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Sample records for final state interactions

  1. GENIE final state interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Final state interactions are an important component of any neutrino-nucleus Monte Carlo program. GENIE has 2 FSI programs which serve different purposes. Each has fair-good agreement with a wide range of hadron-nucleus data. Recent improvements and planned advancements are described.

  2. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  3. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like ''Watson's theorem'' holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B{yields}K{pi} fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  4. Final state interactions and the Sivers function

    SciTech Connect

    Gamberg, Leonard; Schlegel, Marc

    2011-10-24

    The non-vanishing of naive T-odd parton distributions function can be explained by the existence of the gauge link which emerges from the factorized description of the deep inelastic scattering cross section into perturbatively calculable and non-perturbative factors. This path ordered exponential describes initial / final-state interactions of the active parton due to soft gluon exchanges with the target remnants. Although these interactions are non-perturbative, studies of final state interactions have been approximated by perturbative one-gluon exchange in Abelian models. We include higher-order gluonic contributions from the gauge link by applying non-perturbative eikonal methods, incorporating color degrees of freedom in a calculation of the Sivers function. In this context we study the effects of color by considering the FSIs with with Abelian and non-Abelian gluon interactions. We confirm the large N{sub c} QCD scaling behavior of Sivers functions and further uncover the deviations for finite N{sub c}. Within this framework of FSIs we perform a quantitative check of approximate relations between T-odd TMDs and GPD which goes beyond the discussion of overall signs.

  5. Final state interactions in hadronic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    There exist many experimental indications that final-state interactions (FSIs) may play a prominent role not only in charmful B decays but also in charmless B ones. We examine the final-state rescattering effects on the hadronic B decay rates and their impact on direct CP violation. The color-suppressed neutral modes such as B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} can be substantially enhanced by long-distance rescattering effects. The direct CP-violating partial rate asymmetries in charmless B decays to {pi}{pi}/{pi}K and {rho}{pi} are significantly affected by final-state rescattering, and their signs are generally different from that predicted by the short-distance (SD) approach. For example, direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is increased to around 60% due to final-state rescattering effects whereas the short-distance picture gives about 1%. Evidence of direct CP violation in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is now established, while the combined BABAR and Belle measurements of B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} imply a 3.6{sigma} direct CP asymmetry in the {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode. Our predictions for CP violation agree with experiment in both magnitude and sign, whereas the QCD factorization predictions (especially for {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) seem to have some difficulty with the data. Direct CP violation in the decay B{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} is very small ((less-or-similar sign)1%) in the standard model even after the inclusion of FSIs. Its measurement will provide a nice way to search for new physics as in the standard model QCD penguins cannot contribute (except by isospin violation). Current data on {pi}K modes seem to violate the isospin sum-rule relation, suggesting the presence of electroweak penguin contributions. We have also investigated whether a large transverse polarization in B{yields}{phi}K* can arise from the

  6. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Tomasz; Juszczak, Cezary; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  7. Novel QCD Effects from Initial and Final State Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2007-09-12

    Initial-state and final-state interactions which are conventionally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions. The effects, which arise from gluon exchange between the active and spectator quarks, cause leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering also leads to nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing of nuclear structure functions through multiple scattering reactions in the nuclear target. Factorization-breaking effects are particularly important for hard hadron interactions since both initial-state and final-state interactions appear. Related factorization breaking effects can also appear in exclusive electroproduction reactions and in deeply virtual Compton scattering. None of the effects of initial-state and final-state interactions are incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target hadron computed in isolation.

  8. X(1576) and the final state interaction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Lei-Lei; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2007-04-01

    We study whether the broad peak X(1576) observed by BES Collaboration arises from the final state interaction effect of ρ(14501700) decays. The interference effect could produce an enhancement around 1540 MeV in the K+K- spectrum with typical interference phases. However, the branching ratio B[J/ψ→π0ρ(14501700)]·B[ρ(14501700)→K+K-] from the final state interaction effect is far less than the experimental data.

  9. X(1576) and the final state interaction effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Bo; Shen Leilei; Zhu Shilin

    2007-04-01

    We study whether the broad peak X(1576) observed by BES Collaboration arises from the final state interaction effect of {rho}(1450 1700) decays. The interference effect could produce an enhancement around 1540 MeV in the K{sup +}K{sup -} spectrum with typical interference phases. However, the branching ratio B[J/{psi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{rho}(1450 1700)]{center_dot}B[{rho}(1450 1700){yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}] from the final state interaction effect is far less than the experimental data.

  10. Final State Interactions, T-odd PDFs & the Lensing Function

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Gamberg, Marc Schlegel

    2009-12-01

    It has been suggested that under certain approximations the Sivers effect can be described in terms of factorization of final state interactions and a spatial distortion of impact parameter space parton distribution; that is a convolution of the so-called lensing function and the impact parameter GPD E. In this approach the lensing function is calculated in a non-perturbative eikonal model. This enables a comparison between the a priori distinct Sivers function and the GPD E which goes beyond the discussion of overall signs.

  11. Experimental deuteron momentum distributions with reduced final state interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Hari P.

    This dissertation presents a study of the D( e, e'p)n reaction carried out at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) for a set of fixed values of four-momentum transfer Q 2 = 2.1 and 0.8 (GeV/c)2 and for missing momenta pm ranging from pm = 0.03 to pm = 0.65 GeV/c. The analysis resulted in the determination of absolute D(e,e' p)n cross sections as a function of the recoiling neutron momentum and it's scattering angle with respect to the momentum transfer [vector] q. The angular distribution was compared to various modern theoretical predictions that also included final state interactions. The data confirmed the theoretical prediction of a strong anisotropy of final state interaction contributions at Q2 of 2.1 (GeV/c)2 while at the lower Q2 value, the anisotropy was much less pronounced. At Q2 of 0.8 (GeV/c)2, theories show a large disagreement with the experimental results. The experimental momentum distribution of the bound proton inside the deuteron has been determined for the first time at a set of fixed neutron recoil angles. The momentum distribution is directly related to the ground state wave function of the deuteron in momentum space. The high momentum part of this wave function plays a crucial role in understanding the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon force. At Q2 = 2.1 (GeV/c)2, the momentum distribution determined at small neutron recoil angles is much less affected by FSI compared to a recoil angle of 75°. In contrast, at Q2 = 0.8 (GeV/c)2 there seems to be no region with reduced FSI for larger missing momenta. Besides the statistical errors, systematic errors of about 5--6 % were included in the final results in order to account for normalization uncertainties and uncertainties in the determi- nation of kinematic veriables. The measurements were carried out using an electron beam energy of 2.8 and 4.7 GeV with beam currents between 10 to 100 μ A. The scattered electrons and the ejected protons originated from a 15cm

  12. Dispersive approaches for three-particle final state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we presented different representations of Khuri-Treiman equation, the advantage and disadvantage of each representations are discussed. With a scattering amplitude toy model, we also studied the sensitivity of solution of KT equation to left-hand cut of toy model and to the different approximate methods. At last, we give a brief discussion of Watson's theorem when three particles in final states are involved.

  13. Final-state interactions in two-nucleon knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, Camille; Cosyn, Wim; Ryckebusch, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Background: Exclusive two-nucleon knockout after electroexcitation of nuclei [A (e ,e'N N ) in brief] is considered to be a primary source of information about short-range correlations (SRCs) in nuclei. For a proper interpretation of the data, final-state interactions (FSIs) need to be theoretically controlled. Purpose: Our goal is to quantify the role of FSI effects in exclusive A (e ,e'p N ) reactions for four target nuclei representative of the whole mass region. Our focus is on processes that are SRC driven. We investigate the role of FSIs for two characteristic detector setups corresponding to "small" and "large" coverage of the available phase space. Method: Use is made of a factorized expression for the A (e ,e'p N ) cross section that is proportional to the two-body center-of-mass (c.m.) momentum distribution of close-proximity pairs. The A (e ,e'p p ) and A (e ,e'p n ) reactions for the target nuclei 12C,27Al,56Fe, and 208Pb are investigated. The elastic attenuation mechanisms in the FSIs are included using the relativistic multiple-scattering Glauber approximation (RMSGA). Single-charge exchange (SCX) reactions are also included. We introduce the nuclear transparency TAp N, defined as the ratio of exclusive (e ,e'p N ) cross sections on nuclei to those on "free" nucleon pairs, as a measure for the aggregated effect of FSIs in p N knockout reactions from nucleus A . A toy model is introduced in order to gain a better understanding of the A dependence of TAp N. Results: The transparency TAp N drops from 0.2 -0.3 for 12C to 0.04 -0.07 for 208Pb. For all considered kinematics, the mass dependence of TAp N can be captured by the power law TAp N∝A-λ with 0.4 ≲λ ≲0.5 . Apart from an overall reduction factor, we find that FSIs only modestly affect the distinct features of SRC-driven A (e ,e'p N ) which are dictated by the c.m. distribution of close-proximity pairs. Conclusion: The SCX mechanisms represent a relatively small (order of a few percent

  14. A quark model calculation of yy->pipi including final-state interactions

    SciTech Connect

    H.G. Blundell; S. Godfrey; G. Hay; Eric Swanson

    2000-02-01

    A quark model calculation of the processes yy->pi+pi- and yy->pipi is performed. At tree level, only charged pions couple to the initial state photons and neutral pions are not exceeded in the final state. However a small but significant cross section is observed. We demonstrate that this may be accounted for by a rotation in isospin space induced by final-state interactions.

  15. Penguins, trees and final state interactions in B decays in broken SU3.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science

    1997-12-01

    The availability of data on B{sub s} decays to strange quasi-two-body final states, either with or without charmonium opens new possibilities for understanding different contributions of weak diagrams and in particular the relative contributions of tree and penguin diagrams. Corresponding B{sub d} and B{sub s} decays to charge conjugate final states are equal in the SU(3) symmetry limit and the dominant SU(3) breaking mechanism is given by ratios of CKM matrix elements. Final State Interactions effects should be small, because strong interactions conserve C and should tend to cancel in ratios between charge conjugate states. Particularly interesting implications of decays into final states containing {eta} and {eta}{prime} are discussed.

  16. Final state interactions and the transverse structure of the pion using non-perturbative eikonal methods

    SciTech Connect

    Gamberg, Leonard; Schlegel, Marc

    2010-01-18

    In the factorized picture of semi-inclusive hadronic processes the naive time reversal-odd parton distributions exist by virtue of the gauge link which renders it color gauge invariant. The link characterizes the dynamical effect of initial/final-state interactions of the active parton due soft gluon exchanges with the target remnant. Though these interactions are non-perturbative, studies of final-state interaction have been approximated by perturbative one-gluon approximation in Abelian models. We include higher-order contributions by applying non-perturbative eikonal methods incorporating color degrees of freedom in a calculation of the Boer-Mulders function of the pion. Lastly, using this framework we explore under what conditions the Boer Mulders function can be described in terms of factorization of final state interactions and a spatial distribution in impact parameter space.

  17. Final state interactions and the transverse structure of the pion using non-perturbative eikonal methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gamberg, Leonard; Schlegel, Marc

    2010-01-18

    In the factorized picture of semi-inclusive hadronic processes the naive time reversal-odd parton distributions exist by virtue of the gauge link which renders it color gauge invariant. The link characterizes the dynamical effect of initial/final-state interactions of the active parton due soft gluon exchanges with the target remnant. Though these interactions are non-perturbative, studies of final-state interaction have been approximated by perturbative one-gluon approximation in Abelian models. We include higher-order contributions by applying non-perturbative eikonal methods incorporating color degrees of freedom in a calculation of the Boer-Mulders function of the pion. Lastly, using this framework we explore under what conditionsmore » the Boer Mulders function can be described in terms of factorization of final state interactions and a spatial distribution in impact parameter space.« less

  18. Final state interactions and CP violation in B decays to three pseudoscalars

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Robert; Lesniak, L.; Bennich, B. El; Furman, A.; Moussallam, B.

    2010-08-05

    We study CP violation and final state interactions between pions and kaons in B{sup +}, B{sup -}, -B{sup 0} and B-bar{sup 0} decays into K{pi}{pi}. The weak transition amplitudes consist of two terms: the first part is derived in QCD factorization approach and the second one is a phenomenological long-distance charming penguin contribution. The final state K{pi} interactions in S- and P-waves are described by strange scalar and vector form factors, respectively. These are determined using a unitary coupled channel model together with chiral symmetry and asymptotic QCD constraints. The final state interactions are dominated by presence of the scalar K{sub 0}*(1430) and the vector K*(892) resonances. We show that additional charming penguin amplitudes are needed to reproduce the latest experimental K{pi} effective mass and helicity angle distributions, branching fractions and asymmetries obtained by Belle and BaBar collaborations.

  19. Strong-field S -matrix theory with final-state Coulomb interaction in all orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, F. H. M.

    2016-09-01

    During the last several decades the so-called Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss or strong-field approximation (SFA) has been highly useful for the analysis of atomic and molecular processes in intense laser fields. However, it is well known that SFA does not account for the final-state Coulomb interaction which is, however, unavoidable for the ubiquitous ionization process. In this Rapid Communication we solve this long-standing problem and give a complete strong-field S -matrix expansion that accounts for the final-state Coulomb interaction in all orders, explicitly.

  20. Penguins, trees and final state interactions in B decays to flavor mixed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkin, Harry J.

    1995-02-01

    Final state interactions are the catch-22 in planning CP violation experiments using B decays. If FSI are unknown and appreciable, calculations of contributions of various weak interaction diagrams are unreliable. But if FSI are negligible, the contributions from tree and penguin diagrams have the same strong phase and cannot produce a CP-violating charge asymmetry. We show how analysis of certain related decays can pinpoint and clarify the role of FSI. We focus on decays into flavor-mixed neutral nonstrange mesons which are particularly sensitive via interference to small contributions from secondary diagrams, immune to various symmetry-breaking diseases and may avoid the catch-22 via the OZI rule.

  1. Pauli blocking and final-state interaction in electron-nucleus quasielastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lon-chang

    2008-01-01

    The nucleon final-state interaction in electron-nucleus quasielastic scattering is studied. Based on the unitarity equation satisfied by the scattering-wave operators, a doorway model is developed to implement the Pauli-blocking of nucleon knockout. The model is complementary to the commonly used nuclear Fermi gas model which can not be applied with confidence to light- and medium-mass nuclei. Pauli blocking in these latter nuclei is illustrated with the case of Coulomb interaction. Significant effects are noted for beam energies below {approx} 350 MeV/c. Extension of the model to high-energy hadron-nucleus quasielastic scatterings is discussed.

  2. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cosyn, Wim; Melnitchouk, Wally; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-01-16

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~<2 GeV and a continuum contribution for larger W as the relevant set of effective hadron states entering the final-state interaction amplitude. The results show sizeable on-shell FSI contributions for Bjorken x ~> 0.6 andmore » Q2 < 10 GeV2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.« less

  3. X-ray line shapes of metals: Exact solutions of a final-state interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarts, Coenraad A.; Dow, John D.

    2005-10-01

    By means of model calculations for an independent-electron metal, we obtain exact line shapes for the photon absorption, emission, and photoemission spectra of core states, including electronic relaxation. In all cases we find an x-ray edge anomaly. For the absorption and emission spectra this anomaly is superposed on a continuum resembling Elliott exciton theory. We display how the spectra evolve from the exciton limit to the free-electron limit as the final-state interaction strength is decreased or the Fermi energy increased. We compare the spectra obtained for different final-state interactions and find that different types of interactions produce different spectral shapes. Away from threshold the absorption and emission profiles show an enhancement of the free-electron result, as predicted by the screened-exciton theory. Our results offer potential explanations for (i) incompatibilities between threshold exponents and exponents extracted from other data, (ii) the occurrence of nearly symmetric x-ray photoemission lines, and (iii) the lack of mirror symmetry of absorption and emission edges.

  4. Nonthermal p/π ratio at LHC as a consequence of hadronic final state interactions.

    PubMed

    Steinheimer, Jan; Aichelin, Jörg; Bleicher, Marcus

    2013-01-25

    Recent LHC data on Pb+Pb reactions at sqrt[s](NN) = 2.7 TeV suggests that the p/π is incompatible with thermal models. We explore several hadron ratios (K/π, p/π, Λ/π, Ξ/π) within a hydrodynamic model with a hadronic after burner, namely the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics model 3.3, and show that the deviations can be understood as a final state effect. We propose the p/π as an observable sensitive on whether final state interactions take place or not. The measured values of the hadron ratios do then allow us to gauge the transition energy density from hydrodynamics to the Boltzmann description. We find that the data can be explained with transition energy densities of 840 ± 150 MeV/fm(3).

  5. Final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhentao

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect of final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. We consider three major processes of the pair production in the model: lepton pair annihilation, ZZ fusion, and WW fusion. We find that the corrections caused by the effect for these processes are markedly different. According to our results, the effect can cause non-negligible corrections to the cross sections for lepton pair annihilation and small corrections for ZZ fusion, and this effect is negligible for WW fusion.

  6. Neutron-proton final-state interaction in. pi. d breakup: Vector analyzing power

    SciTech Connect

    List, W.; Boschitz, E.T.; Garcilazo, H.; Gyles, W.; Ottermann, C.R.; Tacik, R.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Smith, G.R.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured for the ..pi..d breakup reaction in a kinematically complete experiment. The dependence of iT/sub 11/ on the momentum of the proton has been obtained for 36 pion-proton angle pairs at T/sub ..pi../ = 134 and 228 MeV. The data are compared with predictions from the new relativistic Faddeev theory of Garcilazo. The sensitivity of the observable iT/sub 11/, in particular in the np final-state interaction region, to details of the theory is investigated.

  7. Final-state interaction as origin of single-spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.S.

    2005-05-06

    Recent measurements from the HERMES, SMC, CLAS and COMPASS collaborations show a remarkably large azimuthal single-spin asymmetries of the proton in semi-inclusive pion leptoproduction {gamma}*(q)p{up_arrow} {yields} {pi}X. The existence of such single-spin asymmetries requires a phase difference between two amplitudes coupling the proton target with J{sub p}{sup z} = {+-}(1/2) to the same final-state, the same amplitudes which are necessary to produce a nonzero proton anomalous magnetic moment. We show that the exchange of gauge particles between the outgoing quark and the proton spectators produces a Coulomb-like complex phase which depends on the angular momentum Lz of the proton's constituents and is thus distinct for different proton spin amplitudes. We then find that final-state interactions from gluon exchange between the outgoing quark and the target spectator system lead to single-spin asymmetries at leading twist in perturbative QCD; i.e., the rescattering corrections are not power-law suppressed at large photon virtuality Q2 at fixed xbj.

  8. Three-body Final State Interaction in η→3π

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Schott, Diane; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-09-11

    We present an unitary dispersive model for themore » $$\\eta \\to 3 \\pi$$ decay process based upon the Khuri-Treiman equations which are solved by means of the Pasquier inversion method. The description of the hadronic final-state interactions for the $$\\eta \\to 3\\pi$$ decay is essential to reproduce the available data and to understand the existing discrepancies between Dalitz plot parameters from experiment and chiral perturbation theory. Our approach incorporates substraction constants that are fixed by fitting the recent high-statistics WASA-at-COSY data for $$\\eta \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$$. Based on the parameters obtained we predict the slope parameter for the neutral channel to be $$\\alpha=-0.022\\pm 0.004$$. Through matching to next-to-leading order chiral perturbation theory we estimate the quark mass double ratio to be $$Q=21.4 \\pm 0.4$$.« less

  9. Three-body Final State Interaction in η→3π

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Schott, Diane; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-09-11

    We present an unitary dispersive model for the $\\eta \\to 3 \\pi$ decay process based upon the Khuri-Treiman equations which are solved by means of the Pasquier inversion method. The description of the hadronic final-state interactions for the $\\eta \\to 3\\pi$ decay is essential to reproduce the available data and to understand the existing discrepancies between Dalitz plot parameters from experiment and chiral perturbation theory. Our approach incorporates substraction constants that are fixed by fitting the recent high-statistics WASA-at-COSY data for $\\eta \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$. Based on the parameters obtained we predict the slope parameter for the neutral channel to be $\\alpha=-0.022\\pm 0.004$. Through matching to next-to-leading order chiral perturbation theory we estimate the quark mass double ratio to be $Q=21.4 \\pm 0.4$.

  10. Final state interaction and Coulomb effect for neutrino-nucleus scattering in the quasielastic region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, M. K.

    2009-11-25

    We study the effect of final state interaction between outgoing nucleons and residual nuclei through total cross sections of neutrino-nucleus scattering within the framework of a relativistic single-particle model in the quasielastic region. To investigate the effect of the FSI, a relativistic phenomenological optical potential and a real potential for final nucleons are used. The real potential refers to no loss of flux while the optical potential indicates an absorption. We calculate both neutral-current reaction such as (v, v') and charged-current reactions like (v{sub e}, e{sup -}) and (v{sub {mu}}, {mu}{sup -}). In these calculations, {sup 12}C is used as a target nucleus and the incident neutrino (antineutrino) energies are exploited up to 2 GeV. We find that the effect of the FSI by the optical potential reduces cross sections about 50% and about 15% for the real potential. Furthermore, in the case of the charged-current reaction, we also calculate the Coulomb distortion of the outgoing leptons for {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 208}Pb. As a consequence, the effect of the Coulomb distortion is about a half by comparing with the case of electron scattering.

  11. Characterization of Final State Interaction Strength in Plastic Scintillator by Muon-Neutrino Charged Current Charged Pion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, Brandon M.

    2014-01-01

    Precise knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions is increasingly important as neutrino oscillation measurements transition into the systematics-limited era. In addition to modifying the initial interaction, the nuclear medium can scatter and absorb the interaction by-products through final state interactions, changing the types and kinematic distributions of particles seen by the detector. Recent neutrino pion production data from MiniBooNE is inconsistent with the final state interaction strength predicted by models and theoretical calculations, and some models fit best to the MiniBooNE data only after removing final state interactions entirely. This thesis presents a measurement of dσ/dTπ and dσ/dθπ for muon-neutrino charged current charged pion production in the MINER A scintillator tracker. MINER A is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. The analysis is limited to neutrino energies between 1.5-10 GeV. Dependence on invariant hadronic mass W is studied through two versions of the analysis that impose the limits W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV. The lower limit on W increases compatibility with the MiniBooNE pion data. The shapes of the differential cross sections, which depend strongly on the nature of final state interactions, are compared to Monte Carlo and theoretical predictions. It is shown that the measurements presented in this thesis favor models that contain final state interactions. Additionally, a variety of neutrino-nucleus interaction models are shown to successfully reproduce the thesis measurements, while simultaneously failing to describe the shape of the MiniBooNE data.

  12. The Final State Interaction in the Reactions pp→K+(Λp) and pp→π+(np)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterberger, F.; Nedev, S. N.; Siudak, R.

    The reactions pp→K+(Λp) and pp→π+(np) are measured with high missing mass resolution using the spectrometer BIG KARL at COSY. The pp→K+(Λp) missing mass spectrum is analyzed with respect to the final state interaction near the Λp production threshold. The observed spectrum can be described by factorizing the reaction amplitude in terms of a production amplitude and a final state enhancement factor. Parametrizing the enhancement factor in terms of the inverse Jost function allows a direct extraction of the low-energy phase-equivalent potential parameters. Constraints on the singlet and triplet scattering lengths and effective ranges can be deduced by fitting simultaneously the Λp invariant mass spectrum and the total cross section data of the free Λp scattering. A similar analysis shows that the reaction pp→π+(np) is dominated by the triplet contribution to the (np) final state interaction. An upper limit of a possible singlet contribution is deduced. Finally, the reaction pp→π+(np) allows to test the Fäldt-Wilkin extrapolation theorem where the triplet (np) continuum wave function is extrapolated to the wave function of the deuteron.

  13. Scalar isovector resonance photoproduction through the final state meson-meson interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibrzycki, Łukasz; Kamiński, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We construct the amplitudes of πη photoproduction taking into account the effects of the πη-KK¯ interchannel coupling. The idea of our model is to describe the scalar isovectors as dynamically produced in the final state while the initial stage of the reaction being described in terms of meson exchanges. Meson loops which arise this way include not only pseudoscalars but also vector mesons. These amplitudes are used to calculate the S-wave cross-sections and mass distributions in the πη effective mass region corresponding to the scalar resonances a0(980) and a0(1450). The values we obtained for a0(980) are comparable with predictions of other models while the cross-section for a0(1450) is about an order of magnitude larger than prediction based on the quark model. We show that the amplitudes with loops containing vector mesons calculated in the on-shell approximation are not suppressed in contrast to amplitudes containing only pseudoscalar loops. We also estimate the cross-sections for the P- and D-waves in the πη channel.

  14. The initial and final states of electron and energy transfer processes: Diabatization as motivated by system-solvent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Cave, Robert J.; Steele, Ryan P.; Shenvi, Neil

    2009-06-21

    For a system which undergoes electron or energy transfer in a polar solvent, we define the diabatic states to be the initial and final states of the system, before and after the nonequilibrium transfer process. We consider two models for the system-solvent interactions: A solvent which is linearly polarized in space and a solvent which responds linearly to the system. From these models, we derive two new schemes for obtaining diabatic states from ab initio calculations of the isolated system in the absence of solvent. These algorithms resemble standard approaches for orbital localization, namely, the Boys and Edmiston-Ruedenberg (ER) formalisms. We show that Boys localization is appropriate for describing electron transfer [Subotnik et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 244101 (2008)] while ER describes both electron and energy transfer. Neither the Boys nor the ER methods require definitions of donor or acceptor fragments and both are computationally inexpensive. We investigate one chemical example, the case of oligomethylphenyl-3, and we provide attachment/detachment plots whereby the ER diabatic states are seen to have localized electron-hole pairs.

  15. Electroweak Penguins, Final State Interaction Phases, and {ital CP} Violation in B {r_arrow} K {pi} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.; He, X.; Hou, W.; He, X.; Hou, W.; Pakvasa, S.

    1999-03-01

    The recently observed B{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} K{sup {minus}} {pi} {sup 0}, {bar K}{sup 0} {pi} {sup {minus}} and {bar B} {sup 0} {r_arrow} K{sup {minus}} {pi} {sup +} decay modes appear to have nearly equal branching ratios. This suggests that tree and electroweak penguins play an important role, and inclusion of the latter improves agreement between factorization calculation and experimental data. The value of {gamma} in the range of 90{degree} {endash} 130{degree} and 220{degree} {endash} 260{degree} is favored, while the {bar B} {sup 0} {r_arrow} {bar K} {sup 0} {pi} {sup 0} rate is suppressed. Direct CP violation for B{r_arrow} K{pi} modes can be large if final state interaction phases are large. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Final state interaction effects in B{sup 0} → J/ψπ{sup 0} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Mehraban, Hossein Asadi, Amin

    2014-12-15

    In this research the exclusive decay of B{sup 0} → J/ψπ{sup 0} is calculated by QCD factorization (QCDF) method and final-state interaction (FSI). First, the B{sup 0} → J/ψπ{sup 0} decay is calculated via QCDF method. The result that is found by using the QCDF method is less than the experimental result. So FSI is considered to solve the B{sup 0} → J/ψπ{sup 0} decay. For this decay, the D{sup +}D{sup −}* and D{sup 0} D-bar{sup 0*} via the exchange of D{sup −}, D{sup −}* and D-bar{sup 0}, D-bar{sup 0*} mesons are chosen for the intermediate states. The above intermediate states are calculated by using the QCDF method. The experimental branching ratio of B{sup 0} → J/ψπ{sup 0} decay is (1.76 ± 0.16) × 10{sup −5} and our results calculated by QCDF and FSI are (0.56 ± 0.11) × 10{sup −5} and (1.3 ± 0.09) × 10{sup −5}, respectively.

  17. Effects of final-state interactions on mixing-induced CP violation in penguin-dominated B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-07-01

    Motivated by the recent indications of the possibility of sizable deviations of the mixing-induced CP violation parameter, S{sub f}, in the penguin-dominated b{yields}sqq transition decays such as B{sup 0}{yields}({phi},{omega},{rho}{sup 0},{eta}{sup '},{eta},{pi}{sup 0},f{sub 0})K{sub S} from sin2{beta} determined from B{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S}, we study final-state rescattering effects on their decay rates and CP violation. Recent observations of large direct CP asymmetry in modes such as B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -},{rho}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} suggest that final-state phases in two-body B decays may not be small. It is therefore important to examine these long-distance effects on penguin-dominated decays. Such long-distance effects on S{sub f} are found to be generally small [i.e. O(1-2%)] or negligible except for the {omega}K{sub S} and {rho}{sup 0}K{sub S} modes where S{sub f} is lowered by around 15% for the former and increased by the same percentage for the latter. However, final-state rescattering can enhance the {omega}K{sub S}, {phi}K{sub S}, {eta}{sup '}K{sub S}, {rho}{sup 0}K{sub S}, and {pi}{sup 0}K{sub S} rates significantly and flip the signs of direct CP asymmetries of the last two modes. Direct CP asymmetries in {omega}K{sub S} and {rho}{sup 0}K{sub S} channels are predicted to be A{sub {omega}}{sub K{sub S}}{approx_equal}-0.13 and A{sub {rho}{sup 0}}{sub K{sub S}}{approx_equal}0.47, respectively. However, direct CP asymmetry in all the other b{yields}s penguin-dominated modes that we study is found to be rather small ( < or approx. a few percent), rendering these modes a viable place to search for the CP-odd phases beyond the standard model. Since {delta}S{sub f} ({identical_to}-{eta}{sub f}S{sub f}-S{sub J/{psi}}{sub K{sub S}}, with {eta}{sub f} being the CP eigenvalue of the final state f) and A{sub f} are closely related, the theoretical uncertainties in the mixing-induced parameter S{sub f} and the direct CP asymmetry parameter A{sub f} are

  18. Role of final state interactions in quasielastic [sup 56]Fe([ital e],[ital e][prime]) reactions at large [vert bar][ital [rvec q

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, C.R. )

    1995-04-01

    A relativistic finite nucleus calculation using a Dirac optical potential is used to investigate the importance of final state interactions (FSI) at large momentum transfers in inclusive quasielastic electronuclear reactions. The optical potential is derived from first-order multiple scattering theory and then is used to calculate the FSI in a nonspectral Green's function doorway approach. At intermediate momentum transfers excellent predictions of the quasielastic [sup 56]Fe([ital e],[ital e][prime]) experimental data for the longitudinal response function are obtained. In comparisons with recent measurements at [vert bar][ital [rvec q

  19. Measurement of the Double Polarization Observables Cx and Cz for Λn Final-state Interactions in γd -->K+ Λn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tongtong

    2015-04-01

    Building a comprehensive picture of the strong interaction is the goal of modern nuclear physics. While considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, we are still far from a complete understanding of the hyperon-nucleon (YN) interaction, which plays a key role in hypernuclear matter and neutron stars. For the YN potential, some parameters can be obtained from the NN potential by using SU(3) symmetry. However, other parameters cannot be obtained from the NN potential due to broken SU(3) and must be obtained from fits to experimental data. One can access the dynamics of the YN interaction by studying nuclear reactions in which hyperons are produced. In this talk we present preliminary results for the polarization transfers Cx and Cz from the photon to the hyperon for final-state interactions in γd -->K+ Λn and discuss their dependence on kinematic variables. We use data taken with the CLAS detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Our results are the first ever obtained for Cx and Cz and will provide stringent constraints on the theoretical models of the YN potential. This work is funded in part by the U.S. NSF under Grant PHY-125782.

  20. Study of four-lepton final states in electron-positron interactions at 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Petradza, A.

    1989-08-01

    This thesis presents a study of electron-positron scattering to four light leptons. The motivations behind it are twofold. Firstly, the study is a test of the theory of electron-positron interactions to 4th order in the fine structure constant {alpha}. A deviation from the theory could indicate the existence of a heavy new particle. Secondly, a measurement of these processes may prove useful in the understanding of other QED-type reactions. The method for simulating the four-lepton processes by the Monte Carlo event generator of Berends, Daverveldt and Kleiss is described. Theoretical predictions are compared to data from the Mark II and HRS experiments at the PEP storage ring. The observed events consist of four leptons at large angles. Data for all three e{sup +}e{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -}, e{sup +}e{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} processes are well described by the QED Monte Carlo calculation. The various kinematical distributions are in good agreement with QED to order {alpha}{sup 4}. 18 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Interactive Cable Television. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Active Learning Systems, Inc., Minneapolis, MN.

    This report describes an interactive video system developed by Active Learning Systems which utilizes a cable television (TV) network as its delivery system to transmit computer literacy lessons to high school and college students. The system consists of an IBM PC, Pioneer LDV 4000 videodisc player, and Whitney Supercircuit set up at the head end…

  2. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at < Eν > = 4.2 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling formore » inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.« less

  3. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at < Eν > = 4.2 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.

  4. Extracting the photoproduction cross sections off the neutron, via the γn→π-p reaction, from deuteron data with final-state interaction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, V. E.; Briscoe, W. J.; Gao, H.; Kudryavtsev, A. E.; Strakovsky, I. I.

    2011-09-01

    The incoherent pion photoproduction reaction γd→π-pp is considered theoretically in a wide energy region Eth≤Eγ≤2700 MeV. The model applied contains the impulse approximation as well as the NN and πN final-state-interaction (FSI) amplitudes. The aim of the paper is to study a reliable way for getting the information on elementary γn→π-p reaction cross sections beyond the impulse approximation for γd→π-pp. For the elementary γN→πN, NN→NN, and πN→πN amplitudes, the results of The George Washington University (GW) Data Analysis Center (DAC) are used. There are no additional theoretical constraints. The calculated cross sections dσ/dΩ(γd→π-pp) are compared with existing data. The procedure used to extract information on the differential cross section dσ/dΩ(γn→π-p) on the neutron from the deuteron data using the FSI correction factor R is discussed. The calculations for R versus π-p center-of-mass (CM) angle θ1 of the outgoing pion are performed at different photon-beam energies with kinematic cuts for a “quasifree” process γn→π-p. The results show a sizable FSI effect R≠1 from the S-wave part of pp-FSI at small angles close to θ1˜0: this region narrows as the photon energy increases. At larger angles, the effect is small (|R-1|≪1) and agrees with estimations of FSI in the Glauber approach.

  5. Instructional Systems Development Model for Interactive Videodisc. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. Olin; And Others

    This third and final report on a 3-year project, which developed authoring and production procedures for interactive videodisc based on the Interservice Procedures for Instructional Systems Development (IPISD), reviews the current state of the art, provides an overview of the project, and describes two videodiscs made for the project and the…

  6. SET Careers: An interactive science, engineering, and technology career education exhibit. Final report to the United States Department of Energy Science Museum Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.R.

    1994-04-01

    The New York Hall of Science in collaboration with the Educational Film Center and the Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications developed and pilot tested a unique interactive, video-based/hypermedia series on energy related and other science and engineering careers for middle and junior high school students. The United States Department of Energy Science Museum Program supported the development of one energy-related career profile (Susan Fancy--mechanical engineer) and the development and printing of 100 copies of a career-related workbook. Additional funding from the National Science Foundation and the Sloan Foundation resulted in the development of 3 additional career profiles, a related Data Base and Career Match Self Assessment for 16 careers, available both on screen and in print in this pilot phase. The SET CAREERS Exhibit is a video-based/hypermedia series which contains profiles of people working in Science, Engineering and Technology fields, interactive opportunities for users including interviews with profiled persons, opportunities to attempt work-related tasks through animated simulations, a Data Base of career-related information available both on-screen and in print, and a Career Match Self Assessment. The screen is in an attract loop mode, inviting visitors to interact with the exhibit. A menu of choices is provided so that users may begin by selecting a profiled person, choosing the Career Match Self Assessment or the Data Base. The Data Base is available in print if the user chooses that mode.

  7. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research

  8. Study of the two pion final state photoproduction on deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Lewis; Gothe, Ralf; Park, Kijun; Smith, Elton

    2010-08-05

    Understanding the structure of baryons in terms of the fundamental interaction of the constituent quarks and gluons is one of the challenges in strong interaction physics. This interaction is governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). However, solutions of this theory in the non-perturbative domain of the interaction are extremely difficult to achieve. In inelastic electron scattering, very little is known about exclusive hadron production purely contributed to a lack of knowledge. The {gamma}N interaction is recognized for being a powerful method for investigating hadrons and the mysteries that still exist within the strong interaction. From reactions with the nucleon, the strong interaction can be tested through the amplitudes of the N and {Delta} resonances. More specifically, if an electromagnetic interaction is well known then the intermediate resonance states may be evaluated through pion photoproduction. To gain more detailed insight into this interaction, we look to probe the baryon structure of {Delta} and the meson structure of the pion through photon scattering off a deuteron producing two pions in the final state. The photoproduction processes on the deuteron will be used to investigate known baryon resonances in the proton-pion channel. The two pion final state will be investigated for unraveling new information in to the rho decay at threshold. We want to explore both final states interactions to search for ''missing'' states that are predicted by quark models but have not yet been found experimentally. Using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), the hadronic products are detected in coincidence with the scattered photon. This makes it possible to measure the differential cross section and the decay angular distribution for the production of two and three pion final states. The measured cross sections will contribute significantly and push the knowledge of the strong interaction to the next level. We propose to use the CEBAF Large Acceptance

  9. Study of the two pion final state photoproduction on deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis Graham, Kijun Park, Ralf Gothe, Elton Smith

    2010-08-01

    Understanding the structure of baryons in terms of the fundamental interaction of the constituent quarks and gluons is one of the challenges in strong interaction physics. This interaction is governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). However, solutions of this theory in the non-perturbative domain of the interaction are extremely difficult to achieve. In inelastic electron scattering, very little is known about exclusive hadron production purely contributed to a lack of knowledge. The gammaN interaction is recognized for being a powerful method for investigating hadrons and the mysteries that still exist within the strong interaction. From reactions with the nucleon, the strong interaction can be tested through the amplitudes of the N and Delta resonances. More specifically, if an electromagnetic interaction is well known then the intermediate resonance states may be evaluated through pion photoproduction. To gain more detailed insight into this interaction, we look to probe the baryon structure of Delta and the meson structure of the pion through photon scattering off a deuteron producing two pions in the final state. The photoproduction processes on the deuteron will be used to investigate known baryon resonances in the proton-pion channel. The two pion final state will be investigated for unraveling new information in to the rho decay at threshold. We want to explore both final states interactions to search for “missing” states that are predicted by quark models but have not yet been found experimentally. Using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), the hadronic products are detected in coincidence with the scattered photon. This makes it possible to measure the differential cross section and the decay angular distribution for the production of two and three pion final states. The measured cross sections will contribute significantly and push the knowledge of the strong interaction to the next level. We propose to use the CEBAF Large Acceptance

  10. Photon final states at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Mario; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The authors present here several recent measurements involving associate production of photons and jets at the Tevatron. In particular, inclusive photon + met from D0, and photon + b-jets and photon + b-jet + leptons + MET from CDF are described in some detail. These measurements offer a good test of QCD predictions in rather complex final states.

  11. Measurement of double-differential muon neutrino charged-current interactions on C8 H8 without pions in the final state using the T2K off-axis beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Batkiewicz, M.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Cao, S.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S. G.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Konaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Short, S.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report the measurement of muon neutrino charged-current interactions on carbon without pions in the final state at the T2K beam energy using 5.734 ×1020 protons on target. For the first time the measurement is reported as a flux-integrated, double-differential cross section in muon kinematic variables (cos θμ, pμ), without correcting for events where a pion is produced and then absorbed by final state interactions. Two analyses are performed with different selections, background evaluations and cross-section extraction methods to demonstrate the robustness of the results against biases due to model-dependent assumptions. The measurements compare favorably with recent models which include nucleon-nucleon correlations but, given the present precision, the measurement does not distinguish among the available models. The data also agree with Monte Carlo simulations which use effective parameters that are tuned to external data to describe the nuclear effects. The total cross section in the full phase space is σ =(0.417 ±0.047 (syst ) ±0.005 (stat ) )×10-38 cm2 nucleon-1 and the cross section integrated in the region of phase space with largest efficiency and best signal-over-background ratio (cos θμ>0.6 and pμ>200 MeV ) is σ =(0.202 ±0.036 (syst ) ±0.003 (stat ) )×10-38 cm2 nucleon-1 .

