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Sample records for filtered vacuum arc

  1. Simple filtered repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Yu.; Zhirkov, I. S.; Delplancke-Ogletree, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    A very simple design of cathodic filtered vacuum arc plasma source is proposed. The source without filter has only four components and none of them require precise machining. The source operates in a repetitively pulsed regime, and for laboratory experiments it can be used without water cooling. Despite the simple construction, the source provides high ion current at the filter outlet reaching 2.5% of 400 A arc current, revealing stable operation in a wide pressure range from high vacuum to oxygen pressure up to more than 10-2 mbar. There is no need in complicated power supply system for this plasma source, only one power supply can be used to ignite the arc, to provide the current for the arc itself, to generate the magnetic field in the filter, and provide its positive electric biasing without any additional high power resistance.

  2. The effect of biased plates on transport of vacuum arc plasma through rectangular curved magnetic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, W. Y.; Li, L. H.; Liu, H. T.; Zhao, G.

    2017-07-01

    Filtered cathode vacuum arc deposition can remove the macroparticles produced from the cathode. Positively biasing the whole filter or inserting a biased plate in the filter can increase the plasma transport efficiency. We developed a curved magnetic filter with rectangular cross-section to improve the coating efficiency. In this study, the effect of biased plates at outer-wall and inner-wall on the transport efficiency of vacuum arc plasma through rectangular curved magnetic filter was investigated. A Langmuir probe system is used to measure the distribution properties of the filtered plasma at 15 places in the outlet plane of the filter. The results showed that a positively biased plate at inner-wall would increase the output ion current density and make the plasma concentrate to the middle of the outlet plane.

  3. Macroparticles Reduction Using Filter Free Cathodic Vacuum Arc Deposition Method in ZnO Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Yuvakkumar, R; Peranantham, P; Nathanael, A Joseph; Nataraj, D; Mangalaraj, D; Hong, Sun Ig

    2015-03-01

    We report a new method to reduce macroparticles in ZnO thin films using filter free cathodic vacuum arc deposition without using any cooling arrangements operated at low arc current. The detailed mechanism has been proposed to reduce macroparticles during thin film deposition. The successful reduction of macroparticles was confirmed employing FESEM-EDX studies. FESEM images of ZnO thin films deposited with cathode spot to substrate distance from 10 to 20 cm revealed that the population of the macroparticles were reduced with the increase of cathode spot to substrate distances at low arc current. The prepared ZnO films were characterised and showed good structural and optical properties.

  4. Preparation and investigation of diamond-like carbon stripper foils by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qiwen; Du, Yinghui; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guoji

    2013-04-01

    Thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) stripper foils ˜5 μg/cm2 in thickness were produced and evaluated as heavy-ion strippers for the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator. The DLC layers ˜4 μg/cm2 in thickness were produced by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology onto glass slides coated with betaine-saccharose as releasing agent, which were previously covered with evaporated carbon layers ˜1 μg/cm2 in thickness by the controlled ac arc-discharge method. Irradiation lifetimes of the DLC stripper foils were tested using the heavy-ion beams at the terminal of the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, and compared with those of the standard carbon stripper foils made by the combined dc and ac arc-discharge method. The measurements indicate that the DLC stripper foils outlast the standard combined dc and ac arc-discharge carbon stripper foils by a factor of at least 13 and 4for the 197Au- (˜9 MeV, ˜1 μA) and 63Cu- (˜9 MeV, ˜1 μA) ion beams, respectively. The structure and properties of the DLC foils deposited onto silicon substrates by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology were also evaluated and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the DLC foils contain hardly droplets through the double 90° filters. The X-ray photoelectron spectrum indicates that sp3 bonds of the DLC foils exceed 70%. The integral intensity ratio of the D peak to the G peak (ID/IG) measured by the Raman spectroscopy is0.78.

  5. Contamination due to memory effects in filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, D.R.; Salvadori, M.C.; Verdonck, P.; Brown, I.G.

    2002-08-13

    Thin film synthesis by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition is a widely used technique with a number of important emerging technological applications. A characteristic feature of the method is that during the deposition process not only is the substrate coated by the plasma, but the plasma gun itself and the magnetic field coil and/or vacuum vessel section constituting the macroparticle filter are also coated to some extent. If then the plasma gun cathode is changed to a new element, there can be a contamination of the subsequent film deposition by sputtering from various parts of the system of the previous coating species. We have experimentally explored this effect and compared our results with theoretical estimates of sputtering from the SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) code. We find film contamination of order 10-4 - 10-3, and the memory of the prior history of the deposition hardware can be relatively long-lasting.

  6. Surface modification of magnetic recording media by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.-S.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2009-11-01

    Surface modification of a magnetic recording medium was accomplished by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA). The carbon overcoat of thin-film disks was removed by Ar{sup +} ion sputter etching in vacuum to prevent oxidation of the exposed magnetic medium, which was then modified by FCVA carbon plasma under conditions of zero and -100 V pulsed substrate bias. Monte Carlo simulations performed with the T-DYN code, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and surface force microscopy (SFM) provided insight into carbon implantation profiles, surface chemical composition, roughness, and nanomechanical properties of the surface-treated magnetic medium. The dependence of surface modification on the FCVA treatment conditions is discussed in the context of T-DYN, XPS, AFM, and SFM results. The findings of this study demonstrate the potential of FCVA to provide overcoat-free magnetic recording media exhibiting oxidation resistance and enhanced nanomechanical properties.

  7. Auxiliary particle filter-model predictive control of the vacuum arc remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F.; Beaman, J.; Williamson, R.

    2016-07-01

    Solidification control is required for the suppression of segregation defects in vacuum arc remelting of superalloys. In recent years, process controllers for the VAR process have been proposed based on linear models, which are known to be inaccurate in highly-dynamic conditions, e.g. start-up, hot-top and melt rate perturbations. A novel controller is proposed using auxiliary particle filter-model predictive control based on a nonlinear stochastic model. The auxiliary particle filter approximates the probability of the state, which is fed to a model predictive controller that returns an optimal control signal. For simplicity, the estimation and control problems are solved using Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods. The validity of this approach is verified for a 430 mm (17 in) diameter Alloy 718 electrode melted into a 510 mm (20 in) diameter ingot. Simulation shows a more accurate and smoother performance than the one obtained with an earlier version of the controller.

  8. Growth of single and bilayer graphene by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kesarwani, A. K.; Panwar, O. S. Bisht, Atul; Dhakate, S. R.; Rakshit, R. K.; Singh, V. N.; Kumar, Ashish

    2016-03-15

    The authors present a viable process to grow the high quality graphene films with control over number of layers by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. In the FCVA process, the different carbon concentrations can be controlled by precisely tuning the arc time (1–4 s). The arc generated carbon was deposited on the nickel catalyst at 800 °C, annealed for 10 min, and cooled down to room temperature in the presence of hydrogen gas, resulting in the graphene films with control over number of layers. Prior to arcing, hydrogen etching of nickel was carried out to clean the surface of the substrate. A growth model to prepare the high quality graphene has also been proposed. The as-grown graphene films were transferred to different substrates and are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, optical microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy to determine the number of layers present in these films. Raman spectra of the prepared graphene films exhibit change in the G peak position from 1582.4 to 1578.1 cm{sup −1}, two-dimensional (2D) peak shifts from 2688.5 to 2703.8 cm{sup −1}, the value of I{sub 2D}/I{sub G} increased from 0.38 to 3.82, and the full width at half maxima of 2D peak changed from 41 to 70 cm{sup −1}, for different layers of graphene films. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy image revealed that the graphene films prepared for 1 and 2 s arc times have single and bi- or trilayered structures, respectively.

  9. Hydrogen absorption by Zr-1Nb alloy with TiNx film deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkarov, E. B.; Nikitenkov, N. N.; Syrtanov, M. S.; Babihina, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    coating for Zr-2.5Nb alloy from hydrogenation. Dense TiNx films were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (CVA). Hydrogen absorption rate was calculated from the kinetic curves of hydrogen sorption at elevated temperature of the sample (T = 673 K) and pressure (P = 2 atm). Results revealed that TiNx films significantly reduced hydrogen absorption rate of Zr-2.5Nb.

  10. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  11. Nanodiamond embedded ta-C composite film by pulsed filtered vacuum arc deposition from a single target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Etula, Jarkko; Ge, Yanling; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-11-01

    Detonation Nanodiamonds (DNDs) are known to have sp3 core, sp2 shell, small size (few nm) and are gaining importance as multi-functional nanoparticles. Diverse methods have been used to form composites, containing detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) embedded in conductive and dielectric matrices for various applications. Here we show a method, wherein DND-ta-C composite film, consisting of DNDs embedded in ta-C matrix have been co-deposited from the same cathode by pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method. Transmission Electron Microscope analysis of these films revel the presence of DNDs embedded in the matrix of amorphous carbon. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the presence of DNDs does not adversely affect the sp3 content of DND-ta-C composite film compared to ta-C film of same thickness. Nanoindentation and nanowear tests indicate that DND-ta-C composite films possess improved mechanical properties in comparison to ta-C films of similar thickness.

  12. Optical properties of transparent ZnO SnO2 thin films deposited by filtered vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinörgü, E.; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R. L.

    2006-05-01

    ZnO-SnO2 films were deposited onto glass substrates by filtered vacuum arc deposition. The source was equipped with a 70 at% Zn and 30 at% Sn cathode that was the source of Zn and Sn ion beam. Arc current was 200-300 A. The oxygen background pressure was 4-8 mTorr. The deposition time was 60 or 120 s, resulting in film thickness in the range 100-900 nm. The maximum deposition rate was 7.6 nm s-1. All films were found to be amorphous. The transmission of the film in the VIS was 80%-90%, affected by interference. The refractive index and the extinction coefficient were determined from the measured optical transmission in the range 300-1100 nm by fitting a theoretically calculated film transmission to the measured one, using a single oscillator model. The values of n and k were determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry data and were in the ranges 2.38-1.97 and 0.24-0.013, respectively, depending on wavelengths and deposition parameters. The optical band gap (Eg) was determined by the dependence of the absorption coefficient on the photon energy at short wavelengths. Its values were in the range 3.5-3.62 eV, depending on the deposition conditions.

  13. Numerical study on ion filtering of titanium hydride cathodic vacuum arc plasma through a double-layer extraction grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chaohui; Long, Jidong; Zheng, Le; Dong, Pan; Li, Jie; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Tao; He, Jialong; Li, Xi

    2017-06-01

    A novel method of filtering titanium hydride cathodic vacuum arc ions through a double-layer extraction grid is proposed in this paper. Two grids with different transmission rates are placed very closely, and apertures of the two grids are staggered. Due to the differences of ions in the charge state and kinetic energy, H+ can easily go through the second grid after passing the first grid and then be extracted, while most Tii+ (i = 1 ∼ 3) are blocked and absorbed by the second grid. Using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation, the effectiveness of the double-layer extraction grid on ion filtering is verified. The results show that the fraction of H+ can be increased from 39% to 80% by the double-layer grid and the fraction of metal ions decreases significantly. The fraction of H+ depends on the distance and the overlap length of the two grids. Besides, in a wide range of extraction voltage, the double-layer grid is effective in increasing the fraction of H+.

  14. The dependence of filtered vacuum arc deposited ZnO SnO2 thin films characteristics on substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinórgü, E.; Goldsmith, S.; Barkay, Z.; Boxman, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    ZnO-SnO2 thin films were deposited by filtered vacuum arc deposition system and characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), spectrophotometer and ex situ variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. According to the XRD analysis the films were amorphous, independent of the deposition conditions. The root-mean-squares (RMS) of surface roughness and the average grain size obtained from the AFM images were 0.2-0.8 nm and 15-20 nm, respectively. Averaged optical transmission was 85%, and the refractive index and extinction coefficient of the films were in the range 2.05-2.28 and 0.001-0.044 at 500 nm wavelength, respectively. The range of the optical band gap of the films was 3.43-3.70 eV, depending on deposition conditions. The lowest resistivity was of the order of 10-2 Ω cm for films deposited on 400 °C heated substrates, while films deposited on substrates at room temperature were non-conducting, and films on 200 °C heated substrates were weakly conducting(~101-2 Ω cm). The resistivity of films decreased with increasing pressure for 200 and 400 °C heated substrates relative to RT deposited films. The effect of deposition conditions on the optical constants was analysed statistically by single and two sided variance analysis, using the analysis code 'Analysis Of Variance' to determine the significance of the differences between sets.

  15. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  16. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  17. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  18. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  19. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  20. Phase transitions of doped carbon in CrCN coatings with modified mechanical and tribological properties via filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, J. J.; Wang, H. Q.; Qin, L. Z.; Liao, B.; Liang, H.; Li, B.

    2017-04-01

    The CrCN coatings were fabricated onto Si (1 1 1) wafers and SUS304 stainless steel plates using filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD) technique under different flow ratios of N2/C2H2 gas mixture. The morphology, crystalline structure and chemical composition of the coatings were characterized. It was found that the grain size reduce with increasing carbon content, which makes the CrCN coatings refined and smooth. The quasi-one-dimensional carbolite phase was also found in CrN host lattice with C2H2 content ranging from 5% to 20%, and it will be evolved into amorphous carbon and amorphous CNx phases as C2H2 content exceeds 20%. Moreover, we examined the mechanical and tribological properties of the CrCN coatings, and the experimental results confirmed that the friction coefficient of the coatings descend to the lowest value as 0.39 with 30% C2H2 content, due to the graphite (sp2 Csbnd C) phase embed in CrN host lattice; while the chromium carbon (Cr3C2) and diamond (sp3 Csbnd C) phases may give rise to the increase of the coating hardness with the highest value at 23.97 GPa under 20% C2H2 content.

  1. Air annealing effects on the optical properties of ZnO SnO2 thin films deposited by a filtered vacuum arc deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinörgü, E.; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R. L.

    2006-03-01

    ZnO-SnO2 transparent and conducting thin films were deposited on microscope glass substrates by a filtered vacuum arc deposition (FVAD) system. The cathode was prepared with 50%:50% atomic concentration of Zn:Sn. The films were annealed in air at 500 °C for 1 h. Structural and compositional analyses were obtained using XRD and XPS diagnostics. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that as-deposited and air-annealed thin ZnO-SnO2 films were amorphous. The atomic ratio of Zn to Sn in the film obtained using the 50%:50% cathode as determined by XPS analysis was ~2.7:1 in the bulk film. The optical properties were determined from normal incidence transmission measurements. Film transmission in the visible was 70% to 90%, affected by interference effects. Annealed films did not show higher transmission in the VIS compared to as-deposited films. Assuming that the interband electron transition is direct, the optical band gap was found to be in the range 3.34-3.61 eV for both as-deposited and annealed films. However, the average Eg for annealed films was 3.6 eV, larger by 0.2 eV than that of as-deposited. The refractive index n increased while the extinction index k decreased significantly with annealing.

  2. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed.

  3. Synthesis of graphene-like transparent conductive films on dielectric substrates using a modified filtered vacuum arc system

    SciTech Connect

    Lux, Helge Schrader, Sigurd; Siemroth, Peter; Sgarlata, Anna; Prosposito, Paolo; Casalboni, Mauro; Schubert, Markus Andreas

    2015-05-21

    Here, we present a reliable process to deposit transparent conductive films on silicon oxide, quartz, and sapphire using a solid carbon source. This layer consists of partially ordered graphene flakes with a lateral dimension of about 5 nm. The process does not require any catalytic metal and exploits a high current arc evaporation (Φ-HCA) to homogeneously deposit a layer of carbon on heated substrates. A gas atmosphere consisting of Argon or Argon/Hydrogen blend acting as a buffer influences the morphology of the growing film. scanning tunneling microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectra were used for a thorough characterization of the samples in order to optimize the growth parameters. The best carbon layers have a surface resistance of 5.7 × 10{sup 3} Ω{sub ◻} whereas the optical transparency of the coatings is 88% with an excellent homogeneity over areas of several cm{sup 2}. Such results are compatible with most semiconductor fabrication processes and make this method very promising for various industrial applications.

  4. The effect of post-deposition annealing on the optical properties of filtered vacuum arc deposited ZnO SnO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinörgü, E.; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    Zinc stannate (ZnO-SnO2) thin films were deposited on ultraviolet fused silica (UVFS) substrates using filtered vacuum arc deposition (FVAD). During deposition, the substrates were at 200 and 400 °C. As-deposited films were annealed at 500 and 600 °C in Ar for 50 min. The structure was determined before and after annealing using x-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD patterns of all ZnO-SnO2 thin films had an amorphous structure. The average optical transmission of the film in the visible spectrum was>80% and was affected by annealing. The films' optical constants in the 250-989 nm wavelength range were determined by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). The refractive indexes of as-deposited and annealed films were in the ranges 1.95-2.35 and 2.0-2.32, respectively. The extinction coefficients of as-deposited annealed films were in the same range, approximately 0-0.5. However, in the UV range (<450 nm) the extinction coefficient values decreased significantly for annealed films. The optical energy band gap (Eg) was determined by the dependence of the absorption coefficient on the photon energy at short wavelengths. It varied between 3.65 and 3.72 eV for annealed films as a function of deposition pressure. Although the lowest electrical resistivity of zinc stannate films obtained for as-deposited films on 400 °C heated substrates, using 0.93 Pa oxygen pressure, was 1.08 × 10-2 Ω cm, highly resistive films (>105 Ω cm) were obtained by annealing.

  5. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    DOEpatents

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  6. A novel post-arc current measuring equipment based on vacuum arc commutation and arc blow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Minfu; Ge, Guowei; Duan, Xiongying; Huang, Zhihui

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a novel post-arc current measuring equipment (NPACME), which is based on the vacuum arc commutation and magnetic arc blow. The NPACME is composed of the vacuum circuit breaker (VCB), shunt resistor, protective gap, high-precision current sensor and externally applied transverse magnetic field (ETMF). The prototype of the NPACME is designed and controlled by optical fiber communications. The vacuum arc commutation between the vacuum arc and the shunt resistor with ETMF is investigated. The test platform is established in the synthetic short-circuit test and the vacuum arc is observed by the high speed CMOS camera. The mathematic description of the vacuum arc commutation is obtained. Based on the current commutation characteristic, the parameters of the NPACME are optimized and the post-arc current is measured. The measuring result of the post-arc current is accurate with small interference and the post-arc charge is obtained. The experimental results verify that the NPACME is correct and accurate, which can be used to measure the post-arc characteristic in breaking test.

  7. Characteristic of a triple-cathode vacuum arc plasma source.

    PubMed

    Xiang, W; Li, M; Chen, L

    2012-02-01

    In order to generate a better ion beam, a triple-cathode vacuum arc plasma source has been developed. Three plasma generators in the vacuum arc plasma source are equally located on a circle. Each generator initiated by means of a high-voltage breakdown between the cathode and the anode could be operated separately or simultaneously. The arc plasma expands from the cathode spot region in vacuum. In order to study the behaviors of expanding plasma plume generated in the vacuum arc plasma source, a Langmuir probe array is employed to measure the saturated ion current of the vacuum arc plasma source. The time-dependence profiles of the saturated current density of the triple vacuum arc plasma source operated separately and simultaneously are given. Furthermore, the plasma characteristic of this vacuum arc plasma source is also presented in the paper.

  8. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-10-02

    Thallium arc plasma was investigated in a vacuum arc ionsource. As expected from previous consideration of cathode materials inthe Periodic Table of the Elements, thallium plasma shows lead-likebehavior. Its mean ion charge state exceeds 2.0 immediately after arctriggering, reaches the predicted 1.60 and 1.45 after about 100 microsecand 150 microsec, respectively. The most likely ion velocity is initially8000 m/s and decays to 6500 m/s and 6200 m/s after 100 microsec and 150microsec, respectively. Both ion charge states and ion velocities decayfurther towards steady state values, which are not reached within the 300microsec pulses used here. It is argued that the exceptionally high vaporpressure and charge exchange reactions are associated with theestablishment of steady state ion values.

  9. Influence of Gap Distance on Vacuum Arc Characteristics of Cup Type AMF Electrode in Vacuum Interrupters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shaoyong; Xiu, Shixin; Wang, Jimei; Shen, Zhengchao

    2006-11-01

    The greenhouse effect of SF6 is a great concern today. The development of high voltage vacuum circuit breakers becomes more important. The vacuum circuit breaker has minimum pollution to the environment. The vacuum interrupter is the key part of a vacuum circuit breaker. The interrupting characteristics in vacuum and arc-controlling technique are the main problems to be solved for a longer gap distance in developing high voltage vacuum interrupters. To understand the vacuum arc characteristics and provide effective technique to control vacuum arc in a long gap distance, the arc mode transition of a cup-type axial magnetic field electrode is observed by a high-speed charge coupled device (CCD) video camera under different gap distances while the arc voltage and arc current are recorded. The controlling ability of the axial magnetic field on vacuum arc obviously decreases when the gap distance is longer than 40 mm. The noise components and mean value of the arc voltage significantly increase. The effective method for controlling the vacuum arc characteristics is provided by long gap distances based on the test results. The test results can be used as a reference to develop high voltage and large capacity vacuum interrupters.

  10. Long-Lived Electrode For Arc Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Jack L.; Poorman, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Improved electrode for gas/tungsten arc welding in vacuum essentially hollow cylinder along which inert gas flows. Interior of cylinder provides large surface area for emission of electrons to form welding arc. Flow of pressurized inert gas inhibits vaporization of hot electrode material. Both features combine to reduce erosion of electrode. Electrode lasts considerably longer in vacuum than conventional electrode.

  11. Artificially modulated hard coatings produced with a vacuum arc evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, P. A.; Parada Becerra, F. F.; Dugar-Zhabon, V. D.; Plata, A.; V-Niño, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    The experimental set for artificially modulated structures production through an advanced vacuum arc evaporator with a magnetically-driven cathode spots on the cathode surface is described. The main features of vacuum arc as a vapor source with time-modulated compositions are discussed. The characteristics of the obtained multilayer coatings with artificially modulated Ti/TiB structures are presented.

  12. Vacuum arc deposited DLC based coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, Othon R.; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule

    2002-05-01

    The great interest in the use of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films as a coating material is justified by the superior wear resistance and hardness, chemical inertness, and very low friction coefficients of these coatings. Vacuum arc deposition is well suited to prepare superhard films with high sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratios. However, the high level of internal stresses originating during growth prevents the deposition of thick films, and their hardness makes it difficult for DLC layers to comply with substrate deformations. In order to overcome these limitations, different approaches are possible. Multilayer structures are one means to maintain the surface mechanical properties of the DLC while relieving the internal stresses. Another possibility is to dope the DLC films in order to reduce the internal stress and to stabilize the desirable sp{sup 3} bonds to higher temperatures. At higher doses of dopants, the formation of nanocrystals is possible and the properties of the coatings change drastically. All these approaches were investigated on films prepared by cathodic arc and a synthesis of the results is presented here.

  13. A filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1997-12-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus are described for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  14. A high-current pulsed cathodic vacuum arc plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-11-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs (CVAs) are well established as a method for producing metal plasmas for thin film deposition and as a source of metal ions. Fundamental differences exist between direct current (dc) and pulsed CVAs. We present here results of our investigations into the design and construction of a high-current center-triggered pulsed CVA. Power supply design based on electrolytic capacitors is discussed and optimized based on obtaining the most effective utilization of the cathode material. Anode configuration is also discussed with respect to the optimization of the electron collection capability. Type I and II cathode spots are observed and discussed with respect to cathode surface contamination. An unfiltered deposition rate of 1.7 nm per pulse, at a distance of 100 mm from the source, has been demonstrated. Instantaneous plasma densities in excess of 1×1019 m-3 are observed after magnetic filtering. Time averaged densities an order of magnitude greater than common dc arc densities have been demonstrated, limited by pulse repetition rate and filter efficiency.

  15. Inline screw feeding vacuum arc thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronhaus, Igal; Laterza, Matteo; Maor, Yonatan

    2017-04-01

    A new type of micropropulsion device for nanosatellite applications is presented—the inline-screw-feeding vacuum-arc thruster (ISF-VAT). This thruster couples a conventional "triggerless" ignition geometry with a feeding mechanism that maintains a steady state discharge performance. The feeding mechanism implements a screw action on a central cathode rod. At a predetermined rate, a complete and uniform erosion of the cathodes tip is obtained as well as "healing" of the insulator coating. The inline feeding of the cathode forces the arc to emerge on the tip of the cathode, flush with the exit plane of the anode. This enables the plasma plume to efficiently accelerate away from the thruster, eliminating the need for an additional ion acceleration stage. The ISF-VAT feeding mechanism is computer controlled and offers reliable operation of the thruster over a large number of pulses. Characterization of the ISF-VAT performance is presented, conducted on an experimental prototype in the Aerospace Plasma Laboratory, Technion. Measurement results of the mass flow rate, electrical parameters of the discharge, and thrust are presented. Using a Ti cathode at a discharge power of 3 W, a mass flow rate of ≈1.8 ×10-9 kg/s and a thrust level ≈ 7 μN were measured. More than 106 pulses were demonstrated in a single run, accumulating a total impulse of 0.2 Ns. The thruster prototype dimensions are 15 × 15 × 65 mm3 and are ≈ 60 g in mass.

  16. Inline screw feeding vacuum arc thruster.

    PubMed

    Kronhaus, Igal; Laterza, Matteo; Maor, Yonatan

    2017-04-01

    A new type of micropropulsion device for nanosatellite applications is presented-the inline-screw-feeding vacuum-arc thruster (ISF-VAT). This thruster couples a conventional "triggerless" ignition geometry with a feeding mechanism that maintains a steady state discharge performance. The feeding mechanism implements a screw action on a central cathode rod. At a predetermined rate, a complete and uniform erosion of the cathodes tip is obtained as well as "healing" of the insulator coating. The inline feeding of the cathode forces the arc to emerge on the tip of the cathode, flush with the exit plane of the anode. This enables the plasma plume to efficiently accelerate away from the thruster, eliminating the need for an additional ion acceleration stage. The ISF-VAT feeding mechanism is computer controlled and offers reliable operation of the thruster over a large number of pulses. Characterization of the ISF-VAT performance is presented, conducted on an experimental prototype in the Aerospace Plasma Laboratory, Technion. Measurement results of the mass flow rate, electrical parameters of the discharge, and thrust are presented. Using a Ti cathode at a discharge power of 3 W, a mass flow rate of ≈1.8×10(-9) kg/s and a thrust level ≈ 7 μN were measured. More than 10(6) pulses were demonstrated in a single run, accumulating a total impulse of 0.2 Ns. The thruster prototype dimensions are 15 × 15 × 65 mm(3) and are ≈ 60 g in mass.

  17. Interruption Phenomenon in Intermediate-Frequency Vacuum Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuan; Wu, Jianwen

    2016-03-01

    In the condition of the 3 mm gap, experiments for 360 Hz intermediate-frequency vacuum arc are carried out in interrupters with the diameters being 41 mm and with the contact materials being CuCr50 and Cu-W-WC alloy respectively. The results indicate that the contacts material is closely related to the breaking capacity of the vacuum interrupters and characteristics of an intermediate-frequency vacuum arc. For contacts with the same diameter, the breaking capacity of CuCr50 is better than that of Cu-W-WC. When the current fails to be interrupted, the arcs overflow the gap and present irregular performances in the first half wave. Consequently a voltage spike appears. More macroscopic metal droplets can be seen in the arc column between CuCr50 contacts because of the lower melting point. It is observed that the droplet emission is much more severe during arc reignition than that in the first half wave. It is much more conspicuous that the high frequency arc voltage noises appear in Cu-W-WC contacts when the vacuum arcs reignite, for higher temperature and stronger electronic emission ability of Cu-W-WC contacts. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51377007), Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20131102130006), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China

  18. Metal vapor vacuum arc switching - Applications and results. [for launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, D.; Mongeau, P.

    1984-01-01

    The design of metal-vapor vacuum-arc switches (MVSs) for electromagnetic launchers is discussed, and preliminary results are presented for an experimental MVS. The general principles of triggered-vacuum-gap and vacuum-interrupter MVSs are reviewed, and the requirements of electromagnetic launchers are analyzed. High-current design problems such as electrode erosion, current sharing, magnetic effects, and thermal effects are examined. The experimental MVS employs stainless-steel flanges, a glass vacuum vessel, an adjustable electrode gap, autonomous internal magnetic-field coils, and a tungsten-pin trigger assembly. Some results from tests without magnetic augmentation are presented graphically.

  19. A theoretical analysis of vacuum arc thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Sekerak, Mike; Ziemer, John K.; Schein, Jochen; Qi, Niansheng; Binder, Robert; Anders, Andre

    2001-01-01

    In vacuum arc discharges the current is conducted through vapor evaporated from the cathode surface. In these devices very dense, highly ionized plasmas can be created from any metallic or conducting solid used as the cathode. This paper describes theoretical models of performance for several thruster configurations which use vacuum arc plasma sources. This analysis suggests that thrusters using vacuum arc sources can be operated efficiently with a range of propellant options that gives great flexibility in specific impulse. In addition, the efficiency of plasma production in these devices appears to be largely independent of scale because the metal vapor is ionized within a few microns of the cathode electron emission sites, so this approach is well-suited for micropropulsion.

  20. Diffuse vacuum arc with cerium oxide hot cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, R. Kh; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Liziakin, G. D.; Polistchook, V. P.; Samoylov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse vacuum arc with hot cathode is one of the perspective plasma sources for the development of spent nuclear fuel plasma reprocessing technology. Experimental data is known for such type of discharges on metal cathodes. In this work discharge with cerium dioxide hot cathode was studied. Cerium dioxide properties are similar to uranium dioxide. Its feature as dielectric is that it becomes conductive in oxygen-free atmosphere. Vacuum arc was studied at following parameters: cathode temperatures were between 2.0 and 2.2 kK, discharge currents was between 30 and 65 A and voltages was in range from 15 to 25 V. Power flows from plasma to cathode were estimated in achieved regimes. Analysis of generated plasma component composition was made by radiation spectrum diagnostics. These results were compared with calculations of equilibrium gaseous phase above solid sample of cerium dioxide in close to experimental conditions. Cerium dioxide vacuum evaporation rate and evaporation rate in arc were measured.

  1. Vacuum arc melting of tungsten-hafnium-carbon alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum arc casting of tungsten alloys, which contain carbon as an alloy addition, require special melting procedures in order to produce melts of consistent controlled levels of alloy content. A melting procedure will be described in which elemental components of a tungsten 0.35% HfC alloy are assembled to form an electrode for ac vacuum arc melting to produce 3-in.-diam ingots. Melting procedures and analytical chemistry are discussed and compared with data for ingots produced by other techniques.

  2. Fabrication for multilayered composite thin films by dual-channel vacuum arc deposition.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hua; Shen, Yao; Wang, Jing; Xu, Ming; Li, Liuhe; Li, Xiaoling; Cai, Xun; Chu, Paul K

    2008-06-01

    A flexible dual-channel curvilinear electromagnetic filter has been designed and constructed to fabricate multilayered composite films in vacuum arc ion plating. The filter possesses two guiding channels and one mixing unit. Multilayered TiN/AlN and TiAlN composite films can be produced by controlling the frequency or interval of the two cathodes. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-angle x-ray diffraction results reveal the periodic Ti and Al structures in the TiN/AlN films. The TiAlN films exhibit a smooth surface morphology confirming effective filtering of macroparticles by the filter. High temperature oxidation conducted at 700 degrees C for an hour indicates that the weight increment in the TiAlN films produced by the dual filter is only half of that of the TiAlN films produced without a filter, thereby showing better resistance against surface oxidation.

  3. Fabrication for multilayered composite thin films by dual-channel vacuum arc deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hua; Shen, Yao; Wang, Jing; Xu, Ming; Li, Liuhe; Li, Xiaoling; Cai, Xun; Chu, Paul K.

    2008-06-01

    A flexible dual-channel curvilinear electromagnetic filter has been designed and constructed to fabricate multilayered composite films in vacuum arc ion plating. The filter possesses two guiding channels and one mixing unit. Multilayered TiN /AlN and TiAlN composite films can be produced by controlling the frequency or interval of the two cathodes. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-angle x-ray diffraction results reveal the periodic Ti and Al structures in the TiN /AlN films. The TiAlN films exhibit a smooth surface morphology confirming effective filtering of macroparticles by the filter. High temperature oxidation conducted at 700°C for an hour indicates that the weight increment in the TiAlN films produced by the dual filter is only half of that of the TiAlN films produced without a filter, thereby showing better resistance against surface oxidation.

  4. Parallel vacuum arc discharge with microhollow array dielectric and anode

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jinghua; Zhou, Lin; Fu, Yuecheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Rongkun; Chen, Faxin; Li, Linbo; Meng, Shijian

    2014-07-15

    An electrode configuration with microhollow array dielectric and anode was developed to obtain parallel vacuum arc discharge. Compared with the conventional electrodes, more than 10 parallel microhollow discharges were ignited for the new configuration, which increased the discharge area significantly and made the cathode eroded more uniformly. The vacuum discharge channel number could be increased effectively by decreasing the distances between holes or increasing the arc current. Experimental results revealed that plasmas ejected from the adjacent hollow and the relatively high arc voltage were two key factors leading to the parallel discharge. The characteristics of plasmas in the microhollow were investigated as well. The spectral line intensity and electron density of plasmas in microhollow increased obviously with the decease of the microhollow diameter.

  5. Enhanced vacuum arc vapor deposition electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor); Todd, Douglas M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for forming a thin metal coating on a substrate wherein a gas stream heated by an electrical current impinges on a metallic target in a vacuum chamber to form a molten pool of the metal and then vaporize a portion of the pool, with the source of the heated gas stream being on one side of the target and the substrate being on the other side of the target such that most of the metallic vapor from the target is directed at the substrate.

  6. Measurement of total ion current from vacuum arc plasmasources

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Savkin, Konstantin P.; Yushkov, Georgiu Yu.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.; Anders, A.; Brown, Ian G.

    2005-07-01

    The total ion current generated by a vacuum arc plasma source was measured. The discharge system investigated allowed ion collection from the arc plasma streaming through a hemispherical mesh anode with geometric transparency of 72 percent. A range of different cathode materials was investigated, and the arc current was varied over the range 50-500 A. We find that the normalized ion current (Iion/Iarc) depends on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent and generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The application of a strong axial magnetic field in the cathode and arc region leads to increased normalized ion current, but only by virtue of enhanced ion charge states formed in a strong magnetic field.

  7. 49. EASTERN VIEW OF DORROLIVER VACUUM DRUM FILTER ASSEMBLY IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. EASTERN VIEW OF DORR-OLIVER VACUUM DRUM FILTER ASSEMBLY IN THE FILTER CAKE HOUSE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  8. Vacuum ultraviolet radiometry with a stabilized hydrogen arc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, W. R.; Wiese, W. L.; Fieffe-Prevost, P.; Nakai, Y.

    1971-01-01

    Use of the spectral radiation emitted from a dense hydrogen plasma of at least 12,000 K, which is in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), as a light source for vacuum UV radiometry. Its spectroscopic qualities are exactly known, and except for a few strongly Stark-broadened Lyman lines, its spectrum in the vacuum UV is essentially continuous. The calculated continuum output of this source for typical operating conditions is compared with the UV output of the tungsten strip lamp and the carbon arc.

  9. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schein, Jochen (Inventor); Gerhan, Andrew N. (Inventor); Woo, Robyn L. (Inventor); Au, Michael Y. (Inventor); Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a vacuum arc plasma source device using a low mass, compact inductive energy storage circuit powered by a low voltage DC supply acts as a vacuum arc plasma thruster. An inductor is charged through a switch, subsequently the switch is opened and a voltage spike of Ldi/dt is produced initiating plasma across a resistive path separating anode and cathode. The plasma is subsequently maintained by energy stored in the inductor. Plasma is produced from cathode material, which allows for any electrically conductive material to be used. A planar structure, a tubular structure, and a coaxial structure allow for consumption of cathode material feed and thereby long lifetime of the thruster for long durations of time.

  10. Arc Distribution During the Vacuum Arc Remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodside, C. Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot-Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  11. Arc distribution during the vacuum arc remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, Charles Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot–Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  12. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources: Recent Developments and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Ian; Oks, Efim

    2005-05-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved over the past twenty years into a standard laboratory tool for the production of high current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. The primary application of this kind of source has evolved to be ion implantation for material surface modification. Another important use is for injection of high current beams of heavy metal ions into the front ends of particle accelerators, and much excellent work has been carried out in recent years in optimizing the source for reliable accelerator application. The source also provides a valuable tool for the investigation of the fundamental plasma physics of vacuum arc plasma discharges. As the use of the source has grown and diversified, at the same time the ion source performance and operational characteristics have been improved in a variety of different ways also. Here we review the growth and status of vacuum arc ion sources around the world, and summarize some of the applications for which the sources have been used.

  13. Vacuum Compatibility of Flux-Core Arc Welding (FCAW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arose, Dana; Denault, Martin; Jurcznski, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    Typically, vacuum chambers are welded together using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW). This is demonstrated in the vacuum chamber of Princeton Plasma Physics Lab's (PPPL) National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These processes are slow and apply excess heat to the base metal, which may cause the vacuum chamber to deform beyond designed tolerance. Flux cored arc welding (FCAW) avoids these problems, but may produce an unacceptable amount of outgasing due to the flux shielding. We believe impurities due to outgasing from FCAW will not greatly exceed those found in GTAW and GMAW welding. To test this theory, samples welded together using all three welding processes will be made and baked in a residual gas analyzer (RGA). The GTAW and GMAW welds will be tested to establish a metric for permissible outgasing. By testing samples from all three processes we hope to demonstrate that FCAW does not significantly outgas, and is therefore a viable alternative to GTAW and GMAW. Results from observations will be presented.

  14. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source.

    PubMed

    Lan, C H; Long, J D; Zheng, L; Dong, P; Yang, Z; Li, J; Wang, T; He, J L

    2016-08-01

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons.

  15. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, C. H. Long, J. D.; Zheng, L.; Dong, P.; Yang, Z.; Li, J.; Wang, T.; He, J. L.

    2016-08-15

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons.

  16. Predicting ion charge state distributions of vacuum arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Schulke, T.

    1996-04-01

    Multiply charged ions are present in vacuum arc plasmas. The ions are produced at cathode spots, and their charge state distributions (CSDs) depend on the cathode material but only little on the arc current or other parameters as long as the current is relatively low and the anode is not actively involved in the plasma production. There are experimental data of ion CSDs available in the literature for 50 different cathode materials. The CSDs can be calculated based on the assumption that thermodynamic equilibrium is valid in the vicinity of the cathode spot, and the equilibrium CSDs `freeze` at a certain distance from the cathode spot (transition to a non-equilibrium plasma). Plasma temperatures and densities at the `freezing points` have been calculated, and, based on the existence of characteristic groups of elements in the Periodic Table, predictions of CSDs can be made for metallic elements which have not yet been used as cathode materials.

  17. The investigation of carbon nitride films prepared at various arc currents by vacuum cathode arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Xia, Lifang

    2002-08-01

    The carbon nitride films have been prepared in the arc currents range of 20-60 A at the Ar/N2 atmosphere of 50/400 sccm by the vacuum cathode arc deposition method. The properties of the films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The N concentration showed a maximum of 35 at% at 20 A and decreased gradually with the arc currents. The films below 40 A consisted of linear polymeric-like component and sp2 graphitic cluster. With the increasing of the arc current from 20 to 40 A, the ID/IG rose and the photoluminescence (PL) fell gradually, which resulted from the development of the sp2 graphitic phase and the decrease of the polymeric-like phase. As a result, the CC bonds increased and sp3CN and sp2CN decreased. Above 40 A, with the increasing of arc currents, ID/IG fell and the PL increased gradually, which reflected the decreasing of sp2 graphitic phase and the modification of C and N atoms in sp2 cluster. The CC bonds and sp3CN fell and the sp2CN rose. The nanohardness of films showed increasing tendency with the arc currents. The variation of the relative ratio and the average energy of N-containing species and C-containing species at the atmosphere would be responsible for the change in the properties of films.

  18. 91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF PORTLAND FILTER VACUUM RECEIVER FROM NORTHWEST. AGITATORS No. 4 AND No. 5 VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  19. Ion energy distribution functions of vacuum arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Byon, Eungsun; Anders, Andre

    2002-09-16

    The velocity distribution function of vacuum arc ions can be measured by a time-of-flight technique similar to a method originally proposed by Yushkov. The measuring principle makes use of the well-justified assumption that the ion drift velocity from the cathode spot region to a collector is approximately constant. It is shown that the negative time derivative of the collector current is directly proportional to the ion distribution function provided that the time-averaged source intensity (i.e., emission of ions from cathode spots) is constant until the arc is rapidly switched off. In the experiment, arc termination took about 700 ns, which is much faster than the decay of the ion current measured at the collector placed in more than 2 meters distance from the cathode. The experimental distribution functions for most cathode materials show one large peak with a tail and one or more small peaks at higher ion velocities. The distribution functions for some other materials exhibit several peaks. No conclusive answer can be given about the nature of these peaks. Arguments are presented that the peaks are not caused by different charge states or plasma contamination but rather due to insufficiently averaged source fluctuations and/or acceleration by plasma instabilities.

  20. Anode jet in a high-current vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. A.; Schneider, A. V.; Batrakov, A. V.; Sandolache, G.; Rowe, S. W.; Markov, A. B.; Zyul'kova, L. A.

    2012-07-01

    A stable intense jet with a clear-cut bright sheath has been detected on the anode of a 10-ms-long high-current vacuum arc with a current amplitude of 15 kA. The jet is adjacent to the hot spot of a molten metal on the anode surface. The primary light of the jet is emitted by neutrals. The sheath of the jet is surrounded by an ion-induced diffuse glow. The anode jet arises from interaction between the cathode and anode plasmas. Because of this, the size of the jet inversely depends on the current of the arc and the jet becomes observable only by the end of the current pulse. This object (anode jet with a bright sheath) is well reproducible when the arc is initiated between copper-chromium electrodes. In the case of pure copper electrodes, such objects occur randomly and appear at long projections of the molten metal, where heat release is hampered, and at large drops moving in the interelectrode gap. This means that the anode evaporation intensity is crucial for the appearance of bright-sheath jets.

  1. Quantitative characterization of arc discharge as vacuum interface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.; Zhu, K.; Lu, Y. R.; Wang, S. Z.; Hershcovitch, A.; Yang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2014-12-19

    An arc discharge with channel diameters of 3 mm and 6 mm and lengths between 30mm and 60mm was experimentally investigated for its potential to function as plasma window, i.e., interface vacuum regions of different pressures. In this study, electron temperature of the plasma channel measured spectroscopically varied in the range of 7000K to 15000K, increasing with discharge current while decreasing with gas flow rate. The plasma window had a slightly positive I-V characteristics over the whole range of investigated current 30A–70 A. Measurements of pressure separation capability, which were determined by input current, gas flow rate, discharge channel diameter, and length, were well explained by viscosity effect and “thermal-block” effect. The experimental results of global parameters including temperature, gas flow rate, and voltage had a good agreement with the simulation results calculated by an axis-symmetry Fluent-based magneto-hydrodynamic model.

  2. Behavior of sustained high-current arcs on molten-alloy electrodes during vacuum consumable-arc remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanner, F. J.; Bertram, L. A.

    Vacuum consumable arc remelting is a casting process carried out in a vacuum with the aim of remelting the consumable electrode in such a way that the new ingot has improved chemical and physical homogeneity. The power which causes the melting is supplied by a vacuum arc burning between the electrodes. In order to determine the furnace partitions of electrical power and current, experiments were conducted on molten faced round electrodes. The quasi-steady melt rate was determined for both horizontally opposed 15 cm dia. Ni electrodes and for vertically suspended 40 cm dia. Inconel 718 electrodes.

  3. Fabrication of graphene from graphite by a thermal assisted vacuum arc discharge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guo-Wei; Chu, Kevin; Chen, Jeng Shiung; Tsai, Jeff T. H.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, graphene was fabricated on copper foils using a high temperature furnace embedded in a vacuum arc discharge method. Combining the advantages of chemical vapor deposition and vacuum arc discharge, single-layer graphene can be fabricated at 600 °C base temperature from the mini furnace embedded with a fast heating via the photon radiation from the vacuum arc to 1100 °C on the substrates' surface. The optimal fabrication condition was determined through a series of experiments on ambient pressure, processing time, arc currents, and the cooling process. Observations by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical microscopy showed that the main products were single-layer graphene, which has a uniform thickness across the entire substrate. The results demonstrated that the combination of a vacuum arc with a thermal method that uses graphite as a carbon source provides a low-cost and straight forward method to synthesize graphene films for graphene-based applications.

