the central area, eventually enable the uneven distribution of diamond films quality.

  10. [Optical Spectroscopy for High-Pressure Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond Films].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Zhi-bin

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond growth by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at high-pressure (34.5 kPa) was investigated. The CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma was detected online by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and the spatial distribution of radicals in the CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma was studied. Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze the properties of the diamond films deposited in different oxygen volume fraction. The uniformity of diamond films quality was researched. The results indicate that the spectrum intensities of C₂, CH and Hα decrease with the oxygen volume fraction increasing. While the intensity ratios of C₂, CH to Hα also reduced as a function of increasing oxygen volume fraction. It is shown that the decrease of the absolute concentration of carbon radicals is attributed to the rise volume fraction of oxygen, while the relative concentration of carbon radicals to hydrogen atom is also reducing, which depressing the growth rate but improving the quality of diamond film. Furthermore, the OH radicals, role of etching, its intensities increase with the increase of oxygen volume fraction. Indicated that the improvement of OH concentration is also beneficial to reduce the content of amorphous carbon in diamond films. The spectrum space diagnosis results show that under high deposition pressure the distribution of the radicals in the CH₄/H₂/O₂plasma is inhomogeneous, especially, that of radical C₂ gathered in the central region. And causing a rapid increase of non-diamond components in the central area, eventually enable the uneven distribution of diamond films quality. PMID:26978897

  11. Improving Global Analysis and Short-Range Forecast Using Rainfall and Moisture Observations Derived from TRMM and SSM/I Passive Microwave Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Zhang, Sara Q.; daSilva, Arlindo M.; Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Simpson, Joanne

    2000-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission, a satellite project under consideration as a follow-on to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) by the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) in the United States, the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) in Japan, and other international partners, comprises an improved TRMM-like satellite and a constellation of 8 satellites carrying passive microwave radiometers to provide global rainfall measurements at 3-hour intervals. The success of this concept relies on the merits of rainfall estimates derived from passive microwave radiometers. This article offers a proof-of-concept demonstration of the benefits of using, rainfall and total precipitable water (TPW) information derived from such instruments in global data assimilation with observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and 2 Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) instruments. Global analyses that optimally combine observations from diverse sources with physical models of atmospheric and land processes can provide a comprehensive description of the climate systems. Currently, such data analyses contain significant errors in primary hydrological fields such as precipitation and evaporation, especially in the tropics. We show that assimilating the 6-h averaged TMI and SSM/I surface rainrate and TPW retrievals improves not only the hydrological cycle but also key climate parameters such as clouds, radiation, and the upper tropospheric moisture in the analysis produced by the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System, as verified against radiation measurements by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument and brightness temperature observations by the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) instruments. Typically, rainfall assimilation improves clouds and radiation in areas of active convection, as well as the latent heating and large-scale motions in the tropics, while TPW assimilation leads to reduced

  12. Implications of RFI at L-Band on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture from Space: Experience with ESTAR During SGP97

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    2000-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing in the protected band at 1.413 GHz (L-band) is important for monitoring parameters of the ocean and land surface such as soil moisture and sea surface salinity. These parameters are needed for understanding energy exchange between the surface and atmosphere and therefore are important for improving our understanding of weather and climate change. Although the band at 1.413 GHz is protected for passive use, airborne radiometers experience problems with RFI. For example, during the Southern Great Plains Experiment (1997) the ESTAR radiometer experienced significant RFI associated with airports, presumably air traffic control radar. This is a potential problem for future sensors in space planned for remote sensing of the earth surface in this frequency band.

  13. Effect of excimer laser annealing on a-InGaZnO thin-film transistors passivated by solution-processed hybrid passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermundo, Juan Paolo; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Fujii, Mami N.; Nonaka, Toshiaki; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of excimer laser annealing (ELA) as a low temperature annealing alternative to anneal amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) passivated by a solution-processed hybrid passivation layer. Usually, a-IGZO is annealed using thermal annealing at high temperatures of up to 400 °C. As an alternative to high temperature thermal annealing, two types of ELA, XeCl (308 nm) and KrF (248 nm) ELA, are introduced. Both ELA types enhanced the electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs leading to a mobility improvement of ~13 cm2 V-1 s-1 and small threshold voltage which varied from ~0-3 V. Furthermore, two-dimensional heat simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics was used to identify possible degradation sites, analyse laser heat localization, and confirm that the substrate temperature is below 50 °C. The two-dimensional heat simulation showed that the substrate temperature remained at very low temperatures, less than 30 °C, during ELA. This implies that any flexible material can be used as the substrate. These results demonstrate the large potential of ELA as a low temperature annealing alternative for already-passivated a-IGZO TFTs.

  14. CDRD and PNPR satellite passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms: EuroTRMM/EURAINSAT origins and H-SAF operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnai, A.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G. J.; Bizzarri, B.; Casella, D.; Dietrich, S.; Di Paola, F.; Panegrossi, G.; Sanò, P.

    2013-04-01

    Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF) is a EUMETSAT (European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites) program, designed to deliver satellite products of hydrological interest (precipitation, soil moisture and snow parameters) over the European and Mediterranean region to research and operations users worldwide. Six satellite precipitation algorithms and concomitant precipitation products are the responsibility of various agencies in Italy. Two of these algorithms have been designed for maximum accuracy by restricting their inputs to measurements from conical and cross-track scanning passive microwave (PMW) radiometers mounted on various low Earth orbiting satellites. They have been developed at the Italian National Research Council/Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate in Rome (CNR/ISAC-Rome), and are providing operational retrievals of surface rain rate and its phase properties. Each of these algorithms is physically based, however, the first of these, referred to as the Cloud Dynamics and Radiation Database (CDRD) algorithm, uses a Bayesian-based solution solver, while the second, referred to as the PMW Neural-net Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR) algorithm, uses a neural network-based solution solver. Herein we first provide an overview of the two initial EU research and applications programs that motivated their initial development, EuroTRMM and EURAINSAT (European Satellite Rainfall Analysis and Monitoring at the Geostationary Scale), and the current H-SAF program that provides the framework for their operational use and continued development. We stress the relevance of the CDRD and PNPR algorithms and their precipitation products in helping secure the goals of H-SAF's scientific and operations agenda, the former helpful as a secondary calibration reference to other algorithms in H-SAF's complete mix of algorithms. Descriptions of the algorithms' designs are provided

  15. Identity of Passive Film Formed on Aluminum in Li-ion BatteryElectrolytes with LiPF6

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xueyuan; Devine, T.M.

