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Sample records for find biological factors

  1. New findings on biological factors predicting addiction relapse vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajita

    2011-10-01

    Relapse is a highly prevalent phenomenon in addiction. This paper examines the new research on identifying biological factors that contribute to addiction relapse risk. Prospective studies examining relapse risk are reviewed, and clinical, biological, and neural factors that predict relapse risk are identified. Clinical factors, patient-related factors, and subjective and behavioral measures such as depressive symptoms, stress, and drug craving all predict future relapse risk. Among biological measures, endocrine measures such as cortisol and cortisol/corticotropin (ACTH) ratio as a measure of adrenal sensitivity and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also predictive of future relapse risk. Among neural measures, brain atrophy in the medial frontal regions and hyperreactivity of the anterior cingulate during withdrawal were identified as important in drug withdrawal and relapse risk. Caveats pertaining to specific drug abuse type and phase of addiction are discussed. Finally, significant implications of these findings for clinical practice are presented, with a specific focus on determining biological markers of relapse risk that may be used to identify those individuals who are most at risk of relapse in the clinic. Such markers may then be used to assess treatment response and develop specific treatments that will normalize these neural and biological sequelae so as to significantly improve relapse outcomes.

  2. How to Find Out in: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Doris F.

    This library handbook was designed for the student of biology. It lists some of the more useful materials and reference works basic to general research and gives their locations in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. Materials are listed in six categories: (1) guides to the literature; (2) dictionaries and encyclopedias; (3) handbooks;…

  3. How to Find Out in: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Doris F.

    This library handbook was designed for the student of biology. It lists some of the more useful materials and reference works basic to general research and gives their locations in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. Materials are listed in six categories: (1) guides to the literature; (2) dictionaries and encyclopedias; (3) handbooks;…

  4. Factors associated with HIV testing among male injecting drug users: findings from a cross-sectional behavioural and biological survey in Manipur and Nagaland, India.

    PubMed

    Ganju, Deepika; Ramesh, Sowmya; Saggurti, Niranjan

    2016-06-21

    Although targeted interventions in India require all high-risk groups, including injecting drug users (IDUs), to test for HIV every 6 months, testing uptake among IDUs remains far from universal. Our study estimates the proportion of IDUs who have taken an HIV test and identifies the factors associated with HIV testing uptake in Nagaland and Manipur, two high HIV prevalence states in India where the epidemic is driven by injecting drug use. Data are drawn from the cross-sectional Integrated Behavioural and Biological Assessment (2009) of 1650 male IDUs from two districts each of Manipur and Nagaland. Participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Descriptive data were analysed using RDSAT 7.1. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was undertaken using STATA 11 to examine the association between HIV testing and socio-demographic, behavioural and programme exposure variables. One third of IDUs reported prior HIV testing, of whom 8 % had tested HIV-positive. Among those without prior testing, 6.2 % tested HIV-positive in the current survey. IDUs aged 25-34 years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.41; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-1.93), married (Adjusted OR = 1.56; 95 % CI = 1.15-2.12), had a paid sexual partner (Adjusted OR = 1.64; 95 % CI = 1.24-2.18), injected drugs for more than 36 months (Adjusted OR = 1.38; 95 % CI = 1.06-1.81), injected frequently (Adjusted OR = 1.49; 95 % CI = 1.12-1.98) and had high-risk perception (Adjusted OR = 1.68; 95 % CI = 1.32-2.14) were more likely than others to test for HIV. Compared to those with no programme exposure, IDUs who received counselling, or counselling and needle/syringe services, were more likely to test for HIV. HIV testing uptake among IDUs is low in Manipur and Nagaland, and a critical group of HIV-positive IDUs who have never tested for HIV are being missed by current programmes. This study identifies key sub

  5. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  6. [Biology of von Willebrand factor].

    PubMed

    Girma, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a multimeric glycoprotein synthesized by megakaryocytes and endothelial cells. It is stored in platelets and endothelial cells and secreted towards subendothelium and plasma. VWF multimers consist of linear arrangements of identical subunits with a molecular weight of 270 kDa. The longest multimers reach more than 20 x 10(6) Da in storage granules. In the circulation, the multimer size is limited by the specific protease ADAMTS13. In primary hemostasis, VWF plays a key role as a molecular bridge in adhesion between platelets and subendothelium and between platelets during their aggregation. These functions, which involve the interaction with platelet glycoprotein lb, are mainly enhanced by VWF immobilization onto hydrophobic surfaces (collagen, cell membrane) and by high shear rates found in microcirculation and stenosed arteries. In these functions, the higher molecular weight forms are the most efficient. Under such hemodynamic conditions, proteolytic activity of ADAMTS13 is also optimal and limits the multimer size to about 15 x 10(6) Da as soon as their secretion. Thus ADAMTS13 appears as a key physiologic regulator of the VWF platelet functions. In the microcirculation, the lack of ADAMTS13 activity can result in the formation of VWF-rich platelet aggregates responsible for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  7. Medline search engine for finding genetic markers with biological significance.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Weijian; Wang, Pinglang; Watson, Stanley J; Meng, Fan

    2007-09-15

    Genome-wide high density SNP association studies are expected to identify various SNP alleles associated with different complex disorders. Understanding the biological significance of these SNP alleles in the context of existing literature is a major challenge since existing search engines are not designed to search literature for SNPs or other genetic markers. The literature mining of gene and protein functions has received significant attention and effort while similar work on genetic markers and their related diseases is still in its infancy. Our goal is to develop a web-based tool that facilitates the mining of Medline literature related to genetic studies and gene/protein function studies. Our solution consists of four main function modules for (1) identification of different types of genetic markers or genetic variations in Medline records (2) distinguishing positive versus negative linkage or association between genetic markers and diseases (3) integrating marker genomic location data from different databases to enable the retrieval of Medline records related to markers in the same linkage disequilibrium region (4) and a web interface called MarkerInfoFinder to search, display, sort and download Medline citation results. Tests using published data suggest MarkerInfoFinder can significantly increase the efficiency of finding genetic disorders and their underlying molecular mechanisms. The functions we developed will also be used to build a knowledge base for genetic markers and diseases. The MarkerInfoFinder is publicly available at: http://brainarray.mbni.med.umich.edu/brainarray/datamining/MarkerInfoFinder.

  8. Finding and Scaling Unstable Periodic Orbits in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank

    1998-03-01

    Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) of low order can be detected in noisy physical(D. Pierson and F. Moss, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 2124 (1995)and biological(X. Pei and F. Moss, Nature) 379, 618 (1996) systems. The statistically based detection method extracts the number of encounters with UPOs of period p, and compares that with findings from surrogate files. UPOs can be distinguished from stable orbits. The results are expressed as a time evolving statistical measure, useful for analyzing short files from non-stationary systems. We show bifurcations between stable and unstable behavior in peripheral cold receptors, neurosecretory hypothalamic cells (both in rat) and electroreceptors in catfish(H.A. Braun, et al., J. Comp. Neurosci.), in press. Since only orbits of the lowest orders (p < 4) can be detected, a scaling is necessary to connect the experimentally observable orbits to the infinite set of UPOs which characterize dissipative chaos. A scaling due to C.-Y. Lai is calculated for the Henon map. Data from crayfish photoreceptor cells for p = 1 to 3 are consistent with this scaling.