  4. Investigating influence of the magnetic arc blow in multi-break vacuum circuit breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Minfu; Ge, Guowei; Duan, Xiongying; Huang, Zhihui; Zou, Jiyan

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the interactive magnetic field in multi-break vacuum circuit breakers (VCBs) on the arc plasma and the post-arc characteristics. The magnetic field of multi-break VCBs is asymmetric and off-center because of the interactive magnetic field, which is also called bias magnetic field (BMF). The BMF distribution of double-break VCBs is gained by electromagnetic analysis. The test circuit of the magnetic arc blow in multi-break VCBs is established by simplifying as the interaction between the vacuum arc and the BMF. The influence of the magnetic arc blow on the arc plasma is studied by the high-speed CMOS camera and the post-arc current measure. While the vacuum arc is in the direction of the Ampere force with the BMF at 200 mT, it is in the retrograde direction when the BMF is below 100 mT, which results in the post-arc charge obviously varying from 9 μC to 50 μC. The relationship between the BMF and the post arc charge is gained. The mechanism of the magnetic arc blow in multi-break VCBs is discussed. Therefore, this paper can provide the base of construct and configuration to avoid the influence of the magnetic arc blow.

  5. Metal vapor plasma behavior during vacuum arc remelting of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, F.J.; Maguire, M.C.; Williamson, R.L. ); Adasczik, C.B. ); Roberts, R.R. ); Strohecker, R. )

    1992-01-01

    A production vacuum arc remelt (VAR) furnace was modified to enable direct viewing of the metal vapor arc and molten electrode tip during melting of 432 mm dia. alloy 718 electrodes into 508 mm dia. ingots. Diffuse and constricted arcing conditions were characterized using high speed cinematography, standard video format, and monochromatic imaging. Constricted arcing was observed while melting electrodes contaminated with oxide slag of the type used for refractory linings in vacuum induction furnaces. Monochromatic imaging was used in visualize the ion distribution in the arc plasma; these images clearly showed whether the arc operated in a diffuse or constricted model. Diffuse arc melting conditions were very similar to those previously reported in the literature for smaller laboratory sized melts.

  6. Metal vapor plasma behavior during vacuum arc remelting of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, F.J.; Maguire, M.C.; Williamson, R.L.; Adasczik, C.B.; Roberts, R.R.; Strohecker, R.

    1992-05-01

    A production vacuum arc remelt (VAR) furnace was modified to enable direct viewing of the metal vapor arc and molten electrode tip during melting of 432 mm dia. alloy 718 electrodes into 508 mm dia. ingots. Diffuse and constricted arcing conditions were characterized using high speed cinematography, standard video format, and monochromatic imaging. Constricted arcing was observed while melting electrodes contaminated with oxide slag of the type used for refractory linings in vacuum induction furnaces. Monochromatic imaging was used in visualize the ion distribution in the arc plasma; these images clearly showed whether the arc operated in a diffuse or constricted model. Diffuse arc melting conditions were very similar to those previously reported in the literature for smaller laboratory sized melts.

  7. Astronaut Frederick Gregory vacuums air filters in avionics bay

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-05-03

    51B-13-008 (29 April-6 May 1985) --- Astronaut Frederick D. Gregory vacuums air filters in avionics bay. The 51-B pilot is physically located in the overhead area of the middeck on Challenger, but his activity is only a few meters away from the flight deck.

  8. Quantitative characterization of arc discharge as vacuum interface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.; Zhu, K. Lu, Y. R.; Wang, S. Z.; Hershcovitch, A.; Yang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2014-12-15

    An arc discharge with channel diameters of 3 mm and 6 mm and lengths between 30 mm and 60 mm was experimentally investigated for its potential to function as plasma window, i.e., interface vacuum regions of different pressures. Electron temperature of the plasma channel measured spectroscopically varied in the range of 7000 K to 15 000 K, increasing with discharge current while decreasing with gas flow rate. That plasma window had a slightly positive I-V characteristics over the whole range of investigated current 30 A–70 A. Measurements of pressure separation capability, which were determined by input current, gas flow rate, discharge channel diameter, and length, were well explained by viscosity effect and “thermal-block” effect. The experimental results of global parameters including temperature, gas flow rate, and voltage had a good agreement with the simulation results calculated by an axis-symmetry Fluent-based magneto-hydrodynamic model.

  9. Quantitative characterization of arc discharge as vacuum interface

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, S.; Zhu, K.; Lu, Y. R.; ...

    2014-12-19

    An arc discharge with channel diameters of 3 mm and 6 mm and lengths between 30mm and 60mm was experimentally investigated for its potential to function as plasma window, i.e., interface vacuum regions of different pressures. In this study, electron temperature of the plasma channel measured spectroscopically varied in the range of 7000K to 15000K, increasing with discharge current while decreasing with gas flow rate. The plasma window had a slightly positive I-V characteristics over the whole range of investigated current 30A–70 A. Measurements of pressure separation capability, which were determined by input current, gas flow rate, discharge channel diameter,more » and length, were well explained by viscosity effect and “thermal-block” effect. The experimental results of global parameters including temperature, gas flow rate, and voltage had a good agreement with the simulation results calculated by an axis-symmetry Fluent-based magneto-hydrodynamic model.« less

  10. Multiple Input Electrode Gap Control During Vacuum Arc Remelting

    SciTech Connect

    Beaman, J.J.; Hysinger, C.L.; Melgaard, D.K.; Williamson, R.L.

    1999-01-14

    Accurate control of the electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnace has been a goal of melters for many years. The size of the electrode gap has a direct influence on ingot solidification structure. At the high melting currents (30 to 40 kA) typically used for VAR of segregation insensitive Ti and Zr alloys, process voltage is used as an indicator of electrode gap, whereas drip-short frequency (or period) is usually used at the lower currents (5 to 8 kA) employed during VAR of superalloys. Modem controllers adjust electrode position or drive velocity to maintain a voltage or drip-short frequency (or period) set-point. Because these responses are non-linear functions of electrode gap and melting current, these controllers have a limited range for which the feedback gains are valid. Models are available that relate process voltage and drip-short frequency to electrode gap. These relationships may be used to linearize the controller feedback signal. An estimate of electrode gap may then be obtained by forming a weighted sum of the independent gap estimates obtained from the voltage and drip-short signals. By using multiple independent measures to estimate the gap, a controller that is less susceptible to process disturbances can be developed. Such a controller was designed, built and tested. The tests were carried out at Allvac Corporation during VAR of 12Cr steel at intermediate current levels.

  11. The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2011-12-18

    Cathodic vacuum arc plasmas are known to contain multiply charged ions. 20 years after “Pressure Ionization: its role in metal vapour vacuum arc plasmas and ion sources” appeared in vol. 1 of Plasma Sources Science and Technology, it is a great opportunity to re-visit the issue of pressure ionization, a non-ideal plasma effect, and put it in perspective to the many other factors that influence observable charge state distributions, such as the role of the cathode material, the path in the density-temperature phase diagram, the “noise” in vacuum arc plasma as described by a fractal model approach, the effects of external magnetic fields and charge exchange collisions with neutrals. A much more complex image of the vacuum arc plasma emerges putting decades of experimentation and modeling in perspective.

  12. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1997-04-15

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived. 5 figs.

  13. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Rodney L.; Zanner, Frank J.; Grose, Stephen M.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived.

  14. Complex technology of vacuum-arc processing of structural material surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arustamov, V. N.; Ashurov, Kh. B.; Kadyrov, Kh. Kh.; Khudoikulov, I. Kh.

    2015-08-01

    The development of environmentally friendly and energy-resource-saving technologies based on vacuum arc discharge is a topical problem in science and engineering. In view of their unique properties, cathode spots of a vacuum arc induce cleaning of the surface of an article (cathode) from various contaminations and pulsed thermal action on the surface layers. These processes occur in complex with vacuum-arc deposition of coatings in the same technological cycle, which makes it possible to considerably increase the efficiency of methods for changing physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of the surface of steel articles, which considerably increase their service life. Analysis of the formation of the temperature regime of the surface during vacuum arc action and of the parameters of the deposited coating will make it possible to optimize the regimes of complex treatment of the surfaces of articles and is of considerable theoretical and practical importance.

  15. Voltage drop over a vacuum arc and the cathode-spot brightness

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, S.N.; Rakhovsky, V.I.; Zhurbenko, V.G. )

    1990-06-01

    A spectral investigation of low-current dc vacuum arc voltage is presented. High-speed steak photographs of cathode-spot light emission with high time resolution are obtained. Characteristic frequencies of cathode-spot instabilities are derived from averaged frequency spectra of arc voltage.

  16. Vacuum arcing behavior between transverse magnetic field contacts subjected to variable axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hui; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Jing

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this work is to reveal the effects of an axial magnetic field (AMF) on the vacuum arc characteristics between transverse magnetic field (TMF) contacts. These vacuum arc characteristics include the vacuum arcing behavior and the arc voltage waveform. In the experiments, an external AMF was applied to a pair of TMF contacts. The external AMF flux density B{sub AMF} can be adjusted from 0 to 110 mT. The arc current in the tests varied over a range from 0 to 20 kA rms at 45 Hz. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). A high-speed charge-coupled device video camera was used to record the vacuum arc evolution. The experimental results show that the application of the AMF effectively reduces the TMF arc voltage noise component and reduces the formation of liquid metal drops between the contacts. The diffuse arc duration increases linearly with increasing AMF flux density, but it also decreases linearly with increasing arc current under application of the external AMF. The results also indicate that the diffuse arc duration before the current zero is usually more than 1 ms under the condition that the value of the AMF per kiloampere is more than 2.0 mT/kA. Finally, under application of the AMF, the arc column of the TMF contacts may constrict and remain in the center region without transverse rotation. Therefore, the combined TMF–AMF contacts should be designed such that they guarantee that the AMF is not so strong as to oppose transverse rotation of the arc column.

  17. Vacuum arcing behavior between transverse magnetic field contacts subjected to variable axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to reveal the effects of an axial magnetic field (AMF) on the vacuum arc characteristics between transverse magnetic field (TMF) contacts. These vacuum arc characteristics include the vacuum arcing behavior and the arc voltage waveform. In the experiments, an external AMF was applied to a pair of TMF contacts. The external AMF flux density BAMF can be adjusted from 0 to 110 mT. The arc current in the tests varied over a range from 0 to 20 kA rms at 45 Hz. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). A high-speed charge-coupled device video camera was used to record the vacuum arc evolution. The experimental results show that the application of the AMF effectively reduces the TMF arc voltage noise component and reduces the formation of liquid metal drops between the contacts. The diffuse arc duration increases linearly with increasing AMF flux density, but it also decreases linearly with increasing arc current under application of the external AMF. The results also indicate that the diffuse arc duration before the current zero is usually more than 1 ms under the condition that the value of the AMF per kiloampere is more than 2.0 mT/kA. Finally, under application of the AMF, the arc column of the TMF contacts may constrict and remain in the center region without transverse rotation. Therefore, the combined TMF-AMF contacts should be designed such that they guarantee that the AMF is not so strong as to oppose transverse rotation of the arc column.

  18. NIF Inert Gas/Vacuum Management Prestart Review Phase 3 - Permit Spatial Filter Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J; Beavers, T; Bryan, S; Hermes, G; Patton, H

    2001-03-01

    A Management Prestart Review (MPR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) vacuum testing of spatial filters, the Cavity Spatial Filter (CSF) and the Transport Spatial Filter (TSF), was conducted during March 2001. The review was performed to determine the readiness of the Beamline Infrastucture System (BIS) team and the Integration Management and Installation (IMI) contractor to start the vacuum testing of the components and assemblies that constitute the four CSF clusters and four TSF clusters in the NIF laser. This review assures that appropriate engineering, planning and management is in place to start this testing. Completion and acceptance of this report satisfies the LLNL requirement for MPRs to be conducted whenever a significant new risk is introduced into a project and is an essential part of the ISM work authorization process.

  19. New developments in metal ion implantation by vacuum arc ion sources and metal plasma immersion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation by intense beams of metal ions can be accomplished using the dense metal plasma formed in a vacuum arc discharge embodied either in a vacuum arc ion source or in a metal plasma immersion configuration. In the former case high energy metal ion beams are formed and implantation is done in a more-or-less conventional way, and in the latter case the substrate is immersed in the plasma and repetitively pulse-biased so as to accelerate the ions at the high voltage plasma sheath formed at the substrate. A number of advances have been made in the last few years, both in plasma technology and in the surface modification procedures, that enhance the effectiveness and versatility of the methods, including for example: controlled increase of the in charge states produced; operation in a dual metal-gaseous ion species mode; very large area beam formation; macroparticle filtering; and the development of processing regimes for optimizing adhesion, morphology and structure. These complementary ion processing techniques provide the plasma tools for doing ion surface modification over a very wide parameter regime, from pure ion implantation at energies approaching the MeV level, through ion mixing at energies in the {approximately}1 to {approximately}100 keV range, to IBAD-like processing at energies from a few tens of eV to a few keV. Here the authors review the methods, describe a number of recent developments, and outline some of the surface modification applications to which the methods have been put. 54 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Hydrodynamics of the molten metal in a vacuum arc cathode spot at near-threshold currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, G. A.; Zubarev, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The extrusion of the molten metal from a microcrater formed on a metal cathode during the operation of a vacuum arc is considered. The problem is thought to be similar to the classical hydrodynamic problem of a liquid drop impact on a solid surface. Based on this analogy, the conditions are analyzed under which the liquid will change its regular behavior (spreading over the cathode surface) into a singular behavior (formation of microjets and droplets). It is shown that the conditions realized in vacuum arc cathode spots at near-threshold currents are close to the threshold conditions for splashing of the molten metal. This points to a considerable contribution of hydrodynamic processes to the self-sustained operation of a vacuum arc and, in particular, gives grounds to relate the existence of a threshold arc current to the existence of a splashing threshold for liquid metal.

  1. Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dualfiltered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Intasiri, Sawate; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Anders, Andre

    2007-01-24

    Metal-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films wereproduced by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc plasma sources operatedinsequentially pulsed mode. Negatively pulsed bias was applied to thesubstrate when carbon plasma was generated, whereas it was absentwhen themolybdenum plasma was presented. Film thickness was measured afterdeposition by profilometry. Glass slides with silver padswere used assubstrates for the measurement of the sheet resistance. Themicrostructure and composition of the films were characterizedbyRamanspectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering, respectively. It was foundthat the electrical resistivity decreases with an increaseof the Mocontent, which can be ascribed to an increase of the sp2 content and anincrease of the sp2 cluster size.

  2. Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dualfiltered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Vilaithong,Thiraphat; Intasiri, Sawate

    2006-09-10

    Metal-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films were produced by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) plasma sources operated in sequential pulsed mode. A negatively pulsed bias was applied to the substrate only when carbon plasma was generated. Films thickness was measured after deposition by profilometry. Glass slides with silver pads were used as substrate for the of the measurement sheet resistance. The microstructure and composition of the films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering, respectively. It found that the electrical resistivity decreases with an increase of the Mo content, which can be ascribed to an increase of sp2 content and an increase of the sp2 cluster size.

  3. Voltage Node Arcing in the ICRH Antenna Vacuum Transmission Lines at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monakhov, I.; Bobkov, V.; Graham, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Nicholls, K.; Walden, A.

    2007-09-01

    The observation of parasitic low-VSWR activity during operations of JET RF plant and the damage caused by arcing at the voltage-node in the vacuum transmission line (VTL) in 2004 highlight the importance of the problem of low-voltage breakdown in the ICRH systems. Simulations demonstrate little response of the RF circuit to the voltage-node arcing which explains why it remains largely unnoticed and complicates the design of protection systems. Analysis of the damage pattern produced by the voltage-node arcing suggests that multipactor-related phenomena occurring at elevated voltage thresholds in conditions of unfavorable VTL geometry are most plausible arc-provoking factors.

  4. High Charge State Ions Extracted from Metal Plasmas in the Transition Regime from Vacuum Spark to High Current Vacuum Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, A.

    2008-06-19

    Metal ions were extracted from pulsed discharge plasmas operating in the transition region between vacuum spark (transient high voltage of kV) and vacuum arc (arc voltage ~;; 20 V). At a peak current of about 4 kA, and with a pulse duration of 8 ?s, we observed mean ion charges states of about 6 for several cathode materials. In the case of platinum, the highest average charge state was 6.74 with ions of charge states as high as 10 present. For gold we found traces of charge state 11, with the highest average charge state of 7.25. At currents higher than 5 kA, non-metallic contaminations started to dominate the ion beam, preventing further enhancement of the metal charge states.

  5. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-01

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of J ×B propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (Te) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence Te of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density ne of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4×1021-6×1021m-3 and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2×106cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  6. Optical Analysis Of The Vacuum Arc Plasma Generated In Cup-Shape Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelescu, G.; Gherendi, F.; Pavelescu, D.; Dumitrescu, G.; Anghelita, P.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper are presented the results of the optical analysis on the rotating arc plasma, generated in the vacuum low voltage circuit breaker with cup-shaped contacts. An adequate experimental setup was used for single shot time and spatial resolved spectroscopy in order to analyze the evolution of the vacuum arc plasma. Different current interruption situations are correlated with plasma spectral diagnosis. The study is aimed to contribute to a better understanding of the complex phenomena that take place in the interruption process of high currents that appears in the short-circuit regime of electrical networks.

  7. Miniature pulsed vacuum arc plasma gun and apparatus for thin-film fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Brown, I.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.

    1998-11-24

    A miniature (dime-size in cross-section) vapor vacuum arc plasma gun is described for use in an apparatus to produce thin films. Any conductive material can be layered as a film on virtually any substrate. Because the entire apparatus can easily be contained in a small vacuum chamber, multiple dissimilar layers can be applied without risk of additional contamination. The invention has special applications in semiconductor manufacturing. 8 figs.

  8. Miniature pulsed vacuum arc plasma gun and apparatus for thin-film fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.; Ogletree, David F.; Salmeron, Miquel

    1998-01-01

    A miniature (dime-size in cross-section) vapor vacuum arc plasma gun is described for use in an apparatus to produce thin films. Any conductive material can be layered as a film on virtually any substrate. Because the entire apparatus can easily be contained in a small vacuum chamber, multiple dissimilar layers can be applied without risk of additional contamination. The invention has special applications in semiconductor manufacturing.

  9. The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-05-27

    Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f {sup 2}, where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion.

  10. Energetic deposition of carbon in a cathodic vacuum arc with a biased mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Moafi, A.; Lau, D. W. M.; Sadek, A. Z.; McCulloch, D. G.; Partridge, J. G.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Carbon films were deposited in a filtered cathodic vacuum arc with a bias potential applied to a conducting mesh mounted in the plasma stream between the source and the substrate. We determined the stress and microstructural properties of the resulting carbon films and compared the results with those obtained using direct substrate bias with no mesh. Since the relationship between deposition energy and the stress, sp{sup 2} fraction and density of carbon are well known, measuring these film properties enabled us to investigate the effect of the mesh on the energy and composition of the depositing flux. When a mesh was used, the film stress showed a monotonic decrease for negative mesh bias voltages greater than 400V, even though the floating potential of the substrate did not vary. We explain this result by the neutralization of some ions when they are near to or passing through the negatively biased mesh. The microstructure of the films showed a change from amorphous to glassy carbonlike with increasing bias. Potential applications for this method include the deposition of carbon films with controlled stress on low conductivity substrates to form rectifying or ohmic contacts.

  11. Energetic deposition of carbon in a cathodic vacuum arc with a biased mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moafi, A.; Lau, D. W. M.; Sadek, A. Z.; Partridge, J. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; McCulloch, D. G.

    2011-04-01

    Carbon films were deposited in a filtered cathodic vacuum arc with a bias potential applied to a conducting mesh mounted in the plasma stream between the source and the substrate. We determined the stress and microstructural properties of the resulting carbon films and compared the results with those obtained using direct substrate bias with no mesh. Since the relationship between deposition energy and the stress, sp2 fraction and density of carbon are well known, measuring these film properties enabled us to investigate the effect of the mesh on the energy and composition of the depositing flux. When a mesh was used, the film stress showed a monotonic decrease for negative mesh bias voltages greater than 400V, even though the floating potential of the substrate did not vary. We explain this result by the neutralization of some ions when they are near to or passing through the negatively biased mesh. The microstructure of the films showed a change from amorphous to glassy carbonlike with increasing bias. Potential applications for this method include the deposition of carbon films with controlled stress on low conductivity substrates to form rectifying or ohmic contacts.

  12. Effects of an anode sheath on energy and momentum transfer in vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Zhou, Zhipeng; Tian, Yunbo; Wang, Haoran; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2017-07-01

    Anode phenomena under high-current vacuum arcs have a significant impact on the interrupting capacity of vacuum interrupters. However, the vacuum arc energy flux and momentum flux on the anode—which are necessary boundary conditions for simulations—are either set to an imaginary distribution or calculated using simple formulas without considering anode sheath regulatory effects. The objective of this paper is to reveal the anode sheath effects on regulating the energy and momentum transfer from the arc column to the anode surface in vacuum arcs. A particle-in-cell model for the anode sheath is developed. The required input parameters are obtained from a magnetohydrodynamic model for the arc column. From the results, there exists a sheath near the anode with a negative voltage drop. Both the electron density and the ion density significantly decline in the anode sheath region. The kinetic energy of the ions absorbed by the anode consists of directed kinetic energy, random kinetic energy, and sheath acceleration energy. The sheath acceleration energy contribution is the largest, and the random kinetic energy also accounts for a large part that cannot be ignored. The arc pressure on the anode surface is mainly caused by ion impact, and the accelerating effect of the anode sheath on the ions cannot be neglected in pressure calculations. In addition, in the case of an arc current at 15 kA, the input energy and momentum upon the anode surface is not obviously affected by the evaporated atoms at surface temperatures of 1600 K and 2000 K.

  13. Spatial and temporal characteristics of a vacuum-arc rail-gun plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Vijayan, T.; Iyengar, S. T.

    1997-08-01

    The dynamics of a vacuum-arc operated rail-gun plasma were numerically simulated for the undercritically damped regime and confirmed in experiments. Analytical solutions of arc current, its velocity, and position also showed good agreement with the results. The spatial development of the arc is shown here to follow a linear behavior, even though the propulsion velocity followed an exponential-step function due to the sinusoidal nature of the arc current. Peak arc current ˜100 kA, 15 μs period was propelled to ˜106 cm/s as indicated in time-of-flight measurements and simulations. The voltage signal induced on a B-dot probe by the dynamic sinusoidal arc was simulated, which compared well with the measured probe signal. A Gaussian current distribution inside the measured arc length ˜1-2 cm, was established by unfolding the B-dot probe signal. A peak magnetic field of the order 1-5 kG was also interpreted inside the arc. The emerging plasma contained ion current over tens of amperes in the pulse duration encompassing the arc envelope.

  14. Silicon etch with chromium ions generated by a filtered or non-filtered cathodic arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Scopece, Daniele; Döbeli, Max; Passerone, Daniele; Maeder, Xavier; Neels, Antonia; Widrig, Beno; Dommann, Alex; Müller, Ulrich; Ramm, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The pre-treatment of substrate surfaces prior to deposition is important for the adhesion of physical vapour deposition coatings. This work investigates Si surfaces after the bombardment by energetic Cr ions which are created in cathodic arc discharges. The effect of the pre-treatment is analysed by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and in-depth X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and compared for Cr vapour produced from a filtered and non-filtered cathodic arc discharge. Cr coverage as a function of ion energy was also predicted by TRIDYN Monte Carlo calculations. Discrepancies between measured and simulated values in the transition regime between layer growth and surface removal can be explained by the chemical reactions between Cr ions and the Si substrate or between the substrate surface and the residual gases. Simulations help to find optimum and more stable parameters for specific film and substrate combinations faster than trial-and-error procedure.

  15. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma.

    PubMed

    Vodopyanov, A V; Golubev, S V; Khizhnyak, V I; Mansfeld, D A; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu

    2008-02-01

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 micros, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  16. Peculiarities of the structure formation of nanoscale coatings from the vacuum arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrin, D. K.; Pikus, M. I.; Smirnov, E. A.; Lisenkov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper features of the structure formation of nanoscale coatings (TiN)–(AlN)– (Ti–Al–N) in the vacuum arc discharge plasma are considered. The composition and structure of the formed nanoscale coatings are studied. The main factors influencing the quality of the formed coatings are shown.

  17. Influence of argon and oxygen on charge-state-resolved ion energydistributions of filtered aluminum arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Mraz, Stanislav; Atiser, Adil; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-03-23

    The charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions (IEDs) in filtered aluminum vacuum arc plasmas were measured and analyzed at different oxygen and argon pressures in the range 0.5 8.0 mTorr. A significant reduction of the ion energy was detected as the pressure was increased, most pronounced in an argon environment and for the higher charge states. The corresponding average charge state decreased from 1.87 to 1.0 with increasing pressure. The IEDs of all metal ions in oxygen were fitted with shifted Maxwellian distributions. The results show that it is possible to obtain a plasma composition with a narrow charge-state distribution as well as a narrow IED. These data may enable tailoring thin-film properties through selecting growth conditions that are characterized by predefined charge state and energy distributions.

  18. Generation of high charge state platinum ions on vacuum arc plasma heated by gyrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Nikolaev, A G; Izotov, I V; Savkin, K P; Golubev, S V; Oks, E M

    2014-02-01

    The hybrid high charge metal ion source based on vacuum arc plasma heated by gyrotron radiation into simple magnetic trap has been developed. Two types of magnetic traps were used: a mirror configuration and a cusp one with inherent "minimum-B" structure. Pulsed high power (>100 kW) gyrotrons with frequency 37.5 GHz and 75 GHz were used for heating the vacuum arc plasma injected into the traps. Two different ways were used for injecting the metal plasma-axial injection by a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and simultaneous radial injection by a number of sources mounted radially at the midplane of the traps. This article represents all data gathered for platinum ions, thus making comparison of the experimental results obtained with different traps and injections convenient and accurate.

  19. Effect of an axial magnetic field and arc current on the anode current density in diffuse vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Zaiqin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to measure the effect of an axial magnetic field (AMF) BAMF and arc current on the anode current density in diffuse vacuum arcs. The experimental geometry included a split anode and a butt-type cathode, both with a diameter of 60 mm. The anode surface was divided into a central area and three symmetrically disposed peripheral annular areas. The central area of the split anode had a diameter of 20 mm. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). The arc current IARC ranged from 4 to 14 kA (rms) at 50 Hz. The opening velocity was 2.4 m/s. The currents of the four areas on the anode contact were measured using four Rogowski coils situated outside the vacuum chamber. An external uniform AMF BAMF ranging from 0 to 110 mT was applied during the experiment. The observed arc modes were recorded by a high-speed charge-coupled device video camera. The experimental results quantitatively reveal that the current density distribution on the anode surface in the diffuse arc mode was not uniform but concentrated in the central area. The current density in the central anode area at the current peak JPeakArea I decreased with increasing BAMF following a power law. For BAMF of 0-110 mT and IARC of 4-14 kA, JPeakArea I = (2.2 IARC + 0.069 IARC2) BAMF-0.22, where JPeakArea I is in A/mm2, BAMF is in mT, and IARC is in kA. Moreover, the current distribution was uneven in the three peripheral areas.

  20. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  1. Vacuum-Induction, Vacuum-Arc, and Air-Induction Melting of a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. F.; Rowe, John P.; Freeman, J. W.

    1959-01-01

    The relative hot-workability and creep-rupture properties at 1600 F of a complex 55Ni-20Cr-15Co-4Mo-3Ti-3Al alloy were evaluated for vacuum-induction, vacuum-arc, and air-induction melting. A limited study of the role of oxygen and nitrogen and the structural effects in the alloy associated with the melting process was carried out. The results showed that the level of boron and/or zirconium was far more influential on properties than the melting method. Vacuum melting did reduce corner cracking and improve surface during hot-rolling. It also resulted in more uniform properties within heats. The creep-rupture properties were slightly superior in vacuum heats at low boron plus zirconium or in heats with zirconium. There was little advantage at high boron levels and air heats were superior at high levels of boron plus zirconium. Vacuum heats also had fewer oxide and carbonitride inclusions although this was a function of the opportunity for separation of the inclusions from high oxygen plus nitrogen heats. The removal of phosphorous by vacuum melting was not found to be related to properties. Oxygen plus nitrogen appeared to increase ductility in creep-rupture tests suggesting that vacuum melting removes unidentified elements detrimental to ductility. Oxides and carbonitrides in themselves did not initiate microcracks. Carbonitrides in the grain boundaries of air heats did initiate microcracks. The role of microcracking from this source and as a function of oxygen and nitrogen content was not clear. Oxygen and nitrogen did intensify corner cracking during hot-rolling but were not responsible for poor surface which resulted from rolling heats melted in air.

  2. Velocity and ion charge in a copper plasma plume ejected from 5 microsecond vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Y.; Nachshon, I.; Beilis, I. I.; Leibovitch, G.; Shafir, G.

    2017-02-01

    The charge state and velocity of ions extracted from the expanding plasma of 5 μs vacuum arc were measured using a Time of Flight mass spectrometer. The arc was sustained between the cylindrical copper cathode of 1 mm diameter and Kovar cylindrical anode. The distance between the two electrodes is 0.1 mm. The ion charge state and velocity were detected after the arc pulse at different times (in range 20-45 μs) by opening an electronic shutter. The arc current was 35 A. It was obtained that the ion velocities are decreasing with detection times from 3.75 to 1.75 cm/μs. The fastest ions are made of a large fraction of Cu+3 with some Cu+2 while the slowest ions are made of a larger fraction of Cu+2 with some Cu+.

  3. Finite element analysis of a 3D moving vacuum arc for transverse magnetic field contacts based on Gundlach's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Chang-Seob; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Se-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A systematic numerical method for analyzing a 3D moving vacuum arc was proposed and tested in this research by using a transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact. The analysis was carried out by employing the finite element method and the experimental energy equation defined by Gundlach's formula. In the literature, the vacuum interrupter has been widely applied to medium-voltage switching circuits. TMF-type contacts use the Lorentz force density to move a high-temperature arc so as to prevent the contacts from being melted and damaged. The material erosion caused by the arc on the electrode's surface is an important process that results in the interruptive capabilities of these vacuum interrupters. In a classical arc model, to move the vacuum arc, it is required that the magneto-hydrodynamics be analyzed in the arc region at each step. However, with this approach convergence is difficult, resulting in a very time-consuming. Therefore, we propose a new technique to predict the behaviors of vacuum arc between two electrodes. This new approach adopts the experimental arc voltage equation between two electrodes defined by Gundlach's formula. We verify our proposed model by comparing its results with the arcing behaviors obtained from earlier experiments.

  4. Effect of vacuum arc cathode spot distribution on breaking capacity of the arc-extinguishing chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Can; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2017-10-01

    A DC circuit breaker performs a key function in breaking an intermediate-frequency (IF) current since breaking a pure IF current is equivalent to breaking a very small DC with a reverse IF current. In this study, it is found that cathode spots show a ring-shaped distribution at 2000 Hz. An arc with an uneven distribution of cathode spots has been simulated. The simulation results show that the distribution of cathode spots significantly affect the microparameter distribution of arc plasma. The current distribution on the anode side differs from that on the cathode side under the total radial electric field. Specifically, the anode current distribution is both uneven and concentrated. The applied axial magnetic field, which cannot reduce the concentrated anode current distribution effectively, might increase the concentration of the anode current. Finally, the uneven distribution of cathode spots reduces the breaking capacity of the arc-extinguishing chamber.

  5. Investigation of Metal Puff Z pinch Based on Multichannel Vacuum Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Baksht, R. B.; Mitrofanov, K. N.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of a metal double puff Z-pinch system has been studied experimentally. In this type of system, the outer and inner cylindrical shells were produced by ten plasma guns. Each gun initiates a vacuum arc operating between aluminum electrodes. The net current of the guns was 80 kA. The arc-produced plasma shells were compressed by using a 450-kA, 450-ns driver, and as a result, a plasma column 0.2 cm in diameter was formed. The power of the Al K-line radiation emitted by the plasma for 7 ns was 800 MW/cm.

  6. Vacuum arc deposition of carbon thin films in a low pressure of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, M.D.; Meunier, J.L. )

    1991-10-01

    In this paper results on the vacuum arch deposition (VAD) of thin carbon films on silicon, tungsten, and nickel are presented for different hydrogen pressures in the arc chamber. Raman and Auger electron spectroscopy and SEM analysis show that a large variety of film structures can be obtained. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is formed at high hydrogen pressure and low substrate temperature. Vacuum deposition resulted in diamond like structure. Evidence of the presence of multicrystalline spheres of diamond in some films is also presented.

  7. Lifetime of hydrogenated composite cathodes in a vacuum arc ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Savkin, K. P. Frolova, V. P.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oks, E. M.; Barengolts, S. A.

    2016-02-15

    The paper reports on a study of the mass-charge state of the plasma produced in a vacuum arc discharge with composite cathodes which were copper-disk coated with a hydrogenated Zr film of thicknesses 9, 22, and 35 μm. The cathodes allow the generation of multicomponent gas and metal ion beams with a hydrogen ion content from several to several tens of percent. Also investigated is the dependence of the H ion fraction in a beam on the Zr film thickness during erosion to the point of disappearance of Zr peaks in mass-charge spectra. The ability of the vacuum arc system to produce H ions is analyzed by analyzing the cathode lifetime as a function of the film thickness and pulse repetition frequency.

  8. Growth and characteristics of tantalum oxide thin films deposited using thermionic vacuum arc technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladoiu, Rodica; Ciupina, Victor; Mandes, Aurelia; Dinca, Virginia; Prodan, Madalina; Musa, Geavit

    2010-11-01

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) thin films were synthesized using thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) technology. TVA is an original deposition method using a combination of anodic arc and electron gun system for the growth of thin films from solid precursors under vacuum of 10-6 Torr. The properties of the deposited Ta2O5 thin films were investigated in terms of wettability, refractive index, morphology, and structure. The surface free energy was determined by means of surface energy evaluation system indicating a hydrophilic character and the refractive index was measured by Filmetrics F20 device. The morphology was determined from bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image performed by Philips CM 120 ST TEM system. It exhibits nanoparticles of 3-6 nm diameter smoothly distributed. Selected area electron diffraction pattern revealed the contrast fringes given by complex polycrystalline particles included in the amorphous film. The measured fringes could be indexed using monoclinic structure of Ta2O5.

  9. An Enhanced Vacuum Arc Ion Source for High Current, High Charge State Uranium Beam Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Hershcovitch, A.; Brown, I. G.; Leemans, W.; Liu, F.

    1996-05-01

    We plan to carry out an experimental program at LBNL to develop a novel kind of vacuum arc ion source in which the metal ions are further stripped by interaction with an energetic, dense electron beam. Preliminary results obtained by Batalin et al.(V. A. Batalin, Y. N. Volkov, T. V. Kulevoy, and S. V. Petrenko, ITEP, Moscow, Reprints 18-93 (1993), 33-94 (1994); Proc. EPAC 1994, p. 1453.) using this approach have been most promising; the vacuum arc ion source(I.G. Brown, ``Vacuum Arc Ion Sources'', Rev. Sci. Instrum. 65, 3061 (1994).) uranium ion beam output of mostly U^3+ ions was increased significantly, although the yield of high charge state ions was only a small fraction of the original source current. In our experiments the electron beam will propagate antiparallel to the ion beam so as to provide a radially inward Lorentz force to confine and focus the stripped uranium beam, thus maximizing the electron-ion interactions and increasing the ion beam current density. We expect improved performance over the encouraging earlier^1 results. The motivation for this work(Ady Hershcovitch and Brant Johnson, RHIC/DET Note 17 and AGS/ ADD/Tech. Note No. 416) is the desire to eventually inject fully stripped uranium into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  10. Variation of plasma parameters of vacuum arc column with gap distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-hydrodynamic model, we studied long-gap-distance vacuum arcs in a uniform axial magnetic field and determined the effect of gap distance varying in a large range on plasma parameters. Simulation results showed that with increasing gap distance, the parameters of the plasma near the cathode are almost invariant, except for ion number density, but the parameters of the plasma in front of the anode clearly vary; meanwhile, joule heat gradually becomes the main source of energy for the arc column. In a short gap, a clear current constriction can be found in the entire arc column. Whereas when the gap distance exceeds a certain value, a sharp contraction of the current only arises in front of the anode.

  11. Dynamics of vaporization and dissociation during transient surface heating, with application to vacuum arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.

    1981-02-01

    This report describes a model of vaporization and dissociation occurring as a result of intense heating over a localized area of a material surface. The balance of heat between the input power and losses due to vaporization, as well as radiation and conduction in the material, are considered. The model includes the effect of binary mass diffusion and changes of surface stoichiometry for multiple component materials. Effects of vapor recondensation are included. The model is then applied to the description of spot heating on a vacuum arc anode through the use of a simple power feedback model. Comparison of surface temperature measurements to model predictions are used to parametrically describe the arc behavior. Finally, extensive parametric analyses showing the effect of material property variations on the arc behavior are described.

  12. Electrode material dependence of two-dimensional electron and vapour density distribution over vacuum arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Y.; Matsuoka, S.; Kumada, A.; Ikeda, H.; Hidaka, K.

    2017-03-01

    Electrode material dependence of intense-mode vacuum arc behaviour was systematically investigated by using the Shack-Hartmann method capable of simultaneously visualising two-dimensional electron and metal vapour density distributions from single-shot recordings. The electrode materials studied included Cu, CuCr (Cu75Cr25 wt. %), WC, and AgWC (Ag40WC60 wt. %). A comparison between the Cu and CuCr electrodes showed that the metal vapour densities for the CuCr decreased in an even shorter time scale than for the Cu. In the case of the WC electrodes, the widths of the electron density distributions became narrower as the arc current decreased although the electron densities hardly decreased in the decaying process of the arc current. The density measurements conducted at the late stage of the vacuum arcs demonstrated that the metal vapour densities around the anode were maintained at the highest value for the AgWC among the electrode materials in this study.

  13. Silicon etch with chromium ions generated by a filtered or non-filtered cathodic arc discharge

    PubMed Central

    Scopece, Daniele; Döbeli, Max; Passerone, Daniele; Maeder, Xavier; Neels, Antonia; Widrig, Beno; Dommann, Alex; Müller, Ulrich; Ramm, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The pre-treatment of substrate surfaces prior to deposition is important for the adhesion of physical vapour deposition coatings. This work investigates Si surfaces after the bombardment by energetic Cr ions which are created in cathodic arc discharges. The effect of the pre-treatment is analysed by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and in-depth X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and compared for Cr vapour produced from a filtered and non-filtered cathodic arc discharge. Cr coverage as a function of ion energy was also predicted by TRIDYN Monte Carlo calculations. Discrepancies between measured and simulated values in the transition regime between layer growth and surface removal can be explained by the chemical reactions between Cr ions and the Si substrate or between the substrate surface and the residual gases. Simulations help to find optimum and more stable parameters for specific film and substrate combinations faster than trial-and-error procedure. PMID:27877854

  14. Deposition of Functional Coatings Based on Intermetallic Systems TiAl on the Steel Surface by Vacuum Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budilov, V.; Vardanyan, E.; Ramazanov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Laws governing the formation of intermetallic phase by sequential deposition of nano-sized layers coatings from vacuum arc plasma were studied. Mathematical modeling process of deposition by vacuum arc plasma was performed. In order to identify the structural and phase composition of coatings and to explain their physical and chemical behaviour XRD studies were carried out. Production tests of the hardened punching tools were performed.

  15. Vacuum Arc Vapor Deposition Method and Apparatus for Applying Identification Symbols to Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor); Roxby, Donald L. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for applying permanent markings onto products using a Vacuum Arc Vapor Deposition (VAVD) marker by accelerating atoms or molecules from a vaporization source onto a substrate to form human and/or machine-readable part identification marking that can be detected optically or via a sensing device like x-ray, thermal imaging, ultrasound, magneto-optic, micro-power impulse radar, capacitance, or other similar sensing means. The apparatus includes a housing with a nozzle having a marking end. A chamber having an electrode, a vacuum port and a charge is located within the housing. The charge is activated by the electrode in a vacuum environment and deposited onto a substrate at the marking end of the nozzle. The apparatus may be a hand-held device or be disconnected from the handle and mounted to a robot or fixed station.

  16. Modeling of the anode surface deformation in high-current vacuum arcs with AMF contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2016-02-01

    A high-current vacuum arc subjected to an axial magnetic field is maintained in a diffuse status. With an increase in arc current, the energy carried by the arc column to the anode becomes larger and finally leads to the anode temperature exceeding the melting point of the anode material. When the anode melting pool is formed, and the rotational plasma of the arc column delivers its momentum to the melting pool, the anode melting pool starts to rotate and also flow outwards along the radial direction, which has been photographed by some researchers using high-speed cameras. In this paper, the anode temperature and melting status is calculated using the melting and solidification model. The swirl flow of the anode melting pool and deformation of the anode is calculated using the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model with the volume of fraction (VOF) method. All the models are transient 2D axial-rotational symmetric models. The influence of the impaction force of the arc plasma, electromagnetic force, viscosity force, and surface tension of the liquid metal are all considered in the model. The heat flux density injected into the anode and the arc pressure are obtained from the 3D numerical simulation of the high-current vacuum arc using the MHD model, which gives more realistic parameters for the anode simulation. Simulation results show that the depth of the anode melting pool increases with an increase in the arc current. Some droplets sputter out from the anode surface, which is caused by the inertial centrifugal force of the rotational melting pool and strong plasma pressure. Compared with the previous anode melting model without consideration of anode deformation, when the deformation and swirl flow of the anode melting pool are considered, the anode temperature is relatively lower, and just a little more than the melting point of Cu. This is because of liquid droplets sputtering out of the anode surface taking much of the energy away from the anode surface. The

  17. Radiographic research of the Bi plasma jet formed by the vacuum arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, A. P.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Fedunin, A. V.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    The results of experiments on a soft x-ray radiography (≈ 1-2 keV) of a bismuth plasma formed by the high-current vacuum arc discharge are represented. The plasma gun with the arc current ≈ 60 kA and the current rise time ≈ 7 μs was used to produce the Bi plasma jet. The compact pulsed radiograph XPG-1 (250 kA, 220 ns) with an X-pinch load consisting of four Mo wires with a diameter 25 μm was used as a source of the soft X-ray radiation. The X-ray backlighting images of the researched plasma jet and the Bi step-wedge with a step thickness of ≈ 100 nm were recorded simultaneously in the course of the experiment. A comparison of the plasma jet x-ray image with the current trace has enabled to estimate dependencies of the linear mass on the arc current. The experiments have shown that when the arc current density reaches ≈ 3·105 A/cm2, the evaporation rate of the electrode material reaches ≈ 100 μg/μs, that under the plasma velocity ≈ 0.5 cm/μs, provides a plasma jet linear mass ≈ 200 μg/cm. At a distance of ≈ 1-2 mm from the arc cathode surface, the sharp increase of the jet linear mass (up to ≈ 500 μg/cm) occurred.

  18. Vacuum arc plasma generation and thin film deposition from a TiB{sub 2} cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhirkov, Igor Petruhins, Andrejs; Naslund, Lars-Ake; Rosen, Johanna; Kolozsvári, Szilard; Polcik, Peter

    2015-11-02

    We have studied the utilization of TiB{sub 2} cathodes for thin film deposition in a DC vacuum arc system. We present a route for attaining a stable, reproducible, and fully ionized plasma flux of Ti and B by removal of the external magnetic field, which leads to dissipation of the vacuum arc discharge and an increased active surface area of the cathode. Applying a magnetic field resulted in instability and cracking, consistent with the previous reports. Plasma analysis shows average energies of 115 and 26 eV, average ion charge states of 2.1 and 1.1 for Ti and B, respectively, and a plasma ion composition of approximately 50% Ti and 50% B. This is consistent with measured resulting film composition from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, suggesting a negligible contribution of neutrals and macroparticles to the film growth. Also, despite the observations of macroparticle generation, the film surface is very smooth. These results are of importance for the utilization of cathodic arc as a method for synthesis of metal borides.

  19. Hybrid gas-metal co-implantation with a modified vacuum arc ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E.M.; Yushkov, G.Y.; Evans, P.J.; Oztarhan, A.; Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Liu, F.; MacGill, R.A.; Monteiro, O.R.; Wang, Z.

    1996-08-01

    Energetic beams of mixed metal and gaseous ion species can be generated with a vacuum arc ion source by adding gas to the arc discharge region. This could be an important tool for ion implantation research by providing a method for forming buried layers of mixed composition such as e.g. metal oxides and nitrides. In work to date, we have formed a number of mixed metal-gas ion beams including Ti+N, Pt+N, Al+O, and Zr+O. The particle current fractions of the metal-gas ion components in the beam ranged from 100% metallic to about 80% gaseous, depending on operational parameters. We have used this new variant of the vacuum arc ion source to carry out some exploratory studies of the effect of Al+O and Zr+O co-implantation on tribology of stainless steel. Here we describe the ion source modifications, species and charge state of the hybrid beams produced, and results of preliminary studies of surface modification of stainless steel by co-implantation of mixed Al/O or Zr/O ion beams. 5 figs, 21 refs.