  12. A measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic-like cross section on a hydrocarbon target and final state interaction effects

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Presented is the analysis of the μ charged-current quasielastic-like interaction with a polystyrene (CH or hydrocarbon) target in the MINER A experiment, which was exposed to a neutrino beam that peaked at 3.5 GeV.

  13. Off-shell extrapolation of Regge-model NN scattering amplitudes describing final state interactions in 2H(e,e'p)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ford, William Paul; van Orden, Wally

    2013-11-25

    In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model NN amplitudes presented in a paper by Ford and Van Orden [ Phys. Rev. C 87 014004 (2013)] and in an eprint by Ford (arXiv:1310.0871 [nucl-th]). The prescriptions for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are presented. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.

  14. Off-shell extrapolation of Regge-model NN scattering amplitudes describing final state interactions in 2H(e,e'p)

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, William Paul; van Orden, Wally

    2013-11-25

    In this work, an off-shell extrapolation is proposed for the Regge-model NN amplitudes presented in a paper by Ford and Van Orden [ Phys. Rev. C 87 014004 (2013)] and in an eprint by Ford (arXiv:1310.0871 [nucl-th]). The prescriptions for extrapolating these amplitudes for one nucleon off-shell in the initial state are presented. Application of these amplitudes to calculations of deuteron electrodisintegration are presented and compared to the limited available precision data in the kinematical region covered by the Regge model.

  15. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  16. Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

  17. The 3 Final States of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, A. C. M.; Laskar, J.

    2000-10-01

    In 1962, using radar measurements, the slow retrograde rotation of Venus was discovered (see Carpenter, 1970). Since, the understanding of this particular state becomes a challenge as many uncertainties remain in the dissipative models of Venus' rotation. Various hypothesis were proposed for its evolution, aiming to search wether Venus was born with a direct or retrograde rotation. The most favored scenario assumes that its axis was actually tilted down during its past evolution as a result of core mantle friction and atmospheric tides (Lago and Cazenave, 1979, Dobrovolski, 1980, Shen and Zhang, 1989, McCue and Dormand, 1993, Yoder, 1995, 1997). Nevertheless, this requires high values of the initial obliquity, and it was proposed that Venus was strongly hit by massive bodies which would have tilted it significantly or started its rotation backward (Dones and Tremaine, 1993). Even while considering the chaotic evolution of Venus's obliquity (Laskar and Robutel, 1993), the published scenarios still have some difficulties to tilt Venus axis towards its present position (Yoder,1997). In the present work we show that due to the dissipative effects, there are only 4 possible final states for Venus' rotation, and only 3 of them are really reachable. When the planetary perturbations are added, most of the initial conditions lead to the two states corresponding to the present configuration of Venus, one with period -243.02 days and nearly 0o obliquity, and the other with opposite period and nearly 180o obliquity.We thus demonstrate that a large impact is not necessary to have a satisfying scenario for the reverse rotation of Venus.

  18. Investigation of multiparticle final states in {sup 12}C photoreactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, P.D.; MacGregor, I.J.; Annand, J.R.; Anthony, I.; Cross, G.E.; Hall, S.J.; Kellie, J.D.; McGeorge, J.C.; Miller, G.J.; Owens, R.O.; Grabmayr, P.; Hehl, T.; Lamparter, T.; Sauer, M.; Schneider, R.; Spaeth, K.; Branford, D.; Davinson, T.; MacKenzie, J.A.; Ahrens, J.; Beck, R.

    1998-01-01

    The {sup 12}C({gamma},pn), {sup 12}C({gamma},pp), {sup 12}C({gamma},ppp), {sup 12}C({gamma},pp{pi}{sup {plus_minus}}), {sup 12}C({gamma},p{pi}{sup {plus_minus}}) reactions have been studied using tagged photons of energy E{sub {gamma}}=250{endash}600 MeV. A model which includes all major absorption mechanisms and final state interactions gives results that agree well with the shapes of missing energy spectra, but for some channels the predicted cross sections are too large. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Wildlife interactions at Solar One. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, M.D.; McKernan, R.L.; Flanagan, P.A.; Wagner, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this final report is to provide the results of the study period from December 1982 through May 1983 and to report on the overall impact of the facility on wildlife. During 102 days of study 107 bird species and over 22,000 individuals were counted in the vicinity of Solar One. This high bird use of the Solar One study area in comparison to the sparse population of most of the Mojave desert is a result of the close proximity of Solar One to extensive (53 ha) ponds and active agricultural fields. Almost all cases of incineration at Solar One involved aerial insects. In most cases the identity of the actual species involved could not be determined, but most incinerations probably involved dragonflies, wasps, bees, and butterflies. Unlike insects, the incineration of birds in the standby points is a rare occurrence. During the 14 month period from April 1982 through May 1983, only 6 bird incinerations were known to have occurred at Solar One. Avian collisions with plant structures, especially heliostat mirrors were more frequent than incinerations. Considering all known avian fatalities regardless of cause of death in the 14 month period from April 1982 through May 1983, 60 birds may have died as a direct result of Solar One operation. This low mortality in relation to the high bird use of the study area indicates that the impact of Solar One on birds after initial construction is minimal. The results of this study suggest that, to insure the minimal impact of this technology on birds, future solar central receiver power plants in the Mojave desert should not be sited in close proximity to open water or other areas of high bird use.

  20. Acoustic-structure interaction problems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Love, E.; Taylor, R.L.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare and evaluate different numerical methods for solving problems of interaction between elastic solids and acoustic fluids. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on solution techniques involving the finite element method. To that end, in Chapter 2 we discuss different options for analysis of infinite fluids. In particular, the method of mesh trunction and the use of radiation elements and the use of infinite elements are discussed. Also discussed is the analysis of scattering from rigid boundaries. Chapter 3 is a brief discussion of finite element formulations for elastic solids. We review the development, of two dimensional plane strain elements and one dimensional plate and shell elements. In Chapter 4, there is a discussion of the method used to couple the solid and the fluid. We give examples for solution of scattering of pressure waves from thin elastic shell structures. Chapter 5 is a brief conclusion of results and includes recommendations for the best methods of solution and additional research.

  1. Tetraquark state and multibody interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Chengrong; Ping Jialun; Wang Fan; Goldman, T.

    2010-10-01

    The tetraquark states with diquark-anti-diquark configuration have been studied in the flux-tube model, in which the multibody confinement is used. In this model approach, the states Y(2175), f{sub 0}(600), f{sub 0}(980), and X(1576) can be assigned as tetraquark states. They are color confinement resonances with three-dimension structure. This study suggests that the multibody confinement should be employed in the quark model study of multiquark states instead of the additive two-body confinement.

  2. Tetraquark state and multibody interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chengrong; Ping, Jialun; Wang, Fan; Goldman, T.

    2010-10-01

    The tetraquark states with diquark-anti-diquark configuration have been studied in the flux-tube model, in which the multibody confinement is used. In this model approach, the states Y(2175), f0(600), f0(980), and X(1576) can be assigned as tetraquark states. They are color confinement resonances with three-dimension structure. This study suggests that the multibody confinement should be employed in the quark model study of multiquark states instead of the additive two-body confinement.

  3. Scattering resonances and bound states for strongly interacting Rydberg polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienias, P.; Choi, S.; Firstenberg, O.; Maghrebi, M. F.; Gullans, M.; Lukin, M. D.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Büchler, H. P.

    2014-11-01

    We provide a theoretical framework describing slow-light polaritons interacting via atomic Rydberg states. The method allows us to analytically derive the scattering properties of two polaritons. We identify parameter regimes where polariton-polariton interactions are repulsive. Furthermore, in the regime of attractive interactions, we identify multiple two-polariton bound states, calculate their dispersion, and study the resulting scattering resonances. Finally, the two-particle scattering properties allow us to derive the effective low-energy many-body Hamiltonian. This theoretical platform is applicable to ongoing experiments.

  4. Final Report: Multi-State Sharing Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Begoli, Edmon; Boehmann, Brant; DeNap, Frank A

    2012-04-01

    In 2003 a joint effort between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice created state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers. These fusion centers were an effort to share law enforcement, disaster, and terrorism related information and intelligence between state and local jurisdictions and to share terrorism related intelligence between state and local law enforcement agencies and various federal entities. In 2006, DHS commissioned the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to establish and manage a groundbreaking program to assist local, state, and tribal leaders in developing the tools and methods required to anticipate and forestall terrorist events and to enhance disaster response. This program, called the Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI), combines science and technology with validated operational approaches to address regionally unique requirements and suggest regional solutions with the potential for national application. In 2009, SERRI sponsored the Multistate Sharing Initiative (MSSI) to assist state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers with sharing information related to a wider variety of state interests than just terrorism. While these fusion centers have been effective at sharing data across organizations within their respective jurisdictions, their organizational structure makes bilateral communication with federal entities convenient and also allows information to be further disbursed to other local entities when appropriate. The MSSI-developed Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) sharing system allows state-to-state sharing of non-terrorism-related law enforcement and disaster information. Currently, the MSSI SAR system is deployed in Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and South Carolina. About 1 year after implementation, cognizant fusion center personnel from each state were contacted to ascertain the status of their MSSI SAR systems. The overwhelming response from these individuals was that the MSSI

  5. Disordered Interactions and Fractional Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degottardi, Wade; Hafezi, Mohammad

    The possibility that topological ordered states may be realized in photonic systems has recently attracted a great deal of attention. Given the rich phenomenology of the fractional quantum Hall effect, the bosonic Laughlin states have been of particular focus in this context. These states are known to arise in strongly nonlinear photonic lattices with artificial gauge fields, where nonlinearities associated with the resonators mimic on-site interactions. These effective interaction strengths are not universal and are subject to spatial disorder. We present a detailed study of the stability of these states and what implications they have for experiments.

  6. Interactive Research and Development on Teaching. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikunoff, William J.; And Others

    This document is the final report of the Interactive Research and Development on Teaching (IR&DT) study on the implementation of educational research in actual site locations. Two teams of teachers, researchers, and trainer/developers spent fifteen-and-one-half months implementing the IR&DT at two sites in Vermont and California. Their efforts…

  7. Promoting Learning through Active Interaction. Project PLAI. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Deborah; Haney, Michele

    This final report describes the activities and outcomes of Promoting Learning through Active Interactions, a research-to-practice 4-year project that developed, implemented, and validated a five-module curriculum with 25 infants (ages 6-30 months) who are deaf-blind, their parents, and early interventionists. The project had the following…

  8. State program advisory number 11. Directive (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-23

    The report updates and revises the State Authorization Manual with RCRA program changes for the period January 1, 1991 through June 30, 1991. It provides nine new checklists: corrections to the land disposal restrictions, suspension of the toxicity characteristic for certain used chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, correction to the boilers and industrial furnaces requirements, removal of strontium sulfide from the list of hazardous waste, corrections to the organic air emission standards for process vents and equipment leaks, administrative stay for the K069 listing, revision to the petroleum refining primary and secondary oil/water/solids separation sludge listings. The State Program Advisory (SPA) includes a consolidated land disposal checklist, updated through June 30, 1991. This SPA also provides updated tables G-1 and G-2, a model revision attorney general's statement, and a chekclist linkage table to insert into the State Authorization Manual.

  9. Coulomb Bound States of Strongly Interacting Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, M. F.; Gullans, M. J.; Bienias, P.; Choi, S.; Martin, I.; Firstenberg, O.; Lukin, M. D.; Büchler, H. P.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    We show that two photons coupled to Rydberg states via electromagnetically induced transparency can interact via an effective Coulomb potential. This interaction gives rise to a continuum of two-body bound states. Within the continuum, metastable bound states are distinguished in analogy with quasibound states tunneling through a potential barrier. We find multiple branches of metastable bound states whose energy spectrum is governed by the Coulomb potential, thus obtaining a photonic analogue of the hydrogen atom. Under certain conditions, the wave function resembles that of a diatomic molecule in which the two polaritons are separated by a finite "bond length." These states propagate with a negative group velocity in the medium, allowing for a simple preparation and detection scheme, before they slowly decay to pairs of bound Rydberg atoms.

  10. K- absorption on two nucleons and ppK- bound state search in the Σ0p final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez Doce, O.; Fabbietti, L.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Marton, J.; Piscicchia, K.; Scordo, A.; Sirghi, D.; Tucakovic, I.; Wycech, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Anastasi, A.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwinski, E.; Krzemien, W.; Mandaglio, G.; Martini, M.; Moskal, P.; Patera, V.; Pérez del Rio, E.; Silarski, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report the measurement of K- absorption processes in the Σ0p final state and the first exclusive measurement of the two nucleon absorption (2NA) with the KLOE detector. The 2NA process without further interactions is found to be 9% of the sum of all other contributing processes, including absorption on three and more nucleons or 2NA followed by final state interactions with the residual nucleons. We also determine the possible contribution of the ppK- bound state to the Σ0p final state. The yield of ppK- / Kstop- is found to be (0.044 ± 0.009stat-0.005+0.004 syst) ṡ10-2 but its statistical significance based on an F-test is only 1σ.

  11. State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services is issuing a final regulation that adopts, without change, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled ``State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).'' This final rule implements a provision enacted by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 and reflects the transfer of the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the Administration for Community Living (ACL) in HHS. Prior to the interim final rule, prior regulations were issued by CMS under the authority granted by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA), Section 4360.

  12. State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services is issuing a final regulation that adopts, without change, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled ``State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).'' This final rule implements a provision enacted by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 and reflects the transfer of the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the Administration for Community Living (ACL) in HHS. Prior to the interim final rule, prior regulations were issued by CMS under the authority granted by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA), Section 4360. PMID:27295733

  13. Twist and teleportation analogy of the black hole final state

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Doyeol; Kim, M. S.

    2008-09-15

    Mathematical connection between the quantum teleportation, the most unique feature of quantum information processing, and the black hole final state is studied taking into account the nontrivial spacetime geometry. We use the twist operation for the generalized entanglement measurement and the final-state boundary conditions to obtain transfer theorems for the black hole evaporation. This would enable us to put together the universal quantum teleportation and the black hole evaporation in the unified mathematical footing. For a renormalized post selected final state of outgoing Hawking radiation, we found that the information content, quantified by the mixedness of the state, is preserved only in the special case of the final-state boundary condition in the microcanonical form, which resembles a perfect teleportation channel.

  14. Interactive Negotiation of Perspectives in Japanese: Predicate-Final Structure as a Resource to Organize Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Kanae

    2009-01-01

    While the predicate-final structure of the Japanese language has been considered one of the main causes of its late projectability (Tanaka, 1999), this study demonstrates that the final predicate component of a "turn constructional unit" (TCU) furnishes a useful resource for conversational participants to negotiate various aspects of interaction.…

  15. Supramolecular interactions in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Resnati, Giuseppe; Boldyreva, Elena; Bombicz, Petra; Kawano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, supramolecular chemistry has been at the forefront of chemical research, with the aim of understanding chemistry beyond the covalent bond. Since the long-range periodicity in crystals is a product of the directionally specific short-range intermolecular interactions that are responsible for molecular assembly, analysis of crystalline solids provides a primary means to investigate intermolecular interactions and recognition phenomena. This article discusses some areas of contemporary research involving supramolecular interactions in the solid state. The topics covered are: (1) an overview and historical review of halogen bonding; (2) exploring non-ambient conditions to investigate intermolecular interactions in crystals; (3) the role of intermolecular interactions in morphotropy, being the link between isostructurality and polymorphism; (4) strategic realisation of kinetic coordination polymers by exploiting multi-interactive linker molecules. The discussion touches upon many of the prerequisites for controlled preparation and characterization of crystalline materials. PMID:26594375

  16. Supramolecular interactions in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Resnati, Giuseppe; Boldyreva, Elena; Bombicz, Petra; Kawano, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    In the last few decades, supramolecular chemistry has been at the forefront of chemical research, with the aim of understanding chemistry beyond the covalent bond. Since the long-range periodicity in crystals is a product of the directionally specific short-range intermolecular interactions that are responsible for molecular assembly, analysis of crystalline solids provides a primary means to investigate intermolecular interactions and recognition phenomena. This article discusses some areas of contemporary research involving supramolecular interactions in the solid state. The topics covered are: (1) an overview and historical review of halogen bonding; (2) exploring non-ambient conditions to investigate intermolecular interactions in crystals; (3) the role of intermolecular interactions in morphotropy, being the link between isostructurality and polymorphism; (4) strategic realisation of kinetic coordination polymers by exploiting multi-interactive linker molecules. The discussion touches upon many of the prerequisites for controlled preparation and characterization of crystalline materials.

  17. Characterising a configuration interaction excited state using natural transition geminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, J. P.; Paterson, M. J.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce natural transition geminals as a means to qualitatively understand a transition where double excitations are important. The first two A1 singlet states of the CH cation are used as an initial example. We calculate these states with configuration interaction singles and state-averaged Monte Carlo configuration interaction (SA-MCCI). For each method, we compare the important natural transition geminals with the dominant natural transition orbitals. We then compare SA-MCCI and full configuration interaction with regards to the natural transition geminals using the beryllium atom. We compare using the natural transition geminals with analysing the important configurations in the CI expansion to give the dominant transition for the beryllium atom and the carbon dimer. Finally, we calculate the natural transition geminals for two electronic excitations of formamide.

  18. Transition States and transition state analogue interactions with enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Vern L

    2015-04-21

    Enzymatic transition states have lifetimes of a few femtoseconds (fs). Computational analysis of enzyme motions leading to transition state formation suggests that local catalytic site motions on the fs time scale provide the mechanism to locate transition states. An experimental test of protein fs motion and its relation to transition state formation can be provided by isotopically heavy proteins. Heavy enzymes have predictable mass-altered bond vibration states without altered electrostatic properties, according to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. On-enzyme chemistry is slowed in most heavy proteins, consistent with altered protein bond frequencies slowing the search for the transition state. In other heavy enzymes, structural changes involved in reactant binding and release are also influenced. Slow protein motions associated with substrate binding and catalytic site preorganization are essential to allow the subsequent fs motions to locate the transition state and to facilitate the efficient release of products. In the catalytically competent geometry, local groups move in stochastic atomic motion on the fs time scale, within transition state-accessible conformations created by slower protein motions. The fs time scale for the transition state motions does not permit thermodynamic equilibrium between the transition state and stable enzyme states. Isotopically heavy enzymes provide a diagnostic tool for fast coupled protein motions to transition state formation and mass-dependent conformational changes. The binding of transition state analogue inhibitors is the opposite in catalytic time scale to formation of the transition state but is related by similar geometries of the enzyme-transition state and enzyme-inhibitor interactions. While enzymatic transition states have lifetimes as short as 10(-15) s, transition state analogues can bind tightly to enzymes with release rates greater than 10(3) s. Tight-binding transition state analogues stabilize the rare but

  19. Final state boundary condition of the Schwarzschild black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Doyeol

    2006-10-15

    It is shown that the internal stationary state of the Schwarzschild black hole can be represented by a maximally entangled two-mode squeezed state of collapsing matter and infalling Hawking radiation. The final boundary condition at the singularity is then described by the random unitary transformation acting on the collapsing matter field. The outgoing Hawking radiation is obtained by the final-state projection on the total wave function, which looks like a quantum teleportation process without the classical information transmitted. The black hole evaporation process as seen by the observer outside the black hole is now a unitary process but nonlocal physics is required to transmit the information outside the black hole. It is also shown that the final-state projection by the evaporation process is strongly affected by the quantum state outside the event horizon, which clearly violates the locality principle.

  20. A Technical Index of Interactive Information Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fife, Dennis W.; And Others

    The technical features and operational status of interactive information systems, i.e. those providing a conversational usage mode to a non-programer through a data terminal device, are reviewed. The review is designed to aid information specialists in the state-of-the-art assessments preparatory to a detailed system selection procedure. It…

  1. Phase diagram of two interacting helical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raul A.; Gutman, D. B.; Carr, Sam T.

    2016-06-01

    We consider two coupled time-reversal-invariant helical edge modes of the same helicity, such as would occur on two stacked quantum spin Hall insulators. In the presence of interaction, the low-energy physics is described by two collective modes, one corresponding to the total current flowing around the edge and the other one describing relative fluctuations between the two edges. We find that quite generically, the relative mode becomes gapped at low temperatures, but only when tunneling between the two helical modes is nonzero. There are two distinct possibilities for the gapped state depending on the relative size of different interactions. If the intraedge interaction is stronger than the interedge interaction, the state is characterized as a spin-nematic phase. However, in the opposite limit, when the interaction between the helical edge modes is strong compared to the interaction within each mode, a spin-density wave forms, with emergent topological properties. First, the gap protects the conducting phase against localization by weak nonmagnetic impurities; second, the protected phase hosts localized zero modes on the ends of the edge that may be created by sufficiently strong nonmagnetic impurities.

  2. Portage Multi-State Outreach Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herwig, Julia; Herman, Patti

    This final report of the Portage Multi-State Outreach Project discusses the project's activities in assisting states, agencies, and local programs to plan, develop, and provide services for unserved and underserved young children with disabilities and their families across a variety of settings and program options. Specifically the project…

  3. Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.W.

    1982-05-01

    We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi ..-->.. anti pp..gamma.., the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi ..-->.. baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi ..-->.. B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi ..-->.. B/sub 10/ anti B/sub 10/. We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 10/ + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos/sup 2/theta distribution.

  4. Medicaid program; state flexibility for Medicaid benefit packages. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-04-30

    This rule revises the final rule published on December 3, 2008 to implement provisions of section 6044 of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, which amends the Social Security Act by adding a new section 1937 related to the coverage of medical assistance under approved State plans. That rule provides States increased flexibility under an approved State plan to define the scope of covered medical assistance by offering coverage of benchmark or benchmark-equivalent benefit packages to certain Medicaid-eligible individuals. In addition, this final rule responds to public comments on the February 22, 2008 proposed rule and comments received in response to rules published subsequently that delayed the effective date of the December 3, 2008 final rule until July 1, 2010.

  5. Measurements without probabilities in the final state proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Stanford, Douglas

    2014-02-01

    The black hole final state proposal reconciles the infalling vacuum with the unitarity of the Hawking radiation, but only for some experiments. We study experiments that first verify the exterior, then the interior purification of the same Hawking particle. (This is the same protocol that renders the firewall paradox operationally meaningful in standard quantum mechanics.) We show that the decoherence functional fails to be diagonal, even upon inclusion of external "pointer" systems. Hence, probabilities for outcomes of these measurements are not defined. We conclude that the final state proposal does not offer a consistent alternative to the firewall hypothesis.

  6. Entrepreneurship Education in the Arab States. Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamloumi, Jilani

    2013-01-01

    The report involves the findings of the final evaluation of the regional entrepreneurship education project in Arab States component II (2011-2012) (see ED560497), which is a joint activity between UNESCO and StratREAL Foundation. It aims to help the development of educational policies enabling the integration of entrepreneurship education within…

  7. Classical static final state of collapse with supertranslation memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Long, Jiang

    2016-10-01

    The Kerr metric models the final classical black hole state after gravitational collapse of matter and radiation. Any stationary metric which is close to the Kerr metric has been proven to be diffeomorphic to it. Now, finite supertranslation diffeomorphisms are symmetries which map solutions to inequivalent solutions as such diffeomorphisms generate conserved superrotation charges. The final state of gravitational collapse is therefore parameterized by its mass, angular momentum and supertranslation field, signaled by its conserved superrotation charges. In this paper, we first derive the angle-dependent energy conservation law relating the asymptotic value of the supertranslation field of the final state to the details of the collapse and subsequent evolution of the system. We then generate the static solution with an asymptotic supertranslation field and we study some of its properties. Up to a caveat, the deviation from the Schwarzschild metric could therefore be predicted on a case-by-case basis from accurate modeling of the angular dependence of the ingoing and outgoing energy fluxes leading to the final state.

  8. Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Mark; Margolis, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomplished by Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) through provision of informational tools including reports and webinars as well as the provision of technical assistance to state leaders on wind siting, policy, and finance best practices, identification of strategic federal-state partnership activities for both onshore and offshore wind, and participation in regional wind development collaboratives. The Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project provides a summary of the objectives, activities, and outcomes of this project as accomplished by CESA over the period 12/1/2009 - 11/30/2011.

  9. Electric Industry Restructuring in Five States: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J. M.

    1996-10-31

    The electric industry in the United States is undergoing fundamental changes; it is transitioning from regulated monopolies to competitive markets offering customer choice. In this process, the states have been in the forefront of considering the changes in the industry structure and regulation. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) spearheaded a project on electric restructuring in the United States. This is the final report prepared under the project. The purpose of the report is to describe and compare the overall restructuring processes that took place in five states through June 30, 1996. The five states are California, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, and Wisconsin. These are the first major states to consider restructuring or retail wheeling.

  10. HEMP interaction with an electric power distribution circuit. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaininger, H.W.; Jaszewski, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    A high altitude nuclear burst, detonated at a height of 50 km or more, causes two types of electromagnetic pulses, high altitude EMP (HEMP) and magnetohydrodynamic EMP, which will interact with electric power systems. Previous work indicated that millions of miles of electric distribution systems in the United States may be especially vulnerable to HEMP incident simultaneously throughout large portions of the United States. Purpose of this work was to perform an initial assessment of HEMP induced surges on a simplified electric distribution system. This report presents the assumptions, methodology, and resulting induced transient voltages and currents at various points in the distribution circuit in the microsecond timeframe, considering the impacts of HEMP incident simultaneously throughout the distribution system for a range of parametric conditions. Results of this work suggest that EMP could induce voltage transients that far exceed the basic insulation level (BIL) of distribution systems and that a more detailed analysis is warranted.

  11. Higgs boson search in the WW → lvqq final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, Pietro; Sandström, Rikard

    2016-10-01

    Among proton-proton collision events at the LHC where two Wbosons are produced, the region defined by large masses of their system is sensitive to the presence of SM-like Higgs boson resonances. The final state with one Wboson decaying leptonically and the other one hadronically features both the purity granted by the presence of a lepton, and the large cross section due to the hadronic branching ratio of the Wboson. The ATLAS and CMS analyses of this final state performed with the LHC data acquired at 7TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy are presented, in the frame of Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson searches: besides excluding high mass resonances beyond the one found at a mass of around 125 GeV, these studies pave the way for the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking that will be carried on in the forthcoming runs of the LHC.

  12. Unit charge on supported gold clusters in photoemission final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, G. K.; Dicenzo, S. B.; Youngquist, S. E.

    1983-12-01

    The large, positive core-level shifts seen in photoemission from Au clusters on poorly conducting substrates result from a unit positive charge left on a cluster during the photoemission final state. The case of clusters supported on a poorly conducting carbon substrate is intermediate between the case of free clusters and that of clusters supported on metallic substrates. The identification of a macroscopic Coulomb effect removes the apparent conflict between positive core-level shifts and the expected initial state band-structure effect, whereby increased localization in small clusters should increase the density in Au and decrease the Au core electron binding energy.

  13. Searches for New Physics in Top-like Final States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, Yeng-Ming

    2013-11-01

    We present searches for massive top and bottom quark partners at CMS using data collected at √s = 7 and 8 TeV. Such partners are incorporated in 4th generation models, or can be found in other models, able to solve the Hierarchy problem and stabilize the Higgs mass. Other searches presented here focus on excited states of composite heavy objects that decay to top quarks and jets. The searches span a range of final states, from multi-leptonic to entirely hadronic, and limits are set on mass and production cross sections as a function of branching ratios.

  14. Remarkable Dependence of the Final Charge Separation Efficiency on the Donor-Acceptor Interaction in Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Yamada, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Masanori; Furube, Akihiro; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Miura, Taku; Kobori, Yasuhiro; Jono, Ryota; Yamashita, Koichi; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2016-01-11

    The unprecedented dependence of final charge separation efficiency as a function of donor-acceptor interaction in covalently-linked molecules with a rectilinear rigid oligo-p-xylene bridge has been observed. Optimization of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling remarkably inhibits the undesirable rapid decay of the singlet charge-separated state to the ground state, yielding the final long-lived, triplet charge-separated state with circa 100% efficiency. This finding is extremely useful for the rational design of artificial photosynthesis and organic photovoltaic cells toward efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:26610285

  15. Cognitive Content for Mother-Child Interactions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Alfred L.; And Others

    This study details three methods developed during the course of an investigation for describing adult-child interaction: (1) the "VINEX" category system for coding the actual language of the adult and the child; (2) a coding system for describing nonverbal behavior; and, (3) "Interaction Language," for the use of an observer in narrating the…

  16. B Meson Decays With Tau Leptons in the Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Michael; /Freiburg U.

    2009-08-05

    We present measurements of B meson decays with {tau} leptons in the final state. These decays, while experimentally more challenging than those involving light leptons, provide enhanced sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model due to the large {tau} mass. We present measurements of the branching fractions of B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} and B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, as well as searches for the forbidden decays B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}} and B{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {tau}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}. These measurements are based on several hundred million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events recorded with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider.

  17. 75 FR 62624 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding United States-Final Antidumping Measures on Stainless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding United States--Final Antidumping... Trade Organization (``WTO Agreement''), the Dispute Settlement Body of the World Trade Organization (``WTO'') has referred a matter concerning the dispute United States--Final Antidumping Measures...

  18. Study of B Meson Decays to ppbarh Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana B.; /SLAC

    2006-03-22

    B mesons are unique among well-established non-quarkonium mesons in their ability to decay into baryons. Baryonic B decays offer a wide range of interesting areas of study: they can be used to test our theoretical understanding of rare decay processes involving baryons, search for direct CP violation and study low-energy QCD. This thesis presents measurements of branching fractions and a study of the decay dynamics of the charmless three-body decays of B meson into p{bar p}h final states, where h = {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}. With a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BaBar detector, we report the first observation of the B {yields} p{bar p}K*{sup 0} decay, and provide improved measurements of branching fractions of the other modes. The distribution of the three final-state particles is of particular interest since it provides dynamical information on the possible presence of exotic intermediate states such as the hypothetical pentaquark states {Theta}*{sup ++} and {Theta}{sup +}in the m{sub pK{sup +}} and m{sub pK{sub S}{sup 0}} spectra, respectively, or glueball states (such as the tensor glueball f{sub J}(2220)) in the m{sub p{bar p}} spectrum. No evidence for exotic states is found and upper limits on the branching fractions are set. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed in all the B {yields} p{bar p}h modes, and its shape is compared between the decay modes and with the shape of the time-like proton form factor. A Dalitz plot asymmetry in B {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} mode suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this decay and disfavors the possibility that the low mass p{bar p} enhancement originates from the presence of a resonance below threshold (such as the recently seen baryonium candidate at 1835 MeV/c{sup 2}). We also identify decays of the type B {yields} X{sub c{bar c}}h {yields} p{bar p}h, where h = K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}, and X

  19. Dynamic control of spin states in interacting magnetic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn

    2014-10-07

    A method for the control of the magnetic states of interacting magnetic elements comprising providing a magnetic structure with a plurality of interacting magnetic elements. The magnetic structure comprises a plurality of magnetic states based on the state of each interacting magnetic element. The desired magnetic state of the magnetic structure is determined. The active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the desired magnetic state is determined. Each magnetic element of the magnetic structure is then subjected to an alternating magnetic field or electrical current having a frequency and amplitude below the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of said desired magnetic state and above the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the current state of the magnetic structure until the magnetic state of the magnetic structure is at the desired magnetic state.

  20. Final Report: Interactive Technology Literacy Curriculum Online (ITLC Online)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Linda; Johanson, Joyce; Schneider, Carol; Hutinger, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Interactive Technology Literacy Curriculum Online (ITLC Online) was a Steppingstones of Technology Innovation for Students with Disabilities Phase 1 (Development) project awarded to the Center for Best Practices in Early Childhood (the Center) at Western Illinois University (WIU). ITLC Online's goal was to improve services for young children with…

  1. State-federal interactions in nuclear regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A.D.; Budnitz, R.J.

    1987-12-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 established, and later Congressional amendments have confirmed, that except in areas which have been explicitly granted to the states, the federal government possesses preemptive authority to regulate radiation hazards associated with the development and use of atomic energy. Since the passage of the original Act, numerous decisions by the courts have reaffirmed the legitimacy of federal preemption, and have defined and redefined its scope. In this study, the aim is to explore the underlying issues involved in federal preemption of radiation-hazard regulation, and to recommend actions that the Department of Energy and other agencies and groups should consider undertaking in the near term to protect the preemption principle. Appropriate roles of the states are discussed, as well as recent state-level activities and their rationale, and several current arenas in which state-federal conflicts about regulation of hazards are being played out. The emphasis here is on four particular arenas that are now important arenas of conflict, but the issues discussed are far broader in scope. These four arenas are: state-level moratorium activity; emergency planning for reactors; conflicts arising from state financial regulation; and inroads in federal preemption through litigation under state law.

  2. Characteristics of Quasi-Molecular State Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Devdariani, A.; Dalimier, E.; Kereselidze, T.; Noselidze, I.; Rebentrost, F.; Sauvan, P.

    2008-10-22

    The quasi-molecular dipole transition moments have been considered analytically within the framework of the two-state approximation with particular emphasis on their roots (zeros) on spectral manifestations of the roots in the adiabatic diabatic limits. The interrelation between the spectral features the non-adiabatic transitions found in [1] has been demonstrated for excited state charge exchange Al{sup +12}(n = 4)+C{sup +6}{yields}Al{sup +13}+C{sup +5}(n = 2)

  3. Interactive Media Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 143 competencies, grouped into 25 units, for tech prep programs in the interactive media technologies cluster. The competencies were developed through collaboration of Ohio business, industry, and labor representatives and secondary and associate degree educators. The competencies are rated either "essential" (necessary to…

  4. Final-state angular momentum distributions in charge transfer collisions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdörfer, Joachim

    1985-11-01

    We investigate the influence of different terms of the Born series on the final-state angular momentum ( l) distribution and the anisotropy of the captured electron. A variety of different l distributions depending on the projectile velocity v and the charge asymmetry {Z p}/{Z T} of the collision system can be found, revealing different underlying mechanisms for charge transfer. We compare the predictions of perturbation theories such as the first and second Born approximation, the continuum distorted wave (CDW) approximation and the post-collision interaction (PCI) model valid at high velocities with those of the "quasi-resonant over barrier" model of charge transfer valid at intermediate velocities.

  5. Research and Development for Interactive Teaching of Russian. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manwell, Tom

    1973-01-01

    A computer-assisted instructional (CAI) system for teaching Russian to college students is described. It was operational at Harvard University until September 1971 and then transferred to the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Treatments of second language acquisition, a critique of previous work in the field, and some remarks on CAI…

  6. Exclusive final states from photon-photon collisions at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1981-05-01

    Studies of exclusive final states produced by the two-photon process have been made at SPEAR by the Mark II and by the Crystal Ball Collaborations. Measurements of ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ and ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ production in the mass region 500 MeV/c/sup 2/ < m/sub ..pi pi../ < 2000 MeV/c/sup 2/ are presented. These data include strong signals from the well-known f(1270) meson. The A/sub 2/(1310) has been observed via its ..pi../sup 0/ eta decay mode and its partial width to ..gamma gamma.. has been determined. A measurement of the cross section for the reaction ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is reported. This channel is found to be small just above the four pion threshold, but exhibits a large enhancement near the rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ threshold.

  7. Angular observables for spin discrimination in boosted diboson final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschmann, Malte; Yu, Felix

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the prospects for spin determination of a heavy diboson resonance using angular observables. Focusing in particular on boosted fully hadronic final states, we detail both the differences in signal efficiencies and distortions of differential distributions resulting from various jet substructure techniques. We treat the 2 TeV diboson excess as a case study, but our results are generally applicable to any future discovery in the diboson channel. Scrutinizing ATLAS and CMS analyses at 8 TeV and 13 TeV, we find that the specific cuts employed in these analyses have a tremendous impact on the discrimination power between different signal hypotheses. We discuss modified cuts that can offer a significant boost to spin sensitivity in a post-discovery era. Even without altered cuts, we show that CMS, and partly also ATLAS, will be able to distinguish between spin 0, 1, or 2 new physics diboson resonances at the 2 σ level with 30 fb-1 of 13 TeV data, for our 2 TeV case study.

  8. The State of Children's Interactive Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckleitner, Warren

    2008-01-01

    The words "amazing" and "hair-raising" do a nice job of describing the past year in children's interactive media. A glance at the 625 titles released this year reveals new ways to learn, create, and in some cases jump around the room. The good news is that the five-year software drought has ended. The bad news is that these new titles are…

  9. Geothermal Energy Development in the Eastern United States. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    This document represents the final report from the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) of The Johns Hopkins University on its efforts on behalf of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Department of Energy (DOE). For the past four years, the Laboratory has been fostering development of geothermal energy in the Eastern United States. While the definition of ''Eastern'' has changed somewhat from time to time, basically it means the area of the continental United States east of the Rocky Mountains, plus Puerto Rico but excluding the geopressured regions of Texas and Louisiana. During these years, the Laboratory developed a background in geology, hydrology, and reservoir analysis to aid it in establishing the marketability of geothermal energy in the east. Contrary to the situation in the western states, the geothermal resource in the east was clearly understood to be inferior in accessible temperature. On the other hand, there were known to be copious quantities of water in various aquifers to carry the heat energy to the surface. More important still, the east possesses a relatively dense population and numerous commercial and industrial enterprises, so that thermal energy, almost wherever found, would have a market. Thus, very early on it was clear that the primary use for geothermal energy in the east would be for process heat and space conditioning--heating and cool electrical production was out of the question. The task then shifted to finding users colocated with resources. This task met with modest success on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. A great deal of economic and demographic analysis pinpointed the prospective beneficiaries, and an intensive ''outreach'' campaign was mounted to persuade the potential users to invest in geothermal energy. The major handicaps were: (1) The lack of demonstrated hydrothermal resources with known temperatures and expected longevity; and (2) The lack of a ''bellwether'' installation for entrepreneurs to see, touch, and

  10. Water use, productivity and interactions among desert plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ehleringer, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Productivity, stability, and competitive interactions among ecosystem components within aridlands are key processes related directly to water in deserts. This project assumes that integrated aspects of plant metabolism provide insight into the structure and function of plant communities and ecosystems. While it is difficult to extrapolate from instantaneous physiological observations to higher scales, such as whole plant performance or to the interactions between plants as components of ecosystems, several key aspects of plant metabolism are scalable. Analyses of stable isotopic composition in plant tissues at natural abundance levels provide a useful tool that can provide insight into the consequences of physiological processes over temporal and spatial scales. Some plant processes continuously fractionate among light and heavy stable isotopic forms of an element; over time this results in integrated measures of plant metabolism. For example, carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis results in leaf carbon isotopic composition that is a measure of the set-point for photosynthetic metabolism and of water-use efficiency. Thus it provides information on the temporal scaling of a key physiological process.

  11. 76 FR 13209 - United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final Judgment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Antitrust Division United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final... Statement have been filed with the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas, Wichita Falls Division, in United States of America and State of Texas v. United......

  12. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thalian. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S. I.

    2000-06-01

    This is a final report describing the results of the research funded by the DOE Energy Biosciences Program grant entitled ''A Molecular-Genetic Approach to Studying Source-Sink Interactions in Arabidiopsis thaliana''.