  9. Bipolar spectrum: Relevant psychological and biological factors.

    PubMed

    Terao, Takeshi

    2012-10-22

    The bipolar spectrum is a concept which bridges bipolar I disorder and unipolar depression. As Kraepelin described, there may be continuity across mood disorders. If this is the case, why should we discriminate for drug choice For example, it is generally accepted that mood stabilizers should be used for the bipolar spectrum, whereas antidepressants are for unipolar depression. If these disorders are diagnostically continuous, it is possible that the same drug could be effective in treating both bipolar I disorder/spectrum and unipolar depression. To resolve this question, I would like to propose my hypothesis that there is an inflexion point which constitutes the boundary between the bipolar spectrum and unipolar depression. It is likely that this inflexion point consists of temperaments as, reportedly, there are many significant differences in the presence of various temperaments between the bipolar spectrum (bipolar II, II1/2 and IV) and unipolar depression. These findings suggest that temperaments could draw a boundary between the bipolar spectrum and unipolar depression. Moreover, it has been shown that certain temperaments may be associated with several biological factors and may be associated with drug response. As such, whilst the concept of the bipolar spectrum emphasizes continuity, it is the proposed inflexion point that discriminates drug responses between the bipolar spectrum and unipolar depression. At the moment, although hypothetical, I consider this idea worthy of further research.

  10. Bipolar spectrum: Relevant psychological and biological factors

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The bipolar spectrum is a concept which bridges bipolar I disorder and unipolar depression. As Kraepelin described, there may be continuity across mood disorders. If this is the case, why should we discriminate for drug choice For example, it is generally accepted that mood stabilizers should be used for the bipolar spectrum, whereas antidepressants are for unipolar depression. If these disorders are diagnostically continuous, it is possible that the same drug could be effective in treating both bipolar I disorder/spectrum and unipolar depression. To resolve this question, I would like to propose my hypothesis that there is an inflexion point which constitutes the boundary between the bipolar spectrum and unipolar depression. It is likely that this inflexion point consists of temperaments as, reportedly, there are many significant differences in the presence of various temperaments between the bipolar spectrum (bipolar II, II1/2 and IV) and unipolar depression. These findings suggest that temperaments could draw a boundary between the bipolar spectrum and unipolar depression. Moreover, it has been shown that certain temperaments may be associated with several biological factors and may be associated with drug response. As such, whilst the concept of the bipolar spectrum emphasizes continuity, it is the proposed inflexion point that discriminates drug responses between the bipolar spectrum and unipolar depression. At the moment, although hypothetical, I consider this idea worthy of further research. PMID:24175170

  11. Happiness & Health: The Biological Factors- Systematic Review Article

    PubMed Central

    DFARHUD, Dariush; MALMIR, Maryam; KHANAHMADI, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Happiness underlying factors are considerable from two dimensions: endogenic factors (biological, cognitive, personality and ethical sub-factors) and exogenic factors (behavioral, socialcultural, economical, geographical, life events and aesthetics sub-factors). Among all endogenic factors, biological sub-factors are the significant predictors of happiness. Existence of significant differences in temperament and happiness of infants is an indicator of biological influences. Therefore, this study aimed to consider biological factors that underlie happiness. At the first, all of the biological factors in relation with happiness were searched from following websites: PubMed, Wiley& Sons, Science direct (1990–2014). Then, the articles divided into five sub-groups (genetic, brain and neurotransmitters, endocrinology and hormones, physical health, morphology and physical attractiveness). Finally, a systematic review performed based on existing information. Results of studies on genetic factors indicated an average effectiveness of genetic about 35 -50 percent on happiness. In spite of difficulties in finding special genes, several genes distributed to emotion and mood. Neuroscience studies showed that some part of brain (e.g. amygdala, hipocamp and limbic system) and neurotransmitters (e.g. dopamine, serotonin, norepinefrine and endorphin) play a role in control of happiness. A few studies pointed to the role of cortisol and adrenaline (adrenal gland) and oxitocin (pituitary gland) in controlling happiness. Physical health and typology also concluded in most related studies to have a significant role in happiness. Therefore, according to previous research, it can be said that biological and health factors are critical in underlying happiness and its role in happiness is undeniable. PMID:26060713

  12. Happiness & Health: The Biological Factors- Systematic Review Article.

    PubMed

    Dfarhud, Dariush; Malmir, Maryam; Khanahmadi, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Happiness underlying factors are considerable from two dimensions: endogenic factors (biological, cognitive, personality and ethical sub-factors) and exogenic factors (behavioral, socialcultural, economical, geographical, life events and aesthetics sub-factors). Among all endogenic factors, biological sub-factors are the significant predictors of happiness. Existence of significant differences in temperament and happiness of infants is an indicator of biological influences. Therefore, this study aimed to consider biological factors that underlie happiness. At the first, all of the biological factors in relation with happiness were searched from following websites: PubMed, Wiley& Sons, Science direct (1990-2014). Then, the articles divided into five sub-groups (genetic, brain and neurotransmitters, endocrinology and hormones, physical health, morphology and physical attractiveness). Finally, a systematic review performed based on existing information. Results of studies on genetic factors indicated an average effectiveness of genetic about 35 -50 percent on happiness. In spite of difficulties in finding special genes, several genes distributed to emotion and mood. Neuroscience studies showed that some part of brain (e.g. amygdala, hipocamp and limbic system) and neurotransmitters (e.g. dopamine, serotonin, norepinefrine and endorphin) play a role in control of happiness. A few studies pointed to the role of cortisol and adrenaline (adrenal gland) and oxitocin (pituitary gland) in controlling happiness. Physical health and typology also concluded in most related studies to have a significant role in happiness. Therefore, according to previous research, it can be said that biological and health factors are critical in underlying happiness and its role in happiness is undeniable.

  13. Effectiveness of Biologic Factors in Shoulder Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giotis, Dimitrios; Aryaei, Ashkan; Vasilakakos, Theofanis; Paschos, Nikolaos K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pathology can cause significant pain, discomfort, and loss of function that all interfere with activities of daily living and may lead to poor quality of life. Primary osteoarthritis and rotator cuff diseases with its sequalae are the main culprits. Management of shoulder disorders using biological factors gained an increasing interest over the last years. This interest reveals the need of effective treatments for shoulder degenerative disorders, and highlights the importance of a comprehensive and detailed understanding of the rapidly increasing knowledge in the field. Methods: This study will describe most of the available biology-based strategies that have been recently developed, focusing on their effectiveness in animal and clinical studies. Results: Data from in vitro work will also be briefly presented; in order to further elucidate newly acquired knowledge regarding mechanisms of tissue degeneration and repair that would probably drive translational work in the next decade. The role of platelet rich-plasma, growth factors, stem cells and other alternative treatments will be described in an evidence-based approach, in an attempt to provide guidelines for their clinical application. Finally, certain challenges that biologic treatments face today will be described as an initiative for future strategies. Conclusion: The application of different growth factors and mesenchymal stem cells appears as promising approaches for enhancing biologic repair. However, data from clinical studies are still limited, and future studies need to improve understanding of the repair process in cellular and molecular level and evaluate the effectiveness of biologic factors in the management of shoulder disorders. PMID:28400884

  14. Finding the key - cell biology and science education.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth R

    2010-12-01

    No international research community, cell biology included, can exist without an educational community to renew and replenish it. Unfortunately, cell biology researchers frequently regard their work as independent of the process of education and see little reason to reach out to science teachers. For cell biology to continue to prosper, I argue that researchers must support education in at least three ways. First, we must view education and research as part of a single scientific community. Second, we should take advantage of new technologies to connect the research laboratory to the classroom. Finally, we must take the initiative in defending the integrity of science teaching, particularly when education is under attack for political or religious reasons.