    2006-09-01

    The passive film that forms on aluminum in 1:1 ethylene carbonate + ethylmethyl carbonate with 1.2M LiPF{sub 6} and 1:1 ethylene carbonate + dimethyl carbonate with 1.0M LiPF{sub 6} was investigated by a combination of electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements (EQCM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. During anodic polarization of aluminum a film of AlF{sub 3} forms on top of the air-formed oxide, creating a duplex, or two-layered film. The thickness of the AlF{sub 3} increases with the applied potential. Independent measurements of film thickness by EQCM and EIS indicate that at a potential of 5.5V vs. Li/Li{sup +}, the thickness of the AlF{sub 3} is approximately 1 nm.

  16. Electric field modulation of magnetic anisotropy and microwave absorption properties in Fe50Ni50/Teflon composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhenjun; He, Jun; Ou, Xiulong; Wang, Yu; He, Shuli; Zhao, Dongliang; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-05-01

    Fe50Ni50 nanoparticle films with the size about 6 nm were deposited by a high energetic cluster deposition source. An electric field of about 0 - 40 kV was applied on the sample platform when the films were prepared. The field assisted deposition technique can dramatically induce in-plane magnetic anisotropy. To probe the microwave absorption properties, the Fe50Ni50 nanoparticles were deliberately deposited on the dielectric Teflon sheet. Then the laminated Fe50Ni50/Teflon composites were used to do reflection loss scan. The results prove that the application of electric field is an effective avenue to improve the GHz microwave absorption performance of our magnetic nanoparticles films expressed by the movement of reflection loss peak to high GHz region for the composites.

  17. Investigation of the surface passivation mechanism through an Ag-doped Al-rich film using a solution process.

    PubMed

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-14

    Electronic recombination loss is an important issue for photovoltaic (PV) devices. While it can be reduced by using a passivating layer, most of the techniques used to prepare passivating layers are either not cost effective or not applicable for device applications. Previously, it was reported that a low cost sol-gel derived Al-rich zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) film serves as an effective passivating layer for p-type silicon but is not effective for n-type silicon. Herein, we studied the elemental composition of the film and the interfacial structure of ZnO:Al:Ag/n-Si using TEM, XPS, FTIR, and SIMS analyses. The XPS analysis revealed that Ag-rich zones randomly formed in the film near the ZnO:Al:Ag//n-Si interface, which induced a positive charge at the interface. The maximal value of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff ≈ 1581 μs) is obtained for a wafer using the ZnO:Al:Ag passivating layer with RAg/Zn = 2%. The corresponding limiting surface recombination velocity is ∼16 cm s(-1). The FTIR absorption area of Si-H bonds is used to calculate the hydrogen content in the film. The hydrogen content is increased with increasing Ag content up to RAg/Zn = 2% to a maximal value of 3.89 × 10(22) atoms per cm(3) from 3.03 × 10(22) atoms per cm(3) for RAg/Zn = 0%. The positive charge induced at the interface may cause band bending, which would produce an electric field that repels the minority charge carriers from the interface to the bulk of n-Si. Two basic phenomena, chemical passivation due to Si-H bonding and field effect passivation due to the charge induced at the interface, have been observed for effective passivation of the n-Si surface. An implied Voc of 688.1 mV is obtained at an illumination intensity of 1 sun. PMID:26661502

  18. Microwave properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes films below percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay; Xie, Leiming; Zagozdzon-Wosik, Wanda; Schmidt, Howard K.; Wosik, Jarek

    2009-06-01

    A film residue obtained by evaporating surfactant-stabilized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) suspension was characterized at 12 GHz using a scanning-sample dielectric resonator technique. Resonant frequency and quality factor changes were measured and cavity perturbation method was used to calculate the SWNT complex permittivity. The effective permittivity of the SWNT was determined as (3516-j316.5), which provided an average dielectric constant and conductivity for a single SWNT to be 8.1×105 and 8.4×106 S/m, respectively. Microwave induced losses originated only from the electric field, not from the magnetic field, thus indicating an absence of direct electrical contact between nanotubes and a below percolation-limit configuration.

  19. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Excellent Passivation of p-Type Si Surface by Sol-Gel Al2O3 Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hai-Qing; Zhou, Chun-Lan; Cao, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Lei; Li, Hai-Ling; Diao, Hong-Wei

    2009-08-01

    Al2O3 films with a thickness of about 100 nm synthesized by spin coating and thermally treated are applied for field-induced surface passivation of p-type crystalline silicon. The level of surface passivation is determined by techniques based on photoconductance. An effective surface recombination velocity below 100 cm/s is obtained on 10Ω ·cm p-type c-Si wafers (Cz Si). A high density of negative fixed charges in the order of 1012 cm-2 is detected in the Al2O3 films and its impact on the level of surface passivation is demonstrated experimentally. Furthermore, a comparison between the surface passivation achieved for thermal SiO2 and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition SiNx:H films on the same c-Si is presented. The high negative fixed charge density explains the excellent passivation of p-type c-Si by Al2O3.