  20. Fully kinetic model of breakdown during sheath expansion after interruption of vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Wang, Haoran; Zhou, Zhipeng; Tian, Yunbo; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-01

    Research on sheath expansion is critical to the understanding of the dielectric recovery process in a vacuum interrupter after interruption of vacuum arcs. In this paper, we investigated how residual plasma affects breakdown in the sheath expansion period after the current zero. To simulate sheath expansion and breakdown, we developed a fully kinetic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model with one spatial dimension and three velocity dimensions. The model accounted for various collisions, including ionization, excitation, elastic collisions, charge exchange, and momentum exchange, and we added an external circuit to the model to make the calculations self-consistent. The existence of metal vapor slowed the sheath expansion in the gap and caused high electric field formation in front of the cathode surface. The initial residual plasma, which was at sufficiently low density, seemed to have a limited impact on breakdown, and the metal vapor dominated the breakdown in this case. Additionally, the breakdown probability was sensitive to the initial plasma density if the value exceeded a specific threshold, and plasma at sufficiently high density could mean that breakdown would occur more easily. We found that if the simulation does not take the residual plasma into account, it could overestimate the critical value of the metal vapor density, which is always used to describe the boundary of breakdown after interruption of vacuum arcs. We discussed the breakdown mechanism in sheath expansion, and the breakdown is determined by a combination of metal vapor, residual plasma, and the electric field in front of the cathode surface.

  1. A flexible curvilinear electromagnetic filter for direct current cathodic arc source

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Hua; Shen Yao; Li Liuhe; Li Xiaoling; Cai Xun; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-09-15

    Widespread applications of direct current (dc) cathodic arc deposition are hampered by macroparticle (MP) contamination, although a cathodic arc offers many unique merits such as high ionization rate, high deposition rate, etc. In this work, a flexible curvilinear electromagnetic filter is described to eliminate MPs from a dc cathodic arc source. The filter which has a relatively large size with a minor radius of about 85 mm is suitable for large cathodes. The filter is open and so the MPs do not rebound inside the filter. The flexible design allows the ions to be transported from the cathode to the sample surface optimally. Our measurements with a saturated ion current probe show that the efficiency of this flexible filter reaches about 2.0% (aluminum cathode) when the filter current is about 250 A. The MP density measured from TiN films deposited using this filter is two to three orders of magnitude less than that from films deposited with a 90 deg. duct magnetic filter and three to four orders of magnitude smaller than those deposited without a filter. Furthermore, our experiments reveal that the potential of the filter coil and the magnetic field on the surface of the cathode are two important factors affecting the efficacy of the filter. Different biasing potentials can enhance the efficiency to up to 12-fold, and a magnetic field at about 4.0 mT can improve it by a factor of 2 compared to 5.4 mT.

  2. Ion Species and Charge States of Vacuum Arc Plasma with Gas Feed and Longitudinal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim; Anders, Andre

    2010-06-23

    The evolution of copper ion species and charge state distributions is measured for a long vacuum arc discharge plasma operated in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field of several 10 mT and working gas (Ar). It was found that changing the cathode-anode distance within 20 cm as well as increasing the gas pressure did not affect the arc burning voltage and power dissipation by much. In contrast, burning voltage and power dissipation were greatly increased as the magnetic field was increased. The longer the discharge gap the greater was the fraction of gaseous ions and the lower the fraction of metal ions, while the mean ion charge state was reduced. It is argued that the results are affected by charge exchange collisions and electron impact ionization.

  3. Use of vacuum arc plasma guns for a metal puff Z-pinch system

    SciTech Connect

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Baksht, R. B.

    2011-09-15

    The performance of a metal puff Z-pinch system has been studied experimentally. In this type of system, the initial cylindrical shell 4 cm in diameter was produced by ten plasma guns. Each gun initiates a vacuum arc operating between magnesium electrodes. The net current of the guns was 80 kA. The arc-produced plasma shell was compressed by using a 450-kA, 450-ns driver, and as a result, a plasma column 0.3 cm in diameter was formed. The electron temperature of the plasma reached 400 eV at an average ion concentration of 1.85 {center_dot} 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The power of the Mg K-line radiation emitted by the plasma for 15-30 ns was 300 MW/cm.

  4. Vacuum arc cathode spot motion in oblique magnetic fields: An interpretation of the Robson experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beilis, I. I.

    2016-09-15

    A model was developed of vacuum arc cathode spot motion in a magnetic field that obliquely intercepts the cathode surface. The model takes into account a force under an electric field caused by retrograde spot motion across the normal component of the magnetic field, producing a drift velocity component in the direction of the acute angle between the magnetic field and the cathode surface. The relationship between velocity of the retrograde direction and drift velocity of the cathode spot motion to the acute angle was developed. The dependencies of the drift angle θ on the acute angle φ, magnetic field strength B, and arc current I were calculated. It was found that the calculated θ increased with φ, B, and I in accordance with Robson's measurements.

  5. Vacuum arc cathode spot motion in oblique magnetic fields: An interpretation of the Robson experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.

    2016-09-01

    A model was developed of vacuum arc cathode spot motion in a magnetic field that obliquely intercepts the cathode surface. The model takes into account a force under an electric field caused by retrograde spot motion across the normal component of the magnetic field, producing a drift velocity component in the direction of the acute angle between the magnetic field and the cathode surface. The relationship between velocity of the retrograde direction and drift velocity of the cathode spot motion to the acute angle was developed. The dependencies of the drift angle θ on the acute angle φ, magnetic field strength B, and arc current I were calculated. It was found that the calculated θ increased with φ, B, and I in accordance with Robson's measurements.

  6. Hollow cathode arc discharge as an effective energy source for welding processes in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerovnyi, V. M.; Khakhalev, A. D.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of thermal and physical properties of the hollow cathode arc discharge (HCAD) with respect to its application for welding processes in vacuum. The following main parameters of the arc discharge were studied: the external voltage-current (V-I) characteristics; plasma parameters inside the cathode cavity and in the arc external column and the radial heat flux density distribution into the anode. Langmuir electrical probes have been utilized to investigate plasma parameters. Electron energy distribution function was determined from the probe V-I characteristics by the computation of an inverse ill-posed problem. It was shown that, depending on welding parameters, HCAD can exist in two different forms: diffusive or constricted. At currents below 60 A, HCAD has the diffusive form, and with the increase in the current it changes to the constricted form. The discharge constriction phenomenon, we believe, could be explained by the appearance in the external plasma of high velocity electrons with energies from 12 to 22 eV. Parameters of the heat flux into the anode were investigated with spot and split-anode calorimeters. The heat flux density on the anode of the diffusive form of the discharge has a Gaussian distribution. The heat flux of the constricted form is significantly different from the diffusive one and can be approximated by the sum of two combined normal-circular heat sources with different power concentration coefficients. It was also found that the efficiency parameter of the discharge energy transfer to the anode can reach 0.7-0.86 of the discharge voltage, which confirmed that HCAD is a highly effective energy source for welding processes in vacuum. Examples of industrial applications of HCAD for welding, brazing and alloying in vacuum are presented.

  7. Influence of discharge gap on the discharge stability in a short vacuum arc ion source.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Zhang, G L; Jin, D Z; Yang, L; Dai, J Y

    2012-02-01

    The influence of the discharge gap between cathode and anode on the discharge stability in a short vacuum arc (SVA) ion source is presented in this paper. Planar cathode and cylindrical hollow anode made of titanium are investigated. There is a great need in present accelerator injection research for SVA source to produce the small deviation of the ion current beam. Current research shows that increasing the short discharge gap can reduce the level of ion current deviation and ion charge deviation from 29% and 31% to 15% and 17%, respectively. A microplasma plume generation mechanism in SVA and scanning electron microscopic results can be used to explain this interesting phenomenon.

  8. Influence of discharge gap on the discharge stability in a short vacuum arc ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Zhang, G. L.; Jin, D. Z.; Dai, J. Y.; Yang, L.

    2012-02-15

    The influence of the discharge gap between cathode and anode on the discharge stability in a short vacuum arc (SVA) ion source is presented in this paper. Planar cathode and cylindrical hollow anode made of titanium are investigated. There is a great need in present accelerator injection research for SVA source to produce the small deviation of the ion current beam. Current research shows that increasing the short discharge gap can reduce the level of ion current deviation and ion charge deviation from 29% and 31% to 15% and 17%, respectively. A microplasma plume generation mechanism in SVA and scanning electron microscopic results can be used to explain this interesting phenomenon.

  9. Method of forming ultra thin film devices by vacuum arc vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for providing an ultra thin electrical circuit integral with a portion of a surface of an object, including using a focal Vacuum Arc Vapor Deposition device having a chamber, a nozzle and a nozzle seal, depressing the nozzle seal against the portion of the object surface to create an airtight compartment in the chamber and depositing one or more ultra thin film layer(s) only on the portion of the surface of the object, the layers being of distinct patterns such that they form the circuit.

  10. RF Frequency Oscillations in the Early Stages of Vacuum Arc Collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.; Thio, Y. C. Francis

    2003-01-01

    RF frequency oscillations may be produced in a typical capacitive charging / discharging pulsed power system. These oscillations may be benign, parasitic, destructive or crucial to energy deposition. In some applications, proper damping of oscillations may be critical to proper plasma formation. Because the energy deposited into the plasma is a function of plasma and circuit conditions, the entire plasma / circuit system needs to be considered as a unit To accomplish this, the initiation of plasma is modeled as a time-varying, non-linear element in a circuit analysis model. The predicted spectra are compared to empirical power density spectra including those obtained from vacuum arcs.

  11. High ion charge states in a high-current, short-pulse, vacuum ARC ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Brown, I.; MacGill, R.; Dickinson, M.

    1996-08-01

    Ions of the cathode material are formed at vacuum arc cathode spots and extracted by a grid system. The ion charge states (typically 1-4) depend on the cathode material and only little on the discharge current as long as the current is low. Here the authors report on experiments with short pulses (several {mu}s) and high currents (several kA); this regime of operation is thus approaching a more vacuum spark-like regime. Mean ion charge states of up to 6.2 for tungsten and 3.7 for titanium have been measured, with the corresponding maximum charge states of up to 8+ and 6+, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of Saha calculations and freezing of the charge state distribution.

  12. Modeling and simulation of high-current vacuum arc considering the micro process of anode vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Huang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Xiao; Jia, Shenli

    2017-03-01

    In vacuum arc (VA), when the arc current is very high (usually in the tens of kilo-ampere), the heat flux density injecting into an anode is larger and leads to a higher anode temperature with the increasing of current. The strong anode evaporation drives the evaporated atoms from the anode surface to the arc column. Simultaneously, the anode evaporated atoms impact with the cathode plasma, and then the micro processes as ionization and recombination between anode atoms and plasma will happen. In this paper, the two fluid three-dimensional (3D) magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) model of VA considering ionization and recombination processes is built, and the influence of the anode vapor and its micro processes on the arc column is obtained by solving the two fluid MHD equations, which control anode neutral atoms and cathode plasma, respectively. In the model, the ionization of neutral atoms and the recombination of ions are both considered, the mass, momentum and energy exchange caused by the ionization and recombination processes are also considered. Moreover, the influence of ionization and recombination processes on the electromagnetic process of VA is also considered in the model. By numerical simulation, the anode vapor distribution, cathode plasma distribution and VA distribution, such as density, temperature, pressure, etc, are all obtained, and the parameters related to ionization and recombination processes are also obtained. When the anode temperature is high enough, the anode neutral vapor will enter into the arc column, and strong ionization happens at the interface between anode vapor and cathode plasma. Then, the anode vapor will be quickly ionized (usually smaller than a few microseconds) and generate a lot of ions (usually higher than 1021 m‑3 orders of magnitude). The anode neutral vapor has the same temperature with the anode surface, which is much lower than the temperature of the arc column, so the anode neutral vapor obviously has a cooling effect

  13. Observations of melt rate as a function of arc power, CO pressure, and electrode gap during vacuum consumable arc remelting of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanner, F. J.; Bertram, L. A.; Adasczik, C.; O'Brien, T.

    1984-01-01

    Statistically designed experiments were conducted at two different production melt shops to evaluate the influence of arc power, CO pressure, and electrode gap on melt rate. Approximately 11,000 kg of Inconel 718 alloy 0.4 m diameter electrodes were vacuum consumable arc remelted into 0.5 m diameter ingots. Analysis of the experimental results revealed that melting efficiency (melting rate/kW) was maximized when CO pressure and electrode gap were held at low levels. Under these conditions, the heat distribution (created by the vacuum arc) on the electrode tip and the molten pool exhibited macro uniformity. Increased CO pressure and/or electrode gap depressed the melt rate, and at 13.3 Pa (100 microns) and a 0.050 m electrode gap, this depression exceeds 46 pct. Increasing these parameters also changed the arc behavior to that of a constricted arc with a highly localized heat input. It is hypothesized that the change from the usual diffuse arc to this constricted arc results in intense Lorentz pumping in a localized region of the molten pool atop the ingot causing fluid flow transients. These transients could, in turn, create solidification defects.

  14. Synthesis of Nanosized Titanium Oxide and Nitride Through Vacuum Arc Plasma Expansion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepeshev, A. A.; Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Fedorov, L. Yu.; Shaihadinov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Physical vapor deposition techniques such vacuum arc plasma deposition — which are very commonly used in thin film technology — appear to hold much promise for the synthesis of nanocrystalline thin films as well as nanoparticles. Monodisperse and spherical titanium oxide (TiO2) and nitride nanoparticles were produced at room temperature as a cluster beam in the gas phase using a cluster-deposition source. Using the basic principles of the gas condensation method, this study has developed vacuum arc nanoparticle synthesis system. We demonstrate that major process deposition parameter is the pressure in the plasma chamber. This is the major advantage of these techniques over thermal evaporation. Our method affords TiN powders with high specific surface areas exceeding 200m2g-1. TEM micrograph of TiO2 nanoparticles prepared at an oxygen pressure of 60Pa show an average particle size of 6nm. TiO2 nanoparticles prepared at an oxygen pressure of 70Pa were observed to not have a reduced average particle size.

  15. Investigation of firing properties of a vacuum arcs triggered by plasma injection

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardet, H.; Godechot, X.; Riviere, C.

    1996-08-01

    The firing characteristic of a vacuum arc, by means of plasma injection, is described. In this method, a plasma, created from a trigger device, plumes away to the space between the cathode and anode. As the plasma is quasi-neutral, the electrostatic field is concentrated across the sheath at the surface of the cathode, thus, creating a high electrical field. As a result, a vacuum arc fires between the cathode and anode. The authors have investigated the firing rate as a function of the trigger cathode distance, trigger current, the anode-cathode distance and voltage. They found a firing rate between 90 to 100% for a trigger current in the range of 400-1200 A, the trigger pulse length was 4 ps, and the trigger-cathode distance was 1.6 to 3.6 cm. The anode cathode gap length changes the firing rate to a low extent for values between 2 to 5 cm. The anode cathode voltage do not change the firing rate. The effect of a magnetic field applied axially over the trigger have also been investigated. Using a version of a highly reliable trigger, the authors were able to deposit stainless steel, copper, carbon and molybdenum, thin films.

  16. Removal of Oxide Layer Using Vacuum Arc Cathode Spot with Transverse External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Shiko; Takahashi, Arisa; Ymamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-09-01

    A remarkable characteristic of a cathode spot in a vacuum arc is that the cathode spot moves around the metal at high speed. Cathode spots of vacuum arc have been used for cleaning metal oxide surface. In addition, the adhesion strength increases in the case of thermal spraying because the roughness on the metal surface is formed. However, the removal of oxide layer is not enough and the re-melting occurs because a cathode spot moves with random manner on the metal surface. In this paper, the removal of oxide layer was observed in order to control the cathode spot movement with transverse external magnetic field. Experiment were performed using a SS400 cathode work piece. A high-speed video camera recorded the cathode spot. Then, the obtained images were analyzed by plasma image processing. As a results, the cathode spot moves with retrograde motion under removing the oxide layer when a magnetic field was applied. Then, the moving speed of cathode spot increases with increasing the magnetic field.

  17. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oks, E. M.; Oztarhan, A.; Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E. S.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal-gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the "inverse" concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  18. Vacuum arc behavior and its voltage characteristics in drawing process controlled by composite magnetic fields along axial and transverse directions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lijun Deng, Jie; Wang, Haijing; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2015-10-15

    In this research, drawing vacuum arc (VA) experiments were conducted using composite contacts under currents ranging from 5 kA to 20 kA root mean square (rms). The new type of contact comprised an axial magnetic field (AMF) configuration and a transverse magnetic field (TMF) configuration. The TMF plate was in the center, surrounded by the AMF plate. The contact generated both AMFs and TMFs simultaneously. VA appearances and arc voltages were recorded, and the VA was modeled as a conductor for electromagnetic force analysis in ANSYS software. The results showed that the coaxiality of operating mechanisms significantly influenced arc behavior just as the arc was ignited. When arc brightness did not increase after ignition, there was a voltage drop accompanied with diffusion of the VA. As to VA development, when an arc was ignited on an AMF plate, it spread on the plate and rotated. Over time the arc current increased, the constricting arc forms, and the arc column rotated on the TMF plate under the action of Ampere's force. With regard to the influence of a magnetic field on a VA at different stages, in the initial drawing arc stage the TMF was dominant, and the arc started to rotate under the action of Ampere's force. Afterwards, the AMF was dominant, with a steadily burning arc. As for contact melting, in the initial arcing period, a contracted short arc caused severe melting and erosion of the contact plate. When the ignition spot or root was close to the slot of plate, the electromagnetic force pushed the arc toward slot and contact edge, resulting in local erosion of the slot region.

  19. Study of nanostructured (Ti-Zr-Nb)N coatings’ physical- mechanical properties obtained by vacuum arc evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, S. V.; Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Yerokhina, L. N.; Yeskermessov, D. K.; erdybaeva, N. K. Y.

    2016-02-01

    The coatings were formed by vacuum arc deposition. Unit cast target (cathodes) was used on the basis of 30 atm. % Ti, 35 at. % Zr and 35 atm. % Nb as the vaporized materials. Molecular nitrogen was used as the working gas. The thickness of the coatings in the experiments was 4.0 microns. The surface morphology fractograph fracture, track friction were investigated in a scanning electron microscope JSM-6390 LV. The use of multicoatings based on carbides is very promising to ensure the high performance properties of the complex, nitrides and silicides of transition metals. Findings - nanostructured coating of (Ti-Zr-Nb) N was obtained by vacuum arc evaporation cathode-cast in a nitrogen gas reaction medium. Multicomponent films have a pronounced columnar structure. Elemental composition was obtained by the vacuum arc deposition of coatings (Ti-Zr-Nb) N, depending on the physical parameters of the deposition process, in particular the pressure of the reaction gas nitrogen.

  20. Material and time dependence of the voltage noise generated bycathodic vacuum arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre

    2005-07-15

    The high frequency fluctuations of the burning voltage of cathodic vacuum arcs have been investigated in order to extract information on cathode processes. Eight cathode materials (W, Ta, Hf, Ti, Ni, Au, Sn, Bi) were selected covering a wide range of cohesive energy. The voltage noise was recorded using both a broad-band voltage divider and an attenuator connected to a fast oscilloscope (limits 1 GHz analog and 5 GS/s digital). Fast Fourier transform revealed a power spectrum that is linear in log-log presentation, with a slope of 1/f{sup 2}, where f is the frequency (brown noise). The amplitude of the spectral power of the voltage noise was found to scale with the cohesive energy, in agreement with earlier measurements at lower resolution. These basic results do not depend on the time after arc initiation. However, lower arc current in the beginning of the pulse shows greater voltage noise, suggesting an inverse relation between the noise amplitude and number of emission sites (cathode spot fragments).

  1. Spectral analysis of the charge and elemental composition of the vacuum arc discharge plasma flux during deposition of carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrin, D. K.; Trifonov, S. A.; Lisenkov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    In the present work spectral analysis of the charge and elemental composition of the plasma flux of a vacuum arc discharge on example of clear dispersion of the graphite cathode and also when adding benzene or argon as a working gas is studied. It is shown that the intensity of the main spectral lines of the atomic and molecular carbon in the emission spectrum of the vacuum arc discharge plasma is almost constant for all considered modes of operation, while the intensity of the spectral lines of ionized carbon changes significantly when adding a working gas.

  2. Fine-particle filter prevents damage to vacuum pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlamert, P., Jr.

    1964-01-01

    A filter system for mechanical pumps is designed with a baffle assembly that rotates in a circulating oil bath which traps destructive particles. This prevents severe damage to the pump and is serviceable for long periods before it requires cleaning.

  3. Highly transparent and conductive ZnO:Al thin films prepared by vacuum arc plasma evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Toshihiro; Minamino, Youhei; Ida, Satoshi; Minami, Tadatsugu

    2004-07-01

    A vacuum arc plasma evaporation (VAPE) method using both oxide fragments and gas sources as the source materials is demonstrated to be very effective for the preparation of multicomponent oxide thin films. Highly transparent and conductive Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were prepared by the VAPE method using a ZnO fragment target and a gas source Al dopant, aluminum acethylacetonate (Al(C5H7O2)3) contained in a stainless steel vessel. The Al content in the AZO films was altered by controlling the partial pressure (or flow rate) of the Al dopant gas. High deposition rates as well as uniform distributions of resistivity and thickness on the substrate surface were obtained on large area glass substrates. A low resistivity on the order of 10-4 Ω cm and an average transmittance above 80% in the visible range were obtained in AZO thin films deposited on glass substrates. .

  4. Modeling of thermal stress development during the vacuum arc remelting process

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Z.; Alam, M.K.; Semiatin, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    The development of thermal stresses during the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) process was investigated through numerical solution of the two-dimensional, non-steady state heat conduction and stress equilibrium equations. Solutions were obtained for various levels of input power efficiency, values of the crucible-ingot interface heat transfer coefficients, and lengths of the melted and resolidified ingot. Model predictions revealed that the maximum tensile thermal stresses are developed at the bottom of the ingot for cases involving low input power efficiency and high interface heat transfer coefficients. The predicted development of large tensile stresses at the mid-radius position correlates well with observations of thermal cracking during VAR of near-gamma titanium aluminide alloy ingots.

  5. Subnanosecond Thomson scattering on a vacuum arc discharge in tin vapor.

    PubMed

    Kieft, E R; van der Mullen, J J A M; Banine, V

    2005-08-01

    In a previous series of Thomson scattering (TS) experiments on an extreme ultraviolet producing vacuum arc discharge in tin vapor, background radiation emitted by the plasma was found to make measurements impossible for all parts of the discharge except the prepinch phase. To reduce the level of recorded background radiation, we have built a setup for time and space resolved subnanosecond TS. Results obtained with this new setup are presented for experiments on previously inaccessible parts of the discharge--the ignition phase, pinch phase, and decay phase. For the first two, measurements have been performed at different heights in the plasma. Electron densities for the pinch phase have been derived. For the decay phase, the electron densities confirm previous Stark broadening data. From the overall results, a more complete picture of the plasma evolution can be formed.

  6. Model of liquid-metal splashing in the cathode spot of a vacuum arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gashkov, M. A.; Zubarev, N. M. Zubareva, O. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Uimanov, I. V.

    2016-04-15

    The formation of microjets is studied during the extrusion of a melted metal by the plasma pressure from craters formed on a cathode in a burning vacuum arc. An analytic model of liquid-metal splashing that includes two stages is proposed. At the first stage, the liquid motion has the axial symmetry and a liquid-metal wall surrounding the crater is formed. At the second stage, the axial symmetry is broken due to the development of the Plateau–Rayleigh instability in the upper part of the wall. The wall breakup process is shown to have a threshold. The minimal plasma pressure and the minimal electric current flowing through the crater required for obtaining the liquid-metal splashing regime are found. The basic spatial and temporal characteristics of the jet formation process are found using the analytic model.

  7. Bias and self-bias of magnetic macroparticle filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Byon, Eungsun; Anders, Andre

    2002-12-01

    Curved magnetic filters are often used for the removal of macroparticles from cathodic arc plasmas. This study addresses the need to further reduce losses and improving plasma throughput. The central figure of merit is the system coefficient Kappa defined as filtered ion current normalized by the plasma-producing arc current. The coefficient Kappa is investigated as a function of DC and pulsed magnetic field operation, magnetic field strength, external electric bias, and arc amplitude. It increases with positive filter bias but saturates at about 15 V for relatively low magnetic field ({approx}10 mT), whereas stronger magnetic fields lead to higher Kappa with saturation at about 25 V. Further increase of positive bias reduces Kappa. These findings are true for both pulsed and DC filters. Bias of pulsed filters has been realized using the voltage drop across a self-bias resistor, eliminating the need for a separate bias circuit. Almost 100 A of filtered copper ions have been obtained in pulse d mode, corresponding to Kappa approximately equal to 0.04. The results are interpreted by a simplified potential trough model.

  8. Some novel design features of the LBL metal vapor vacuum arc ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The family of MEVVA (metal vapor vacuum arc) high current metal ion sources developed at LBL over the past several years has grown to include a number of different source versions with a wide range of some of the design and operational parameters. The MicroMEVVA source is a particularly compact version, about 2 cm diameter and 10 cm long, while the MEVVA IV weighs some 30 kG. MEVVAs IV and V incorporate multiple cathode assemblies (16 and 18 separate cathodes, respectively), and the operating cathode can be switched rapidly and without down-time. The new MEVVA V embodiment is quite compact considering its broad beam (10 cm), high voltage (100 kV) and multiple cathode features. The large-area extractor grids used in the MEVVA V were fabricated using a particularly simple technique, and they are clamped into position and so can be changed simply and quickly. The electrical system used to drive the arc is particularly simple and incorporates several attractive features. In this paper we review and describe a number of the mechanical and electrical design features that have been developed for these sources. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  10. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu. Frolova, V. P.; Oks, E. M.

    2016-02-15

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%.

  11. Dynamic Mission Modeling and Simulation: Application of Micro-Vacuum Arc Thrusters and Frozen Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaris, Therese

    The dynamic mission modeling and simulation of scenarios around the Earth, Moon, and libration points are used to explore the application of the Vacuum Arc Thruster and frozen orbits for future space exploration missions. The Micro-Vacuum Arc Thruster (microVAT) is a propulsion system that uses an arc to evaporate solid cathode material. The propulsion system is compatible for nano-satellite applications due to its low operating voltage, low mass, and its simplicity to be integrated into the spacecraft operating system. The microVAT experimental performance values were used to baseline the numerical thruster model for the space mission operational scenarios. The simulation results were used analyze and make recommendations on the performance parameters that are required for maneuvers and interplanetary trajectories for space exploration missions. In addition, the analytical derivation and numerical analysis of Earth-based frozen orbits are used to baseline the low-altitude, frozen orbits. A high resolution in order and degree lunar gravity model and third-body perturbations due to the Earth and Sun are included in the detailed simulation. The time evolution of the classical frozen orbital conditions is calculated by numerically propagating the orbits in an environment where all the perturbations are included. The behaviour and evolution pattern of the orbital elements are used to baseline a set of numerical quasi-frozen conditions for a series of low-altitude, polar orbits. The numerically integrated results for a family of polar frozen orbits provide insight into the predictive behaviour pattern and evolution of the orbital elements that can be extended to any given set of initial conditions and requirements. It is shown that these results are not a fixed point solution that is calculated for a selective set of perturbations, but rather the numerical model can be used to determine a set of conditions and orbital elements to satisfy a given set of mission

  12. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  13. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  14. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  15. In vitro studies on silver implanted pure iron by metal vapor vacuum arc technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-06-01

    Pure iron has been verified as a promising biodegradable metal for absorbable cardiovascular stent usage. However, the degradation rate of pure iron is too slow. To accelerate the degradation of the surface of pure iron, silver ions were implanted into pure iron by metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source at an extracted voltage of 40keV. The implanted influence was up to 2×10(17)ions/cm(2). The composition and depth profiles, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of Ag ion implanted pure iron were investigated. The implantation depths of Ag was around 60nm. The element Ag existed as Ag2O in the outermost layer, then gradually transited to metal atoms in zero valent state with depth increase. The implantation of Ag ions accelerated the corrosion rate of pure iron matrix, and exhibited much more uniform corrosion behavior. For cytotoxicity assessment, the implantation of Ag ions slightly decreased the viability of all kinds of cell lines used in these tests. The hemolysis rate of Ag ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%, which was acceptable, whereas the platelet adhesion tests indicated the implantation of Ag ions might increase the risk of thrombosis.

  16. Contribution of moving speed of vacuum arc cathode spot to the heat conduction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    Thermal spraying has been widely used because it can give various functions by coating materials on the surface. It is necessary to remove an oxide layer and form a roughness. However, the blast has problems that occurs crushing and wear of the particles, and residual grid becomes a starting point of rust and peeling. The pretreatment with vacuum arc cathode spot is focused by this problem. Cathode spot with high energy density evaporates the oxide layer and melts the bulk for roughness. However, this process is believed that surface state is changed by the power density and sojourn time because the roughness depends on the location. It remains to be elucidated the formation factor of roughness and removal process. Therefore, the models of heat conduction process and vapor mixed affected by moving speed were proposed. To elucidate the formation factor of roughness and removal process, the contribution of moving speed to the heat conduction process is analyzed. As a result, the molten depth, width, and volume depend on the moving speed.

  17. Method and apparatus for controlling electrode gap during vacuum consumable arc remelting

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, R.W.; Maroone, J.P.; Tipping, D.W.; Zanner, F.J.

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  18. Anodic vacuum arc developed nanocrystalline Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni thin film thermocouples

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, S. K.; Sinha, M. K.; Pathak, B.; Rout, S. K.; Barhai, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    This paper deals with the development of nanocrystalline Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) by using ion-assisted anodic vacuum arc deposition technique. The crystallographic structure and surface morphology of individual layer films have been studied by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, and thermoelectric power of as deposited and annealed films have been measured. The observed departure of these transport parameters from their respective bulk values can be understood in terms of intrinsic scattering due to enhanced crystallite boundaries. From the measured values of thermoelectric power and the corresponding temperature coefficient of resistance of annealed Cu, Ni, and Fe films, the calculated values of log derivative of the mean free path of conduction electrons at the Fermi surface with respect to energy (U) are found to be -0.51, 3.22, and -8.39, respectively. The thermoelectric response of annealed Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs has been studied up to a maximum temperature difference of 300 deg. C. Reproducibility of TFTCs has been examined in terms of the standard deviation in thermoelectric response of 16 test samples for each pair. Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs agree well with their wire thermocouple equivalents. The thermoelectric power values of Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs at 300 deg. C are found to be 0.0178 and 0.0279 mV/ deg. C, respectively.

  19. Anodic vacuum arc developed nanocrystalline Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni thin film thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S. K.; Sinha, M. K.; Pathak, B.; Rout, S. K.; Barhai, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    This paper deals with the development of nanocrystalline Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) by using ion-assisted anodic vacuum arc deposition technique. The crystallographic structure and surface morphology of individual layer films have been studied by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, and thermoelectric power of as deposited and annealed films have been measured. The observed departure of these transport parameters from their respective bulk values can be understood in terms of intrinsic scattering due to enhanced crystallite boundaries. From the measured values of thermoelectric power and the corresponding temperature coefficient of resistance of annealed Cu, Ni, and Fe films, the calculated values of log derivative of the mean free path of conduction electrons at the Fermi surface with respect to energy (U) are found to be -0.51, 3.22, and -8.39, respectively. The thermoelectric response of annealed Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs has been studied up to a maximum temperature difference of 300°C. Reproducibility of TFTCs has been examined in terms of the standard deviation in thermoelectric response of 16 test samples for each pair. Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs agree well with their wire thermocouple equivalents. The thermoelectric power values of Cu-Ni and Fe-Ni TFTCs at 300°C are found to be 0.0178 and 0.0279mV/°C, respectively.

  20. Laser-assisted vacuum arc extreme ultraviolet source: a comparison of picosecond and nanosecond laser triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyene, Girum A.; Tobin, Isaac; Juschkin, Larissa; Hayden, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sokell, Emma; Zakharov, Vassily S.; Zakharov, Sergey V.; O'Reilly, Fergal

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light generation by hybrid laser-assisted vacuum arc discharge plasmas, utilizing Sn-coated rotating-disc-electrodes, was investigated. The discharge was initiated by localized ablation of the liquid tin coating of the cathode disc by a laser pulse. The laser pulse, at 1064 nm, was generated by Nd:YAG lasers with variable energy from 1 to 100 mJ per pulse. The impact of shortening the laser pulse from 7 ns to 170 ps on the EUV generation has been investigated in detail. The use of ps pulses resulted in an increase in emission of EUV radiation. With a fixed discharge energy of ~4 J, the EUV conversion efficiency tends to plateau at ~2.4  ±  0.25% for the ps laser pulses, while for the ns pulses, it saturates at ~1.7  ±  0.3%. Under similar discharge and laser energy conditions, operating the EUV source with the ps-triggering resulted also in narrower spectral profiles of the emission in comparison to ns-triggering. The results indicate an advantage in using ps-triggering in laser-assisted discharges to produce brighter plasmas required for applications such as metrology.

  1. Advancing alloy 718 vacuum arc remelting technology through developing model-based controls.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBarbadillo, John J; Beaman, Joseph Jefferson; Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2005-06-01

    The Specialty Metals Processing Consortium (SMPC) was established in 1990 with the goal of advancing the technology of melting and remelting nickel and titanium alloys. In recent years, the SMPC technical program has focused on developing technology to improve control over the final ingot remelting and solidification processes to alleviate conditions that lead to the formation of inclusions and positive and negative segregation. A primary objective is the development of advanced monitoring and control techniques for application to vacuum arc remelting (VAR), with special emphasis on VAR of Alloy 718. This has lead to the development of an accurate, low order electrode melting model for this alloy as well as an advanced process estimator that provides real-time estimates of important process variables such as electrode temperature distribution, instantaneous melt rate, process efficiency, fill ratio, and voltage bias. This, in turn, has enabled the development and industrial application of advanced VAR process monitoring and control systems. The technology is based on the simple idea that the set of variables describing the state of the process must be self-consistent as required by the dynamic process model. The output of the process estimator comprises the statistically optimal estimate of this self-consistent set. Process upsets such as those associated with glows and cracked electrodes are easily identified using estimator based methods.

  2. Plasma centrifuge with vacuum arc discharge applied to the separation of stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbosco, Edson

    1989-09-01

    The results of a vacuum-arc plasma centrifuge experiment are described. A plasma centrifuge is an apparatus where a plasma column is produced due to the interaction of an electric current with an externally applied magnetic field, vector J x vector B. Among the applications of a rotating plasma, this work deals particularly with its utilization in an isotope enrichment device. The main characteristics of the plasma produced in this experiment are presented, with special attention to the plasma column rotation and the isotope enrichment. The analysis of the results is performed using a fluid model for a completely ionized rigid body rotating plasma column in steady state equilibrium. The main results are: (1) rotation frequency of the plasma column in the range 2 x (exp 4) to 3 x 10 (exp 5) rad/s; (2) enrichment of 10 to 30 pct for the magnesium isotopes, and 290 to 490 pct for the carbon-13 isotope; (3) rigid body rotation of the plasma column only for radii smaller than the characteristic radius of the plasma column, r(sub e); (4) linear dependence of the rotation frequency upon the magnetic field strength only for r is less than r(sub e); (5) existence of an optimum value of the magnetic field for maximum enrichment; and (6) dependence of the rotation frequency upon the inverse of the atomic mass.

  3. Comparison of filter bag, cyclonic, and wet dust collection methods in vacuum cleaners.

    PubMed

    Trakumas, S; Willeke, K; Reponen, T; Grinshpun, S A; Friedman, W

    2001-01-01

    In this study, methods were developed for comparative evaluation of three primary dust collection methods employed in vacuum cleaners: filter bag, cyclonic, and wet primary dust collection. The dry collectors were evaluated with KCl test aerosols that are commonly used in filter testing. However, these aerosols cannot be used for evaluating wet collectors due to their hygroscopicity. Therefore, the wet collectors were evaluated with nonhygroscopic test particles. Both types of test aerosol indicated similar collection efficiencies in tests with dry collectors. The data show that high initial collection efficiency can be achieved by any one of the three dust collection methods: up to 50% for 0.35 microm particles, and close to 100% for 1.0 microm and larger particles. The degree of dependence of the initial collection efficiency on airflow rate was strongly related to the type and manufacturing of the primary dust collector. Collection efficiency decreased most with decreasing flow rate for the tested wet collectors. The tested cyclonic and wet collectors showed high reentrainment of already collected dust particles. After the filter bag collectors had been loaded with test dust, they also reemitted particles. The degree of reentrainment from filter bags depends on the particulate load and the type of filter material used. Thus, the overall particle emissions performance of a vacuum cleaner depends not only on the dust collection efficiency of the primary collector and other filtration elements employed, but also on the degree of reentrainment of already collected particles.

  4. Experimental study and modeling of the deuterium releasing quantity in a pulsed vacuum arc discharge with a metal deuteride cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei-Xiang; Long, Ji-Dong; Zheng, Le; Dong, Pan; Li, Chen; Chen, Wei

    2017-04-01

    The pulsed vacuum arc discharge using a metal deuteride cathode is widely applied as a deuterium ion source, where the upper limit of the deuterium ion yield is largely determined by the deuterium releasing quantity (DRQ) from the cathode. This work aims to measure the DRQ at various discharge conditions, and meanwhile develop a simple thermoelectric model to evaluate the deuterium liberation from different sources, such as the crater vicinity during the arc power-on phase and the hot crater in the afterglow. The calculated DRQ are in accordance with the experimental results obtained by measuring the D2 pressure evolution in the early afterglow using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the model reveals that at low arc current (<10 A), the DRQ orginates dominantly from the crater vicinity, leading to a low conversion efficiency of the released deuterium to ions and a high D:Ti elemental ratio in the released cathode vapor.

  5. Plasma-Arc Deposited Elemental Boron Film for use as a Durable Nonstick Coating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    COOKWARE BORON PLASMA ARCS MAGNETIC PROPERTIES FILTERED VACUUM CATHODIC ARC 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a... magnetic ducting system, which would filter out macroparticles (particle debris from the cathode) and expand the boron plasma to produce a uniform, debris...current. In addition to the high rate of material production, vacuum arc deposition also benefits from the fact that the output vapor is in a fully

  6. SiC multi-layer protective coating on carbon obtained by thermionic vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupina, V.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Epure, T.-D.; Prodan, G.; Roşca, C.; Porosnicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Belc, M.; Prodan, M.; Stanescu, I. M.; Stefanov, C.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Vasile, E.; Zarovschi, V.; Nicolescu, V.

    2013-09-01

    SiC single-layer or multi-layer on C used to improve the oxidation resistance and tribological properties of C have been obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The 200nm thickness carbon thin films was deposed on glass or Si substrate and then 100÷500 nm thickness SiC successively layers on carbon thin film was deposed. The microstructure and mechanical characteristics of as-prepared SiC coating were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Electron Scattering Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and tribological techniques. Samples containing SiC single-layer or multi-layer coating on carbon were investigated up to 1000°C. The results of thermal treatments reveals the increase of oxidation resistance with increase of the number of SiC layers. The mechanism of oxidation protection is based on the reaction between SiC and elemental oxygen resulting SiO2 and CO. The tribological behavior of SiC coatings was evaluated with a tribometer with ball-on-disk configuration from CSM device with 6mm diameter sapphire ball, sliding speed in dry conditions being 0.2m/s, with normal contact loads of 0.5N, 1N, 1.5N and 2N, under unlubricated conditions. The friction coefficient on SiC was compared with the friction coefficient on uncoated carbon layer. Electrical surface resistance of SiC coating on carbon at different temperatures was measured comparing the potential drop on the sample with the potential drop on a series standard resistance in constant mode.

  7. Damage and fracture in large-aperture fused-silica vacuum spatial filter lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John H.; Edwards, Gary J.; Marion, John E.

    1995-12-01

    Optical damage that results in large scale fracture has been observed in the large, high- fluence, fused-silica, spatial filter lenses on the Nova and Beamlet lasers. In nearly all cases damage occurs on the vacuum side of the lenses and because the vacuum side of the lens is under tensile stress this damage can lead to catastrophic crack growth if the flaw (damage) size exceeds the critical flaw size for SiO2. The damaged 52 cm Nova lenses fracture into two and sometimes three large pieces. Although under full vacuum load at the time they fracture, the Nova lenses do not implode. Rather we have observed that the pieces lock together and air slowly leaks into the vacuum spatial filter housing through the lens cracks. The Beamlet lenses have a larger aspect ratio and peak tensile stress than Nova. The peak tensile stress at the center of the output surface of the Beamlet lens is 1490 psi versus 810 psi for Nova. During a recent Beamlet high energy shot, a damage spot on the lens grew to the critical flaw size and the lens imploded. Post shot data indicate the lens probably fractured into 5 to 7 pieces, however, unlike Nova, these pieces did not lock together. Analysis shows that the likely source of damage is contamination from pinhole blow-off or out-gassing of volatile materials within the spatial filter. Contamination degrades the anti-reflection properties of the sol-gel coating and reduces its damage threshold. By changing the design of the Beamlet lens it may be possible to insure that it fails safe by locking up in much the same manner as the Nova lens.

  8. Theoretical and experimental study of a high-current vacuum arc in a uniform axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimiya, Osami

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the electron temperature, floating potential, plasma density, and average plasma pressure in a magnetically confined high-current vacuum arc are described. A 40-mm-diam, 30-mm-long arc was initiated between OFCu copper electrodes in a uniform axial magnetic field by triggering the gap. The crest values of the arc current ranged from 3 to 20 kA. The electron temperature by Langmuir probe measurement was Te= 2.5-3.0 eV with a uniform space distribution and was independent of the arc current. The space distribution of the ion density was parabolic in the radial direction and with a zero derivative in the axial direction. The average plasma pressure by paramagnetic measurement increased with the square of the arc current. The experiment showed that the arc column could be considered as an infinitely long column in which the plasma parameters have zero axial derivatives. Theoretical analysis has been carried out under the following assumptions. An infinitely long cylindrical and fully ionized steady-state plasma in which all quantities varied in the r direction only was considered. The anisotropy factor σ∥/σ⊥ for electrical conductivities was taken into account in the theoretical analysis, where σ∥ and σ⊥ were electrical conductivities parallel to the magnetic field and perpendicular to it, respectively. The plasma parameters determined from the experiments and theoretical analysis agreed closely with each other when the factor σ∥/σ⊥ was equal to ˜2, which is the theoretical upper limit in a high magnetic field. Constant temperature characteristics independent of the arc current have been found to be clearly seen by using line radiation as the dominant power loss in the power balance equation.

  9. The effect of debris accumulation on and filter resistance to airflow for four commercially available vacuum cleaners.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Santalla-Elias, Javier

    2009-06-01

    Mortar removal with right-angle grinders can cause excessive exposure to respirable crystalline silica. To control this dust exposure, vacuum cleaners need to exhaust 2.3 m(3)/min (80 cubic feet per minute) from the grinder's exhaust hood. Maintaining this airflow while collecting as much as 15.9 kg (35 lb) of debris in the vacuum cleaner has been problematic. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate how mortar debris affects vacuum cleaner airflow and filter pressure loss. Four vacuum cleaners were tested. Two of the vacuum cleaners used vacuum cleaner bags as a prefilter; the other two vacuum cleaners used cyclones to reduce the amount of debris that reaches the filter. Test debris was collected by a masonry restoration contractor during actual mortar removal using a grinder fitted with a hood. The hood is attached to a vacuum cleaner with cyclonic pre-separation. The vacuum cleaner fan curves were obtained experimentally to learn how pressure loss affects vacuum cleaner airflows. Then, 15.9 kg (35 lb) of mortar removal debris was sucked into the vacuum cleaner in 2.27-kg (5-lb) increments. Before and after adding each 2.27-kg (5-lb) increment of debris, vacuum cleaner airflows were measured with a venturi meter, and vacuum cleaner static pressures were measured at the inlet to the vacuum cleaner motor, and before and after each filter. The vacuum cleaners equipped with cyclonic pre-separation were unaffected by the mass of debris collected in the vacuum cleaner and were able to maintain airflows in excess of 1.98 m(3)/min (70 cfm) throughout the testing program. As debris accumulated in the vacuum cleaners that used bags, airflow decreased from 2.3 m(3)/min (80 cfm) to as little as 0.85 m(3)/min (30 cfm). This airflow loss is caused by the increased airflow resistance of the bags that increased from less 0.03 kPa/m(3)/min (0.1 inches of water per cfm) to 16.7 kPa/m(3)/min (1.9 inches of water/cfm). Apparently, vacuum cleaners using bags should be used in

  10. Model of phosphorus precipitation and crystal formation in electric arc furnace steel slag filters.

    PubMed

    Claveau-Mallet, Dominique; Wallace, Scott; Comeau, Yves

    2012-02-07

    The objective of this study was to develop a phosphorus retention mechanisms model based on precipitation and crystallization in electric arc furnace slag filters. Three slag columns were fed during 30 to 630 days with a reconstituted mining effluent at different void hydraulic retention times. Precipitates formed in columns were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electronic microscopy. The proposed model is expressed in the following steps: (1) the rate limiting dissolution of slag is represented by the dissolution of CaO, (2) a high pH in the slag filter results in phosphorus precipitation and crystal growth, (3) crystal retention takes place by filtration, settling and growth densification, (4) the decrease in available reaction volume is caused by crystal and other particulate matter accumulation (and decrease in available reaction time), and (5) the pH decreases in the filter over time if the reaction time is too low (which results in a reduced removal efficiency). Crystal organization in a slag filter determines its phosphorus retention capacity. Supersaturation and water velocity affect crystal organization. A compact crystal organization enhances the phosphorus retention capacity of the filter. A new approach to define filter performance is proposed: saturation retention capacity is expressed in units of mg P/mL voids.