  15. Helping Nonmajors Find Out What's So Interesting about Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierzychudek, Paulette; Reiness, C. Gary

    1992-01-01

    Describes a course entitled "DNA and Evolution" in which students develop an appreciation for what science is and how it is practiced as well as an understanding of how some of the most central ideas in biology were developed and tested. Discusses the design of the course, the lecture and discussion topics, and the results and their…

  16. Prognostic biological factors in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Popa, CC

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a serious disease. Many clinical and laboratory prognostic scores for the severity of acute pancreatitis have been proposed over the years. The aim was to identify the biological factors of prognostic severity. The study was prospective, including a four-year period between 2007 and 2010. 103 patients were diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis and treated in a surgical clinic in Bucharest. 58 were males, accounting for 56.31%, and 45 were women, 43.69% respectively. Numerous biochemical analyses of blood, especially the number of leukocytes, glucose, urea and bilirubin were monitored. They proposed generic profiles for patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: There is no single biological prognostic factor, but a combination of different markers may contribute to a more precise prediction of severity, as confirmed by international literature. PMID:25713614

  17. Prognostic biological factors in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Popa, C C

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a serious disease. Many clinical and laboratory prognostic scores for the severity of acute pancreatitis have been proposed over the years. The aim was to identify the biological factors of prognostic severity. The study was prospective, including a four-year period between 2007 and 2010. 103 patients were diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis and treated in a surgical clinic in Bucharest. 58 were males, accounting for 56.31%, and 45 were women, 43.69% respectively. Numerous biochemical analyses of blood, especially the number of leukocytes, glucose, urea and bilirubin were monitored. They proposed generic profiles for patients with severe acute pancreatitis. There is no single biological prognostic factor, but a combination of different markers may contribute to a more precise prediction of severity, as confirmed by international literature.

  18. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Mark A.; Nielsen, Kellin R.; Byrnes, Mark E.; Simmons, Sally A.; Morse, John J.; Geiger, James B.; Watkins, Louis E.; McFee, Phillip M.; Martins, K.

    2015-01-14

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.

  19. Finding 'Newton's Laws' for Biology, Society, and the Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Luis

    2004-05-01

    Could a robot play the outfield in Major League Baseball? At first one would be tempted to answer "yes," after all we have put humans in the Moon using Newton's Laws, and baseball, on appearance, involves nothing else but Newton's Laws. Since computers can integrate Newton's Laws of motion faster than any human, it would appear logical that a robot would make a better outfielder. In my talk I will argue that playing the outfield has little to do with solving Newton's Laws, the reason being noise and uncertainty. As in the outfield, noise and uncertainty are the only certainties in biology and society. I will show that these challenges do not imply an absence of laws in those areas.

  20. Biological Factors Associated with Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickarby, Geoff; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews Asperger Syndrome, a form of developing autism with average intelligence, in 12 boys (ages 5 to late teens). Examination of family histories, medical history and findings, obstetric, and neonatal data found no common environmental factors and supports a brain damage hypothesis. (DB)

  1. Biological Factors Associated with Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickarby, Geoff; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews Asperger Syndrome, a form of developing autism with average intelligence, in 12 boys (ages 5 to late teens). Examination of family histories, medical history and findings, obstetric, and neonatal data found no common environmental factors and supports a brain damage hypothesis. (DB)

  2. Biological risk factors for deep vein trombosis.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Mira, Yolanda; Martínez, Marcial; Villa, Piedad; Ferrando, Fernando; Estellés, Amparo; Corella, Dolores; Aznar, Justo

    2002-01-01

    Hypercoagulable states due either to inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors are only present in approximately half of cases of DVT, but the causes in the other half, remain unknown. The importance of biological risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypofibrinolysis and hemorheological alterations in the pathogenesis of DVT has not been well established. In order to ascertain whether the above mentioned biological factors are associated with DVT and could constitute independent risk factors, we carried out a case-control study in 109 first DVT patients in whom inherited or acquired thrombophilic risk factors had been ruled out and 121 healthy controls age (42+/-15 years) and sex matched. From all the biological variables analyzed (cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, fibrinogen, erythrocyte aggregation, hematocrit, plasma viscosity and PAI-1) only fibrinogen concentration reached a statistically significant difference on the comparison of means (290+/-73 mg/dl in cases vs 268+/-58 mg/dl in controls, p<0.05). After this continuous variables were dichotomized according to our reference values, the percentage of cases with cholesterolemia >220 mg/dl, hematocrit >45% and fibrinogen >300 mg/dl was higher in cases than in controls: 38% vs 22%; p<0.01; 43% vs 27%; p<0.05; 36% vs 23%; p<0.05, respectively. The percentage of cases with PAI-1 values >30 ng/ml, 37% vs 25% was borderline significant; p=0.055. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that cholesterolemia >220 mg/dl and fibrinogen >300 mg/dl constitute independent predictors of venous thrombotic risk. The adjusted OR's were 2.03 (95% CI; 1.12-3.70) for cholesterolemia and 1.94 (95% CI; 1.07-3.55) for fibrinogen. When these two variables combined DVT risk rose about fourfold (3.96; p<0.05). Our results suggest that hypercholesterolemia and hyperfibrinogenemia should be added to the list of known DVT risk factors and we recommend adopting measures to decrease these variables in the population with a

  3. Transcription factor binding energy vs. biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, M.; Grotewold, E.

    2007-03-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that bind to DNA and regulate expression of genes. Identification of transcription factor binding sites within the regulatory segments of genomic DNA is an important step towards understanding of gene regulatory networks. Recent theoretical advances that we developed [1,2], allow us to infer TF-DNA interaction parameters from in-vitro selection experiments [3]. We use more than 6000 binding sequences [3], assembled under controlled conditions, to obtain protein-DNA interaction parameters for a mammalian TF with up to now unprecedented accuracy. Can one accurately identify biologically functional TF binding sites (i.e. the binding sites that regulate gene expression), even with the best possible protein-DNA interaction parameters? To address this issue we i) compare our prediction of protein binding with gene expression data, ii) use evolutionary comparison between related mammalian genomes. Our results strongly suggest that in a genome there exists a large number of randomly occurring high energy binding sites that are not biologically functional. [1] M Djordjevic, submitted to Biomol. Eng. [2] M. Djordjevic and A. M. Sengupta, Phys. Biol. 3: 13, 2006. [3] E. Roulet et al., Nature Biotech. 20: 831, 2002.