  20. Effect of low thermal budget annealing on surface passivation of silicon by ALD based aluminum oxide films.

    PubMed

    Vandana; Batra, Neha; Gope, Jhuma; Singh, Rajbir; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Tyagi, Sanjay; Pathi, P; Srivastava, S K; Rauthan, C M S; Singh, P K

    2014-10-21

    Thermal ALD deposited Al2O3 films on silicon show a marked difference in surface passivation quality as a function of annealing time (using a rapid thermal process). An effective and quality passivation is realized in short anneal duration (∼100 s) in nitrogen ambient which is reflected in the low surface recombination velocity (SRV <10 cm s(-1)). The deduced values are close to the best reported SRV obtained by the high thermal budget process (with annealing time between 10-30 min), conventionally used for improved surface passivation. Both as-deposited and low thermal budget annealed films show the presence of positive fixed charges and this is never been reported in the literature before. The role of field and chemical passivation is investigated in terms of fixed charge and interface defect densities. Further, the importance of the annealing step sequence in the MIS structure fabrication protocol is also investigated from the view point of its effect on the nature of fixed charges.

  1. Desorption of Ag from Grain Boundaries in Ag Film on Br and H-Passivated Si(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Anupam; Batabyal, R.; Mahato, J. C.; Dev, B. N.; Sundaravel, B.

    2011-07-15

    Growth of Ag film on Br- and H-passivated Si(111) surfaces was examined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) techniques. The phenomenon of thermal grooving was observed after annealing at higher temperatures. Hierarchical desorption of Ag from the grain boundaries produce a fractal structure of Ag-depleted regions. Hierarchical desorption may be used for nanopatterning of the layer.

  2. Composition analysis of the passive film on the carbon electrode of a lithium-ion battery with an EC-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. R.; Wang, Y. Y.; Wan, C. C.

    This work examines the formation of a passive film on the carbon electrode of lithium-ion batteries. With a single solvent of EC (ethylene carbonate), the structure of the passive film is found to be (CH 2OCOOLi) 2. In a DEC (diethyl carbonate) or DMC (dimethyl carbonate) system, C 2H 5OCOOLi and Li 2CO 3 are formed on the surface of the carbon electrode. According to results from mass spectra, CO 2 gas is the main product when EC is decomposed. By contrast, DEC is decomposed into CO and C 2H 6, and DMC into CO and CH 4. These findings suggest that the composition of the passive film depends on the chosen solvent. In a binary solvent system which contains EC, the passive film contains chiefly (CH 2OCOOLi) 2, which is identical to a single EC solvent system.

  3. Combined Brillouin light scattering and microwave absorption study of magnon-photon coupling in a split-ring resonator/YIG film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, S.; Maier-Flaig, H.; Gross, R.; Hu, C.-M.; Huebl, H.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Weiler, M.

    2016-08-01

    Microfocused Brillouin light scattering (BLS) and microwave absorption (MA) are used to study magnon-photon coupling in a system consisting of a split-ring microwave resonator and an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film. The split-ring resonator is defined by optical lithography and loaded with a 1 μm-thick YIG film grown by liquid phase epitaxy. BLS and MA spectra of the hybrid system are simultaneously recorded as a function of the applied magnetic field magnitude and microwave excitation frequency. Strong coupling of the magnon and microwave resonator modes is found with a coupling strength of geff /2π = 63 MHz. The combined BLS and MA data allow us to study the continuous transition of the hybridized modes from a purely magnonic to a purely photonic mode by varying the applied magnetic field and microwave frequency. Furthermore, the BLS data represent an up-conversion of the microwave frequency coupling to optical frequencies.

  4. Fabrication of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films by decomposition of hexamethyldisilane with microwave discharge flow of Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Haruhiko; Kumakura, Motoki; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Niibe, Masahito; Kanda, Kazuhiro; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films have been fabricated by the decomposition of hexamethyldisilane with a microwave discharge flow of Ar. Mechanically hard films were obtained by applying radio-frequency (RF) bias voltages to the substrate. The atomic compositions of the films were analyzed by a combination of Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical structure was analyzed by carbon-K near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, high-resolution XPS, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. The structural changes upon the application of RF bias were investigated, and the concentration of O atoms near the film surface was found to play a key role in the mechanical hardness of the present films.

  5. The role of passive surface films on corrosion fatigue crack initiation. Final report, August 15, 1987--July 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.W.

    1992-12-31

    Fatigue testing on commercially pure titanium with low and high oxygen contents, chosen to produce quite different slip behaviors, wavy and planar, respectively, was carried out in air and in 1M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, a strongly passivating environment for Ti. Goal was comparison of experimental fatigue data with a published model which rationalizes fatigue crack initiation under passive corrosion conditions. Although the general features of the experimental data were consistent with the tenets of the model, as was also the case in prior work using the stainless steel superalloy A-286, it appeared that the passivation conditions were so strong as to preclude the primary event proposed as the basis for the model, namely the emergence of slip steps through the passive film, thus permitting corrosive fatigue crack initiation. It is possible that choice of a less strong passivating environment would permit a better comparison of model and experiment for the CP Ti, an otherwise suitable experimental material.

  6. Microwave properties and characterization of co-evaporated BSCCO thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, F. A.; Chorey, C. M.; Stan, M. A.; Nordgren, C. E.; Kwor, R. Y.; Kalkur, T. S.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive characterization of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) thin films deposited by co-evaporation on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates was performed. The films had a T(sub c) (R = O) of approximately 78 K, and were predominantly c-axis oriented, with critical current densities (J(sub c)) at 4.5 K of 1.6 x 10(exp 6) and 1.1 x 10(exp 6) A cm(sup -2), for the samples on SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, respectively. The microwave properties of the films were examined by three techniques. The complex conductivity sigma(sub *) = sigma(sub 1) - j(sigma(sub 2)) and the magnetic penetration depth (A) were measured by power transmission at 30.6 GHz; the surface resistance (R(sub s)) was measured using a cavity resonator at 58.9 GHz, and the transmission line losses were determined by measuring the quality factor (Q) of a linear microstrip resonator at 10.4 and 20.2 GHz. The complex conductivity for the film on LaAlO3 was determined to be (2.0-j10) x 10(exp 5) S/m at 77 K. It was observed that in the superconducting state sigma(sub 1) deviates from both the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory and the two-fluid model. Values of lambda were found to be approximately 2.0 and 1.1 microns at 77 K and 20 K respectively, and were obtained for the film on LaAlO3. The value of lambda at 20 K was approximately three times larger than that of BSCCO single crystals. R(sub s) values of 865 and 1391 mOmega were obtained for the films on SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, respectively, at 77 K and 58.9 GHz. Unloaded Q factors at 20 K of approximately 1100 and 800 at 10.4 and 20.2 GHz respectively, were measured for the BSCCO resonator. Unloaded Q values of 290 and 405 at 20 K were obtained at 10.4 GHz and 20.2 GHz respectively, for an all gold (Au) resonator.