  11. Influence of residual plasma drift velocity on the post-arc sheath expansion of vacuum circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yongpeng; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Wang, Lijun; Bai, Zhibin

    2016-05-15

    The residual plasma in the inter-contact region of a vacuum circuit breaker moves towards the post-arc cathode at current zero, because the residual plasma mainly comes from the cathode spots during the arc burning process. In the most previous theoretical researches on the post-arc sheath expansion process of vacuum circuit breakers, only the thermal motion of residual plasma was taken into consideration. Alternately, the residual plasma was even assumed to be static at the moment of current zero in some simplified models. However, the influence of residual plasma drift velocity at current zero on the post-arc sheath expansion process was rarely investigated. In this paper, this effect is investigated by a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model. Simulation results indicate that the sheath expands slower with higher residual plasma drift velocity in the initial sheath expansion stage. However, with the increase of residual plasma drift velocity, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region decreases faster, and the sheath expansion velocity increases earlier. Consequently, as a whole, it needs shorter time to expel the residual plasma from the inter-contact region. Furthermore, if the residual plasma drift velocity is high enough, the sheath expansion process ceases before it develops to the post-arc anode. Besides, the influence of the collisions between charges and neutrals is investigated as well in terms of the density of metal vapor. It shows that the residual plasma drift velocity takes remarkable effect only if the density of the metal vapor is relatively low, which corresponds to the circumstance of low-current interruptions.

  12. Influence of residual plasma drift velocity on the post-arc sheath expansion of vacuum circuit breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yongpeng; Shi, Zongqian; Bai, Zhibin; Jia, Shenli; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    The residual plasma in the inter-contact region of a vacuum circuit breaker moves towards the post-arc cathode at current zero, because the residual plasma mainly comes from the cathode spots during the arc burning process. In the most previous theoretical researches on the post-arc sheath expansion process of vacuum circuit breakers, only the thermal motion of residual plasma was taken into consideration. Alternately, the residual plasma was even assumed to be static at the moment of current zero in some simplified models. However, the influence of residual plasma drift velocity at current zero on the post-arc sheath expansion process was rarely investigated. In this paper, this effect is investigated by a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model. Simulation results indicate that the sheath expands slower with higher residual plasma drift velocity in the initial sheath expansion stage. However, with the increase of residual plasma drift velocity, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region decreases faster, and the sheath expansion velocity increases earlier. Consequently, as a whole, it needs shorter time to expel the residual plasma from the inter-contact region. Furthermore, if the residual plasma drift velocity is high enough, the sheath expansion process ceases before it develops to the post-arc anode. Besides, the influence of the collisions between charges and neutrals is investigated as well in terms of the density of metal vapor. It shows that the residual plasma drift velocity takes remarkable effect only if the density of the metal vapor is relatively low, which corresponds to the circumstance of low-current interruptions.

  13. Fabrication of highly transparent Al-ion-implanted ZnO thin films by metal vapor vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han; Sivashanmugan, Kundan; Kao, Chi-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we utilized the metal vapor vacuum arc technique to implant vaporized aluminum (Al) ions in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. By adjusting the ion implantation dose and operational parameters, the conductivity and optical properties of the ZnO thin film can be controlled. The electrical sheet resistance of Al-ion-implanted ZnO decreased from 3.02 × 107 to 3.03 × 104 Ω/sq, while the transparency of the film was mostly preserved (91.5% at a wavelength of 550 nm). The ZnO thin-film Young’s modulus significantly increased with increasing Al ion dose.

  14. Split Heat Mechanical Property Comparison of ESR (Electroslag Remelting) and VAR (Vacuum Arc Remelting) 4340 Steel. Revised

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    34· AMMRC TR 83-27 (Revised) lAD SPLIT HEAT MECHANICAL PROPERTY COMPARISON OF ESR AND VAR 4340 STEEL CHARI£S F. HICKEY, Jr. and ALBERT A...COIIEREO SPLIT HEAT MECHANICAL PROPERTY COMPARISON OF Final Report ESR AND VAR 4340 STEEL ’ PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NU1118ER 7. AU THOA(•I •• CONTRACT...decarburized (AOD) heat of 4340 steel which was further pro- cessed by vacuum arc remelting (VAR) and electroslag remelting ( ESR ) into 12.7 em (5 inch) square

  15. Characterization of a vacuum-arc discharge in tin vapor using time-resolved plasma imaging and extreme ultraviolet spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kieft, E R; van der Mullen, J J A M; Kroesen, G M W; Banine, V; Koshelev, K N

    2005-02-01

    Discharge sources in tin vapor have recently been receiving increased attention as candidate extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources for application in semiconductor lithography, because of their favorable spectrum near 13.5 nm. In the ASML EUV laboratory, time-resolved pinhole imaging in the EUV and two-dimensional imaging in visible light have been applied for qualitative characterization of the evolution of a vacuum-arc tin vapor discharge. An EUV spectrometer has been used to find the dominant ionization stages of tin as a function of time during the plasma evolution of the discharge.

  16. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-09-01

    This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreement/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex (routine technical meeting 12/10/96) and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant (routine technical meeting 06/25/96). Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year.

  17. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Czigány, Zsolt; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CNx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A "fullerene-like" (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CNx films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N2 pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp3-hybridized films to sp2 films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CNx films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  18. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Mark D. Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna; Czigány, Zsolt

    2014-04-14

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CN{sub x}, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A “fullerene-like” (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CN{sub x} films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N{sub 2} pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp{sup 3}-hybridized films to sp{sup 2} films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CN{sub x} films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  19. SU-E-T-153: Burst-Mode Modulated Arc Therapy with Flattening-Filter-Free Beams Versus Flattening-Filtered Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kainz, K; Lawton, C; Li, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry and delivery of burst-mode modulated arc radiotherapy using flattening-filter-free (FFF) and flattening-filtered (FF) beams. Methods: Burst-mode modulated arc therapy (mARC, Siemens) plans were generated for six prostate cases with FFF and FF beam models, using the Elekta Monaco v. 5.00 planning system. One 360-degree arc was used for five cases, and for one case two 360-degree coplanar arcs were used. The maximum number of optimization points (OPs) per arc was set to 91, and OPs with less than 4 MU were disregarded. All plans were delivered on the Siemens Artiste linear accelerator with 6MV FF (300 MU/min) and comparable-energy FFF (2000 MU/min, labeled as 7UF) beams. Results: For all cases studied, the plans with FFF beams exhibited DVHs for the PTV, rectum, and bladder that were nearly identical to those for the plans with FF beams. The FFF plan yielded reduced dose to the right femoral head for 5 cases, and lower mean dose to the left femoral head for 4 cases. For all but the two-arc case, the FFF and FF plans resulted in an identical number of segments. The total number of MUs was slightly lower for the FF plans for five cases. The total delivery time per fraction was substantially lower for the FFF plans, ranging from 25 to 50 percent among all cases, as compared to the FF plans. Conclusion: For mARC plans, FFF and FF beams provided comparable PTV coverage and rectum and bladder sparing. For the femoral heads, the mean dose was slightly lower in most cases when using the FFF beam. Although the flat beam plans typically required slightly fewer MUs, FFF beams required substantially less time to deliver a plan of similar quality. This work was supported by Siemens Medical Solutions and the MCW Cancer Center Fotsch Foundation.

  20. Reirradiation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma focusing on volumetric modulated arcs with flattening filter-free beams

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, M; Huang, L; Zhu, D; Peng, X

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to assess the role of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for patients with recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (rNPC). Methods: 13 patients with rNPC were replanned for FFF RapidArc® (RA-FFF) and conventional RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Quantitative evaluation was performed for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Phantom dose verifications, treatment delivery time and monitor units (MUs) were also assessed. Results: Each technique delivered similar doses to the PTV. RA-FFF had a better sparing effect on the brain stem and normal tissue when compared with RA, whereas RA provided lower mean doses to the skin. No significant difference between the two techniques could be established for other OAR parameters. Both techniques showed equally good gamma scores in dosimetric verification. RA-FFF required more MUs than RA, whereas the delivery time for RA-FFF was slightly shorter than for RA. Conclusion: Both treatment plans met the planning objectives. Dose measurements also showed good agreement with computed doses. In addition to slightly faster delivery times, RA-FFF produced better sparing of brain stem and normal tissue with uncompromised target coverage compared with RA. Advances in knowledge: FFF beams have recently been assembled for clinical use. Our findings show RA-FFF is useful in the salvage treatment of rNPC owing to better brain stem and normal tissue sparing with uncompromised target coverage compared with RA. This may be beneficial in the case of tumour invasion close to the brain stem. PMID:26032355

  1. Hygienization of municipal sludge in automatically operated chamber filter presses with thermal vacuum drying.

    PubMed

    Sagberg, P

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the state of the art of thermal vacuum drying in chamber filter presses for unattended automatic operation. The achieved results are exemplified by the treatment of the two stage digested combined primary, chemical and biological sludge created by the VEAS concept for nutrient removal from municipal wastewater at VEAS. The water removal rate in each stage of the drying process is described, with comments on the low energy needs. The advantages of one-sided heating, the capacity and the drying potential are discussed. The hygienization potential of the process is demonstrated by the effect on thermostable coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli, salmonella, the spores of sulfite reducing anaerobic bacteria, f-specific bacteriophages, the seeds of the weed, wild oat, Avena fatua, and the parasite eggs of the potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis. A more complete paper with the VEAS-concept is found on the VEAS homepage (www.veas.nu).

  2. Transparent and conductive indium doped cadmium oxide thin films prepared by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Yuankun; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Zhu, Jiaqi; ...

    2012-11-26

    Indium doped cadmium oxide (CdO:In) films with different In concentrations were prepared on low-cost glass substrates by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition (PFCAD). In this study, it is shown that polycrystalline CdO:In films with smooth surface and dense structure are obtained. In-doping introduces extra electrons leading to remarkable improvements of electron mobility and conductivity, as well as improvement in the optical transmittance due to the Burstein Moss effect. CdO:In films on glass substrates with thickness near 230 nm show low resistivity of 7.23 x 10-5 Ωcm, high electron mobility of 142 cm2/Vs, and mean transmittance over 80% from 500-1250 nmmore » (including the glass substrate). These high quality pulsed arc-grown CdO:In films are potentially suitable for high efficiency multi-junction solar cells that harvest a broad range of the solar spectrum.« less

  3. Transparent and conductive indium doped cadmium oxide thin films prepared by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuankun; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Zhu, Jiaqi; Han, Jiecai; Anders, André

    2012-11-26

    Indium doped cadmium oxide (CdO:In) films with different In concentrations were prepared on low-cost glass substrates by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition (PFCAD). In this study, it is shown that polycrystalline CdO:In films with smooth surface and dense structure are obtained. In-doping introduces extra electrons leading to remarkable improvements of electron mobility and conductivity, as well as improvement in the optical transmittance due to the Burstein Moss effect. CdO:In films on glass substrates with thickness near 230 nm show low resistivity of 7.23 x 10-5 Ωcm, high electron mobility of 142 cm2/Vs, and mean transmittance over 80% from 500-1250 nm (including the glass substrate). These high quality pulsed arc-grown CdO:In films are potentially suitable for high efficiency multi-junction solar cells that harvest a broad range of the solar spectrum.

  4. Vacuum arc with a distributed cathode spot as a plasma source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Amirov, R. Kh. Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Lizyakin, G. D.; Polishchuk, V. P.; Samoilov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.

    2015-10-15

    Results from experimental studies of a vacuum arc with a distributed cathode spot on the heated cathode are presented. Such an arc can be used as a plasma source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. The experiments were performed with a gadolinium cathode, the properties of which are similar to those of an uranium arc cathode. The heat flux from the plasma to the cathode (and its volt equivalent) at discharge voltages of 4-15 V and discharge currents of 44-81 A, the radial distribution of the emission intensity of gadolinium atoms and singly charged ions in the arc channel at a voltage of 4.3 V, and the plasma electron temperature behind the anode were measured. The average charge of plasma ions at arc voltages of 3.5-8 V and a discharge current of 52 A and the average rate of gadolinium evaporation in the discharge were also determined.

  5. Optical and Surface Characteristics of Mg-Doped GaAs Nanocrystalline Thin Film Deposited by Thermionic Vacuum Arc Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pat, Suat; Özen, Soner; Şenay, Volkan; Korkmaz, Şadan

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is the most promising p-type dopant for gallium arsenide (GaAs) semiconductor technology. Mg-doped GaAs nanocrystalline thin film has been deposited at room temperature by the thermionic vacuum arc technique, a rapid deposition method for production of doped GaAs material. The microstructure and surface and optical properties of the deposited sample were investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, and interferometry. The crystalline direction of the deposited sample was determined to be (220) plane and (331) plane at 44.53° and 72.30°, respectively. The Mg-doped GaAs nanocrystalline sample showed high transmittance.

  6. Influence of the bias voltage on the formation of beryllium films by a thermionic vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, A.; Mustata, I.; Porosnicu, C.; Lungu, C. P.

    2009-03-01

    Beryllium is intended to be used as suggested material for the first wall in the thermonuclear power plants. Some tiles of the first wall will be of inconel coated by a beryllium layer that must be adherent to the substrate and have a compact structure in order to resist as much as possible the dramatic interaction with the high energetic plasma particles, ions, electrons and neutrons. Applying bias voltages (-200 to + 700 V) on the substrates, the morphology of the prepared Be layers using the original thermionic vacuum arc method developed at NILPRP was controlled in order to obtain smooth surfaces, free of holes and lamellar structures. The prepared films were studied and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger spectroscopy (AES). The films prepared using negative bias voltages were found to be more compact and smooth with an average roughness (Rms) of 7 nm.

  7. Investigation on the physical properties of C-doped ZnO thin films deposited by the thermionic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza; Özen, Soner; Hakan Yudar, H.; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine some physical properties of C-doped ZnO coated on a glass substrate by using the thermionic vacuum arc method. The produced C-doped ZnO thin film is characterized by using several analysis techniques. The produced thin film has a cubic crystal structure, high transmittance in the visible region, symmetrical surface distribution, and optical band gap energy of 3.34 eV. According to the XRD analysis of the produced thin film, it is a fullerene (C60)-doped polycrystalline ZnO. Hardness value and Young's modulus value were determined as 8 GPa and 140 GPa, respectively. These physical properties are adequate for future transparent electrode applications.

  8. Passivation layer on polyimide deposited by combined plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition and cathodic vacuum arc technique

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Z. J.; Tay, B. K.; Sze, J. Y.; Ha, P. C. T.

    2007-05-15

    A thin passivation layer of aluminum oxide was deposited on polyimide by using the combined plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D) and cathodic vacuum arc technique. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy C 1s spectra showed that the carbonyl bond (C=O) and ether group (C-O-C and C-N-C) presented in pristine polyimide were damaged by implantation of aluminum ions and deposition of an aluminum oxide passivation layer. O 1s and Al 2p spectra confirmed the formation of a thin aluminum oxide passivation layer. This passivation layer can be implemented in aerospace engineering where polyimide may suffer degradation from fast atomic oxygen in the low-earth-orbit environment. To test the protection of this passivation layer to energetic oxygen ions, a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system was used to simulate the oxygen-ion irradiation, and the results showed that a higher weight occurred for passivated samples compared to pristine ones. X-ray diffraction showed that Al peaks were presented on the surface region, but no aluminum oxide peak was detected. The authors then concluded that Al clusters were formed in polyimide besides aluminum oxide, which was in an x-ray amorphous state. Furthermore, contact-angle measurements showed a reduced contact angle for passivated polyimide from a pristine value of 78 deg. to 20 deg. by using deionized water. Several discussions have been made on the surface chemical and structural property changes by using the combined PIII and D and cathodic vacuum arc technique.

  9. Shock layer vacuum UV spectroscopy in an arc-jet wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, G.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program is being developed to obtain measurements of the incident surface radiation in the 1000 A to 2000 A range from the shock stagnation region of a blunt model in the Ames 20 MW Arc-Jet Wind Tunnel. The setup consists of a water-cooled blunt model, with a magnesium fluoride forward-viewing window. Radiation incident on the window is optically imaged via an evacuated system and reflective optical elements onto the entrance slit of a spectrograph. The model will be exposed to the supersonic plasma stream from the exit nozzle of the arc-jet tunnel. The resulting bow shock radiation will be measured. It is expected that this experiment will help evaluate the importance of atomic N and O lines to the radiative heating of future Aeroassist Space Transfer Vehicles (ASTVs).

  10. Optimization of a DC Vacuum Arc to Obtain Anatase Phase TiO2 Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, A.; Marquez, A.; Lamas, D. G.

    2006-12-04

    In this work, the characterization of TiO2 coatings obtained with a dc cathodic arc is presented. The arc was run with a current of 100 A. Glass samples placed in front of the cathode on the chamber axis were exposed to the discharge during 5 min. The samples were mounted on a heater that allows heating the sample up to 400 deg. C. The gas flow and the sample temperature were varied in order to find the optimum conditions for growing TiO2 in anatase phase. The coatings were analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results obtained by varying the gas flow in a range of 30-40 sccm and the sample temperature from 200 to 400 deg. C are presented.

  11. Production of neutrals and their and effects on the ion chargestates in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2007-05-23

    Cathodic arc plasmas are considered fully ionized and theycontain multiply charged ions, yet, gaseous and metal neutrals can bepresent. It is shown that they can cause a significant reduction of theion charge states as measured far from the cathode spots. Several cathodematerials were used to study the evolution the mean ion charge state as afunction of time after arc ignition. The type of cathode material, arccurrent amplitude, intentionally increased background gas, additionalsurfaces placed near the plasma flow, and other factors influence thedegree of charge state reduction because all of these factors influencethe density of neutrals. In all cases, it was found that the mean ioncharge state follows an exponential decay of first order, Q(t) = A *exp(t/tau) + Qss, where A is a parameter describing the importance of thedecay, tau is the characteristic decay time, and Qss is a steady-statevalue approached for continuous arc operation. The extrapolated valuesQ(t-->0) indicate surprisingly high mean charge states as produced atcathode spots and not "skewed" by charge exchange collisions withneutrals.

  12. Single-shot selective laser micromachining of filtered arc deposited TiN films from chromium underlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Andrew J.; Ghantasala, Muralidhar K.; Evans, Peter E.; Hayes, Jason P.; Harvey, Erol C.; Doyle, E. Derry

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents the results on single-shot laser micromachining of filtered arc deposited TiN films and compares the machining characteristics of the films deposited under partially and fully filtered conditions. Machining performance was evaluated in terms of patterning quality and the ability to perform selective removal of top TiN film with minimal interference to an underlying layer. TiN was arc-deposited onto silicon substrate with a chromium layer on the top. These films were analysed for their composition and microstructure using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) before and after laser machining. Under single shot conditions the effect of fluence on the machined features has been investigated. The results showed selective removal of TiN films with a single shot from the underlying Cr layer. Further, this work clearly shows a distinction between the laser machining characteristics of the films deposited under different filtering conditions and substrate temperatures.

  13. Research of influence of mobile cathodic stains of the vacuum arc for reception of the adjustable roughness of metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikeev, V. N.; Dokukin, M. Yu

    2017-05-01

    In the modern technics there is a requirement in micro- and macrorough surfaces of products for improvement of their operational characteristics (improvement of adhesive properties of various coverings, decrease in deterioration of rubbing details because of the best deduction of greasing, increase of the heat exchanging coefficient from a surface, stimulation of adhesive processes on sites of contact to a bone fabric of medical implants in stomatology and orthopedy etc.). In the given work the modes of reception regulated micro- and macrorough surfaces on samples from a titanic alloy and stainless steel by electrothermal influence of moving cathodic stains in the vacuum arc discharge are investigated. Chaotically moving stains, possessing high specific power allocation (∼ 107 W/cm2), “scan” the difficult design of a product, including “shadow” sites, doing rough its blanket. The sizes of roughnesses are regulated by a current and time of influence of the discharge, pressure in the vacuum chamber and a number of other parameters. The scheme of experimental device, photo and the characteristic of rough surfaces and technological modes of their reception are resulted.

  14. SU-E-T-389: Evaluation of Flattening-Filter-Free Arcs for Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, L; Lee, H; Pompos, A; Yan, Y; Jiang, S; Foster, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Five clinical patients, previously treated with SBRT using non-coplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), were selected and re-planned with DCAT and VMAT with both FFF beam (6xFFF with a dose rate of 1200MU/min) and flattened beams (6x with 600 MU/min). All the arc plans were planned with one 360° arc and normalized to the same PTV coverage (100% prescription cover 95% PTV volume) for comparison. Treatment planning metrics such as R100%, R50%, D2cm and lung V20 were compared to the original plans. To evaluate the treatment efficiency differences, all the arc plans were delivered and plan delivery time was compared to that of the clinical treatment as recorded in Mosaiq. Results: All plans meet RTOG conformality constraints and normal tissue tolerances. Average R100% was similar for FFFDCAT (1.07±0.05), FFFVMAT (1.03±0.08) and flattened VMAT (fVMAT) (1.03±0.09) while flattened DCAT (fDCAT) (1.09±0.07) and 3DCRT (1.11±0.06) were significantly inferior (p<0.05, t test). FFFDCAT produced the best average intermediate dose conformality as indicated by R50% (3.86±0.44) and D2cm (43.7±5.3%) when compared to all the other techniques. Significant improvement (p<0.05) in lung V20 was also found with FFFDCAT (2.33±2.06%) when compared to FFFVMAT (2.48±2.03%), fVMAT (2.52±2.07%) and fDCAT (2.64±2.11%) and was slightly better than 3DCRT (2.43±2.04%), though not significant. The FFFDCAT delivery significantly improves the treatment efficiency with an average plan delivery time of 2.70±1.57 min (p<0.05), as compared to fDCAT (5.98±3.45min), fVMAT (6.51±2.94) and 3DCRT (25.14±5.67), but is not significantly better than the FFFVMAT (3.18±1.04). Conclusion: Combining FFF beams and DCAT provide promising

  15. A new test method for the assessment of the arc tracking properties of wire insulation in air, oxygen enriched atmospheres and vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Dieter

    1994-01-01

    Development of a new test method suitable for the assessment of the resistance of aerospace cables to arc tracking for different specific environmental and network conditions of spacecraft is given in view-graph format. The equipment can be easily adapted for tests at different realistic electrical network conditions incorporating circuit protection and the test system works equally well whatever the test atmosphere. Test results confirm that pure Kapton insulated wire has bad arcing characteristics and ETFE insulated wire is considerably better in air. For certain wires, arc tracking effects are increased at higher oxygen concentrations and significantly increased under vacuum. All tests on different cable insulation materials and in different environments, including enriched oxygen atmospheres, resulted in a more or less rapid extinguishing of all high temperature effects at the beginning of the post-test phase. In no case was a self-maintained fire initiated by the arc.

  16. An analysis of the use of magnetic source tomography to measure the spatial distribution of electric current during vacuum arc remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Bindu G.; Ward, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic source tomography is explored to analyse the distribution of electric current during vacuum arc remelting (VAR). The goal is to use sensors outside the process to deduce the behaviour within. VAR systems having non-axisymmetric distributions of arc current were modelled using a commercial finite element electromagnetic code (Opera 3d), and a database was created from the resulting patterns of magnetic flux predicted to occur outside the crucible. A reconstruction algorithm was developed using constrained nonlinear optimization to estimate the arc current distribution within the process from the magnetic field data outside. The capabilities of this algorithm were studied, and it was found that given sufficiently low noise in the measurement data it was possible to accurately deduce important features of the spatial distribution of the arc current.

  17. New ion-assisted filtered cathodic arc deposition (IFCAD) technology for producing advanced thin films on temperature-sensitive substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Michael L.

    1999-10-01

    An innovative Ion-Assisted Filtered Cathodic Arc Deposition (IFCAD) system has been developed for low temperature production of thin-film coatings. The IFCAD system employs electro-magnetic and mechanical filtering techniques to remove unwanted macroparticles and neutral atoms from the plasma stream. Therefore, only ions within a defined energy range arrive at the substrate surface, depositing thin-films with excellent mechanical and optical properties. Ion- Assisted-Deposition is coupled with Filtered Cathodic Arc technology to enhance and modify the arc deposited thin- films. Using an advanced computer controlled plasma beam scanning system, high quality, large area, uniform IFCAD multi-layer film structures are attained. Amorphous Diamond- Like-Carbon films (up to 85% sp3 bonded carbon; and micro- hardness greater than 50 GPa) have been deposited in multi- layer thin-film combinations with other IFCAD source materials (such as: Al2O3) for optical and tribological applications. Rutile TiO2 (refractive index of 2.8 at 500 nm) has been deposited with this technology for advanced optical filter applications. The new IFCAD technology has been included in development programs, such as: plastic and glass lens coatings for optical systems; wear resistant coatings on various metal substrates, ultra smooth, durable, surface hydrophobic coatings for aircraft windows; EUV coatings for space instrumentation; transparent conductive coatings; and UV protective coatings for solar cell concentrator plastic Fresnel lens elements for space power.

  18. Evaluation of vacuum filter sock surface sample collection method for Bacillus spores from porous and non-porous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gary S; Betty, Rita G; Brockmann, John E; Lucero, Daniel A; Souza, Caroline A; Walsh, Kathryn S; Boucher, Raymond M; Tezak, Matthew S; Wilson, Mollye C

    2007-07-01

    Vacuum filter socks were evaluated for recovery efficiency of powdered Bacillus atrophaeus spores from two non-porous surfaces, stainless steel and painted wallboard and two porous surfaces, carpet and bare concrete. Two surface coupons were positioned side-by-side and seeded with aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus spores. One of the surfaces, a stainless steel reference coupon, was sized to fit into a sample vial for direct spore removal, while the other surface, a sample surface coupon, was sized for a vacuum collection application. Deposited spore material was directly removed from the reference coupon surface and cultured for enumeration of colony forming units (CFU), while deposited spore material was collected from the sample coupon using the vacuum filter sock method, extracted by sonication and cultured for enumeration. Recovery efficiency, which is a measure of overall transfer effectiveness from the surface to culture, was calculated as the number of CFU enumerated from the filter sock sample per unit area relative to the number of CFU enumerated from the co-located reference coupon per unit area. The observed mean filter sock recovery efficiency from stainless steel was 0.29 (SD = 0.14, n = 36), from painted wallboard was 0.25 (SD = 0.15, n = 36), from carpet was 0.28 (SD = 0.13, n = 40) and from bare concrete was 0.19 (SD = 0.14, n = 44). Vacuum filter sock recovery quantitative limits of detection were estimated at 105 CFU m(-2) from stainless steel and carpet, 120 CFU m(-2) from painted wallboard and 160 CFU m(-2) from bare concrete. The method recovery efficiency and limits of detection established in this work provide useful guidance for the planning of incident response environmental sampling for biological agents such as Bacillus anthracis.

  19. mARC Treatment of Hypopharynx Carcinoma with Flat and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Energies – A Planning Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Katharina; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Nuesken, Frank; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian; Dzierma, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently implemented mARC-rotation-technique is capable to deliver high dose rate bursts. For the case of hypopharynx cancer plans we evaluate whether the mARC can achieve an advantage in treatment time in comparison to IMRT. These plans consider two arcs with flat and flattening filter free (FFF) beam energies. Materials and Methods For 8 hypopharynx-cancer patients step-and-shoot-IMRT and mARC plans were created retrospectively using flat and FFF beam energy. The comparison of the plan scenarios considered measures of quality for PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk. All plans were irradiated on an anthromorphic phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure scattered dose and treatment times. Results A visual comparison of the dose distribution did not show a marked preference for either technique or energy. The statistical evaluation yielded significant differences in favor of the mARC technique and the FFF energy. Scattered dose could be decreased markedly by the use of the mARC technique. Treatment times could be reduced up to 3 minutes with the use of mARC in comparison to IMRT. The high dose rate energy results in another time advantage of about 1 minute. Conclusions All four plan scenarios yielded equally good quality plans. A combination of the mARC technique with FFF 7 MV high dose rate resulted in a decrease of treatment times from about 9 minutes to 5–6 minutes in comparison to 6 MV IMRT. PMID:27741272

  20. LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

  1. High Rate Deposition of High Quality ZnO:Al by Filtered Cathodic Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Lim, S.H.N.; Milliron, D.J.; Anders, Andre

    2010-11-18

    High quality ZnO:Al (AZO) thin films were prepared on glass substrates by direct current filtered cathodic arc deposition. Substrate temperature was varied from room temperature to 425oC, and samples were grown with and without the assistance of low power oxygen plasma (75W). For each growth condition, at least 3 samples were grown to give a statistical look at the effect of the growth environment on the film properties and to explore the reproducibility of the technique. Growth rate was in the 100-400 nm/min range but was apparently random and could not be easily traced to the growth conditions explored. For optimized growth conditions, 300-600 nm AZO films had resistivities of 3-6 x 10-4 ?Omega cm, carrier concentrations in the range of 2-4 x 1020 cm3, Hall mobility as high as 55 cm2/Vs, and optical transmittance greater than 90percent. These films are also highly oriented with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate and a surface roughness of 2-4 nm.

  2. Adding high time resolution to charge-state-specific ion energy measurements for pulsed copper vacuum arc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Koichi; Han, Liang; Zhou, Xue; Anders, André

    2015-08-01

    Charge-state-resolved ion energy-time distributions of pulsed Cu arc plasma were obtained by using direct (time-dependent) acquisition of the ion detection signal from a commercial ion mass-per-charge and energy-per-charge analyzer. We find a shift of energies of Cu2+, Cu3+ and Cu4+ ions to lower values during the first few hundred microseconds after arc ignition, which is evidence for particle collisions in the plasma. The generation of Cu+ ions in the later part of the pulse, measured by the increase of Cu+ signal intensity and an associated slight reduction of the mean charge state, points to charge exchange reactions between ions and neutrals. At the very beginning of the pulse, when the plasma expands into vacuum and the plasma potential strongly fluctuates, ions with much higher energy (over 200 eV) are observed. Early in the pulse, the ion energies observed are approximately proportional to the ion charge state, and we conclude that the acceleration mechanism is primarily based on acceleration in an electric field. This field is directed away from the cathode, indicative of a potential hump. Measurements by a floating probe suggest that potential structures travel, and ions moving in the traveling field can gain high energies up to a few hundred electron-volts. Later in the pulse, the approximate proportionality is lost, which is related to increased smearing out of different energies due to collisions with neutrals, and/or to a change of the acceleration character from electrostatic to ‘gas-dynamic’, i.e. dominated by pressure gradient.

  3. Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings - Part I: Coating deposition process and basic coating properties characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Bowman, C.; Gannon, Paul E.; VanVorous, D.; Voevodin, A. A.; Rutkowski, A.; Muratore, C.; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Gelles, David S.; Shutthanandan, V.; Trusov, B. G.

    2006-12-04

    Aircraft propulsion applications require low-friction and wear resistant surfaces that operate under high contact loads in severe environments. Recent research on supertough and low friction nanocomposite coatings produced with hybrid plasma deposition processes was demonstrated to have a high potential for such demanding applications. However, industrially scalable hybrid plasma technologies are needed for their commercial realization. The Large area Filtered Arc Deposition (LAFAD) process provides atomically smooth coatings at high deposition rates over large surface areas. The LAFAD technology allows functionally graded, multilayer, super-lattice and nanocomposite architectures of multi-elemental coatings via electro-magnetic mixing of two plasma flows composed of different metal ion vapors. Further advancement can be realized through a combinatorial process using a hybrid filtered arc-magnetron deposition system. In the present study, multilayer and nanostructured TiCrCN/TiCr +TiBC composite cermet coatings were deposited by the hybrid filtered arc-magnetron process. Filtered plasma streams from arc evaporated Ti and Cr targets, and two unbalanced magnetron sputtered B4C targets, were directed to the substrates in the presence of reactive gases. A multiphase nanocomposite coating architecture was designed to provide the optimal combination of corrosion and wear resistance of advanced steels (Pyrowear 675) used in aerospace bearing and gear applications. Coatings were characterized using SEM/EDS, XPS and RBS for morphology and chemistry, XRD and TEM for structural analyses, wafer curvature and nanoindentation for stress and mechanical properties, and Rockwell and scratch indentions for adhesion. Coating properties were evaluated for a variety of coating architectures. Thermodynamic modeling was used for estimation of phase composition of the top TiBC coating segment. Correlations between coating chemistry, structure and mechanical properties are discussed.

  4. Effects of flattening filter-free and volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery on treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Evan M; Popple, Richard A; Prendergast, Brendan M; Clark, Grant M; Dobelbower, Michael C; Fiveash, John B

    2013-11-04

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are available on an increasing number of commercial linear accelerators. FFF beams have higher dose rates than flattened beams of equivalent energy which can lead to increased efficiency of treatment delivery, especially in conjunction with increased FFF beam energy and arc-based delivery configurations. The purpose of this study is to quantify and assess the implications of improved treatment efficiency for several FFF delivery options on common types of linac applicable radiotherapy. Eleven characteristic cases representative of a variety of clinical treatment sites and prescription doses were selected from our patient population. Treatment plans were generated for a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. For each case, a reference plan was created using DMLC IMRT with 6MV flat beams. From the same initial objectives, plans were generated using DMLC IMRT and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 6 MV FFF and 10 MV FFF beams (max. dose rates of 1400 and 2400 MU/min, respectively). The plans were delivered to a phantom; beam-on time, total treatment delivery time, monitor units (MUs), and integral dose were recorded. For plans with low dose fractionations (1.8-2.0 & 3.85 Gy/fraction), mean beam-on time difference between reference plan and most efficient FFF plan was 0.56 min (41.09% decrease); mean treatment delivery time difference between the reference plan and most efficient FFF plan was 1.54 min (range: 0.31-3.56 min), a relative improvement of 46.1% (range: 29.2%-59.2%). For plans with high dose fractionations (16-20 Gy/fraction), mean beam-on time difference was 6.79 min (74.9% decrease); mean treatment delivery time difference was 8.99 min (range: 5.40-13.05 min), a relative improvement of 71.1% (range: 53.4%- 82.4%). 10 MV FFF VMAT beams generated the most efficient plan, except in the spine SBRT case. The distribution of monitor unit counts did not vary by plan type. In cases where respiratory motion management would

  5. Nanocomposite vacuum-Arc TiC/a-C:H coatings prepared using an additional ionization of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhtenberg, I. Sh.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Emlin, D. R.; Plotnikov, S. A.; Vladimirov, A. B.; Volkova, E. G.; Rubshtein, A. P.

    2014-07-01

    The composition, structure, and properties of TiC/a-C:H coatings obtained by simultaneous vacuum-arc deposition of titanium and carbon in a low-pressure argon-acetylene medium additionally activated by a low-energy (a few hundreds of electron-volts) electron beam. The creation of conditions under which the decomposition of acetylene is provided by the ionization and dissociation of molecules due to electron impacts and by the recharging of molecules through titanium and argon ions with subsequent dissociation should favor the most complete decomposition of acetylene in a wide range of pressures. With increasing acetylene pressure, the structure of the nanocomposite coating changes: the size of TiC crystallites decreases, and the fraction of interfaces (or the fraction of regions with a disordered (amorphous) structure) increases. The application of a bias voltage leads to an increase in the sizes of TiC nanocrystallites. The coatings with a maximum microhardness (˜40 GPa) have been obtained without the action of an electron beam under an acetylene pressure of ˜0.05-0.08 Pa and the atomic ratio Ti: C ˜ 0.9: 1.1 in the coating.

  6. Vacuum arc plasma deposition of thin titanium dioxide films on silicone elastomer as a functional coating for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Cécile; Kühn, Marvin; Kühn-Kauffeldt, Marina; Schein, Jochen

    2017-05-01

    Silicone elastomer is a promising material for medical applications and is widely used for implants with blood and tissue contact. However, its strong hydrophobicity limits adhesion of tissue cells to silicone surfaces, which can impair the healing process. To improve the biological properties of silicone, a triggerless pulsed vacuum cathodic arc plasma deposition technique was applied to deposit titanium dioxide (TiO2) films onto the surface. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and contact angle measurements were used for coating characterization. Deposited films were about 150nm thick and exhibited good adhesion to the underlying silicone substrate. Surface wettability and roughness both increased after deposition of the TiO2 layer. In addition, cell-biological investigations demonstrated that the in-vitro cytocompatibility of TiO2-coated samples was greatly improved without impacting silicone's nontoxicity. For validation of use in medical devices, further investigations were conducted and demonstrated stability of surface properties in an aqueous environment for a period of 68days and the coating's resistance to several sterilization methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Macrosegregation Behavior of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al Alloy During Vacuum Consumable Arc Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhijun; Kou, Hongchao; Li, Jinshan; Hu, Rui; Chang, Hui; Zhou, Lian

    2011-02-01

    The effects of melting current and magnetic field in vacuum consumable arc remelting (VAR) process on the macrosegregation of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al ingot are investigated in this paper. The results show that Fe content increases gradually from the bottom to the top of ingots along axial direction and the degree of macrosegregation is greater in the radial direction in the middle of the ingot versus the top and bottom. The macrosegregation rate of Fe element is higher with melting current of 2.6 kA than that of 1.7 kA in Ti-10V-2Al-3Fe ingot. There are two forces, buoyancy and Lorentz forces which arise from the flow of current through the pool of VAR when without magnetic stirring, but a new Lorentz force arising from the presence of external inductors occurs with adding magnetic stirring which decreases the macrosegregation rate of Fe element in Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al.

  8. InGaN thin film deposition on Si(100) and glass substrates by termionic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, E.; Kundakçı, M.; Mantarcı, A.

    2016-04-01

    Group-III nitride semiconductors covering infrared, visible and ultraviolet spectral range has direct band gaps changing from 0,7 eV (InN) to 3,4 eV (GaN). LEDs emit red, blue, green light, ultraviolet (UV) laser diodes (LD), UV light detectors and high power electronic devices are obtained and commercialized based on group-III nitride materials. InGaN semiconductor can be deposited by different techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). In this study, InGaN thin films were prepared on Si and glass substrates as well as on GaN layer by termionic vacuum arc (TVA) which is a plasma asisted thin film deposition technique. The film was deposited at 10-6 torr working pressure, 18A filament current. Plasma was produced at 200 V with 0,6A plasma current. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of InGaN thin films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrophotometer was used to analyze microstructure of the deposited films. Scanning electon microscopy (SEM) were used for surface morphology characterizations. Compositional analysis was done by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX).

  9. Optical and surface properties of the in doped GaAs layer deposition using thermionic vacuum arc method.

    PubMed

    Pat, Suat; Özen, Soner; Şenay, Volkan; Korkmaz, Şadan; Şimşek, Veli

    2016-07-01

    A broadband optical transparent InGaAs semiconductor layer production of micron thicknesses was produced in only 75 s by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method at the first time. The optical and surface properties of the produced layers have been investigated. InGaAs structure is using in electronics and optoelectronics devices. The main advantage of TVA method is its fast deposition rate, without any loss in the quality of the films. Doping is a very simple and fast according to common production methods. InGaAs is an alloy of indium arsenide (InAs) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). InAs with (220) crystallographic direction and GaAs with (024)/(022) crystallographic directions were detected using by XRD analysis. GaAs and InAs are in the cubic and zinc blende crystal system, respectively. According to the transmittance spectra, sample has a broadband transparency in the range of 1000-3300 nm. According to results, defined TVA method for In doping to GaAs is proper fast and friendly method. SCANNING 38:297-302, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Time and space resolved spectroscopic investigation during anode plume formation in a high-current vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakpour, A.; Methling, R.; Uhrlandt, D.; Franke, St.; Gortschakow, S.; Popov, S.; Batrakov, A.; Weltmann, K. D.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents time and space resolved results of spectroscopic measurements during the formation of an anode plume in the late current pulse phase of a high-current vacuum arc. The formation of the anode plume is investigated systematically based on the occurrence of high-current anode spots, depending on gap distance and current for AC 100 Hz and CuCr7525 butt contacts with a diameter of 10 mm. The anode plume is observed after the extinction of anode spot type 2 in which both the anode and cathode are active. It is concluded from the spatial profiles of the atomic and ionic radiation, parallel and perpendicular to anode surface, that the inner part of the plume is dominated by Cu I radiation, whereas a halo of light emitted by Cu II covers the plume. The radiation intensity of Cu III lines is quite low across the whole anode plume. Upper level excited state densities corresponding to Cu I lines at 510.55, 515.32, 521.82, 578.21 nm are determined. The temporal evolution of the resulting excitation temperature in the centre of the plume varies from 8500 K to 6000 K at 500 µs to 100 µs before current zero, respectively. The density calculated for Cu I at position in the plume is in the range of 1-5  ×  1019 m-3.

  11. AlGaAs film growth using thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) and determination of its physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, Soner; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan

    2015-06-01

    In this research, an AlGaAs film was deposited on a microscope slide by means of the thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) technique which is a novel plasma production technique. AlGaAs structures were grown by this deposition technique for the first time and this process occurred in a very short period of time. In order to characterize the produced film, nano-structural, nano-mechanical, optical, and surface properties were determined by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and interferometer. According to the results of the measurements, the mean thickness value of the produced film was obtained as 1.8 μm. The band gap value was determined as 2eV from the Kubelka-Munk plot. The refractive index value was obtained as approximately 3.4. Hardness value was determined as 2 GPa from the Oliver-Pharr method. All these values are consistent with the reported values in the literature for the AlGaAs films produced by different methods. TVA technique appeared as a suitable and promising technique for the production of AlGaAs films.

  12. Preparation of transparent and conductive multicomponent Zn-In-Sn oxide thin films by vacuum arc plasma evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Tsukada, Satoshi; Minamino, Youhei; Miyata, Toshihiro

    2005-07-01

    This article describes the preparation of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films by a vacuum arc plasma evaporation (VAPE) method using multicomponent oxide materials composed of any combination of two of the following binary compounds: ZnO, In2O3, and SnO2. The resulting TCO thin films were prepared with high deposition rates with the desired chemical composition in the ZnO-In2O3, In2O3-SnO2, and SnO2-ZnO systems by altering the composition of the sintered oxide fragments used as the source materials. Minimum resistivities were obtained in amorphous In2O3-ZnO, SnO2-In2O3, and ZnO-SnO2 thin films that were prepared with a Zn content of about 8.5 at. %, an In content of about 46 at. %, and a Sn content of about 78 at. %, respectively. It was found that the electrical, optical and chemical properties in ZnO-SnO2 thin films prepared using the VAPE method could be controlled by altering the Sn content.

  13. Overview spectra and axial distribution of spectral line intensities in a high-current vacuum arc with CuCr electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lisnyak, M.; Pipa, A. V.; Gorchakov, S. E-mail: weltmann@inp-greifswald.de; Iseni, S.; Franke, St.; Khapour, A.; Methling, R.; Weltmann, K.-D. E-mail: weltmann@inp-greifswald.de

    2015-09-28

    Spectroscopic investigations of free-burning vacuum arcs in diffuse mode with CuCr electrodes are presented. The experimental conditions of the investigated arc correspond to the typical system for vacuum circuit breakers. Spectra of six species Cu I, Cu II, Cu III, Cr I, Cr II, and Cr III have been analyzed in the wavelength range 350–810 nm. The axial intensity distributions were found to be strongly dependent on the ionization stage of radiating species. Emission distributions of Cr II and Cu II can be distinguished as well as the distributions of Cr III and Cu III. Information on the axial distribution was used to identify the spectra and for identification of overlapping spectral lines. The overview spectra and some spectral windows recorded with high resolution are presented. Analysis of axial distributions of emitted light, which originates from different ionization states, is presented and discussed.