  13. Selective interactions in trapped ions: State reconstruction and quantum logic

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We propose the implementation of selective interactions of atom-motion subspaces in trapped ions. These interactions yield resonant exchange of population inside a selected subspace, leaving the others in a highly dispersive regime. Selectivity allows us to generate motional Fock (and other nonclassical) states with high purity out of a wide class of initial states, and becomes an unconventional cooling mechanism when the ground state is chosen. Individual population of number states can be distinctively measured, as well as the motional Wigner function. Furthermore, a protocol for implementing quantum logic through a suitable control of selective subspaces is presented.

  14. 75 FR 7522 - United States Section; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Flood...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO United States Section; Notice of Availability of the Final... Project, Presidio, TX AGENCY: United States Section, International Boundary and Water Commission (USIBWC..., International Boundary and Water Commission (USIBWC) has prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement...

  15. Final Scientifc Report - Hydrogen Education State Partnership Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Warren

    2012-02-03

    Under the leadership of the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells program, Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) educated and worked with state leaders to encourage wider deployment of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Through outreach to state policymakers, legislative leaders, clean energy funds, energy agencies, and public utility commissions, CESA worked to accomplish the following objectives of this project: 1. Provide information and technical assistance to state policy leaders and state renewable energy programs in the development of effective hydrogen fuel cell programs. 2. Identify and foster hydrogen program best practices. 3. Identify and promote strategic opportunities for states and the Department of Energy (DOE) to advance hydrogen technology deployment through partnerships, collaboration, and targeted activities. Over the three years of this project, CESA, with our partner National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), was able to provide credible information on fuel cell policies, finance, and technical assistance to hundreds of state officials and other stakeholders. CESA worked with its membership network to effectively educate state clean energy policymakers, program managers, and decision makers about fuel cell and hydrogen technologies and the efforts by states to advance those technologies. With the assistance of NCSL, CESA gained access to an effective forum for outreach and communication with state legislators from all 50 states on hydrogen issues and policies. This project worked to educate policymakers and stakeholders with the potential to develop and deploy stationary and portable fuel cell technologies.

  16. EOC requirements at state and local levels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, K.F.; Goshe, F.; Rainey, C.T.

    1980-08-01

    Part One of this report analyzes Emergency Operating Center functions and requirements at local, area, and sub-State or State levels. EOC roles in times of normalcy, in natural disasters with and without warning, and in the crisis, in-shelter, and postattack phases of nuclear war are examined and compared. In Part Two, three approaches to a backbone nationwide direction and control network are reviewed. A sub-State system based on existing State highway department districts, facilities, and equipment is proposed and correlations with two other sub-State concepts (MIDAS and RAOC) are evaluated.

  17. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective. PMID:26900948

  18. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective. PMID:26900948

  19. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective.

  20. Equation of state in a strongly interacting relativistic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; Keith, Jason P.

    2012-09-01

    We study the evolution of the equation of state of a strongly interacting quark system as a function of the diquark interaction strength. We show that for the system to avoid collapsing into a pressureless boson gas at sufficiently strong diquark coupling strength, the diquark-diquark repulsion has to be self-consistently taken into account. In particular, we find that the tendency at zero temperature of the strongly interacting diquark gas to condense into the system ground state is compensated by the repulsion between diquarks if the diquark-diquark coupling constant is higher than a critical value λC=7.65. Considering such diquark-diquark repulsion, a positive pressure with no significant variation along the whole strongly interacting region is obtained. A consequence of the diquark-diquark repulsion is that the system maintains its BCS character in the whole strongly interacting region.

  1. Undocumented Students with Disabilities: A State Inquiry. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Joy

    This study attempted to identify critical issues in the provision of special education services to children of undocumented immigrants in the context of the 1982 Supreme Court decision, Plyler versus Doe, which affirmed the state's obligation to educate these children. The study developed a questionnaire which was sent to eight states having large…

  2. 77 FR 69788 - Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to the EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The EPA proposes to grant final authorization to the hazardous...

  3. Interaction-induced topological insulator states in strained graphene.

    PubMed

    Abanin, D A; Pesin, D A

    2012-08-10

    The electronic properties of graphene can be manipulated via mechanical deformations, which opens prospects for both studying the Dirac fermions in new regimes and for new device applications. Certain natural configurations of strain generate large nearly uniform pseudomagnetic fields, which have opposite signs in the two valleys, and give rise to flat spin- and valley-degenerate pseudo-Landau levels (PLLs). Here we consider the effect of the Coulomb interactions in strained graphene with a uniform pseudomagnetic field. We show that the spin or valley degeneracies of the PLLs get lifted by the interactions, giving rise to topological insulator states. In particular, when a nonzero PLL is quarter or three-quarter filled, an anomalous quantum Hall state spontaneously breaking time-reversal symmetry emerges. At half-filled PLLs, a weak spin-orbital interaction stabilizes the time-reversal-symmetric quantum spin-Hall state. These many-body states are characterized by the quantized conductance and persist to a high temperature scale set by the Coulomb interactions, which we estimate to be a few hundreds Kelvin at moderate strain values. At fractional fillings, fractional quantum Hall states breaking valley symmetry emerge. These results suggest a new route to realizing robust topological states in mesoscopic graphene.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of...: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) State Compliance supplement...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of...: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) State Compliance supplement...

  6. Interactivity versus Interaction: What Really Matters for State Legislature Web Sites?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferber, Paul; Foltz, Franz; Pugliese, Rudy

    2005-01-01

    The Internet, not unlike previous communication technologies, has been predicted to dramatically change the nature of democracy. The interactive nature of Web sites, in particular, is seen as the basis for a new cyberdemocracy. Although the definition of interactivity is less than precise, an evaluation of state legislature Web sites finds them…

  7. Initial state fluctuations and final state correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzum, Matthew; Petersen, Hannah

    2014-06-01

    We review the phenomenology and theory of bulk observables in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, focusing on recent developments involving event-by-event fluctuations in the initial stages of a heavy-ion collision, and how they manifest in observed correlations. We first define the relevant observables and show how each measurement is related to underlying theoretical quantities. Then we review the prevailing picture of the various stages of a collision, including the state-of-the-art modeling of the initial stages of a collision and subsequent hydrodynamic evolution, as well as hadronic scattering and freeze-out in the later stages. We then discuss the recent results that have shaped our current understanding and identify the challenges that remain. Finally, we point out open issues and the potential for progress in the field.

  8. 40 CFR 272.2101 - South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Program: Final Authorization. 272.2101 Section 272.2101 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS South Dakota § 272.2101 South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final Authorization. (a) Pursuant to...

  9. Final Scientific and Technical Report State and Regional Biomass Partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

    2008-12-29

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

  10. Limit states and reliability-based pipeline design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, T.J.E.; Chen, Q.; Pandey, M.D.

    1997-06-01

    This report provides the results of a study to develop limit states design (LSD) procedures for pipelines. Limit states design, also known as load and resistance factor design (LRFD), provides a unified approach to dealing with all relevant failure modes combinations of concern. It explicitly accounts for the uncertainties that naturally occur in the determination of the loads which act on a pipeline and in the resistance of the pipe to failure. The load and resistance factors used are based on reliability considerations; however, the designer is not faced with carrying out probabilistic calculations. This work is done during development and periodic updating of the LSD document. This report provides background information concerning limits states and reliability-based design (Section 2), gives the limit states design procedures that were developed (Section 3) and provides results of the reliability analyses that were undertaken in order to partially calibrate the LSD method (Section 4). An appendix contains LSD design examples in order to demonstrate use of the method. Section 3, Limit States Design has been written in the format of a recommended practice. It has been structured so that, in future, it can easily be converted to a limit states design code format. Throughout the report, figures and tables are given at the end of each section, with the exception of Section 3, where to facilitate understanding of the LSD method, they have been included with the text.

  11. The cryogenics of the LHC interaction region final focus superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Byrns, R.; et al., FNAL

    1998-08-01

    The LHC interaction region final focus magnets will include four superconducting quadrupoles cooled with pressurized, static superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The heat absorbed in pressurized He II, which may be more than 10 Watts per meter due to dynamic heating from the particle beam halo, will be transported to saturated He II at 1.8 K and removed by the 16 mbar vapor. This paper discusses the conceptual design for the cryogenics of the interaction region final focus superconducting magnets and the integration of this magnet system into the overall LHC cryogenic system.

  12. New York State technical and economic MAGLEV evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The study is the preliminary evaluation of magnetically levitated ground transportation systems (MAGLEV). The evaluation focuses on using the New York State Thruway right-of-way in combination with MAGLEV systems currently in development in Germany and Japan and those proposed for development in the United States. The Energy Authority's goal in cosponsoring the study was to determine if MAGLEV offered the potential to meet future New York State transportation demands cost-effectively, and to evaluate the benefits that the State might expect from supporting MAGLEV technology development and system implementation. According to the preliminary report, substantial economic benefits could accrue to the State through MAGLEV-related research, development, manufacturing and construction. Implementation would have a favorable impact on issues related to transportation, the environment and energy conservation. With the exception of the German Transrapid system, developing a domestic prototype MAGLEV vehicle would take seven to nine years; no insurmountable technical barriers are apparent. EMF shielding (electromagnetic fields) is, however, a concern. It will cost an estimated $1 billion to develop a new MAGLEV system design; however, innovative designs may reduce the price.

  13. Interaction between emotional state and learning underlies mood instability.

    PubMed

    Eldar, Eran; Niv, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Intuitively, good and bad outcomes affect our emotional state, but whether the emotional state feeds back onto the perception of outcomes remains unknown. Here, we use behaviour and functional neuroimaging of human participants to investigate this bidirectional interaction, by comparing the evaluation of slot machines played before and after an emotion-impacting wheel-of-fortune draw. Results indicate that self-reported mood instability is associated with a positive-feedback effect of emotional state on the perception of outcomes. We then use theoretical simulations to demonstrate that such positive feedback would result in mood destabilization. Taken together, our results suggest that the interaction between emotional state and learning may play a significant role in the emergence of mood instability.

  14. Measurement of. gamma gamma. psi final states in psi' decay

    SciTech Connect

    Himel, T.M.; Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burke, D.L.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Coles, M.W.; Cooper, S.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Eaton, M.W.; Feldman, G.J.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Jenni, P.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; Levi, M.E.; Lueth, V.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Perl, M.L.; Richter, B.; Roussarie, A.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Strait, J.; Taureg, H.; Tonutti, M.; Trilling, G.H.; Vella, E.N.; Vidal, R.A.; Videau, I.; Weiss, J.M.; Zaccone, H.

    1980-04-07

    The decay mode psi' ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..psi has been studied with the Mark-II detector at SPEAR. New measurements of branching ratios for decays of the type psi' ..-->.. ..gamma..chi, chi ..-->.. ..gamma..psi involving known chi states are presented. The existence of a chi state of mass near 3455 MeV/c/sup 2/ produced in this decay chain is not confirmed, and the upper limit (90% confidence level) of the product of branching ratios is measured to be 0.13%. A new decay mode, psi' ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/psi, which violates isospin conservation is observed with branching ratio (0.15 +- 0.06)%.

  15. Enhanced Internet firewall design using stateful filters final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, J.A.; Simons, R.W.

    1997-08-01

    The current state-of-the-art in firewall design provides a lot of security for company networks, but normally at the expense of performance and/or functionality. Sandia researched a new approach to firewall design which incorporates a highly stateful approach, allowing much more flexibility for protocol checking and manipulation while retaining performance. A prototype system was built and multiple protocol policy modules implemented to test the concept. The resulting system, though implemented on a low-power workstation, performed almost at the same performance as Sandia`s current firewall.

  16. RTG resource book for western states and provinces: Final proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Western Interstate Energy Board held a workshop and liaison activities among western states, provinces, and utilities on the formation of Regional Transmission Groups (RTGs). Purpose of the activities was to examine the policy implications for western states and provinces in the formation of RTGs in the West, the implications for western ratepayers and utilities of the RTG formation and potential impacts of RTGs on the western electricity system. The workshop contributed to fulfilling the transmission access and competition objectives of Title VII of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

  17. State dependence of Rydberg interaction-induced collisional loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhigang; Zhao, Kejia; Miao, Jingyuan; Li, Difei; Yang, Zhijun; Wu, Zhaochun; He, Zhao; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    We present a simple analytical formula from an existing theoretical model and theoretically investigate in detail the state dependence of interaction-induced collisional loss rate coefficients, and the various parameter effects on collisional loss rate. We also investigate the different mechanisms and corresponding effects on collisional loss by analyzing our previous experimental results using the present formula, and even investigate the time evolution of Rydberg atom number for different Rydberg states.

  18. Generating non-classical states from spin coherent states via interaction with ancillary spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Shane; Joo, Jaewoo; Proctor, Timothy; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2015-02-01

    The generation of non-classical states of large quantum systems has attracted much interest from a foundational perspective, but also because of the significant potential of such states in emerging quantum technologies. In this paper we consider the possibility of generating non-classical states of a system of spins by interaction with an ancillary system, starting from an easily prepared initial state. We extend previous results for an ancillary system comprising a single spin to bigger ancillary systems and the interaction strength is enhanced by a factor of the number of ancillary spins. Depending on initial conditions, we find - by a combination of approximation and numerics - that the system of spins can evolve to spin cat states, spin squeezed states or to multiple cat states. We also discuss some candidate systems for implementation of the Hamiltonian necessary to generate these non-classical states.

  19. The SPICE Center at Bluefield State College. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, David Harrill

    The writing center at Bluefield State College (West Virginia) is called the SPICE Center, SPICE being an acronym for Self Paced Instruction for Competency in English. In addition to emphasizing skill acquisition and flexibility, it stresses face-to-face evaluation of written work, and places heavy emphasis on writing as process instead of writing…

  20. MERC Report: State Management Evaluation Reviews for Compliance. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra Planning and Research Associates, Reno, NV.

    A process assessment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the procedure used by the Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education, U.S. Office of Education (USOE), in conducting State Management Evaluation Reviews for Compliance (MERC) with Federal legislation and regulations governing public vocational and adult education programs. The…

  1. Washington State Student Achievement Initiative Policy Study: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Wachen, John; Moore, Colleen; Shulock, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges launched a performance funding policy called the Student Achievement Initiative (SAI) both to improve public accountability by more accurately describing what students achieve from enrolling in community colleges and to provide incentives to colleges through financial rewards…

  2. United States Participation in the Pacific Circle Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The goal of the Pacific Circle Project is to improve international and intercultural understanding among the people and nations of the Pacific. Consortium member countries are Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. Within the countries are chosen member institutions. Two major types of activities of the consortium are the exchange…

  3. Properties of interacting 2D chiral tensor network states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Dubail, Jerome; Read, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    In a recent paper, Dubail and Read gave a construction for free fermion tensor network states(TNSs) in the chiral p + ip and ν = 1 Chern insulator topological phases in two dimensions, and gave a generalization to Laughlin-like states. However, on general principles these free fermion states must be ground states of gapless local Hamiltonians. In this talk, we address the issue of the energy gap in the interacting states, with a particular focus on the ν = 1 / 2 bosonic Laughlin-like TNS. Through a combination of analytic and numerical arguments, we will show that these states too have gapless local parent Hamiltonians. Nevertheless, we will explore to what degree they can be used as numerical approximations to gapped phases.

  4. "Photonic" Cat States from Strongly Interacting Matter Waves.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Uwe R; Kang, Myung-Kyun

    2015-12-31

    We consider ultracold quantum gases of scalar bosons residing in a coupling strength-density regime in which they constitute a twofold fragmented condensate trapped in a single well. It is shown that the corresponding quantum states are, in the appropriate Fock space basis, identical to the photon cat states familiar in quantum optics, which correspond to superpositions of coherent states of the light field with a phase difference of π. In marked distinction to photon cat states, however, the very existence of matter-wave cat states crucially depends on the many-body correlations of the constituent bosons. We consequently establish that the quadratures of the effective "photons," expressing the highly nonclassical nature of the macroscopic matter-wave superposition state, can be experimentally accessed by measuring the density-density correlations of the interacting quantum gas. PMID:26764977

  5. "Photonic" Cat States from Strongly Interacting Matter Waves.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Uwe R; Kang, Myung-Kyun

    2015-12-31

    We consider ultracold quantum gases of scalar bosons residing in a coupling strength-density regime in which they constitute a twofold fragmented condensate trapped in a single well. It is shown that the corresponding quantum states are, in the appropriate Fock space basis, identical to the photon cat states familiar in quantum optics, which correspond to superpositions of coherent states of the light field with a phase difference of π. In marked distinction to photon cat states, however, the very existence of matter-wave cat states crucially depends on the many-body correlations of the constituent bosons. We consequently establish that the quadratures of the effective "photons," expressing the highly nonclassical nature of the macroscopic matter-wave superposition state, can be experimentally accessed by measuring the density-density correlations of the interacting quantum gas.

  6. [Interaction of differential anxiety states with analytic cognitive style].

    PubMed

    Otto, J H; Lantermann, E D

    1995-01-01

    Interactions of anxiety states with modes of cognitive processing are investigated. It is assumed that the analytic thinking style of negative feeling states consists of probabilistic reasoning in the case of self-relevant anxiety states and of simple bipolar (yes-or-no) decisions in the case of physically threatening anxiety states. Sixty-six female student teachers (M = 23 years of age, SD = 2.7) served as subjects in a 3 x 2 x 4 mixed design. The subjects were divided into three groups of equal size. In each group a self-threatening or physically threatening anxiety state or a neutral feeling state was generated. Half of the subjects in each of the three groups were provided with either a probabilistic or yes-or-no answering format for a list of life events to induce a different style of cognitive processing. Repeated measurements of affect provided a pre-induction baseline, a manipulation check, and an assessment of affect change during task completion. The feeling states were assessed by means of scales for longitudinal studies of mood (Becker, 1988). The results show that the combination of self-threatening anxiety states with probabilistic judgments and--to a lesser degree--of physically threatening anxiety states with simple yes-or-no judgments caused the maintenance of the respective feeling states. Neither the inverse combinations nor the processing styles alone led to similarly stable affective states. Anxiety states seem to be inherently connected with modes of cognitive processing that should be considered relevant for understanding affect-task interactions and processes of mood repair.

  7. United States Coast Guard portable salvage computer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.J.

    1986-07-01

    The US Coast Guard's interest in marine salvage arises from its responsibility under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act and other laws dealing with oil spills. At vessel stranding situations, which could result in significant environmental damage through the release of oil or hazardous chemicals, the Coast Guard is represented by an On-Scene Coordinator (OSC), who must evaluate whether or not appropriate salvage techniques are applied to the stranded vessel by commercial salvors. To assist the OSC, who may not be trained in marine salvage, and other Coast Guard personnel assigned to such salvage operations, a portable salvage computer has been programmed to accomplish salvage calculations in a user-friendly manner. In this final report, the development of the salvage program and selection of a portable computer are described along with results of field testing with actual stranding situations.

  8. Single stage anaerobic digester at Tarleton State University. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The design and operation of the demonstration plant facilities at Tarleton State University to produce methane in a single stage anaerobic digester are described. A combination of manures from hogs and poultry are used as feedstock. Uses for the methane, cost of the digester, and value of the energy produced are discussed. During the 21 months of operation, 310 people have visited the project. (DMC)

  9. State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    This rule implements a provision enacted by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 and reflects the transfer of the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the Administration for Community Living (ACL) in HHS. The previous regulations were issued by CMS under the authority granted by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA `90), Section 4360.

  10. United States Coast Guard recycling guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    In accordance with the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990, the United States Coast Guard (CG) is committed to a pollution prevention program that will improve the quality of the environment. A key element of this program is the minimization of municipal, industrial, and hazardous waste being generated at CG facilities nationwide. Recycling of wastes serves to reduce disposal costs and minimize adverse effects on the environment. This document gives guidance to personnel responsible for establishing CG recycling programs.

  11. 77 FR 4663 - Final Revisions to Certain Data Collection and Reporting Requirements, Final Priority; State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... free, at 1- 800-877-8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of Program: The State Fiscal Stabilization... Federal Register on November 12, 2009 (74 FR 58436) (November 2009 Notice), the Department established... requirements and proposed priority (NPR) in the Federal Register (76 FR 59074). Public Comment: In response...

  12. Periodic Striped Ground States in Ising Models with Competing Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We consider Ising models in two and three dimensions, with short range ferromagnetic and long range, power-law decaying, antiferromagnetic interactions. We let J be the ratio between the strength of the ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic interactions. The competition between these two kinds of interactions induces the system to form domains of minus spins in a background of plus spins, or vice versa. If the decay exponent p of the long range interaction is larger than d + 1, with d the space dimension, this happens for all values of J smaller than a critical value J c ( p), beyond which the ground state is homogeneous. In this paper, we give a characterization of the infinite volume ground states of the system, for p > 2 d and J in a left neighborhood of J c ( p). In particular, we prove that the quasi-one-dimensional states consisting of infinite stripes ( d = 2) or slabs ( d = 3), all of the same optimal width and orientation, and alternating magnetization, are infinite volume ground states. Our proof is based on localization bounds combined with reflection positivity.

  13. Periodic Striped Ground States in Ising Models with Competing Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We consider Ising models in two and three dimensions, with short range ferromagnetic and long range, power-law decaying, antiferromagnetic interactions. We let J be the ratio between the strength of the ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic interactions. The competition between these two kinds of interactions induces the system to form domains of minus spins in a background of plus spins, or vice versa. If the decay exponent p of the long range interaction is larger than d + 1, with d the space dimension, this happens for all values of J smaller than a critical value J c (p), beyond which the ground state is homogeneous. In this paper, we give a characterization of the infinite volume ground states of the system, for p > 2d and J in a left neighborhood of J c (p). In particular, we prove that the quasi-one-dimensional states consisting of infinite stripes (d = 2) or slabs (d = 3), all of the same optimal width and orientation, and alternating magnetization, are infinite volume ground states. Our proof is based on localization bounds combined with reflection positivity.

  14. Programmatic Research on Social Interaction Maintenance and Generalization with Severely Handicapped Preschoolers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, Phillip S.; Kohler, Frank W.

    This document presents the final report of a 4-year project (ending in 1991) which conducted six studies of the impact of various peer-mediated interventions on the acquisition, generalization, and maintenance of social interaction skills of preschoolers with severe disabilities. The report covers project objectives, the project's theoretical…

  15. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  16. Glassy states in fermionic systems with strong disorder and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David J.; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2009-03-01

    We study the competition between interactions and disorder in two dimensions. Whereas a noninteracting system is always Anderson localized by disorder in two dimensions, a pure system can develop a Mott gap for sufficiently strong interactions. Within a simple model, with short-ranged repulsive interactions, we show that, even in the limit of strong interaction, the Mott gap is completely washed out by disorder for an infinite system for dimensions D≤2 , leading to a glassy state. Moreover, the Mott insulator cannot maintain a broken symmetry in the presence of disorder. We then show that the probability of a nonzero gap as a function of system size falls onto a universal curve, reflecting the glassy dynamics. An analytic calculation is also presented in one dimension that provides further insight into the nature of slow dynamics.

  17. Transportation control measure: State Implementation Plan guidance (revised final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, D.S.; Deakin, E.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Morris, R.E.; Ireson, R.G.

    1990-09-01

    The document has been developed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency to summarize current knowledge about transportation control measures (TCMs). The target audience includes transportation and air quality management staff at all government levels. The guidance development effort is motivated by the need to provide post-1987 guidance to attain National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The document provides descriptions and examples of the most frequently implemented TCMs; institutional guidance such as assessing feasibility, agency responsibilities, and funding; and techniques for monitoring and enforcing TCMs. In addition, the document describes the tools available for evaluating TCM impacts on hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide emissions. Appendices present approaches to estimate TCM effects on PM-10 emissions; important sources of additional information; implementation experiences in various cities; and rules of thumb to quantitatively evaluate TCM transportation system effects. The information presented demonstrates that there have been significant advances in TCM development over the past decade, and that TCMs are appropriate control options for state implementation plans.

  18. Battery charger and state of charge indicator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Latos, T.S.

    1984-04-15

    The battery charger has a full-wave rectifier in series with a transformer isolated 20 kHz dc-dc converter with high frequency switches which are programmed to actively shape the input ac line current to be a mirror image of the ac line voltage. The power circuit is capable of operating at 2 kW peak and 1 kW average power. The BC/SCI has two major subsystems: (1) the battery charger power electronics with its controls; and (2) a microcomputer subsystem which is used to acquire battery terminal data and exercise the state-of-charge software programs. The state-of-charge definition employed is the energy remaining in the battery when extracted at a 10 kW rate divided by the energy capacity of a fully charged new battery. The battery charger circuit is an isolated boost converter operating at an internal frequency of 20 kHz. The switches selected for the battery charger are the single most important item in determining its efficiency. The combination of voltage and current requirements dictated the use of high power NPN Darlington switching transistors. The power circuit topology developed is a three switch design utilizing a power FET on the center tap of the isolation transformer and the power Darlingtons on each of the two ends. An analog control system is employed to accomplish active input current waveshaping as well as the necessary regulation.

  19. Constant-atomic-final-state filtering of dissociative states in the O1s-->sigma* core excitation in O2.

    PubMed

    Hjelte, I; Björneholm, O; Carravetta, V; Angeli, C; Cimiraglia, R; Wiesner, K; Svensson, S; Piancastelli, M N

    2005-08-01

    The below-threshold region in core-excited O2 is very complex, consisting of a multitude of exchange-split states with mixed molecular orbital-Rydberg character. We have investigated the nature of these intermediate states by resonant Auger spectroscopy. In particular, we have obtained constant-atomic-final-state yield curves for several atomic peaks in the electron decay spectra which are stemming from ultrafast dissociation. The relative intensity of Auger decay leading to atomic final states is considered a signature of the relative weight of the sigma* character. This method allows one to "filter out" intermediate states with dissociative character. Extensive calculations have been performed by multi-reference configuration interaction at different interatomic distances in order to evaluate the potential curves of the core-excited states and propose a qualitative description of the dissociative molecular dynamics. The calculations show that the core-excited states have a relevant admixture of excitations to orbitals with Rydberg character and excitations to the sigma* orbital with different spin couplings. A diabatization of the adiabatic potential curves shows that the coupling between Rydberg and sigma* diabatic states is very different at the different crossing points and ultrafast dissociation occurs more easily on the lowest sigma* diabatic potential curve. As a consequence, the observation of atomic peaks only in the lower-energy region of the absorption curve is well justified.

  20. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona § 272.151 Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  1. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona § 272.151 Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  2. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona § 272.151 Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  3. 40 CFR 272.1201 - Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minnesota State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Minnesota § 272.1201 Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization. Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  4. 40 CFR 272.1201 - Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minnesota State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Minnesota § 272.1201 Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization. Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  5. 40 CFR 272.1201 - Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minnesota State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Minnesota § 272.1201 Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization. Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  6. 40 CFR 272.1201 - Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minnesota State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Minnesota § 272.1201 Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization. Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  7. 40 CFR 272.1201 - Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minnesota State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Minnesota § 272.1201 Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization. Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  8. 40 CFR 272.501 - Florida State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Florida State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Florida § 272.501 Florida State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42...

  9. Final report for Utah State's SciDAC CEMM contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eric Held

    2008-05-13

    This document represents a summary of work carried out at Utah State University in conjunction with the Center for Extended Magnetohyrodynamic Modeling (CEMM). The principal investigator, Dr. Eric Held, was aided in this work by two former graduate students, Drs. John James and Michael Addae-Kagyah, who completed their PhD's while being partially funded by CEMM monies. In addtion, Dr. Jeong-Young Ji, a postdoctoral researcher and Mukta Sharma, a graduate student were supported. The work associated with this grant focused on developing an efficient, hybrid fluid/kinetic model for fusion plasmas. Specifically, expressions for the parallel heat fluxes and stresses in magnetized plasmas were implemented and exercised in the NIMROD plasma fluid code.

  10. Overview of sediment quality in the United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, W.J.; Glazer, A.E.; Ong, J.H.; Coons, S.F.

    1987-06-01

    This report provides an overview of sediment quality in waters of the United States. The focus is on describing qualitatively the nature and extent of contaminated sediments, i.e., bottom deposits in rivers, lakes, harbors and oceans that have been polluted with heavy metals, organic chemicals and other materials from anthropogenic sources. Such materials, also called in-place pollutants, may be significantly impacting aquatic ecosystems in some areas, and may be degrading the quality of the overlying water to the extent that water quality criteria are exceeded and that uses of the water - by both aquatic life and humans - are impaired. Major sections of the report provide information on: (1) the nature of sediment contamination problems; (2) sources of contaminated sediments; (3) available responses to sediment contamination; and (4) an overview of sediment quality criteria, used to classify sediments as polluted or not. There are appendices.

  11. ARPA solid state laser and nonlinear materials program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moulton, P.F.

    1994-06-01

    The Research Division of Schwartz Electro-Optics, as part of the ARPA Solid State Laser and Nonlinear Materials Program, conducted a three-year study Erbium-Laser-Based Infrared Sources. The aim of the study was to improve the understanding of semiconductor-laser-pumped, infrared (IR) solid state lasers based on the trivalent rare-earth ion erbium (Er) doped into a variety of host crystals. The initial program plan emphasized operation of erbium-doped materials on the 2.8-3.0 micrometers laser transition. Pulsed, Q-switched sources using that transition, when employed as a pump source for parametric oscillators, can provide tunable mid-IR energy. The dynamics of erbium lasers are more complex than conventional neodymium (Nd)-doped lasers and they intended to use pump-probe techniques to measure the level and temporal behavior of gain in various materials. To do so they constructed a number of different cw Er-doped lasers as probe sources and employed the Cr:LiSAF(LiSrAlF6) laser as a pulsed pump source that would simulate pulsed diode arrays. The authors identified the 970-nm wavelength pump band of Er as the most efficient and were able to make use of recently developed cw and pulsed InGaAs strained-quantum-well diode lasers in the effort. At the conclusion of the program they demonstrated the first pulsed diode bar pumping of the most promising materials for pulsed operation, the oxide garnets YSGG and GGG and the fluoride BaY2F8.

  12. The Interactions of Federal and Related State Education Programs. Volume II: State Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Richard P., Ed.

    This collection of case studies of eight states--California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Virginia, Wyoming--documents a 1981-82 investigation of federal and state administrative interactions across a select sample of federal education programs. To represent a wide spectrum of political, economic, and institutional…

  13. 75 FR 36538 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ...; 70 FR 44150-44151. Arkansas Pollution Control and Ecology (APC&E) Regulation Number 23 (Hazardous... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Arkansas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

  14. Final state effects in liquid /sup 4/He: An experimental test

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, P.E.; Silver, R.N.; Sosnick, T.R.; Snow, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering at high momentum transfers can provide direct information on the atomic momentum distribution n(p) when the Impulse Approximation (IA) is valid. In isotropic systems, the scattering in the IA is directly proportional to the longitudinal momentum distribution which is a function of a single scaling variable Y /triple bond/ (M/Q)(..omega.. /minus/ ..omega../sub r/), where M is the mass of the scatterer, Q is the momentum transfer, and ..omega../sub r/ = Q/sup 2//2M is the recoiled energy. However, the experimentally attainable Q's are not large enough to reach the IA limit. Deviations from the IA due to final state scattering by neighboring atoms, known as final state effects, will distort the observed scattering from the IA prediction. Thus, an understanding of deviations from the IA is essential to accurate determination of n(p). Liquid helium provides an excellent testing ground for studying FSE in a dense, strongly interacting system for two reasons. First, theoretical calculations of the momentum distributions are available in both the normal liquid, and superfluid phases. These calculations are believed to be quite accurate, since they agree well with several other measured properties of the liquid. In addition, n(p) in the superfluid exhibits a very sharp feature, the Bose condensate peak, which should be very sensitive to FSE. Comparison of the predicted scattering obtained from the theoretical n(p) using the IA to the experimentally observed scattering can be used to study deviations due to FSE. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  15. 75 FR 5132 - United States v. Cameron International Corp., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ..., Suite 100, Houston, TX 77041, Defendants. Case No.: Case: 1:09-cv-02165. Assigned To: Bates, John D...: November 17, 2009. Judge: Bates, John D. Proposed Final Judgment Whereas, Plaintiff, United States...

  16. 75 FR 42134 - United States v. Keyspan Corporation; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... Register on March 4, 2010, see United States v. KeySpan corporation, 75 FR 9946-01, 2010 WL 723203; and... proposed Final Judgment. Dated: June 11, 2010. Respectfully submitted, /s/ Jade Alice Eaton,...

  17. 78 FR 70255 - West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: West Virginia...

  18. Robust chimera states in SQUID metamaterials with local interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hizanidis, J.; Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the emergence of robust multiclustered chimera states in a dissipative-driven system of symmetrically and locally coupled identical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) oscillators. The "snakelike" resonance curve of the single SQUID is the key to the formation of the chimera states and is responsible for the extreme multistability exhibited by the coupled system that leads to attractor crowding at the geometrical resonance (inductive-capacitive) frequency. Until now, chimera states were mostly believed to exist for nonlocal coupling. Our findings provide theoretical evidence that nearest-neighbor interactions are indeed capable of supporting such states in a wide parameter range. SQUID metamaterials are the subject of intense experimental investigations, and we are highly confident that the complex dynamics demonstrated in this paper can be confirmed in the laboratory.

  19. 78 FR 15338 - New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Solid Waste... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management...

  20. 77 FR 15343 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... Oklahoma. In the ``Rules and Regulations'' section of this Federal Register, EPA is authorizing the...

  1. 77 FR 39180 - Withdrawal of Direct Final Rule Revising the California State Implementation Plan, South Coast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ...: Withdrawal of direct final rule. SUMMARY: On June 1, 2012 (77 FR 32398), EPA published a direct final... Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1156, Further Reductions of Particulate Emissions... proposal also published on June 1, 2012 (77 FR 32398), or repropose an alternative action. As stated in...

  2. 78 FR 25678 - Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation...

  3. 76 FR 6594 - Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  4. 76 FR 19004 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under...

  5. Closing the wedge: Search strategies for extended Higgs sectors with heavy flavor final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Stefania; Kim, Ian-Woo; Shah, Nausheen R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-04-01

    We consider search strategies for an extended Higgs sector at the high-luminosity LHC14 utilizing multitop final states. In the framework of a two Higgs doublet model, the purely top final states (t t ¯ , 4 t ) are important channels for heavy Higgs bosons with masses in the wedge above 2 mt and at low values of tan β , while a 2 b 2 t final state is most relevant at moderate values of tan β . We find, in the t t ¯H channel, with H →t t ¯, that both single and three lepton final states can provide statistically significant constraints at low values of tan β for mA as high as ˜750 GeV . When systematics on the t t ¯ background are taken into account, however, the three lepton final state is more powerful, though the precise constraint depends fairly sensitively on lepton fake rates. We also find that neither 2 b 2 t nor t t ¯ final states provide constraints on additional heavy Higgs bosons with couplings to tops smaller than the top Yukawa due to expected systematic uncertainties in the t t ¯ background.

  6. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  7. Improved physical stability of amorphous state through acid base interactions.

    PubMed

    Telang, Chitra; Mujumdar, Siddharthya; Mathew, Michael

    2009-06-01

    To investigate role of specific interactions in aiding formation and stabilization of amorphous state in ternary and binary dispersions of a weakly acidic drug. Indomethacin (IMC), meglumine (MU), and polyvinyl pyrollidone (PVP) were the model drug, base, and polymer, respectively. Dispersions were prepared using solvent evaporation. Physical mixtures were cryogenically coground. XRPD, PLM, DSC, TGA, and FTIR were used for characterization. MU has a high crystallization tendency and is characterized by a low T(g) (17 degrees C). IMC crystallization was inhibited in ternary dispersion with MU compared to IMC/PVP alone. An amorphous state formed readily even in coground mixtures. Spectroscopic data are indicative of an IMC-MU amorphous salt and supports solid-state proton transfer. IMC-MU salt displays a low T(g) approximately 50 degrees C, but is more physically stable than IMC, which in molecular mixtures with MU, resisted crystallization even when present in stoichiometric excess of base. This is likely due to a disrupted local structure of amorphous IMC due to specific interactions. IMC showed improved physical stability on incorporating MU in polymer, in spite of low T(g) of the base indicating that chemical interactions play a dominant role in physical stabilization. Salt formation could be induced thermally and mechanically.

  8. 40 CFR 272.1301 - State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program; Final authorization. 272.1301 Section 272.1301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Missouri § 272.1301...

  9. 40 CFR 272.2501 - Wisconsin State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wisconsin State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.2501 Section 272.2501 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Wisconsin §...

  10. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.151 Section 272.151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona §...

  11. 40 CFR 272.651 - Idaho State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Idaho State-Administered Program: Final Authorization. 272.651 Section 272.651 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Idaho § 272.651...

  12. 40 CFR 272.401 - State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.401 Section 272.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Delaware § 272.401...

  13. 40 CFR 272.2251 - Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Utah State-Administered program: Final authorization. 272.2251 Section 272.2251 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Utah § 272.2251 Utah...

  14. 40 CFR 272.1301 - State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State-administered program; Final authorization. 272.1301 Section 272.1301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Missouri § 272.1301...

  15. 40 CFR 272.1351 - Montana State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Montana State-Administered Program: Final Authorization. 272.1351 Section 272.1351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Montana §...

  16. 40 CFR 272.1801 - State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.1801 Section 272.1801 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Ohio § 272.1801...

  17. 40 CFR 272.951 - Louisiana state-administered Program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Louisiana state-administered Program: Final authorization. 272.951 Section 272.951 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Louisiana §...

  18. 40 CFR 272.951 - Louisiana state-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Louisiana state-administered program: Final authorization. 272.951 Section 272.951 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Louisiana §...

  19. 40 CFR 272.401 - State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.401 Section 272.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Delaware § 272.401...

  20. 40 CFR 272.1801 - State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.1801 Section 272.1801 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Ohio § 272.1801...

  1. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.151 Section 272.151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona §...

  2. 77 FR 10560 - United States v. International Paper Company et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. International Paper Company et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and... Columbia in United States v. International Paper Company et al., Civil Action No. 1:12-cv-00227. On... International Paper Company of Temple-Inland Inc. would violate Section 7 of the Clayton Act, 15 U.S.C. 18....

  3. Implications of Climate Change for State Bioassessment Programs and Approaches to Account for Effects (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report uses biological data collected by four states in wadeable rivers and streams to examine the components of state and tribal bioassessment and biomonitoring programs that may be vulnerable to climate change. The study investigates the potential to identify biologi...

  4. Freed by interaction kinetic states in the Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Klaus M.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2015-12-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in a one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattice of the Harper model. We show that a short or long range interaction between particles leads to emergence of delocalized pairs in the non-interacting localized phase. The properties of these freed by interaction kinetic states (FIKS) are analyzed numerically including the advanced Arnoldi method. We find that the number of sites populated by FIKS pairs grows algebraically with the system size with the maximal exponent b = 1, up to a largest lattice size N = 10 946 reached in our numerical simulations, thus corresponding to a complete delocalization of pairs. For delocalized FIKS pairs the spectral properties of such quasiperiodic operators represent a deep mathematical problem. We argue that FIKS pairs can be detected in the framework of recent cold atom experiments [M. Schreiber et al., Science 349, 842 (2015)] by a simple setup modification. We also discuss possible implications of FIKS pairs for electron transport in the regime of charge-density wave and high T c superconductivity.