  7. A method for the detection of the severe rain-on-snow event on Banks Island, October 2003, using passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Putkonen, J.

    2008-03-01

    Severe wintertime rain-on-snow (ROS) events create a strong ice layer (or layers) in the snow on arctic tundra that act as a barrier to ungulate grazing. They are linked with large-scale ungulate (reindeer, caribou, elk, and musk-ox) herd declines via starvation and reduced calf production rate when the animals are unable to penetrate the resulting subsnowpack ice layer. ROS events also produce considerable perturbation in the mean wintertime soil temperature under the snowpack. ROS is a sporadic but well-known and significant phenomenon that is currently very poorly documented. Characterization of the distribution and occurrence of severe ROS events is based only on anecdotal evidence, indirect observations of carcasses found adjacent to iced snowpacks, and irregular detection by a sparse observational weather network. We have analyzed in detail a particular ROS event that took place on Banks Island in early October 2003 that resulted in the death of 20,000 musk oxen. We make use of multifrequency passive microwave imagery from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager satellite sensor suite in conjunction with a strong-fluctuation-theory (SFT) emissivity model. We show that a combination of time series analysis and cluster analysis based on microwave spectral gradients and polarization ratios provides a means to detect the stages of the ROS event resulting from the modification of the vertical structure of the snowpack, specifically wetting the snow, the accumulation of liquid water at the base of the snow during the rain event, and the subsequent modification of the snowpack after refreezing. SFT model analysis provides quantitative confirmation of our interpretation of the evolution of the microwave properties of the snowpack as a result of the ROS event. In addition to the grain coarsening owing to destructive metamorphism, we detect the presence of the internal water and ice layers, directly identifying the physical properties producing the hazardous conditions

  8. Challenges and opportunities for multi-functional oxide thin films for voltage tunable radio frequency/microwave components

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanyam, Guru; Cole, M. W.; Sun, Nian X.; Kalkur, Thottam S.; Sbrockey, Nick M.; Tompa, Gary S.; Guo, Xiaomei; Chen, Chonglin; Alpay, S. P.; Rossetti, G. A.; Dayal, Kaushik; Chen, Long-Qing; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2013-11-21

    There has been significant progress on the fundamental science and technological applications of complex oxides and multiferroics. Among complex oxide thin films, barium strontium titanate (BST) has become the material of choice for room-temperature-based voltage-tunable dielectric thin films, due to its large dielectric tunability and low microwave loss at room temperature. BST thin film varactor technology based reconfigurable radio frequency (RF)/microwave components have been demonstrated with the potential to lower the size, weight, and power needs of a future generation of communication and radar systems. Low-power multiferroic devices have also been recently demonstrated. Strong magneto-electric coupling has also been demonstrated in different multiferroic heterostructures, which show giant voltage control of the ferromagnetic resonance frequency of more than two octaves. This manuscript reviews recent advances in the processing, and application development for the complex oxides and multiferroics, with the focus on voltage tunable RF/microwave components. The over-arching goal of this review is to provide a synopsis of the current state-of the-art of complex oxide and multiferroic thin film materials and devices, identify technical issues and technical challenges that need to be overcome for successful insertion of the technology for both military and commercial applications, and provide mitigation strategies to address these technical challenges.

  9. Formation of mesoscopic metallic filaments in manganite thin films imaged by microwave impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Lai, Keji; Yang, Yongliang; Ma, Yue; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Nakamura, Masao; Sheng, Zhigao; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshi

    2012-02-01

    We study the ferromagnetic metallic domains from the charge-order insulating background at mesoscopic length scale in a Pr0.55Ca0.75Sr0.25MnO3 thin film using a variable temperature microwave impedance microscope (MIM). The metallic state in this compound can be easily induced at a moderate magnetic field as low as 2 T observed by both the transport and MIM. The temperature dependent transport under 1.2 T shows a large hysteresis loop. MIM allows us to observe the formation and melting of metallic domains at different temperatures during the cooling and warming processes. At higher temperatures, the metallic domains first emerge in small isolated filaments along certain crystal axes of the LSAT(110) substrate, suggesting that the local strain plays an important role. Surprisingly, small insulating islands remain in the metallic ground state and persist up to very high magnetic fields, indicating strong pining sites. Lastly, the sizes of the insulating islands at the ground state increase when the film is field cooled at lower speeds, suggesting s glassy order in this compound.

  10. Microwave Characterization of Low-k Dielectric Thin Films using a Coplanar Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radican, Kevin P.; Koeck, Deborah C.; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Spencer, Gregory; Donnelly, David; Galloway, Heather C.

    2003-03-01

    As microelectronic logic devices increase in speed the RC time delay is becoming of greater concern. One remedy is the use of low-k dielectrics along with less resistive metals such as Cu in back end processing. We have demonstrated a method of forming coplanar waveguides on low-k dielectric materials deposited on SiC/Si wafers. These thin films are prepared by the usual semiconductor industry methods. Then, the dielectric properties of the low-k dielectric thin films on wafers were measured at microwave frequencies using coplanar waveguide test structures. Several OSG low k materials were investigated before and after chemical mechanical planarization processing which involves placing the dielectrics in a liquid abrasive slurry. We will report on the details of the fabrication of the waveguide structures using argon laser beam lithography, magnetron sputter deposition, and reactive plasma etching. We will also report on the electrical changes observed due to the chemical processing. Electrical measurements were taken using an Agilent network analyzer, and Cascade Microtech probe station.