  14. Investigations on phosphorus recovery and reuse as soil amendment from electric arc furnace slag filters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Simon C; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2009-11-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag has been identified as an effective filter material for the removal of phosphorus (P) from both point and non-point sources. To determine the feasibility of land-applying P saturated EAF steel slag this study was undertaken to investigate (i) saturated EAF steel slag material's potential as a P fertilizer or soil amendment and (ii) P desorption and metals leachate from saturated EAF steel slag material to surface runoff. Medicago sativa (alfalfa) was planted in a nutrient depleted washed sand media. Phosphorus was added either as saturated EAF steel slag or as a standard commercial phosphate fertilizer in order to assess the plant availability of the P from saturated EAF steel slag. Four different P application levels were tested: a low (20 lbs acre furrow slice(-1) (5.5 g P m(-3))) two medium (40 and 60 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (11 and 16.5 g P m(-3))) and a high (120 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (33 g P m(-3))). The above-ground biomass of half of the plants was harvested after 5 weeks and the second half at 10 weeks. All treatments regardless of the P source used showed high rates of germination. At the first harvest period (5 weeks) significantly higher above-ground biomass (p < 0.01) was seen at the 3 highest P amendment rates in treatments with triple super phosphate fertilizer (TSP) than with EAF steel slag. However, by the second harvest (10 weeks) only the highest amendment rate of TSP showed a significantly higher amount of biomass (p < 0.01), suggesting that EAF steel slag might be an effective slow release P source. In a second experiment, a rain simulator was used to assess desorption of DRP, TP and metals from a saturated and semi-saturated EAF steel slag. The results revealed that the total amounts of DRP and TP released to surface runoff from EAF steel slag were negligible when compared to the total quantities of P retained by this material. Overall the results from this study demonstrated that once the EAF steel slag filter

  15. Thickening, refertilization, and the deep lithosphere filter in continental arcs: Constraints from major and trace elements and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Emily J.; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Barnes, Jaime D.

    2014-07-01

    Arc magmatism is a complex process involving generation of primary melts in the mantle wedge and chemical refinement of these melts into differentiated products akin to continental crust. Interaction of magmas (cooling, crystallization and assimilation) with the overlying crust, particularly if it is thick, is one way by which primary basalts are refined into more evolved compositions. Here, we explore the role of the mantle lithosphere as a trap and/or reactive filter of magmas. We use mantle xenoliths from the Sierra Nevada continental arc in California as a probe into sub-Moho processes. Based on clinopyroxene modal abundance and major, minor and moderately incompatible trace element concentrations, the peridotites define a refertilization trend that increases with depth, grading from clinopyroxene-poor (<5%), undeformed spinel peridotites equilibrated at <3 GPa (<90 km) to clinopyroxene-rich (10-20%), porphyroclastic garnet peridotites equilibrated between 3 and 3.5 GPa (90-105 km), the latter presumably approaching the top of the subducting slab. The petrology and geochemistry of the xenoliths suggest that the fertile peridotites were originally depleted spinel peridotites, which were subsequently refertilized. Incompatible trace element geochemistry reveals a pervasive cryptic metasomatic overprint in all peridotites, suggesting involvement of small amounts of subduction-derived fluids from the long-lived Farallon plate beneath western North America. However, bulk reconstructed δOSMOW18 values of the peridotites, including the most refertilized, fall between 5.4 and 5.9‰, within the natural variability of unmetasomatized mantle (∼5.5±0.2‰). Together with Sm, Yb, and Ca compositional data, the oxygen isotope data suggest that the role of slab or sediment melts in refertilizing the peridotites was negligible (<5% in terms of added melt mass). Instead, binary mixing models suggest that many of the Sierran garnet peridotites, particularly those with high

  16. Non-platinum nanocatalyst on porous nitrogen-doped carbon fabricated by cathodic vacuum arc plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirirak, Reungruthai; Sarakonsri, Thapanee; Medhesuwakul, Min

    2015-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy where catalysts composing of non-noble transition metals, nitrogen, and carbon compounds are the most promising materials to replace the expensive platinum catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this research, cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique was used to fabricate porous nitrogen doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum catalyst on porous NC (Fe-NC) directly on ion exchange membrane for being used as an ORR catalyst at the cathode. The porous NC layer was fabricated on silicon wafer at 0.05 mTorr, 0.1 mTorr, 0.5 mTorr, 1 mTorr, and 5 mTorr of nitrogen gas inlet. The AFM, and SEM images are observed to be regularly big with quite high hillocks and thin NC layers; these results indicate that the optimum process pressure of nitrogen gas inlet is 5 mTorr for porous NC fabrication. The SEM-EDS detects Fe, N, and C elements in the prepared catalysts, and the XRD pattern reviews the iron nitride and the carbon nitride phases. The SEM images in the backscattered electron mode (BSE) reveal good dispersion of very small metal particles (bright spots) on the highly porous coral-like carbon film. The TEM images clearly show the spherical Fe nanoparticles (64 nm) dispersed on the porous carbon film. However, the XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) analysis specifies that the prepared Fe is in the form of iron(III). As a result of no FeN standard for confirmation, both the XRD and the XANES results are used to confirm the Fe(III) compound. In preparing the catalyst as FeN, all these results specify that the CVAP technique can be used to produce the catalyst on the membrane.

  17. Mechanical properties and platelet adhesion behavior of diamond-like carbon films synthesized by pulsed vacuum arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Y. X.; Chen, J. Y.; Yang, P.; Sun, H.; Wan, G. J.; Huang, N.

    2003-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an attractive biomedical material due to its high inertness and excellent mechanical properties. In this study, DLC films were fabricated on Ti6Al4V and Si(1 0 0) substrates at room temperature by pulsed vacuum arc plasma deposition. By changing the argon flow from 0 to 13 sccm during deposition, the effects of argon flow on the characteristics of the DLC films were systematically examined to correlate to the blood compatibility. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the films were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface analysis, a nano-indenter and pin-on-disk tribometer. The blood compatibility of the films was evaluated using in vitro platelet adhesion investigation, and the quantity and morphology of the adherent platelets was investigated employing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The Raman spectroscopy results showed a decreasing sp 3 fraction (an increasing trend in ID/ IG ratio) with increasing argon flow from 0 to 13 sccm. The sp 3:sp 2 ratio of the films was evaluated from the deconvoluted XPS spectra. We found that the sp 3 fraction decreased as the argon flow was increased from 0 to 13 sccm, which is consistent with the results of the Raman spectra. The mechanical properties results confirmed the decreasing sp 3 content with increasing argon flow. The Raman D-band to G-band intensity ratio increased and the platelet adhesion behavior became better with higher flow. This implies that the blood compatibility of the DLC films is influenced by the sp 3:sp 2 ratio. DLC films deposited on titanium alloys have high wear resistance, low friction and good adhesion.

  18. Growth and characterization of GaN thin film on Si substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundakçı, Mutlu; Mantarcı, Asim; Erdoğan, Erman

    2017-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is an attractive material with a wide-direct band gap (3.4 eV) and is one of the significant III-nitride materials, with many advantageous device applications such as high electron mobility transistors, lasers, sensors, LEDs, detectors, and solar cells, and has found applications in optoelectronic devices. GaN could also be useful for industrial research in the future. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), sputter, and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) are some of the methods used to fabricate GaN thin film. In this research, a GaN thin film grown on a silicon substrate using the thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) technique has been extensively studied. Fast deposition, short production time, homogeneity, and uniform nanostructure with low roughness can be seen as some of the merits of this method. The growth of the GaN was conducted at an operating pressure of 1× {{10}-6} \\text{Torr} , a plasma current 0.6 \\text{A} and for a very short period of time of 40 s. For the characterization process, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was conducted to determine the structure and surface morphology of the material. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was used to comprehend the elemental analysis characterization of the film. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to analyze the structure of the film. Raman measurements were taken to investigate the phonon modes of the material. The morphological properties of the material were analyzed in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  19. High-RRR thin-films of NB produced using energetic condensation from a coaxial, rotating vacuum ARC plasma (CEDTM)

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique Francisco Valderrama, Colt James, Mahadevan Krishnan, Xin Zhao, Larry Phillips, Charles Reece, Kang Seo

    2012-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated unprecedentedly high values of RRR (up to 542) in thin-films of pure Nb deposited on a-plane sapphire and MgO crystal substrates. The Nb films were grown using a vacuum arc discharge struck between a reactor grade Nb cathode rod (RRR {approx} 30) and a coaxial, semi-transparent Mo mesh anode, with a heated substrate placed just outside it. The substrates were pre-heated for several hours prior to deposition at different temperatures. Low pre-heat temperatures (<300 C) and deposition temperatures (<300 C) give low RRR (<50) films, whereas higher pre-heat (700 C) and coating temperatures (500 C) give RRR=214 on a-sapphire and RRR=542 on MgO. XRD (Bragg-Brentano scans and Pole Figures), EBSD and SIMS data reveal several features: (1) on asapphire, higher temperatures show better 3D registry for epitaxial growth of Nb; the crystal structure evolves from textured, polycrystalline (with twins) to single-crystal; (2) on MgO, there is a transition from {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes to {l_brace}100{r_brace} as the temperature is increased beyond 500 C. The dramatic increase in RRR (from {approx}10 at <300 C to {approx}500 at >600 C) is correlated with better epitaxial crystal structure in both a-sapphire and MgO substrate grown films. However, the SIMS data reveal that the most important requirement for high-RRR Nb films on either substrate is the reduction of impurities in the film, especially hydrogen. The hydrogen content in the MgO grown films is 1000 times lower than in bulk Nb tested as a reference from SRF cavity grade Nb. This result has potential implications for SRF accelerators. Coating bulk Nb cavities with an MgO layer followed by our CEDTM deposited Nb films, might create superior SRF cavities that would avoid Q-slope and operate at higher peak fields.

  20. Influence of substrate structure on adhesion behavior of TiN and TiAl3/TiAlN coatings deposited by vacuum arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, E.; Ramazanov, K.; Yagafarov, I.; Budilov, V.; Agzamov, R.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the study of the influence of a substrate structure on the adhesion behavior of monolayer coatings TiN and multilayer coatings TiAl3 / TiAlN deposited by vacuum arc plasma. Martensitic steel with a coarse-grained (CG) and ultrafine-grained (UFG) structure was used for samples. The samples were subjected to ion nitriding in a glow discharge before coating deposition. Adhesion of the coatings was examined with CSM ScratchTEST. For samples with different structures, critical load was defined at which microcracks are formed in the coatings.

  1. Modeling of thermal processes in the modification of the surface by means of the cathode spot of vacuum arc on equipment with non-cooled rotating anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. G.; Babushkina, E. S.; Kurbanov, T. A.

    2017-05-01

    Theoretically and experimentally the thermal processes in the case of modification the inner surface of the cylindrical cavity by means of the cathode spots of vacuum arc discharge are investigated. As the anode was used uncooled graphite electrode in the form of a half cut in diameter of a cylindrical rod. At the modeling of thermal processes was taken into account the process of heating the surface of the cylinder by radiation from the hot surface of the anode. In this case the cylindrical surface has been uneven wall thickness around the perimeter.

  2. Planning Study of Flattening Filter Free Beams for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Youqun; Shi, Liwan; Lin, Qin; Fu, Lirong; Ha, Huiming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Flattening filter free (FFF) beams show the potential for a higher dose rate and lower peripheral dose. We investigated the planning study of FFF beams with their role for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp. Methods and Materials One patient with squamous cell carcinoma which had involvement of entire scalp was subjected to VMAT using TrueBeam linear accelerator. As it was a rare skin malignancy, CT data of 7 patients with brain tumors were also included in this study, and their entire scalps were outlined as target volumes. Three VMAT plans were employed with RapidArc form: two half-field full-arcs VMAT using 6 MV standard beams (HFF-VMAT-FF), eight half-field quarter-arcs VMAT using 6 MV standard beams (HFQ-VMAT-FF), and HFQ-VMAT using FFF beams (HFQ-VMAT-FFF). Prescribed dose was 25×2 Gy (50 Gy). Plan quality and efficiency were assessed for all plans. Results There were no statistically significant differences among the three VMAT plans in target volume coverage, conformity, and homogeneity. For HFQ-VMAT-FF plans, there was a significant decrease by 12.6% in the mean dose to the brain compared with HFF-VMAT-FF. By the use of FFF beams, the mean dose to brain in HFQ-VMAT-FFF plans was further decreased by 7.4% compared with HFQ-VMAT-FF. Beam delivery times were similar for each technique. Conclusions The HFQ-VMAT-FF plans showed the superiority in dose distributions compared with HFF-VMAT-FF. HFQ-VMAT-FFF plans might provide further normal tissue sparing, particularly in the brain, showing their potential for radiation therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp. PMID:25506701

  3. Experimental Test Of Whether Electrostatically Charged Micro-organisms And Their Spores Contribute To The Onset Of Arcs Across Vacuum Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    none,; Grisham, Larry R.

    2014-02-24

    Recently it was proposed [L.R. Grisham, A. vonHalle, A.F. Carpe, Guy Rossi, K.R. Gilton, E.D. McBride, E.P. Gilson, A. Stepanov, T.N. Stevenson, Physics of Plasma 19 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between condu cting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which tnen become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. The note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maxium operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance

  4. Experimental test of whether electrostatically charged micro-organisms and their spores contribute to the onset of arcs across vacuum gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Halle, A. von; Carpe, A. F.; Gilton, K. R.; Rossi, Guy; Stevenson, T. N.

    2013-12-15

    Recently it was proposed [L. R. Grisham et al. Phys. Plasmas 19, 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between conducting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which then become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. This note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maximum operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each case preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance.

  5. Filtered topological structure of the QCD vacuum: Effects of dynamical quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckmann, Falk; Gruber, Florian; Schäfer, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    We systematically compare filtering methods used to extract topological structures on SU(3) lattice configurations. We show that there is a strong correlation of the topological charge densities obtained by APE and Stout smearing. To get rid of artifacts of these methods, we analyse structures that are also seen by Laplace filtering and indeed identify artifacts for strong smearing. The topological charge density in this combined analysis is more fragmented in the presence of dynamical quarks. A power law exponent that characterises the distribution of filtered topological clusters turns out to be not far off the values of an instanton gas model.

  6. Ultrathin ta-C films on heads depositied by twist-filteredcathodic arc carbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Ryan, Francis W.

    2000-07-14

    It is known that filtered cathodic-arc-deposited ta-C films have outstanding properties even within the family of diamondlike materials. However, filtering of macroparticles is usually incomplete or accompanied by significant plasma losses. Ongoing research effort is directed towards the following goals: (1) complete elimination of macro- and nanoparticles from the vacuum arc plasma, (2) increase of plasma utilization in the cathodic-arc and macroparticle-filter system, (3) precise control and reproducibility of film deposition, and (4) synthesis of ultrathin films (< 5 nm) that meet requirements of the magnetic storage industry. The development of new filters, in particular the ''Twist Filter'', enables cathodic arc plasma deposition to synthesize ultrathin ta-C films of 3 nm on heads that pass corrosion and other relevant tests. We describe the Twist Filter system and report about recent ta-C tests results. In light of these results, even thinner films seem to be possible.

  7. Dosimetric influence of filtered and flattening filter free photon beam on rapid arc (RA) radiotherapy planning in case of cervix carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Yadav, Girigesh; Samuvel, Kothanda Raman; Bhushan, Manindra; Kumar, Pawan; Suhail, Mahammood; Pal, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric influence of filtered and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beam of 6 and 10 MV energies on cervix RA radiotherapy planning and to find possibilities to develop the clinically acceptable RA plans with FFFB photon beam and explore their potential benefits to cervix cancer patients. FFF photon beams enhances the treatment delivery by increased dose rate which results in shorter treatment time, this shorter treatment time reduces intrafraction motion and enhance comfort to the patients. RA plans were generated for filtered and flattening filter free photon beams of 6 and 10 MV energies using same dose-volumes constraints. RA plans were generated to deliver a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, for a cohort of eleven patients reported with cervix carcinoma. RA plans were evaluated in terms of PTV coverage, dose to OAR's, CI, HI, total no. of monitor units (MUs) and NTID and low dose volume of normal tissues. Clinically acceptable and similar plans were generated for filtered and flattening filter free photon beams. FFFB delivered slightly higher mean target dose (52.28 Gy vs. 52.0 Gy, p = 0.000 for 6 MV and 52.42 Gy vs. 52.0 Gy, p = 0.000 for 10 MV) less homogeneous (1.062 vs. 1.052, p = 0.000 for 6 MV and 1.066 vs. 1.051, p = 0.000 for 10 MV) and less conformal (1.007 vs. 1.004, p = 0.104 for 6 MV and 1.012 vs. 1.003, p = 0.010 for 10 MV) RA plans compared to FB. FFFB delivered more doses to the bladder and rectum, also required more numbers of MUs in comparison to FB. This study concludes that FB is more beneficial for cervix RA planning in comparison to FFFB, as FB generates more conformal and homogenous rapid arc plans and offers better OAR's sparing.

  8. High quality ZnO:Al transparent conducting oxide films synthesized by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Lim, Sunnie H.N.; Yu, Kin Man; Andersson, Joakim; Rosen, Johanna; McFarland, Mike; Brown, Jeff

    2009-04-24

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide, ZnO:Al or AZO, is a well-known n-type transparent conducting oxide with great potential in a number of applications currently dominated by indium tin oxide (ITO). In this study, the optical and electrical properties of AZO thin films deposited on glass and silicon by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition are systematically studied. In contrast to magnetron sputtering, this technique does not produce energetic negative ions, and therefore ion damage can be minimized. The quality of the AZO films strongly depends on the growth temperature while only marginal improvements are obtained with post-deposition annealing. The best films, grown at a temperature of about 200?C, have resistivities in the low to mid 10-4 Omega cm range with a transmittance better than 85percent in the visible part of the spectrum. It is remarkable that relatively good films of small thickness (60 nm) can be fabricated using this method.

  9. Preparation and characterization of high-quality TiN films at low temperature by filtered cathode arc plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.J.; Yan, P.X.; Wu, Z.G.; Xu, J.W.; Zhang, W.W.; Li, X.; Liu, W.M.; Xue, Q.J.

    2004-11-01

    High-quality TiN films were successfully deposited on silicon and stainless-steel substrates at low temperature using an improved filtered cathode arc plasma technique developed in our lab. Atomic force microscope, x-ray diffractometer, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and a nanoindenter were employed to characterize the TiN thin films. The microhardness of the TiN films have a high value up to 41 GPa, which is far higher than that of TiN compounds deposited by conventional chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition methods (20 Gpa or so). The films are of a stronger preferred crystalline orientation, very smooth surface, and high reflectivity. The effects of the negative substrate bias on the preferred crystalline orientation, surface roughness, deposition rate, and microhardness of Tin thin films are discussed in detail.

  10. Note: A cryogenic, ultra-high-vacuum, microwave filter which passes a narrow beam

    SciTech Connect

    Evetts, N. Dosanjh, P.; Hardy, W. N.; Zvyagintsev, V.

    2015-12-15

    We report on a device which filters microwave radiation prone to heating cryogenic experiments while at the same time allowing large apertures which will not disturb a propagating beam. A method for evaporating thin films onto the inner face of a narrow tube is also described.

  11. Reproducibility of the single-phase structural state of the multielement high-entropy Ti-V-Zr-Nb-Hf system and related superhard nitrides formed by the vacuum-arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol', O. V.; Andreev, A. A.; Gorban', V. F.; Krapivka, N. A.; Stolbovoi, V. A.; Serdyuk, I. V.; Fil'chikov, V. E.

    2012-07-01

    The reproducibility of the single-phase structural state of the Ti-V-Zr-Nb-Hf multielement system (a high-entropy alloy) is demonstrated using the vacuum-arc method to prepare coatings based on this system. Single-phase high-entropy compounds with a bcc lattice typical of the molten state result from vacuum deposition; preparation in nitrogen atmosphere yields single-phases nitride superhard nanocrystalline coatings based on the fcc metallic lattice.

  12. A HIGH SPEED VACUUM CENTRIFUGE SUITABLE FOR THE STUDY OF FILTERABLE VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Johannes H.; Pickels, Edward G.

    1936-01-01

    1. A high speed centrifuge is described in which the speed is limited only by the strength of the material of which the rotor is made. It carries sixteen tubes, each of which conveniently accommodates 7 cc. of fluid. 2. The centrifuge operates in a very high vacuum and therefore requires only a small amount of driving energy. The arrangement has been found to eliminate the possibility of producing injurious frictional heat. 3. The rotating parts are supported by anair-bearing and are driven by compressed air. 4. The centrifuge has been successfully operated at a speed of 30,000 revolutions per minute, representing a maximum centrifugal force in the fluid of 95,000 times gravity. 5 Celluloid tubes used for centrifugation of fluid at high speeds are described. 6. Experiments are described in which good sedimentation of the yellow fever virus was obtained. PMID:19870550

  13. Time-dependence ion charge state distributions of vacuum arcs: An interpretation involving atoms and charge exchange collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2004-08-27

    Experimentally observed charge state distributions are known to be higher at the beginning of each arc discharge. Up to know, this has been attributed to cathode surface effects in terms of changes of temperature, chemical composition and spot mode. Here it is shown that the initial decay of charge states of cathodic arc plasmas may at least in part due to charge exchange collisions of ions with neutrals that gradually fill the discharge volume. Sources of neutrals may include evaporated atoms from macroparticles and still-hot craters of previously active arc spots. More importantly, atoms are also produced by energetic condensation of the cathodic arc plasma. Self-sputtering is significant when ions impact with near-normal angle of incidence, and ions have low sticking probability when impacting at oblique angle of incidence. Estimates show that the characteristic time for filling the near-cathode discharge volume agrees well with the charge state decay time, and the likelihood of charge exchange is reasonably large to be taken into account.

  14. SU-E-T-493: Influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 Megavolts Energy On Rapid Arc Radiotherapy Planning for Cervix Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Girigesh, Y; Kumar, L; Raman, K; Mishra, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 MV energy on RA planning for Ca. Cervix. Methods: CT data sets of eleven patients reported with carcinoma cervix were used for RA planning for 10MV -FFB and 10MV-FFFB. RA plans were generated using two full arcs.All RA plans were generated to deliver a dose of 50.4Gy in 28 fractions for PTV and ALARA for OAR’s. All plans were analysed for PTV Coverage, conformity Index, homogeneity index, dose to OAR’s, integral dose to normal tissue and total monitor units were studied. Results: DVH was used to evaluate RA plans for both 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB photon beam. Planning results show a comparable PTV coverage for both energies. Results shows volume of PTV receiving prescription dose were 95.10+ 0.09% and 95.09 +0.11%, and volume of PTV receiving a dose of 107% is 0.45+0.96% and 5.25+8.9%, homogeneity index (HI) were 1.051+0.007 and 1.066+0.008, Conformity Index(CI) were 1.003+0.019 and 1.012+0.013, Mean Integral dose were 2.65+0.34 and 2.60+0.33(*10−5Gy.cm3) for 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB respectively. 10MV-FB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) improvement in mean doses to bladder, rectum, bowel and mean total number of MU’s and also shows remarkable decrease in mean total no. of MU’s by 43.7% in comparison to 10MV-FFFB. There is statistically significant (p<0.05) difference found in CI and HI for 10MV-FB in comparison to 10MV -FFF beam. 10MV-FFFB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) for mean NTID and delivers 1.65 % less NTID in comparison to 10 MV- FB. Conclusion: 10MV-FB is superior to 10MV-FFFB for rapid arc planning in case of Cervix carcinomas, it offers better target coverage and OAR’s sparing, comparable mean Integral dose to normal tissues and 10 MV- FB also produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distribution in comparison to 10MV-FFFB.

  15. A 4 MV flattening filter-free beam: commissioning and application to conformal therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, S. W.; Rosser, K. E.; Bedford, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that radiotherapy treatments undertaken on a flattening filter-free (FFF) linear accelerator have a number of advantages over treatments undertaken on a conventional linear accelerator. In addition, 4 MV photon beams may give improved isodose coverage for some treatment volumes at air/tissue interfaces, compared to when utilizing the clinical standard of 6 MV photons. In order to investigate these benefits, FFF beams were established on an Elekta Beam Modulator linear accelerator for 4 MV photons. Commissioning beam data were obtained for open and wedged fields. The measured data were then imported into a treatment planning system and a beam model was commissioned. The beam model was optimized to improve dose calculations at shallow, clinically relevant depths. Following verification, the beam model was utilized in a treatment planning study, including volumetric modulated arc therapy, for a selection of lung, breast/chest wall and larynx patients. Increased dose rates of around 800 MU min-1 were recorded for open fields (relative to 320 MU min-1 for filtered open fields) and reduced head scatter was inferred from output factor measurements. Good agreement between planned and delivered dose was observed in verification of treatment plans. The planning study indicated that with a FFF beam, equivalent (and in some cases improved) isodose profiles could be achieved for small lung and larynx treatment volumes relative to 4 MV filtered treatments. Furthermore, FFF treatments with wedges could be replicated using open fields together with an 'effective wedge' technique and isocentre shift. Clinical feasibility of a FFF beam was therefore demonstrated, with beam modelling, treatment planning and verification being successfully accomplished.

  16. SU-E-T-311: Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans for Preoperative Radiotherapy Rectal Cancer Using Flattening Filter-Free and Flattening Filter Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W; Zhang, J; Lu, J; Chen, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) for preoperative radiotherapy rectal cancer using 6MV X-ray flattening filter free(FFF) and flattening filter(FF) modes. Methods: FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were designed to 15 rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy by planning treatment system(Eclipse 10.0),respectively. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. All plans were normalized to 50 Gy to 95% of PTV. The Dose Volume Histogram (DVH), target and risk organ doses, conformity indexes (CI), homogeneity indexes (HI), low dose volume of normal tissue(BP), monitor units(MU) and treatment time (TT) were compared between the two kinds of plans. Results: FF-VMAT provided the lower Dmean, V105, HI, and higher CI as compared with FFF-VMAT. The small intestine of D5, Bladder of D5, Dmean, V40, V50, L-femoral head of V40, R-femoral head of Dmean were lower in FF-VMAT than in FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT had higher BP of V5, but no significantly different of V10, V15, V20, V30 as compared with FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT reduceed the monitor units(MU) by 21%(P<0.05), as well as the treatment time(TT) was no significantly different(P>0.05), as compared with FFF-VMAT. Conclusion: The plan qualities of FF and FFF VMAT plans were comparable and both clinically acceptable. FF-VMAT as compared with FFF-VMAT, showing better target coverage, some of OARs sparing, the MUs of FFF-VMAT were higher than FF-VMAT, yet were delivered within the same time. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  17. Fabrication of TiC-Reinforced Composites by Vacuum Arc Melting: TiC Mode of Reprecipitation in Different Molten Metals and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karantzalis, A. E.; Arni, Z.; Tsirka, K.; Evangelou, A.; Lekatou, A.; Dracopoulos, V.

    2016-08-01

    TiC crystals were developed and grown through a melt dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism, in different alloy matrices (pure Fe, 316L, Fe-22 at.%Al, Ni-25at.%Al, and pure Co) through the use of Vacuum Arc Melting (VAM) process. The TiC surfaces exhibit a characteristic faceted mode of growth which is explained in terms of classic nucleation and crystal growth theories and is related with the well-known Jackson factor of crystal growth. Different morphologies of the finally solidified TiC grains are observed (dendritic, radially grown, isolated blocky crystals, particle clusters), the establishment of which may be most likely related with solidification progress, cooling rate, and melt compositional considerations. An initial, rough and qualitative phase identification shows a variety of compounds, and the attempts to define specific phase crystallographic-orientational relationships led to rather random results.

  18. Computational and experimental analysis of a U-6w/oNb vacuum consumable arc remelted ingot. A progress report for the Sandia macrosegregation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, F. J.; Bertram, L. A.

    1981-04-01

    A computer code (ZAP) has been developed to simulate the thermodynamic, magnetohydrodynamic, and fluid flow conditions in the liquid and solid-liquid regions of a solidifying ingot during vacuum consumable arc remelting. The code is coupled and constrained with experimentally determined measurements of boundary conditions and melt parameters such as melt rate, melt current, and melt time. The work reported presents one preliminary step in the coupled experimental-numerical process. A 538 kg U-6w/oNb ingot was remelted to obtain regions of constant melting current of 2 through 6 kA in 1 kA increments. The melt was simulated numerically using inputs for the code that were obtained from this experiment. Results of this numerical simulation are compared to experimental results obtained from ingot radiography and chemical analysis.

  19. Study of the phase composition of silicide coatings, based on layered Nb-Mo structures, obtained by vacuum-arc deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya; Lenkovets, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    A multilayer composite ∼1000 μm in thickness, formed by niobium and molybdenum layers (number of layers n = 230), is obtained by vacuum-arc deposition with subsequent siliconization of the surface layers at a temperature of 1200 °C. Layer-by-layer phase analysis is performed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that in the surface layers ∼130 μm in thickness, single-phase silicides (Nb x Mo1- x )Si2 are formed with the hexagonal C40 structure (Strukturbericht designations). Alternating layers of solid solutions based on niobium and molybdenum with a body-centered cubic (BCC) lattice are observed within the composite. The formation of solid solutions caused by heating of the coating leads to convergence of the values of the linear thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus at the interface between the layers.

  20. Vacuum distillation: vapor filtered-catalytic oxidation water reclamation system utilizing radioisotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honegger, R. J.; Remus, G. A.; Kurg, E. K.

    1971-01-01

    The development of a functional model water reclamation system is discussed. The system produces potable water by distillation from the urine and respiration-perspiration condensate at the normal rate generated by four men. Basic processes employed are vacuum distillation, vapor filtration, vapor phase catalytic oxidation, and condensation. The system is designed to use four 75-watt isotope heaters for distillation thermal input, and one 45-watt isotope for the catalytic oxidation unit. The system is capable of collecting and storing urine, and provides for stabilizing the urine by chemical pretreatment. The functional model system is designed for operation in a weightless condition with liquid-vapor phase separators for the evaporator still, and centrifugal separators for urine collection and vapor condensation. The system provides for storing and dispensing reclaimed potable water. The system operates in a batch mode for 40 days, with urine residues accumulating in the evaporator. The evaporator still and residue are removed to storage and replaced with a fresh still for the next 40-day period.

  1. Advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arcs and the potential role of flattening filter-free beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening filter-free (FFF) beams and assess the role of VMAT in the treatment of advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods Ten cases of CT data were randomly selected from advanced NPC patients. Three treatment plans were optimized for each patient, RapidArc with FFF beams (RA-FFF), conventional beams (RA) and static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The doses to the planning target volumes (PTVs), organs at risk (OARs), skin and normal tissue were compared. All the plans were delivered on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator and verified using the Delta4 phantom. Technical delivery parameters including the mean gamma score, treatment delivery time and monitor units (MUs) were also analyzed. Results All the techniques delivered adequate doses to the PTVs. RA-FFF gave the highest D1% (dose received by 1% of the volume), but the poorest conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) among the PTVs except for the planning target volume of involved regional lymph nodes (PTV66) CI, which showed no significant difference among three techniques. For the planning target volume of the primary nasopharyngeal tumor (PTV70), RA-FFF provided for higher mean dose than other techniques. For the planning target volume receiving 60 Gy (PTV60) and PTV66, RA delivered the lowest mean doses whereas IMRT delivered the highest mean doses. IMRT demonstrated the highest percentage of target coverage and D99% for PTV60. RA-FFF provided for the highest doses to the brain stem, skin and oral cavity. RA gave the highest D1% to the right optic nerve among three techniques while no significant differences were found between each other. IMRT delivered the highest mean doses to the parotid glands and larynx while RA delivered the lowest mean doses. Gamma analysis showed an excellent agreement for all the techniques at 3%/3mm. Significant

  2. Dosimetric Impact of the Interplay Effect During Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy Delivery Using Flattening Filter-Free Beams and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Chin Loon; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric impact of the interplay effect during RapidArc stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung tumors using flattening filter-free (FFF) beams with different dose rates. Methods and Materials: Seven tumors with motion ≤20 mm, treated with 10-MV FFF RapidArc, were analyzed. A programmable phantom with sinusoidal longitudinal motion (30-mm diameter “tumor” insert; period = 5 s; individualized amplitude from planning 4-dimensional computed tomography) was used for dynamic dose measurements. Measurements were made with GafChromic EBT III films. Plans delivered the prescribed dose to 95% of the planning target volume, created by a 5-mm expansion of the internal target volume. They comprised 2 arcs and maximum dose rates of 400 and 2400 MU/min. For 2400 MU/min plans, measurements were repeated at 3 different initial breathing phases to model interplay over 2 to 3 fractions. For 3 cases, 2 extra plans were created using 1 full rotational arc (with contralateral lung avoidance sector) and 1 partial arc of 224° to 244°. Dynamic and convolved static measurements were compared by use of gamma analysis of 3% dose difference and 1 mm distance-to-agreement. Results: For 2-arc 2400 MU/min plans, maximum dose deviation of 9.4% was found in a single arc; 7.4% for 2 arcs (single fraction) and <5% and 3% when measurements made at 2 and 3 different initial breathing phases were combined, simulating 2 or 3 fractions. For all 7 cases, >99% of the area within the region of interest passed the gamma criteria when all 3 measurements with different initial phases were combined. Single-fraction single-arc plans showed higher dose deviations, which diminished when dose distributions were summed over 2 fractions. All 400 MU/min plans showed good agreement in a single fraction measurement. Conclusion: Under phantom conditions, single-arc and single-fraction 2400 MU/min FFF RapidArc lung stereotactic body radiation therapy is susceptible to interplay

  3. Flattening Filter-Free Beams in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Sinonasal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Wu-Zhe; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric impacts of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for sinonasal cancer. For fourteen cases, IMRT and VMAT planning was performed using 6-MV photon beams with both conventional flattened and FFF modes. The four types of plans were compared in terms of target dose homogeneity and conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, number of monitor units (MUs) per fraction, treatment time and pure beam-on time. FFF beams led to comparable target dose homogeneity, conformity, increased number of MUs and lower doses to the spinal cord, brainstem and normal tissue, compared with flattened beams in both IMRT and VMAT. FFF beams in IMRT resulted in improvements by up to 5.4% for sparing of the contralateral optic structures, with shortened treatment time by 9.5%. However, FFF beams provided comparable overall OAR sparing and treatment time in VMAT. With FFF mode, VMAT yielded inferior homogeneity and superior conformity compared with IMRT, with comparable overall OAR sparing and significantly shorter treatment time. Using FFF beams in IMRT and VMAT is feasible for the treatment of sinonasal cancer. Our results suggest that the delivery mode of FFF beams may play an encouraging role with better sparing of contralateral optic OARs and treatment efficiency in IMRT, but yield comparable results in VMAT.

  4. Flattening Filter-Free Beams in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Sinonasal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dosimetric impacts of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for sinonasal cancer. Methods For fourteen cases, IMRT and VMAT planning was performed using 6-MV photon beams with both conventional flattened and FFF modes. The four types of plans were compared in terms of target dose homogeneity and conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, number of monitor units (MUs) per fraction, treatment time and pure beam-on time. Results FFF beams led to comparable target dose homogeneity, conformity, increased number of MUs and lower doses to the spinal cord, brainstem and normal tissue, compared with flattened beams in both IMRT and VMAT. FFF beams in IMRT resulted in improvements by up to 5.4% for sparing of the contralateral optic structures, with shortened treatment time by 9.5%. However, FFF beams provided comparable overall OAR sparing and treatment time in VMAT. With FFF mode, VMAT yielded inferior homogeneity and superior conformity compared with IMRT, with comparable overall OAR sparing and significantly shorter treatment time. Conclusions Using FFF beams in IMRT and VMAT is feasible for the treatment of sinonasal cancer. Our results suggest that the delivery mode of FFF beams may play an encouraging role with better sparing of contralateral optic OARs and treatment efficiency in IMRT, but yield comparable results in VMAT. PMID:26734731

  5. Effect of annealing temperature on AIN thin films prepared by D.C. magnetism filter arc deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Haifeng; Liu, Yan; Cai, Changlong

    2007-12-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films have attracted much attention because of its more excellent properties and are widely applied to different fields. In our work, AlN thin films were grown on silicon substrate bying using D.C. magnetism filter arc deposition. Various annealing temperature of 573K, 773K, 973K, 1173K were used to process AlN thin films. Microscopy, ellpsometry and XRD were carried out to character films' properties. The results show that the films' refractive index and the extinction coefficient, processed in different annealing temperature, presented small float and were all less than 5 X 10-3, respectively. Furthermore, from microscopy graph, we can see that the film, annealed in 573-973K temperature, were all un-cracked, uniformity and denser. However, the films show cracking when the annealing temperature reaches 1173K°C. In addition, the XRD spectrum of AlN films show 002 preferred orientation with 973K annealing temperature and show abroad band peaks without annealing.

  6. Modified Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Left Sided Breast Cancer After Radical Mastectomy With Flattening Filter Free Versus Flattened Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Youqun; Chen, Yanyan; Wu, Sangang; Shi, Liwan; Fu, Lirong; Ha, Huiming; Lin, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Conventional volumetric modulated arc therapy (C-VMAT) for breast cancer after radical mastectomy had its limitation that resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. We explored whether there was a way to deal with this disadvantage and determined the potential benefit of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Twenty patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy were subjected to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and VMAT treatment planning. For VMAT plans, 3 different designs were employed with RapidArc form: conventional-VMAT plan (C-VMAT), modified-VMAT plan (M-VMAT), and modified-VMAT plan using FFF beams (M-VMAT-F). Plan quality and efficiency were assessed for all plans. For each technique in homogeneity, there were no statistically significant differences. VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT in conformity. C-VMAT plans were obviously not only superior to 3DCRT in the medium to high-dose regions (about 15–50 Gy) but also resulted in larger volumes in low-dose regions (about 0–10 Gy). M-VMAT plans were similar to M-VMAT-F. Both of them might significantly reduce the regions of low dose compared with C-VMAT (V5lung: ∼ 11.5%; V5heart: ∼ 23.8%, P < 0.05), even less than 3DCRT in heart irradiation (V2.5heart, 9.4%, P < 0.05). For liver, contralateral breast, and lung irradiation, M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior to M-VMAT with a reduction of ∼0.08, 0.2, and 0.24 Gy in the respective mean doses (P < 0.05). C-VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT, while also resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. M-VMAT and M-VMAT-F plans might not only reduce the region in the medium to high doses but also have lower volumes in low-dose regions. M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior compared with M-VMAT due to further contralateral organs sparing. PMID:27057896

  7. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  8. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  9. Magnetic hysterysis evolution of Ni-Al alloy with Fe and Mn substitution by vacuum arc melting to produce the room temperature magnetocaloric effect material

    SciTech Connect

    Notonegoro, Hamdan Akbar; Kurniawan, Budhy; Manaf, Azwar; Setiawan, Jan

    2016-06-17

    The development of magnetocaloric effect (MCE) material is done in order to reduce the damage of the ozone layer caused by the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emitted into the air. The research dealing with synthesis of magnetocaloric materials based of Ni-Al Heusler Alloy structure and by varying substitution some atoms of Ni with Fe and Al with Mn on Ni-Al Heusler Alloy structure to become Ni{sub 44}Fe{sub 6}Mn{sub 32}Al{sub 18}. Vacuum Arc Melting (VAM) equipment is used to form the alloys on vacuum condition and by flowing argon gas atmosphere and then followed by annealing process for 72 hours. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) reveals that crystallite structure of material is observed. We define that Ni{sub 44}Fe{sub 6} as X{sub 2}, Mn{sub 25} as Y, and Al{sub 18}Mn{sub 7} as Z. Based on the XRD result, we observed that the general formula X{sub 2}YZ is not changed. The PERMAGRAF measurement revealed that there exists of magnetic hysterysis. The hysterysis show that the magnetic structures of the system undego evolution from diamagnetic to soft ferromagnetic material which all of the compound have the same crystallite structure. This evolution indicated that the change in the composition has led to changes the magnetic composition. Mn is the major element that gives strong magnetic properties to the sample. When Mn partially replaced position of Al, the sample became dominant to be influenced to improve their magnetic properties. In addition, substitution a part of Ni by Fe in the composition reveals a pinning of the domain walls in the sample.

  10. Electrical properties of a-C:Mo films produced by dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Yodsombat, Banchob

    2008-01-20

    Molybdenum-containing amorphous carbon (a-C:Mo) thin films were prepared using a dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma source with a molybdenum and a carbon (graphite) cathode. The Mo content in the films was controlled by varying the deposition pulse ratio of Mo and C. Film sheet resistance was measured in situ at process temperature, which was close to room temperature, as well as ex situ as a function of temperature (300-515 K) in ambient air. Film resistivity and electrical activation energy were derived for different Mo and C ratios and substrate bias. Film thickness was in the range 8-28 nm. Film resistivity varied from 3.55x10-4 Omega m to 2.27x10-6 Omega m when the Mo/C pulse ratio was increased from 0.05 to 0.4, with no substrate bias applied. With carbon-selective bias, the film resistivity was in the range of 4.59x10-2 and 4.05 Omega m at a Mo/C pulse ratio of 0.05. The electrical activation energy decreased from 3.80x10-2 to 3.36x10-4 eV when the Mo/C pulse ratio was increased in the absence of bias, and from 0.19 to 0.14 eV for carbon-selective bias conditions. The resistivity of the film shifts systematically with the amounts of Mo and upon application of substrate bias voltage. The intensity ratio of the Raman D-peak and G-peak (ID/IG) correlated with the pre-exponential factor (sigma 0) which included charge carrier density and density of states.

  11. Effect of bias voltage and nitrogen pressure on the structure and properties of vacuum-arc (Mo + Ti6%Si)N coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, V. M.; Sobol', O. V.; Litovchenko, S. V.; Pogrebnyak, A. D.; Srebnyuk, P. A.; Novikov, V. Yu.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Meilekhov, A. A.; Postel'nik, A. A.; Nemchenko, U. S.

    2017-05-01

    Effect of deposition conditions in reactive nitrogen atmosphere on the growth morphology, phase composition, structure, and mechanical characteristics (microhardness) of vacuum-arc multilayer coatings obtained using evaporation of the (Ti6%Si) and Mo cathodes is studied with the aid of raster electron microscopy, energy-dispersive elemental microanalysis, and microindentation. It is demonstrated that nitrogen atoms are redistributed to the region of the strongest nitride-forming element (Ti) in relatively thin layers (about 7 nm) consisting of substances with substantially different heats of formation (-336 kJ/mol for TiN and -34 kJ/mol for MoN). Such a process leads to lamination with the formation of nitride TiN and metal Mo (weaker nitride-forming element). Nitrogen-metal bonds are saturated in the layers of strong nitrideforming elements Ti(Si) when the nitrogen pressure increases from 6 × 10-4 to 5 × 10-3 Torr in the condensation procedure. Thus, the compound is filled with nitrogen to the stoichiometric composition and, then, the second system of layers based on molybdenum is saturated with nitrogen with the formation of the γ-Mo2N phase. An increase in bias potential U SP from-100 to-200 V stimulates mixing in thin layers with the formation of the (Ti, Si, Mo)N solid solution and leads to a decrease in microhardness from 37 to 32 GPa.

  12. Temperature influence on deuterium retention for Be-W mixed thin films prepared by Thermionic Vacuum Arc method exposed to PISCES B plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepu, I.; Doerner, R. P.; Baldwin, M. J.; Porosnicu, C.; Lungu, C. P.

    2015-08-01

    Beryllium-tungsten thin films with well controlled elemental composition were prepared using Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) technique and subsequently exposed to steady state, high ion flux (5.5 - 9.8 × 1022 ions m-2 s-1) deuterium (D) plasma in the PISCES-B facility to consistent fluences of 2.3 × 1026 m-2. Six types of layers were studied, ranging from pure Be, composite Be-W, having the atomic ratios of 9:1; 7:3; 1:1; 3:7; to pure W with a total deposited layer thickness of 2 μm. The sample exposure temperatures, namely 300 K, 473 K, 573 K and 773 K, respectively, were measured in situ with a thermocouple placed on the back of the sample. Morphological and structural examinations were undertaken before and after plasma exposure. Results show an influence of temperature on the subsequent morphology of the surface. Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS) spectra showed a change in the D release behavior for different Be-W ratio for a certain exposure temperature.

  13. Influence of N2 partial pressure on structural and microhardness properties of TiN/ZrN multilayers deposited by Ar/N2 vacuum arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naddaf, M.; Abdallah, B.; Ahmad, M.; A-Kharroub, M.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of N2 partial pressure on structural, mechanical and wetting properties of multilayered TiN/ZrN thin films deposited on silicon substrates by vacuum arc discharge of (N2 + Ar) gas mixtures is investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the average texturing coefficient of (1 1 1) orientation and the grain size of both TiN and ZrN individual layers increase with increasing the N2 partial pressure. The Rutherford back scattering (RBS) measurements and analysis reveal that incorporation of the nitrogen in the film increases with increasing the N2 partial pressure and both TiN and ZrN individual layers have a nitrogen over-stoichiometry for N2 partial pressure ⩾50%. The change in the film micro-hardness is correlated to the changes in crystallographic texture, grain size, stoichiometry and the residual stress in the film as a function of the N2 partial pressure. In particular, stoichiometry of ZrN and TiN individual is found to play the vital role in determining the multilayer hardness. The multilayer film deposited at N2 partial pressure of 25% has the best stoichiometric ratio of both TiN and ZrN layers and the highest micro-hardness of about 32 GPa. In addition, water contact angle (WCA) measurements and analysis show a decrease in the work of adhesion on increasing the N2 partial pressure.

  14. Influence of pulsed substrate bias on the structure and properties of Ti-Al-N films deposited by cathodic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. P.; Gao, G. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Lv, G. H.; Zhou, L.; Chen, H.; Pang, H.; Yang, S. Z.