  4. Effects of biological and behavioral factors on urinary arsenic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Abstract In older men and women who were long-term residents of Churchill County, Nevada, we examined the relation between arsenic exposure from home tap water and urinary levels of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites. Over a wide exposure range (up to 1850 ug of arsenic per liter), urinary concentrations of inorganic, monomethylated, and dimethylated arsenicals strongly correlated with home tap water arsenic concentrations. However, percentages of summed urinary concentrations of inorganic, monomethylated, and dimethylated arsenicals accounted for by each arsenical species were unaffected by arsenic concentration in home tap water, suggesting thc1t capacity for formation and excretion of methylated metabolites was not exceeded. Biological factors (gender, age, body mass index, and genotype) and a behavioral factor (smoking) influenced absolute and relative levels of arsenicals in urine. A multivariate regression model showed that both biological and behavioral factors were significant predictors of absolute and relative concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites in urine. These findings suggest that analyses of dose-response relations in arsenic-exposed populations should account for these biological and behavioral factors. Furthermore, evidence of significant effects of these factors on arsenic metabolism may support mode of action studies in appropriate experimental models. Running title- Methylated arsenicals as urinary b

  5. Social, behavioral, and biological factors, and sex differences in mortality.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Richard G; Everett, Bethany G; Onge, Jarron M Saint; Krueger, Patrick M

    2010-08-01

    Few studies have examined whether sex differences in mortality are associated with different distributions of risk factors or result from the unique relationships between risk factors and mortality for men and women. We extend previous research by systematically testing a variety offactors, including health behaviors, social ties, socioeconomic status, and biological indicators of health. We employ the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III Linked Mortality File and use Cox proportional hazards models to examine sex diferences in adult mortality in the United States. Our findings document that social and behavioral characteristics are key factors related to the sex gap in mortality. Once we controlfor women's lower levels of marriage, poverty, and exercise, the sex gap in mortality widens; and once we control for women 's greater propensity to visit with friends and relatives, attend religious services, and abstain from smoking, the sex gap in mortality narrows. Biological factors-including indicators of inflammation and cardiovascular risk-also inform sex differences in mortality. Nevertheless, persistent sex differences in mortality remain: compared with women, men have 30% to 83% higher risks of death over the follow-up period, depending on the covariates included in the model. Although the prevalence of risk factors difers by sex, the impact of those risk factors on mortality is similar for men and women.

  6. Social, Behavioral, and Biological Factors, and Sex Differences in Mortality

    PubMed Central

    ROGERS, RICHARD G.; EVERETT, BETHANY G.; SAINT ONGE, JARRON M.; KRUEGER, PATRICK M.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined whether sex differences in mortality are associated with different distributions of risk factors or result from the unique relationships between risk factors and mortality for men and women. We extend previous research by systematically testing a variety of factors, including health behaviors, social ties, socioeconomic status, and biological indicators of health. We employ the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III Linked Mortality File and use Cox proportional hazards models to examine sex differences in adult mortality in the United States. Our findings document that social and behavioral characteristics are key factors related to the sex gap in mortality. Once we control for women’s lower levels of marriage, poverty, and exercise, the sex gap in mortality widens; and once we control for women’s greater propensity to visit with friends and relatives, attend religious services, and abstain from smoking, the sex gap in mortality narrows. Biological factors— including indicators of inflammation and cardiovascular risk—also inform sex differences in mortality. Nevertheless, persistent sex differences in mortality remain: compared with women, men have 30% to 83% higher risks of death over the follow-up period, depending on the covariates included in the model. Although the prevalence of risk factors differs by sex, the impact of those risk factors on mortality is similar for men and women. PMID:20879677

  7. Study Finds Association between Biological Marker and Susceptibility to the Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... U V W X Y Z Study Finds Association Between Biological Marker and Susceptibility to the Common ... published in the Journal of the American Medical Association . Funded in part by NCCAM, the study is ...

  8. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: epidemiology, risk factors and case finding.

    PubMed

    Caminero, J A

    2010-04-01

    Although the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) epidemic is a very recent problem, many studies have attempted to understand it. We now have good estimates of the current burden (approximately 500 000 MDR-TB cases worldwide), and following the introduction of potential MDR-TB control strategies projections of these figures are being estimated. The projected trends in tuberculosis (TB) and MDR-TB incidence vary. Risk factors for resistance can be divided into two categories: 1) those facilitating the selection of resistance in the community and 2) the specific conditions that appear to increase some patients' vulnerability to resistance. The epidemiological situation varies greatly across countries, principally due to poor treatment practices and poor implementation of control programmes in the past-and even today, to a lesser degree-and recent data have suggested that national TB programmes that use existing drugs efficiently can postpone and even reverse the MDR-TB epidemic. Other factors that have also contributed to this epidemic situation are analysed in this article. The recognition of factors leading to the epidemic in some regions and the identification of populations at risk will assist in focusing case-finding efforts. From an individual perspective, treatment failures with first-line rifampicin-containing regimens and contacts of MDR-TB cases have the highest rates of resistance. Patients previously treated for TB and the other risk factors analysed in this article should be prioritised in case finding.

  9. Biological Factors in Mild Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costeff, H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Children (N=434) with nonsyndromic mental retardation were analysed for frequency of prenatal, perinatal and infantile biological disturbances. Mildly retarded individuals of unrelated parentage, both idiopathic and familial, had a strikingly higher prevalence of disturbances than a control group of retarded individuals with consanguineous parents…

  10. Protein moonlighting: a new factor in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Brian; Martin, Andrew C R

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenon of protein moonlighting was discovered in the 1980s and 1990s, and the current definition of what constitutes a moonlighting protein was provided at the end of the 1990s. Since this time, several hundred moonlighting proteins have been identified in all three domains of life, and the rate of discovery is accelerating as the importance of protein moonlighting in biology and medicine becomes apparent. The recent re-evaluation of the number of protein-coding genes in the human genome (approximately 19000) is one reason for believing that protein moonlighting may be a more general phenomenon than the current number of moonlighting proteins would suggest, and preliminary studies of the proportion of proteins that moonlight would concur with this hypothesis. Protein moonlighting could be one way of explaining the seemingly small number of proteins that are encoded in the human genome. It is emerging that moonlighting proteins can exhibit novel biological functions, thus extending the range of the human functional proteome. The several hundred moonlighting proteins so far discovered play important roles in many aspects of biology. For example, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) and tRNA synthetases play a wide range of biological roles in eukaryotic cells, and a growing number of eukaryotic moonlighting proteins are recognized to play important roles in physiological processes such as sperm capacitation, implantation, immune regulation in pregnancy, blood coagulation, vascular regeneration and control of inflammation. The dark side of protein moonlighting finds a range of moonlighting proteins playing roles in various human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, HIV and cystic fibrosis. However, some moonlighting proteins are being tested for their therapeutic potential, including immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein (BiP), for rheumatoid arthritis, and Hsp90 for wound healing. In addition, it

  11. Biological risk factors for suicidal behaviors: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, B P; Franklin, J C; Ribeiro, J D; Fox, K R; Bentley, K H; Kleiman, E M; Nock, M K

    2016-09-13

    Prior studies have proposed a wide range of potential biological risk factors for future suicidal behaviors. Although strong evidence exists for biological correlates of suicidal behaviors, it remains unclear if these correlates are also risk factors for suicidal behaviors. We performed a meta-analysis to integrate the existing literature on biological risk factors for suicidal behaviors and to determine their statistical significance. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed, PsycInfo and Google Scholar for studies that used a biological factor to predict either suicide attempt or death by suicide. Inclusion criteria included studies with at least one longitudinal analysis using a biological factor to predict either of these outcomes in any population through 2015. From an initial screen of 2541 studies we identified 94 cases. Random effects models were used for both meta-analyses and meta-regression. The combined effect of biological factors produced statistically significant but relatively weak prediction of suicide attempts (weighted mean odds ratio (wOR)=1.41; CI: 1.09-1.81) and suicide death (wOR=1.28; CI: 1.13-1.45). After accounting for publication bias, prediction was nonsignificant for both suicide attempts and suicide death. Only two factors remained significant after accounting for publication bias-cytokines (wOR=2.87; CI: 1.40-5.93) and low levels of fish oil nutrients (wOR=1.09; CI: 1.01-1.19). Our meta-analysis revealed that currently known biological factors are weak predictors of future suicidal behaviors. This conclusion should be interpreted within the context of the limitations of the existing literature, including long follow-up intervals and a lack of tests of interactions with other risk factors. Future studies addressing these limitations may more effectively test for potential biological risk factors.