  11. Quantitative determination of sheet resistance of semiconducting films by microwave near-field probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Alexander N.; Demidov, Evgenii V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and experimentally approve a method for determining the sheet resistance Rsh of a semiconducting film on a dielectric substrate from the near-field (NF) microwave measurements data. The method is based on the earlier developed theory for NF microscopy of plane layered media. The fitting parameters of the theoretical model were sought using a universal set of calibration standards, specifically, bulk-homogeneous Si slabs varying in the doping degree. Experimental investigations were assisted by a 3 GHz resonance probe with an aperture of about 1 mm. As test structures we used n-GaN films of 0.03-15 kΩ sheet resistance, grown on a sapphire substrate. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by comparing the NF probing data with the dc measurements of Rsh in the Van-der-Pauw (VDP) method. For Rsh < 4 kΩ the root-mean-square deviation of NF from VDP data is approximately equal to 20%.

  12. An electrode-free method of characterizing the microwave dielectric properties of high-permittivity thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovtun, V.; Pashkov, V.; Kempa, M.; Kamba, S.; Eremenko, A.; Molchanov, V.; Poplavko, Y.; Yakymenko, Y.; Lee, J. H.; Schlom, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    A thin dielectric resonator consisting of a dielectric substrate and the thin film deposited upon it is shown to suffice for microwave characterization and dielectric parameter measurement of high-permittivity thin films without electrodes. The TE01δ resonance mode was excited and measured in thin (down to 0.1 mm) rectangular- or disk-shaped low-loss dielectric substrates (D ˜10 mm) with permittivity ɛ'≥10 inserted into a cylindrical shielding cavity or rectangular waveguide. The in-plane dielectric permittivity and losses of alumina, DyScO3, SmScO3, and (LaAlO3)0.29(SrAl1/2Ta1/2O3)0.71 (LSAT) substrates were measured from 10 to 18 GHz. The substrate thickness optimal for characterization of the overlying thin film was determined as a function of the substrate permittivity. The high sensitivity and efficiency of the method, i.e., of a thin dielectric resonator to the dielectric parameters of an overlying film, was demonstrated by characterizing ultrathin strained EuTiO3 films. A 22 nm thick EuTiO3 film grown on a (100) LSAT substrate and strained in biaxial compression by 0.9% exhibited an increase in microwave permittivity at low temperatures consistent with it being an incipient ferroelectric; no strain-induced ferroelectric phase transition was seen. In contrast, a 100 nm thick EuTiO3 film grown on a (110) DyScO3 substrate and strained in biaxial tension by 1% showed two peaks as a function of temperature in microwave permittivity and loss. These peaks correspond to a strain-induced ferroelectric phase transition near 250 K and to domain wall motion.

  13. Investigation of the surface passivation mechanism through an Ag-doped Al-rich film using a solution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Electronic recombination loss is an important issue for photovoltaic (PV) devices. While it can be reduced by using a passivating layer, most of the techniques used to prepare passivating layers are either not cost effective or not applicable for device applications. Previously, it was reported that a low cost sol-gel derived Al-rich zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) film serves as an effective passivating layer for p-type silicon but is not effective for n-type silicon. Herein, we studied the elemental composition of the film and the interfacial structure of ZnO:Al:Ag/n-Si using TEM, XPS, FTIR, and SIMS analyses. The XPS analysis revealed that Ag-rich zones randomly formed in the film near the ZnO:Al:Ag//n-Si interface, which induced a positive charge at the interface. The maximal value of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff ~ 1581 μs) is obtained for a wafer using the ZnO:Al:Ag passivating layer with RAg/Zn = 2%. The corresponding limiting surface recombination velocity is ~16 cm s-1. The FTIR absorption area of Si-H bonds is used to calculate the hydrogen content in the film. The hydrogen content is increased with increasing Ag content up to RAg/Zn = 2% to a maximal value of 3.89 × 1022 atoms per cm3 from 3.03 × 1022 atoms per cm3 for RAg/Zn = 0%. The positive charge induced at the interface may cause band bending, which would produce an electric field that repels the minority charge carriers from the interface to the bulk of n-Si. Two basic phenomena, chemical passivation due to Si-H bonding and field effect passivation due to the charge induced at the interface, have been observed for effective passivation of the n-Si surface. An implied Voc of 688.1 mV is obtained at an illumination intensity of 1 sun.Electronic recombination loss is an important issue for photovoltaic (PV) devices. While it can be reduced by using a passivating layer, most of the techniques used to prepare passivating layers are either not cost effective or not applicable for device

  14. Water-Mediated Photochemical Treatments for Low-Temperature Passivation of Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jae Sang; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kang, Jingu; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Kwanpyo; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Gil; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-27

    The low-temperature electrical passivation of an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistor (TFT) is achieved by a deep ultraviolet (DUV) light irradiation-water treatment-DUV irradiation (DWD) method. The water treatment of the first DUV-annealed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film is likely to induce the preferred adsorption of water molecules at the oxygen vacancies and leads to subsequent hydroxide formation in the bulk a-IGZO films. Although the water treatment initially degraded the electrical performance of the a-IGZO TFTs, the second DUV irradiation on the water-treated devices may enable a more complete metal-oxygen-metal lattice formation while maintaining low oxygen vacancies in the oxide films. Overall, the stable and dense metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) network formation could be easily achieved at low temperatures (below 150 °C). The successful passivation of structural imperfections in the a-IGZO TFTs, such as hydroxyl group (OH-) and oxygen vacancies, mainly results in the enhanced electrical performances of the DWD-processed a-IGZO TFTs (on/off current ratio of 8.65 × 10(9), subthreshold slope of 0.16 V/decade, an average mobility of >6.94 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and a bias stability of ΔVTH < 2.5 V), which show more than a 30% improvement over the simple DUV-treated a-IGZO TFTs.