    2012-07-01

    Ti-Al-N films were deposited by cathodic vacuum arc (CVA) technique in N2 atmosphere with different pulsed substrate bias. The influence of pulsed substrate bias (0 to -800 V) on the deposition rate, surface morphology, crystal structure, and mechanical properties of the Ti-Al-N films were systematically investigated. Increasing pulsed bias voltage resulted in the decrease of deposition rate but the increase of surface roughness. It was found that there was a strong correlation between the pulsed bias and film structure. All the films studied in this paper were composed of TiN, AlN, and Ti-Al-N ternary phases. The grains changed from equiaxial to columnar and exhibited preferred orientation when the pulsed bias increased. With the increase of pulsed bias voltage, the atomic ratio of Ti to Al element increased gradually, while the N to (Ti + Al) ratio decreased. The composite films present an enhanced nanohardness compared with binary TiN and ZrN films. The film deposited with pulsed bias of -200 V possessed the maximum scratch critical load and nanohardness. The minimum friction coefficient with pulsed bias of -300 V was obtained.

  15. Dosimetric Impact of Intrafraction Motion During RapidArc Stereotactic Vertebral Radiation Therapy Using Flattened and Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Chin Loon; Dahele, Max; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric impact of relatively short-duration intrafraction shifts during a single fraction of RapidArc delivery for vertebral stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using flattened (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods and Materials: The RapidArc plans, each with 2 to 3 arcs, were generated for 9 patients using 6-MV FF and 10-MV FFF beams with maximum dose rates of 1000 and 2400 MU/min, respectively. A total of 1272 plans were created to estimate the dosimetric consequences in target and spinal cord volumes caused by intrafraction shifts during one of the arcs. Shifts of 1, 2, and 3 mm for periods of 5, 10, and 30 seconds, and 5 mm for 5 and 10 seconds, were modelled during a part of the arc associated with high doses and steep dose gradients. Results: For FFF plans, shifts of 2 mm over 10 seconds and 30 seconds could increase spinal cord D{sub max} by up to 6.5% and 13%, respectively. Dosimetric deviations in FFF plans were approximately 2-fold greater than in FF plans. Reduction in target coverage was <1% for 83% and 96% of the FFF and FF plans, respectively. Conclusion: Even short-duration intrafraction shifts can cause significant dosimetric deviations during vertebral SBRT delivery, especially when using very high dose rate FFF beams and when the shift occurs in that part of the arc delivering high doses and steep gradients. The impact is greatest on the spinal cord and its planning-at-risk volume. Accurate and stable patient positioning is therefore required for vertebral SBRT.

  16. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on the influence of electron and ion temperature on the sheath expansion process in the post-arc stage of vacuum circuit breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yongpeng; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Wang, Lijun

    2015-02-01

    The inter-contact region of vacuum circuit breakers is filled with residual plasma at the moment when the current is zero after the burning of metal vapor arc. The residual plasma forms an ion sheath in front of the post-arc cathode. The sheath then expands towards the post-arc anode under the influence of a transient recovery voltage. In this study, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model is developed to investigate the post-arc sheath expansion. The influence of ion and electron temperatures on the decrease in local plasma density at the post-arc cathode side and post-arc anode side is discussed. When the decay in the local plasma density develops from the cathode and anode sides into the high-density region and merges, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region begins to decrease. Meanwhile, the ion sheath begins to expand faster. Furthermore, the theory of ion rarefaction wave only explains quantitatively the decrease in the overall plasma density at relatively low ion temperatures. With the increase of ion temperature to certain extent, another possible reason for the decrease in the overall plasma density is proposed and results from the more active thermal diffusion of plasma.

  17. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on the influence of electron and ion temperature on the sheath expansion process in the post-arc stage of vacuum circuit breaker

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yongpeng; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Wang, Lijun

    2015-02-15

    The inter-contact region of vacuum circuit breakers is filled with residual plasma at the moment when the current is zero after the burning of metal vapor arc. The residual plasma forms an ion sheath in front of the post-arc cathode. The sheath then expands towards the post-arc anode under the influence of a transient recovery voltage. In this study, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model is developed to investigate the post-arc sheath expansion. The influence of ion and electron temperatures on the decrease in local plasma density at the post-arc cathode side and post-arc anode side is discussed. When the decay in the local plasma density develops from the cathode and anode sides into the high-density region and merges, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region begins to decrease. Meanwhile, the ion sheath begins to expand faster. Furthermore, the theory of ion rarefaction wave only explains quantitatively the decrease in the overall plasma density at relatively low ion temperatures. With the increase of ion temperature to certain extent, another possible reason for the decrease in the overall plasma density is proposed and results from the more active thermal diffusion of plasma.

  18. Can volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams play a role in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver lesions? A volume-based analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reggiori, Giacomo; Mancosu, Pietro; Castiglioni, Simona; Alongi, Filippo; Pellegrini, Chiara; Lobefalo, Francesca; Catalano, Maddalena; Fogliata, Antonella; Arcangeli, Stefano; Navarria, Piera; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free (FFF) and flattening filter (FF) beams in patients with hepatic metastases subject to hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT). Methods: A planning study on 13 virtual lesions of increasing volume was performed. Two single arc plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using either FFF or FF beams. A second planning study was performed on ten patients treated for liver metastases to validate conclusions. In all cases, a dose of 75 Gy in 3 fractions was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and plans were evaluated in terms of coverage, homogeneity, conformity, mean dose to healthy liver and to healthy tissue. For each parameter, results were expressed in relative terms as the percentage ratio between FFF and FF data. Results: In terms of PTV coverage, conformity index favored FFF for targets of intermediate size while FF resulted more suitable for small (<100 cm{sup 3}) and large (>300 cm{sup 3}) targets. Plans optimized with FFF beams resulted in increased sparing of healthy tissue in {approx_equal}85% of cases. Despite the qualitative results, no statistically significant differences were found between FFF and FF results. Plans optimized with un-flattened beams resulted in higher average MU/Gy than plans with FF beams. A remarkable and significant difference was observed in the beam-on time (BOT) needed to deliver plans. The BOT for FF plans was 8.2 {+-} 1.0 min; for FFF plans BOT was 2.2 {+-} 0.2 min. Conclusions: RapidArc plans optimized using FFF were dosimetrically equivalent to those optimized using FF beams, showing the feasibility of SBRT treatments with FFF beams. Some improvement in healthy tissue sparing was observed when using the FFF modality due to the different beam's profile. The main advantage was a considerable reduction of beam-on time, relevant for SBRT techniques.

  19. Study on nanocomposite Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films with various Si contents deposited by cathodic vacuum arc ion plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Muders, C. M.; Kumar, A.; Jiang, X.; Pei, Z. L.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2012-10-01

    In this study, nanocomposite Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films were deposited on high speed steel substrates by the vacuum cathode arc ion plating (AIP) technique. By virtue of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), the influence of silicon content on the film microstructure and characteristics was investigated systematically, including the chemical composition, crystalline structure as well as cross-section morphologies. With increasing the silicon content, a deterioration of the preferred orientation and a dense globular structure were detected. In the meanwhile, atomic force microscopy (AFM), nano-indentation, Rockwell indenter and reciprocating test were also utilized to analyze the hardness, elastic modulus, H3/E2, friction coefficient, adhesive strength and wear rate of the Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films. The results showed that an optimal silicon content correlated with the best mechanical and tribological properties of the presented Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films existed. With increasing the silicon content, the hardness, elastic modulus and the ratio H3/E2 first were improved gradually, and then were impaired sharply again. When the silicon content reached to 6 at.%, the film possessed the highest hardness, elastic modulus and ratio H3/E2 of approximately 24 GPa, 218 GPa and 0.31, respectively. Besides, films containing both 6 at.% and 10 at.% Si contents obtained a relatively low friction coefficient and a good adhesive strength. The wear rate decreased with an increase in hardness, with the highest hardness corresponding to a wear rate around 1.3 × 10-5 mm3/(N m) of the film with 6 at.% Si content. The correlations between hardness and tribological properties for the films were also examined. The essence of above phenomena was attributed to the variations of microstructure and morphologies in the films induced by the increasing silicon content.

  20. The electrical, elemental, optical, and surface properties of Si-doped ZnO thin films prepared by thermionic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza; Özen, Soner; Yudar, Hafizittin Hakan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the properties of Si-doped ZnO (SZO) thin films, which were prepared using the non-reactive thermionic vacuum arc technique. The analysis of the elemental, optical, and surface properties of ZnO:Si thin films was carried out using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, UV–VIS spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The current–voltage measurement was employed in order to study the electrical properties of the films. The effect of Si doping on the physical properties of ZnO films was investigated. The film thicknesses were measured as 55 and 35 nm for glass and PET substrates, respectively. It was clearly observed from the x-ray diffraction results that the Si and ZnO peaks were present in the coated SZO films for all samples. The morphological studies showed that the deposited surfaces are homogenous, dense, and have a uniform surface, with the existence of some cracks only on the glass substrate. The elemental composition has confirmed the existence of Zn, Si, and O elements within the prepared films. Using a UV–VIS spectrophotometer, the optical parameters such as transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, and reflectance were calculated. It should be noted that the transparency and refractive indices obtained from the measurements decrease with increasing Si concentration. The obtained optical bandgap values using transmittance spectra were determined to be 3.74 and 3.84 eV for the glass and PET substrates, respectively. An increase in the bandgap results demonstrates that the Si doping concentration is comparable to the pure ZnO thin films. The current versus voltage curves revealed the ohmic nature of the films. Subsequently, the development and fabrication of excellent transparent conducting electrodes enabled the appropriate use of Si-doped ZnO thin films.

  1. Structural, mechanical, electrical and wetting properties of ZrNx films deposited by Ar/N2 vacuum arc discharge: Effect of nitrogen partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, B.; Naddaf, M.; A-Kharroub, M.

    2013-03-01

    Non-stiochiometric zirconium nitride (ZrNx) thin films have been deposited on silicon substrates by vacuum arc discharge of (N2 + Ar) gas mixtures at different N2 partial pressure ratio. The microstructure, mechanical, electrical and wetting properties of these films are studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford back scattering (RBS) technique, conventional micro-hardness testing, electrical resistivity, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle (CA) measurements. RBS results and analysis show that the (N/Zr) ratio in the film increases with increasing the N2 partial pressure. A ZrNx film with (Zr/N) ratio in the vicinity of stoichiometric ZrN is obtained at N2 partial pressure of 10%. XRD and Raman results indicate that all deposited films have strained cubic crystal phase of ZrN, regardless of the N2 partial pressure. On increasing the N2 partial pressure, the relative intensity of (1 1 1) orientation with respect to (2 0 0) orientation is seen to decrease. The effect of N2 partial pressure on micro-hardness and the resistivity of the deposited film is revealed and correlated to the alteration of grain size, crystallographic texture, stoichiometry and residual stress developed in the film. In particular, it is found that residual stress and nitrogen incorporation in the film play crucial role in the alteration of micro-hardness and resistivity respectively. In addition, CA and AFM results demonstrate that as N2 partial pressure increases, both the surface hydrophobicity and roughness of the deposited film increase, leading to a significant decrease in the film surface free energy (SFE).

  2. The Use of Photon Beams of a Flattening Filter-free Linear Accelerator for Hypofractionated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R.; Lang, Stephanie; Hrbacek, Jan; Glanzmann, Christoph; Kloeck, Stephan; Najafi, Yousef; Streller, Tino; Studer, Gabriela; Zaugg, Kathrin; Luetolf, Urs M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential usage of flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning was performed for 7 patients using TrueBeam{sup Registered-Sign} linear accelerator and photon beams with (X6, X10) and without (X6FFF, X10FFF) flattening filter. Prescribed dose was 19 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy = 57 Gy. One or two 360 Degree-Sign arcs with dose rate of 600 MU/min for flattened beams, and 1,200 MU/min for FFF beams were used. Results: No difference was detected between the four beams in PTV coverage, conformity, and homogeneity. Mean body dose and body volume receiving 50% of the prescribed dose decreased with increasing mean energy (r{sup 2} = 0.8275, p < 0.01). X6FFF delivered 3.6% more dose compared with the X6 (p < 0.01). X10FFF delivered 3.0% (p < 0.01), and the X10 5.8% (p < 0.01) less mean body dose compared with X6. There was a significant increase in the mean dose to the rectum for the X10 compared with X6 (2.6%, p < 0.01). Mean dose to the bladder increased by 1.3% for X6FFF and decreased by 2.3% for X10FFF. Using a single arc and FFF, treatment time was reduced by 35% (2 SD = 10%). Conclusion: FFF beams resulted in dose distributions similar to flattened beams. X10FFF beam provided the best solution, sparing rectum and bladder and minimizing whole-body dose. FFF beams lead to a time efficient treatment delivery, particularly when combined with hypofractionated VMAT.

  3. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  4. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  5. Influence of deposition temperature and bias voltage on the crystalline phase of Er 2O 3 thin films deposited by filtered cathodic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelhelm, Christoph; Pickert, Thomas; Koch, Freimut; Balden, Martin; Jahn, Stephan; Rinke, Monika; Maier, Hans

    2011-10-01

    Er 2O 3 thin films on Eurofer steel substrates were produced by a filtered cathodic arc device, varying the substrate temperature (RT - 700 °C) and sample bias (0 to -450 V). The crystallographic phase was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Deposition at ⩾600 °C without bias lead to solely formation of the cubic Er 2O 3 phase. Thin films of the uncommon, monoclinic B-phase were prepared with a negative bias voltage of ⩾100 V at RT, and at temperatures ⩽500 °C for -250 V bias. The B-phase films exhibit a strongly textured film structure. Residual stress measurements show high compressive stress for B-phase films deposited at RT.

  6. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF) beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Methods Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc). We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments). Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. Results All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Conclusions Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes. PMID:23216821

  7. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Filippo; Fogliata, Antonella; Clerici, Elena; Navarria, Pierina; Tozzi, Angelo; Comito, Tiziana; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Clivio, Alessandro; Lobefalo, Francesca; Reggiori, Giacomo; Cozzi, Luca; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Scorsetti, Marta

    2012-12-05

    SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF) beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeam(TM) treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc). We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments). Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes.

  8. Chemical characterization of dust particles recovered from bag filters of electric arc furnaces for steelmaking: some factors influencing the formation of hexachlorobenzene.

    PubMed

    Tsubouchi, Naoto; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohtaka, Noriaki; Ohtsuka, Yasuo

    2010-11-15

    To make clear some factors controlling the formation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in the process of electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking, six dust samples recovered from different bag filters in commercial EAF steelmaking plants have been characterized with XRD, SEM-EPMA, XPS and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. These dust samples contain 1.9-8.0 mass% of chlorine element, and the XPS and TPD measurements exhibit that the Cl is enriched at the dust surface and composed of the inorganic and organic functionalities, part of the Cl being evolved as HCl in the temperature region of flue gas treatment. All of the samples also include 2.1-6.4 mass% of carbon element, and some of the C can release CO(2) in the TPD up to 300°C to form active carbon sites. The number is related closely to HCB concentration of each dust. Further, it is suggested that the Zn present in the samples consists of ZnFe(2)O(4), ZnO and surface ZnCO(3), and the dust with a larger content of the ZnCO(3) has a higher concentration of HCB. It is possible that HCB formation occurs via gas-solid-solid interactions among gaseous Cl-containing compounds in flue gas, active carbon sites and surface Zn-species produced in exhaust ducts and bag filters.

  9. Vacuum Melting of Refractory Metals and Alloys in Lining Furnaces (Chapter VI),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Melting, *Refractory metals, *Refractory metal alloys, Vacuum furnaces, Linings, Electric arcs, Crucibles, Titanium alloys, Safety, Arc melting, Electron beam melting , Plasmas(Physics), Heating, Translations, USSR

  10. Continuous calibration of a vacuum ultraviolet system from 65 to 125 nm by a cascade arc and comparison with the calibrated line radiation of a hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Frost, R M; Awakowicz, P

    1997-03-20

    A high-power stationary helium cascade arc has been developed as a standard source for continuum radiation in the VUV spectral range from 65 to 125 nm. The calibration of the VUV system response was based on the calculated and measured continuum radiation of a 2-mmphi pure He arc. Diagnostics of the arc plasma in partial thermal equilibrium yielded the electron density and the temperature that were inserted in the calculations of the continuous radiation. The results were compared with the helium, argon, and krypton radiation lines of a high-current hollow cathode lamp. This lamp was built according to the construction drawings of a hollow cathode, which was calibrated by means of the electron synchrotron radiation at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin.

  11. Charge-State-Resolved Ion Energy Distribution Functions ofCathodic Vacuum Arcs: A Study Involving the Plasma Potential and BiasedPlasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim

    2006-03-09

    There are divergent results in the literature on the(in)dependence of the ion velocity distribution functions on the ioncharge states. Apparently, most time-of-flight methods of measurementsindicate independence whereas most measurements with electrostaticanalyzers state the opposite. It is shown here that this grouping iscoincidental with investigations of pulsed and continuous arcs. Allresults can be consolidated by taking ion-neutral interaction intoaccount, especially charge exchange collisions with the metal neutralsproduced by the arc itself. The velocity distribution functions areindependent of charge state when produced at cathode spots but becomecharge-state dependent when the plasma interacts withneutrals.

  12. SU-E-T-269: Quality Assurance of Spine Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Flattening Filter Free Beams Using Gafchromic EBT3 Films

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y; Cho, B; Kwak, J; Ahn, S; Choi, E; Kim, J; Song, S; Yoon, S; Kim, Y; Kim, S; Park, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We implemented the Gafchromic film-based patient specific QA of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening-filter free (FFF) beams for spine metastases and validated the accuracy of fast arc delivery. Methods: EBT3 films and a homemade cylindrical QA phantom were employed for dosimetric verification of VMATs. For 14 FFF VMAT plans (10 with 10-MV FFF beams and 4 with 6-MV FFF beams), the doses were recalculated on the phantom and delivered by a TrueBeam STx accelerator equipped with a high-definition 120 leaf MLC. The EBT3 films were scanned using an Epson 10000XL scanner through the FilmQA Pro software. All the irradiated film images were converted to dose map using a calibration response curve. The resulting dose map of film measurement was compared with treatment plan and evaluated using gamma analysis with dose tolerance of 2% within 2 mm. In addition, the point-dose measurement in the phantom using an ion chamber was evaluated as a reference in a ratio of measured and planned doses. Results: The gamma pass rates averaged over all FFF plans for composite-field measurements were 96.0 ± 3.6% (88.9%–99.5%). When adopting a tolerance level of 3% - 3 mm, the gamma pass rates were improved with the ranges from 98% to 100%. In addition, dose profiles and dose distributions showed that spinal cord was protected by the rapid dose fall-off and by delivering the treatment with high precision. In point-dose measurements, the average differences between the measured and planned doses were 0.5% ± 1.0% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that Gafchromic EBT3 film would be an effective patient-specific QA tool, especially for VMAT of spine SBRT with treatment of small fields and highly gradient dose distributions. The results of film QA verified that the dosimetric accuracy of spine SBRT utilizing RapidArc with FFF beams in our institution is reliable.

  13. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  14. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  15. Effect of C2H2 flow rate on microstructure and properties of nc-Cu/a-C:H nanocomposite films prepared by filtered cathodic vaccum arc technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiqiang; Chen, Yiming; Liao, Bin; Wu, Xianying; Zhang, Huixing; Zhang, Xu

    2013-07-01

    Nc-Cu/a-C:H nanocomposite films are deposited by filtered cathodic vaccum arc (FCVA) technique using C2H2 as the precursor. The effects of C2H2 flow rate on the microstructure, composition and properties of nc-Cu/a-C:H films have been studied by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and nanoindentation test. In these films, copper nanoparticles (3.5-15 nm) are embedded in the amorphous carbon matrix, which could be confirmed by XRD analysis. Raman spectroscopy and XPS results confirm the decrease of sp3 content with the increasing copper fraction, which could be a result of more severe thermalization on carbon matrix owing to the presence of copper. The compressive stresses of these films, calculated by Stoney's equation, are found to be as low as 0.5 Gpa, declining with the increasing copper content. Nanoindentation measurements reveal that the film hardness falls monotonically as the Cu content in the films increases.

  16. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy With Flattening Filter-Free Beams Compared With Static Gantry IMRT and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore; Banerjee, Sushovan; Chaudhary, Suresh; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Munshi, Anusheel; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Mancosu, Pietro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: A feasibility study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), and the potential benefit of flattening filter-free beams, on advanced esophageal cancer against intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT with three to seven and five to seven fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with avoidance sectors to spare the lungs for 10 patients. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. The RA plans were studied for conventional and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. The objectives for the planning target volume were the volume receiving {>=}95% or at most 107% of the prescribed dose of <1% with a dose prescription of 59.4 Gy. For the organs at risk, the lung volume (minus the planning target volume) receiving {>=}5 Gy was <60%, that receiving 20 Gy was <20%-30%, and the mean lung dose was <15.0 Gy. The heart volume receiving 45 Gy was <20%, volume receiving 30 Gy was <50%. The spinal dose received by 1% was <45 Gy. The technical delivery parameters for RA were assessed to compare the normal and FFF beam characteristics. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity, slightly superior to 3D-CRT. The conformity index was 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT and 1.5 {+-} 0.2 for 3D-CRT. The mean lung dose was 12.2 {+-} 4.5 for IMRT, 11.3 {+-} 4.6 for RA, and 10.8 {+-} 4.4 for RA with FFF beams, 18.2 {+-} 8.5 for 3D-CRT. The percentage of volume receiving {>=}20 Gy ranged from 23.6% {+-} 9.1% to 21.1% {+-} 9.7% for IMRT and RA (FFF beams) and 39.2% {+-} 17.0% for 3D-CRT. The heart and spine objectives were met by all techniques. The monitor units for IMRT and RA were 457 {+-} 139, 322 {+-} 20, and 387 {+-} 40, respectively. RA with FFF beams showed, compared with RA with normal beams, a {approx}20% increase in monitor units per Gray, a 90% increase in the average dose rate, and 20% reduction in beam on time (owing to different

  17. SU-E-T-216: Comparison of Volumetrically Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Using Flattening Filter Free Beams Vs. Flattened Beams for Partial Brain Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Roa, D; Hanna, N; Sehgal, V; Farol, H; Kuo, J; Daroui, P; Ramsinghani, N; Al-Ghazi, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams offer the potential for higher dose rates, short treatment time, and lower out of field dose. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects and out of field dose of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plans using FFF vs Flattening Filtering (FF) beams for partial brain irradiation. Methods: Ten brain patients treated with a 6FF beam from a Truebeam STX were analyzed retrospectively for this study. These plans (46Gy at 2 Gy per fraction) were re-optimized for 6FFF beams using the same dose constraints as the original plans. PTV coverage, PTV Dmax, total MUs, and mean dose to organs-at-risk (OAR) were evaluated. In addition, the out-of-field dose for 6FF and 6FFF plans for one patient was measured on an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were placed inside (central axis) and outside (surface) the phantom at distances ranging from 0.5 cm to 17 cm from the field edge. Paired T-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: PTV coverage and PTV Dmax were comparable for the FF and FFF plans with 95.9% versus 95.6% and 111.2% versus 111.9%, respectively. Mean dose to the OARs were 3.7% less for FFF than FF plans (p<0.0001). Total MUs were, on average, 12.5% greater for FFF than FF plans with 481±55 MU (FFF) versus 429±50 MU (FF), p=0.0003. On average, the measured out of field dose was 24% less for FFF compared to FF, p<0.0001. A similar beam-on time was observed for the FFF and FF treatment. Conclusion: It is beneficial to use 6FFF beams for regular fractionated brain VMAT treatments. VMAT treatment plans using FFF beams can achieve comparable PTV coverage but with more OAR sparing. The out of field dose is significant less with mean reduction of 24%.

  18. Welding space vacuum technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to assist the EH 42 Division in putting together a vacuum system that could attain the desired pressure and be large enough to accommodate the gas-metal arc (GMA) welding fixture apparatus. A major accomplishment was the design and fabrication of the controller/annunciator for the 4' by 8' system. It contains many safety features such as thermocouple set point relays that will only allow inlet and exit gas and vacuum valves to be operated at pre-selected system pressures, and a fail safe mode for power interruptions and operator mistakes. It is felt that significant progress was made in this research effort to weld in a vacuum environment. With continued efforts to increase the pump speeds for vacuum chambers and further studies on weld fixtures and gas inlet pressures, the NASA program will be successful.

  19. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  20. Review of switching arcs and plasma chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenson, D. M.; Gilmour, A. S., Jr.; Dollinger, R. E.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Pfender, E.; Warder, R. C., Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Physical processes in switching arcs are considered in such applications as circuit interruption (in high pressure, high voltage gas blast circuit breakers and vacuum arc interrupters), fault current limiting (principally through vacuum arc devices), and pulse power systems (using vacuum arcs). The physics of arc heaters, associated with processes in the anode region, are described. Analytical models of (1) the current zero region and interrupter performance of gas blast interrupters and (2) the heat transfer mechanisms in the anode region of arc heaters, are discussed. Selected diagnostic techniques are presented. Applications of plasma chemistry involving the high pressure, equilibrium (thermal) plasma are noted. Low pressure (nonequilibrium) plasma processing is described through mechanisms associated with coating, deposition, and etching applications.

  1. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 06: Dosimetric Comparison of 3D Conformai, Flattened and Flattening Filter-Free TrueBeam RapidArc Planning for Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Runqing; Zhan, Lixin; Osei, Ernest

    2014-08-15

    The major advantages of the VMAT SBRT plans compared to the conventional 3D conformai plan include faster delivery and improved target dose conformity. This study quantifies the dosimetric differences among 3D conformai plan; flattened beam and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam RapidArc Plans for lung SBRT. Five early stage lung cancer patients with various tumor positions and sizes previously treated with 3D non-coplanar SBRT were randomly selected. 4DCT was used for each patient to determine the internal target volume. Abdominal compression was applied to minimize respiratory motion for SBRT patients. For treatment planning, a 5 mm margin was given to the ITV to generate a planning target volume. The prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions and normalized to 95% of the PTV. Organs at risk (OAR) included spinal cord, esophagus, heart, trachea, bilateral lung, and great vessels. Optimization constraints were set to meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. All VMAT plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using two full arcs in Eclipse treatment planning system. The RapidArc SBRT plans with flattened 6MV beam and 6MV FFF beam were generated and dosimetric results were compared with the previous treated 3D non-coplanar plans. RapidArc plans demonstrated better conformity to target, sharper dose fall-off in normal tissues and lower dose to normal lung and other OARs than the 3D conformai plans. RapidArc SBRT for FFF beam showed comparable target conformity, adequate tumor dose, and clinically acceptable DVHs of OARs to flattened beams and significantly reduced treatment delivery time.

  2. Diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications: Tribological behaviors of vacuum arc diamond-like carbon-coated titanium alloy against medical-grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianzong

    An extensive and detailed investigation of tribological behaviors of vacuum arc carbon coated Ti6Al4V against medical grade ultra high molecular weight polyethylene were conducted in this work in order to investigate the potential use of diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications. Further, the gas plasma sterilization and surface modification technique were evaluated as an alternative to the currently used gamma-radiation technique which has previously shown degradation effects on the mechanical properties of the UHMWPE. In addition, an emerging polymer surface modification technique using high-energy ion-implantation is explored to modify the surface of the UHMWPE for improved wear performance. The experiments were performed using a standard pin-on-disk wear tester under both dry and distilled water lubricated condition. The evolution of friction and wear processes are interpreted in the context of in situ recorded coefficient of friction and microscopic images of worn surfaces. Sliding wear tests demonstrated the existence of two distinct friction and wear regimes which comprise physically different dominant mechanisms: an adhesive and abrasive mechanism activated early in the run-in stage, followed by fatigue processes which developed later microscopically in the (quasi) steady-state sliding stage. The effects of surface roughness, distilled water lubricant, coating structure, polymer sterilization and surface modification on the tribological behaviors are presented and discussed in light of these results. Explanations based on theories of sliding contact stress fields, temperature profiles, as well as lubrication and coating fracture mechanics are presented to discuss and support the experimental results. It is revealed that, largely depending on material structures and surface roughness of both articulating components, significantly improved friction and wear performance can be achieved by optimal design of their process

  3. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free (FFF) beams for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with medically inoperable early stage non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Mancosu, Pietro; Alongi, Filippo; Clerici, Elena; Tozzi, Angelo; Iftode, Cristina; Reggiori, Giacomo; Tomatis, Stefano; Infante, Maurizio; Alloisio, Marco; Testori, Alberto; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca; Morenghi, Emanuela; Scorsetti, Marta

    2013-06-01

    To assess the impact of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening filter free (FFF) beams for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in inoperable stage I NSCLC. Current data were compared against a cohort of patients previously treated with advanced conformal techniques (3DCRT) based on conformal arcs. From July 2006 to December 2011 132 patients underwent SBRT, 86 by 3DCRT with flattened beams (FF), while the last 46 with VMAT RapidArc and unflattened beams (FFF). All patients were treated with 48 Gy in four fractions of 12 Gy each. Patients underwent follow-up. Clinical outcome was evaluated with thoracic and abdominal CT scan and 18FDG-CTPET before and after treatment. Both techniques achieved adequate dose conformity to the target but with a statistically significant reduction of ipsilateral lung doses in RapidArc plans and also of Beam-on-Time (BOT) with FFF mode. The median follow up was 16 months (range 2-24 months). At 1 year, local control rate was 100% with FFF beams compared with 92.5% with FF beams (p=0.03). SBRT with FFF beams permitted us a safe delivery of high dose per fraction in a short treatment time and resulted in an earlier radiological response compared with FF beams. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metal vapor arc switch electromagnetic accelerator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongeau, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A multielectrode device housed in an insulator vacuum vessel, the metal vapor vacuum switch has high power capability and can hold off voltages up to the 100 kilovolt level. Such switches can be electronically triggered and can interrupt or commutate at a zero current crossing. The physics of arc initiation, arc conduction, and interruption are examined, including material considerations; inefficiencies; arc modes; magnetic field effects; passive and forced extinction; and voltage recovery. Heating, electrode lifetime, device configuration, and external circuit configuration are discussed. The metal vapor vacuum switch is compared with SCRs, GTOs, spark gaps, ignitrons, and mechanical breakers.

  5. Effect of deposition parameters on the photocatalytic activity and bioactivity of TiO2 thin films deposited by vacuum arc on Ti-6Al-4V substrates.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Mirjam; Welch, Ken; Astrand, Maria; Engqvist, Håkan; Strømme, Maria

    2012-05-01

    This article evaluates the influence of the main parameters in a cathodic arc deposition process on the microstructure of titanium dioxide thin coatings and correlates these to the photocatalytic activity (PCA) and in vitro bioactivity of the coatings. Bioactivity of all as deposited coatings was confirmed by the growth of uniform layers of hydroxyapatite (HA) after 7 days in phosphate buffered saline at 37°C. Comparison of the HA growth after 24 h indicated enhanced HA formation on coatings with small titanium dioxide grains of rutile and anatase phase. The results from the PCA studies showed that coatings containing a mixed microstructure of both anatase and rutile phases, with small grain sizes in the range of 26-30 nm and with a coating thickness of about 250 nm, exhibited enhanced activity as compared with other microstructures and higher coating thickness. The results of this study should be valuable for the development of new bioactive implant coatings with photocatalytically induced on-demand antibacterial properties. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Characterization, mechanical, and corrosion properties of chromium carbide films by using a 90° bend magnetic filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Chun-Chun; Chen, Ya-Chyi; Shieu, Fuh-Sheng; Shih, Han C.

    2016-09-01

    The 90° bend magnetic FCVA that equipped with the target of Cr (99.95%) and C2H2/Ar gas mixture deposited a high quality of chromium carbide films on the AISI D2 steel and Si wafer. The FCVA has been employed to eliminate the macroparticles during the film deposition. Various deposition temperatures of ambient temperature, 300, and 500° and negative substrate bias voltages ranging from -50 to -550V were applied. The microstructure of chromium carbide films was investigated by GIXRD and HRTEM. The atomic concentrations of C and Cr were measured by AES. The chemical bonding was elucidated by XPS, showing that the total C-Cr bond contents increased with increasing deposition temperature. As the substrate bias voltage increased from -50 to -550V, the phase transformed from amorphous to crystalline Cr3C2. The mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindetation, nanoscratch, and scratch test. The surface roughness decreased from 2.05 to 0.34nm and the friction coefficient decreased from 0.28(amorphous) to 0.22(crystalline) as the substrate bias voltage increased from -50 to -550V. The corrosion resistance showed that the Cr3C2 coated steel had the noticeable increasing with the negative bias voltage up to -550V, and the pitting corrosion did not appear on the Cr3C2 coated steel.

  7. Critical appraisal of RapidArc radiosurgery with flattening filter free photon beams for benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife: a treatment planning study.

    PubMed

    Abacioglu, Ufuk; Ozen, Zeynep; Yilmaz, Meltem; Arifoglu, Alptekin; Gunhan, Basri; Kayalilar, Namik; Peker, Selcuk; Sengoz, Meric; Gurdalli, Salih; Cozzi, Luca

    2014-05-21

    To evaluate the role of RapidArc (RA) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife (GK) based technique. Twelve patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS, n = 6) or cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM, n = 6) were planned for both SRS using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RA. 104 MV flattening filter free photon beams with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min were selected. Data were compared against plans optimised for GK. A single dose of 12.5 Gy was prescribed. The primary objective was to assess treatment plan quality. Secondary aim was to appraise treatment efficiency. For VS, comparing best GK vs. RA plans, homogeneity was 51.7 ± 3.5 vs. 6.4 ± 1.5%; Paddick conformity Index (PCI) resulted 0.81 ± 0.03 vs. 0.84 ± 0.04. Gradient index (PGI) was 2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.8 ± 0.6. Mean target dose was 17.1 ± 0.9 vs. 12.9 ± 0.1 Gy. For the brain stem, D(1cm3) was 5.1 ± 2.0 Gy vs 4.8 ± 1.6 Gy. For the ipsilateral cochlea, D(0.1cm3) was 1.7 ± 1.0 Gy vs. 1.8 ± 0.5 Gy. For CSM, homogeneity was 52.3 ± 2.4 vs. 12.4 ± 0.6; PCI: 0.86 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.05; PGI: 2.6 ± 0.1 vs. 3.8 ± 0.5; D(1cm3) to brain stem was 5.4 ± 2.8 Gy vs. 5.2 ± 2.8 Gy; D(0.1cm3) to ipsi-lateral optic nerve was 4.2 ± 2.1 vs. 2.1 ± 1.5 Gy; D(0.1cm3) to optic chiasm was 5.9 ± 3.1 vs. 4.5 ± 2.1 Gy. Treatment time was 53.7 ± 5.8 (64.9 ± 24.3) minutes for GK and 4.8 ± 1.3 (5.0 ± 0.7) minutes for RA for schwannomas (meningiomas). SRS with RA and FFF beams revealed to be adequate and comparable to GK in terms of target coverage, homogeneity, organs at risk sparing with some gain in terms of treatment efficiency.

  8. Critical appraisal of RapidArc radiosurgery with flattening filter free photon beams for benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife: a treatment planning study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of RapidArc (RA) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife (GK) based technique. Methods Twelve patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS, n = 6) or cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM, n = 6) were planned for both SRS using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RA. 104 MV flattening filter free photon beams with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min were selected. Data were compared against plans optimised for GK. A single dose of 12.5 Gy was prescribed. The primary objective was to assess treatment plan quality. Secondary aim was to appraise treatment efficiency. Results For VS, comparing best GK vs. RA plans, homogeneity was 51.7 ± 3.5 vs. 6.4 ± 1.5%; Paddick conformity Index (PCI) resulted 0.81 ± 0.03 vs. 0.84 ± 0.04. Gradient index (PGI) was 2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.8 ± 0.6. Mean target dose was 17.1 ± 0.9 vs. 12.9 ± 0.1 Gy. For the brain stem, D1cm3 was 5.1 ± 2.0 Gy vs 4.8 ± 1.6 Gy. For the ipsilateral cochlea, D0.1cm3 was 1.7 ± 1.0 Gy vs. 1.8 ± 0.5 Gy. For CSM, homogeneity was 52.3 ± 2.4 vs. 12.4 ± 0.6; PCI: 0.86 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.05; PGI: 2.6 ± 0.1 vs. 3.8 ± 0.5; D1cm3 to brain stem was 5.4 ± 2.8 Gy vs. 5.2 ± 2.8 Gy; D0.1cm3 to ipsi-lateral optic nerve was 4.2 ± 2.1 vs. 2.1 ± 1.5 Gy; D0.1cm3 to optic chiasm was 5.9 ± 3.1 vs. 4.5 ± 2.1 Gy. Treatment time was 53.7 ± 5.8 (64.9 ± 24.3) minutes for GK and 4.8 ± 1.3 (5.0 ± 0.7) minutes for RA for schwannomas (meningiomas). Conclusions SRS with RA and FFF beams revealed to be adequate and comparable to GK in terms of target coverage, homogeneity, organs at risk sparing with some gain in terms of treatment efficiency. PMID:24884967

  9. XVIIth international symposium on discharges and electrical insulation in vacuum. Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This is the proceedings of the XVIIth International Symposium on Discharges and Electrical Insulation in Vacuum, held in Berkeley, CA, July 21-26, 1996. Papers were presented in the following areas: vacuum breakdown and prebreakdown phenomena; vacuum arcs; switching in vacuum; surface flashover; vacuum insulation including magnetic insulation, accelerators, and others; high current diodes, intense particle beams, and vacuum arc ion sources; discharges in the space environment; arcing in controlled fusion devices; emission processes and electrode phenomena; cathodic arc deposition; pseudospark discharges; industrial applications. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for some articles from this proceedings.

  10. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (<1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (<11°), allowing large areas of reciprocal space to be imaged with a 2D detector. The system has been designed for use on the 1-tonne, ultra-high load, high-resolution hexapod at the P07 High Energy Materials Science beamline at PETRA III at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. The deposition system includes standard features of a typical UHV deposition system plus a range of special features suited for synchrotron radiation studies and industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  11. Characteristics of a SAR arc registered by the EMO-5 filter and the spatial-scanning photometric system aboard the IC Bulgaria 1300 satellite on August 21, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeva, P.; Guineva, V.; Spasov, St.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents the behaviour of a SAR arc registered by the two channels of the EMO - 5 spectrometer aboard the IC Bulgaria 1300 satellite on August 21, 1981. For the first time data from the measurements of the spatial-scanning channel of this photometric system have been processed and used. The spatial structure of the SAR arc is investigated. It has been specified that the SAR arc is accompanied by an unhomogeneous flux of suprathermal electrons directed downward the magnetic field lines and by an increase of the electron temperature Te.

  12. Filter service system

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Cheryl L.; Nordyke, Daniel S.; Crandell, Richard A.; Tomlins, Gregory; Fei, Dong; Panov, Alexander; Lane, William H.; Habeger, Craig F.

    2008-12-09

    According to an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure, a system for removing matter from a filtering device includes a gas pressurization assembly. An element of the assembly is removably attachable to a first orifice of the filtering device. The system also includes a vacuum source fluidly connected to a second orifice of the filtering device.

  13. HEPA filter encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    Gates-Anderson, Dianne D.; Kidd, Scott D.; Bowers, John S.; Attebery, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    A low viscosity resin is delivered into a spent HEPA filter or other waste. The resin is introduced into the filter or other waste using a vacuum to assist in the mass transfer of the resin through the filter media or other waste.

  14. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOEpatents

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  15. Evaluation of an aSi-EPID with flattening filter free beams: applicability to the GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and first experience for pretreatment QA of RapidArc.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, G; Clivio, A; Vanetti, E; Krauss, H; Fenoglietto, P; Cozzi, L; Fogliata, A

    2013-11-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of portal dosimetry with an amorphous silicon mega voltage imager for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams by means of the GLAaS methodology and to validate it for pretreatment quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc). The GLAaS algorithm, developed for flattened beams, was applied to FFF beams of nominal energy of 6 and 10 MV generated by a Varian TrueBeam (TB). The amorphous silicon electronic portal imager [named mega voltage imager (MVI) on TB] was used to generate integrated images that were converted into matrices of absorbed dose to water. To enable GLAaS use under the increased dose-per-pulse and dose-rate conditions of the FFF beams, new operational source-detector-distance (SDD) was identified to solve detector saturation issues. Empirical corrections were defined to account for the shape of the profiles of the FFF beams to expand the original methodology of beam profile and arm backscattering correction. GLAaS for FFF beams was validated on pretreatment verification of RapidArc plans for three different TB linacs. In addition, the first pretreatment results from clinical experience on 74 arcs were reported in terms of γ analysis. MVI saturates at 100 cm SDD for FFF beams but this can be avoided if images are acquired at 150 cm for all nominal dose rates of FFF beams. Rotational stability of the gantry-imager system was tested and resulted in a minimal apparent imager displacement during rotation of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm at SDD = 150 cm. The accuracy of this approach was tested with three different Varian TrueBeam linacs from different institutes. Data were stratified per energy and machine and showed no dependence with beam quality and MLC model. The results from clinical pretreatment quality assurance, provided a gamma agreement index (GAI) in the field area for six and ten FFF beams of (99.8 ± 0.3)% and (99.5 ± 0.6)% with distance to agreement and dose difference criteria set to 3 mm/3% with 2 mm/2

  16. Vacuum arc ion source development at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Emig, H.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Ion beams produced by the Mevva ion source are well suited for the injection into a synchrotron accelerator due to the low repetition rate (0.2 ... 5 Hz, the higher repetition rate is for the optimization of the linear accelerator only) and the short pulse length (up to 0.5ms). From the beginning of the authors experience with the Mevva ion source at GSI they tried to improve the reliability of pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and to minimize the noise on the extracted ion beam. For accelerator application this is highly necessary, otherwise the accelerator tuning and optimization becomes very difficult or even impossible. Already the beam transport becomes difficult for a noisy beam, because space charge compensation can be destroyed (at least partially). Furthermore a noisy dc-beam results in some rf-buckets which might be even empty.

  17. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  18. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  19. Evaluation of pyrolysis and arc tracking on candidate wire insulation designs for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Hrovat, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    The ability of wire insulation materials and constructions to resist arc tracking was determined and the damage caused by initial arcing and restrike events was assessed. Results of arc tracking tests on various insulation constructions are presented in view-graph format. Arc tracking tests conducted on Champlain, Filotex, and Teledyne Thermatics indicate the Filotex is least likely to arc track. Arc tracking occurs more readily in air than it does in vacuum.

  20. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  1. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  2. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  3. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  4. Gravitational vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L. S.; Saakyan, G. S.

    1984-09-01

    The existence of a special gravitational vacuum is considered in this paper. A phenomenological method differing from the traditional Einsteinian formalization is utilized. Vacuum, metric and matter form a complex determined by field equations and at great distances from gravitational masses vacuum effects are small but could be large in powerful fields. Singularities and black holes justify the approach as well as the Ambartsmyan theory concerning the existence of supermassive and superdense prestallar bodies that then disintegrate. A theory for these superdense bodies is developed involving gravitational field equations that describe the vacuum by an energy momentum tensor and define the field and mass distribution. Computations based on the theory for gravitational radii with incompressible liquid models adequately reflecting real conditions indicate that a gravitational vacuum could have considerable effects on superdense stars and could have radical effects for very large masses.

  5. Electrical Strength of Multilayer Vacuum Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Caporaso, G J

    2008-07-01

    The electrical strength of vacuum insulators is a key constraint in the design of particle accelerators and pulsed power systems. Vacuum insulating structures assembled from alternating layers of metal and dielectric can result in improved performance compared to conventional insulators, but previous attempts to optimize their design have yielded seemingly inconsistent results. Here, we present two models for the electrical strength of these structures, one assuming failure by vacuum arcing between adjacent metal layers and the other assuming failure by vacuum surface flashover. These models predict scaling laws which are in agreement with the experimental data currently available.

  6. Arc jet diagnostics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Two objectives were addressed during a 10 week 1988 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). These objectives were the evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species in an arc jet environment, and the determination of atomic recombination coefficients for reaction cured glass (RCG) coated high temperature surface insulation (HRSI) materials subjected to simulated reentry conditions. Evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species provided some of the first measurements of point compositions in arc jet tunnel environments. A major objective of this project centered around the sampling residence time. A three staged vacuum sampling system pulled the molecules and atoms from the arc jet to a quadrupole ionization mass spectrometer in 400 milliseconds. Conditions investigated included a composition survey across the nozzle exit at 3 cm z-distance from the nozzle exit for 3 different currents. Also, a point composition survey was taken around a shock created by the presence of a blunt body.