  5. Magnetic monopole interactions: shell structure of meson and baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.

    1986-12-01

    It is suggested that a low-mass magnetic monopole of Dirac charge g = (137/2)e may be interacting with a c-quark's magnetic dipole moment to produce Zeeman splitting of meson states. The mass M/sub 0/ = 2397 MeV of the monopole is in contrast to the 10/sup 16/-GeV monopoles of grand unification theories (GUT). It is shown that shell structure of energy E/sub n/ = M/sub 0/ + 1/4nM/sub 0/... exists for meson states. The presence of symmetric meson states leads to the identification of the shell structure. The possible existence of the 2397-MeV magnetic monopole is shown to quantize quark masses in agreement with calculations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the shell structure of meson states, the existence of two new mesons is predicted: eta(1814 +/- 50 MeV) with I/sup G/(J/sup PC/) = 0/sup +/(0/sup - +/) and eta/sub c/ (3907 +/- 100 MeV) with J/sup PC/ = 0/sup - +/. The presence of shell structure for baryon states is shown.

  6. Final state rescattering and color-suppressed B0-->D(*)0h0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Chun-Khiang; Hou, Wei-Shu; Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2002-05-01

    The color-suppressed B0-->D(*)0π0, D(*)0η, D0ω decay modes have just been observed for the first time. The rates are all larger than expected, hinting at the presence of final state interactions. Considering the B0-->D(*)0π0 mode alone, an elastic D(*)π-->D(*)π rescattering phase difference δ≡δ1/2-δ3/2~30° would suffice, but the B0-->D(*)0η, D0ω modes compel one to extend the elastic formalism to SU(3) symmetry. We find that a universal a2/a1=0.25 and two strong phase differences 20°~θ<δ<δ'~50° can describe both DP and D*P modes rather well; the large phase of order 50° is needed to account for the strength of both the D(*)0π0 and D(*)0η modes. For DV modes, the nonet symmetry reduces the number of physical phases to just one, giving better predictive power. Two solutions are found. We predict the rates of the B0-->D+sK-, D*+sK-, D0ρ0, D+sK*-, and D0φ modes, as well as the B0-->D0K0, D*0K0, D0K*0 modes. The formalism may have implications for the rates and CP asymmetries of charmless modes.

  7. Interacting trapped bosons yield fragmented condensate states in low dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Uwe R.; Bader, Philipp

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the level population statistics and degree of coherence encoded in the single-particle density matrix of harmonically trapped low-dimensional [quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) or quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D)] Bose gases with repulsive contact interactions. Using a variational analysis, we derive fragmentation of the condensate in the weakly confining directions into two (quasi-1D) and three (quasi-2D) mutually incoherent macroscopic pieces, upon increasing a dimensionless interaction measure beyond a critical value. Fragmented condensate many-body states in low-dimensional systems therefore occur well before the thermodynamic limit of infinite extension is reached, in which phase fluctuations of the matter wave field create an infinite number of nonmacroscopic fragments.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of... PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Pt. 97, App. D Appendix D to Part 97—Final Section 126...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of... PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Pt. 97, App. D Appendix D to Part 97—Final Section 126...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of... PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Pt. 97, App. D Appendix D to Part 97—Final Section 126...

  11. Measuring Asymmetric Interactions in Resting State Brain Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anand A.; Salloum, Ronald; Bhushan, Chitresh; Leahy, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Directed graph representations of brain networks are increasingly being used in brain image analysis to indicate the direction and level of influence among brain regions. Most of the existing techniques for directed graph representations are based on time series analysis and the concept of causality, and use time lag information in the brain signals. These time lag-based techniques can be inadequate for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal analysis due to the limited time resolution of fMRI as well as the low frequency hemodynamic response. The aim of this paper is to present a novel measure of necessity that uses asymmetry in the joint distribution of brain activations to infer the direction and level of interaction among brain regions. We present a mathematical formula for computing necessity and extend this measure to partial necessity, which can potentially distinguish between direct and indirect interactions. These measures do not depend on time lag for directed modeling of brain interactions and therefore are more suitable for fMRI signal analysis. The necessity measures were used to analyze resting state fMRI data to determine the presence of hierarchy and asymmetry of brain interactions during resting state. We performed ROI-wise analysis using the proposed necessity measures to study the default mode network. The empirical joint distribution of the fMRI signals was determined using kernel density estimation, and was used for computation of the necessity and partial necessity measures. The significance of these measures was determined using a one-sided Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the posterior cingulate cortex plays a central role in the default mode network. PMID:26221690

  12. Measuring Asymmetric Interactions in Resting State Brain Networks.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anand A; Salloum, Ronald; Bhushan, Chitresh; Leahy, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Directed graph representations of brain networks are increasingly being used to indicate the direction and level of influence among brain regions. Most of the existing techniques for directed graph representations are based on time series analysis and the concept of causality, and use time lag information in the brain signals. These time lag-based techniques can be inadequate for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal analysis due to the limited time resolution of fMRI as well as the low frequency hemodynamic response. The aim of this paper is to present a novel measure of necessity that uses asymmetry in the joint distribution of brain activations to infer the direction and level of interaction among brain regions. We present a mathematical formula for computing necessity and extend this measure to partial necessity, which can potentially distinguish between direct and indirect interactions. These measures do not depend on time lag for directed modeling of brain interactions and therefore are more suitable for fMRI signal analysis. The necessity measures were used to analyze resting state fMRI data to determine the presence of hierarchy and asymmetry of brain interactions during resting state. We performed ROI-wise analysis using the proposed necessity measures to study the default mode network. The empirical joint distribution of the fMRI signals was determined using kernel density estimation, and was used for computation of the necessity and partial necessity measures. The significance of these measures was determined using a one-sided Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the posterior cingulate cortex plays a central role in the default mode network. PMID:26221690

  13. 76 FR 12283 - Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... State of Texas initially received final authorization on December 26, 1984 (49 FR 48300), to implement... March 26, 1985 (50 FR 11858). Texas received authorization for revisions to its program, effective October 4, 1985 (51 FR 3952), February 17, 1987 (51 FR 45320), March 15, 1990 (55 FR 7318), July 23,...

  14. Description of superdeformed nuclear states in the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Zhao, E.; Liu, Y.; Song, J.; Liu, Y.; Sun, H.; Zhao, E.; Liu, Y.; Sun, H.

    1997-09-01

    We show in this paper that the superdeformed nuclear states can be described with a four parameter formula in the spirit of the perturbated SU(3) limit of the sdg IBM. The E2 transition {gamma}-ray energies, the dynamical moments of inertia of the lowest superdeformed (SD) bands in even-even Hg, Pb, Gd, and Dy isotopes, and the energy differences {Delta}E{sub {gamma}}{minus}{Delta}E{sub {gamma}}{sup ref} of the SD band 1 of {sup 194}Hg are calculated. The calculated results agree with experimental data well. This indicates that the SD states are governed by a rotational interaction plus a perturbation with SO{sub sdg}(5) symmetry. The perturbation causing the {Delta}I=4 bifurcation to emerge in the {Delta}I=2 superdeformed rotational band may then possess SO{sub sdg}(5) symmetry. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. The role of interaction vertices in bound state calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cetin Savkli; Franz Gross; John Tjon

    2001-02-01

    In recent studies of the one and two-body problem for scalar interactions it was shown that crossed ladder and ''crossed rainbow'' (for the one-body case) exchanges play a crucial role in nonperturbative dynamics. In this letter we use exact analytical and numerical results to show that the contribution of vertex dressings to the two-body bound state mass for scalar QED are canceled by the wavefunction normalization. This proves, for the first time, that the mass of a two-body bound state given by the full theory can be obtained by summing only ladder and crossed ladder diagrams using a bare vertex and a constant dressed mass. We also discuss the implications of the remarkable cancellation between rainbow and crossed rainbow diagrams that is a feature of one-body calculations.

  16. Direct time-domain observation of attosecond final-state lifetimes in photoemission from solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng; Chen, Cong; Szilvási, Tibor; Keller, Mark; Mavrikakis, Manos; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    Attosecond spectroscopic techniques have made it possible to measure differences in transport times for photoelectrons from localized core levels and delocalized valence bands in solids. We report the application of attosecond pulse trains to directly and unambiguously measure the difference in lifetimes between photoelectrons born into free electron–like states and those excited into unoccupied excited states in the band structure of nickel (111). An enormous increase in lifetime of 212 ± 30 attoseconds occurs when the final state coincides with a short-lived excited state. Moreover, a strong dependence of this lifetime on emission angle is directly related to the final-state band dispersion as a function of electron transverse momentum. This finding underscores the importance of the material band structure in determining photoelectron lifetimes and corresponding electron escape depths.

  17. Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /more authors..

    2013-11-01

    We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

  18. Three-nucleon problem: trinucleon bound states and trinucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The assumptions underlying the formulation and solution of the Schroedinger equation for three nucleons in configuration space are reviewed, in conjunction with those qualitative aspects of the two-nucleon problem which are important. The geometrical features of the problem and the crucial role of the angular momentum barrier are developed. The boundary conditions for scattering are discussed qualitatively, and the Faddeev-Noyes equation is motivated. The method of splines and orthogonal collocation are shown to provide convenient techniques for generating numerical solutions. Properties of the many numerical solutions for the bound states and zero-energy scattering states are discussed. The evidence for three-body forces is reviewed, and the results of the recent calculations including such forces are discussed. The importance of electromagnetic interactions in the three-nucleon systems is motivated. Relativistic corrections and meson-exchange currents are discussed in the context of ''rules of scale'', and the pion-exchange currents of nonrelativistic order are derived. The experimental results for trinucleon electromagnetic interactions are reviewed, including recent tritium data. Conclusions are presented. 56 refs., 23 figs.

  19. Study of kaonic final states in {pi}{sup -} p at 190 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, Tobias

    2010-08-05

    We discuss the status of analyses of data recorded in the 2008 and 2009 runs of the COMPASS experiment at CERN with sepcific focus on final states with K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0{pi}}- and K{sup +}K{sup -{pi}-} produced in {pi}{sup -}(190 GeV)p scattering. The interest in such final states is motivated by a summary of some of the relevant literature. We also show first results from the analysis of diffractively produced KK-bar{pi} states. Two prominent three-body structures, one around 1.8 GeV, the other at 2.2 GeV decaying via known KK-bar and K{pi} states are seen.

  20. Interacting boson model descriptions of high-spin states

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyucak, S.

    1995-10-01

    The I/N expansion technique for the interacting boson model (IBM) has recently been extended to higher orders using computer algebra. This allows, for the first time, a realistic description of high-spin states in the framework of the sdg-IBM. Systematic studies of moment of inertia show that the problems with its spin dependence are due to the energy surface being too rigid against rotations which can be remedied by including the d-boson energy in the Hamiltonian. The d-boson energy is also instrumental in resolving two other problems in the IBM first raised by Bohr and Mottelson, namely, energy scale mismatch in the ground and gamma bands, and the boson cutoff in B(E2) values. We apply the results to describe the high-spin states in rare-earth and actinide nuclei where the ground band has been followed up to spins L=30, and hence provide unique test cases for collective models. The same formalism can also be used in a phenomenological description of superdeformed states as will be demonstrated with examples in the Hg-Pb region.

  1. Final State Projection Method in Charge-Transfer Multiplet Calculations: An analysis of Ti L-edge Absorption Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Thomas; Solomon, Edward I.; de Groot, Frank M. F.

    2016-01-01

    A projection method to determine the final state configuration character of all peaks in a charge transfer multiplet calculation of a 2p X-ray absorption spectrum is presented using a d0 system as an example. The projection method is used to identify the most important influences on spectral shape and to map out the configuration weights. The spectral shape of a 2p X-ray absorption or L2,3-edge spectrum is largely determined by the ratio of the 2p core-hole interactions relative to the 2p3d atomic multiplet interaction. This leads to a non-trivial spectral assignment, which makes a detailed theoretical description of experimental spectra valuable for the analysis of bonding. PMID:26226507

  2. Final-State Projection Method in Charge-Transfer Multiplet Calculations: An Analysis of Ti L-Edge Absorption Spectra.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Thomas; Solomon, Edward I; de Groot, Frank M F

    2015-10-29

    A projection method to determine the final-state configuration character of all peaks in a charge transfer multiplet calculation of a 2p X-ray absorption spectrum is presented using a d(0) system as an example. The projection method is used to identify the most important influences on spectral shape and to map out the configuration weights. The spectral shape of a 2p X-ray absorption or L2,3-edge spectrum is largely determined by the ratio of the 2p core-hole interactions relative to the 2p3d atomic multiplet interaction. This leads to a nontrivial spectral assignment, which makes a detailed theoretical description of experimental spectra valuable for the analysis of bonding. PMID:26226507

  3. Estimating short-run and long-run interaction mechanisms in interictal state.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Ata; Korürek, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    We address the issue of analyzing electroencephalogram (EEG) from seizure patients in order to test, model and determine the statistical properties that distinguish between EEG states (interictal, pre-ictal, ictal) by introducing a new class of time series analysis methods. In the present study: firstly, we employ statistical methods to determine the non-stationary behavior of focal interictal epileptiform series within very short time intervals; secondly, for such intervals that are deemed non-stationary we suggest the concept of Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) process modelling, well known in time series analysis. We finally address the queries of causal relationships between epileptic states and between brain areas during epileptiform activity. We estimate the interaction between different EEG series (channels) in short time intervals by performing Granger-causality analysis and also estimate such interaction in long time intervals by employing Cointegration analysis, both analysis methods are well-known in econometrics. Here we find: first, that the causal relationship between neuronal assemblies can be identified according to the duration and the direction of their possible mutual influences; second, that although the estimated bidirectional causality in short time intervals yields that the neuronal ensembles positively affect each other, in long time intervals neither of them is affected (increasing amplitudes) from this relationship. Moreover, Cointegration analysis of the EEG series enables us to identify whether there is a causal link from the interictal state to ictal state.

  4. 40 CFR 272.701 - State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 as part of the hazardous waste management... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.701 Section 272.701 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  5. 40 CFR 272.501 - Florida State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .../92 Recycled Used Oil Management Standards (Checklist 112) 57 FR 41566: Amendments to 40 CFR Parts 260... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Florida State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.501 Section 272.501 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  6. 40 CFR 272.701 - State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 as part of the hazardous waste management... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-administered program: Final authorization. 272.701 Section 272.701 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  7. Fulfilling Our Promises: The United States and the Helsinki Final Act. A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, Washington, DC.

    This report examines compliance by the United States with agreements made in the Helsinki Final Act. The Act was signed in 1975 by leaders of 33 East and West European nations, Canada, and the U.S. It contains numerous cooperative measures aimed at improving East-West relations. This report was prepared by the Commission on Security and…

  8. 76 FR 62303 - California: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ..., effective August 1, 1992 (57 FR 32726), to implement the RCRA hazardous waste management program. EPA... (LDR) Treatment Standards for Listed Hazardous Wastes from Carbamate Production; (10) Extension of... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 California: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management...

  9. 76 FR 6561 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ..., effective December 31, 1984 (49 FR 48694) to implement its base hazardous waste management program. EPA....0112(b), (c). Cosmetic Colorants. 207--Uniform Hazardous Waste 70 FR 10776, 03/ 15A NCAC 13A.0102(b... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management...

  10. CP Violation in B0 decays to Charmonium and Charm Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunhui

    2008-09-24

    We report on measurements of time-dependent CP-violation asymmetries in neutral B meson decays to charmonium and charm final states. The results are obtained from a data sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory.

  11. Extra dimensions in photon-induced two lepton final states at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Atag, S.; Inan, S. C.; Sahin, I.

    2009-10-01

    We discuss the potential of the photon-induced two lepton final states at the LHC to explore the phenomenology of the Kaluza-Klein tower of gravitons in the scenarios of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali model and the Randall-Sundrum model. The sensitivity to model parameters can be improved compared to the present LEP or Tevatron sensitivity.

  12. 75 FR 57188 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... Fertilizer Rule, 67 FR 48393 (July 24, 2002) and the Burden Reduction Initiative, 71 FR 1686 (April 24, 2006... authorization of the state's requirements regarding EPA's Zinc Fertilizer Rule in a separate final rule... to EPA authorizing Rhode Island for the Zinc Fertilizer Rule. Today's action responds to that...

  13. Branching ratios of B{sub c} meson decays into tensor meson in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Neelesh

    2010-01-01

    Two-body hadronic weak decays of B{sub c} meson involving tensor meson in the final state are studied by using the Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise II model. Decay amplitudes are obtained using the factorization scheme in the spectator quark model. Branching ratios for the charm changing and bottom changing decay modes are predicted.

  14. Where the Brain Appreciates the Final State of an Event: The Neural Correlates of Telicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romagno, Domenica; Rota, Giuseppina; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether the human brain distinguishes between telic events that necessarily entail a specified endpoint (e.g., "reaching"), and atelic events with no delimitation or final state (e.g., "chasing"). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the patterns of neural response associated with verbs denoting…

  15. Land-atmosphere interactions over the continental United States

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xubin

    1997-11-01

    This paper briefly discusses four suggested modifications for land surface modeling in climate models. The impact of the modifications on climate simulations is analyzed with the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) land surface model. It is found that the modifications can improve BATS simulations. In particular, the sensitivity of BATS to the prescribed value of physical root fraction which cannot be observed from satellite remote sensing or field experiments is improved. These modifications significantly reduce the excessive summer land surface temperature over the continental United States simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2) coupled with BATS. A land-atmosphere interaction mechanism involving energy and water cycles is proposed to explain the results. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in the multilepton final state

    SciTech Connect

    Attal, Alon Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a search for physics beyond the standard model of elementary particles in events containing three or more charged leptons in the final state. The search is based on an R-parity violating supersymmetric model that assumes supersymmetric particles are pair produced at hadron colliders and the R-parity violating coupling is small enough so that these particles ''cascade'' decay into the lightest supersymmetric particle. The lightest supersymmetric particle may only decay into two charged leptons (electrons or muons) plus a neutrino through a lepton number violating interaction. Proton-antiproton collision events produced with √ s= 1.96 TeV are collected between March 2002 and August 2004 with an integrated luminosity of 346 pb-1. R-parity violating supersymmetry is sought for in two data samples, one with exactly three leptons and one with four or more leptons. The trilepton sample has a modest background primarily from Drell-Yan events where an additional lepton is a result of photon conversions or jet misidentification while the four or more lepton sample has an extremely low background. In the three lepton samples 6 events are observed while in the four or more lepton sample zero events are observed. These results are consistent with the standard model expectation and are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino and lightest chargino particles. The neutralino mass is constrained to be heavier than 97.7 to 110.4 GeV/c2, while the chargino mass is constrained to be heavier than 185.3 to 202.7 GeV/c2, depending on the supersymmetry scenario.

  17. Ground-state energy of a quantum chain with competing interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, C. E. I.; de Oliveira, M. J.; Wreszinski, W. F.

    1995-04-01

    We show rigorously that the ground state of a quantum chain with competing ferromagnetic nearest and antiferromagnetic next nearest interactions undergoes a transition from ferromagnetic to helical type, in the isotropic case, for a certain value of the relevant ratio of coupling constants. Boundaries of the phase diagram are also determined in the anisotropic case. The stability of a special quantum state (corresponding to a classical modulated phase of ⫇=п/3) is analyzed by an extension of Holstein-Primakoff arguments, along a line of constant ratio of couplings, showing in particular a sequence of (instability) gaps. Finally, a natural adaptation of a variational wave function due to Huse and Elser is used to study several portions of the phase diagram, with very good agreement with previous theoretical results.

  18. Etudes sociales 30. Sujet B: Interactions entre nations. Unite d'enseignement--Guide. Edition finale = Social Studies 30. Subject B: Interactions between Nations. Teaching Unit--Guide. Final Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    In this Alberta (Canada) teacher's guide, four history units are outlined. These are: (1) Between Two Wars (1919-36); (2) World War II; (3) The Emergence and Interaction of the Superpowers; and (4) Contemporary World Interactions. At the end of each unit, questions are provided for discussion and there is a final synthesis at the end of the…

  19. Study of B meson decays to three-body charmless hadronic final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmash, A.; Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Abe, T.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Akatsu, M.; Asano, Y.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Ban, Y.; Bedny, I.; Behera, P. K.; Bizjak, I.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Casey, B. C.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K.-F.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Chuvikov, A.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Dong, L. Y.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Eiges, V.; Fukunaga, C.; Gabyshev, N.; Gershon, T.; Golob, B.; Gordon, A.; Guo, R.; Haba, J.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Higuchi, I.; Hinz, L.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Huang, H.-C.; Igarashi, Y.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jang, H. K.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, S. K.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Leder, G.; Lee, S. H.; Li, J.; Lin, S.-W.; MacNaughton, J.; Majumder, G.; Mandl, F.; Matsumoto, H.; Matyja, A.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyata, H.; Moloney, G. R.; Mori, T.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nam, J. W.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ohshima, T.; Okabe, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Ozaki, H.; Palka, H.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, K. S.; Parslow, N.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rozanska, M.; Sagawa, H.; Saitoh, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sarangi, T. R.; Satapathy, M.; Satpathy, A.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semenov, S.; Senyo, K.; Seuster, R.; Sevior, M. E.; Shibuya, H.; Shwartz, B.; Sidorov, V.; Singh, J. B.; Soni, N.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sugi, A.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Swain, S. K.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Teramoto, Y.; Tomura, T.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yanai, H.; Yuan, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Žontar, D.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of a study of charmless B meson decays to three-body Kππ, KKπ and KKK final states. Measurements of branching fractions for B decays to K+(0)π+π-, K+K+K-, K0K+K-, K+K0SK0S and K0SK0SK0S final states are presented. The decays B0→K0K+K-, B+→K+K0SK0S and B0→K0SK0SK0S are observed for the first time. We also report evidence for B+→K+K-π+ decay. For the three-body final states K0K+π-, K0SK0Sπ+, K+K+π- and K-π+π+, 90% confidence level upper limits are reported. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using the three-body B0→K0SK+K- decay for CP violation studies. The results are obtained with a 78 fb-1 data sample collected at the Υ(4S) resonance by the Belle detector operating at the KEKB asymmetric energy e+e- collider.

  20. Tailoring Rydberg interactions via Förster resonances: state combinations, hopping and angular dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Gorniaczyk, Hannes; Tresp, Christoph; Mirgorodskiy, Ivan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Förster resonances provide a highly flexible tool to tune both the strength and the angular shape of interactions between two Rydberg atoms. We give a detailed explanation about how Förster resonances can be found by searching through a large range of possible quantum number combinations. We apply our search method to SS, SD and DD pair states of 87Rb with principal quantum numbers from 30 to 100, taking into account the fine structure splitting of the Rydberg states. We find various strong resonances between atoms with a large difference in principal quantum numbers. We quantify the strength of these resonances by introducing a figure of merit {\\tilde{C}}3 which is independent of the magnetic quantum numbers and geometry to classify the resonances by interaction strength. We further predict to what extent excitation exchange is possible on different resonances and point out limitations of the coherent hopping process. Finally, we discuss the angular dependence of the dipole-dipole interaction and its tunability near resonances.

  1. Tailoring Rydberg interactions via Förster resonances: state combinations, hopping and angular dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Gorniaczyk, Hannes; Tresp, Christoph; Mirgorodskiy, Ivan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Förster resonances provide a highly flexible tool to tune both the strength and the angular shape of interactions between two Rydberg atoms. We give a detailed explanation about how Förster resonances can be found by searching through a large range of possible quantum number combinations. We apply our search method to SS, SD and DD pair states of 87Rb with principal quantum numbers from 30 to 100, taking into account the fine structure splitting of the Rydberg states. We find various strong resonances between atoms with a large difference in principal quantum numbers. We quantify the strength of these resonances by introducing a figure of merit {\\tilde{C}}3 which is independent of the magnetic quantum numbers and geometry to classify the resonances by interaction strength. We further predict to what extent excitation exchange is possible on different resonances and point out limitations of the coherent hopping process. Finally, we discuss the angular dependence of the dipole–dipole interaction and its tunability near resonances.

  2. Tension Control of a Bimodal Coiler System by Final-State Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Mitsuo; Eda, Akihiro

    A bimodal coiler system is a system for winding the materials rolled in a tandem mill in a rolling plant. In the bimodal coiler system, the tension changes greatly when the tail end of materials being rolled emerge out of the final stand, and as a result, the winding process might be disturbed. In this study, we attempt to suppress the fluctuation in the tension by employing a feedforward method based on final-state control. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by performing simulations.

  3. 75 FR 3277 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment F-2) in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment F-2) in... actions relate to a proposed highway project, Grand Parkway (State Highway 99) Segment F-2, from State... the following highway project in the State of Texas: Grand Parkway (State Highway 99) Segment F-2...

  4. Topological states in a one-dimensional fermi gas with attractive interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruhman, Jonathan; Berg, Erez; Altman, Ehud

    2015-03-13

    We describe a novel topological superfluid state, which forms in a one-dimensional Fermi gas with Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling, a Zeeman field, and intrinsic attractive interactions. In spite of total number conservation and the presence of gapless excitations, Majorana-like zero modes appear in this system and can be linked with interfaces between two distinct phases that naturally form at different regions of the harmonic trap. As a result, the low lying collective excitations of the system, including the dipole oscillations and the long-wavelength phonons are all doubly degenerate. While backscattering from point impurities can lead to a splitting of the degeneracies that scales algebraically with the system size, the smooth confining potential can only cause an exponentially small splitting. We show that the topological state can be uniquely probed by a pumping effect induced by a slow sweep of the Zeeman field from a high initial value down to zero. The effect is expected to be robust to introducing a finite temperature as long as it is much smaller than the interaction induced single particle gap in the final state of the sweep. PMID:25815908

  5. Topological States in a One-Dimensional Fermi Gas with Attractive Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhman, Jonathan; Berg, Erez; Altman, Ehud

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel topological superfluid state, which forms in a one-dimensional Fermi gas with Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling, a Zeeman field, and intrinsic attractive interactions. In spite of total number conservation and the presence of gapless excitations, Majorana-like zero modes appear in this system and can be linked with interfaces between two distinct phases that naturally form at different regions of the harmonic trap. As a result, the low lying collective excitations of the system, including the dipole oscillations and the long-wavelength phonons are all doubly degenerate. While backscattering from point impurities can lead to a splitting of the degeneracies that scales algebraically with the system size, the smooth confining potential can only cause an exponentially small splitting. We show that the topological state can be uniquely probed by a pumping effect induced by a slow sweep of the Zeeman field from a high initial value down to zero. The effect is expected to be robust to introducing a finite temperature as long as it is much smaller than the interaction induced single particle gap in the final state of the sweep.

  6. International workshop on final focus and interaction regions of next generation linear colliders: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The first day of the workshop was devoted to four plenary issues'' talks, one for each working group: Beam-Beam Interaction, Detector, Hardware, and Optical Design. The last day was devoted to plenary talks summarizing the activities of the working groups. Each of the three remaining days there,was a short morning plenary devoted to a brief summary of the preceding day and an announcement of planned working group discussions for that day. The transparencies for the issues'' and summary'' talks are included in this volume, along with some remarks from the working group chairpersons. Very briefly, the beam-beam group continued to address the quantitative study of QED induced backgrounds, and attempted to better understand the nature and prevalence of QCD millijets. The detector group attempted to identify the impact on masking and detector design of the beam-beam backgrounds, the synchrotron radiation induced backgrounds from beam halos and muon backgrounds produced primarily in collimators. Nanosecond timing elements needed in conjunction with multi-bunch operation were discussed. The hardware group addressed the problem of magnet design and support, especially the final doublet magnets suspended within the detector environment, and instrumentation issues, such as high resolution beam position monitors. The optics group discussed new final focus system ideas, collimator design, and improvement of beamline tolerances. If you were not here to participate, we hope that this volume will help you in your orientation to these problems.

  7. International workshop on final focus and interaction regions of next generation linear colliders: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The first day of the workshop was devoted to four plenary ``issues`` talks, one for each working group: Beam-Beam Interaction, Detector, Hardware, and Optical Design. The last day was devoted to plenary talks summarizing the activities of the working groups. Each of the three remaining days there,was a short morning plenary devoted to a brief summary of the preceding day and an announcement of planned working group discussions for that day. The transparencies for the ``issues`` and ``summary`` talks are included in this volume, along with some remarks from the working group chairpersons. Very briefly, the beam-beam group continued to address the quantitative study of QED induced backgrounds, and attempted to better understand the nature and prevalence of QCD millijets. The detector group attempted to identify the impact on masking and detector design of the beam-beam backgrounds, the synchrotron radiation induced backgrounds from beam halos and muon backgrounds produced primarily in collimators. Nanosecond timing elements needed in conjunction with multi-bunch operation were discussed. The hardware group addressed the problem of magnet design and support, especially the final doublet magnets suspended within the detector environment, and instrumentation issues, such as high resolution beam position monitors. The optics group discussed new final focus system ideas, collimator design, and improvement of beamline tolerances. If you were not here to participate, we hope that this volume will help you in your orientation to these problems.

  8. Etudes sociales 30. Sujet B: Interaction entre nations. Cahier de l'eleve. Edition finale = Social Studies 30. Subject B: Interaction between Nations. Student Workbook. Final Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    In this Alberta (Canada) student workbook, four history units are presented for study. These are: (1) Between Two Wars (1919-1936); (2) World War II; (3) The Emergence and Interaction of the Superpowers; and (4) Contemporary World Interactions. Advice is offered to students in each unit along with information about key events and issues during…

  9. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau final states.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-06-26

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using hadronically decaying tau leptons, in 1 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. We select two final states: tau+/- plus missing transverse energy and b jets, and tau+ tau- plus jets. These final states are sensitive to a combination of associated W/Z boson plus Higgs boson, vector boson fusion, and gluon-gluon fusion production processes. The observed ratio of the combined limit on the Higgs production cross section at the 95% C.L. to the standard model expectation is 29 for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV. PMID:19659068

  10. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain amore » top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.« less

  11. Searches for and decays to and final states with first observation of the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-04-01

    A search for previously unobserved decays of beauty baryons to the final states and is reported. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 .0 fb-1 of pp collisions. The decay is observed with a significance of 8 .6 σ, with branching fraction where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, from the ratio of fragmentation fractions and from the branching fraction of the B 0 → K 0 π + π - normalisation channel, respectively. A first measurement is made of the CP asymmetry, giving No significant signals are seen for decays, decays to both the and final states, and the decay, and upper limits on their branching fractions are reported. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 . The matrix element technique is applied to t t ¯ events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton +jets final state of t t ¯ decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt=173.93 ±1.84 GeV .

  13. Search for B0 decays to invisible final states and to nunugamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-08-27

    We establish upper limits on branching fractions for B0 decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for B0 decays to nunugamma. Within the standard model, these decays have branching fractions that are below current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the standard model predict significant contributions from these channels. Using 88.5 x 10(6) BB pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e(+)e- storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 22 x 10(-5) for the branching fraction of B0-->invisible and 4.7 x 10(-5) for the branching fraction of B0-->nunugamma.

  14. Search for the Higgs boson in the $\\gamma \\gamma$ final state at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Krisztian; /Manchester U.

    2010-09-01

    We present searches for Higgs bosons decaying to the di-photon final state using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of data at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Whilst the branching ratio to the di-photon final state is small in the Standard Model, this channel contributes appreciably to the overall Higgs sensitivity at the Tevatron. In parallel, the limit is re-interpreted in fermiophobic models where the di-photon branching ratio is considerably larger. This decay channel will be of major importance in the light mass Standard Model Higgs search at the LHC.

  15. QCD radiation in the production of high s-hat final states

    SciTech Connect

    Skands, Peter; Plehn, Tilman; Rainwater, David; /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    In the production of very heavy final states--high Mandelstam {cflx s}--extra QCD radiation can play a significant role. By comparing several different parton shower approximations to results obtained with fixed-order perturbation theory, they quantify the degree to which these approaches agree (or disagree), focusing on initial state radiation above p{perpendicular} = 50 GeV, for top pair production at the Tevatron and at the LHC, and for SUSY pair production at the LHC. Special attention is paid to ambiguities associated with the choice of the maximum value of the ordering variable in parton shower models.

  16. Contracts and provider agreements for State home nursing home care. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    This interim final rule amends Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations to allow VA to enter into contracts or provider agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is required to implement a change in law that revises how VA will pay for care provided to these veterans and authorizes VA to use provider agreements to pay for such care. The change made by this law applies to all care provided to these veterans in State homes on and after February 2, 2013.

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Leptons plus Jets Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Huong

    2014-01-01

    Searches for SM Higgs boson production in the leptons plus jets final states with a data set corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.96TeV collected by the DØ Experiment are presented in this thesis. The searches are carried out in two independent analyses, accounting for different signal topologies.

  18. Searches for new phenomena with lepton final states at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; /Florida State U.

    2007-05-01

    Numerous searches for new phenomena have been carried out using data from proton-antiproton collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron. Final states with leptons give signatures which are relatively unique and generally have small backgrounds. We present many of the latest results from the CDF and D0 collaborations from 0.4-1.2 fb{sup -1} of data. Topics include supersymmetry, extra gauge bosons, Randall-Sundrum gravitons, excited electrons and neutral, long-lived particles.

  19. Search for anomalous ZZZ couplings in the dilepton+dijet final state at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Matthew; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Lipeles, Elliot; Neubauer, Mark; Vanguri, Rami; Wurthwein, Frank

    2007-04-01

    Using the di-lepton di-jet final state, we study ZZZ anomalous triple neutral gauge couplings (aTGC) produced in p p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collected with the CDF II detector. Specifically, we reconstruct two Zs, one decaying to two leptons and one decaying to two jets, and constrain aTGC based on the observed yield in Z ->ll at high transverse momentum.

  20. Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, Scott A

    2014-04-02

    This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

  1. Photofragmentation, state interaction, and energetics of Rydberg and ion-pair states: Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI

    SciTech Connect

    Hróðmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2014-06-28

    Mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization data for hydrogen iodide (HI), for two-photon resonance excitation to Rydberg and ion-pair states in the 69 600–72 400 cm{sup −1} region were recorded and analyzed. Spectral perturbations due to homogeneous and heterogeneous interactions between Rydberg and ion-pair states, showing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and line-widths, were focused on. Parameters relevant to photodissociation processes, state interaction strengths and spectroscopic parameters for deperturbed states were derived. Overall interaction and dynamical schemes to describe the observations are proposed.

  2. Approaching exact hyperpolarizabilities via sum-over-states Monte Carlo configuration interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, J. P.; Paterson, M. J.

    2014-09-28

    We propose using sum-over-states calculations with the compact wavefunctions of Monte Carlo configuration interaction to approach accurate values for higher-order dipole properties up to second hyperpolarizabilities in a controlled way. We apply the approach to small systems that can generally be compared with full configuration interaction (FCI) results. We consider hydrogen fluoride with a 6-31g basis and then look at results, including frequency dependent properties, in an aug-cc-pVDZ basis. We extend one calculation beyond FCI by using an aug-cc-pVTZ basis. The properties of an H{sub 4} molecule with multireference character are calculated in an aug-cc-pVDZ basis. We then investigate this method on a strongly multireference system with a larger FCI space by modelling the properties of carbon monoxide with a stretched geometry. The behavior of the approach with increasing basis size is considered by calculating results for the neon atom using aug-cc-pVDZ to aug-cc-pVQZ. We finally test if the unusual change in polarizability between the first two states of molecular oxygen can be reproduced by this method in a 6-31g basis.

  3. Approaching exact hyperpolarizabilities via sum-over-states Monte Carlo configuration interaction.

    PubMed

    Coe, J P; Paterson, M J

    2014-09-28

    We propose using sum-over-states calculations with the compact wavefunctions of Monte Carlo configuration interaction to approach accurate values for higher-order dipole properties up to second hyperpolarizabilities in a controlled way. We apply the approach to small systems that can generally be compared with full configuration interaction (FCI) results. We consider hydrogen fluoride with a 6-31g basis and then look at results, including frequency dependent properties, in an aug-cc-pVDZ basis. We extend one calculation beyond FCI by using an aug-cc-pVTZ basis. The properties of an H4 molecule with multireference character are calculated in an aug-cc-pVDZ basis. We then investigate this method on a strongly multireference system with a larger FCI space by modelling the properties of carbon monoxide with a stretched geometry. The behavior of the approach with increasing basis size is considered by calculating results for the neon atom using aug-cc-pVDZ to aug-cc-pVQZ. We finally test if the unusual change in polarizability between the first two states of molecular oxygen can be reproduced by this method in a 6-31g basis. PMID:25273423

  4. Approaching exact hyperpolarizabilities via sum-over-states Monte Carlo configuration interaction.

    PubMed

    Coe, J P; Paterson, M J

    2014-09-28

    We propose using sum-over-states calculations with the compact wavefunctions of Monte Carlo configuration interaction to approach accurate values for higher-order dipole properties up to second hyperpolarizabilities in a controlled way. We apply the approach to small systems that can generally be compared with full configuration interaction (FCI) results. We consider hydrogen fluoride with a 6-31g basis and then look at results, including frequency dependent properties, in an aug-cc-pVDZ basis. We extend one calculation beyond FCI by using an aug-cc-pVTZ basis. The properties of an H4 molecule with multireference character are calculated in an aug-cc-pVDZ basis. We then investigate this method on a strongly multireference system with a larger FCI space by modelling the properties of carbon monoxide with a stretched geometry. The behavior of the approach with increasing basis size is considered by calculating results for the neon atom using aug-cc-pVDZ to aug-cc-pVQZ. We finally test if the unusual change in polarizability between the first two states of molecular oxygen can be reproduced by this method in a 6-31g basis.

  5. Revealing Two-State Protein-Protein Interactions of Calmodulin by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ruchuan; Hu, Dehong; Tan, Xin; Lu, H. Peter

    2006-08-01

    We report a single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and polarization study of conformational dynamics of calmodulin (CaM) interacting with a target peptide, C28W of a 28 amino acid oligomer. The C28W peptide represents the essential binding sequence domain of the Ca-ATPase protein interacting with CaM, which is important in cellular signaling for the regulation of energy in metabolism. However, the mechanism of the CaM/C28W recognition complex formation is still unclear. The amino-terminal (N-terminal) domain of the CaM was labeled with a fluorescein-based arsenical hairpin binder (FlAsH) that enables our unambiguous probing of the CaM N-terminal target-binding domain motions on a millisecond time scale without convolution of the probe-dye random motions. Finally, by analyzing the distribution of FRET efficiency between FlAsH labeled CaM and Texas Red labeled C28W and the polarization fluctuation dynamics and distributions of the CaM N-terminal domain, we reveal binding-unbinding motions of the N-terminal domain of the CaM in CaM/C28W complexes, which is strong evidence of a two-state binding interaction of CaM-mediated cell signaling.

  6. State-selected chemical reaction dynamics at the S matrix level - Final-state specificities of near-threshold processes at low and high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1992-01-01

    State-to-state reaction probabilities are found to be highly final-state specific at state-selected threshold energies for the reactions O + H2 yield OH + H and H + H2 yield H2 + H. The study includes initial rotational states with quantum numbers 0-15, and the specificity is especially dramatic for the more highly rotationally excited reactants. The analysis is based on accurate quantum mechanical reactive scattering calculations. Final-state specificity is shown in general to increase with the rotational quantum number of the reactant diatom, and the trends are confirmed for both zero and nonzero values of the total angular momentum.

  7. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction as an agent to free the bound entangled states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kapil K.; Pandey, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the efficacy of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction to convert the bound entangled states into free entangled states. We consider the tripartite hybrid system as a pair of non interacting two qutrits initially prepared in bound entangled states and one auxiliary qubit. Here, we consider two types of bound entangled states investigated by Horodecki. The auxiliary qubit interacts with any one of the qutrit of the pair through DM interaction. We show that by tuning the probability amplitude of auxiliary qubit and DM interaction strength, one can free the bound entangled states, which can be further distilled. We use the reduction criterion to find the range of the parameters of probability amplitude of auxiliary qubit and DM interaction strength, for which the states are distillable. The realignment criterion and negativity have been used for detection and quantification of entanglement.