  15. Water-Mediated Photochemical Treatments for Low-Temperature Passivation of Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jae Sang; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kang, Jingu; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Kwanpyo; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Gil; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-27

    The low-temperature electrical passivation of an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistor (TFT) is achieved by a deep ultraviolet (DUV) light irradiation-water treatment-DUV irradiation (DWD) method. The water treatment of the first DUV-annealed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film is likely to induce the preferred adsorption of water molecules at the oxygen vacancies and leads to subsequent hydroxide formation in the bulk a-IGZO films. Although the water treatment initially degraded the electrical performance of the a-IGZO TFTs, the second DUV irradiation on the water-treated devices may enable a more complete metal-oxygen-metal lattice formation while maintaining low oxygen vacancies in the oxide films. Overall, the stable and dense metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) network formation could be easily achieved at low temperatures (below 150 °C). The successful passivation of structural imperfections in the a-IGZO TFTs, such as hydroxyl group (OH-) and oxygen vacancies, mainly results in the enhanced electrical performances of the DWD-processed a-IGZO TFTs (on/off current ratio of 8.65 × 10(9), subthreshold slope of 0.16 V/decade, an average mobility of >6.94 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and a bias stability of ΔVTH < 2.5 V), which show more than a 30% improvement over the simple DUV-treated a-IGZO TFTs. PMID:27035796

  16. Recombination and thin film properties of silicon nitride and amorphous silicon passivated c-Si following ammonia plasma exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao; Thomson, Andrew F.; Cuevas, Andres; McIntosh, Keith R.

    2015-01-26

    Recombination at silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) passivated crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces is shown to increase significantly following an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) plasma exposure at room temperature. The effect of plasma exposure on chemical structure, refractive index, permittivity, and electronic properties of the thin films is also investigated. It is found that the NH{sub 3} plasma exposure causes (i) an increase in the density of Si≡N{sub 3} groups in both SiN{sub x} and a-Si films, (ii) a reduction in refractive index and permittivity, (iii) an increase in the density of defects at the SiN{sub x}/c-Si interface, and (iv) a reduction in the density of positive charge in SiN{sub x}. The changes in recombination and thin film properties are likely due to an insertion of N–H radicals into the bulk of SiN{sub x} or a-Si. It is therefore important for device performance to minimize NH{sub 3} plasma exposure of SiN{sub x} or a-Si passivating films during subsequent fabrication steps.

  17. Assimilation of Synchronous and Asynchronous Active/Passive Microwave Observations at Different Spatial Scales for Improved Soil Moisture and Crop Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Liu, P. W.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Bongiovanni, T. E.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Assimilation of active and passive (AP) microwave observations at L-band in the crop simulation models is able to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and crop growth in the models. These observations provide complementary information for dynamic heterogeneous landscapes. Active observations are more sensitive to soil surface roughness and vegetation structure, while passive observations are more sensitive to SM. These observations may be available at different spatial and temporal resolutions from different satellite platforms. For example, the present ESA Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission provides passive observations at 1.41 GHz at 25 km every 2-3 days, while the NASA/CONAE Aquarius mission provides L-band AP observations at spatial resolution of 150 km with a repeat coverage of 7 days for global SM products. The planned NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive mission (SMAP) will provide AP observations at 1.26 and 1.41 GHz at the spatial resolutions of 3 and 30 km, respectively, with a repeat coverage of 2-3 days, starting early 2015. The goal of this study is to develop an Ensemble Kalman Filter-based methodology that assimilates synchronously and asynchronously available backscattering coefficients (σ0) and brightness temperatures (TB) at different spatial scales from SMOS and Aquarius. The Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) that contains a suite of crop simulation models will be linked to microwave emission and scattering models (DSSAT-A-P) for the assimilation. The methodology will be implemented in the rain fed agricultural region of the Brazilian La Plata Basin in South America, where soybean is the primary crop. The augmented state vector will include both model states and parameters related to soil and vegetation during the growing season. The methodology will be evaluated using a synthetic experiment and also using observations from SMOS and Aquarius. In preliminary results with synthetic experiment, using asynchronous

  18. Avalanche-like vortex penetration driven by pulsed microwave fields in an epitaxial LaSrCuO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadra-Solís, P.-de-J.; Hernandez, J. M.; García-Santiago, A.; Tejada, J.; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    Different vortex penetration regimes have been registered in the output voltage signal of a magnetometer when single microwave pulses are applied to an epitaxial overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 thin film in a perpendicular dc magnetic field. The onset of a significant variation in the sample magnetization which exists below threshold values of temperature, dc magnetic field, and pulse duration is interpreted as an avalanche-type flux penetration. The microwave contribution to the background electric field suggests that the nucleation of this fast vortex motion is of electric origin, which also guarantees the occurrence of vortex instabilities under adiabatic conditions via the enhancement of the flux flow resistivity. Flux creep phenomena and heat transfer effects act as stabilizing factors against the microwave-pulse-induced fast flux diffusion.

  19. Structure/property relationships in pulsed-laser-deposited ferroelectric thin films for frequency-agile microwave electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, James S.; Carter, A. C.; Chang, Wontae; Pond, Jeffrey M.; Kirchoefer, Steven W.; Chrisey, Douglas B.; Levy, J.; Hubert, C.