  12. Biological risk factors for suicidal behaviors: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, B P; Franklin, J C; Ribeiro, J D; Fox, K R; Bentley, K H; Kleiman, E M; Nock, M K

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have proposed a wide range of potential biological risk factors for future suicidal behaviors. Although strong evidence exists for biological correlates of suicidal behaviors, it remains unclear if these correlates are also risk factors for suicidal behaviors. We performed a meta-analysis to integrate the existing literature on biological risk factors for suicidal behaviors and to determine their statistical significance. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed, PsycInfo and Google Scholar for studies that used a biological factor to predict either suicide attempt or death by suicide. Inclusion criteria included studies with at least one longitudinal analysis using a biological factor to predict either of these outcomes in any population through 2015. From an initial screen of 2541 studies we identified 94 cases. Random effects models were used for both meta-analyses and meta-regression. The combined effect of biological factors produced statistically significant but relatively weak prediction of suicide attempts (weighted mean odds ratio (wOR)=1.41; CI: 1.09–1.81) and suicide death (wOR=1.28; CI: 1.13–1.45). After accounting for publication bias, prediction was nonsignificant for both suicide attempts and suicide death. Only two factors remained significant after accounting for publication bias—cytokines (wOR=2.87; CI: 1.40–5.93) and low levels of fish oil nutrients (wOR=1.09; CI: 1.01–1.19). Our meta-analysis revealed that currently known biological factors are weak predictors of future suicidal behaviors. This conclusion should be interpreted within the context of the limitations of the existing literature, including long follow-up intervals and a lack of tests of interactions with other risk factors. Future studies addressing these limitations may more effectively test for potential biological risk factors. PMID:27622931

  13. Parameterized Algorithmics for Finding Exact Solutions of NP-Hard Biological Problems.

    PubMed

    Hüffner, Falk; Komusiewicz, Christian; Niedermeier, Rolf; Wernicke, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-parameter algorithms are designed to efficiently find optimal solutions to some computationally hard (NP-hard) problems by identifying and exploiting "small" problem-specific parameters. We survey practical techniques to develop such algorithms. Each technique is introduced and supported by case studies of applications to biological problems, with additional pointers to experimental results.

  14. Functional near infrared spectroscopy as a potential biological assessment of addiction recovery: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jared P; Harris, Kitty S; Shumway, Sterling T; Kimball, Thomas G; Herrera, J Caleb; Dsauza, Cynthia M; Bradshaw, Spencer D

    2015-03-01

    Addiction science has primarily utilized self-report, continued substance use, and relapse factors to explore the process of recovery. However, the entry into successful abstinence substantially reduces our assessment abilities. Advances in neuroscience may be the key to objective understanding, treating, and monitoring long-term success in addiction recovery. To explore functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIR) as a viable technique in the assessment of addiction-cue reactivity. Specifically, prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation to alcohol cues was explored among formally alcohol-dependent individuals, across varying levels of successful abstinence. The aim of the investigation was to identify patterns of PFC activation change consistent with duration of abstinence. A total of 15 formally alcohol-dependent individuals, with abstinence durations ranging from 1 month to 10 years, viewed alcohol images during fNIR PFC assessment. Participants also subjectively rated the same images for affect and arousal level. Subjective ratings of alcohol cues did not significantly correlate with duration of abstinence. As expected, days of abstinence did not significantly correlate with neutral cue fNIR reactivity. However, for alcohol cues, fNIR results showed increased days of abstinence was associated with decreased activation within the dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex regions. The present results suggest that fNIR may be a viable tool in the assessment of addiction-cue reactivity. RESULTS also support previous findings on the importance of dorsolateral and dorsomedial PFC in alcohol-cue activation. The findings build upon these past results suggesting that fNIR-assessed activation may represent a robust biological marker of successful addiction recovery.

  15. Genetic factors associated with longevity: a review of recent findings.

    PubMed

    Shadyab, Aladdin H; LaCroix, Andrea Z

    2015-01-01

    Given the rising rate of survival into advanced old age in the United States, achieving longevity and healthy aging is becoming increasingly important. Besides maintaining healthy lifestyle behaviors, positive aging outcomes may also be heritable, with estimates ranging from 20% to 35%. In this qualitative review, we summarize recent findings on genetic factors linked to longevity across different populations and study designs. Recent studies not only confirm the association of APOE with longevity in different populations, but also implicate several other pathways that may influence longevity including nitric oxide production, inflammation, immunity, and DNA damage response and repair. Recent evidence also suggests that mitochondrial DNA may play an important role in attaining longevity. Despite these implicated pathways, longevity may be a polygenic trait influenced by a complex interplay of multiple genes. Future genetic studies on aging would benefit from larger samples of long-lived individuals, birth-cohort matched controls, inclusion of different aging phenotypes (e.g., aging free of morbidities), and analysis of gender differences.

  16. [Molecular biology of haemostasis: fibrinogen, factor XIII].

    PubMed

    Meyer, M

    2004-05-01

    Genetic defects of fibrinogen are caused by a broad spectrum of mutations in one of the three structural genes FGA, FGB and FGG. They result in complete or partial lack of plasma fibrinogen (a- or hypofibrinogenaemia) or in structural abnormalities affecting protein function (dysfibrinogenaemia). In contrast to afibrinogenaemia mainly caused by nonsense, frameshift, and splice site mutations resulting in substantially truncated polypeptide chains (mainly Aalpha), in hypo- and dysfibrinogenaemias missense mutations lead to the exchange of single amino acids as dominating underlying defect. In the cases with quantitative disorders, bleeding with various degrees of severity is generally observed. Dysfibrinogenaemia is associated with both bleeding or thrombosis or even a combination of haemorrhagic and thromboembolic symptoms. About one half of the dysfibrinogenaemic cases is clinically asymptomatic. The plasmatic factor XIII (FXIII) is a heterotetramer composed of two A and two B subunits encoded by two different genes. FXIII deficiency is associated with bleeding, wound dehiscence and recurrent spontaneous abortions. The most frequent form is caused by defects in the A subunit with a broad spectrum of underlying mutations. Defects of the B subunit are very rare and were molecularly elucidated in only a few cases.

  17. Cell and molecular biology of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, Brian P; Peterson, Joanne L

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most intensely studied cell surface receptors due to its well-established roles in developmental biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer biology. The EGFR has been critical for creating paradigms for numerous aspects of cell biology, such as ligand binding, signal transduction, and membrane trafficking. Despite this history of discovery, there is a continual stream of evidence that only the surface has been scratched. New ways of receptor regulation continue to be identified, each of which is a potential molecular target for manipulating EGFR signaling and the resultant changes in cell and tissue biology. This chapter is an update on EGFR-mediated signaling, and describes some recent developments in the regulation of receptor biology.