  8. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  9. Interactions between friction-induced vibration and wear. Final report, May 15, 1982-May 15, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, A.F.; Aronov, V.; Kalpakjian, S.; Shareef, I.; Dweib, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The interactions among friction, wear, and system dynamics have been investigated for dry sliding contact between a steel pin and a cast iron disk. The system was equipped with force and displacement transducers to measure the contact forces and the displacements in three directions. As the normal load increased, four different regimes were observed, the steady state friction regime, the nonlinear friction regime, transient friction regime, and the self-excited vibration regime. The last regime is characterized by periodic oscillations of the slider and high wear rate. The experimental setup was modified for further detailed study of this regime. The recorded wave forms showed that the oscillations consist of a fundamental harmonic with a frequency close to the system natural frequency in torsion and its second harmonic. A mathematical model was developed for the system including the coupling between the different degrees of freedom and a nonlinear contact stiffness, and the model was analyzed using triple input describing functions to include the constant, fundamental, and second harmonics. The model showed the existence of limit cycling at a frequency close to the torsional frequency of the system with amplitudes close to those observed experimentally. The results of this study enhance our understanding of friction induced vibrations and interactions which give rise to instability.

  10. Search for B decays to final states with the ηc meson

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vinokurova, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Eidelman, S.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.

    2015-06-18

    We report a search for B decays to selected final states with the ηc meson: B± → K±ηcπ+π-, B± → K±ηcω, B± → K±ηcη and B± → K±ηcπ0. The analysis is based on 772 × 106 BB-bar pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions of the studied B decay modes, independent of intermediate resonances, in the range (0.6–5.3) × 10-4. We also search for molecular-state candidates in the D0D*-bar0 - D-bar0D*0, D0D-bar0 + D-bar0D0 and D*0D*-bar0 + D*-bar0D*0 combinations, neutralmore » partners of the Z(3900)± and Z(4020)±, and a poorly understood state X(3915) as possible intermediate states in the decay chain, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of branching fractions to the mentioned intermediate states and decay branching fractions of these states in the range (0.6–6.9) × 10-5.« less

  11. Final state of a perturbed liquid film inside a container under the effect of solid-liquid molecular forces and gravity.

    PubMed

    Perazzo, Carlos Alberto; Mac Intyre, J R; Gomba, J M

    2014-04-01

    We investigate theoretically the possible final stationary configurations that can be reached by a laterally confined uniform liquid film inside a container. The liquid is under the action of gravity, surface tension, and the molecular interaction with the solid substrate. We study the case when the container is in an upright position as well as when it is turned upside down. The governing parameters of the problem are the initial thickness of the film, the size of the recipient that contains the liquid, and a dimensionless number that quantifies the relative strength of gravity with respect to the molecular interaction. The uniform film is always a possible final state and depending on the value of the parameters, up to three different additional final states may exist, each one consisting in a droplet surrounded by a thin film. We derive analytical expressions for the energy of these possible final configurations and from these we analyze which state is indeed reached. A uniform thin film may show three different behaviors after a perturbation: The system recovers its initial shape after any perturbation, the fluid evolves towards a drop (if more than one is possible, it tends toward that with the thinnest precursor film) for any perturbation, or the system ends as a uniform film or a drop depending on the details of the perturbation.

  12. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-07-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  13. Explosion and Final State of an Unstable Reissner-Nordström Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis-Gual, Nicolas; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Montero, Pedro J.; Font, José A.; Herdeiro, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    A Reissner-Nordström black hole (BH) is superradiantly unstable against spherical perturbations of a charged scalar field enclosed in a cavity, with a frequency lower than a critical value. We use numerical relativity techniques to follow the development of this unstable system—dubbed a charged BH bomb—into the nonlinear regime, solving the full Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon equations, in spherical symmetry. We show that (i) the process stops before all the charge is extracted from the BH, and (ii) the system settles down into a hairy BH: a charged horizon in equilibrium with a scalar field condensate, whose phase is oscillating at the (final) critical frequency. For a low scalar field charge q , the final state is approached smoothly and monotonically. For large q , however, the energy extraction overshoots, and an explosive phenomenon, akin to a bosenova, pushes some energy back into the BH. The charge extraction, by contrast, does not reverse.

  14. Explosion and Final State of an Unstable Reissner-Nordström Black Hole.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gual, Nicolas; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Montero, Pedro J; Font, José A; Herdeiro, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    A Reissner-Nordström black hole (BH) is superradiantly unstable against spherical perturbations of a charged scalar field enclosed in a cavity, with a frequency lower than a critical value. We use numerical relativity techniques to follow the development of this unstable system-dubbed a charged BH bomb-into the nonlinear regime, solving the full Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon equations, in spherical symmetry. We show that (i) the process stops before all the charge is extracted from the BH, and (ii) the system settles down into a hairy BH: a charged horizon in equilibrium with a scalar field condensate, whose phase is oscillating at the (final) critical frequency. For a low scalar field charge q, the final state is approached smoothly and monotonically. For large q, however, the energy extraction overshoots, and an explosive phenomenon, akin to a bosenova, pushes some energy back into the BH. The charge extraction, by contrast, does not reverse.

  15. LDRD final report on quantum computing using interacting semiconductor quantum wires.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Dunn, Roberto G.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Tibbetts, Denise R. ); Stephenson, Larry L.; Seamons, John Andrew; Reno, John Louis; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

    2006-01-01

    For several years now quantum computing has been viewed as a new paradigm for certain computing applications. Of particular importance to this burgeoning field is the development of an algorithm for factoring large numbers which obviously has deep implications for cryptography and national security. Implementation of these theoretical ideas faces extraordinary challenges in preparing and manipulating quantum states. The quantum transport group at Sandia has demonstrated world-leading, unique double quantum wires devices where we have unprecedented control over the coupling strength, number of 1 D channels, overlap and interaction strength in this nanoelectronic system. In this project, we study 1D-1D tunneling with the ultimate aim of preparing and detecting quantum states of the coupled wires. In a region of strong tunneling, electrons can coherently oscillate from one wire to the other. By controlling the velocity of the electrons, length of the coupling region and tunneling strength we will attempt to observe tunneling oscillations. This first step is critical for further development double quantum wires into the basic building block for a quantum computer, and indeed for other coupled nanoelectronic devices that will rely on coherent transport. If successful, this project will have important implications for nanoelectronics, quantum computing and information technology.

  16. Boosting Higgs pair production in the bbar{b}bbar{b} final state with multivariate techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. Katharina; Bortoletto, Daniela; Frost, James A.; Hartland, Nathan P.; Issever, Cigdem; Rojo, Juan

    2016-07-01

    The measurement of Higgs pair production will be a cornerstone of the LHC program in the coming years. Double Higgs production provides a crucial window upon the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and has a unique sensitivity to the Higgs trilinear coupling. We study the feasibility of a measurement of Higgs pair production in the bbar{b}bbar{b} final state at the LHC. Our analysis is based on a combination of traditional cut-based methods with state-of-the-art multivariate techniques. We account for all relevant backgrounds, including the contributions from light and charm jet mis-identification, which are ultimately comparable in size to the irreducible 4 b QCD background. We demonstrate the robustness of our analysis strategy in a high pileup environment. For an integrated luminosity of L=3 ab^{-1}, a signal significance of S/√{B}˜eq 3 is obtained, indicating that the bbar{b}bbar{b} final state alone could allow for the observation of double Higgs production at the High Luminosity LHC.

  17. Molecular final states after. beta. decay of tritium-substituted molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Claxton, T.A.; Schafroth, S.; Meier, P.F. )

    1992-05-01

    Calculations on the ground state of HT and CH{sub 3}T and the excited states of HHe{sup +} and CH{sub 3}He{sup +} have been carried out within the sudden approximation to test alternative approaches to existing problems, with the ultimate aim of studying the effects of a molecular environment on the detailed energetics of tritium {beta} decay. By using an appropriate projection operator most of the transition probability has been accounted for. Commonly used sum rules are shown to have limited utility. The inaccuracies introduced by describing an excited state by a single spin-adapted configuration are discussed. The problem of determining transition probabilities from configuration-interaction wave functions is highlighted and some solutions are proposed.

  18. Recoil distance transmission method: Measurement of interaction cross sections of excited states with fast rare-isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Whitmore, K.; Iwasaki, H.

    2016-09-01

    The possible appearance of nuclear halos in ground and excited states close to the particle-decay threshold is of great importance in the investigation of nuclear structure and few-body correlations at the limit of stability. In order to obtain direct evidence of the halo structure manifested in nuclear excited states, we have considered a new method to measure the interaction cross sections of excited states. The combination of the transmission method and the recoil distance Doppler-shift method with a plunger device enables us to measure the number of interactions of the excited states in a target. Formulae to determine the interaction cross section are derived, and key issues to realize measurements are discussed. Dominant sources of errors are uncertainties in the excited-state lifetimes and γ-ray yields. We examine prototype experiments and perform simulations to study the impact of each uncertainty on the final result. This method provides a novel opportunity to perform cross section measurements on the excited states of rare isotopes.

  19. Test-Case Generation using an Explicit State Model Checker Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Gao, Jimin

    2003-01-01

    In the project 'Test-Case Generation using an Explicit State Model Checker' we have extended an existing tools infrastructure for formal modeling to export Java code so that we can use the NASA Ames tool Java Pathfinder (JPF) for test case generation. We have completed a translator from our source language RSML(exp -e) to Java and conducted initial studies of how JPF can be used as a testing tool. In this final report, we provide a detailed description of the translation approach as implemented in our tools.

  20. Search for Chargino-Neutralino Associated Production in Dilepton Final States with Tau Leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, R.; Chertok, M.; /UC, Davis

    2011-10-01

    We present a search for chargino and neutralino supersymmetric particles yielding same signed dilepton final states including one hadronically decaying tau lepton using 6.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the the CDF II detector. This signature is important in SUSY models where, at high tan {beta}, the branching ratio of charginos and neutralinos to tau leptons becomes dominant. We study event acceptance, lepton identification cuts, and efficiencies. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of SUSY particle mass for certain generic models.

  1. Precise QCD Predictions for the Production of Dijet Final States in Deep Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Currie, James; Gehrmann, Thomas; Niehues, Jan

    2016-07-22

    The production of two-jet final states in deep inelastic scattering is an important QCD precision observable. We compute it for the first time to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Our calculation is fully differential in the lepton and jet variables and allows one to impose cuts on the jets in both the laboratory and the Breit frame. We observe that the NNLO corrections are moderate in size, except at kinematical edges, and that their inclusion leads to a substantial reduction of the scale variation uncertainty on the predictions. Our results will enable the inclusion of deep inelastic dijet data in precision phenomenology studies. PMID:27494466

  2. Precise QCD Predictions for the Production of Dijet Final States in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, James; Gehrmann, Thomas; Niehues, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The production of two-jet final states in deep inelastic scattering is an important QCD precision observable. We compute it for the first time to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Our calculation is fully differential in the lepton and jet variables and allows one to impose cuts on the jets in both the laboratory and the Breit frame. We observe that the NNLO corrections are moderate in size, except at kinematical edges, and that their inclusion leads to a substantial reduction of the scale variation uncertainty on the predictions. Our results will enable the inclusion of deep inelastic dijet data in precision phenomenology studies.

  3. Search for Supersymmetry in the Dilepton Final State with Taus at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Robert David

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the results a search for chargino and neutralino supersymmetric particles yielding same signed dilepton final states including one hadronically decaying tau lepton using 6.0 fb-1 of data collected by the the CDF II detector. This signature is important in SUSY models where, at high tan β, the branching ratio of charginos and neutralinos to tau leptons becomes dominant. We study event acceptance, lepton identification cuts, and efficiencies. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of SUSY particle mass for certain generic models.

  4. Final State of Ecosystem Containing Grass, Sheep and Wolves with Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingfeng; Pan, Qiu-Hui; Wang, Shuang

    This paper describes a cellular automata model containing movable wolves, sheep and reproducible grass. Each wolf or sheep is characterized by Penna bitstrings. In addition, we introduce the energy rule and the predator-prey mechanism for wolf and sheep. With considering age-structured, genetic strings, minimum reproduction age, cycle of the reproduction, number of offspring, we get three possible states of a predator-prey system: the coexisting one with predators and prey, the absorbing one with prey only, and the empty one where no animal survived. In this paper, we mainly discuss the effect of the number of poor genes, the energy supply (food), the minimum reproduction age, the reproductive cycle and the birth rate on the above three possible final states.

  5. Final-state diffraction effects in angle-resolved photoemission at an organic-metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, F. C.; Giovanelli, L.; Amsalem, P.; Petaccia, L.; Topwal, D.; Gorovikov, S.; Abel, M.; Koch, N.; Porte, L.; Goldoni, A.; Themlin, J.-M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper it is shown that angle-resolved photoemission performed using low-energy photons on an organic-metal interface allows to clearly distinguish genuine interface states from features of substrate photoelectrons diffracted by the molecular lattice. As a model system an ordered monolayer of Zn-phthalocyanine is used as a diffraction lattice to probe the electronic band structure of a Ag(110) substrate. Photoemission close to normal emission geometry reveals strongly dispersive features absent in the pristine substrate spectra. Density functional theory modeling helped identifying these as bulk sp direct transitions undergoing surface-umklapp processes. The present results establish the important role of final-state diffraction effects in photoemission experiments at organic-inorganic interfaces.

  6. Final Results on Modeling the Spectrum of Ammonia 2ν_2 and ν_4 States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John; Amano, Takayoshi; Pirali, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    At this symposium in 2013, we reported our preliminary results on modeling the spectrum of ammonia 2ν_2 and ν_4 states (see Paper TB09 in 2013). This presentation reports the final results on our extensive experimental measurements and data analysis for the 2ν_2 and ν_4 inversion-rotation and vibrational transitions. We measured 159 new transition frequencies with microwave precision and assigned 1680 new ones from existing Fourier Transform spectra recorded in Synchrotron SOLEIL. The newly assigned data significantly expand the range of assigned quantum numbers. Combined with all the previously published high-resolution data, the 2ν_2 and ν_4 states are reproduced to 1.3σ using a global model. We will discuss the types of transitions included in our global analysis, and fit statistics for date sets from individual experimental work.

  7. Searches for Natural Supersymmetry in Hadronic Final States with Heavy Flavor at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Bart Clayton

    2012-12-01

    This thesis presents the hadronic-channel supersymmetric searches for direct sbottom and gluino-mediated sbottom and stop production performed on 4.71 fb-1 of √s = 7 TeV data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. These signatures are characterized by final states with multiple b-tagged jets and missing transverse energy ( ET ) and the analysis strategy is chosen accordingly. Particular emphasis is placed on the utilization of the simplified models approach in signal characterization, optimization, and interpretation of results. No significant excess is observed resulting in limits set at 95% confidence level. Relative to the previous versions of the analyses, this iteration represents a several-fold increase in sensitivity to the new physics signatures considered. This is largely due to the use of three b-tag signal regions as well as signal regions based on initial state radiation.

  8. Final report for DOE-FG02-02ER54688: Study of nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, T A

    2006-11-16

    Final report for DOE Plasma Physics Junior Faculty Development award DOE-FG02-02ER54688. Reports on research undertaken from 8/1/2002 until 5/15/2006, investigating nonlinear interactions between Alfven waves in a laboratory experiment.

  9. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability

  10. 77 FR 24405 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan... Environmental Management (IDEM) submitted the revised State Plan on December 14, 2011. The revised State Plan is... units. See 74 FR 51368. A HMIWI unit as defined in 40 CFR 60.51c is any device that combusts any...

  11. 76 FR 56797 - United States v. Cumulus Media Inc., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. Cumulus Media Inc., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive... United States District Court for the District of Columbia in United States of America v. Cumulus Media... Complaint alleging that Cumulus Media Inc.'s proposed acquisition of Citadel Broadcasting Corporation...

  12. 78 FR 22298 - United States v. Apple, Inc., et al.; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ..., see United States v. Apple, Inc., et al., 77 FR 77094; and summaries of the terms of the proposed... Antitrust Division United States v. Apple, Inc., et al.; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final... States v. Apple, Inc., et al., Civil Action No. 12-CV-2826 (DLC), which was filed in the United...

  13. 29 CFR 825.701 - Interaction with State laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Effect of Other Laws, Employer Practices, and Collective Bargaining... supersedes any provision of State or local law that provides greater family or medical leave rights than those provided by FMLA. The Department of Labor will not, however, enforce State family or medical......

  14. 29 CFR 825.701 - Interaction with State laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Effect of Other Laws, Employer Practices, and Collective Bargaining... supersedes any provision of State or local law that provides greater family or medical leave rights than those provided by FMLA. The Department of Labor will not, however, enforce State family or medical......

  15. 29 CFR 825.701 - Interaction with State laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Effect of Other Laws, Employer Practices, and Collective Bargaining... supersedes any provision of State or local law that provides greater family or medical leave rights than those provided by FMLA. The Department of Labor will not, however, enforce State family or medical......

  16. 29 CFR 825.701 - Interaction with State laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Effect of Other Laws, Employer Practices, and Collective Bargaining... supersedes any provision of State or local law that provides greater family or medical leave rights than those provided by FMLA. The Department of Labor will not, however, enforce State family or medical......

  17. 29 CFR 825.701 - Interaction with State laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Effect of Other Laws, Employer Practices, and Collective Bargaining... supersedes any provision of State or local law that provides greater family or medical leave rights than those provided by FMLA. The Department of Labor will not, however, enforce State family or medical......

  18. The Function of Phenomenal States: Supramodular Interaction Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morsella, Ezequiel

    2005-01-01

    Discovering the function of phenomenal states remains a formidable scientific challenge. Research on consciously penetrable conflicts (e.g., "pain-for-gain" scenarios) and impenetrable conflicts (as in the pupillary reflex, ventriloquism, and the McGurk effect [H. McGurk & J. MacDonald, 1976]) reveals that these states integrate diverse kinds of…

  19. Search for MSSM Higgs Bosons in Tau Final States with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wan-Ching

    2010-01-01

    The cross-section times branching ratio of the Higgs boson decaying to τ+τ- final state in the Standard Model (SM) is too small to play any role in the SM Higgs boson searches. This, however, is different in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), which predicts two Higgs doublets leading to five Higgs bosons: a pair of charged Higgs boson (H±); two neutral CP-even Higgs bosons (h,H) and a CP-odd Higgs boson (A). A search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into τ+τ- final states in p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV is presented in this thesis. One of the two τ leptons is required to decay into a muon while the other decays hadronically. The integrated luminosity is L = 1.0-5.36 fb -1, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider from 2002 to 2009 in the Run II.

  20. Studies of beauty baryon decays to D0ph- and Λc+h- final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    Decays of beauty baryons to the D0ph- and Λc+h- final states (where h indicates a pion or a kaon) are studied using a data sample of pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, collected by the LHCb detector. The Cabibbo-suppressed decays Λb0→D0pK- and Λb0→Λc+K- are observed, and their branching fractions are measured with respect to the decays Λb0→D0pπ- and Λb0→Λc+π-. In addition, the first observation is reported of the decay of the neutral beauty-strange baryon Ξb0 to the D0pK- final state, and a measurement of the Ξb0 mass is performed. Evidence of the Ξb0→Λc+K- decay is also reported.

  1. Combination of Run-1 exotic searches in diboson final states at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F.; Gadatsch, S.; Gouzevich, M.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Novaes, S. F.; Oliveira, A.; Pierini, M.; Tomei, T.

    2016-04-01

    We perform a statistical combination of the ATLAS and CMS results for the search of a heavy resonance decaying to a pair of vector bosons with the √{s}=8 TeV datasets collected at the LHC. We take into account six searches in hadronic and semileptonic final states carried out by the two collaborations. We consider only public information provided by ATLAS and CMS in the HEPDATA database and in papers published in refereed journals. We interpret the combined results within the context of a few benchmark new physics models, such as models predicting the existence of a W' or a bulk Randall-Sundrum spin-2 resonance, for which we present exclusion limits, significances, p-values and best-fit cross sections. A heavy diboson resonance with a production cross section of ˜4-5 fb and mass between 1.9 and 2.0 TeV is the exotic scenario most consistent with the experimental results. Models in which a heavy resonance decays preferentially to a WW final state are disfavoured.

  2. Coulomb interaction effects on the Majorana states in quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Manolescu, A; Marinescu, D C; Stanescu, T D

    2014-04-30

    The stability of the Majorana modes in the presence of a repulsive interaction is studied in the standard semiconductor wire-metallic superconductor configuration. The effects of short-range Coulomb interaction, which is incorporated using a purely repulsive δ-function to model the strong screening effect due to the presence of the superconductor, are determined within a Hartree-Fock approximation of the effective Bogoliubov-De Gennes Hamiltonian that describes the low-energy physics of the wire. Through a numerical diagonalization procedure we obtain interaction corrections to the single particle eigenstates and calculate the extended topological phase diagram in terms of the chemical potential and the Zeeman energy. We find that, for a fixed Zeeman energy, the interaction shifts the phase boundaries to a higher chemical potential, whereas for a fixed chemical potential this shift can occur either at lower or higher Zeeman energies. These effects can be interpreted as a renormalization of the g-factor due to the interaction. The minimum Zeeman energy needed to realize Majorana fermions decreases with the increasing strength of the Coulomb repulsion. Furthermore, we find that in wires with multi-band occupancy this effect can be enhanced by increasing the chemical potential, i.e. by occupying higher energy bands. PMID:24722427

  3. Charmless Hadronic B Decays into Vector, Axial Vector and Tensor Final States at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Paolo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-06

    We present experimental measurements of branching fraction and longitudinal polarization fraction in charmless hadronic B decays into vector, axial vector and tensor final states with the final dataset of BABAR. Measurements of such kind of decays are a powerful tool both to test the Standard Model and search possible sources of new physics. In this document we present a short review of the last experimental results at BABAR concerning charmless quasi two-body decays in final states containing particles with spin 1 or spin 2 and different parities. This kind of decays has received considerable theoretical interest in the last few years and this particular attention has led to interesting experimental results at the current b-factories. In fact, the study of longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} in charmless B decays to vector vector (VV), vector axial-vector (VA) and axial-vector axial-vector (AA) mesons provides information on the underlying helicity structure of the decay mechanism. Naive helicity conservation arguments predict a dominant longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} {approx} 1 for both tree and penguin dominated decays and this pattern seems to be confirmed by tree-dominated B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B{sup +} {yields} {Omega}{rho}{sup +} decays. Other penguin dominated decays, instead, show a different behavior: the measured value of f{sub L} {approx} 0.5 in B {yields} {phi}K* decays is in contrast with naive Standard Model (SM) calculations. Several solutions have been proposed such as the introduction of non-factorizable terms and penguin-annihilation amplitudes, while other explanations invoke new physics. New modes have been investigated to shed more light on the problem.

  4. Search for B decays to final states with the ηc meson

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokurova, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Eidelman, S.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.

    2015-06-18

    We report a search for B decays to selected final states with the ηc meson: B± → K±ηcπ+π-, B± → K±ηcω, B± → K±ηcη and B± → K±ηcπ0. The analysis is based on 772 × 106 BB-bar pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions of the studied B decay modes, independent of intermediate resonances, in the range (0.6–5.3) × 10-4. We also search for molecular-state candidates in the D0D*-bar0 - D-bar0D*0, D0D-bar0 + D-bar0D0 and D*0D*-bar0 + D*-bar0D*0 combinations, neutral partners of the Z(3900)± and Z(4020)±, and a poorly understood state X(3915) as possible intermediate states in the decay chain, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of branching fractions to the mentioned intermediate states and decay branching fractions of these states in the range (0.6–6.9) × 10-5.

  5. Mapping Control and Affiliation in Teacher-Student Interaction with State Space Grids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainhard, M. Tim; Pennings, Helena J. M.; Wubbels, Theo; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how State Space Grids (SSG), a dynamic systems research method, can be used to map teacher-student interactions from moment-to-moment and thereby to incorporate temporal aspects of interaction. Interactions in two secondary school classrooms are described in terms of level of interpersonal control and affiliation, and of…

  6. Quasi-stationary states and a classification of the range of pair interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielli, A.; Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.

    2011-03-24

    Systems of long-range interacting particles present typically 'quasi-stationary' states (QSS). Investigating their lifetime for a generic pair interaction V(r{yields}{infinity}){approx}1/r{sup {gamma}} we give a classification of the range of the interactions according to the dynamical properties of the system.

  7. Configuration interaction singles natural orbitals: An orbital basis for an efficient and size intensive multireference description of electronic excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin G.; Hohenstein, Edward G.

    2015-01-14

    Multireference quantum chemical methods, such as the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, have long been the state of the art for computing regions of potential energy surfaces (PESs) where complex, multiconfigurational wavefunctions are required, such as near conical intersections. Herein, we present a computationally efficient alternative to the widely used CASSCF method based on a complete active space configuration interaction (CASCI) expansion built from the state-averaged natural orbitals of configuration interaction singles calculations (CISNOs). This CISNO-CASCI approach is shown to predict vertical excitation energies of molecules with closed-shell ground states similar to those predicted by state averaged (SA)-CASSCF in many cases and to provide an excellent reference for a perturbative treatment of dynamic electron correlation. Absolute energies computed at the CISNO-CASCI level are found to be variationally superior, on average, to other CASCI methods. Unlike SA-CASSCF, CISNO-CASCI provides vertical excitation energies which are both size intensive and size consistent, thus suggesting that CISNO-CASCI would be preferable to SA-CASSCF for the study of systems with multiple excitable centers. The fact that SA-CASSCF and some other CASCI methods do not provide a size intensive/consistent description of excited states is attributed to changes in the orbitals that occur upon introduction of non-interacting subsystems. Finally, CISNO-CASCI is found to provide a suitable description of the PES surrounding a biradicaloid conical intersection in ethylene.

  8. A Comparison of Interaction Patterns in an Open Space and a Fixed Plan School. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County School System, Christiansburg, VA.

    This study investigates interaction patterns that occur in an open plan and in a traditional plan school. The objectives of the study were: (1) to investigate some interaction patterns among members of the school populations, (2) to investigate some interaction patterns between the school population and the available physical resources, (3) to…

  9. Final Summary Report: Em-Powering Coastal States and Utilities through Model Offshore Wind Legislation and Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-11-30

    The final summary report summarizes the most significant findings from three project reports detailing: feed-in tariffs, model request for proposals for new generation, and model state offshore wind power legislation.

  10. Equation of state and contact of a strongly interacting Bose gas in the normal state

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia -Ji; Mulkerin, Brendan; He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui

    2015-04-27

    Here, we theoretically investigate the equation of state and Tan's contact of a nondegenerate three-dimensional Bose gas near a broad Feshbach resonance, within the framework of large-N expansion. Our results agree with the path-integral Monte Carlo simulations in the weak-coupling limit and recover the second-order virial expansion predictions at strong interactions and high temperatures. At resonance, we find that the chemical potential and energy are significantly enhanced by the strong repulsion, while the entropy does not change significantly. With increasing temperature, the two-body contact initially increases and then decreases like T–1 at large temperature, and therefore exhibits a peak structure at about 4Tc0, where Tc0 is the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature of an ideal, noninteracting Bose gas. These results may be experimentally examined with a nondegenerate unitary Bose gas, where the three-body recombination rate is substantially reduced. In particular, the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the two-body contact could be inferred from the momentum distribution measurement.

  11. Equation of state and contact of a strongly interacting Bose gas in the normal state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia-Ji; Mulkerin, Brendan; He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui

    2015-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the equation of state and Tan's contact of a nondegenerate three-dimensional Bose gas near a broad Feshbach resonance, within the framework of large-N expansion. Our results agree with the path-integral Monte Carlo simulations in the weak-coupling limit and recover the second-order virial expansion predictions at strong interactions and high temperatures. At resonance, we find that the chemical potential and energy are significantly enhanced by the strong repulsion, while the entropy does not change significantly. With increasing temperature, the two-body contact initially increases and then decreases like T-1 at large temperature, and therefore exhibits a peak structure at about 4 Tc 0 , where Tc 0 is the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature of an ideal, noninteracting Bose gas. These results may be experimentally examined with a nondegenerate unitary Bose gas, where the three-body recombination rate is substantially reduced. In particular, the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the two-body contact could be inferred from the momentum distribution measurement.

  12. Equation of state and contact of a strongly interacting Bose gas in the normal state

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Xia -Ji; Mulkerin, Brendan; He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui

    2015-04-27

    Here, we theoretically investigate the equation of state and Tan's contact of a nondegenerate three-dimensional Bose gas near a broad Feshbach resonance, within the framework of large-N expansion. Our results agree with the path-integral Monte Carlo simulations in the weak-coupling limit and recover the second-order virial expansion predictions at strong interactions and high temperatures. At resonance, we find that the chemical potential and energy are significantly enhanced by the strong repulsion, while the entropy does not change significantly. With increasing temperature, the two-body contact initially increases and then decreases like T–1 at large temperature, and therefore exhibits a peak structuremore » at about 4Tc0, where Tc0 is the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature of an ideal, noninteracting Bose gas. These results may be experimentally examined with a nondegenerate unitary Bose gas, where the three-body recombination rate is substantially reduced. In particular, the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the two-body contact could be inferred from the momentum distribution measurement.« less

  13. Radiative decays of the psi(3097) to two meson final states

    SciTech Connect

    Einsweiler, K.F.

    1984-05-01

    The MARK III detector operating at the SPEAR storage ring has acquired a sample of 2.7 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi(3097)'s. These events are used to investigate the radiative decays of the psi to two meson final states. Such decays are of topical interest because of the unusual QCD laboratory they provide - of particular interest is the possibility of observing glueball states. The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is studied. The f(1270) tensor meson is observed and the helicity structure of its production is measured. The data indicate that helicity 2 is suppressed, in disagreement with lowest order QCD calculations. Evidence is presented for the first observation of the theta(1700) in the ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ final state. The strong, but not complete, suppression of this state in the ..pi pi.. channel, combined with the absence of a J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ signal in a recent MARK III analysis of psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. rho rho, suggest a very mysterious nature for the theta(1700). The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma..K/sup +/K/sup -/ is also studied. The f'(1515) tensor meson is observed with a branching ratio in agreement with the SU(3) symmetry prediction for the standard two gluon radiative decay diagram with no mixing corrections. The helicity structure of the f'(1515) is measured for the first time, and is found to be similar to that of the f(1270). The theta(1700) is observed with high statistics. Its spin and parity are measured, with the result that J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ is preferred over J/sup P/ = 0/sup +/ at the 99.9% C.L. In addition, evidence is presented for a remarkable narrow state, designated the xi(2220). Its parameters are measured to be: m = 2.218 +- 0.003 +- 0.010 GeV, GAMMA less than or equal to 0.040 GeV at 95% C.L., and BR(psi ..-->.. ..gamma..xi(2220))BR(xi(2220) ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/) = (5.7 +- 1.9 +- 1.4) x 10/sup -5/.

  14. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 3. Fluid/structure interaction studies using 3-D STEALTH/WHAMSE. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1982-11-01

    This report, the third in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the final step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid-structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The final step in the methodology implements enhancements and special modifications to the STEALTH 3D computer program and the WHAMSE 3D computer program. After describing the enhancements, the individual and the coupled computer programs are assessed by comparing calculational results with either analytical solutions or with experimental data. The coupled 3D STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program is then applied to the simulation of HDR Test V31.1 to further assess the program and to investigate the role that fluid-structure interaction plays in the hydrodynamic loading of reactor internals during subcooled blowdown.

  15. Correlations of excited states for sd bosons in the presence of random interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Yoshida, N.; Arima, A.

    2011-04-15

    In this work we study the yrast states of sd-boson systems in the presence of random interactions. It is found that the yrast states with spin-zero ground states among the random ensemble exhibit strong correlations, characterized by anharmonic vibration, s-boson or d-boson condensation, as well as vibrational and rotational motions. We study these correlations explicitly based on their wave functions and the features of two-body interactions in the random ensemble.

  16. Final Report: Natural State Models of The Geysers Geothermal System, Sonoma County, California

    SciTech Connect

    T. H. Brikowski; D. L. Norton; D. D. Blackwell

    2001-12-31

    Final project report of natural state modeling effort for The Geysers geothermal field, California. Initial models examined the liquid-dominated state of the system, based on geologic constraints and calibrated to match observed whole rock delta-O18 isotope alteration. These models demonstrated that the early system was of generally low permeability (around 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}), with good hydraulic connectivity at depth (along the intrusive contact) and an intact caprock. Later effort in the project was directed at development of a two-phase, supercritical flow simulation package (EOS1sc) to accompany the Tough2 flow simulator. Geysers models made using this package show that ''simmering'', or the transient migration of vapor bubbles through the hydrothermal system, is the dominant transition state as the system progresses to vapor-dominated. Such a system is highly variable in space and time, making the rock record more difficult to interpret, since pressure-temperature indicators likely reflect only local, short duration conditions.

  17. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian

    2010-08-05

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sub 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  18. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian

    2011-10-24

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sup 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  19. Folding of apocytochrome c induced by the interaction with negatively charged lipid micelles proceeds via a collapsed intermediate state.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, S. E.; Watts, A.; Roder, H.; Pinheiro, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    Unfolded apocytochrome c acquires an alpha-helical conformation upon interaction with lipid. Folding kinetic results below and above the lipid's CMC, together with energy transfer measurements of lipid bound states, and salt-induced compact states in solution, show that the folding transition of apocytochrome c from the unfolded state in solution to a lipid-inserted helical conformation proceeds via a collapsed intermediate state (I(C)). This initial compact state is driven by a hydrophobic collapse of the polypeptide chain in the absence of the heme group and may represent a heme-free analogue of an early compact intermediate detected on the folding pathway of cytochrome c in solution. Insertion into the lipid phase occurs via an unfolding step of I(C) through a more extended state associated with the membrane surface (I(S)). While I(C) appears to be as compact as salt-induced compact states in solution with substantial alpha-helix content, the final lipid-inserted state (Hmic) is as compact as the unfolded state in solution at pH 5 and has an alpha-helix content which resembles that of native cytochrome c. PMID:10048331

  20. Experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy final state electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Sadek; Ozer, Zehra N.; Dogan, Mevlut; Yavuz, Murat; Varol, Onur; Madison, Don

    2016-09-01

    There have been several studies of electron-impact ionization of inert gases for asymmetric final state energy sharing and normally one electron has an energy significantly higher than the other. However, there have been relatively few studies examining equal energy final state electrons. Here we report experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy sharing of the outgoing electrons. Previous experimental results combined with some new measurements are compared with distorted wave born approximation (DWBA) results, DWBA results using the Ward-Macek (WM) approximation for the post collision interaction (PCI), and three-body distorted wave (3DW) which includes PCI without approximation. The results show that it is crucially important to include PCI in the calculation particularly for lower energies and that the WM approximation is valid only for high energies. The 3DW, on the other hand, is in reasonably good agreement with data down to fairly low energies.

  1. Experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy final state electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Sadek; Ozer, Zehra N.; Dogan, Mevlut; Yavuz, Murat; Varol, Onur; Madison, Don

    2016-09-01

    There have been several studies of electron-impact ionization of inert gases for asymmetric final state energy sharing and normally one electron has an energy significantly higher than the other. However, there have been relatively few studies examining equal energy final state electrons. Here we report experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy sharing of the outgoing electrons. Previous experimental results combined with some new measurements are compared with distorted wave born approximation (DWBA) results, DWBA results using the Ward–Macek (WM) approximation for the post collision interaction (PCI), and three-body distorted wave (3DW) which includes PCI without approximation. The results show that it is crucially important to include PCI in the calculation particularly for lower energies and that the WM approximation is valid only for high energies. The 3DW, on the other hand, is in reasonably good agreement with data down to fairly low energies.

  2. Study of Lambda+(c) Cabibbo favored decays containing a Lambda baryon in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-05-01

    Using data from the FOCUS experiment (FNAL-E831), they study the decay of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons into final states contain a {Lambda} hyperon. The branching fractions of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} into {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} relative to that into pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} are measured to be 0.217 {+-} 0.013 {+-} 0.020, 0.508 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.024 and 0.142 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.022, respectively. New measurements are also reported. Further, an analysis of the subresonant structure for the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode is presented.

  3. PHANTOM: A Monte Carlo event generator for six parton final states at high energy colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrero, Alessandro; Belhouari, Aissa; Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Kashkan, Vladimir; Maina, Ezio

    2009-03-01

    PHANTOM is a tree level Monte Carlo for six parton final states at proton-proton, proton-antiproton and electron-positron colliders at O(αEM6) and O(αEM4αS2) including possible interferences between the two sets of diagrams. This comprehends all purely electroweak contributions as well as all contributions with one virtual or two external gluons. It can generate unweighted events for any set of processes and it is interfaced to parton shower and hadronization packages via the latest Les Houches Accord protocol. It can be used to analyze the physics of boson-boson scattering, Higgs boson production in boson-boson fusion, tt¯ and three boson production. Program summaryProgram title:PHANTOM (V. 1.0) Catalogue identifier: AECE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 175 787 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 965 898 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Any with a UNIX, LINUX compatible Fortran compiler Operating system: UNIX, LINUX RAM: 500 MB Classification: 11.1 External routines: LHAPDF (Les Houches Accord PDF Interface, http://projects.hepforge.org/lhapdf/), CIRCE (beamstrahlung for ee ILC collider). Nature of problem: Six fermion final state processes have become important with the increase of collider energies and are essential for the study of top, Higgs and electroweak symmetry breaking physics at high energy colliders. Since thousands of Feynman diagrams contribute in a single process and events corresponding to hundreds of different final states need to be generated, a fast and stable calculation is needed. Solution method:PHANTOM is a tree level Monte Carlo for six parton final states at proton-proton, proton-antiproton and

  4. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in lepton + jets final States.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2014-07-18

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states using the full sample of pp collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity. We use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt production or background. The overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure m(t) = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. This constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.

  5. Technical Report (Final): Development of Solid State Reagents for Preparing Radiolabeled Imaging Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, George W

    2011-05-20

    The goal of this research was on the development of new, rapid, and efficient synthetic methods for incorporating short-lived radionuclides into agents of use in measuring dynamic processes. The initial project period (Year 1) was focused on the preparation of stable, solid state precursors that could be used to efficiently incorporate short-lived radioisotopes into small molecules of use in biological applications (environmental, plant, and animal). The investigation included development and evaluation of new methods for preparing carbon-carbon and carbon-halogen bonds for use in constructing the substrates to be radiolabeled. The second phase (Year 2) was focused on developing isotope incorporation techniques using the stable, boronated polymeric precursors. The final phase (Year 3), was focused on the preparation of specific radiolabeled agents and evaluation of their biodistribution using micro-PET and micro-SPECT. In addition, we began the development of a new series of polymeric borane reagents based on polyethylene glycol backbones.

  6. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton$+$jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton þ jets final states using the full sample of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We also use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt¯ production or background. Furthermore, the overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure mt = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. As a result, this constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.

  7. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton+jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2014-07-17

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton$+$jets final states using the full sample of $p\\bar{p}$ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at $\\sqrt s=1.96 $TeV, corresponding to $9.7 {\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. We use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from $t\\bar t$ production or background. The overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the $W$ boson. We measure $m_t=174.98\\pm0.76$ GeV. In conclusion, this constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.

  8. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton$+$jets final states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton þ jets final states using the full sample of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We also use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt¯ production or background. Furthermore, the overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure mt = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. As a result, this constitutes the mostmore » precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.« less

  9. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton+jets final states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2014-07-17

    We measure the mass of the top quark in leptonmore » $+$jets final states using the full sample of $$p\\bar{p}$$ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at $$\\sqrt s=1.96 $$TeV, corresponding to $$9.7 {\\rm fb}^{-1}$$ of integrated luminosity. We use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from $$t\\bar t$$ production or background. The overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the $W$ boson. We measure $$m_t=174.98\\pm0.76$$ GeV. In conclusion, this constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.« less

  10. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau lepton final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D0 Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with zero, one, or two or more jets using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 7.3 fb collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon-gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, and to Higgs boson decays to ττ, WW, ZZ and bb¯ pairs. Observed (expected) limits are set on the ratio of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio, relative to those predicted by the Standard Model, of 22 (14) at a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV and 6.8 (7.7) at 165 GeV.