    1998-06-01

    Low loss ferroelectric thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) are currently being used to develop a new class of tunable microwave circuits based on the electric field dependence of the dielectric constant. Single phase, (100) oriented Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 (BST) films have been deposited onto (100) LaAlO3, SrTiO3, and MgO substrates. Interdigitated capacitors have been used to measure the dielectric constant and dissipation factor of these films as a function of DC bias and temperature at 1 MHz and as a function of DC bias at 1 to 20 GHz at room temperature. A low phase noise voltage controlled oscillator is currently being developed for use at frequencies from 1 - 20 GHz. To achieve low phase noise in the oscillator will require the loss tangent in the ferroelectric to be films using confocal scanning optical microscopy shows reproducible polarization fluctuations over sub-micrometer length scales for BST films deposited onto SrTiO3 which are not observed for films deposited onto MgO. Dielectric loss in the ferroelectric film is reduced through a combination of post deposition processing and donor/acceptor doping of the films. The lowest dielectric loss measured at microwave frequencies (tan(delta) equals 0.01 at 1 - 10 GHz) has been in a post-deposition annealed Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 film doped with approximately 1 - 2 atomic % Mn.

  20. Cloud Liquid Water Path Comparisons from Passive Microwave and Solar Reflectance Satellite Measurements: Assessment of Sub-Field-of-View Cloud Effects in Microwave Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, Thomas J.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Chou, Joyce

    1997-01-01

    Satellite observations of the cloud liquid water path (LWP) are compared from special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) measurements and GOES 8 imager solar reflectance (SR) measurements to ascertain the impact of sub-field-of-view (FOV) cloud effects on SSM/I 37 GHz retrievals. The SR retrievals also incorporate estimates of the cloud droplet effective radius derived from the GOES 8 3.9-micron channel. The comparisons consist of simultaneous collocated and full-resolution measurements and are limited to nonprecipitating marine stratocumulus in the eastern Pacific for two days in October 1995. The retrievals from these independent methods are consistent for overcast SSM/I FOVS, with RMS differences as low as 0.030 kg/sq m, although biases exist for clouds with more open spatial structure, where the RMS differences increase to 0.039 kg/sq m. For broken cloudiness within the SSM/I FOV the average beam-filling error (BFE) in the microwave retrievals is found to be about 22% (average cloud amount of 73%). This systematic error is comparable with the average random errors in the microwave retrievals. However, even larger BFEs can be expected for individual FOVs and for regions with less cloudiness. By scaling the microwave retrievals by the cloud amount within the FOV, the systematic BFE can be significantly reduced but with increased RMS differences of O.046-0.058 kg/sq m when compared to the SR retrievals. The beam-filling effects reported here are significant and are expected to impact directly upon studies that use instantaneous SSM/I measurements of cloud LWP, such as cloud classification studies and validation studies involving surface-based or in situ data.

  1. Dielectric constant at x-band microwave frequencies for multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Ahad, Faris B.; Hung, D. S.; Yao, Y. D.; Lee, S. F.; Tu, C. S.; Wang, T. H.; Chen, Y. Y.; Fu, Y. P.

    2009-04-01

    The magnetic-induced dielectric responses of BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films were measured at the X-band microwave frequency ranged from 7 to 12.5 GHz. The measurement was given initially by a high-precision cavity microwave resonator without magnetic field. Both the real and imaginary parts of the permittivity showed its dielectric property as a function of the measuring frequency. The X-band dielectric responses of the BFO thin film were then measured by a controlled magnetic field at room temperature. The data demonstrated up to 2.2% dielectric tunability by using only 3.46 kOe magnetic field at TE107 mode (9.97705 GHz).

  2. Microwave surface resistance of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ thin films deposited by pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGroot, D. C.; Hogan, T. P.; Kannewurf, C. R.; Buchholz, D. B.; Chang, R. P. H.; Gao, F.; Feng, M.; Nordin, R. A.

    1994-03-01

    The microwave surface resistance of superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ thin films deposited by pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE) has been characterized using the parallel plate transmission line resonator method. POMBE is an advanced organometric chemical vapor deposition technique where precursor vapors are precisely metered onto the substrate under computer control. In this study, the POMBE reactor was used to deposit epitaxial films of varying thickness onto LaAlO 3 substrates. The deposition procedure and surface-resistance results for films of varying thicknesses are described. The reduction of surface resistance achieved supports the use of the POMBE technique as a possible method for preparing device-quality high- Tc films and multi-layer structures.

  3. Photovoltaic characteristics of postdeposition iodine-doped amorphous carbon films by microwave surface wave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Omer, Ashraf M.M.; Adhikari, Sudip; Adhikary, Sunil; Uchida, Hideo; Umeno, Masayoshi

    2005-10-17

    The amorphous carbon thin films have been deposited on silicon and quartz substrates by microwave surface wave plasma chemical vapor deposition at low temperature (<100 deg. C) in Ar/CH{sub 4} phase gas. Doping of iodine has been done in the postdeposited films by exposing them in iodine vapor. The photovoltaic measurements of the films were carried out before and after iodine doping. The results show dramatic decrease of optical gap from 3.4 to 0.9 eV corresponding to nondoping to iodine doping conditions, respectively. The preliminary photovoltaic characteristics of the film deposited on n-type silicon substrate under light illumination (AM1.5, 100 mW/cm{sup 2}) reveal a short-circuit current density of 1.15 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}, open-circuit voltage of 177 mV and fill factor of 21.7%.

  4. Effect of microwave plasma treatment on silicon dioxide films grown by atomic layer deposition at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimura, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Hirota, Y.; Sato, Y.; Kabe, Y.

    2013-02-14

    The effects of microwave plasma treatments on the physical and electrical characteristics of silicon dioxide films are discussed. Plasma treatments significantly improve the characteristics at low temperatures. Differences in the type of inert gas, O{sub 2} partial pressure, and total pressure cause differences in the plasma energy and active species concentrations, which affect reduction in the impurity concentrations, generation of dangling bonds, and effective working depth of the plasma. The changes in the electrical characteristics of the plasma-treated oxide films are consistent with those in the physical characteristics. The plasma conditions that result in the best improvements are determined.