  7. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  8. High-quality Linac-based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with Flattening Filter Free Beams and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Low-Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer. A Mono-institutional Experience with 90 Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, G; Franzese, C; De Rose, F; Franceschini, D; Comito, T; Villa, E; Alongi, F; Liardo, R; Tomatis, S; Navarria, P; Mancosu, P; Reggiori, G; Cozzi, L; Scorsetti, M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy in patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer. Biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer patients were enrolled, provided that they had the following characteristics: initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 20 ng/ml, Gleason Score < 7, International Prostate Symptom Score < 7. The treatment schedule was 35 Gy in five fractions, delivered with volumetric modulated arcs with flattening filter free beams. Toxicity was recorded according to CTCAE criteria v4.0. Biochemical failure was calculated according to the Phoenix definition. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaire was used to record health-related quality of life. Between December 2011 and March 2015, 90 patients were enrolled (53 low risk, 37 intermediate risk). The median age was 71 years (range 48-82). In total, 58 (64.5%) of the patients had Gleason Score=6, the remaining had Gleason Score=7.The median initial PSA was 6.9 ng/ml (range 2.7-17.0). Acute toxicity was mild, with 32.2 patients presenting grade 1 urinary toxicity and 32.2% of patients presenting grade 2 urinary toxicity, mainly represented by urgency, dysuria and stranguria. Rectal grade 1 toxicity was found in 15.5% of patients, whereas grade 2 toxicity was recorded in 6.6% of patients. Regarding late toxicity, grade 1 proctitis was recorded in 11.1% of patients and grade 1 urinary in 38.8%; only two events of grade 2 urinary toxicity were observed (transient urethral stenosis, resolved by a 24 h catheterisation). At a median follow-up of 27 months (6-62 months) only two intermediate risk patients experienced a biochemical failure. Health-related quality of life revealed a slight worsening in all the domains during treatment, with a return to baseline 3 months after treatment. Stereotactic body radiotherapy delivered using linac-based flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy in low and

  9. The characteristics of primary and secondary arcs on a solar array in low earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liying; Fu, Linchun; Qiao, Ming; Cui, Bo; Chen, Qi; Lin, Junyi

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of the primary arc and secondary arc on a solar array in low earth orbit (LEO) are investigated. The vacuum plasma environment in LEO has been used to study the primary arc and secondary arc of a high-voltage solar array. Silicon solar cells with rigid substrate specimens are used for the experiment. The series-parallel spacing of the silicon solar cells is 1 mm. The string currents of the solar cells are 0.7 A, 1.5 A and 2 A. The primary arc and secondary arc are photographed by high-speed cameras. The differences between the primary arc and secondary arc are observed. The secondary arc can be observed before the primary arc is extinguished. The primary arc is a single arc when the string current is 0.7 A. Multiple arc columns are accompanied by higher arc current. Two arc columns of the primary arc can be observed at 1.5 A string current and 2 A string current. The multiple primary arc columns are related to higher bias voltage. The threshold for sustained arcing is near 145 V/0.7 A, 105 V/1.5 A and 100 V/2 A at 1 mm string gap. Moreover, the transition time of secondary arc formation is analyzed, and found to be about 10-13 μs. The string currents, string voltages and primary arc have no effect on the transition time of the secondary arc formation.

  10. Metrology in arc plasmas - A new cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croche, R.

    1980-02-01

    A new radiating source consisting of an electric arc under argon pressure is described, with power varying between about 0.2 and 1.5 kW, and with the plasma furnishing a continuous spectrum between 115 and 350 nm. The arc functions from 5 to 50 A, with a voltage varying between 30 and 35 V. The cathode of the transfer arc is described in detail, including such advantages as easy igniting of the arc and the possibility of re-sharpening the tip of the cathode. Most important, the new 'knife-shaped' form of the tungsten cathode has improved the stability and reproducibility of the ultraviolet continuum emitted by the plasma of the arc, which is used at the French National Institute of Metrology as a transfer standard of spectral radiance in the vacuum ultraviolet.

  11. Proceedings of the twenty sixth international symposium on discharges and electrical insulation in vacuum. V. 1

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    Vacuum science and technology has made vital contributions in high technology areas like space, high energy particle accelerators, plasma devices, pulse power, electronics, vacuum interrupters, thin films, melting and refining of metals/alloys, extraction and processing of advanced materials. Vacuum discharges, vacuum arc physics and technology and various applications towards vacuum interrupters, pulse power and particle accelerator are the main themes for this symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately.

  12. Proceedings of the twenty sixth international symposium on discharges and electrical insulation in vacuum. V. 2

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    Vacuum science and technology has made vital contributions in high technology areas like space, high energy particle accelerators, plasma devices, pulse power, electronics, vacuum interrupters, thin films, melting and refining of metals/alloys, extraction and processing of advanced materials. Vacuum discharges, vacuum arc physics and technology and various applications towards vacuum interrupters, pulse power and particle accelerator are the main themes for this symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately.

  13. SU-E-T-591: Optimizing the Flattening Filter Free Beam Selection in RapidArc-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize the flattening filter free (FFF) beam energy selection in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for stage I lung cancer with different fraction schemes. Methods: Twelve patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Plans were designed using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams with the most widely used fraction schemes of 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy, respectively. The plan quality was appraised in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity of the prescribed dose (CI100%), intermediate dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), organs at risk (OARs) sparing and beam-on time. Results: The 10XFFF beam predicted 1% higher maximum, mean dose to the PTV and 4–5% higher R50% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the three fraction schemes, whereas the CI100% and D2cm was similar. Most importantly, the 6XFFF beam exhibited 3–10% lower dose to all the OARs. However, the 10XFFF beam reduced the beam-on time by 31.9±7.2%, 38.7±2.8% and 43.6±4.0% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy schemes, respectively. Beam-on time was 2.2±0.2 vs 1.5±0.1, 3.3±0.9 vs 2.0±0.5 and 6.3±0.9 vs 3.5±0.4 minutes for the 6XFFF and 10XFFF one in the three fraction schemes. Conclusion: The 6XFFF beam obtains better OARs sparing in SBRT treatment for stage I lung cancer, but the 10XFFF one provides improved treatment efficiency. To balance the OARs sparing and intrafractional variation as a function of prolonged treatment time, the authors recommend to use the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy and 3*18 Gy schemes for better OARs sparing. However, for the 1*34 Gy scheme, the 10XFFF beam is recommended to achieve improved treatment efficiency.

  14. Initial Testing of Optical Arc Detector Inside 285/300 Fast Wave Antenna Box on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Diem, Stephanie J; Fehling, Dan T; Hillis, Donald Lee; Horton, Anthony R; Unterberg, E. A.; Nagy, A.; Pinsker, R.

    2013-01-01

    Locating arcs within the fast wave current drive system is necessary to improve antenna performance and coupling to the plasma. Previously, there had been no way to observe arcs inside the vacuum vessel in an ICRF antenna on DIII-D. A new diagnostic that uses photomultiplier tubes has been installed for the 2012 run campaign on the 285/300 antenna of the fast wave system. The diagnostic has top and bottom views of the back of the four antenna straps and uses narrow-bandpass visible filters to isolate emission lines of copper (577 nm) and deuterium (656.1 nm). This diagnostic is based on the ORNL filterscope system currently in use on multiple devices. The system will be used to guide fast wave antenna conditioning, plasma operation and provide insight into future antenna upgrades on DIII-D.

  15. Arc/gas electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A gas/arc electrode is disclosed for use under vacuum conditions where a first housing encloses a second housing, with an end of the second housing extending through an opening in the first housing and having an outlet orifice. Provisions are made for circulating a coolant through the first housing to surround and cool the second housing. An electrical current and a gas, such as argon, as passed through the second housing, with the current flowing through a narrow stream of the ionized gas flowing through the outlet orifice to a workpiece to be treated. The second housing forms a chamber which has a cross sectional area, in a plane perpendicular to the direction of gas flow, of at least ten times the cross sectional area of the outlet orifice such that a gas pressure can be maintained in the chamber to reduce erosion of the chamber walls.

  16. PLASMA WINDOW FOR VACUUM - ATMOSPHERE INTERFACE AND FOCUSING LENS OF SOURCES FOR NON-VACUUM MATERIAL MODIFICATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HERSHCOVITCH,A.

    1997-09-07

    Material modifications by ion implantation, dry etching, and micro-fabrication are widely used technologies, all of which are performed in vacuum, since ion beams at energies used in these applications are completely attenuated by foils or by long differentially pumped sections, which ate currently used to interface between vacuum and atmosphere. A novel plasma window, which utilizes a short arc for vacuum-atmosphere interface has been developed. This window provides for sufficient vacuum atmosphere separation, as well as for ion beam propagation through it, thus facilitating non-vacuum ion material modification.

  17. A treatment planning and delivery comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with or without flattening filter for gliomas, brain metastases, prostate, head/neck and early stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasic, Daniel; Ohlhues, Lars; Brodin, N Patrik; Fog, Lotte S; Pommer, Tobias; Bangsgaard, Jens P; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per

    2014-08-01

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are an emerging technology that has not yet been widely implemented as standard practice in radiotherapy centers. To facilitate the clinical implementation of FFF, we attempted to elucidate the difference in plan quality and treatment delivery time compared to flattening filter beams (i.e. standard, STD) for several patient groups. We hypothesize that the treatment plan quality is comparable while the treatment delivery time of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is considerably shorter using FFF beams, especially for stereotactic treatments. A total of 120 patients treated for head and neck (H&N) tumors, high-grade glioma, prostate cancer, early stage lung cancer and intra-cranial metastatic disease (both single and multiple metastases) were included in the study. For each cohort, 20 consecutive patients were selected. The plans were generated using STD- and FFF-VMAT for both 6 MV and 10 MV, and were compared with respect to plan quality, monitor units and delivery time using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. For H&N and high-grade gliomas, there was a significant difference in homogeneity index in favor for STD-VMAT (p < 0.001). For the stereotactic sites there were no differences in plan conformity. Stereotactic FFF-VMAT plans required significantly shorter delivery time compared to STD-VMAT plans (p < 0.001) for higher dose per fraction, on average 54.5% for 6 MV and 71.4% for 10 MV. FFF-VMAT generally required a higher number of MU/Gy (p < 0.001), on average 7.0% for 6 MV and 8.4% for 10 MV. It was generally possible to produce FFF-VMAT plans with the same target dose coverage and doses to organs at risk as STD-VMAT plans. Target dose homogeneity tended to be somewhat inferior for FFF-VMAT for the larger targets investigated. For stereotactic radiotherapy, FFF-VMAT resulted in a considerable time gain while maintaining similar plan quality compared to STD beams.

  18. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  19. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1984-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occassionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  20. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1985-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occasionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  1. Comparison of Arc Tracking Tests in Various Aerospace Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Hammoud, Ahmad; McCall, David

    1996-01-01

    Momentary short-circuit arcs between a polyimide insulated wire with defective insulation and another conductor may cause pyrolization of the insulation resulting in a conductive path capable of sustaining the arc. These sustained arcs may propagate along the wires or to neighboring wires leading to complete failure of the wire bundle. Wire insulation susceptibility to arc tracking may be dependent on its environment. Because all wire insulation types tested to date arc track, a test procedure has been developed to compare different insulation types with respect to their arc tracking susceptibility. This test procedure is presented along with a comparison of arc tracking in the following three environments: (1) Air at atmospheric pressure and 1 gravitational(g) force; (2) Vacuum (2.67 x 10(exp -3) Pa) and 1g, and (3) Air at atmospheric pressure and microgravity (less than 0.04g).

  2. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  3. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  4. Evaluation of Vacuum-based Sampling Devices for Collection ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report The existing surface sampling strategy for a biological incident involving B. anthracis spores requires the use of various methods depending on the surface type. This project comparatively evaluated the vacuum sock and two additional vacuum-based collection devices (37 mm filter cassette and 3M™ Trace Evidence Filter) for their sampling efficacy. The 37 mm filter cassette was evaluated with mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filters or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters installed, each was considered a unique device. These data were generated so appropriate sampling devices could be selected following a B. anthracis incident. Bacillus atrophaeus was used a surrogate.

  5. Review of cathodic arc deposition technology at the start of the new millennium

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, D M; Anders, A

    2000-02-24

    The vacuum cathodic arc has been known to provide a means of producing coatings since the second half of the 19th century. This makes it one of the oldest known means for making coatings in a vacuum. In the last century it has been recognized that the copious quantities of ions produced by the process offers certain advantages in terms of coating properties. Specifically, ions can be steered and/or accelerated toward the parts to be coated. This, in turn, can provide enhanced adhesion, film density, and composition stoichiometry in the case of compound coatings. The ions generated by the cathodic arc have high ''natural'' kinetic energy values in the range 20-200 eV, leading to enhanced surface mobility during the deposition process and even ion subplantation. In many cases, dense coatings are achieved even when non-normal arrival angles are involved. The ion energy can further manipulated by the plasma immersion biasing technique. The issue of macroparticle contamination has been addressed by a variety of novel plasma filters. In spite of all of these advantages, this deposition technique has not been widely adopted in the western nations for commercial coating except in the case of enhancing the performance of cutting tools. The purpose of the this review is to explore reasons for this lack of general use of the technology and to point out some encouraging recent developments which may lead to its accelerated adoption for a much wider variety of applications in the near future.

  6. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  7. Coated x-ray filters

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-24

    A radiation filter for filtering radiation beams of wavelengths within a preselected range of wavelengths comprises a radiation transmissive substrate and an attenuating layer deposited on the substrate. The attenuating layer may be deposited by a sputtering process or a vacuum process. Beryllium may be used as the radiation transmissive substrate. In addition, a second radiation filter comprises an attenuating layer interposed between a pair of radiation transmissive layers.

  8. Coated x-ray filters

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-24

    A radiation filter for filtering radiation beams of wavelengths within a preselected range of wavelengths comprises a radiation transmissive substrate and an attenuating layer deposited on the substrate. The attenuating layer may be deposited by a sputtering process or a vacuum process. Beryllium may be used as the radiation transmissive substrate. In addition, a second radiation filter comprises an attenuating layer interposed between a pair of radiation transmissive layers. 4 figs.

  9. Design of the Vacuum Feedthrough for the EAST ICRF Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingxi; Song, Yuntao; Wu, Songtao; Zhao, Yanping

    2011-04-01

    Detailed design of the vacuum feedthrough for the ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) antenna in EAST, along with an electro-analysis and thermal structural analysis, is presented. The electric field, the voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) and the stresses in the vacuum feedthrough are studied. A method using the rings of oxygen-free copper as the cushion and macro-beam plasma arc welding is applied in the assembly to protect the ceramic from being damaged during welding. The vacuum leak test on the prototype of vacuum feedthrough is introduced.

  10. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  11. The QCD vacuum probed by overlap fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Volker

    2006-12-01

    We summarize different uses of the eigenmodes of the Neuberger overlap operator for the analysis of the QCD vacuum, here applied to quenched configurations simulated by means of the Lüscher-Weisz action. We describe the localization and chiral properties of the lowest modes. The overlap-based topological charge density (with and without UV-filtering) is compared with the re- sults of UV-filtering for the field strength tensor. The latter allows to identify domains of good (anti-)selfduality. All these techniques together lead to a dual picture of the vacuum, unifying the infrared instanton picture with the presence of singular defects co-existent at different scales.

  12. Vacuum phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome.

  13. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  14. Weld arc simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  15. Weld arc simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.J.

    1990-01-30

    This patent describes an arc voltage simulator for an arc welder which permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  16. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T,; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2005-01-01

    Tests of arcing and current collection in simulated space plasma conditions have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, for over 30 years and at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, for almost as long. During this period, proper test conditions for accurate and meaningful space simulation have been worked out, comparisons with actual space performance in spaceflight tests and with real operational satellites have been made, and NASA has achieved our own internal standards for test protocols. It is the purpose of this paper to communicate the test conditions, test procedures, and types of analysis used at NASA GRC and MSFC to the space environmental testing community at large, to help with international space-plasma arcing-testing standardization. To be discussed are: 1.Neutral pressures, neutral gases, and vacuum chamber sizes. 2. Electron and ion densities, plasma uniformity, sample sizes, and Debuy lengths. 3. Biasing samples versus self-generated voltages. Floating samples versus grounded. 4. Power supplies and current limits. Isolation of samples from power supplies during arcs. 5. Arc circuits. Capacitance during biased arc-threshold tests. Capacitance during sustained arcing and damage tests. Arc detection. Prevention sustained discharges during testing. 6. Real array or structure samples versus idealized samples. 7. Validity of LEO tests for GEO samples. 8. Extracting arc threshold information from arc rate versus voltage tests. 9. Snapover and current collection at positive sample bias. Glows at positive bias. Kapon (R) pyrolisis. 10. Trigger arc thresholds. Sustained arc thresholds. Paschen discharge during sustained arcing. 11. Testing for Paschen discharge threshold. Testing for dielectric breakdown thresholds. Testing for tether arcing. 12. Testing in very dense plasmas (ie thruster plumes). 13. Arc mitigation strategies. Charging mitigation strategies. Models. 14. Analysis of test results

  17. Arc Inception Mechanism on a Solar Array Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, B.; Galofaro, J.; Ferguson, D.

    2001-01-01

    In this report, results are presented of an experimental and theoretical study of arc phenomena and snapover for two samples of solar arrays immersed in argon plasma. The effects of arcing and snapover are investigated. I-V curves are measured, and arc and snapover inception voltages and arc rates are determined within the wide range of plasma parameters. A considerable increase in arc rate due to absorption of molecules from atmospheric air has been confirmed. It is shown that increasing gas pressure causes increasing ion current collection and, consequently, arc rate even though the effect of conditioning also takes place. Arc sites have been determined by employing a video-camera. It is confirmed that keeping sample under high vacuum for a long time results in shifting arc threshold voltage well below -300 V. The results obtained seem to be important for the understanding of arc inception mechanism.

  18. Vacuum mechatronics. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinski, S. E.; Shirazi, M.; Hackwood, S.; Beni, G.

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is the design and development of vacuum-compatible, computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. Vacuum mechantronics is relevant to research engineers in integrated circuit manufacturing, surface physics, food processing, biotechnology, materials handling, space sciences and manufacturing.

  19. A comparative study of the structural, mechanical and tribological characteristics of TiSiC-Cr coatings prepared in CH4 and C2H2 reactive atmosphere by cathodic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braic, Mariana; Vladescu, Alina; Balaceanu, Mihai; Luculescu, Catalin; Padmanabhan, Sibu C.; Constantin, Lidia; Morris, Michael A.; Braic, Viorel; Ana Grigorescu, Cristiana Eugenia; Ionescu, Paul; Dracea, Maria Diana; Logofatu, Constantin

    2017-04-01

    TiSiC-Cr coatings, with Cr and Si as additional elements, were deposited on Si, C 45 and 316 L steel substrates via cathodic arc evaporation. Two series of coatings with thicknesses in the range of 3.6-3.9 μm were produced, using either CH4 or C2H2 as carbon containing gas. For each series, different coatings were prepared by varying the carbon rich gas flow rate between 90 and 130 sccm, while maintaining constant cathode currents (110 and 100 A at TiSi and Cr cathodes, respectively), substrate bias (-200 V) and substrate temperature (∼320 °C). The coatings were analyzed for their mechanical characteristics (hardness, adhesion) and tribological performance (friction, wear), along with their elemental and phase composition, chemical bonds, crystalline structure and cross-sectional morphology. The coatings were found to be formed with nano-scale composite structures consisting of carbide crystallites (grain size of 3.1-8.2 nm) and amorphous hydrogenated carbon. The experimental results showed significant differences between the two coating series, where the films formed from C2H2 exhibited markedly superior characteristics in terms of microstructure, morphology, hardness, friction behaviour and wear resistance. For the coatings prepared using CH4, the measured values of crystallite size, hardness, friction coefficient and wear rate were in the ranges of 7.2-8.2 nm, 26-30 GPa, 0.3-0.4 and 2.1-4.8 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1, respectively, while for the coatings grown in C2H2, the values of these characteristics were found to be in the ranges of 3.1-3.7 nm, 41-45 GPa, 0.1-0.2 and 1.4-3.0 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1, respectively. Among the investigated coatings, the one produced using C2H2 at the highest flow rate (130 sccm) exhibited the highest hardness (45.1 GPa), the lowest friction coefficient (0.10) and the best wear resistance (wear rate of 1.4 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1).

  20. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  1. Natural vacuum electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    The ambient natural vacuum of space is proposed as a basis for electron valves. Each valve is an electron controlling structure similiar to a vacuum tube that is operated without a vacuum sustaining envelope. The natural vacuum electron valves discussed offer a viable substitute for solid state devices. The natural vacuum valve is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, system generated electromagnetic pulse, current transients, and direct exposure to space conditions.

  2. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  3. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  4. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  5. Commander Truly cleans ARS filters on middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-09-05

    STS008-13-336 (5 Sept 1983) --- On middeck, Richard M. Truly, STS-8 commander, uses vacuum cleaner to remove debris from air revitalization system (ARS) filter assembly. Open panel on middeck floor is the ARS access panel.

  6. Vacuum interrupters and thyratrons as opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honig, E. M.

    High power opening switches for inductive storage for large scale energy storage applications are described. The triggered vacuum interrupter and the magnetically quenched thyratrons are discussed. By electrically retriggering the discharge in the vacuum interrupter between pulses, the dependence on mechanical motion is eliminated. This should enable repetition rate operation at 10 to 15 kHz while still maintaining the vacuum interrupter's proven interrupting performance of tens of kiloamps at tens of kilovolts. The magnetically quenched thyratron uses a cross magnetic field to raise the switch impedance by decreasing the electron mobility and driving the discharge into an arc chute wall where it is quenched. Attempts to understand the basic mechanisms involved and to increase the switch, ratings, and particularly the conduction time, are discussed.

  7. Red Arcs on Tethys

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-29

    Unusual arc-shaped, reddish streaks cut across the surface of Saturn's ice-rich moon Tethys in this enhanced-color mosaic. The red streaks are narrow, curved lines on the moon's surface, only a few miles (or kilometers) wide but several hundred miles (or kilometers) long. The red streaks are among the most unusual color features on Saturn's moons to be revealed by Cassini's cameras. A few of the red arcs can be faintly seen in Cassini imaging observations made earlier in the mission, but the color images for this observation, which were obtained in April 2015, were the first to show large northern areas of Tethys under the illumination and viewing conditions necessary to see the features clearly. As the Saturn system moved into its northern hemisphere summer over the past few years, northern latitudes have become increasingly well illuminated. As a result, the red arc features have become clearly visible for the first time. The origin of the features and their reddish color is currently a mystery to Cassini scientists. Possibilities being studied include ideas that the reddish material is exposed ice with chemical impurities, or the result of outgassing from inside Tethys. The streaks could also be associated with features like fractures that are below the resolution of the available images. Except for a few small craters on Dione, reddish tinted features are rare on other moons of Saturn. However, many reddish features are observed on the geologically young surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. Images taken using clear, green, infrared and ultraviolet spectral filters were combined to create the view, which highlights subtle color differences across Tethys' surface at wavelengths not visible to human eyes. The moon's surface is fairly uniform in natural color. The yellowish tones on the left side of the view are a result of alteration of the moon's surface by high-energy particles from Saturn's magnetosphere. This particle radiation slams into the moon's trailing

  8. Low pressure arc electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenn, P. D.; Richter, R.

    1970-01-01

    Reducing the pressure in the vicinity of the arc attachment point by allowing the gas to flow through a supersonic nozzle minimizes local heating rates, prevents ablation, and increases the efficiency of coaxial gas-flow arcs.

  9. Vacuum sources in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Wiper, D W; Duchon, M A; Muise, K L

    1996-06-01

    To characterize the performance of vacuum equipment used in operative vaginal deliveries. We measured wall suction in eight Cleveland area labor-and-delivery units. Additionally, we tested samples of hand-operated and electric vacuum pumps. For each apparatus we recorded vacuum in millimeters of mercury using a calibrated, diaphragm-type gauge. We calculated mean maximal vacuum. Work required to produce 500 mm Hg of vacuum was determined for the hand-operated pumps. At increments of vacuum, we compared the vacuum displayed by the gauge head included with the device to our standard. Mean wall suction was 494 mm Hg (range, 248-655). As compared to the Mity-vac, the CMI hand-operated pump needed significantly more work to generate 500 mm Hg of vacuum. Electric pumps produced a reliable and consistent vacuum. Gauges included with the pump had an average error of 4% over 400-600 mm Hg. Wall suction was an unreliable source of vacuum. The two hand-operated pumps tested required significantly different amounts of work to achieve an adequate vacuum. Addition of a fluid trap does not affect the vacuum, and head gauges supplied with vacuum pumps are accurate.

  10. Quick-change filter cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Ortiz, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  11. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  12. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Nam Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-03

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17 J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  13. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam; Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  14. Vacuum collection of Douglas-fir pollen for supplemental mass pollinations.

    Treesearch

    D.L. Copes; N.C. Vance; W.K. Randall; A. Jasumback; R. Hallman

    1991-01-01

    An Aget Cyclone dust collector and peripheral equipment were fieldtested for use in vacuuming large quantities of pollen from 30- to 40-foot trees in a Douglas-fir seed orchard. The Cyclone machine (Model 20SN31P) operated without a vacuum bag or filter device, so no blockage or reduction in vacuum efficiency occurred when large volumes of pollen were collected....

  15. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  16. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

    1994-02-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

  17. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Falabella, Steven

    1994-01-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

  18. Vacuum-assisted delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000514.htm Vacuum-assisted delivery To use the sharing features on ... the baby through the birth canal. When is Vacuum-assisted Delivery Needed? Even after your cervix is ...

  19. The SOAR Gravitational Arc Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makler, M.; Furlanetto, C.; Santiago, B. X.; Caminha, G. B.; Cypriano, E.; Cibirka, N.; Pereira, M. E. S.; Bom, C. R. D.; Lima, M. P.; Brandt, C. H.; Neto, A. F.; Estrada, J.; Lin, H.; Hao, J.; McKay, T. M.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first results of the SOAR Gravitational Arc Survey (SOGRAS). The survey imaged 47 clusters in two redshift intervals centered at z=0.27 and z=0.55, targeting the richest clusters in each interval. Images were obtained in the g', r' and i' bands with a median seeing of 0.83, 0.76 and 0.71 arcsec, respectively, in these filters. Most of the survey clusters are located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe-82 region and all of them are in the SDSS footprint. We present the first results of the survey, including the 6 best strong lensing systems, photometric and morphometric catalogs of the galaxy sample, and cross matches of the clusters and galaxies with complementary samples (spectroscopic redshifts, photometry in several bands, X-ray and Sunyaev Zel'dovich clusters, etc.), exploiting the synergy with other surveys in Stripe-82. We apply several methods to characterize the gravitational arc candidates, including the Mediatrix method (Bom et al. 2012) and ArcFitting (Furlanetto et al. 2012), and for the subtraction of galaxy cluster light. Finally, we apply strong lensing inversion techniques to the best systems, providing constraints on their mass distribution. The analyses of a spectral follow-up with Gemini and the derived dynamical masses are presented in a poster submitted to this same meeting (Cibirka et al.). Deeper follow-up images with Gemini strengthen the case for the strong lensing nature of the candidates found in this survey.

  20. Visual and Electrical Evidence Supporting a Two-Plasma Mechanism of Vacuum Breakdown Initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Castano-Giraldo, C.; Aghazarian, Maro; Caughman, John B; Ruzic, D. N.

    2012-01-01

    The energy available during vacuum breakdown between copper electrodes at high vacuum was limited using resistors in series with the vacuum gap and arresting diodes. Surviving features observed with SEM in postmortem samples were tentatively correlated with electrical signals captured during breakdown using a Rogowski coil and a high-voltage probe. The visual and electrical evidence is consistent with the qualitative model of vacuum breakdown by unipolar arc formation by Schwirzke [1, 2]. The evidence paints a picture of two plasmas of different composition and scale being created during vacuum breakdown: an initial plasma made of degassed material from the metal surface, ignites a plasma made up of the electrode material.

  1. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  2. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  3. Bibliography and author index for electrical discharges in vacuum (1897 to 1980)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.

    1982-01-29

    This bibliography covers the field of electrical discharges in vacuum, comprising both electrical breakdown in vacuum and vacuum arcs. A brief review section lists some review papers which would be helpful to the novice in this field. The bulk of the paper consists of bibliographic listings, arranged by year of publication and within each year, alphabetically by first author. An author index refers one to all papers authored or coauthored by a particular person. There are 2450 papers listed through December 1980.

  4. Effect of vacuum conditions and plasma concentration on the chemical composition and adhesion of vacuum-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, D. P.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Slabodchikov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper reports on the chemical composition of titanium nitride (TiN) and silicon (Si) coatings deposited with a new technological vacuum plasma setup which comprises magnetron sputtering systems, arc evaporators, and an efficient plasma generator. It is shown that due to highly clean vacuum conditions and highly clean surface treatment in the gas discharge plasma, both the coating-substrate interface and the coatings as such are almost free from oxygen and carbon. It is found that the coating-substrate interface represents a layer of thickness ≥ 60 nm formed through vacuum plasma mixing of the coating and substrate materials. The TiN coatings obtained on the new equipment display a higher adhesion compared to brass coatings deposited by industrial technologies via intermediate titanium oxide layers. It is concluded that the designed vacuum plasma equipment allows efficient surface modification of materials and articles by vacuum plasma immersion processes.

  5. Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Moon, Dong-Il; Meyyappan, M

    2017-04-12

    Vacuum tubes that sparked the electronics era had given way to semiconductor transistors. Despite their faster operation and better immunity to noise and radiation compared to the transistors, the vacuum device technology became extinct due to the high power consumption, integration difficulties, and short lifetime of the vacuum tubes. We combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern silicon nanofabrication technology here. The surround gate nanoscale vacuum channel transistor consists of sharp source and drain electrodes separated by sub-50 nm vacuum channel with a source to gate distance of 10 nm. This transistor performs at a low voltage (<5 V) and provides a high drive current (>3 microamperes). The nanoscale vacuum channel transistor can be a possible alternative to semiconductor transistors beyond Moore's law.

  6. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  7. Arcing in Leo and Geo Simulated Environments: Comparative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Galofaro, Joel TY.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive tests of two solar array samples in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environments have demonstrated that the arc inception voltage was 2-3 times lower in the LEO plasma than in the GEO vacuum. Arc current pulse wave forms are also essentially different in these environments. Moreover, the wide variations of pulse forms do not allow introducing the definition of a "standard arc wave form" even in GEO conditions. Visual inspection of the samples after testing in a GEO environment revealed considerable damage on coverglass surfaces and interconnects. These harmful consequences can be explained by the discharge energy being one order of magnitude higher in vacuum than in background plasma. The tests also revealed a potential danger of powerful electrostatic discharges that could be initiated on the solar array surface of a satellite in GEO during the ignition of an arcjet thruster.

  8. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  9. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  10. Filter arrays

    DOEpatents

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  11. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  12. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  13. Long arc stabilities with various arc gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, K.; Takeda, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Noguchi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new arc torch for use in magnetically driven arc device was developed with a commercially available TIG welding arc torch. The torch has a water-cooling system to the torch nozzle and has a nozzle nut to supply a swirling-free plasma gas flow. Its endurance against arc thermal load is examined. Features of its generated arc are investigated.

  14. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A plasma thruster with a cylindrical inner and cylindrical outer electrode generates plasma particles from the application of energy stored in an inductor to a surface suitable for the formation of a plasma and expansion of plasma particles. The plasma production results in the generation of charged particles suitable for generating a reaction force, and the charged particles are guided by a magnetic field produced by the same inductor used to store the energy used to form the plasma.

  15. Population Inversion in Laser-Initiated Vacuum Arcs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-25

    1015 cm- 3. The electron temperature was estimated to be 3.3 eV . The AilIl, 560 X pump line radiation was found to per- sist for up to 3 .s in the...The density of the 3d level required to give an optical depth of unity at 3601 A is found to be 1 x 1013 cm- 3 , for an ion temperature of 1 eV . With...this lower bound, and assuming that the excitation temperature is 11 eV (based on the line ratios), the lower bound on the 5s and 5p densities is

  16. Vacuum ultraviolet thin films. I - Optical constants of BaF2, CaF2, LaF3, MgF2, Al2O3, HfO2, and SiO2 thin films. II - Vacuum ultraviolet all-dielectric narrowband filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.; Spann, James F.; Torr, Marsha R.

    1990-01-01

    An iteration process matching calculated and measured reflectance and transmittance values in the 120-230 nm VUV region is presently used to ascertain the optical constants of bulk MgF2, as well as films of BaF2, CaF2, LaF3, MgF2, Al2O3, HfO2, and SiO2 deposited on MgF2 substrates. In the second part of this work, a design concept is demonstrated for two filters, employing rapidly changing extinction coefficients, centered at 135 nm for BaF2 and 141 nm for SiO2. These filters are shown to yield excellent narrowband spectral performance in combination with narrowband reflection filters.

  17. Vacuum pump aids ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The steam ejector/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the hybrid system of steam ejectors, surface condensers, and vacuum pumps. This current project is even more financially attractive because it allows a dirty water cooling tower which serves the barometric condensers to be shut down. Providing a vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers with this hybrid system is by no means the only application of this technique. Any vacuum system consisting of all steam ejectors would be a candidate for this hybrid system and the resulting savings in energy.

  18. An improved pinhole spatial filter

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Celliers, P.; Murray, J.; Wallace, R.; Stone, G.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B.; Da Silva, L.; Hunt, J.; Manes, K.

    1996-08-21

    Lasers generate phase aberrated light that can damage laser glass, frequency conversion crystals, lenses, and mirror coatings and can also reduce extractable energy and power. Spatial pinhole filters can partly eliminate such ``hot spots.`` Problems are that the pinhole closes during the laser pulse and has to be made too large initially. Debris from the pinhole can coat or damage spatial filter lenses. This paper presents a novel design for a more robust pinhole filter. Phase distorted (hot spot) light refracts at grazing incidence by plasma on the wall of a funnel shaped filter resulting in less absorption and debris. Refracted light absorbs at low intensities on the vacuum wall. We present 2D hydrodynamic computer simulations and compare the two types of filters with experiment.

  19. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  20. Maintaining vacuum furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, J.

    2000-04-01

    A preventive maintenance program is essential for safe and consistent vacuum furnace operation. The program should be developed in cooperation with safety, maintenance, and furnace operators, implemented as soon as the furnace is commissioned, and adhered to throughout the life of the furnace. This article serves as an introduction to the topic of vacuum furnace preventive maintenance. Basic information about installing a new vacuum furnace also is provided.

  1. The Effect of Flattening Filter Free on Three-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT), Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Plans for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li-Wan; Lai, You-Qun; Lin, Qin; Ha, Hui-Ming; Fu, Li-Rong

    2015-07-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) may affect outcome measures of radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters in three types of radiotherapy plans, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), with or without the flattening filter (FF), developed for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From July 2013 to October 2013, 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT treatment plans were designed using 6 MV and 10 MV, with and without FF, for 10 patients with brain metastasis from NSCLC. The evaluation of the treatment plans included homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), monitor units (MU), mean dose (Dmean), treatment time, and the influence of FFF on volumes. There was no difference in CI or HI between FFF and FF models with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans. At 6 MV, a lower Dmean was seen in the FFF model of 3D-CRT and in the VMAT plan at 10 MV. In the IMRT 6 MV, IMRT 10 MV, and VMAT 10 MV plans, higher MUs were seen in the FFF models. FFF treatments are similar in quality to FF plans, generally lead to more monitor units, and are associated with shorter treatment times. FFF plans ranked by the order of superiority in terms of a time advantage are VMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT.

  2. Numerical modeling of high-voltage circuit breaker arcs and their interraction with the power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orama, Lionel R.

    In this work the interaction between series connected gas and vacuum circuit breaker arcs has been studied. The breakdown phenomena in vacuum interrupters during the post arc current period have been of special interest. Numerical models of gas and vacuum arcs were developed in the form of black box models. Especially, the vacuum post arc model was implemented by combining the existing transition model with an ion density function and expressions for the breakdown mechanisms. The test series studied reflect that for electric fields on the order of 10sp7V/m over the anode, the breakdown of the vacuum gap can result from a combination of both thermal and electrical stresses. For a particular vacuum device, the vacuum model helps to find the interruption limits of the electric field and power density over the anode. The series connection of gas and vacuum interrupters always performs better than the single gas device. Moreover, to take advantage of the good characteristics of both devices, the time between the current zero crossing in each interrupter can be changed. This current zero synchronization is controlled by changing the capacitance in parallel to the gas device. This gas/vacuum interrupter is suitable for interruption of very stressful short circuits in which the product of the dI/dt before current zero and the dV/dt after current zero is very high. Also, a single SF6 interrupter can be replaced by an air circuit breaker of the same voltage rating in series with a vacuum device without compromising the good performance of the SF6 device. Conceptually, a series connected vacuum device can be used for high voltage applications with equal distribution of electrical stresses between the individual interrupters. The equalization can be made by a sequential opening of the individual contact pairs, beginning with the interruptors that are closer to ground potential. This could eliminate the use of grading capacitors.

  3. ARC-1989-A89-7015

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-08-21

    Range : 4.8 million km. ( 3 million miles ) P-34648 This Voyager 2, sixty-one second exposure, shot through clear filters, of Neptunes rings. The Voyager cameras were programmed to make a systematic search of the entire ring system for new material. The previously ring arc is visible as a long bright streak at the bottom of the image. Extening beyond the bright arc is a much fainter component which follows the arc in its orbit. this faint material was also visible leading the ring arc and, in total, covers at least half of the orbit before it becomes too faint to identify. Also visible in this image, is a continuous ring of faint material previously identified as a possible ring arc by Voyager. this continuous ring is located just outside the orbit of the moon 1989N3, which was also discovered by Voyager. This moon is visible as a streak in the lower left. the smear of 1989N3 is due to its own orbital motion during the exposure. Extreme computer processing of this image was made to enhance the extremely faint features of Neptunes moon system. the dark area surrounding the moon as well as the bright corners are due to this special processing.

  4. Gravitation and vacuum field

    SciTech Connect

    Tevikyan, R.V.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents equations that describe particles with spins s = 0, 1/2, 1 completely and which also describe 2s + 2 limiting fields as E ..-->.. infinity. It is shown that the ordinary Hilbert-Einstein action for the gravitation field must be augmented by the action for the Bose vacuum field. This means that one must introduce in the gravitational equations a cosmological term proportional to the square of the strength of the Bose vacuum field. It is shown that the theory of gravitation describes three realities: matter, field, and vacuum field. A new form of matter--the vacuum field--is introduced into field theory.

  5. Filter component assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.W.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of this program are to provide a more ruggedized filter system that utilizes porous ceramic filters which have improved resistance to damage resulting from crack propagation, thermal fatigue and/or thermal excursions during plant or process transient conditions, and/or mechanical ash bridging events within the candle filter array. As part of the current Phase 1, Task 1, effort of this program, Westinghouse is evaluating the filtration characteristics, mechanical integrity, and corrosion resistance of the following advanced or second generation candle filters for use in advanced coal-fired process applications: 3M CVI-SiC composite--chemical vapor infiltration of silicon carbide into an aluminosilicate Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber preform; DuPont PRD-66--filament wound candle filter structure containing corundum, cordierite, cristobalite, and mullite; DuPont SiC-SiC--chemical infiltration of silicon carbide into a silicon carbide Nicalon{trademark} fiber mat or felt preform; and IF and P Fibrosic{trademark}--vacuum infiltrated oxide-based chopped fibrous matrix. Results to date are presented.

  6. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aquaspace H2OME Guardian Water Filter, available through Western Water International, Inc., reduces lead in water supplies. The filter is mounted on the faucet and the filter cartridge is placed in the "dead space" between sink and wall. This filter is one of several new filtration devices using the Aquaspace compound filter media, which combines company developed and NASA technology. Aquaspace filters are used in industrial, commercial, residential, and recreational environments as well as by developing nations where water is highly contaminated.

  7. Vacuum Filtration. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filer, Herb; Windram, Kendall

    Three types of vacuum filters and their operation are described in this lesson. Typical filter cycle, filter components and their functions, process control parameters, expected performance, and safety/historical aspects are considered. Conditioning methods are also described, although it is suggested that lessons on sludge characteristics, sludge…

  8. Generation of low-temperature plasma by low-pressure arcs for synthesis of nitride coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysina, O. V.; Koval, N. N.; Lopatin, I. V.; Shugurov, V. V.; Kovalsky, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study gas, metal, and mixed metal-gas plasmas. The plasmas were generated with the use of an arc evaporator and a gas-plasma source with a hot filament and hollow cathode that were operated independently or simultaneously. It has been revealed that the arc current of gas-plasma source affects the parameters of the metal-gas plasma and the element concentrations in the coatings. It has been demonstrated that the characteristics of the nitride coatings produced by plasma-assisted vacuum-arc deposition can be controlled by varying the parameters of the arc in the gas-plasma source.

  9. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  10. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. In the Arc

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-15

    NASA Cassini spacecraft image holds an unseen treasure orbiting within the bright arc of Saturn G ring: the tiny moonlet Aegaeon. Too small to be seen here, it is thought to be the source of the debris forming the bright arc in the lower right.

  12. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Hillary

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  13. WSTF electrical arc projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  14. WSTF electrical arc projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  15. Filter validation.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Russell E

    2006-01-01

    Validation of a sterilizing filtration process is critical since it is impossible with currently available technology to measure the sterility of each filled container; therefore, sterility assurance of the filtered product must be achieved through validation of the filtration process. Validating a pharmaceutical sterile filtration process involves three things: determining the effect of the liquid on the filter, determining the effect of the filter on the liquid, and demonstrating that the filter removes all microorganisms from the liquid under actual processing conditions.

  16. Metallic Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Filtration technology originated in a mid 1960's NASA study. The results were distributed to the filter industry, an HR Textron responded, using the study as a departure for the development of 421 Filter Media. The HR system is composed of ultrafine steel fibers metallurgically bonded and compressed so that the pore structure is locked in place. The filters are used to filter polyesters, plastics, to remove hydrocarbon streams, etc. Several major companies use the product in chemical applications, pollution control, etc.

  17. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  18. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  19. FILTER TREATMENT

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, J.B.; Torrey, J.V.P.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for reconditioning fused alumina filters which have become clogged by the accretion of bismuth phosphate in the filter pores, The method consists in contacting such filters with faming sulfuric acid, and maintaining such contact for a substantial period of time.

  20. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water filter generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in the water flow system. Silver ions serve as effective bactericide/deodorizers. Ray Ward requested and received from NASA a technical information package on the Shuttle filter, and used it as basis for his own initial development, a home use filter.

  1. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  2. ELETTRA vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M.

    1991-08-01

    A status report of the vacuum system of ELETTRA, the 2 GeV, 400 mA light source under construction in Trieste, will be described. The Vacuum project, presented at ``Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop'' at Riken (Japan 22-24 March 1990) and more recently at EVC-2, the European Vacuum Conference at Trieste (Italy 21-26 May 1990), is now in the phase of testing a prototype sector, which is 1/24 of the ring circumference. Details and some technological aspects of the fabrication will be reviewed together with the vacuum performances. Results of laboratory experiments on components, standard or not, allowed us to finalize the main choices in light of the general philosophy of the project and will be properly summarized.

  3. Cervical spine annulus vacuum.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, S P; Chen, Y M

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-eight annulus vacuums in 27 patients were analyzed with regard to location, configuration, and associated vertebral abnormalities such as degenerative changes, absent and compressed anterosuperior vertebral body corners, and annulus calcification. It is concluded that most annulus vacuums are a degenerative phenomenon at the attachment of the annulus to bone. These vacuums may be associated with other degenerative changes such as osteophytes and annulus calcification. Vacuums have a strong association with compressed anterosuperior corners. These deformed corners are thought to be early osteophytes and may be related to previous trauma, a vertebra with an absent corner, and/or normal motion. Small annulus vacuums adjacent to vertebral corners with a normal appearance are more likely to result from acute trauma.

  4. Vacuum tunneling in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Pak, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    Topologically non-trivial vacuum structures in gravity models with Cartan variables (vielbein and contortion) are considered. We study the possibility of vacuum spacetime tunneling in Einstein gravity assuming that the vielbein may play a fundamental role in quantum gravitational phenomena. It has been shown that in the case of RP3 space topology, the tunneling between non-trivial topological vacuums can be realized by means of Eguchi-Hanson gravitational instanton. In the Riemann-Cartan geometric approach to quantum gravity, the vacuum tunneling can be provided by means of contortion quantum fluctuations. We define a double self-duality condition for the contortion and give explicit self-dual configurations which can contribute to vacuum tunneling amplitude.

  5. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  6. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-03-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  7. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Tests of arcing and current collection in simulated space plasma conditions have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, for over 30 years and at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, for almost as long. During this period, proper test conditions for accurate and meaningful space simulation have been worked out, comparisons with actual space performance in spaceflight tests and with real operational satellites have been made, and NASA has achieved our own internal standards for test protocols. It is the purpose of this paper to communicate the test conditions, test procedures, and types of analysis used at NASA GRC and MSFC to the space environmental testing community at large, to help with international space-plasma arcing-testing standardization. Discussed herein are neutral gas conditions, plasma densities and uniformity, vacuum chamber sizes, sample sizes and Debye lengths, biasing samples versus self-generated voltages, floating samples versus grounded samples, test electrical conditions, arc detection, preventing sustained discharges during testing, real samples versus idealized samples, validity of LEO tests for GEO samples, extracting arc threshold information from arc rate versus voltage tests, snapover, current collection, and glows at positive sample bias, Kapton pyrolysis, thresholds for trigger arcs, sustained arcs, dielectric breakdown and Paschen discharge, tether arcing and testing in very dense plasmas (i.e. thruster plumes), arc mitigation strategies, charging mitigation strategies, models, and analysis of test results. Finally, the necessity of testing will be emphasized, not to the exclusion of modeling, but as part of a complete strategy for determining when and if arcs will occur, and preventing them from occurring in space.