  11. Search for chargino-neutralino associated production via trileptonic final states with DO detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Ahn, S.; Baldin, B.; Bhat, P.C.

    1996-09-01

    Preliminary results from a search for the production of an associated lightest chargino, W{sub 1}, and second lightest neutralino, Z{sub 2}, pair with the D0 detector at Fermilab`s pp collider with {radical}s = 1.8 TeV are presented. Based on approximately 85 pb{sup -1} of data collected during the 1993-1995 Tevatron Runs we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the chargino-neutralino cross section times branching fraction to any trileptonic final state ranging from 0.91 pb to 0.19 pb for wino masses ranging from 45 GeV/c{sup 2} to 96 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. First observation of vector boson pairs in a hadronic final state at the tevatron collider.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-08-28

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 + or - 239(stat) + or - 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section sigma(pp[over ]-->VV + X) of 18.0 + or - 2.8(stat) + or - 2.4(syst) + or -1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  13. First Observation of Vector Boson Pairs in a Hadronic Final State at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W,Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 {+-} 239(stat) {+-} 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} VV + X) of 18.0 {+-} 2.8(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst) {+-} 1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  14. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau lepton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with zero, one, or two or more jets using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 7.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, and to Higgs boson decays to tau lepton pairs or W boson pairs. Observed (expected) limits are set on the ratio of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio, relative to those predicted by the Standard Model, of 14 (22) at a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV and 7.7 (6.8) at 165 GeV.

  15. Permanent magnet materials: An assessment of the state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, R.H.; McNaughton, W.P.

    1994-07-01

    Permanent magnets underlie many of the technologies that are central to modern industrial societies, including electric motors. Given that electric motors consume approximately 62% of the total electricity generated in the United States each year, they are considered one of the most promising applications of high-efficiency permanent magnet materials. In particular, a new class of permanent magnets composed of rare-earth (RE) and transition-metal (TM) elements is expected to have a major impact on electric motor efficiency and the electric power industry. EPRI has conducted a thorough review of the literature on permanent magnet materials to summarize their status and potential, with a focus on applications to electric motors technologies. This report summarizes and discusses issues that are key to the successful application of new permanent magnetic materials in electric motors, including design innovations in large electric motors and the economical and political limitations on raw materials. Finally, areas of future research are outlined.

  16. Final state problem for the cubic nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Nakao; Naumkin, Pavel I.

    2009-10-15

    We study the final state problem for the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation, u{sub tt}+u-u{sub xx}={mu}u{sup 3}, t is an element of R,x is an element of R, where {mu} is an element of R. We prove the existence of solutions in the neighborhood of the approximate solutions 2 Re U(t)w{sub +}(t), where U(t) is the free evolution group defined by U(t)=F{sup -1}e{sup -it<{xi}}{sup >}F, ={radical}(1+x{sup 2}), F and F{sup -1} are the direct and inverse Fourier transformations, respectively, and w{sub +}(t,x)=F{sup -1}(u{sub +}({xi})e{sup (3/2)i{mu}}{sup <{xi}}{sup >{sup 2}}{sup |u{sub +}{sup ({xi})|{sup 2}}{sup log t}), with a given final data u{sub +} is a real-valued function and parallel <{xi}>{sup 3}u{sub +}({xi}) parallel {sub L{sup {infinity}}} is small.

  17. Explosion and Final State of an Unstable Reissner-Nordström Black Hole.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gual, Nicolas; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Montero, Pedro J; Font, José A; Herdeiro, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    A Reissner-Nordström black hole (BH) is superradiantly unstable against spherical perturbations of a charged scalar field enclosed in a cavity, with a frequency lower than a critical value. We use numerical relativity techniques to follow the development of this unstable system-dubbed a charged BH bomb-into the nonlinear regime, solving the full Einstein-Maxwell-Klein-Gordon equations, in spherical symmetry. We show that (i) the process stops before all the charge is extracted from the BH, and (ii) the system settles down into a hairy BH: a charged horizon in equilibrium with a scalar field condensate, whose phase is oscillating at the (final) critical frequency. For a low scalar field charge q, the final state is approached smoothly and monotonically. For large q, however, the energy extraction overshoots, and an explosive phenomenon, akin to a bosenova, pushes some energy back into the BH. The charge extraction, by contrast, does not reverse. PMID:27104692

  18. An experimental scheme to generate nonclassical states in interacting Fock space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P. K.; Haldar, Prasanta

    2015-07-01

    An experimentally realizable scheme is considered for manipulating quantum states using a general superposition (SUP) of products of interacting annihilation and creation operators. Application of such an operation on states with classical features introduces strong nonclassicality. This provides the possibility of engineering quantum states with nonclassical features.

  19. Electrostatic Interaction of Long DNA Molecules with Solid State Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bingquan; Samuilov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Jonathan; Rafailovich, Miriam; Chu, Ben

    2004-03-01

    At low buffer concentration the electric charge of DNA molecules creates a strong electrostatic interaction and, as a result, a number of phenomena, such as the electro-hydrodynamic instability, partial adsorption at the buffer-semiconductor interface and stretching of DNA with the electric field. Long DNA molecules at the silicon substrate?buffer solution interface are very interesting objects for the electrical transport [1,2] and the mechanical properties, like entropic elasticity, studies. The system (DNA-substrate-electric field in the buffer solution) is very complicated. Due to the strong electrostatic interaction of DNA with the substrate, the image charge is generated, and the physical adsorption takes place. We have studied the S. Pombe genomic DNA of the order of 5 Mbp. Within a surface DNA is entropically partially recoiled due to electrostatic adsorption at a few points. While varying the direction of the low electric field the direction of the electroosmotic flow is changing and stretching the parts of DNA between the adsorption points. If the electric field is high enough, DNA is de-trapped and forms a compact coil. This behavior could be considered as an inverse mechanism of entropy trapping due to confined constrictions. In the case of the surface, DNA is recoiled and trapped in the stretched configuration in the deep energetic barrier by Si surface due to the strong electrostatic interaction. If the energy of the field is enough to overcome the barrier, DNA is detached. The Si surface could be considered as an analog of the entropic recoiling nanostructure. [1]. N. Pernodet, V. Samuilov, K. Shin, J. Sokolov, M.H. Rafailovich, D. Gersappe, B. Chu. DNA Electrophoresis on a Flat Surface, Physical Review Letters, 85 (2000) 5651-5654. [2] Y.-S. Seo, V.A. Samuilov, J. Sokolov, M. Rafailovich, B. Tinland, J. Kim, B. Chu. DNA separation at a liquid-solid interface, Electrophoresis, 23 (2002) 2618-2625.

  20. Electron-phonon interaction and excited states relaxation in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perebeinos, Vasili

    2008-03-01

    We will discuss the role of electron-phonon interaction on excited states relaxation and phonon spectra in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The electron-phonon interaction leads to the polaronic effects of the charge carriers, but it also renormalizes the energy and the lifetime of phonons. We present a theoretical model that predicts the changes induced in the phonon modes of CNTs as a function of the charge carrier doping, i.e. position of the Fermi level. In agreement with the predictions, our experiments show sharpening and blue shifts of the G-phonons of metallic CNTs, but only blue shifts for semiconducting CNTs, making the Raman scattering a useful probe of local doping of CNTs [1]. The non-equilibrium dynamics of charge carriers under external electric field is determined by the electron-phonon scattering. The hot carriers under unipolar transport conditions can be produced, leading to the strong impact excitation and light emission, which intensity is determined by electric field, phonon scattering, and impact excitation cross section [2, 3]. In the reverse process of photoconductivity, light is absorbed creating excited states. We will discuss electronic relaxation of high energy excited states leading to the free carriers, contributing to the photoconductivity, and phonon relaxation, leading to the bound excitons [4]. The later can contribute to the photocurrent only after ionization by the external field [5]. Finally, we will discuss the role of phonons in the long puzzling question regarding the nature of the dominant decay channel of the low energy excited states and the potential of optoelectronic applications of CNTs. [1] J.C. Tsang, M. Freitag, V. Perebeinos, J. Liu, and Ph. Avouris, Nature Nanotechnology 2, 725 (2007); [2] J. Chen, V. Perebeinos, M. Freitag, J. Tsang, Q. Fu, J. Liu, Ph. Avouris, Science 310, 1171 (2005); [3] V. Perebeinos and Ph. Avouris, Phys. Rev. B. 74, 121410(R), (2006); [4] T. Hertel, V. Perebeinos, J. Crochet, K. Arnold, M. Kappes

  1. Frequency specific interactions of MEG resting state activity within and across brain networks as revealed by the multivariate interaction measure.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, L; Della Penna, S; Snyder, A Z; Pizzella, V; Nolte, G; de Pasquale, F; Romani, G L; Corbetta, M

    2013-10-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) are sets of brain regions exhibiting temporally coherent activity fluctuations in the absence of imposed task structure. RSNs have been extensively studied with fMRI in the infra-slow frequency range (nominally <10(-1)Hz). The topography of fMRI RSNs reflects stationary temporal correlation over minutes. However, neuronal communication occurs on a much faster time scale, at frequencies nominally in the range of 10(0)-10(2)Hz. We examined phase-shifted interactions in the delta (2-3.5 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) frequency bands of resting-state source space MEG signals. These analyses were conducted between nodes of the dorsal attention network (DAN), one of the most robust RSNs, and between the DAN and other networks. Phase shifted interactions were mapped by the multivariate interaction measure (MIM), a measure of true interaction constructed from the maximization of imaginary coherency in the virtual channels comprised of voxel signals in source space. Non-zero-phase interactions occurred between homologous left and right hemisphere regions of the DAN in the delta and alpha frequency bands. Even stronger non-zero-phase interactions were detected between networks. Visual regions bilaterally showed phase-shifted interactions in the alpha band with regions of the DAN. Bilateral somatomotor regions interacted with DAN nodes in the beta band. These results demonstrate the existence of consistent, frequency specific phase-shifted interactions on a millisecond time scale between cortical regions within RSN as well as across RSNs. PMID:23631996

  2. A STUDY IN ORGANIZATIONAL INTERACTION BETWEEN AN EVENING COLLEGE AND ITS PARENT INSTITUTION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JACOBSON, MYRTLE S.

    THIS STUDY IN ORGANIZATIONAL INTERACTION ANALYZES THE STRUCTURAL TIES AND INTERACTIVE RELATIONSHIPS OF AN EDUCATIONAL SUB-ORGANIZATION (EVENING DEGREE PROGRAM) AND ITS PARENT COLLEGIATE INSTITUTION (BROOKLYN COLLEGE). AN EXAMINATION OF OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS, CORRESPONDENCE, POLICY STATEMENTS, AND MANY INTERVIEWS, QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEYS, AND…

  3. Dynamics of interacting qubits coupled to a common bath: Non-Markovian quantum-state-diffusion approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Xinyu; Jing Jun; Corn, Brittany; Yu Ting

    2011-09-15

    Non-Markovian dynamics is studied for two interacting qubits strongly coupled to a dissipative bosonic environment. We derive a non-Markovian quantum-state-diffusion (QSD) equation for the coupled two-qubit system without any approximations, and in particular, without the Markov approximation. As an application and illustration of our derived time-local QSD equation, we investigate the temporal behavior of quantum coherence dynamics. In particular, we find a strongly non-Markovian regime where entanglement generation is significantly modulated by the environmental memory. Additionally, we study residual entanglement in the steady state by analyzing the steady-state solution of the QSD equation. Finally, we discuss an approximate QSD equation.

  4. 76 FR 21017 - United States v. Google Inc. and ITA Software Inc., Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. Google Inc. and ITA Software Inc., Proposed Final Judgment and... America v. Google Inc. and ITA Software Inc., Civil Case No. 1:11-cv-00688. On April 8, 2011, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that Google's proposed acquisition of ITA Software Inc....

  5. An Evaluation of the Project STAR Reading Program Intervention (State Technical Assistance Resources Project). Volume II: Evaluation Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holowenzak, Stephen P.

    This is the second of three volumes that constitute the final evaluation report of Project STAR (State Technical Assistance Resources), an undertaking of the Maryland State Department of Education designed to help 36 elementary schools improve their reading programs. This volume is divided into five parts. The first part contains a discussion of…

  6. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...). The Indiana Department of Environmental Management submitted the revised State Plan on December...

  7. 76 FR 10471 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; Final Free and Restricted Percentages for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; Final Free and... strengthen market conditions. The percentages were recommended by the Cherry Industry Administrative Board... handling of tart cherries grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah,...

  8. 75 FR 12702 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; Final Free and Restricted Percentages for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... Michigan, et al.; Final Free and Restricted Percentages for the 2009-2010 Crop Year for Tart Cherries... order regulates the handling of tart cherries grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania... 930), regulating the handling of tart cherries produced in the States of Michigan, New...

  9. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI... consistent with Emission Guidelines promulgated by EPA on October 6, 2009. This approval means that EPA...

  10. Emotional states after grooming interactions in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masataka; Yamada, Kazunori; Nakamichi, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    In animal societies, the effect of grooming interactions on anxiety reduction is unclear. This study examined the effects of giving and receiving grooming on anxiety reduction in free ranging female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) by measuring rates of self-scratching as an index of anxiety. In this study, the authors used a focal-animal sampling method, targeting 17 females at Katsuyama, Okayama prefecture, Japan. They evaluated affiliative relationships, which were defined by standard proximity rates, and found that females' self-scratching rates were lower after grooming affiliated partners than during matched-control periods (occurring on another day, beginning at approximately the same time of day as the corresponding postgrooming period) and not after grooming unaffiliated partners. Moreover, regardless of affiliative relationships, self-scratching rates were lower after receiving grooming than during matched-control periods. These findings did not change after excluding data in which groomer and groomee were in proximity after the grooming interaction. In addition, multivariable analysis showed that affiliative relationships, but not kinship or rank distances, were related to differences in the rates of self-scratching between giving grooming and matched-control periods. In contrast, neither affiliative relationships nor kinship nor rank distances affected differences in self-scratching rates between receiving grooming and matched-control periods. Therefore, individuals' anxiety levels decreased both after giving grooming to affiliated partners and after receiving grooming, regardless of affiliative relationships. This is the first empirical study to support the notion that giving grooming to affiliated partners is self-rewarding in Japanese macaques.

  11. Study of B-Meson Decays to Final States with a Single Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Stephanie A.

    2007-08-01

    A study of B-meson decays to final states with a single charm baryon is presented based on data recorded by the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Although the B meson is the lightest bottom-flavored meson, it is heavy enough to decay to a baryon made of three quarks and an antibaryon made of three antiquarks. By studying the baryonic weak decays of the B meson, we can investigate baryon production mechanisms in heavy meson decays. In particular, we measure the rates of the decays B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- and $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. Comparing these rates, we confirm an observed trend in baryonic B decays that the decay with the lower energy release, B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π-, is favored over $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. The dynamics of the baryon-antibaryon (Λ+c$\\bar{p}$) system in the three-body decay also provide insight into baryon-antibaryon production mechanisms. The B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- system is a laboratory for searches for excited #c baryon states; we observe the resonant decays B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ and B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$. This is the first observation of the decay B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$; however, the mass of the observed #c(2800)0 state is inconsistent with previous measurements. Finally, we examine the angular distribution of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ decays and measure the spin of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ baryon to be J = 1/2, as predicted by the quark model.

  12. Ground state of a resonantly interacting Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Diederix, J. M.; Heijst, T. C. F. van; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2011-09-15

    We show that a two-channel mean-field theory for a Bose gas near a Feshbach resonance allows for an analytic computation of the chemical potential, and therefore the universal constant {beta}, at unitarity. To improve on this mean-field theory, which physically neglects condensate depletion, we study a variational Jastrow ansatz for the ground-state wave function and use the hypernetted-chain approximation to minimize the energy for all positive values of the scattering length. We also show that other important physical quantities such as Tan's contact and the condensate fraction can be directly obtained from this approach.

  13. Nuclear ground state charge radii from electromagnetic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frickle, G.; Bernhardt, C.; Heilig, K.

    1995-07-01

    The Tables summarize experimental results from muonic atom transition energies, nuclear charge parameters from elastic electron scattering, and K x-ray isotope shifts in so far as they provide information on nuclear ground-state charge radii. Numerous experimental results for optical isotope shifts have been published elsewhere; for eight elements the relevant information is condensed ({open_quotes}project{close_quotes}) here to one optical line per element. A model-independent analysis which combines data from all three experimental methods is applied to these elements and is presented as an illustration of the improved accuracy for the rms radii and Barrett radii which result from this analysis. 51 refs., 11 figs, 1 tab.

  14. Gray-level transformations for interactive image enhancement. M.S. Thesis. Final Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fittes, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    A gray-level transformation method suitable for interactive image enhancement was presented. It is shown that the well-known histogram equalization approach is a special case of this method. A technique for improving the uniformity of a histogram is also developed. Experimental results which illustrate the capabilities of both algorithms are described. Two proposals for implementing gray-level transformations in a real-time interactive image enhancement system are also presented.

  15. Interactions of Science and Technology in the Innovative Process: Some Case Studies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH. Columbus Labs.

    This is the final report of the latest effort in a series sponsored by the National Science Foundation on the innovation process. It adds to the store of retrospective case studies by documenting historically the significant events in several technological innovations of high social impact. These cases, drawn together by the Battelle Columbus…

  16. Characterizations of resting-state modulatory interactions in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Di, Xin; Biswal, Bharat B

    2015-11-01

    Functional connectivity between two brain regions, measured using functional MRI (fMRI), has been shown to be modulated by other regions even in a resting state, i.e., without performing specific tasks. We aimed to characterize large-scale modulatory interactions by performing region-of-interest (ROI)-based physiophysiological interaction analysis on resting-state fMRI data. Modulatory interactions were calculated for every possible combination of three ROIs among 160 ROIs sampling the whole brain. Firstly, among all of the significant modulatory interactions, there were considerably more negative than positive effects; i.e., in more cases, an increase of activity in one region was associated with decreased functional connectivity between two other regions. Next, modulatory interactions were categorized as to whether the three ROIs were from one single network module, two modules, or three different modules (defined by a modularity analysis on their functional connectivity). Positive modulatory interactions were more represented than expected in cases in which the three ROIs were from a single module, suggesting an increase within module processing efficiency through positive modulatory interactions. In contrast, negative modulatory interactions were more represented than expected in cases in which the three ROIs were from two modules, suggesting a tendency of between-module segregation through negative modulatory interactions. Regions that were more likely to have modulatory interactions were then identified. The numbers of significant modulatory interactions for different regions were correlated with the regions' connectivity strengths and connection degrees. These results demonstrate whole-brain characteristics of modulatory interactions and may provide guidance for future studies of connectivity dynamics in both resting state and task state.

  17. Stabilization of intermediate density states in globular proteins by homogeneous intramolecular attractive interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, I; Jernigan, R L

    1994-01-01

    On-lattice simulations of two-dimensional self-avoiding chains subject to homogeneous intramolecular attractive interactions were performed as a model for studying various density regimes in globular proteins. For short chains of less than 15 units, all conformations were generated and classified by density. The range of intramolecular interactions was found to increase uniformly with density, and the average number of topological contacts is directly proportional to density. The uniform interaction energy increases the probability of high density states but does not necessarily lead to dominance of the highest density state. Typically, several large peaks appear in the probability distribution of packing densities, their location and amplitude being determined by the balance between entropic effects enhancing more expanded conformations and attractive interactions favoring compact forms. Also, the homogeneous interaction energy affects the distribution of most probable interacting points in favor of the longer range interactions over the short range ones, but in addition it introduces some more detailed preferences even among short range interactions. There are some implications about the characteristics of the intermediate density states and also for the likelihood that the native state does not correspond completely to the lowest energy conformation. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8161699

  18. Pre-Service Teachers: Dispositional Traits, Emotional States, and Quality of Teacher-Student Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripski, Michael B.; LoCasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Decker, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Given the interactive nature of teaching, dispositional characteristics (i.e., traits that dispose a person towards certain behaviors, choices, and experiences) like assertiveness and openness or emotional states such as sadness, worry, and stress may play important roles in a teacher's ability to interact in meaningful, engaging, and effective…

  19. The Internet and Public Participation: State Legislature Web Sites and the Many Definitions of Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferber, Paul; Foltz, Franz; Pugliese, Rudy

    2005-01-01

    The interactive nature of the Internet is seen by some as a technological innovation that might boost participation in politics and civic affairs. That potential, however, is clouded by imprecise definitions of interactivity found among scholars and practitioners alike. Evaluation of state legislature Web sites found them to not be very…

  20. Interaction of 8-Hydroxyquinoline with Cadmium Halides in Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, M. A.; Ahmad, A.; Beg, Saba; Askari, Hasan

    1995-07-01

    The solid state reactions of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and cadmium halides (CdX2; X = Cl, Br, and I) have been studied. Each reaction follows the rate equation Xn = kt. The activation energies calculated from the progress of the reaction studied by the lateral diffusion technique are 74.55 ± 1.22, 84.65 ± 3.88, and 101.66 ± 0.93 kJ mole-1 for CdCl2-8-HQ CdBr2-8-HQ and Cdl2-8-HQ reactions, respectively. 8-HQ diffuses into cadmium halide grains by a defect mechanism; penetration to the grains is preceded by surface migration. The reactions were followed by chemical analysis, IR spectral studies, and thermal and conductivity measurements. A single addition product, [CdX2-(8-HQ)], was obtained for CdCl2 and CdBr2, whereas Cdl2 gave rise to two addition products, Cdl2-(8-HQ) and Cdl2-(8-HQ)2.

  1. New Theoretical Developments in Exploring Electronically Excited States: Including Localized Configuration Interaction Singles and Application to Large Helium Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closser, Kristina Danielle

    This thesis presents new developments in excited state electronic structure theory. Contrasted with the ground state, the electronically excited states of atoms and molecules often are unstable and have short lifetimes, exhibit a greater diversity of character and are generally less well understood. The very unusual excited states of helium clusters motivated much of this work. These clusters consist of large numbers of atoms (experimentally 103--109 atoms) and bands of nearly degenerate excited states. For an isolated atom the lowest energy excitation energies are from 1s → 2s and 1s → 2 p transitions, and in clusters describing the lowest energy band minimally requires four states per atom. In the ground state the clusters are weakly bound by van der Waals interactions, however in the excited state they can form well-defined covalent bonds. The computational cost of quantum chemical calculations rapidly becomes prohibitive as the size of the systems increase. Standard excited-state methods such as configuration interaction singles (CIS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) can be used with ≈100 atoms, and are optimized to treat only a few states. Thus, one of our primary aims is to develop a method which can treat these large systems with large numbers of nearly degenerate excited states. Additionally, excited states are generally formed far from their equilibrium structures. Vertical excitations from the ground state induce dynamics in the excited states. Thus, another focus of this work is to explore the results of these forces and the fate of the excited states. Very little was known about helium cluster excited states when this work began, thus we first investigated the excitations in small helium clusters consisting of 7 or 25 atoms using CIS. The character of these excited states was determined using attachment/detachment density analysis and we found that in the n = 2 manifold the excitations could generally be interpreted as

  2. Interactions in the solid state. I: Interactions of sodium bicarbonate and tartaric acid under compressed conditions.

    PubMed

    Usui, F; Carstensen, J T

    1985-12-01

    The interaction of NaHCO3 and tartaric acid in powder mixtures and compressed tablets has been studied. It has been found that in an open system the reaction is simply a decarboxylation of NaHCO3 and that the effect of compression on the reaction rate can be attributed to the brittle fracture (and subsequent surface area increase) that occurs on compaction. In a closed system the decomposition of the mixture is an interaction between the acid and the base, and it is mediated by the amount of moisture in the system. This latter is a product of reaction, and a suitable kinetic scheme is described for this. It is shown that "curing" the sodium bicarbonate by heating it to, e.g., 90 degrees C stabilizes the system by virtue of the formation of surface Na2CO3, which acts as a moisture scavenger.

  3. Search for CP Violation in $\\tau$ And D Decays With a $K^0_S$ in the Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, Maurizio; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    I report the recent searches for CP violation in {tau} and D decays including a K{sub s}{sup 0} in the final state. The analyses herein shown are based on data samples recorded by BABAR and Belle experiments. A brief introduction on CP violation is followed by the summary of the experimental techniques and the results obtained for {tau} and D decays, respectively. Finally, an outlook on future development is provided.

  4. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, J. T.

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  5. Search for new phenomena in monophoton final states in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Neveu, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Rurua, L.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. 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T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Golutvin, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. 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I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2016-04-01

    Results are presented from a search for new physics in final states containing a photon and missing transverse momentum. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 collected in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. No deviation from the standard model predictions is observed for these final states. New, improved limits are set on dark matter production and on parameters of models with large extra dimensions. In particular, the first limits from the LHC on branon production are found and significantly extend previous limits from LEP and the Tevatron. An upper limit of 14.0 fb on the cross section is set at the 95% confidence level for events with a monophoton final state with photon transverse momentum greater than 145 GeV and missing transverse momentum greater than 140 GeV.

  6. Next-to-leading order predictions for Z gamma+jet and Z gamma gamma final states at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Hartanto, Heribertus B.; Williams, Ciaran

    2012-11-01

    We present next-to-leading order predictions for final states containing leptons produced through the decay of a Z boson in association with either a photon and a jet, or a pair of photons. The effect of photon radiation from the final state leptons is included and we also allow for contributions arising from fragmentation processes. Phenomenological studies are presented for the LHC in the case of final states containing charged leptons and in the case of neutrinos. We also use the procedure introduced by Stewart and Tackmann to provide a reliable estimate of the scale uncertainty inherent in our theoretical calculations of jet-binned Z gamma cross sections. These computations have been implemented in the public code MCFM.

  7. Search for heavy resonances decaying to two Higgs bosons in final states containing four b quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. 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A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. 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A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Rurua, L.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. 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M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, l. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A search is presented for narrow heavy resonances X decaying into pairs of Higgs bosons ({H}) in proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC at √{s}=8 {TeV} . The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^{-1}. The search considers {H} {H} resonances with masses between 1 and 3 {TeV}, having final states of two b quark pairs. Each Higgs boson is produced with large momentum, and the hadronization products of the pair of b quarks can usually be reconstructed as single large jets. The background from multijet and {t}overline{{t}} events is significantly reduced by applying requirements related to the flavor of the jet, its mass, and its substructure. The signal would be identified as a peak on top of the dijet invariant mass spectrum of the remaining background events. No evidence is observed for such a signal. Upper limits obtained at 95 % confidence level for the product of the production cross section and branching fraction σ ({{g} {g}} → X) B({X} → {H} {H} → {b} overline{{b}} {b} overline{{b}} ) range from 10 to 1.5 { fb} for the mass of X from 1.15 to 2.0 {TeV}, significantly extending previous searches. For a warped extra dimension theory with a mass scale Λ _R = 1 {TeV}, the data exclude radion scalar masses between 1.15 and 1.55 {TeV}.

  8. Studies of charmed strange baryons in the Λ D final state at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Y.; Iijima, T.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hirose, S.; Hou, W.-S.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Niiyama, M.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, H.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Seong, I. S.; Sevior, M. E.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yelton, J.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of Ξc(3055 )0, observed by its decay into the final-state Λ D0, and present the first observation and evidence of the decays of Ξc(3055 )+and Ξc(3080)+ into Λ D+. We also perform a combined analysis of the Λ D+ with the Σc++K- and Σc*++K- decay modes to measure the ratios of branching fractions, masses and widths with improved accuracy. We measure the ratios of branching fractions B (Ξc(3055)+→ΛD+)/ B(Ξc(3055)+→Σc++ K-)=5.09±1.01 ±0.76 , B(Ξc(3080)+→ΛD+)/ B(Ξc(3080)+→Σc++ K-)=1.29±0.30 ±0.15 , and B(Ξc(3080)+→Σc*++ K-)/B(Ξc(3080)+→ Σc++K-)=1.07 ±0.27 ±0.04 , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. The analysis is performed using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  9. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau, and jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2013-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb-1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H → τ τ decays or H → WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  10. Linear state feedback, quadratic weights, and closed loop eigenstructures. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Equations are derived for the angles of general multivariable root loci and linear quadratic optimal root loci, including angles of departure and approach. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used to compute angles of approach. Equations are also derived to find the sensitivity of closed loop eigenvalue and the directional derivatives of closed loop eigenvectors. An equivalence class of quadratic weights that produce the same asymptotic eigenstructure is defined, a canonical element is defined, and an algorithm to find it is given. The behavior of the optimal root locus in the nonasymptotic region is shown to be different for quadratic weights with the same asymptotic properties. An algorithm is presented that can be used to select a feedback gain matrix for the linear state feedback problem which produces a specified asymptotic eigenstructure. Another algorithm is given to compute the asymptotic eigenstructure properties inherent in a given set of quadratic weights. Finally, it is shown that optimal root loci for nongeneric problems can be approximated by generic ones in the nonasymptotic region.

  11. FINAL REPORT: SUNSHINE STATE SOLAR GRID INITIATIVE (SUNGRIN) PHASE 1 (Critical Milestone Review Version)

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, Rick; Steurer, Mischa; Li, Hui; Edrington, Chris; Dale, Steinar; Faruque, MD Omar; Schoder, Karl; McLaren, Peter G.; Liu, Liming; Ravindra, Harsha; Henry, Shawn; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Xiaohu; Springstroh, Aaron; Click, David; Reedy, Robert; Moaveni, Houtan; Davis, Kristopher; Cromer, Charlie; Pappalardo, Anthoney; Krueger, Rodica; Domijan, Alexander; Islam, Arif; Islam, Mujahidil; Damole, Ademole

    2012-03-30

    This report provides details on the activities and accomplishments of Phase 1 of the Sunshine State Solar Grid Initiative (SUNGRIN) Project for the period beginning 4/28/2010 and ending 12/31/2011. SUNGRIN is a five-phase high-penetration solar PV project within the Systems Integration (SI) area of the Solar Energy Technologies (SETP) Program, under the SunShot Initiative. SUNGRIN is focused on understanding and enabling high-penetration grid-connected solar PV through simulation assisted studies of actual Florida utility high-penetration distribution circuits as well as substations and, to a limited extent, the bulk power system. Each phase builds and expands upon the efforts of the previous phase, leading to a comprehensive examination and understanding of high-penetration solar PV issues, from the solar resource to the conversion and integration technologies to the electric power system, with Florida and it’s utility partners providing the broad range of conditions and system integration scenarios necessary to develop useful insight and solutions. This phase, Phase 1, was funded with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. This version of the final report is organized to align with statement of project objectives (SOPO) critical milestones.

  12. Search for pair production of the scalar top quark in muon plus tau final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; Lopes de Sa R.; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-04-20

    We present a search for the pair production of scalar top quarks ({tilde t}{sub 1}), the lightest supersymmetric partners of the top quarks, in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Each scalar top quark is assumed to decay into a b quark, a charged lepton, and a scalar neutrino ({tilde {nu}}). We investigate final states arising from {tilde t}{sub 1}{ovr {tilde t}{sub 1}} {yields} b{bar b}{mu}{tau}{tilde {nu}}{tilde {nu}} and {tilde t}{sub 1}{ovr {tilde t}{sub 1}} {yields} b{bar b}{tau}{tau}{tilde {nu}}{tilde {nu}}. With no significant excess of events observed above the background expected from the standard model, we set exclusion limits on this production process in the (M{sub {tilde t}{sub 1}}, M{sub {tilde {nu}}}) plane.

  13. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau and jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.

    2013-09-17

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb–1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H → ττ decays or H → WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. As a result, the observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsample at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0, respectively.

  14. Hadronic final states in high -pT QCD at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Matera, Keith

    2013-11-18

    The heavy quark content of gauge boson events is of great interest to studies of QCD. These events probe the gluon and heavy-quark parton distribution functions of the proton, and also provide a measurement of the rate of final state gluon splitting to heavy flavor. In addition, gauge boson plus heavy quark events are representative of backgrounds to Higgs, single top, and supersymmetric particle searches. Recent work with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron has measured the cross-section of several gauge boson plus heavy flavor production processes, including the first Tevatron observation of specific charm process p{p bar} → W +c. Results are found to be in agreement with NLO predictions that include an enhanced rate of g → {cc bar}/bb splitting. Lastly, a new analysis promises to probe a lower pT (c) region than has been previously explored, by fully reconstructing D* → D0(Kπ)π decays in the full CDF dataset (9.7 fb-1).

  15. Semileptonic decays of charmed and beauty baryons with heavy sterile neutrinos in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, Sabir

    2009-04-01

    We obtain tree-level estimates of various differential branching ratios of heavy baryon decays with massive sterile neutrinos {nu}{sub x} in the final state. Generally, charmed baryons are found to be less promising than charmed mesons, in contrast to b hadrons. In the latter case, branching ratios of beauty mesons and baryons into sterile neutrinos are of the same order. As a consequence, at high energies beauty baryons give contribution to sterile neutrino production comparable to the contribution of beauty mesons (up to about 15%). Experimental limits on active-to-sterile mixing are quite strong for neutrinos lighter than D mesons but for heavier neutrinos they are weaker. As an example, for neutrino masses in the range 2 GeV < or approx. m{sub {nu}{sub x}} < or approx. 2.5 GeV, current data imply that the bounds on {lambda}{sub b}-hyperon branching ratios into sterile neutrinos are Br({lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}+e{sup -}+{nu}{sub x}) < or approx. 1.3x10{sup -5}-1.7x10{sup -6} and Br({lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}+{mu}{sup -}+{nu}{sub x}) < or approx. 3.9x10{sup -7}-1.4x10{sup -7}.

  16. Interaction between the Kravchuck and Meixner oscillators coherent states and the coherent radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugen Drăgănescu, Gheorghe

    2013-03-01

    To describe a series of phenomena that occur in micro- and nano-systems, we have used the discrete variable Kravchuk and Meixner oscillators for which some sets of coherent states and some squeezed states were established. For a system consisting of molecular oscillators interacting with the coherent radiation field, an oscillatory variation of the refractive index was established.

  17. Attentional Engagement in Infancy: The Interactive Influence of Attentional Inertia and Attentional State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, Lisa M.; Ross-Sheehy, Shannon; Kannass, Kathleen N.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the interactive influences of attentional state and attentional inertia on infants' level of attentional engagement. We assessed infants' distraction latencies longitudinally at 6.5 and 9 months as they explored toys, and we coded both their attentional state (focused vs. casual) and how long they had been looking at the toy at each…

  18. 24 CFR 58.14 - Interaction with State, Federal and non-Federal entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... NEPA and comparable environmental review requirements of the State (see 40 CFR 1506.2 (b) and (c)). The... of joint EISs or joint environmental assessments (see 40 CFR 1501.5(b) and 1501.6). A single EIS or... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interaction with State, Federal...

  19. Radon: Chemical and physical states of radon progeny. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The evolving chemical and physical form of radon progeny influence their transport to the bioreceptor and the extent to which that receptor can take up these species into various tissues. When first born following radioactive decay processes, the potentially deleterious radon progeny undergo various physical and chemical transformations as they transcend from a highly charged to a neutral state, and interact with various constituents of the environment. These transformations impact on the extent to which the radon progeny become associated with aerosol particles on the one hand, and their ultimate chemical form that is available for uptake in the biosystem, on the other. The program, which originally commenced in 1987, dealt with the basic chemistry and physics of radon progeny and hence impacted on several themes of importance to the DOE/OHER radon program. One of these is dose response, which is governed by the physical forms of the radon progeny, their transport to the bioreceptor and the chemical forms that govern their uptake. The second theme had to do with cellular responses, one of the major issues motivating the work. It is well known that various sizes of ions and molecules are selectively transported across cell membrane to differing degrees. This ultimately has to do with their chemical and physical forms, charge and size. The overall objective of the work was threefold: (1) quantifying the mechanisms and rates of the chemical and physical transformation; (2) ascertaining the ultimate chemical forms, and (3) determining the potential interactions of these chemical species with biological functional groups to ascertain their ultimate transport and incorporation within cells.

  20. Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS): Final report, November 1994--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS) is a software tool for complex three-dimensional (3-D) visualization and modeling. Its primary purpose is to facilitate the use of robotic and telerobotic systems in remote and/or hazardous environments, where spatial information is provided by 3-D mapping sensors. ICERVS provides a robust, interactive system for viewing sensor data in 3-D and combines this with interactive geometric modeling capabilities that allow an operator to construct CAD models to match the remote environment. Part I of this report traces the development of ICERVS through three evolutionary phases: (1) development of first-generation software to render orthogonal view displays and wireframe models; (2) expansion of this software to include interactive viewpoint control, surface-shaded graphics, material (scalar and nonscalar) property data, cut/slice planes, color and visibility mapping, and generalized object models; (3) demonstration of ICERVS as a tool for the remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) and the dismantlement of contaminated processing facilities. Part II of this report details the software design of ICERVS, with particular emphasis on its object-oriented architecture and user interface.

  1. Interactive Graphics Simulator: Design, Development, and Effectiveness/Cost Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, William J.; And Others

    This study was initiated to design, develop, implement, and evaluate a videodisc-based simulator system, the Interactive Graphics Simulator (IGS) for 6883 Converter Flight Control Test Station training at Lowry Air Force Base, Colorado. The simulator provided a means for performing task analysis online, developing simulations from the task…

  2. Development of Inventories for Assessing Parent and Teacher Interaction and Involvement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Earl S.; Edgerton, Marianna

    This study was designed to develop a conceptual scheme and brief reliable measures of parent and teacher involvement and interaction, to be given to kindergarteners' parents and teachers at the time of enrollment and again at the end of kindergarten. The inventories provide a framework for an analysis of (1) characteristics of parents and teachers…

  3. EZLP: An Interactive Computer Program for Solving Linear Programming Problems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, John J.; And Others

    Designed for student use in solving linear programming problems, the interactive computer program described (EZLP) permits the student to input the linear programming model in exactly the same manner in which it would be written on paper. This report includes a brief review of the development of EZLP; narrative descriptions of program features,…

  4. Radiative decays of the psi prime to all-photon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    Results of studies of selected radiative decays of the psi' to charmonium and non-charmonium states which decay into photons are presented. These studies were performed using a sample of 1.8 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi''s collected by the Crystal Ball detector at the SPEAR electron-positron storage ring. The branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/, chi/sub 2/, and eta'/sub c/ to two photons have been measured to be (4.5 +- 2.2 +- 2.0) x 10/sup -4/, (9.5 +- 2.9 +- 4.5) x 10/sup -4/ (first errors statistical, second systematic), and <1 x 10/sup -2/ (90% C.L.). The signal from the decay chain psi' ..-->.. ..gamma..chi/sub 0/, chi/sub 0/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ has been observed with essentially no background. Using the observed line shape of the radiative photon in this reaction, the full width of the psi/sub 0/ has been found to be 8.8 +- 1.3 +- 1.5 MeV/c/sup 2/. In addition, the branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/ and chi/sub 2/ to ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ have been measured to be (3.5 +- 0.3 +- 1.2) x 10/sup -3/ and (1.2 +- 0.2 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -3/; the branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/ and chi/sub 2/ to eta eta have been measured to be (2.8 +- 0.9 +- 1.3) x 10/sup -3/ and (8.4 +- 4.2 +- 4.0) x 10/sup -4/. The decays of the psi' to four non-charmonium states have been investigated. The branching ratios and upper limits of these decays have been normalized to the branching ratios of the corresponding decays from the J/psi which have been measured using a sample of 2.2 x 10/sup 6/ produced J/psi's collected by the Crystal Ball detector. The ratios of the psi' branching ratios to the J/psi branching ratios for the final states ..gamma..eta, ..gamma..eta', ..gamma..theta, and ..gamma..f have been measured to be <1.8%, <2.6%, <10 to 15%, and 9 +- 3%. These results are compared with the theoretical expectations of lowest-order quantum chromodynamics potential models. Substantial disagreement is found between theory and experiment.