  5. Data Assimilation of Space-Based Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals and the Correction for a Dynamic Open Water Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouweleeuw, Ben T.; van Dijik, Albert I. J. M.; Renzullo, Luigi J.

    2011-01-01

    The large observation footprint of low-frequency satellite microwave emissions complicates the interpretation of near-surface soil moisture retrievals. Temporal changes in the extent of smaller water bodies can cause significant and dynamic biases. We analysed the influence of open water on near-surface soil moisture retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) for three areas in Oklahoma, USA. Differences between on-ground observations or model estimates and AMSR-E retrievals were compared to dynamic estimates of open water fraction derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The comparison indicates that seasonally varying biases of up to 20% soil water content can be attributed to the presence of relatively small areas (<5%) of open water in or near the sensor footprint. The results presented here feed into the discussion if the retrieved variable or the observed microwave brightness temperature is most suitable for assimilation with simulated fields from land surface models.

  6. Magnetic and microwave properties of U-type hexaferrite films with high remanence and low ferromagnetic resonance linewidth

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhijuan; Bennett, Steven; Hu, Bolin; Chen, Yajie Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-05-07

    U-type barium hexaferrite films (Ba{sub 4}Ni{sub 1.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 36}O{sub 60}) were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure and magnetic properties of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were performed at X-band. The results indicate an anisotropy field of ∼8 kOe, and the saturation magnetization (4πM{sub s}) of ∼3.6 kG. An optimal post-deposition annealing of films results in a strong (0 0 n) crystallographic texture and a high hysteresis loop squareness (M{sub r}/M{sub s} = 92%) leading to self biased properties. Furthermore, the highly self-biased ferrite films exhibited an FMR linewidth of ∼200 Oe. The U-type hexaferrite films having low microwave loss, low magnetic anisotropy field, and high squareness are a suitable alternative to Sc or In doped BaM ferrites that have been the choice material for self-biased microwave devices at X-band frequencies.

  7. Fabrication and morphology control of BaWO{sub 4} thin films by microwave assisted chemical bath deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Rui; Liu Chen; Zeng Jia; Li KunWei; Wang Hao

    2009-04-15

    Highly crystallized barium tungstate (BaWO{sub 4}) thin films with dumbbell-like, kernel-like, bowknot-like and cauliflower-like microstructure were synthesized from an aqueous solution containing barium nitrate, ethylenediamine tetraacetate acid disodium and sodium tungstate, via mild microwave assisted chemical bath deposition process. The resulting BaWO{sub 4} films with different morphologies were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectrum, scanning electron microscope, Raman and photoluminescence spectra. The results indicate that the morphologies of final products significantly depend on the reaction conditions including the reaction time, the initial concentration of precursor reagent and the physicochemical characteristics of the substrates. Furthermore, the oriented aggregation mechanism is proposed as a possible formation mechanism of the films with specific morphologies. - Graphical abstract: Highly crystallized BaWO{sub 4} thin films with controllable morphologies have been synthesized via mild microwave assisted chemical bath deposition. The oriented aggregation mechanism has been proposed as the possible formation mechanism of specific films.

  8. Micro construction of poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/poly(L-lactic acid) blend film by solution casting under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wei; Liu, Lijian

    2004-07-14

    The micro construction of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) blend films fabricated by solution casting under microwave irradiation was investigated by selective enzymatic degradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results were totally different from the blends obtained by conventional methods. The blend was more homogeneous and the PCL continuous phase more compact as no spherulites and tiny zone separation were observed from the film surface and no PCL network was observed inside the film, and the degradation of a PCL plank by Pseudomonas lipase was significantly retarded. The distributed PLLA micro spheres were enlarged and amorphous. The thermal behavior of the blend by microwave heating revealed that PCL and PLLA underwent a melting process, which induced the variations of the PCL phase and PLLA spheres. The weight loss caused by degradation of the PCL/PLLA blend obtained by conventional methods (B50c) is greater than that of the blend obtained by microwave methods (B50m), which reflects the change in morphology from a loose PCL network (B50c) to a dense PCL plank (B50m).

  9. Surface correlation behaviors of metal-organic Langmuir-Blodgett films on differently passivated Si(001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, J. K.; Kundu, Sarathi

    2013-03-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett films of standard amphiphilic molecules like nickel arachidate and cadmium arachidate are grown on wet chemically passivated hydrophilic (OH-Si), hydrophobic (H-Si), and hydrophilic plus hydrophobic (Br-Si) Si(001) surfaces. Top surface morphologies and height-difference correlation functions g(r) with in-plane separation (r) are obtained from the atomic force microscopy studies. Our studies show that deposited bilayer and trilayer films have self-affine correlation behavior irrespective of different passivations and different types of amphiphilic molecules, however, liquid like correlation coexists only for a small part of r, which is located near the cutoff length (1/κ) or little below the correlation length ξ obtained from the liquid like and self-affine fitting, respectively. Thus, length scale dependent surface correlation behavior is observed for both types of Langmuir-Blodgett films. Metal ion specific interactions (ionic, covalent, etc.,) in the headgroup and the nature of the terminated bond (polar, nonpolar, etc.,) of Si surface are mainly responsible for having different correlation parameters.

  10. Satellite passive microwave remote sensing for estimating diurnal variation of leaf water content, as a proxy of evapotranspiration, in the Dry Chaco Forest, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza Bernadas, V.; Grings, F.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Carbajo, A.; Fernandez, R.; Karszenbaum, H.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key component of water cycle, which is strongly linked with environmental condition and vegetation functioning. Since it is very difficult to robustly estimate it from remote sensing data at regional scale it is usually inferred from other proxies using water balance. This work describes a procedure to estimate ET in a dry forest by monitoring diurnal variation of leaf water content (LWC), using multitemporal passive microwave remote sensing observations. Hourly observations provide the opportunity to monitor repetitive diurnal variations of passive microwave observations, which can only be