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Vacuum-based Surface Sampling ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article Following a biological contamination incident, collection of surface samples is necessary to determine the extent and level of contamination, and to deem an area safe for reentry upon decontamination. Current sampling strategies targeting Bacillus anthracis spores prescribe vacuum-based methods for rough and/or porous surfaces. In this study, four commonly-used B. anthracis spore sampling devices (vacuum socks, 37 mm 0.8 µm MCE filter cassettes, 37 mm 0.3 µm PTFE filter cassettes, and 3MTM forensic filters) were comparatively evaluated for their ability to recover surface-associated spores. The vacuum sock device was evaluated at two sampling speeds (slow and fast), resulting in five total methods evaluated. Aerosolized spores (~105 cm-2) of a surrogate Bacillus species (Bacillus atrophaeus) were allowed to settle onto three material types (concrete, carpet, and upholstery). Ten replicate samples were collected using each vacuum method, from each of the three material types. In addition, stainless steel (i.e., nonporous) surfaces inoculated simultaneously were sampled with pre-moistened wipes. Recoveries from wipes of steel surfaces were utilized to verify the inoculum, and to normalize vacuum-based recoveries across trials. Recovery (CFU cm-2) and relative recovery (vacuum recovery/wipe recovery) were determined for each method and material type. Relative recoveries were compared by one-way and three-way ANOVA. Data analysis by one-

  9. Influence of axial self-magnetic field component on arcing behavior of spiral-shaped contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Dingyu; Xiu, Shixin Wang, Yi; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yali; Bi, Dongli

    2015-10-15

    The transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact design is commonly used in vacuum interrupters. When arcing occurs between the TMF contacts, the contact structure can create a self-induced magnetic field that drives the arc to move and rotate on the contact, and thus local overheating and severe erosion can be avoided. However, TMF contacts could also create an axial self-magnetic component, and the influence of this component on the arc behavior has not been considered to date. In this paper, five different types of Cu-Cr spiral-shaped TMF contacts with three different structures are investigated in a demountable vacuum chamber that contains a high-speed charge-coupled device video camera. It was found that the contact structure greatly influenced the arc behavior, especially in terms of arc rotation and the effective contact area, while contacts with the same slot structure but different diameters showed similar arc behavior and arc motion. The magnetic field distribution and the Lorentz force of each of the three different contact structures are simulated, and the axial self-magnetic field was first taken into consideration for investigation of the TMF contact design. It was found that contact designs that have higher axial self-magnetic field components tend to have arc columns with larger diameters and show poorer arc motion and rotation performance in the experiments.

  10. Housing protects laser in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canali, V. G.

    1978-01-01

    Airtight housing encloses laser for easy alinement and operation in high-vacuum chamber. Beam is transmitted through window into vacuum chamber. Flexible line runs through vacuum chamber to outside, maintaining laser enclosure at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Variational filtering.

    PubMed

    Friston, K J

    2008-07-01

    This note presents a simple Bayesian filtering scheme, using variational calculus, for inference on the hidden states of dynamic systems. Variational filtering is a stochastic scheme that propagates particles over a changing variational energy landscape, such that their sample density approximates the conditional density of hidden and states and inputs. The key innovation, on which variational filtering rests, is a formulation in generalised coordinates of motion. This renders the scheme much simpler and more versatile than existing approaches, such as those based on particle filtering. We demonstrate variational filtering using simulated and real data from hemodynamic systems studied in neuroimaging and provide comparative evaluations using particle filtering and the fixed-form homologue of variational filtering, namely dynamic expectation maximisation.

  12. DETAIL OF FILTER DISCS ON DENVER FILTER IN CO91107. AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF FILTER DISCS ON DENVER FILTER IN CO-91-107. AS DISCS SLOWLY ROTATE, VACUUM INSIDE DISCS ATTRACT SLURRY IN THE SUMP AND DEWATERS CONCENTRATE AS DISCS MOVE THROUGH AIR. FURTHER ROTATION PASSES A BAR TO SCRAPE OFF DRIED METAL CONCENTRATE, ASSISTED BY BLASTS OF COMPRESSED AIR. METAL CONCENTRATE READY FOR SHIPMENT TO SMELTER FALLS INTO BIN BELOW. EIMCO FILTERS OPERATE SIMILARLY. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  13. Filter Component Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced particulate filtration systems are currently being developed at Westinghouse for use in both coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems. To date, Westinghouse has demonstrated 5855 hours of successful operation of first generation monolithic filter elements in PFBC applications when ash bridging or process thermal transient excursions are avoided. Alternate advanced monolithic and second generation fiber reinforced, filament wound and vacuum infiltrated filters are also being developed which are considered to have enhanced high temperature creep resistance, improved fracture toughness, or enhanced thermal shock characteristics, respectively. Mechanical and component fabrication improvements, as well as degradation mechanisms for each filter element have been identified by Westinghouse during exposure to simulated PFBC operating conditions and alkali-containing steam/air environments. Additional effort is currently being focused on determining the stability of the advanced monolithic high temperature creep resistant clay bonded silicon carbide (SiC) materials, alumina/mullite, and chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC materials during operation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (W-APF) system at Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Select advanced filter materials are being defined for additional long-term exposure in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gas streams. The results of these efforts are summarized in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  15. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  16. Arc spraying in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianjun

    2001-03-01

    Although are spraying is not a new technique, recent development of arc spraying device systems, spray wires, research on the coating mechanism, and the dynamic behavior of spraying make it a most active thermal spray process. In China, the arc spraying technique is the most efficient way for long life corrosion protection of steel structures. In addition, the arc spraying process is widely used for renovation and surface modification of machine components, mold making for plastic products, high-temperature corrosion resistance for waterwalls of boilers, antisliding coatings, self-lubricating coatings, etc.

  17. Tokamak ARC damage

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  18. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  19. Multi-cathode metal vapor arc ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. One embodiment of the appaatus utilizes a multi-cathode arrangement for interaction with the anode.

  20. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  1. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2001-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  2. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2000-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  3. Arc Voltage Between Deion Grid Affected by Division of Arc in Magnetic Driven Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inuzuka, Yutaro; Yamato, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic driven arc has been applied to DC breaker and fault current limiters. However, it has not been researched, especially stagnation and re-strike of the arc. In this paper, the arc voltage between deion grid affected by division of arc in magnetic driven arc and arc behavior are measured by using the oscilloscope and HSVC (High Speed Video Camera). As a result, arc voltage increased because of division of the arc. The arc mean moving speed increases with increasing the external magnetic field. However, when the arc was not stalemate, the arc moving speed does not change so much. The arc re-strike time increases and stalemate time decreases with increasing the external magnetic field. Therefore, the anode spot moving speed increases 8 times because arc re-strike occurs easily with the external magnetic field. Thus, the erosion of electrodes decreases and the arc movement becomes the smooth. When the arc is divided, the arc voltage increased because of the electrode fall voltage. Therefore, the arc voltage increases with increasing the number of deion grid.

  4. Arc voltage distribution skewness as an indicator of electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1998-01-13

    The electrode gap of a VAR is monitored by determining the skewness of a distribution of gap voltage measurements. A decrease in skewness indicates an increase in gap and may be used to control the gap. 4 figs.

  5. Arc voltage distribution skewness as an indicator of electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Rodney L.; Zanner, Frank J.; Grose, Stephen M.

    1998-01-01

    The electrode gap of a VAR is monitored by determining the skewness of a distribution of gap voltage measurements. A decrease in skewness indicates an increase in gap and may be used to control the gap.

  6. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-01

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  7. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  8. Vacuum mechatronics first international workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Belinski, S.E.; Shirazi, M.; Hackwood, S.; Beni, G. )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: proposed epitaxial thin film growth in the ultra-vacuum of space; particle monitoring and control in vacuum processing equipment; electrostatic dust collector for use in vacuum systems; materials evaluation of an electrically noisy vacuum slip ring assembly; an overview of lubrication and associated materials for vacuum service; the usage of lubricants in a vacuum environment; guidelines and practical applications for lubrication in vacuum; recent development in leak detector and calibrator designs; the durability of ballscrews for ultrahigh vacuum; vacuum-compatible robot for self-contained manufacturing systems; the design, fabrication, and assembly of an advanced vacuum robotics system for space payload calibration; design criteria for mechanisms used in space; and concepts and requirements for semiconductor multiprocess integration in vacuum. These papers are indexed separately elsewhere.

  9. ARC-1964-A-31910

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-01-24

    Dr. Dean R. Chapman a Ames Research Center scientists studing tektits, holding a simulated tektite created in the Ames arc jet facility (left) and authentic Australian tektite over a map of Australia.

  10. Diatomite Type Filters for Swimming Pools. Standard No. 9, Revised October, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Pressure and vacuum diatomite type filters are covered in this standard. The filters herein described are intended to be designed and used specifically for swimming pool water filtration, both public and residential. Included are the basic components which are a necessary part of the diatomite type filter such as filter housing, element supports,…

  11. Filter Leaf. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, John F.

    In the operation of vacuum filters and belt filters, it is desirable to evaluate the performance of different types of filter media and conditioning processes. The filter leaf test, which is used to evaluate these items, is described. Designed for individuals who have completed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) level 1…

  12. ARC-1964-A-33038-22

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-08-14

    Aerial view of Gasdynamics facility in 1964 and the 20 inch helium tunnel Part of the Thermal Protection Laboratory used to research materials for heat shield applications and for aerodynamic heating and materials studies of vehicles in planetary atmospheres.  This laboratory is comprised of five separate facilities: an Aerodynamic Heating Tunnel, a Heat Transfer Tunnel, two Supersonic Turbulent Ducts, and a High-Power CO2 Gasdynamic Laser. All these facilities are driven by arc-heaters, with the exception of the large, combustion-type laser. The arc-heated facilities are powered by a 20 Megawatt DC power supply. Their effluent gas stream (test gases; Air, N2, He, CO2 and mixtures; flow rates from 0.05 to 5.0 lbs/sec) discharges into a five-stage stream-ejector-driven vacuum system. The vacuum system and power supply are common to the test faciities in building N-238. All of the facilities have high pressure water available at flow rates up to 4, 000 gals/min. The data obtained from these facilities are recorded on magnetic tape or oscillographs. All forms of data can be handled whether from thermo-couples, pressure cells, pyrometers, or radiometers, etc. in addition, closed circuit T. V. monitors and various film cameras are available. (operational since 1962)

  13. The classical vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T. H.

    1985-08-01

    The history of vacuum concepts is reviewed, noting that no way is known to physically produce a true void. Even at absolute zero, a pattern of electromagnetic wave fluctuations are still present. The fluctuations are called zero-point radiation (ZPR). To be invariant to Lorentz transformation, ZPR has a spectral intensity proportional to the cube of each frequency. ZPR does not change in response to compression and produces a force between objects that is inversely proportional to the 4th power of the separation distance. The ZPR scale value has been measured to be one-half of the Planck constant, and is the measure of the energy of a harmonic oscillator, such as the electron, in a vacuum. Finally, since gravitational accelerations always occur in the physical space, a minimum thermal radiation can also be found for the vacuum, implying that a fixed relationship exists between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum.

  14. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  15. Water in Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    In the past decade, baseline data have been obtained on pre-eruptive water contents for several volcanic arcs worldwide. One surprising observation is that parental magmas contain ~ 4 wt% H2O on average at each arc worldwide [1]. Within each arc, the variation from volcano to volcano is from 2 to 6 w% H2O, with few exceptions. The similar averages at different arcs are unexpected given the order of magnitude variations in the concentration of other slab tracers. H2O is clearly different from other tracers, however, being both a major driver of melting in the mantle and a major control of buoyancy and viscosity in the crust. Some process, such as mantle melting or crustal storage, apparently modulates the water content of mafic magmas at arcs. Mantle melting may deliver a fairly uniform product to the Moho, if the wet melt process includes a negative feedback. On the other hand, magmas with variable water content may be generated in the mantle, but a crustal filter may lead to magma degassing up to a common mid-to-upper crustal storage region. Testing between these two end-member scenarios is critical to our understanding of subduction dehydration, global water budgets, magmatic plumbing systems, melt generation and eruptive potential. The Alaska-Aleutian arc is a prime location to explore this fundamental problem in the subduction water cycle, because active volcanoes vary more than elsewhere in the world in parental H2O contents (based on least-degassed, mafic melt inclusions hosted primarily in olivine). For example, Shishaldin volcano taps magma with among the lowest H2O contents globally (~ 2 wt%) and records low pressure crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a shallow magma system (< 1 km bsl). At the other extreme, Augustine volcano is fed by a mafic parent that contains among the highest H2O globally (~ 7 wt%), and has evolved by deep crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a deep magma system (~ 14 km bsl). Do these magmas stall at different depths

  16. The vacuum system for technological unit development and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukeshov, A. M.; Gabdullina, A. T.; Amrenova, A. U.; Giniyatova, Sh G.; Kaibar, A.; Sundetov, A.; Fermakhan, K.

    2015-11-01

    The paper shows results of development of plasma technological unit on the basis of accelerator of vacuum arc and automated system. During the previous years, the authors investigated the operation of pulsed plasma accelerator and developed unique technologies for hardening of materials. Principles of plasma formation in pulsed plasma accelerator were put into basis of the developed unit. Operation of the pulsed arc accelerator was investigated at different parameters of the charge. The developed vacuum system is designed for production of hi-tech plasma units in high technologies in fields of nanomaterials, mechanical and power engineering and production with high added value. Unlike integrated solutions, the system is a module one to allow its low cost, high reliability and simple maintenance. The problems of use of robots are discussed to modernize the technological process.

  17. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  18. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  19. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, G.B.; Dilmore, W.J.

    1992-09-01

    A vertical vessel is described having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas. 18 figs.

  20. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, Gaurang B.; Dilmore, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A vertical vessel having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas.

  1. Reducing the moisture content of clean coals. Volume 3, Belt filter press: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, G.

    1992-12-01

    Reducing the Moisture Content of Clean Coals, Volume 3: Belt Filter Press contains the results of an EPRI investigation into the performance of an alternative clean coal dewatering device. Investigators at EPRI`s Coal Quality Development Center (CQDC) designed test so that mathematical relationships predicting filter cake moisture and solids capture could be developed. They also compared the economics of installing and operating a belt filter press with a vacuum disc filter, which is its nearest equivalent. For 100M {times} 0 clean coal from the Upper Freeport seam, the belt filter press produced filter cake with an average moisture content of 30 percent. This moisture is 5 to 10 percentage points higher than moistures from a vacuum disc filter. Economic analysis shows that the belt filter press costs an additional $72,000 a year to operate in place of a vacuum disc filter.

  2. Vacuum self-magnetization?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Rojas, H.; Rodriguez Querts, E.

    2006-06-19

    We study vacuum properties in a strong magnetic field as the zero temperature and zero density limit of quantum statistics. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) the vacuum energy density diverges for B > B{sub c} = m{sub w}{sup 2}/e, leading to vacuum instability. A logarithmic divergence of vacuum magnetization is found for B = Bc, which suggests that if the magnetic field is large enough, it is self-consistently maintained, and this mechanism actually prevents B from reaching the critical value Bc. For virtual neutral vector bosons bearing an anomalous magnetic moment, the instability of the ground state for B > B{sub c}{sup '} = m{sub n}{sup 2}/q also leads to the vacuum energy density divergence for fields B > B{sub c}{sup '} and to the magnetization divergence for B B{sub c}{sup '}. The possibility of virtual electron-positron pairs bosonization in strong magnetic field and the applicability of the neutral bosons model to describe the virtual positronium behavior in a magnetic field are discussed. We conjecture that this could lead to vacuum self-magnetization in QED.

  3. Catalyst and doping methods for arc graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyunjin; Oh, InSeoup; Kang, JungHo; Park, Sungchan; Ku, Boncheol; Park, Min; Kwak, Soonjong; Khanra, Partha; Lee, Joong Hee; Jong Kim, Myung

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene synthesis with ˜g scale has been accomplished using the arc discharge method. The defects formed in the synthesis process were reduced by adding various metal catalysts, among which Bi2O3 was found to be the most effective. Adding dopants to the starting materials increased the electrical conductivity of the graphene product, and the doping concentration in graphene was tuned by adjusting the amount of nitrogen dopants. A step-wise technique to fabricate graphene thin films was developed, including dispersion, separation, and filtering processes. The arc graphene can also find its potential application in supercapacitors, taking advantage of its large surface area and improved conductivity by doping.

  4. Vacuum interrupters and thyratrons as opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    The clear advantages of inductive storage for large scale energy storage applications are creating an increasing interest in the research and development of the opening switches required. Opening switches for single-shot inductive transfers have received considerable attention and are fairly well advanced. The problem addressed by this workshop of high power opening switches for high repetition rate applications is much more severe, however, and may well require a major research and development effort. Two candidates for such an opening switch, the triggered vacuum interrupter and the magnetically quenched thyratron, are discussed. By electrically retriggering the discharge in the vacuum interrupter between pulses, the dependence on mechanical motion is eliminated. This should enable repetition rate operation at 10 to 15 kHz while still maintaining the vacuum interrupter's proven interrupting performance of tens of kiloamps at tens of kilovolts. The magnetically quenched thyratron, on the other hand, uses a cross magnetic field to raise the switch impedance by decreasing the electron mobility and driving the discharge into an arc chute wall where it is quenched. Successful interruptions of 1 kA at 15 kV and 100 A at 50 kV after conduction for 10 ..mu..s have been demonstrated by previous researchers. Work at Los Alamos is directed toward understanding the basic mechanisms involved and increasing the switch ratings, particularly the conduction time.

  5. The statistical difference between bending arcs and regular polar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Fear, R. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the Polar UVI data set by Kullen et al. (2002) of 74 polar arcs is reinvestigated, focusing on bending arcs. Bending arcs are typically faint and form (depending on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By direction) on the dawnside or duskside oval with the tip of the arc splitting off the dayside oval. The tip subsequently moves into the polar cap in the antisunward direction, while the arc's nightside end remains attached to the oval, eventually becoming hook-shaped. Our investigation shows that bending arcs appear on the opposite oval side from and farther sunward than most regular polar arcs. They form during By-dominated IMF conditions: typically, the IMF clock angle increases from 60 to 90° about 20 min before the arc forms. Antisunward plasma flows from the oval into the polar cap just poleward of bending arcs are seen in Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data, indicating dayside reconnection. For regular polar arcs, recently reported characteristics are confirmed in contrast to bending arcs. This includes plasma flows along the nightside oval that originate close to the initial arc location and a significant delay in the correlation between IMF By and initial arc location. In our data set, the highest correlations are found with IMF By appearing at least 1-2 h before arc formation. In summary, bending arcs are distinctly different from regular arcs and cannot be explained by existing polar arc models. Instead, these results are consistent with the formation mechanism described in Carter et al. (2015), suggesting that bending arcs are caused by dayside reconnection.

  6. Ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Shaath, Nadim A

    2010-04-01

    The chemistry, photostability and mechanism of action of ultraviolet filters are reviewed. The worldwide regulatory status of the 55 approved ultraviolet filters and their optical properties are documented. The photostabilty of butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (avobenzone) is considered and methods to stabilize it in cosmetic formulations are presented.

  7. LTC vacuum blasting machine (metal): Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The LTC coating removal system consists of several hand tools such as a Roto Peen scaler and a needlegun. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. These are used with the LTC PTC-6 vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The PTC-6 is a vacuum system designed to be used with surface decontamination equipment. Dust and debris are captured by a high efficiency particulate filter (HEPA) vacuum system that deposits the waste directly into an on-board 23-gallon waste drum. The PTC-6 utilizes compressed air delivered from a source via an air hose connected to the air inlet to drive the hand held power tools. The control panel regulated the air pressure delivered to the tool. A separate compressed air flow powers the vacuum generator. The vacuum hoses connect the power tools to the dust chamber, returning paint chips and dust from the surface. A third compressed air flow is used to clean filters by pulsing air through a pipe with slots. The blasts of air shake dust and debris from the filter fabric.

  8. Optically bistable interference filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiting

    1990-07-01

    In general the temperature dependence of refractive index of coating materials is usually small. The most notable exception being the lead telluride. Thinfilm filters made of PbTe possess anomalously high nortlinearily in refractive index. We have investigated the phenomenon theoretically and experimexitally. 2 . BISTABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERFERENCE FILTERS It can be proved that the transmittance and reflectance of a twin-cavity NLIF which consists of two F-B filters coupled by a single low-index are given by 2 a(1r1 )(1-r0) T --i. -. (1) -d (1r01) (1r12) (1-i-Fsin 4)(1+sin p) where a r01 F . Te phase change of the cavity 0 IS 2r0dnAI0D (2) 2k5dT 1k where the absorbtance A 00 the initial detunning of fresonance and the first term on the right side of the equation(1)-(2) the output characteristics of the NLIF can be calculated. 3 . EXPERIMENTAL CASE The interference filters suggested to be used in my research will be made by vacuum deposition with a thermal source. The filters will be made according to the prescripti The dominant mechanism responsible for d(nhl) must be the change in the refractive index. A low limit on the OB switch-on time is found to be O. 35us and switch-off time is 5. 5us. 4. REFERENCES 1. W. T. Feng " Temperature effects on properties of zinc selenide and lead telluride" to be published in Infrared Physics. 2. H. S. Carslaw Conduction

  9. Vapor Deposition Of Metal From Gas/Tungsten Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Jack L.; Poorman, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum gas/tungsten-arc vapor-deposition process yields highly reflective, smooth films reproducing contours of surfaces on which deposited. Rate of deposition controlled precisely, and surface texture varied. Capable of deposition at rates double those of standard sputtering. Useful in making thin metallic coats to serve as electrical conductors, radio reflectors or antenna elements, or optical mirrors of partial or ultrahigh reflectivity, and in making semiconductor devices.

  10. Vapor Deposition Of Metal From Gas/Tungsten Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Jack L.; Poorman, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum gas/tungsten-arc vapor-deposition process yields highly reflective, smooth films reproducing contours of surfaces on which deposited. Rate of deposition controlled precisely, and surface texture varied. Capable of deposition at rates double those of standard sputtering. Useful in making thin metallic coats to serve as electrical conductors, radio reflectors or antenna elements, or optical mirrors of partial or ultrahigh reflectivity, and in making semiconductor devices.

  11. Vacuum-assisted venous drainage in complex congenital cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Walther, T; Tsang, V; Hawkey, D; de Leval, M

    2002-04-01

    Here, we report on a case of temporary neurological damage following conduit replacement from the right ventricle to pulmonary artery during which vacuum-assisted venous drainage was used. We will discuss the benefits and risks of this technique with potential arterial air embolism despite the use of arterial line filters. We will also make recommendations for avoiding such complications.

  12. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  13. ISABELLE vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H J

    1980-01-01

    The Intersecting Storage Accelerator (ISABELLE) consists of two rings having a circumference of 3.8 km each. In these rings superconducting magnets, held at 4 K, bend and focus the proton beam which is accelerated up to 400 GeV. Due to very different pressure requirements, ISABELLE has two completely independent vacuum systems. One, which operates at 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr, provides a very clean environment for the circulating proton beam. Here only ion and titanium sublimation pumps are used to provide the vacuum. The other system maintains superconducting magnet vessels at a pressure below 1 x 10/sup -4/ Torr, since at this pressure the gas conduction becomes negligible. In this so-called insulating vacuum system, turbomolecular pumps pump the inadvertent small helium leaks. Other gases are cryocondensed on the cold surfaces of the cryogenic system. The basic element of ISABELLE known as Full Cell containing 45 meters of beam tube, 8 pumping stations, 8 superconducting magnets and complete instrumentation has been constructed, leak checked and tested. All design parameters have been achieved in both vacuum systems. The two vacuum systems are described with particular emphasis on the influence of superconducting magnets in the selection of materials and UHV components.

  14. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  15. Environmental Influence of Gravity and Pressure on Arc Tracking of Insulated Wires Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Momentary short-circuit arcs between a defective polyimide-insulated wire and another conductor may thermally char (pyrolize) the insulating material. The charred polyimide, being conductive, can sustain the short-circuit arc, which may propagate along the wire through continuous pyrolization of the polyimide insulation (arc tracking). If the arcing wire is part of a multiple-wire bundle, the polyimide insulation of other wires within the bundle may become thermally charred and start arc tracking also (flash over). Such arc tracking can lead to complete failure of an entire wire bundle, causing other critical spacecraft or aircraft failures. Unfortunately, all tested candidate wire insulations for aerospace vehicles were susceptible to arc tracking. Therefore, a test procedure was designed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to select the insulation type least susceptible to arc tracking. This test procedure addresses the following three areas of concern: (1) probability of initiation, (2) probability of reinitiation (restrike), and (3) extent of arc tracking damage (propagation rate). Item 2 (restrike probability) is an issue if power can be terminated from and reapplied to the arcing wire (by a switch, fuse, or resettable circuit breaker). The degree of damage from an arcing event (item 3) refers to how easily the arc chars nearby insulation and propagates along the wire pair. Ease of nearby insulation charring can be determined by measuring the rate of arc propagation. Insulation that chars easily will propagate the arc faster than insulation that does not char very easily. A popular polyimide insulated wire for aerospace vehicles, MIL-W-81381, was tested to determine a degree of damage from an arcing event (item 3) in the following three environments: (1) microgravity with air at 1-atm pressure, (2) 1g with air at 1 atm, and (3) 1g within a 10^-6 Torr vacuum. The microgravity 1-atm air was the harshest environment, with respect to the rate of damage of arc

  16. Control of arc length during gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    An arc-length control system has been developed for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) under spray transfer welding conditions. The ability to monitor and control arc length during arc welding allows consistent weld characteristics to be maintained and therefore improves weld quality. Arc length control has only been implemented for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), where an automatic voltage control (AVC) unit adjusts torch-to-work distance. The system developed here compliments the voltage- and current-sensing techniques commonly used for control of GMAW. The system consists of an arc light intensity sensor (photodiode), a Hall-effect current sensor, a personal computer and software implementing a data interpretation and control algorithms. Arc length was measured using both arc light and arc current signals. Welding current was adjusted to maintain constant arc length. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was used. Gains were automatically selected based on the desired welding conditions. In performance evaluation welds, arc length varied from 2.5 to 6.5 mm while welding up a sloped workpiece (ramp in CTWD) without the control. Arc length was maintained within 1 mm of the desired (5 mm ) with the control.

  17. Definition and means of maintaining the process vacuum liquid detection interlock systems portion of the PFP safety envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.J.

    1997-01-02

    The Process Vacuum Liquid Detection interlock systems prevent intrusion of process liquids into the HEPA filters downstream of demisters {number_sign}6 and {number_sign}7 during Process Vacuum System operation. This prevents liquid intrusion into the filters which could cause a criticality. The Safety Envelope (SE) includes the equipment which detects the presence of liquids in the vacuum headers; isolates the filters; shuts down the vacuum pumps; and alarms the condition. The presence of liquid in the HC-4, HC-7, and HC-227S glovebox vacuum traps or a high level of liquid in the 236-Z Tank 50 will isolate these portions of the vacuum system from the main headers. This report identifies the equipment in the SE; operating, maintenance, and surveillance procedures needed to maintain the SE equipment; and rationale for exclusion of some equipment and testing from the SE.

  18. Multi-Canister overpack internal HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-11-03

    The rationale for locating a filter assembly inside each Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) rather than include the filter in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) process piping system was to eliminate the potential for contamination to the operators, processing equipment, and the MCO. The internal HEPA filters provide essential protection to facility workers from alpha contamination, both external skin contamination and potential internal depositions. Filters installed in the CVD process piping cannot mitigate potential contamination when breaking the process piping connections. Experience with K-Basin material has shown that even an extremely small release can result in personnel contamination and costly schedule disruptions to perform equipment and facility decontamination. Incorporating the filter function internal to the MCO rather than external is consistent with ALARA requirements of 10 CFR 835. Based on the above, the SNF Project position is to retain the internal HEPA filters in the MCO design.

  19. Improving Vacuum Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between the Kirby company and Lewis Research Center, NASA technology was applied to a commercial vacuum cleaner product line. Kirby engineers were interested in advanced operational concepts, such as particle flow behavior and vibration, critical factors to improve vacuum cleaner performance. An evaluation of the company 1994 home care system, the Kirby G4, led to the refinement of the new G5 and future models. Under the cooperative agreement, Kirby had access to Lewis' holography equipment, which added insight into how long a vacuum cleaner fan would perform, as well as advanced computer software that can simulate the flow of air through fans. The collaboration resulted in several successes including fan blade redesign and continuing dialogue on how to improve air-flow traits in various nozzle designs.

  20. Arc characteristics of submerged arc welding with stainless steel wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Wu, Zhi-sheng; Liu, Cui-rong; Chen, Feng-hua

    2014-08-01

    The arc characteristics of submerged arc welding (SAW) with stainless steel wire were studied by using Analysator Hannover (AH). The tests were carried out under the same preset arc voltage combined with different welding currents. By comparing the probability density distribution (PDD) curves of arc voltage and welding current, the changes were analyzed, the metal transfer mode in SAW was deduced, and the characteristics of a stable arc were summarized. The analysis results show that, with an increase of welding parameters, the short-circuiting peak in the PDD curves of arc voltage decreases gradually until it disappears, and the dominant metal transfer mode changes from flux-wall guided transfer to projected transfer and then to streaming transfer. Moreover, when the PDD curves of arc voltage are both unimodal and generally symmetrical, the greater the peak probability and the smaller the peak span, the more stable the arc becomes.

  1. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  2. Are vacuum-filtrated reduced graphene oxide membranes symmetric?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Wu, Jinbo; Hedhili, Mohamed Neijib; Wang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Graphene or reduced graphene oxide (rGO) membrane-based materials are promising for many advanced applications due to their exceptional properties. One of the most widely used synthesis methods for rGO membranes is vacuum filtration of graphene oxide (GO) on a filter membrane, followed by reduction, which shows great advantages such as operational convenience and good controllability. Despite vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes being widely used in many applications, a fundamental question is overlooked: are the top and bottom surfaces of the membranes formed at the interfaces with air and with the filter membrane respectively symmetric or asymmetric? This work, for the first time, reports the asymmetry of the vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes and discloses the filter membranes' physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane, which takes place when the filter membrane surface pores have similar dimension to GO sheets. This result points out that the asymmetric surface properties should be cautiously taken into consideration while designing the surface-related applications for GO and rGO membranes.Graphene or reduced graphene oxide (rGO) membrane-based materials are promising for many advanced applications due to their exceptional properties. One of the most widely used synthesis methods for rGO membranes is vacuum filtration of graphene oxide (GO) on a filter membrane, followed by reduction, which shows great advantages such as operational convenience and good controllability. Despite vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes being widely used in many applications, a fundamental question is overlooked: are the top and bottom surfaces of the membranes formed at the interfaces with air and with the filter membrane respectively symmetric or asymmetric? This work, for the first time, reports the asymmetry of the vacuum-filtrated rGO membranes and discloses the filter membranes' physical imprint on the bottom surface of the rGO membrane, which takes place when the filter

  3. Superoleophobicity under vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Bell, Steven E. J.; Liu, Weimin; Zhou, Feng

    2011-05-01

    By using superoleophobic alumina and low vapor pressure oils we have been able to study wetting behavior at high vacuum. Here, we show that a superoleophobic state can exist for some probe liquids, even under high vacuum. However, with other liquids the surfaces are only superoloephobic because air is trapped beneath the droplet and the contact angle decreases dramatically (150°-120°) if this air is removed. These observations open up the possibility of designing materials which fully exploit the potential of physically trapped air to achieve extreme oleophobicity and/or hydrophobicity.

  4. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  5. Arc electrode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Berns, D.; Heberlein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The project consisted of two parts: (1) the cathode interaction studies which were a continuation of previous work and had the objective of increasing our understanding of the microscopic phenomena controlling cathode erosion in arc jet thrusters, and (2) the studies of the anode attachment in arc jet thrusters. The cathode interaction studies consisted of (1) a continuation of some modeling work in which the previously derived model for the cathode heating was applied to some specific gases and electrode materials, and (2) experimental work in which various diagnostics was applied to the cathode. The specific diagnostics used were observation of the cathode tip during arcing using a Laser Strobe Video system in conjunction with a tele-microscope, a monochromator with an optical multichannel analyzer for the determination of the cathode temperature distribution, and various ex situ materials analysis methods. The emphasis of our effort was shifted to the cathode materials analysis because a parallel project was in place during the second half of 1993 with a visiting scientist pursuing arc electrode materials studies. As a consequence, the diagnostic investigations of the arc in front of the cathode had to be postponed to the first half of 1994, and we are presently preparing these measurements. The results of last year's study showed some unexpected effects influencing the cathode erosion behavior, such as increased erosion away from the cathode tip, and our understanding of these effects should improve our ability to control cathode erosion. The arc jet anode attachment studies concentrated on diagnostics of the instabilities in subsonic anode attachment arc jet thrusters, and were supplemental measurements to work which was performed by one of the authors who spent the summer as an intern at NASA Lewis Research Center. A summary of the results obtained during the internship are included because they formed an integral part of the study. Two tasks for 1994, the

  6. Bright Arcing Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-27

    Several arcing loops rotated into view and swirled above an active region, which gave us a nice profile view of the action (June 26-27, 2016). The arcing plasma is tracing magnetic field lines extending out from the active region. Some darker matter also jiggled back and forth near the active region as well, pulled about by magnetic forces. At one point a lick of plasma pushed its way out from the region but quickly fell back into the sun. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are also available at the Photojournal. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20882

  7. HEPA filter concerns - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.F.

    1995-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated a complete review of the DOE High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Program to identify areas for improvement. Although this process is currently ongoing, various issues and problems have already been identified for action that not only impacts the DOE HEPA filter program, but potentially the national and international air cleaning community as well. This paper briefly reviews a few of those concerns that may be of interest, and discusses actions initiated by the DOE to address the associated issues and problems. Issues discussed include: guidance standards, in-place testing, specifications, Test Facilities, portable units, vacuum cleaners, substitute aerosols, filter efficiencies, aging/shelf life/service life, fire suppression, handbook, Quality Products List (QPL), QA testing, and evaluations.

  8. Characterization Tests of WFC3 Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggett, S.; Boucarut, R.; Telfer, R.; Quijano, J. Kim; Quijada, M.; Arsenovic, P.; Brown, T.; Dailey, M.; Figer, D.; Hilbert, B.

    2006-01-01

    The WFC3 instrument to be installed on HST during the next servicing mission consists of a UVIS and an IR channel. Each channel is allocated its own complement of filters: 48 elements for the UVIS (42 filters, 5 quads, and 1 UV grism) and 17 slots for the IR (15 filters and 2 grisms). While a majority of the UVIS filters exhibit excellent performance consistent with or exceeding expectations, a subset show significant filter ghosts. Procurement of improved replacement filters is in progress and a summary of the characterization tests being performed on the new filters is presented. In the IR channel, while no filter ghosting was detected in any of the filters during thermal vacuum testing, the grisms were found to be installed incorrectly; they have been removed and will be reinstalled. In addition, due to the significantly improved response blueward of 800nm expected in the new substrate-removed IR detector (see Invited talk by R.A.Kimble, this volume), two IR filters originally constructed on a fused silica substrate are being remade using an IR transmitting color glass to block any visible light transmission. Tests of the new IR filters and preparations for the grism reinstallation are summarized

  9. Synthesis method for ultrananocrystalline diamond in powder employing a coaxial arc plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Aki; Hanada, Kenji; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    A new method that enables us to synthesize ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) in powder is proposed. Highly energetic carbon species ejected from a graphite cathode of a coaxial arc plasma gun were provided on a quartz plate at a high density by repeated arc discharge in a compact vacuum chamber, and resultant films automatically peeled from the plate were aggregated and powdered. The grain size was easily controlled from 2.4 to 15.0 nm by changing the arc discharge energy. It was experimentally demonstrated that the proposed method is a new and promising method that enables us to synthesize UNCD in powder easily and controllably.

  10. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  11. VACUUM SEALING MEANS FOR LOW VACUUM PRESSURES

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-06-12

    S>A vacuum seal is designed in which the surface tension of a thin layer of liquid metal of low vapor pressure cooperates with adjacent surfaces to preclude passages of gases across pressure differentials as low as 10/sup -8/ mm Hg. Mating contiguous surfaces composed of copper, brass, stainless steel, nickel, molybdenum, tungsten, tantalum, glass, quartz, and/or synthetic mica are disposed to provide a maximum tolerance, D, expressed by 2 gamma /P/sub 1/, where gamma is the coefflcient of the surface tension of the metal sealant selected in dynes/cm/sub 2/. Means for heating the surfaces remotely is provided where temperatures drop below about 250 deg C. A sealant consisting of an alloy of gallium, indium, and tin, among other combinations tabulated, is disposed therebetween after treating the surfaces to improve wettability, as by ultrasonic vibrations, the surfaces and sealants being selected according to the anticipated experimental conditions of use. (AEC)

  12. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: circuitry and mechanical design.

    PubMed

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  13. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    SciTech Connect

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-15

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 {mu}s. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  14. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  15. Vacuum Kundt waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, David; Milson, Robert; Coley, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the invariant classification of vacuum Kundt waves using the Cartan-Karlhede algorithm and determine the upper bound on the number of iterations of the Karlhede algorithm to classify the vacuum Kundt waves (Collins (1991 Class. Quantum Grav. 8 1859-69), Machado Ramos (1996 Class. Quantum Grav. 13 1589)). By choosing a particular coordinate system we partially construct the canonical coframe used in the classification to study the functional dependence of the invariants arising at each iteration of the algorithm. We provide a new upper bound, q ⩽ 4, and show that this bound is sharp by analyzing the subclass of Kundt waves with invariant count beginning with (0, 1,…) to show that the class with invariant count (0, 1, 3, 4, 4) exists. This class of vacuum Kundt waves is shown to be unique as the only set of metrics requiring the fourth covariant derivatives of the curvature. We conclude with an invariant classification of the vacuum Kundt waves using a suite of invariants.

  16. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  17. Various unique vacuum holders

    SciTech Connect

    Gregar, J.S.

    1992-12-01

    Glassblowers use vacuum holding devices to support a flat plate in the glassflowing lathe to seal onto the end of, or inside of, a glass cylinder. Glassblowing blowhose swivels tend to leak; a rotating union from the hydraulics industry is better. Various graphite holder designs are described.

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The authors report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182 A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and read out with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 836 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of sub-micron particles were recorded.

  19. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  20. Investigating Discharge Ignition Fundamentals of Micro-Cathode Arc Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teel, George Lewis

    This dissertation is a compilation of studies of the volatile process that vacuum arcs undergo, known as breakdown. Breakdown is a transfer of electrons from one electrode to another. These electrons typically bombard the electrode surfaces causing secondary electron emission and ionization. This expulsion of ions and electrons then proceed to cause arc discharge, is what most people associate as ``the spark.'' This field-emission to breakdown process induces localized heating, which then causes this explosive ionization to occur. Once plasma is formed, high temperatures and pressures are forced on the surrounding surfaces. This initiation process, the effects of this process, and the manipulation of these effects have all been studied and described in this work. A series of initial observations of the before and after effects of discharge have been made through various equipment such as a Scanning Electron Microscope, Energy Dispersive X-Ray, and Confocal Microscope. Methods to develop a resistance measurement scheme provided a means to characterize the thruster's operation over its lifetime. Further characterization of the plasma plume was done through the use of Langmuir probes. Temperature and density distributions were also measured. An entirely new and miniaturized design of the thrusters were developed and initially tested. Last, a new application for these vacuum arc thrusters was studied for use in an underwater environment. The purpose of this work was to further develop a vacuum arc thruster, known as the Micro-Cathode Arc Thruster (muCAT), which has been developed at the George Washington University's Micro Propulsion and Nanotechnology Lab. The muCAT has been developed over the past decade, and in the last 5 years has gone from simple lab circuitry to space flown hardware. Therefore it is imperative to fully understand every aspect of this technology to achieve precisely what missions require. The results of this dissertation have allowed a new

  1. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  2. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  3. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  4. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  5. Evaluation of pyrolysis and arc tracking on candidate wire insulation designs for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Stavnes, Mark W.; Hrovat, Kenneth

    1994-05-01

    Polyimide wire insulation has been found to be vulnerable to pyrolization and arc tracking due to momentary short circuit arcing events. This report compares arc tracking susceptibility of candidate insulation configurations for space wiring applications. The insulation types studied in this report were gauge 20 (0.81 mm dia.) hybrid wiring constructions using polyimide, tetrafluoroethylene (TFE), cross-linked ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (XL-ETFE) and/or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) insulations. These constructions were manufactured according to military wiring standards for aerospace applications. Arc track testing was conducted under DC bias and vacuum (10(exp -6) torr). The tests were conducted to compare the various insulation constructions in terms of their resistance to arc tracking restrike. The results of the tests are presented.

  6. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  7. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  8. Effect of arc current on droplet ejection from tungsten-based electrode in multiphase AC arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Taro; Tanaka, Manabu; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2017-05-01

    The dynamic behavior of droplet ejection from a tungsten electrode was successfully visualized using a high-speed camera and an appropriate band-pass filter. The effect of arc current on droplet ejection was investigated to understand the electrode erosion mechanism in the multiphase AC arc. The rate of erosion by droplet ejection increased with increasing current. This result was examined on the basis of the time variation in forces on a pending droplet at the electrode tip during the AC cycle. The relationship among electromagnetic force, surface tension, and ion pressure on the molten tip during the cathodic period is crucial for controling droplet ejection. The molten tip becomes hemispherical forming the pending droplet with an increase in the instantaneous value of arc current during the AC cycle. The pending droplet detaches from the electrode surface when electromagnetic force becomes the dominant force. Consequently, a higher rate of erosion by droplet ejection with a higher arc current resulted from a stronger electromagnetic force.

  9. Characterization and performance of PAUCam filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, R.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Castander, F. J.; Díaz, C.; Gaweda, J.; Jiménez Rojas, J.; Jiménez, S.; Lamensans, M.; Padilla, C.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla Noarbe, I.

    2016-08-01

    PAUCam is a large field of view camera designed to exploit the field delivered by the prime focus corrector of the William Herschel Telescope, at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos. One of the new features of this camera is its filter system, placed within a few millimeters of the focal plane using eleven trays containing 40 narrow band and 6 broad band filters, working in vacuum at an operational temperature of 250K and in a focalized beam. In this contribution, we describe the performance of these filters both in the characterization tests at the laboratory.

  10. Designer Infrared Filters using Stacked Metal Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Rebbert, M.; Sternberg, O.

    2003-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated infrared filters for use at wavelengths greater than or equal to 15 microns. Unlike conventional dielectric filters used at the short wavelengths, ours are made from stacked metal grids, spaced at a very small fraction of the performance wavelengths. The individual lattice layers are gold, the spacers are polyimide, and they are assembled using integrated circuit processing techniques; they resemble some metallic photonic band-gap structures. We simulate the filter performance accurately, including the coupling of the propagating, near-field electromagnetic modes, using computer aided design codes. We find no anomalous absorption. The geometrical parameters of the grids are easily altered in practice, allowing for the production of tuned filters with predictable useful transmission characteristics. Although developed for astronomical instrumentation, the filters arc broadly applicable in systems across infrared and terahertz bands.

  11. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  12. Gas bearing operates in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Bearing has restrictions to reduce air leaks and is connected to external pumpout facility which removes exhausted air. Token amount of air which is lost to vacuum is easily removed by conventional vacuum pump.

  13. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.T.; Coffin, D.O.

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  14. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  15. REVIEW ARTICLE Fibre optic devices produced by arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego, G.

    2010-11-01

    We present an overview of the applications of the electric arc technique related to optical fibre technology. The use of arc discharges ranges from the well-known fibre splicing, going through the fabrication of basic devices such as fibre tapers and microspheres, to tailoring the spectra of UV-induced gratings such as in the apodization of fibre Bragg gratings and also in the fabrication of phase-shifted and sampled fibre Bragg gratings. However, in the past decade a topic more intensively investigated was probably long-period fibre gratings. Therefore, some devices based on arc-induced gratings, namely, phase-shifted and step-changed gratings and bandpass filters are discussed. We also present an electrically insulated thermocouple assembled in situ using arc discharges. This sensor is very useful in the determination of the temperature attained by the fibre during an arc discharge, this property being fundamental for the discussion of the mechanisms of formation and for the understanding of the thermal properties of arc-induced devices.

  16. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  17. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  18. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object.

  19. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  20. Hall-effect arc protector

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.