  18. Finding off-targets, biological pathways, and target diseases for chymase inhibitors via structure-based systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Arooj, Mahreen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Cao, Guang Ping; Kim, Songmi; Arulalapperumal, Venkatesh; Lee, Keun Woo

    2015-07-01

    Off-target binding connotes the binding of a small molecule of therapeutic significance to a protein target in addition to the primary target for which it was proposed. Progressively such off-targeting is emerging to be regular practice to reveal side effects. Chymase is an enzyme of hydrolase class that catalyzes hydrolysis of peptide bonds. A link between heart failure and chymase is ascribed, and a chymase inhibitor is in clinical phase II for treatment of heart failure. However, the underlying mechanisms of the off-target effects of human chymase inhibitors are still unclear. Here, we develop a robust computational strategy that is applicable to any enzyme system and that allows the prediction of drug effects on biological processes. Putative off-targets for chymase inhibitors were identified through various structural and functional similarity analyses along with molecular docking studies. Finally, literature survey was performed to incorporate these off-targets into biological pathways and to establish links between pathways and particular adverse effects. Off-targets of chymase inhibitors are linked to various biological pathways such as classical and lectin pathways of complement system, intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation cascade, and fibrinolytic system. Tissue kallikreins, granzyme M, neutrophil elastase, and mesotrypsin are also identified as off-targets. These off-targets and their associated pathways are elucidated for the effects of inflammation, cancer, hemorrhage, thrombosis, and central nervous system diseases (Alzheimer's disease). Prospectively, our approach is helpful not only to better understand the mechanisms of chymase inhibitors but also for drug repurposing exercises to find novel uses for these inhibitors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Biosynthesis, processing and secretion of von Willebrand factor: biological implications.

    PubMed

    de Wit, T R; van Mourik, J A

    2001-06-01

    von Willebrand factor is a multimeric plasma glycoprotein that is required for normal haemostasis. von Willebrand factor is synthesized by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, and originates from its precursor pro-von Willebrand factor. The endoproteolytic processing of pro-von Willebrand factor results in mature von Willebrand factor and von Willebrand factor propeptide (also known as von Willebrand Ag II). In endothelial cells, the propeptide controls the polymerization and subsequent targeting of von Willebrand factor to the storage vesicles, the so-called Weibel-Palade bodies. Upon stimulation of the endothelial cells, the Weibel-Palade bodies are translocated to the plasma membrane of the cell, and mature von Willebrand factor and its propeptide are co-secreted. After release, these polypeptides have divergent fates and serve different biological functions. Mature von Willebrand factor both controls platelet adhesion and aggregation at sites of vascular injury and acts as a chaperone protein for coagulation factor VIII. The von Willebrand factor propeptide may serve a role in modulating inflammatory processes. This still growing body of information indicates that the biological function of the von Willebrand factor gene product is more diverse than was previously thought.

  20. Supporting cognition in systems biology analysis: findings on users' processes and design implications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Current usability studies of bioinformatics tools suggest that tools for exploratory analysis support some tasks related to finding relationships of interest but not the deep causal insights necessary for formulating plausible and credible hypotheses. To better understand design requirements for gaining these causal insights in systems biology analyses a longitudinal field study of 15 biomedical researchers was conducted. Researchers interacted with the same protein-protein interaction tools to discover possible disease mechanisms for further experimentation. Results Findings reveal patterns in scientists' exploratory and explanatory analysis and reveal that tools positively supported a number of well-structured query and analysis tasks. But for several of scientists' more complex, higher order ways of knowing and reasoning the tools did not offer adequate support. Results show that for a better fit with scientists' cognition for exploratory analysis systems biology tools need to better match scientists' processes for validating, for making a transition from classification to model-based reasoning, and for engaging in causal mental modelling. Conclusion As the next great frontier in bioinformatics usability, tool designs for exploratory systems biology analysis need to move beyond the successes already achieved in supporting formulaic query and analysis tasks and now reduce current mismatches with several of scientists' higher order analytical practices. The implications of results for tool designs are discussed. PMID:19216777

  1. Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra; Coles, Adrienne D.

    1998-01-01

    Studies on race-based admissions, sports and sex, and religion and drugs suggest that: affirmative action policies were successful regarding college admissions; boys who play sports are more likely to be sexually active than their peers, with the opposite true for girls; and religion is a major factor in whether teens use cigarettes, alcohol, and…

  2. Neutrophil biology and the next generation of myeloid growth factors.

    PubMed

    Dale, David C

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the body's critical phagocytic cells for defense against bacterial and fungal infections; bone marrow must produce approximately 10 x 10(9) neutrophils/kg/d to maintain normal blood neutrophil counts. Production of neutrophils depends on myeloid growth factors, particularly granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). After the original phase of development, researchers modified these growth factors to increase their size and delay renal clearance, increase their biologic potency, and create unique molecules for business purposes. Pegylated G-CSF is a successful product of these efforts. Researchers have also tried to identify small molecules to serve as oral agents that mimic the parent molecules, but these programs have been less successful. In 2006, the European Medicines Agency established guidelines for the introduction of new biologic medicinal products claimed to be similar to reference products that had previously been granted marketing authorization in the European community, called bio-similars. Globally, new and copied versions of G-CSF and other myeloid growth factors are now appearing. Some properties of the myeloid growth factors are similar to other agents, offering opportunities for the development of alternative drugs and treatments. For example, recent research shows that hematopoietic progenitor cells can be mobilized with a chemokine receptor antagonist, chemotherapy, G-CSF, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Advances in neutrophil biology coupled with better understanding and development of myeloid growth factors offer great promise for improving the care of patients with cancer and many other disorders.

  3. Muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: update on causes and biological findings

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sergi; Casadevall, Carme; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and/or limb muscle dysfunction, which are frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contribute to their disease prognosis irrespective of the lung function. Muscle dysfunction is caused by the interaction of local and systemic factors. The key deleterious etiologic factors are pulmonary hyperinflation for the respiratory muscles and deconditioning secondary to reduced physical activity for limb muscles. Nonetheless, cigarette smoke, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exercise, exacerbations, anabolic insufficiency, drugs and comorbidities also seem to play a relevant role. All these factors modify the phenotype of the muscles, through the induction of several biological phenomena in patients with COPD. While respiratory muscles improve their aerobic phenotype (percentage of oxidative fibers, capillarization, mitochondrial density, enzyme activity in the aerobic pathways, etc.), limb muscles exhibit the opposite phenotype. In addition, both muscle groups show oxidative stress, signs of damage and epigenetic changes. However, fiber atrophy, increased number of inflammatory cells, altered regenerative capacity; signs of apoptosis and autophagy, and an imbalance between protein synthesis and breakdown are rather characteristic features of the limb muscles, mostly in patients with reduced body weight. Despite that significant progress has been achieved in the last decades, full elucidation of the specific roles of the target biological mechanisms involved in COPD muscle dysfunction is still required. Such an achievement will be crucial to adequately tackle with this relevant clinical problem of COPD patients in the near-future. PMID:26623119

  4. Biological factors in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Berton, Alessandra; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-09-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common, and lead to shoulder pain and functional impairment. Despite their frequency and related disability, etiology and pathogenesis are still debated. Multiple factors contribute to tears of the rotator cuff. Extrinsic factors are anatomic variables, such as acromial morphologic characteristics, os acromiale, and acromial spurs that compress the rotator cuff by bony impingement or direct pressure from the surrounding soft tissue. Intrinsic factors arise from the tendon itself, because of tensile overload, aging, microvascular supply, traumatisms, or degeneration. Little information is available from a cellular and molecular point of view. We reviewed the biological factors involved in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears. Understanding the mechanism of rotator cuff pathology would facilitate the rationale for therapeutic interventions, by guiding the design, selection, and implementation of treatment strategies such as biologic modulation and preventive measures.