  5. Preparation and spectroscopy of a metastable Mott-insulator state with attractive interactions.

    PubMed

    Mark, M J; Haller, E; Lauber, K; Danzl, J G; Janisch, A; Büchler, H P; Daley, A J; Nägerl, H-C

    2012-05-25

    We prepare and study a metastable attractive Mott-insulator state formed with bosonic atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Starting from a Mott insulator with Cs atoms at weak repulsive interactions, we use a magnetic Feshbach resonance to tune the interactions to large attractive values and produce a metastable state pinned by attractive interactions with a lifetime on the order of 10 s. We probe the (de)excitation spectrum via lattice modulation spectroscopy, measuring the interaction dependence of two- and three-body bound-state energies. As a result of increased on-site three-body loss we observe resonance broadening and suppression of tunneling processes that produce three-body occupation. PMID:23003276

  6. Numerical Simulation of Quantum State Reduction in Bose-Einstein Condensates with Attractive Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palpacelli, Silvia; Succi, Sauro

    Following an idea first proposed by Penrose in 1996 to explain the problem of quantum state reduction as a gravitational effect, Moroz, Penrose and Tod1 have shown that quantum state reduction due to gravitational interactions could take place in about one second for the case of 1011 nucleons. However, keeping 1011 nucleons together in a quantum macroscopic state does not appear to be feasible as yet. The closest physical system to such a situation is provided by Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) with attractive interactions. We present numerical simulations of the Schrödinger-Newton equations, which show that an attractive BEC with 103 atoms would yield a decorrelation time of the order of 10-2 seconds. Hence, a "Penrose-like" reduction, induced by BEC attractive interaction instead of gravity, might be observable and possibly monitored in current BEC experiments with attractive interactions.

  7. Superfluid state of repulsively interacting three-component fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Sei-Ichiro; Inaba, Kensuke

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the superfluid state of repulsively interacting three-component (color) fermionic atoms in optical lattices using Feynman diagrammatic approaches and the dynamical mean field theory. When the anisotropy of the three repulsive interactions is strong, atoms of two of the three colors form Cooper pairs and atoms of the third color remain a Fermi liquid. This superfluid emerges close to half filling at which the Mott insulating state characteristic of the three-component repulsive fermions appears. An effective attractive interaction is induced by density fluctuations of the third-color atoms. The superfluid state is stable against the phase separation that occurs in the strongly repulsive region. We determine the phase diagrams in terms of temperature, filling, and the anisotropy of the repulsive interactions. This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) (No. 23540467) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  8. 75 FR 47256 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... and Recovery Act, as amended (RCRA), for which the State had not previously sought authorization. EPA... provisions of the State regulations that are authorized and that EPA will enforce under RCRA. DATES:...

  9. 78 FR 58988 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended, for which the State had not previously sought authorization. EPA... provisions of the State regulations that are authorized and that EPA will enforce under RCRA. DATES:...

  10. 76 FR 12307 - Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Act, as amended (RCRA), for which the State had not previously sought authorization. The EPA proposes... of the State regulations that are authorized and that the EPA will enforce under RCRA. DATES:...

  11. 77 FR 71395 - Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... Act, as amended (RCRA), for which the State had not previously sought authorization. The EPA proposes... of the State regulations that are authorized and that the EPA will enforce under RCRA. DATES:...

  12. Excitation energies of particle-hole states in {sup 208}Pb and the surface delta interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heusler, A.; Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2013-07-15

    The schematic shell model without residual interaction (SSM) assumes the same excitation energy for all spins in each particle-hole configuration multiplet. In {sup 208}Pb, more than forty states are known to contain almost the full strength of a single particle-hole configuration. The experimental excitation energy for a state with a certain spin differs from the energy predicted by the SSM by -0.2 to +0.6 MeV. The multiplet splitting is calculated with the surface delta interaction; it corresponds to the diagonal matrix element of the residual interaction in the SSM. For states containing more than 90% strength of a certain configuration and for the centroid of several completely observed configurations, the calculated multiplet splitting often approximates the experimental excitation energy within 30 keV. The strong mixing within some pairs of states containing the full strengths of two configurations is explained.

  13. Reformulation of the covering and quantizer problems as ground states of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torquato, S.

    2010-11-01

    It is known that the sphere-packing problem and the number-variance problem (closely related to an optimization problem in number theory) can be posed as energy minimizations associated with an infinite number of point particles in d -dimensional Euclidean space Rd interacting via certain repulsive pair potentials. We reformulate the covering and quantizer problems as the determination of the ground states of interacting particles in Rd that generally involve single-body, two-body, three-body, and higher-body interactions. This is done by linking the covering and quantizer problems to certain optimization problems involving the “void” nearest-neighbor functions that arise in the theory of random media and statistical mechanics. These reformulations, which again exemplify the deep interplay between geometry and physics, allow one now to employ theoretical and numerical optimization techniques to analyze and solve these energy minimization problems. The covering and quantizer problems have relevance in numerous applications, including wireless communication network layouts, the search of high-dimensional data parameter spaces, stereotactic radiation therapy, data compression, digital communications, meshing of space for numerical analysis, and coding and cryptography, among other examples. In the first three space dimensions, the best known solutions of the sphere-packing and number-variance problems (or their “dual” solutions) are directly related to those of the covering and quantizer problems, but such relationships may or may not exist for d≥4 , depending on the peculiarities of the dimensions involved. Our reformulation sheds light on the reasons for these similarities and differences. We also show that disordered saturated sphere packings provide relatively thin (economical) coverings and may yield thinner coverings than the best known lattice coverings in sufficiently large dimensions. In the case of the quantizer problem, we derive improved upper

  14. Final Report. Coupled simulations of Antarctic Ice-sheet/ocean interactions using POP and CISM

    SciTech Connect

    Asay-Davis, Xylar Storm

    2015-12-30

    The project performed under this award, referred to from here on as CLARION (CoupLed simulations of Antarctic Ice-sheet/Ocean iNteractions), included important advances in two models of ice sheet and ocean interactions. Despite its short duration (one year), the project made significant progress on its three major foci. First, together with collaborator Daniel Martin at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), I developed the POPSICLES coupled ice sheet-ocean model to the point where it could perform a number of pan-Antarctic simulations under various forcing conditions. The results were presented at a number of major conferences and workshops worldwide, and are currently being incorporated into two manuscripts in preparation.

  15. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1992-12-31

    A research program on the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions is proposed. The experiments involve measuring changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol. Aerosols with differing surface properties will be generated by changing the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. Kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modelling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol will be measured, both before and after reaction, using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Information about the detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during the course of the reaction. Studies will focus on the condensation and oxidation of sulfur species (sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide) on water aerosols.

  16. Final Report: Interactive Web Technologies for Dissemination of Scientific Graphics, September 2, 1998 - March 17, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Craig

    1999-02-28

    An interactive software tool was developed to support the dissemination of scientific graphics. The technologies were developed both as a Java applet and stand-alone application and allow images to be disseminated as a data collection and an appearance script. Phase I efforts defined the model for the grahics tools. Software prototypes were constructed to test the utility of the graphics tool and refine the model.

  17. Tissue interactions with nonionizing electromagnetic fields. Final report, March 1979-February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Adey, W.R.; Bawin, S.M.; Byus, C.V.; Cain, C.D.; Lin-Liu, S.; Luben, R.A.; Lyle, D.B.; Sagan, P.M.; Sheppard, A.R.; Stell, M.A.

    1986-08-01

    This report provides an overview of this research program focused on basic research in nervous system responses to electric fields at 60 Hz. The emphasis in this project was to determine the fundamental mechanisms underlying some phenomena of electric field interactions in neural systems. The five studies of the initial program were tests of behavioral responses in the rat based upon the hypothesis that electric field detection might follow psychophysical rules known from prior research with light, sound and other stimuli; tests of electrophysiological responses to ''normal'' forms of stimulation in rat brain tissue exposed in vitro to electric fields, based on the hypothesis that the excitability of brain tissue might be affected by fields in the extracellular environment; tests of electrophysiological responses of spontaneously active pacemaker neurons of the Aplysia abdominal ganglion, based on the hypothesis that electric field interactions at the cell membrane might affect the balance among the several membrane-related processes that govern pacemaker activity; studies of mechanisms of low frequency electromagnetic field interactions with bone cells in the context of field therapy of ununited fractures; and manipulation of cell surface receptor proteins in studies of their mobility during EM field exposure.

  18. Study of the Impact of Federal Student Financial Aid Policies on State Decisions. Final Report. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolfi, George J.; And Others

    The impact of federal student financial aid policy on states and state responses to federal programs are assessed. After reviewing federal and state student aid during the past decade, the State Student Incentive Grant program (SSIG), is discussed, along with the effect of federal policy on SSIG. Perspectives of the state legislatures, governors,…

  19. Compound-Nucleus Formation Following Direct Interactions to Highly-Excited Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S

    2008-02-05

    When direct reactions populate highly excited, unbound configurations in the residual nucleus, the nucleus may further evolve into a compound nucleus. Alternatively, the residual system may decay by emitting particles into the continuum. Understanding the relative weights of these two processes as a function of the angular momentum and parity deposited in the nucleus is important for the surrogate-reaction technique. A particularly interesting case is compound-nucleus formation via the (d, p) reaction, which may be a useful tool for forming compound nuclei off the valley of stability in inverse-kinematics experiments. We present here a study of the compound formation probability for a closely-related direct reaction, direct-semidirect radiative neutron capture.

  20. Final LDRD report human interaction with complex systems: advances in hybrid reachability and control.

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Meeko M.

    2006-08-01

    This document describes new advances in hybrid reachability techniques accomplished during the course of a one-year Truman Postdoctoral Fellowship. These techniques provide guarantees of safety in complex systems, which is especially important in high-risk, expensive, or safety-critical systems. My work focused on new approaches to two specific problems motivated by real-world issues in complex systems: (1) multi-objective controller synthesis, and (2) control for recovery from error. Regarding the first problem, a novel application of reachability analysis allowed controller synthesis in a single step to achieve (a) safety, (b) stability, and (c) prevent input saturation. By extending the state to include the input parameters, constraints for stability, saturation, and envelope protection are incorporated into a single reachability analysis. Regarding the second problem, a new approach to the problem of recovery provides (a) states from which recovery is possible, and (b) controllers to guide the system during a recovery maneuver from an error state to a safe state in minimal time. Results are computed in both problems on nonlinear models of single longitudinal aircraft dynamics and two-aircraft lateral collision avoidance dynamics.

  1. Comparison of methods for finding saddle points without knowledge of the final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. A.; Kroes, G. J.; Henkelman, G.; Arnaldsson, A.; Jónsson, H.

    2004-11-01

    Within the harmonic approximation to transition state theory, the biggest challenge involved in finding the mechanism or rate of transitions is the location of the relevant saddle points on the multidimensional potential energy surface. The saddle point search is particularly challenging when the final state of the transition is not specified. In this article we report on a comparison of several methods for locating saddle points under these conditions and compare, in particular, the well-established rational function optimization (RFO) methods using either exact or approximate Hessians with the more recently proposed minimum mode following methods where only the minimum eigenvalue mode is found, either by the dimer or the Lanczos method. A test problem involving transitions in a seven-atom Pt island on a Pt(111) surface using a simple Morse pairwise potential function is used and the number of degrees of freedom varied by varying the number of movable atoms. In the full system, 175 atoms can move so 525 degrees of freedom need to be optimized to find the saddle points. For testing purposes, we have also restricted the number of movable atoms to 7 and 1. Our results indicate that if attempting to make a map of all relevant saddle points for a large system (as would be necessary when simulating the long time scale evolution of a thermal system) the minimum mode following methods are preferred. The minimum mode following methods are also more efficient when searching for the lowest saddle points in a large system, and if the force can be obtained cheaply. However, if only the lowest saddle points are sought and the calculation of the force is expensive but a good approximation for the Hessian at the starting position of the search can be obtained at low cost, then the RFO approaches employing an approximate Hessian represent the preferred choice. For small and medium sized systems where the force is expensive to calculate, the RFO approaches employing an approximate

  2. Nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, G.; Munoz, J. H.; Vera, C. E.

    2007-11-01

    We present a systematic study of exclusive charmless nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state. We calculate branching ratios of B{yields}PA, VA, and AA decays, where A, V, and P denote an axial vector, a vector, and a pseudoscalar meson, respectively. We assume a naive factorization hypothesis and use the improved version of the nonrelativistic Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise quark model for form factors in B{yields}A transitions. We include contributions that arise from the effective {delta}B=1 weak Hamiltonian H{sub eff}. The respective factorized amplitudes of these decays are explicitly shown and their penguin contributions are classified. We find that decays B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup +}K{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup 0}, B{sup -}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup -}, B{sup -}{yields}K{sub 1}{sup -}(1400){eta}{sup (')}, B{sup -}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, and B{sup 0}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}(K{sup -}) have branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -5}. We also study the dependence of branching ratios for B{yields}K{sub 1}P(V,A) decays [K{sub 1}=K{sub 1}(1270), K{sub 1}(1400)] with respect to the mixing angle between K{sub 1A} and K{sub 1B}.

  3. Nonlinear interactions in mixing layers and compressible heated round jets. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrah, Yousef Mohd

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear interactions between a fundamental instability mode and both its harmonics and the changing mean flow are studied using the weakly nonlinear stability theory of Stuart and Watson, and numerical solutions of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. The first part focuses on incompressible cold (or isothermal; constant temperature throughout) mixing layers, and for these, the first and second Landau constants are calculated as functions of wavenumber and Reynolds number. It is found that the dominant contribution to the Landau constants arises from the mean flow changes and not from the higher harmonics. In order to establish the range of validity of the weakly nonlinear theory, the weakly nonlinear and numerical solutions are compared and the limitation of each is discussed. At small amplitudes and at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, the two results compare well in describing the saturation of the fundamental, the distortion of the mean flow, and the initial stages of vorticity roll-up. At larger amplitudes, the interaction between the fundamental, second harmonic, and the mean flow is strongly nonlinear and the numerical solution predicts flow oscillations, whereas the weakly nonlinear theory yields saturation. In the second part, the weakly nonlinear theory is extended to heated (or nonisothermal; mean temperature distribution) subsonic round jets where quadratic and cubic nonlinear interactions are present, and the Landau constants also depend on jet temperature ratio, Mach number and azimuthal mode number. Under exponential growth and nonlinear saturation, it is found that heating and compressibility suppress the growth of instability waves, that the first azimuthal mode is the dominant instability mode, and that the weakly nonlinear solution describes the early stages of the roll-up of an axisymmetric shear layer. The receptivity of a typical jet flow to pulse type input disturbance is also studied by solving the initial value problem

  4. Conserved Intramolecular Interactions Maintain Myosin Interacting-Heads Motifs Explaining Tarantula Muscle Super-Relaxed State Structural Basis.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Qi, Dan; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Zhu, Jingui; Bilbao, Aivett; Gillilan, Richard E; Hu, Songnian; Padrón, Raúl

    2016-03-27

    Tarantula striated muscle is an outstanding system for understanding the molecular organization of myosin filaments. Three-dimensional reconstruction based on cryo-electron microscopy images and single-particle image processing revealed that, in a relaxed state, myosin molecules undergo intramolecular head-head interactions, explaining why head activity switches off. The filament model obtained by rigidly docking a chicken smooth muscle myosin structure to the reconstruction was improved by flexibly fitting an atomic model built by mixing structures from different species to a tilt-corrected 2-nm three-dimensional map of frozen-hydrated tarantula thick filament. We used heavy and light chain sequences from tarantula myosin to build a single-species homology model of two heavy meromyosin interacting-heads motifs (IHMs). The flexibly fitted model includes previously missing loops and shows five intramolecular and five intermolecular interactions that keep the IHM in a compact off structure, forming four helical tracks of IHMs around the backbone. The residues involved in these interactions are oppositely charged, and their sequence conservation suggests that IHM is present across animal species. The new model, PDB 3JBH, explains the structural origin of the ATP turnover rates detected in relaxed tarantula muscle by ascribing the very slow rate to docked unphosphorylated heads, the slow rate to phosphorylated docked heads, and the fast rate to phosphorylated undocked heads. The conservation of intramolecular interactions across animal species and the presence of IHM in bilaterians suggest that a super-relaxed state should be maintained, as it plays a role in saving ATP in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles. PMID:26851071

  5. Final Report - Interaction of radiation and charged particles in miniature plasma structures

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2014-07-16

    The extension of our program to the development of theories and models capable of describing the interactions of intense laser pulses and charged particles in miniature plasma channels is reported. These channels, which have recently been created in the laboratory, have unique dispersion properties that make them interesting for a variety of applications including particle acceleration, high harmonic generation, and THz generation. Our program systematically explored the properties of these channels, including dispersion, losses, and coupling. A particular application that was pursued is the generation of intense pulses of THz radiation by short laser pulses propagating these channels. We also explored the nonlinear dynamics of laser pulses propagating in these channels.

  6. FY04 LDRD Final Report: Interaction of Viruses with Membranes and Soil Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schaldach, C M

    2005-02-08

    The influence of ionic strength on the electrostatic interaction of viruses with environmentally relevant surfaces was determined for three viruses, MS2, Q{beta} and Norwalk. The environmental surface is modeled as charged Gouy-Chapman plane with and without a finite atomistic region (patch) of opposite charge. The virus is modeled as a particle comprised of ionizable amino acid residues in a shell surrounding a spherical RNA core of negative charge, these charges being compensated for by a Coulomb screening due to intercalated ions. Surface potential calculations for each of the viruses show excellent agreement with electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential measurements as a function of pH. The results indicate that the electrostatic interaction between the virus and the planar surface, mitigated by the ionic strength of the solute, is dependent upon the spatial distribution of the amino acid residues in the different viruses. Specifically, the order of interaction energies with the patch (MS2 greatest at 5 mM; Norwalk greatest at 20 mM) is dependent upon the ionic strength of the fluid as a direct result of the viral coat amino acid distributions. We have developed an atomistic-scale method of calculation of the binding energy of viruses to surfaces including electrostatic, van der Waals, electron-overlap repulsion, surface charge polarization (images), and hydrophobic effects. The surface is treated as a Gouy-Chapman plane allowing inclusion of pH and ionic strength effects on the electrostatic potential at each amino acid charge. Van der Waals parameters are obtained from the DREIDING force field and from Hamaker constant measurements. We applied this method to the calculation of the Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV), a negatively charged virus at a pH of 7.0, and find that the viral-gold surface interaction is very long range for both signs of surface potential, a result due to the electrostatic forces. For a negative (Au) surface potential of -0.05 volts, a nearly

  7. Imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premalatha, K.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the emergence of different kinds of imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We find that the complete synchronization in population I and existence of solitary oscillators which escape from the synchronized group in population II lead to imperfectly synchronized states for sufficiently small values of nonisochronicity parameter. Interestingly, upon increasing the strength of this parameter further there occurs an onset of mixed imperfectly synchronized states where the solitary oscillators occur from both the populations. Synchronized oscillators from both the populations are locked to a common average frequency. In both cases of imperfectly synchronized states, synchronized oscillators exhibit periodic motion while the solitary oscillators are quasiperiodic in nature. In this region, for spatially prepared initial conditions, we can observe the mixed chimera states where the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized oscillations occur from both the populations. On the other hand, imperfectly synchronized states are not always stable, and they can drift aperiodically due to instability caused by an increase of nonisochronicity parameter. We observe that these states are robust to the introduction of frequency mismatch between the two populations.

  8. Imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, K; Chandrasekar, V K; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the emergence of different kinds of imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We find that the complete synchronization in population I and existence of solitary oscillators which escape from the synchronized group in population II lead to imperfectly synchronized states for sufficiently small values of nonisochronicity parameter. Interestingly, upon increasing the strength of this parameter further there occurs an onset of mixed imperfectly synchronized states where the solitary oscillators occur from both the populations. Synchronized oscillators from both the populations are locked to a common average frequency. In both cases of imperfectly synchronized states, synchronized oscillators exhibit periodic motion while the solitary oscillators are quasiperiodic in nature. In this region, for spatially prepared initial conditions, we can observe the mixed chimera states where the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized oscillations occur from both the populations. On the other hand, imperfectly synchronized states are not always stable, and they can drift aperiodically due to instability caused by an increase of nonisochronicity parameter. We observe that these states are robust to the introduction of frequency mismatch between the two populations. PMID:27575152

  9. Imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, K; Chandrasekar, V K; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the emergence of different kinds of imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We find that the complete synchronization in population I and existence of solitary oscillators which escape from the synchronized group in population II lead to imperfectly synchronized states for sufficiently small values of nonisochronicity parameter. Interestingly, upon increasing the strength of this parameter further there occurs an onset of mixed imperfectly synchronized states where the solitary oscillators occur from both the populations. Synchronized oscillators from both the populations are locked to a common average frequency. In both cases of imperfectly synchronized states, synchronized oscillators exhibit periodic motion while the solitary oscillators are quasiperiodic in nature. In this region, for spatially prepared initial conditions, we can observe the mixed chimera states where the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized oscillations occur from both the populations. On the other hand, imperfectly synchronized states are not always stable, and they can drift aperiodically due to instability caused by an increase of nonisochronicity parameter. We observe that these states are robust to the introduction of frequency mismatch between the two populations.

  10. 77 FR 47797 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... reasons for this authorization in the preamble to the immediate final rule. Unless we get written comments... comments that oppose this action, we will withdraw the immediate final rule and it will not take effect. We...: Send your written comments by September 10, 2012. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Alima...

  11. 77 FR 13248 - Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... this authorization in the preamble to the immediate final rule. Unless we get written comments which... that oppose this action, we will withdraw the immediate final rule and it will not take effect. We will... written comments by April 5, 2012. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Alima Patterson, Region 6,...

  12. 76 FR 37048 - Louisiana; Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... reasons for this authorization in the preamble to the immediate final rule. Unless we get written comments... comments that oppose this action, we will withdraw the immediate final rule and it will not take effect. We.... DATES: Send your written comments by July 25, 2011. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Alima...

  13. 78 FR 32223 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... reasons for this authorization in the preamble to the direct final rule. Unless we get written comments... comments that oppose this action, we will withdraw the direct final rule and it will not take effect. We...: Send your written comments by June 28, 2013. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Alima...

  14. 76 FR 6594 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... this authorization in the preamble of the immediate final rule. Unless we get written comments which... comments that oppose this action, we will withdraw the immediate final rule and it will not take effect. We...: Send your written comments by March 9, 2011. ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket...

  15. 77 FR 60963 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... this authorization in the preamble to the immediate final rule. Unless EPA receives written comments... comments that oppose this action, we will withdraw the immediate final rule and it will not take effect...) 562-9964 (prior to faxing, please notify the EPA contact listed below). Mail: Send written comments...

  16. 75 FR 65442 - New Mexico: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... written comments which oppose this authorization during the comment period, the immediate final rule will... effect. We will then respond to public comments in a later final rule based on this proposal. You may not... time. DATES: Send your written comments by November 24, 2010. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to...

  17. 77 FR 15966 - Ohio: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ...; Definition of Solid Waste; Toxicity Characteristic, Checklist 199, March 13, 2002 (67 FR 11251); ] NESHAPS...; Final Rule: Methods Innovation Rule and SW-846 Final Update IIIB, Checklist 208, June 14, 2005 (70 FR... (RCRA). The agency published a proposed rule on September 14, 2011 at ] 76 FR 56708 and provided...

  18. 75 FR 50932 - Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... by EPA through the recent immediate final action are identified in the immediate final rule, 75 FR... affects only the land in the town of Gay Head (Aquinnah), Massachusetts, taken into trust by the Department of the Interior for the Wampanoag Tribal Council of Gay Head, Inc., as authorized by the...

  19. 77 FR 12748 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; Final Free and Restricted Percentages for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Michigan, et al.; Final Free and Restricted Percentages for the 2011-12 Crop Year for Tart Cherries AGENCY... tart cherries grown in the states of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin (order). The order is administered locally by the Cherry Industry Administrative Board...

  20. 77 FR 24403 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan... pollutants from ``Hazardous/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators'' (HMIWI). The Illinois Environmental... compliance schedules for the control of emissions from HMIWI units. See 74 FR 51368. EPA codified...

  1. 75 FR 6709 - United States, et al. v. Ticketmaster Entertainment Inc. and Live Nation Inc.; Proposed Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States, et al. v. Ticketmaster Entertainment Inc. and Live Nation Inc.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact Statement Notice is hereby given pursuant to the Antitrust Procedures and Penalties Act, 15 U.S.C....

  2. 78 FR 71377 - United States et al. v. US Airways Group, Inc. and AMR Corporation; Proposed Final Judgment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Vol. 78 Wednesday, No. 229 November 27, 2013 Part III Department of Justice Antitrust Division United States et al. v. US Airways Group, Inc. and AMR Corporation; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact Statement; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 229...

  3. 75 FR 55784 - Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver for the State and Federal Policy Forum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Department published a notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 44231) on July 28, 2010, proposing an extension... March 3, 2005, the Department published a notice in the Federal Register (70 FR 10374), inviting... Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver for the State and Federal Policy Forum AGENCY: Office...

  4. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction analysis of SIMQUAKE II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.K.; Isenberg, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes an analytic method for modeling of soil-structure interaction (SSI) for nuclear power plants in earthquakes and discusses its application to SSI analyses of SIMQUAKE II. The method is general and can be used to simulate a three-dimensional structural geometry, nonlinear site characteristics and arbitrary input ground shaking. The analytic approach uses the soil island concept to reduce SSI models to manageable size and cost. Nonlinear constitutive behavior of the soil is represented by the nonlinear, kinematic cap model. In addition, a debonding-rebonding soil-structure interface model is utilized to represent nonlinear effects which singificantly alter structural response in the SIMQUAKE tests. STEALTH, an explicit finite difference code, is used to perform the dynamic, soil-structure interaction analyses. Several two-dimensional posttest SSI analyses of model containment structures in SIMQUAKE II are performed and results compared with measured data. These analyses qualify the analytic method. They also show the importance of including debonding-rebonding at the soil-structure interface. Sensitivity of structural response to compaction characteristics of backfill material is indicated.

  5. Interactive fundamental physics. [Final report], April 15, 1992--November 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.L.

    1992-11-24

    THE REAL STUFF is an Expanded Media Physics Course aimed at students still in the formative early years of secondary school. Its consists of a working script for an interactive multimedia study unit in basic concepts of physics. The unit begins with a prologue on the Big Bang that sets the stage, and concludes with a lesson on Newton`s first law of motion. The format is interactive, placing the individual student in control of a layered ``hypermedia`` structure that enables him or her to find a level of detail and difficulty that is comfortable and meaningful. The intent is to make physics relevant, intellectually accessible and fun. On-screen presenters and demonstrators will be females and males of various ages, ethnicities and backgrounds, and will include celebrities and physicists of note. A lean, layered design encourages repeated, cumulative study and makes the material useful for self-directed Teaming even by college students. THE REAL STUFF introduces a new science teaching paradigm, a way to teach science that will engage even students who have ``declined`` to be interested in science in the past. Increased participation in science by women, African-Americans and Spanish-speaking students is a particular goal.

  6. Molecular analyses of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions affecting plant growth and yield. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, K.J.

    1998-11-01

    Mitochondria have a central role in the production of cellular energy. The biogenesis and functioning of mitochondria depends on the expression of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. One approach to investigating the role of nuclear-mitochondrial cooperation in plant growth and development is to identify combinations of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that result in altered but sublethal phenotypes. Plants that have certain maize nuclear genotypes in combination with cytoplasmic genomes from more distantly-related teosintes can exhibit incompatible phenotypes, such as reduced plant growth and yield and cytoplasmic male sterility, as well as altered mitochondrial gene expression. The characterization of these nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions was the focus of this grant. The authors were investigating the effects of two maize nuclear genes, RcmI and Mct, on mitochondrial function and gene expression. Plants with the teosinte cytoplasms and homozygous for the recessive rcm allele are small (miniature) and-slow-growing and the kernels are reduced in size. The authors mapped this locus to molecular markers on chromosome 7 and attempted to clone this locus by transposon tagging. The effects of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial protein profiles were also studied.

  7. PROTEIN NUCLEIC ACID INTERACTIONS GRANT # DE-FG02-96ER62166 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Helen M.; Thornton, Janet

    2005-02-17

    The overall goal of this collaborative project is to develop methods for analyzing protein-nucleic acid interactions. Nucleic acid-binding proteins have a central role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, replication, and repair. Thus, it is extremely important to examine the nature of complexes that are formed between proteins and nucleic acids, as they form the basis of our understanding of how these processes take place. Over the past decade, the world has witnessed a great expansion in the determination of high-quality structures of nucleic acid-binding proteins. As a result, the number of such structures has seen a constant increase in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) (1) and the Nucleic Acid Database (NDB) (2). These structures, especially those of proteins in complex with DNA, have provided valuable insight into the stereochemical principles of binding, including how particular base sequences are recognized and how the nucleic acid structure is quite often modified on binding. In this project, we designed several approaches to characterize and classify the properties of both protein-DNA and protein-RNA complexes. In work done in the previous grant period, we developed methods to use experimental data to evaluate nucleic acid crystal structures in order to ensure that the structures utilized in future studies would be of high quality. The methodology was collated in the standalone software package SFCHECK (3) [A], and an applied survey of structures in the NDB produced very positive results. With this quality control mechanism in place, we then analyzed DNA-binding sites on proteins by studying the distortions observed in DNA structures bound to protein. From our observations, we found that DNA-binding proteins present a very different binding surface to those that bind other proteins and defined three modes of protein binding [B]. Following this survey, we classified DNA-binding proteins into eight different structural

  8. Measures for the Final Common Core of Constructs. The Project on State-Level Child Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Project on State-Level Child Outcomes, a federal project designed to improve the measurement of child outcomes in state welfare evaluations and in other state data systems. This document provides measures for the common core of constructs that state representatives developed at the second national-level meeting of the Project's planning phase.…

  9. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions And Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, Russell

    2014-06-30

    Matrix diffusion and adsorption within a rock matrix are widely regarded as important mechanisms for retarding the transport of radionuclides and other solutes in fractured rock (e.g., Neretnieks, 1980; Tang et al., 1981; Maloszewski and Zuber, 1985; Novakowski and Lapcevic, 1994; Jardine et al., 1999; Zhou and Xie, 2003; Reimus et al., 2003a,b). When remediation options are being evaluated for old sources of contamination, where a large fraction of contaminants reside within the rock matrix, slow diffusion out of the matrix greatly increases the difficulty and timeframe of remediation. Estimating the rates of solute exchange between fractures and the adjacent rock matrix is a critical factor in quantifying immobilization and/or remobilization of DOE-relevant contaminants within the subsurface. In principle, the most rigorous approach to modeling solute transport with fracture-matrix interaction would be based on local-scale coupled advection-diffusion/dispersion equations for the rock matrix and in discrete fractures that comprise the fracture network (Discrete Fracture Network and Matrix approach, hereinafter referred to as DFNM approach), fully resolving aperture variability in fractures and matrix property heterogeneity. However, such approaches are computationally demanding, and thus, many predictive models rely upon simplified models. These models typically idealize fracture rock masses as a single fracture or system of parallel fractures interacting with slabs of porous matrix or as a mobile-immobile or multi-rate mass transfer system. These idealizations provide tractable approaches for interpreting tracer tests and predicting contaminant mobility, but rely upon a fitted effective matrix diffusivity or mass-transfer coefficients. However, because these fitted parameters are based upon simplified conceptual models, their effectiveness at predicting long-term transport processes remains uncertain. Evidence of scale dependence of effective matrix diffusion

  10. The interaction potential of NO-H2 in ground and A Rydberg state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajón-Suárez, Pedro; Valentín-Rodríguez, Mónica; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón

    2016-08-01

    The interaction potential for the ground and A Rydberg state of NO-H2 has been calculated using high level ab initio methods. The complex is very floppy in nature and large amplitude motions are expected to characterize its dynamics. The ground state is characterized by two very close-lying states which exhibit crossings. By analogy with other complexes the Rydberg state is characterized by much smaller well depth and larger intermolecular distance. We compare with model potentials used in previous molecular dynamics simulations of photoexcitation and relaxation and conclude on the importance of performing new studies.

  11. 76 FR 21006 - United States and State of New York v. Stericycle, Inc., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... Civil Enforcement. /s/ Lowell R. Stern (DC Bar 440387), Stephen A. Harris, Blake W. Rushforth, Milosz K....Stern@usdoj.gov For Plaintiff State of New York, Eric T. Schneiderman, Attorney General. By: /s/ Richard... proposed remedies''); United States v. Archer- Daniels-Midland Co., 272 F. Supp. 2d 1, 6 (D.DC...

  12. 3D interactive tractography-informed resting-state fMRI connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chamberland, Maxime; Bernier, Michaël; Fortin, David; Whittingstall, Kevin; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the fusion between diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has opened the way for exploring structure-function relationships in vivo. As it stands, the common approach usually consists of analysing fMRI and dMRI datasets separately or using one to inform the other, such as using fMRI activation sites to reconstruct dMRI streamlines that interconnect them. Moreover, given the large inter-individual variability of the healthy human brain, it is possible that valuable information is lost when a fixed set of dMRI/fMRI analysis parameters such as threshold values are assumed constant across subjects. By allowing one to modify such parameters while viewing the results in real-time, one can begin to fully explore the sensitivity of structure-function relations and how they differ across brain areas and individuals. This is especially important when interpreting how structure-function relationships are altered in patients with neurological disorders, such as the presence of a tumor. In this study, we present and validate a novel approach to achieve this: First, we present an interactive method to generate and visualize tractography-driven resting-state functional connectivity, which reduces the bias introduced by seed size, shape and position. Next, we demonstrate that structural and functional reconstruction parameters explain a significant portion of intra- and inter-subject variability. Finally, we demonstrate how our proposed approach can be used in a neurosurgical planning context. We believe this approach will promote the exploration of structure-function relationships in a subject-specific aspect and will open new opportunities for connectomics. PMID:26321901

  13. Microwave interaction with plasmas. Final report, 1 May 1989-30 April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeff, I.

    1992-04-30

    During the past year, we have made progress on frequency shifting by means of plasmas. Theoretically we have demonstrated that a rising plasma density tends to slow down and trap microwaves passing through the plasma-filled region. This increases the interaction time, so that a very rapid rise in plasma density is not required to produce very high frequency shifts. A preliminary version has been submitted to the Transactions of Plasma Science, and more updated version is in progress. An attempt to provide frequency upshifts by use of multiple transverse arcs was attempted without the use of equalizing resistors. The plasma discharge was observed, and the frequency upshift was seen, as was expected but it was not as extensive as in previous systems. A more balance system is being developed.

  14. Asphalt-aggregate interactions in hot recycling. Final report, April 1985-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggundu, B.M.; Newman, J.K.

    1987-07-01

    This report summarizes results of an investigation of asphalt-aggregate interactions in hot recycled systems. Materials used in the research included a severe stripping aggregate and a nonstripping aggregate. Both were evaluated using the Lottman 70% retained tensile-strength criteria. Additional materials included a 40/60 RAP new aggregate system, one virgin asphalt, two RAP recovered binders, one modifier or recycling agent, and two blends. The modifier was selected using a recently developed specification involving physical, composition, and solubility properties. Aggregates were evaluated for surface area, bulk composition, water-soluble ions, cation exchange capacity, gradation, and specific gravities. Binders were tested for physical properties and composition properties using a modified Clay-Gel procedure, and compatibility properties using a modified Heithaus procedure.

  15. Final Report: Model interacting particle systems for simulation and macroscopic description of particulate suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Mucha

    2007-08-30

    Suspensions of solid particles in liquids appear in numerous applications, from environmental settings like river silt, to industrial systems of solids transport and water treatment, and biological flows such as blood flow. Despite their importance, much remains unexplained about these complicated systems. Mucha's research aims to improve understanding of basic properties of suspensions through a program of simulating model interacting particle systems with critical evaluation of proposed continuum equations, in close collaboration with experimentalists. Natural to this approach, the original proposal centered around collaboration with studies already conducted in various experimental groups. However, as was detailed in the 2004 progress report, following the first year of this award, a number of the questions from the original proposal were necessarily redirected towards other specific goals because of changes in the research programs of the proposed experimental collaborators. Nevertheless, the modified project goals and the results that followed from those goals maintain close alignment with the main themes of the original proposal, improving efficient simulation and macroscopic modeling of sedimenting and colloidal suspensions. In particular, the main investigations covered under this award have included: (1) Sedimentation instabilities, including the sedimentation analogue of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (for heavy, particle-laden fluid over lighter, clear fluid). (2) Ageing dynamics of colloidal suspensions at concentrations above the glass transition, using simplified interactions. (3) Stochastic reconstruction of velocity-field dependence for particle image velocimetry (PIV). (4) Stochastic modeling of the near-wall bias in 'nano-PIV'. (5) Distributed Lagrange multiplier simulation of the 'internal splash' of a particle falling through a stable stratified interface. (6) Fundamental study of velocity fluctuations in sedimentation. (7) Parallelization of

  16. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  17. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J; Mattus, Catherine H; Dole, Leslie Robert

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-protein interactions. Final report, September 1, 1977-February 28, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimori, E.

    1982-02-01

    In the dark interactions of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and oxygen with the SH-protein bovine serum albumin (BSA), the formation of various BaP products (hydroxy-BaP, BaP-radical, uv-fluorescent products) was found. The involvement of SH-groups was suggested by their formation in interactions with cysteine. The dark covalent binding was demonstrated by removing non-covalently bound hydrocarbons by SDS-gel filtration. The chromatographic separation of uv(365 nm)-irradiated BaP-BSA complexes revealed covalent binding of photooxidized pyrene-type products, similar to the metabolic oxidation product of BaP. Benzo(e)pyrene did not show any dark products or binding, but photo-activated binding of pyrene-type products. Benz(a)anthracene and 7, 12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene were photo-converted apparently to phenanthrene-type products, whereas 3-methyl-cholanthrene produced two photoproducts: presumably a naphthalene-type product and an intact molecule bound to BSA via the external carbons. In contrast to BSA, the non-SH protein collagen did not covalently bind BaP. Non-covalently bound BaP and subsequent uv (365 nm)-irradiation did not alter the helical structure of collagen, but affected the non-helical terminal telopeptides. This was shown by the inhibition of fibril formation and the anomalous BaP fluorescence changes occurring during thermal denaturation. The latter was observed by exciting tyrosine residues present only in the telopeptides, but not by direct BaP excitation.

  19. Steady state behavior in a model for droplet growth, sliding and coalescence: the final stage of dropwise condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meakin, Paul

    1992-05-01

    The final (steady state) stage of dropwise condensation has been explored using a simple model for droplet deposition and coalescence with the rapid sliding of droplets that exceed a critical size S∗. In this steady state regime the mean droplet size and the total mass density both decrease algebraically with increasing distance from the upper edge of the inclined substrate (apart from pronounced oscillations at very shot distances). The droplet number density on the other hand, varies at most logarithmically with this distance. The steady state droplet size distribution can be represented quite well by a stretched exponential form.

  20. VIBRA: An interactive computer program for steady-state vibration response analysis of linear damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive steady state frequency response computer program with graphics is documented. Single or multiple forces may be applied to the structure using a modal superposition approach to calculate response. The method can be reapplied to linear, proportionally damped structures in which the damping may be viscous or structural. The theoretical approach and program organization are described. Example problems, user instructions, and a sample interactive session are given to demonstate the program's capability in solving a variety of problems.

  1. Final-state symmetry of Na 1s core-shell excitons in NaCl and NaF

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, K.P.; Seidler, G.T.; Shirley, E.L.; Fister, T.T.; Bradley, J.A.; Brown, F.C.

    2009-08-13

    We report measurements of the Na 1s contribution to the nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from NaCl and NaF. Prior x-ray absorption studies have observed two pre-edge excitons in both materials. The momentum-transfer dependence (q dependence) of the measured NRIXS cross section and of real-space full multiple scattering and Bethe-Salpeter calculations determine that the higher-energy core excitons are s type for each material. The lower-energy core excitons contribute at most weakly to the NRIXS signal and we propose that these may be surface core excitons, as have been observed in several other alkali halides. The analysis of the orbital angular momentum of these features leads to a discussion of the limited sensitivity of NRIXS measurements to d-type final states when investigating 1s initial states. In this case the s- and p-type final density of states can be characterized by measurements at a small number of momentum transfers. This is in contrast to the case of more complex initial states for which measurements at a large number of momentum transfers are needed to separate the rich admixture of accessible and contributing final-state symmetries.

  2. Final-state symmetry of Na 1s core-shell excitons in NaCl and NaF.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, K. P.; Seidler, G. T.; Shirley, E. L.; Fister, T. T.; Bradley, J. A.; Brown, F. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Washington; NIST

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the Na 1s contribution to the nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) from NaCl and NaF. Prior x-ray absorption studies have observed two pre-edge excitons in both materials. The momentum-transfer dependence (q dependence) of the measured NRIXS cross section and of real-space full multiple scattering and Bethe-Salpeter calculations determine that the higher-energy core excitons are s type for each material. The lower-energy core excitons contribute at most weakly to the NRIXS signal and we propose that these may be surface core excitons, as have been observed in several other alkali halides. The analysis of the orbital angular momentum of these features leads to a discussion of the limited sensitivity of NRIXS measurements to d-type final states when investigating 1s initial states. In this case the s- and p-type final density of states can be characterized by measurements at a small number of momentum transfers. This is in contrast to the case of more complex initial states for which measurements at a large number of momentum transfers are needed to separate the rich admixture of accessible and contributing final-state symmetries.

  3. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction. PMID:26904821

  4. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction.

  5. Anisotropic surface-state-mediated RKKY interaction between adatoms on a hexagonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent numerical studies of Ag on Pt(111), we derive an expression for the RKKY interaction mediated by surface states, considering the effect of anisotropy in the Fermi edge. Our analysis is based on a stationary phase approximation. The main contribution to the interaction comes from electrons whose Fermi velocity vF is parallel to the vector R connecting the interacting adatoms; we show that, in general, the corresponding Fermi wave vector kF is not parallel to R. The interaction is oscillatory; the amplitude and wavelength of oscillations have angular dependence arising from the anisotropy of the surface-state band structure. The wavelength, in particular, is determined by the projection of this kF (corresponding to vF) onto the direction of R. Our analysis is easily generalized to other systems. For Ag on Pt(111), our results indicate that the RKKY interaction between pairs of adatoms should be nearly isotropic and so cannot account for the anisotropy found in the studies motivating our work. However, for metals with surface-state dispersions similar to Be(101¯0), we show that the RKKY interaction should have considerable anisotropy.

  6. Exact ground states and topological order in interacting Kitaev/Majorana chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Hosho; Schuricht, Dirk; Takahashi, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    We study a system of interacting spinless fermions in one dimension that, in the absence of interactions, reduces to the Kitaev chain [Kitaev, Phys. Usp. 44, 131 (2001), 10.1070/1063-7869/44/10S/S29]. In the noninteracting case, a signal of topological order appears as zero-energy modes localized near the edges. We show that the exact ground states can be obtained analytically even in the presence of nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions when the on-site (chemical) potential is tuned to a particular function of the other parameters. As with the noninteracting case, the obtained ground states are twofold degenerate and differ in fermionic parity. We prove the uniqueness of the obtained ground states and show that they can be continuously deformed to the ground states of the noninteracting Kitaev chain without gap closing. We also demonstrate explicitly that there exists a set of operators each of which maps one of the ground states to the other with opposite fermionic parity. These operators can be thought of as an interacting generalization of Majorana edge zero modes.

  7. 75 FR 36609 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... and Recovery Act, as amended (RCRA), for which the State had not previously sought authorization. The... under RCRA. DATES: Send written comments by July 28, 2010. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to...

  8. 77 FR 41348 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended (RCRA), for which the State had not previously sought authorization... under RCRA. DATES: Send written comments by August 13, 2012. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to...

  9. Time evolution of initial states that extend beyond the potential interaction region in quantum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Calderón, Gastón; Villavicencio, Jorge; Hernández-Maldonado, Alberto; Romo, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the decay of initial states that possess a tail that extends beyond the interaction potential region, for potentials of arbitrary shape that vanish exactly after a distance. This is the case for a relevant class of artificial quantum structures. We obtain that along the internal interaction region, the time evolution of the decaying wave function is formed by two terms. The first one refers to the proper decay of the internal portion of the initial state, whereas the second one, that arises from the external tail, yields a transient contribution that tunnels into the internal region, builds up to a value, and then decays. We obtain that depending on the parameters of the initial state, the nonexponential tail decaying contribution may be larger than the contribution of the proper nonexponential term. These results are illustrated by an exactly solvable model and the Heidelberg potential for decay of ultracold atoms and open the possibility to control initial states in artificial decaying systems.

  10. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) interaction with electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaininger, H.W.

    1984-08-01

    A high altitude nuclear burst, detonated at a height of 50 km or more, causes two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) - high altitude EMP (HEMP) and magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD-EMP). This high altitude EMP scenario is of principal concern when assessing the effects of EMP on electric power systems, because the total United States can be simultaneously illuminated by HEMP and MHD-EMP can cover a large area of up to several hundred kilometers in diameter. The purpose of this project was first to define typical electrical power system characteristics for EMP analysis, and second, to determine reasonable worst case EMP induced surges on overhead electric power system transmission and distribution lines for reasonable assumptions, using unclassified HEMP and MHD-EMP electric field waveforms.

  11. Interaction of highly vibrationally excited molecules with clean metal surfaces. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, A.M.; Auerbach, D.J.

    1998-11-01

    The authors present results from a grant funded under the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences. A collaboration between Prof. Alec Wodtke of the Department of Chemistry at UCSB and Daniel J. Auerbach of IBM Almaden Research Labs has allowed new experiments on the dynamics of surface chemical reactivity to be successfully executed. High quality data has been generated which provides an excellent test of theoretical models of surface reactivity, a topic of importance to catalysis. The authors have obtained the first experimental measurements on the influence of reactant velocity on the steric effect in a chemical reaction: the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on copper. They have also designed and built a molecular beam scattering apparatus for the study of highly vibrationally excited molecules and their interactions with clean and oxidized metal surfaces. With this apparatus they have observed the vibrational energy exchange of highly vibrationally excited NO with an oxidized copper surface. Multi-quantum vibrational relaxation was found ({Delta}v = 1-5). Such remarkably strong and efficient vibrational energy transfer represents a qualitatively new phenomenon and is representative of the exciting new behavior that they had hoped might be observable in this project. Evidence of chemical reactivity of vibrationally excited NO on a clean copper surface was also found.

  12. Two studies of colloidal interactions: electric polarizability and protein crystallization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fraden, Seth; Hu, Yue

    2001-08-06

    (I)Electric polarizability. During this grant period, the focus was on five topics concerning electric field effects on colloids. The first topic focuses on electric interactions between charged colloids in the absence of external fields, and the remaining four deal with colloids in the presence of external fields. The topics are (1) calculation of the effect of confinement on the pair-potential between like-charged colloids, (2) experimental determination of the interparticle potential under the conditions of dielectric polarization, (3) measurement of the evolution of structure of ER fluids, (4) synthesis of novel colloids designed for ER studies, and (5) computer modeling of polarization of surface charge. (II) Protein crystallization. Studies of the phase behavior of mixtures of proteins and polymers were initiated. The motivation was to test recent theories that suggested that optimal conditions for protein crystallization could be obtained using such mixtures. Combined light scattering measurements of the virial coefficients and determination of the phase diagram of protein/polymer mixtures revealed that the theoretical picture needs to be substantially modified.

  13. Heterofunctionality interaction with donor solvent coal liquefaction. Final progress report, August 1982-April 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    This project was undertaken to understand the role of the coal liquefaction solvent through a study of the interaction between the hydrogen donor solvent characteristics and the heterofunctionality of the solvent. Specifically, hydroxyl- and nitrogen-containing solvents were studied and characterized. A series of coal liquefaction experiments were carried out at 450/sup 0/C in a continuous feed stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) to observe the effect of adding phenolics to anthracene oil (AO) and SRC-II recycle solvents. The addition of phenol to AO at a ratio of 5/65 resulted in a nominal increase in coal conversion to THF solubles, but the amount of asphaltenes more than doubled resulting in a sizable net loss of solvent. The addition of m-cresol to both AO and SRC-II solvents had a positive effect on coal conversion to both THF and pentane solubles (oils). The partial removal of an OH-concentrate from SRC-II solvent was carried out using Amberlyst IRA-904 ion exchange resin. The resin-treated oil was only marginally better than raw SRC-II recycle solvent for coal liquefaction. Hydroaromatics having nitrogen functionality should be good solvents for coal liquefaction considering their effective solvent power, ability to penetrate and swell coal, and their ability to readily transfer hydrogen, particularly in the presence of oxygen functionality. However, these benefits are overshadowed by the strong tendency of the nitrogen-containing species to adduct with themselves and coal-derived materials.

  14. Interactive Photochemistry in Earth System Models to Assess Uncertainty in Ozone and Greenhouse Gases. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, Michael J.; Hsu, Juno; Nicolau, Alex; Veidenbaum, Alex; Smith, Philip Cameron; Bergmann, Dan

    2014-11-07

    Atmospheric chemistry controls the abundances and hence climate forcing of important greenhouse gases including N2O, CH4, HFCs, CFCs, and O3. Attributing climate change to human activities requires, at a minimum, accurate models of the chemistry and circulation of the atmosphere that relate emissions to abundances. This DOE-funded research provided realistic, yet computationally optimized and affordable, photochemical modules to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that augment the CESM capability to explore the uncertainty in future stratospheric-tropospheric ozone, stratospheric circulation, and thus the lifetimes of chemically controlled greenhouse gases from climate simulations. To this end, we have successfully implemented Fast-J (radiation algorithm determining key chemical photolysis rates) and Linoz v3.0 (linearized photochemistry for interactive O3, N2O, NOy and CH4) packages in LLNL-CESM and for the first time demonstrated how change in O2 photolysis rate within its uncertainty range can significantly impact on the stratospheric climate and ozone abundances. From the UCI side, this proposal also helped LLNL develop a CAM-Superfast Chemistry model that was implemented for the IPCC AR5 and contributed chemical-climate simulations to CMIP5.

  15. Clouds and ocean-atmosphere interactions. Final report, September 15, 1992--September 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.A.; Jensen, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    Predictions of global change based on climate models are influencing both national and international policies on energy and the environment. Existing climate models show some skill in simulating the present climate, but suffer from many widely acknowledged deficiencies. Among the most serious problems is the need to apply ``flux corrections`` to prevent the models from drifting away from the observed climate in control runs that do not include external perturbing influences such as increased carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations. The flux corrections required to prevent climate drift are typically comparable in magnitude to the observed fluxes themselves. Although there can be many contributing reasons for the climate drift problem, clouds and their effects on the surface energy budget are among the prime suspects. The authors have conducted a research program designed to investigate global air-sea interaction as it relates to the global warming problem, with special emphasis on the role of clouds. Their research includes model development efforts; application of models to simulation of present and future climates, with comparison to observations wherever possible; and vigorous participation in ongoing efforts to intercompare the present generation of atmospheric general circulation models.

  16. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    B. C. Culp

    2007-05-01

    Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

  17. 76 FR 78253 - New York State Prohibition of Discharges of Vessel Sewage; Final Affirmative Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... and treatment of sewage from all vessels are reasonably available for those waters, so that the State... such waters. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) has proposed to establish a Vessel Waste No Discharge Zone (NDZ) for the New York State portion of Lake Ontario...

  18. Final Report to the Governor and the Legislature by the State Advisory Commission on Indian Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Advisory Commission on Indian Affairs, Sacramento.

    The stated purpose of the State Advisory Commission on Indian Affairs was to study the problems of California's American Indians, including "the problems presented by the termination of federal control over Indian affairs, the operation, effect, administration, enforcement, and needed revision of any and all state laws" pertaining to the Indians…

  19. State Planning for the Delivery of Vocational Education to Special Populations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spetz, Sally H.; And Others

    A project developed a system to assist states in planning vocational education services to meet the needs of special populations. It had three goals: (1) design and develop a comprehensive planning system for states to select strategies for planning the delivery of vocational education services, (2) train state personnel for system implementation,…

  20. Evaluation of SHEEO's State Policy Resource Connections (SPRC) Initiative. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryherd, Ann Daley

    2011-01-01

    With the assistance of the Lumina Foundation, the State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) staff has been working to develop a broad, up-to-date database of policy relevant information for the states and to create analytical studies to help state leaders identify priorities and practices for improving policies and performance across the…

  1. State as an Infant-Environment Interaction: An Analysis of Mother-Infant Behavior as a Function of Sex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael

    The literature on the psychological construct of state is reviewed, and it is proposed that state be defined in terms of an infant-environment interaction. Interactive behavior of 32 mother-infant dyads was observed in the home for a total of 2 hours for each pair, in order to explore various types of interactive processes and analyses. A…

  2. Nuclear interactions of high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1998-06-25

    Projectile fragmentation experiments have been conducted at the LBL Bevalac accelerator, utilizing both the B40 and the HISS facilities, to produce a dataset of 36 beam/energy combinations covering projectiles from {sup 4}He to {sup 58}Ni and various energies from 170--2100 MeV/nucleon. While some runs were subject to beam instabilities, magnet problems or low statistics, there remains a large dataset which is still being analyzed. The results will be used to investigate the physics of the intermediate energy fragmentation process and will find application in the astrophysics of cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy. An overview of the science goals and rationale is followed by presentation of the experimental techniques and apparatus that has been employed. Data analysis, including both detector subsystem and accelerator calibration, is discussed with emphasis on the unique features of the dataset and the analysis problems being addressed. Results from the experiments are presented throughout to illustrate the status of the analysis, e.g., momentum distribution widths. Total, Elemental and Isotopic cross sections from various beam/energy combinations are presented, including the first data on {sup 32}S fragmentation and the complete isotopic fragmentation cross sections for {sup 28}Si interacting in both Carbon and Hydrogen targets. The new results are compared to any existing data and to formulae used to predict unmeasured cross sections. The size and complexity of the dataset and the required detail of the analysis precluded finishing the full analysis under the subject grant. Plans for additional analysis are presented, and these will be carried out in coming years as time and resources permit.

  3. Informal Face-to-Face Interaction Improves Mood State Reflected in Prefrontal Cortex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress with wearable sensors has enabled researchers to capture face-to-face interactions quantitatively and given great insight into human dynamics. One attractive field for applying such sensors is the workplace, where the relationship between the face-to-face behaviors of employees and the productivity of the organization has been investigated. One interesting result of previous studies showed that informal face-to-face interaction among employees, captured by wearable sensors that the employees wore, significantly affects their performance. However, the mechanism behind this relationship has not yet been adequately explained, though experiences at the job scene might qualitatively support the finding. We hypothesized that informal face-to-face interaction improves mood state, which in turn affects the task performance. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the change of mood state before and after break time for two groups of participants, one that spent their breaks alone and one that spent them with other participants, by administering questionnaires and taking brain activity measurements. Recent neuroimaging studies have suggested a significant relationship between mood state and brain activity. Here, we show that face-to-face interaction during breaks significantly improved mood state, which was measured by Profiles of Mood States (POMS). We also observed that the verbal working memory (WM) task performance of participants who did not have face-to-face interaction during breaks decreased significantly. In this paper, we discuss how the change of mood state was evidenced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity accompanied by WM tasks measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). PMID:27199715

  4. Exploring the gene: Interactive exhibits on genetics and the human genome. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    Under funding by the United States Department of Energy, the Exploratorium has substantially completed the prototype development of four exhibits on the nature of DNA and genetics, and substantially completed the production of ed exhibits based on these prototypes. Individually these genetic exhibits have been designed to elucidate specific themes, such as, the molecular properties of DNA, the encoding of genetic information, the expression of genetic information, and technological manipulation. The exhibits are titled Dancing DNA, Marching Bands, Protein Production Line, and Genetic Playbook. Specific exhibit projects are detailed below. In all the exhibits we have sought to draw a relationship between the nature of DNA and its expression in organisms. For most visitors, DNA exists as an invisible abstract molecule with marginal connections to their lives, while organisms exist as a familiar tangible entities. Inclusion of this broad thematic connection provides the crucial bridge between the abstract principles and the real world, and serves to underpin scientific, medical, and public interest in the topic.

  5. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pion and electrons. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Minehart, R.C.

    1998-05-01

    The work in this report is grouped into four categories. (1) The experiments in pion nucleus physics were primarily studies of pion absorption and scattering in light nuclei, carried out at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). (2) The experiments on fundamental particle properties were carried out at LAMPF and at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland, the pion-beta decay experiment is still under construction and will begin taking data in 1999. (3) The experiments in electro-nuclear physics were performed at the Stanford Linear Electron Accelerator (SLAC), at the Saclay Laboratory in France, at the LEGS facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Jefferson Laboratory. These experiments relate mainly to the question of the role of longitudinal and transverse strength for inelastic scattering from nuclei, measurements of fundamental nuclear properties with tagged polarized photons, and to the quark structure of the nucleon and its excited states. (4) Experiments on absorption of antiprotons in heavy nuclei, were carried out by K. Ziock primarily while on a sabbatical leave in Munich, Germany.

  6. Final rotational state distributions from NO(vi = 11) in collisions with Au(111): the magnitude of vibrational energy transfer depends on orientation in molecule-surface collisions.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Bastian C; Bartels, Nils; Wodtke, Alec M; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-06-01

    When NO molecules collide at a Au(111) surface, their interaction is controlled by several factors; especially important are the molecules' orientation with respect to the surface (N-first vs. O-first) and their distance of closest approach. In fact, the former may control the latter as N-first orientations are attractive and O-first orientations are repulsive. In this work, we employ electric fields to control the molecules' incidence orientation in combination with rotational rainbow scattering detection. Specifically, we report final rotational state distributions of oriented NO(vi = 11) molecules scattered from Au(111) for final vibrational states between vf = 4 and 11. For O-first collisions, the interaction potential is highly repulsive preventing the close approach and scattering results in high-J rainbows. By contrast, these rainbows are not seen for the more intimate collisions possible for attractive N-first orientations. In this way, we reveal the influence of orientation and the distance of closest approach on vibrational relaxation of NO(vi = 11) in collisions with a Au(111) surface. We also elucidate the influence of steering forces which cause the O-first oriented molecules to rotate to an N-first orientation during their approach to the surface. The experiments show that when NO collides at the surface with the N-atom first, on average more than half of the initial vibrational energy is lost; whereas O-first oriented collisions lose much less vibrational energy. These observations qualitatively confirm theoretical predictions of electronically non-adiabatic NO interactions at Au(111). PMID:27193070

  7. Relativistic configuration interaction calculation on the ground and excited states of iridium monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Bingbing; Yu, Yan-Mei; Han, Huixian

    2015-03-07

    We present the fully relativistic multi-reference configuration interaction calculations of the ground and low-lying excited electronic states of IrO for individual spin-orbit component. The lowest-lying state is calculated for Ω = 1/2, 3/2, 5/2, and 7/2 in order to clarify the ground state of IrO. Our calculation suggests that the ground state is of Ω = 1/2, which is highly mixed with {sup 4}Σ{sup −} and {sup 2}Π states in Λ − S notation. The two low-lying states 5/2 and 7/2 are nearly degenerate with the ground state and locate only 234 and 260 cm{sup −1} above, respectively. The equilibrium bond length 1.712 Å and the harmonic vibrational frequency 903 cm{sup −1} of the 5/2 state are close to the experimental measurement of 1.724 Å and 909 cm{sup −1}, which suggests that the 5/2 state should be the low-lying state that contributes to the experimental spectra. Moreover, the electronic states that give rise to the observed transition bands are assigned for Ω = 5/2 and 7/2 in terms of the obtained excited energies and oscillator strengths.

  8. Summary of current state nonpoint source control practices for forestry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, J.; Parcher, M.A.; Wright, J.; Townsend, G.; Cannell, J.

    1993-08-01

    Forestry practices have been implicated by many states as a contributor to nonpoint source (NPS) pollution of streams, rivers, lakes, and other waterbodies. Many states, recognizing the forestry contribution to water pollution, have developed programs to address forestry NPS. The recent development of the Management Measures Guidance, as required by section 6217 of the Coastal Zone Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA), provided the motivation to develop a summary of the current state forestry NPS programs. The document provides a synopsis of the BMPs currently used by states to address the nonpoint source (NPS) impacts on water quality caused by forestry activities. Summaries of over 41 existing state BMP manuals or regulations that include BMPs are presented. The information presented in the document is intended to provide an increased understanding of the types of forestry activities commonly addressed in existing state NPS programs and to serve as a reference for the type and nature of BMPs included in current state BMP manuals.

  9. Search for Quark-Lepton Compositeness in the Dimuon Final State at DØ

    SciTech Connect

    Xuan, Nguyen Phuoc

    2005-04-01

    We used the upgraded DØ detector at the Tevatron at √s = 1.96 TeV to collect data in a search for a compositeness signature of quarks and leptons. This analysis uses an integrated luminosity of 400 pb-1. The high-mass dimuon mass spectrum is compared with that predicted by Drell-Yan (DY) scattering, modified by a contact interaction. This interaction is parameterized by a compositeness energy scale factor Λ. Preliminary limits on Λ are set at the 95% confidence level for constructive and destructive interference between the DY amplitude and the contact interaction for various quark and lepton chiralities.

  10. The Interaction of Evaluation and Policy: Case Reports from State Education Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nick L., Ed.; Caulley, Darrel N., Ed.

    The nature of educational evaluation and its interaction with policy in six state departments of education is examined. Case reports of research and evaluation units are presented for Virginia (by Gerald W. Bracey), Michigan (by David L. Donovan and Stanley A. Rumbaugh), Washington (by Alfred F. Rasp, Jr.), South Carolina (by Paul D. Sandifer),…

  11. The Relationship between Affective States and Dialog Patterns during Interactions with AutoTutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.; D'Mello, Sidney K.; Craig, Scotty D.; Witherspoon, Amy; Sullins, Jeremiah; McDaniel, Bethany; Gholson, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Relations between emotions (affect states) and learning have recently been explored in the context of AutoTutor. AutoTutor is a tutoring system on the Internet that helps learners construct answers to difficult questions by interacting with them in natural language. AutoTutor has an animated conversation agent and a dialog management facility that…

  12. The Effects of Predominant Neonatal State Upon the Neonate-Mother Feeding Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arco, Christina M.; Self, Patricia A.

    This paper explores the effects of infant predominant state of arousal upon very early mother-infant interaction, through observation of a group of 20 healthy 3-day-old nursery roommates and their mothers during hospital feeding sessions. In an experimental procedure involving a modified time-sampling technique, two observers simultaneously…

  13. Systematics of ground state multiplets of atomic nuclei in the delta-interaction approach

    SciTech Connect

    Imasheva, L. T.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Stepanov, M. E.; Tretyakova, T. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    Pairing forces between nucleons in an atomic nucleus strongly influence its structure. One of the manifestations of pair interaction is the ground state multiplet (GSM) formation in the spectrum of low-lying excited states of even–even nuclei. The value of GSM splitting is determined by the value of pair interaction of nucleons; for each isotope, it can be estimated on the basis of experimental nuclear masses. The quality of this estimate is characterized by the degree of reproduction of GSM levels in the nucleus. The GSM systematics in even–even nuclei with a pair of identical nucleons in addition to the filled nuclear core is considered on the basis of delta interaction.

  14. RKKY interaction in P-N junction based on surface states of 3D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuhui; Yang, Wen; Chang, Kai

    The RKKY interaction mediated by conduction electrons supplies a mechanism to realize the long-range coupling of localized spins which is desired for the spin devices. Here, we examine the controllability of RKKY interaction in P-N junction (PNJ) based on surface states of 3D topological insulator (3DTI). In this study, through quantum way but not usual classical analogy to light propagation, the intuitive picture for electron waves across the interface of PNJ is obtained, e.g., Klein tunneling, negative refraction and focusing. Moreover, we perform the numerical calculations for all kinds of RKKY interaction including the Heisenberg, Ising, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya terms. We find the focusing of surface states leads to the local augmentation of RKKY interaction. Most importantly, a dimension transition occurs, i.e., the decay rate of RKKY interaction from the deserved 1/R 2 to 1/ R . In addition, the quadratic gate-dependence of RKKY interaction is also beneficial to the application of 3DTI PNJ in the fields of spintronics and quantum computation. This work was supported by the MOST (Grant No. 2015CB921503, and No. 2014CB848700) and NSFC (Grant No. 11434010, No. 11274036, No. 11322542, and No. 11504018).

  15. Final Technical Report for "Feature Extraction, Characterization, and Visualization for Protein Interaction via Geometric and Topological Methods"

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yusu

    2013-03-25

    Shape analysis plays an important role in many applications. In particular, in molecular biology, analyzing molecular shapes is essential to the fundamental problem of understanding how molecules interact. This project aims at developing efficient and effective algorithms to characterize and analyze molecular structures using geometric and topological methods. Two main components of this project are (1) developing novel molecular shape descriptors; and (2) identifying and representing meaningful features based on those descriptors. The project also produces accompanying (visualization) software. Results from this project (09/2006-10/2009) include the following publications. We have also set up web-servers for the software developed in this period, so that our new methods are accessible to a broader scientific community. The web sites are given below as well. In this final technical report, we first list publications and software resulted from this project. We then briefly explain the research conducted and main accomplishments during the period of this project.

  16. Efficiency Improvement of Nitride-Based Solid State Light Emitting Materials -- CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kisielowski, Christian; Weber, Eicke

    2010-05-13

    The development of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} N/GaN thin film growth by Molecular Beam Epitaxy has opened a new route towards energy efficient solid-state lighting. Blue and green LED's became available that can be used to match the whole color spectrum of visible light with the potential to match the eye response curve. Moreover, the efficiency of such devices largely exceeds that of incandescent light sources (tungsten filaments) and even competes favorably with lighting by fluorescent lamps. It is, however, also seen in Figure 1 that it is essential to improve on the luminous performance of green LED's in order to mimic the eye response curve. This lack of sufficiently efficient green LED's relates to particularities of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N materials system. This ternary alloy system is polar and large strain is generated during a lattice mismatched thin film growth because of the significantly different lattice parameters between GaN and InN and common substrates such as sapphire. Moreover, it is challenging to incorporate indium into GaN at typical growth temperatures because a miscibility gap exists that can be modified by strain effects. As a result a large parameter space needs exploration to optimize the growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and to date it is unclear what the detailed physical processes are that affect device efficiencies. In particular, an inhomogeneous distribution indium in GaN modifies the device performance in an unpredictable manner. As a result technology is pushed forward on a trial and error basis in particular in Asian countries such as Japan and Korea, which dominate the market and it is desirable to strengthen the competitiveness of the US industry. This CRADA was initiated to help Lumileds Lighting/USA boosting the performance of their green LED's. The tasks address the distribution of the indium atoms in the active area of their blue and green LED's and its relation to internal and external quantum efficiencies. Procedures to

  17. Maine State Planning Office, 1990--1991 heating season home heating fuels price survey. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The 1990--1991 heating season was the first time in Maine that the Home Heating Fuels Survey was conducted for the United States Department of Energy by the Maine State Planning Office. This season also marked the first time that dealers were surveyed for a price for propane. Under a late agreement, the State of Maine was picked up by the regional survey of the Energy Information Agency in the beginning of October. This accounted for the weekly survey of the traditional participants in the State`s Home Heating Fuels Price Survey being supplemented by biweekly DOE surveys of separate survey samples of oil and propane dealers. The SPO sample identifies 36 dealers in the State of Maine, while the DOE sample was constructed around 22 oil dealers in Maine and New Hampshire and 29 propane dealers in Maine.

  18. Load Modeling and State Estimation Methods for Power Distribution Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tom McDermott

    2010-05-07

    The project objective was to provide robust state estimation for distribution systems, comparable to what has been available on transmission systems for decades. This project used an algorithm called Branch Current State Estimation (BCSE), which is more effective than classical methods because it decouples the three phases of a distribution system, and uses branch current instead of node voltage as a state variable, which is a better match to current measurement.

  19. Evaluation of the State Energy Conservation Program from program initiation to September 1978. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, James N.; Grossmann, John R.; Shochet, Susan; Bresler, Joel; Duggan, Noreene

    1980-03-01

    The State Energy Conservation Program was established in 1975 to promote energy conservation and to help states develop and implement their own conservation programs. Base (5) and supplemental (3) programs required states to implement programs including: mandatory thermal-efficiency standards and insulation requirements for new and renovated buildings; mandatory lighting efficiency standards for public buildings; mandatory standards and policies affecting the procurement practices of the state and its political subdivisions; program measures to promote the availability and use of carpools, vanpools, and public transportation; a traffic law or regulation which permits a right turn-on-red; and procedures to carry out a continuing public education effort to increase awareness of energy conservation; procedures which promote effective coordination among local, state, and Federal energy conservation programs; and procedures for carrying out energy audits on buildings and industrial plants. All 50 states and Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the District of Columbia participated in the program. The total 1980 energy savings projected by the states is about 5.9 quadrillion Btu's or about 7% of the DOE projected 1980 baseline consumption of just under 83 quads. The detailed summary is presented on the following: information the SECP evaluation; DOE response to the SECP; DOE's role in the program management process; the effectiveness of the states in managing the SECP; the status of program measure implementation; innovative state energy conservation programs; and the evaluation methodology.

  20. Rydberg and valence state excitation dynamics: a velocity map imaging study involving the E-V state interaction in HBr.

    PubMed

    Zaouris, Dimitris; Kartakoullis, Andreas; Glodic, Pavle; Samartzis, Peter C; Rafn Hróðmarsson, Helgi; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-04-28

    Photoexcitation dynamics of the E((1)Σ(+)) (v' = 0) Rydberg state and the V((1)Σ(+)) (v') ion-pair vibrational states of HBr are investigated by velocity map imaging (VMI). H(+) photoions, produced through a number of vibrational and rotational levels of the two states were imaged and kinetic energy release (KER) and angular distributions were extracted from the data. In agreement with previous work, we found the photodissociation channels forming H*(n = 2) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) to be dominant. Autoionization pathways leading to H(+) + Br((2)P3/2)/Br*((2)P1/2) via either HBr(+)((2)Π3/2) or HBr(+)*((2)Π1/2) formation were also present. The analysis of KER and angular distributions and comparison with rotationally and mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra revealed the excitation transition mechanisms and characteristics of states involved as well as the involvement of the E-V state interactions and their v' and J' dependence. PMID:25801122

  1. Higgs boson search in the WW → ℓℓvv and ℓℓqq final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwilliam, Carl; Vartak, Adish

    2016-10-01

    A Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass larger than 200 GeV decays almost exclusively to a pair of weak bosons. This chapter presents the search for such a high mass Higgs boson in the H → ZZ ℓℓqq and H → ZZ ℓℓvv final states performed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. The search in these final states was instrumental in excluding a large range of Higgs boson masses beyond 200 GeV with the first few fb-1 of integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC. This helped to narrow down the window for the Standard Model Higgs boson to masses around 100 GeV.

  2. Impurity States in Ionic Crystals: a Self-Interaction - Corrected Local Spin Density Theory Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Koblar Alan

    1988-12-01

    While the local spin density theory (LSD) has been successfully used to calculate the electronic properties of a variety of condensed matter systems, its use does not provide an adequate description of point impurities in insulating crystals. Unphysical self-interaction effects in LSD lead to calculated one-electron properties which do not agree well with corresponding experimental properties in the limit of localized states. As an additional result of the spurious self-interactions, LSD calculations underestimate the host crystal band gaps in these systems by typically 40%. Recently the self-interaction-correction (SIC) was developed to remove the non-physical effects of electronic self-interaction from LSD. The resulting SIC-LSD theory is self-interaction free, and its use greatly improves the description of both localized states and insulator band gaps compared to uncorrected LSD. In the first part of this work, a novel method for calculating multiplet -dependent atomic wave functions in SIC-LSD is described, and calculated SIC-LSD wave functions for the quintet and triplet excited states of atomic oxygen are shown to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding Hartree-Fock wave functions, further establishing the success of SIC -LSD in calculating the properties of localized states. SIC -LSD is then applied to the NaCl:Cu^+ and LiCl:Ag^+ impurity systems. Transitions associated with the impurity ions in these systems are studied, and the calculated transition energies are found to be in good agreement with experiment. By examining the impurity state wave functions, characteristic differences between the absorption spectra for the Cu^+ and Ag^+ systems are explained.

  3. Observation of χcJ decaying into the pp̄K⁺K⁻ final state

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; et al

    2011-06-27

    First measurements of the decays of the three χcJ states to pp̄K⁺K⁻ final states are presented. Intermediate Φ→K⁺K⁻ and Λ(1520)→pK⁻ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for χcJ→p̄K⁺Λ(1520), Λ(1520)Λ¯¯¯(1520), and Φpp̄ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct χcJ→pp̄K⁺K⁻ decays. These are first observations of χcJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the χcJ states. The experiment uses samples of χcJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10⁶ ψ' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e⁺e⁻ collider.

  4. Observation of χcJ decaying into the pp̄K⁺K⁻ final state

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-06-27

    First measurements of the decays of the three χcJ states to pp̄K⁺K⁻ final states are presented. Intermediate Φ→K⁺K⁻ and Λ(1520)→pK⁻ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for χcJ→p̄K⁺Λ(1520), Λ(1520)Λ¯¯¯(1520), and Φpp̄ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct χcJ→pp̄K⁺K⁻ decays. These are first observations of χcJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the χcJ states. The experiment uses samples of χcJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10⁶ ψ' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e⁺e⁻ collider.

  5. 77 FR 69765 - Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Solid Waste... limitations of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). New federal requirements and... November 2, 1984 (49 FR 41036), to implement the RCRA hazardous waste management program. We...

  6. State In-Service Training for Correctional Personnel. Final Report. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiefer, George W.

    Volume 1 of a final report in three volumes, this is an overall narrative account of a correctional staff training project in Illinois. The rationale of the project, methods and activities involved, findings, and evaluations are summarized and synthesized. Initial objectives were to survey training practices and needs; determine resources…

  7. 77 FR 47779 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... authorized? Arkansas initially received final authorization on January 25, 1985, (50 FR 1513, January 11... revisions to its program on January 11, 1985 (50 FR 1513), effective January 25, 1985; March 27, 1990 (55 FR 11192) effective May 29, 1990; September 18, 1991 (56 FR 47153) effective November 18, 1991; October...

  8. 75 FR 35720 - Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to Massachusetts...- RCRA-2010-0468, by one of the following methods: http://www.regulations.gov : Follow the on-line... Robin Biscaia. Mail: Robin Biscaia, RCRA Waste Management Section, Office of Site Remediation...

  9. 75 FR 44144 - Washington: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... comments on EPA's proposed rule? On June 18, 2010 (75 FR 34674), EPA published a proposed rule to grant... received final authorization on January 30, 1986, effective January 31, 1986 (51 FR 3782), to implement the... program on September 22, 1987, effective on November 23, 1987 (52 FR 35556); August 17, 1990,...

  10. 40 CFR 272.951 - Louisiana state-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 6926(b), the EPA granted Louisiana final authorization for the following elements as submitted to EPA... this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain.../federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. (i) The binder entitled “EPA Approved Louisiana Statutory...

  11. State In-Service Training for Correctional Personnel. Final Report. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiefer, George W.

    This is part of the final report on a project that focused on the inservice training needs of correctional personnel in the Illinois penal system. Most of this volume is devoted to an overview of existing staff training for line personnel and parole agents; an assessment of unmet training needs; group discussion and other demonstration projects in…

  12. An Aggregate Data Archive for the Russian Area Studies Center, Louisiana State University. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Peter R.

    This final report announces the completion of a project, the purpose of which was to develop in coded machine retrievable form, a biographical data archive on the Soviet political elite, and in addition, to gather data on socio-economic and political factors in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. The computer processed data is intended to help…

  13. 75 FR 43478 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... respect to the zinc fertilizer rule). EPA did not make a proposal prior to the immediate final rule... on this action, you should do so at this time. With respect to the zinc fertilizer rule (checklist... for this rule. Thus, we are not including the authorization of the zinc fertilizer rule within...

  14. 75 FR 9345 - Michigan: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA published a proposed rule on October 9, 2009, at 74 FR 52161 and provided for..., 2009 (74 FR 52161), EPA published a proposed rule. In that rule we proposed granting authorization of... detail in the RCRA Burden Reduction Initiative Final Rule (71 FR 16862)), no regulation adopted...

  15. 77 FR 13200 - Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... received final authorization on December 26, 1984 (49 FR 48300), to implement its Base Hazardous Waste Management Program. This authorization was clarified in a notice published March 26, 1985 (50 FR 11858). Texas received authorization for revisions to its program, effective October 4, 1985 (51 FR...

  16. 76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... authorized? Oklahoma initially received final Authorization on January 10, 1985 (49 FR 50362-50363) published..., 1990 (55 FR 14280-14282), effective June 18, 1990; September 26, 1990 (55 FR 39274) effective November 27, 1990; April 2, 1991 (56 FR 13411-13413) effective June 3, 1991; September 20, 1991 (56 FR...

  17. 78 FR 33986 - Indiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Materials Processed in a Gasification System to Produce Synthesis Gas, Checklist 216, January 2, 2008 (73 FR... already in effect, and will not be changed by this action. D. Proposed Rule On October 9, 2012 (77 FR...? Indiana initially received Final Authorization on January 31, 1986, effective January 31, 1986 (51 FR...

  18. 77 FR 60919 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... Secondary 73 FR 57 1200-01-11-.01(2)(a); 1200-01-11- Materials Processed in a Gasification 01/02/08 .02(1)(d...? Tennessee initially received final authorization on January 22, 1985, effective February 5, 1985 (50 FR 2820... Tennessee's program on the following dates: June 12, 1987, effective August 11, 1987 (52 FR 22443); June...

  19. 78 FR 35766 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... a Gasification .0106(a). System to Produce Synthesis Gas. 217--NESHAP: Final Standards for 73 FR... (49 FR 48694), to implement a hazardous waste management program. EPA granted authorization for changes to North Carolina's program on the following dates: March 25, 1986, effective April 8, 1986 (51...

  20. Immigration and Naturalization Service--nonimmigrant alien (H-1) nurses; state license or examination requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1980-04-16

    This final rule requires nonimmigrant nurses to possess a valid state license to practice nursing in the United States or to have successfully passed the screening examination given by the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools in order to qualify for an "H-1" nonimmigrant visa classification. Proof of having met either requirement is necessary before the Service will approve the visa petition. This amendment to the regulations is necessary to ensure that only those nonimmigrant nurses who are fully qualified to perform services of the "exceptional nature" required by section 101(a)(15)(H)(i) of the Act are admitted under this classification.