  5. Conduct, Biological Factors and Adult Delinquency in a Longitudinal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnusson, David

    In the course of a longitudinal research program conducted in Sweden, data were being collected on biological and psychological aspects of individual functioning and on environmental factors for a fairly large representative sample (approximately 1,000) of Swedish males and females between 10 and 27 years of age. Based on data from the…

  6. Conduct, Biological Factors and Adult Delinquency in a Longitudinal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnusson, David

    In the course of a longitudinal research program conducted in Sweden, data were being collected on biological and psychological aspects of individual functioning and on environmental factors for a fairly large representative sample (approximately 1,000) of Swedish males and females between 10 and 27 years of age. Based on data from the…

  7. Systems biology via redescription and ontologies (I): finding phase changes with applications to malaria temporal data

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Kevin; Mishra, Bud

    2008-01-01

    Biological systems are complex and often composed of many subtly interacting components. Furthermore, such systems evolve through time and, as the underlying biology executes its genetic program, the relationships between components change and undergo dynamic reorganization. Characterizing these relationships precisely is a challenging task, but one that must be undertaken if we are to understand these systems in sufficient detail. One set of tools that may prove useful are the formal principles of model building and checking, which could allow the biologist to frame these inherently temporal questions in a sufficiently rigorous framework. In response to these challenges, GOALIE (Gene ontology algorithmic logic and information extractor) was developed and has been successfully employed in the analysis of high throughput biological data (e.g. time-course gene-expression microarray data and neural spike train recordings). The method has applications to a wide variety of temporal data, indeed any data for which there exist ontological descriptions. This paper describes the algorithms behind GOALIE and its use in the study of the Intraerythrocytic Developmental Cycle (IDC) of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for a deadly form of chloroquine resistant malaria. We focus in particular on the problem of finding phase changes, times of reorganization of transcriptional control. PMID:19003444

  8. Conceptual Modeling in Systems Biology Fosters Empirical Findings: The mRNA Lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Dori, Dov; Choder, Mordechai

    2007-01-01

    One of the main obstacles to understanding complex biological systems is the extent and rapid evolution of information, way beyond the capacity individuals to manage and comprehend. Current modeling approaches and tools lack adequate capacity to model concurrently structure and behavior of biological systems. Here we propose Object-Process Methodology (OPM), a holistic conceptual modeling paradigm, as a means to model both diagrammatically and textually biological systems formally and intuitively at any desired number of levels of detail. OPM combines objects, e.g., proteins, and processes, e.g., transcription, in a way that is simple and easily comprehensible to researchers and scholars. As a case in point, we modeled the yeast mRNA lifecycle. The mRNA lifecycle involves mRNA synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA transport to the cytoplasm, and its subsequent translation and degradation therein. Recent studies have identified specific cytoplasmic foci, termed processing bodies that contain large complexes of mRNAs and decay factors. Our OPM model of this cellular subsystem, presented here, led to the discovery of a new constituent of these complexes, the translation termination factor eRF3. Association of eRF3 with processing bodies is observed after a long-term starvation period. We suggest that OPM can eventually serve as a comprehensive evolvable model of the entire living cell system. The model would serve as a research and communication platform, highlighting unknown and uncertain aspects that can be addressed empirically and updated consequently while maintaining consistency. PMID:17849002

  9. Epidemiology, genetics and biological factors of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Berton, Alessandra; Papapietro, Nicola; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Rotator cuff disease is among the most common musculoskeletal disorders with high direct and indirect costs in industrialized countries. Not all rotator cuff tears are symptomatic. Genetics has recently been investigated as a factor involved in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff pathology. Genetic factors seem to be involved in symptom presentation and tear progression. As rotator cuff disease is multifactorial, no single gene is directly involved in the pathology. Phenotypic expression of genetic susceptibility manifests at the level of ultrastructure of the tendon. Predisposing genes may also operate through apoptosis and regenerative capacity. Studies on cellular and molecular biology are more numerous, but still incomplete, and recently have focussed on the role of apoptosis in tendinopathy, analyzing its key mediators and cellular changes. Oxidative stress is responsible for reduction of collagen synthesis. Biological investigations have identified recently new risk factors. Preliminary reports introduced the possible role of glucose as a risk factor for rotator cuff tear. Further studies are required to fully clarify the genetic and biological factors involved in rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Presumed Perinatal Stroke: Risk Factors, Clinical and Radiological Findings.

    PubMed

    Ilves, Pilvi; Laugesaar, Rael; Loorits, Dagmar; Kolk, Anneli; Tomberg, Tiiu; Lõo, Silva; Talvik, Inga; Kahre, Tiina; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown why some infants with perinatal stroke present clinical symptoms late during infancy and will be identified as infants with presumed perinatal stroke. The risk factors and clinical and radiological data of 42 infants with presumed perinatal stroke (69% with periventricular venous infarction and 31% with arterial ischemic stroke) from the Estonian Pediatric Stroke Database were reviewed. Children with presumed perinatal stroke were born at term in 95% of the cases and had had no risk factors during pregnancy in 43% of the cases. Children with periventricular venous infarction were born significantly more often (82%) vaginally (P = .0213) compared to children with arterial stroke (42%); nor did they require resuscitation (P = .0212) or had any neurological symptoms after birth (P = .0249). Periventricular venous infarction is the most common type of lesion among infants with the presumed perinatal stroke. Data suggest that the disease is of prenatal origin.

  11. [Rheumatoid factor or antinuclear antibodies as incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Biesen, R; Burmester, G-R; Hiepe, F

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies are detectable in many different conditions and are ordered by various specialities. The interpretation of results, however, is quite complex.The objective of this article is to help apply these tests correctly and enable an accurate interpretation of the test results. Furthermore, we describe the steps in the differential diagnostics for selecting those patients who need to be referred to a rheumatologist.

  12. Finding of the Low Molecular Weight Inhibitors of Resuscitation Promoting Factor Enzymatic and Resuscitation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Demina, Galina R.; Makarov, Vadim A.; Nikitushkin, Vadim D.; Ryabova, Olga B.; Vostroknutova, Galina N.; Salina, Elena G.; Shleeva, Margarita O.; Goncharenko, Anna V.; Kaprelyants, Arseny S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Resuscitation promoting factors (RPF) are secreted proteins involved in reactivation of dormant actinobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They have been considered as prospective targets for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs preventing reactivation of dormant tubercle bacilli, generally associated with latent tuberculosis. However, no inhibitors of Rpf activity have been reported so far. The goal of this study was to find low molecular weight compounds inhibiting the enzymatic and biological activities of Rpfs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel class of 2-nitrophenylthiocyanates (NPT) compounds that inhibit muralytic activity of Rpfs with IC50 1–7 µg/ml. Fluorescence studies revealed interaction of active NPTs with the internal regions of the Rpf molecule. Candidate inhibitors of Rpf enzymatic activity showed a bacteriostatic effect on growth of Micrococcus luteus (in which Rpf is essential for growth protein) at concentrations close to IC50. The candidate compounds suppressed resuscitation of dormant (“non-culturable”) cells of M. smegmatis at 1 µg/ml or delayed resuscitation of dormant M. tuberculosis obtained in laboratory conditions at 10 µg/ml. However, they did not inhibit growth of active mycobacteria under these concentrations. Conclusions/Significance NPT are the first example of low molecular weight compounds that inhibit the enzymatic and biological activities of Rpf proteins. PMID:20016836

  13. Gibbs Recursive Sampler: finding transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William; Rouchka, Eric C; Lawrence, Charles E

    2003-07-01

    The Gibbs Motif Sampler is a software package for locating common elements in collections of biopolymer sequences. In this paper we describe a new variation of the Gibbs Motif Sampler, the Gibbs Recursive Sampler, which has been developed specifically for locating multiple transcription factor binding sites for multiple transcription factors simultaneously in unaligned DNA sequences that may be heterogeneous in DNA composition. Here we describe the basic operation of the web-based version of this sampler. The sampler may be acces-sed at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/gibbs.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/gibbs.html. An online user guide is available at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/bernoulli.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/manual/bernoulli.html. Solaris, Solaris.x86 and Linux versions of the sampler are available as stand-alone programs for academic and not-for-profit users. Commercial licenses are also available. The Gibbs Recursive Sampler is distributed in accordance with the ISCB level 0 guidelines and a requirement for citation of use in scientific publications.

  14. Impact of biological aging on arterial aging in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A.; Best, Lyle G.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Devereux, Richard B.; Roman, Mary J.; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased arterial stiffness, an indicator of arterial aging, predicts adverse CVD outcomes. However, the relationship between telomere length and arterial stiffness is less well studied. Here we examined the cross-sectional association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and arterial stiffness in 2,165 American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). LTL was measured by qPCR. Arterial stiffness was assessed by stiffness index β. The association between LTL and arterial stiffness was assessed by generalized estimating equation model, adjusting for sociodemographics (age, sex, education level), study site, metabolic factors (fasting glucose, lipids, systolic blood pressure, and kidney function), lifestyle (BMI, smoking, drinking, and physical activity), and prevalent CVD. Results showed that longer LTL was significantly associated with a decreased arterial stiffness (β=-0.070, P=0.007). This association did not attenuate after further adjustment for hsCRP (β=-0.071, P=0.005) or excluding participants with overt CVD (β=-0.068, P=0.012), diabetes (β=-0.070, P=0.005), or chronic kidney disease (β=-0.090, P=0.001). In summary, shorter LTL was significantly associated with an increased arterial stiffness, independent of known risk factors. This finding may shed light on the potential role of biological aging in arterial aging in American Indians. PMID:27540694

  15. Impact of biological aging on arterial aging in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A; Best, Lyle G; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-08-01

    Telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased arterial stiffness, an indicator of arterial aging, predicts adverse CVD outcomes. However, the relationship between telomere length and arterial stiffness is less well studied. Here we examined the cross-sectional association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and arterial stiffness in 2,165 American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). LTL was measured by qPCR. Arterial stiffness was assessed by stiffness index β. The association between LTL and arterial stiffness was assessed by generalized estimating equation model, adjusting for sociodemographics (age, sex, education level), study site, metabolic factors (fasting glucose, lipids, systolic blood pressure, and kidney function), lifestyle (BMI, smoking, drinking, and physical activity), and prevalent CVD. Results showed that longer LTL was significantly associated with a decreased arterial stiffness (β=-0.070, P=0.007). This association did not attenuate after further adjustment for hsCRP (β=-0.071, P=0.005) or excluding participants with overt CVD (β=-0.068, P=0.012), diabetes (β=-0.070, P=0.005), or chronic kidney disease (β=-0.090, P=0.001). In summary, shorter LTL was significantly associated with an increased arterial stiffness, independent of known risk factors. This finding may shed light on the potential role of biological aging in arterial aging in American Indians.

  16. Performance of transdermal therapeutic systems: Effects of biological factors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inderjeet; Morris, Andrew Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) is a technique that is used to deliver a drug into the systemic circulation across the skin. This mechanism of drug delivery route has many advantages, including steady drug plasma concentrations, improved patient compliance, elimination of hepatic first pass, and degradation in the gastrointestinal tract. Over the last 30 years, many transdermal products have been launched in the market. Despite the inherent advantages of TDD and the growing list of transdermal products, one of the major drawbacks to TDD is the occurrence of inter- and intraindividual variation in the absorption of the drug across the skin. A majority of these variations are caused by biological factors, such as gender, age, ethnicity, and skin hydration and metabolism. These factors affect the integrity and the barrier qualities of the skin, which subsequently result in the variation in the amount of drug absorbed. The main objective of this review article is to provide a concise commentary on the biological factors that contribute to the variation in transdermal permeation of drugs across human skin and the available transdermal therapeutic systems that may reduce the variations caused by biological factors.

  17. HIGEDA: a hierarchical gene-set genetics based algorithm for finding subtle motifs in biological sequences.

    PubMed

    Le, Thanh; Altman, Tom; Gardiner, Katheleen

    2010-02-01

    Identification of motifs in biological sequences is a challenging problem because such motifs are often short, degenerate, and may contain gaps. Most algorithms that have been developed for motif-finding use the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm iteratively. Although EM algorithms can converge quickly, they depend strongly on initialization parameters and can converge to local sub-optimal solutions. In addition, they cannot generate gapped motifs. The effectiveness of EM algorithms in motif finding can be improved by incorporating methods that choose different sets of initial parameters to enable escape from local optima, and that allow gapped alignments within motif models. We have developed HIGEDA, an algorithm that uses the hierarchical gene-set genetic algorithm (HGA) with EM to initiate and search for the best parameters for the motif model. In addition, HIGEDA can identify gapped motifs using a position weight matrix and dynamic programming to generate an optimal gapped alignment of the motif model with sequences from the dataset. We show that HIGEDA outperforms MEME and other motif-finding algorithms on both DNA and protein sequences. Source code and test datasets are available for download at http://ouray.cudenver.edu/~tnle/, implemented in C++ and supported on Linux and MS Windows.

  18. Ocular surface findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis under methotrexate or biological agent therapy.

    PubMed

    Sevimli, Neslihan; Karadag, Remzi; Madenci, Ercan; Bayramlar, Huseyin; Arslan, Pinar; Ocal, Ayse; Dag, Yasar

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the ocular findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as methotrexate (MTX) or MTX with biological agents. One hundred and twelve eyes of 56 patients with RA and treated with MTX or MTX with biological agents were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups using DMARDs only (group 1) and patients using DMARDs and biologic agents together (group 2). In both groups; Schirmer's II test, tear film break-up time (tBUT), central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal volume (CV), intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and anterior segment and fundus examinations of the eye with slit lamp were carried out. Ocular surface disease index (OSDI) score questionnaire were performed. Thirty-eight patients with a mean age of 53.00 ± 8.19 years were in group 1 and 18 patients with a mean age of 51.00 ± 9.54 years were in group 2. The mean duration of RA was 6.89 ± 7.96 years in group 1 and 5.70 ± 9.00 years in group 2. There was a statistically significant difference between two groups with tBUT, CCT, CV, IOP (p < 0.05) and there was no significant difference with age, sex, disease duration, disease activity, and Schirmer's II test (p > 0.05). The disease duration showed a significant moderate negative correlation with CCT and CV in group 2 (p < 0.05). Although tBUT values were significantly higher in the combination treatment group, CCT and CV values were significantly lower. Due to the decrease in corneal thickness, IOP was determined to be significantly lower.

  19. [Professional biological risk factors of health care workers].

    PubMed

    Gailiene, Greta; Cenenkiene, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Health care workers are attributed to the group at highest risk of biological factors, as they are daily exposed to fluids of the human body. The risk of sharps injuries and exposure to blood is associated with bloodborne infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and type of professional biological risk factors, to evaluate the use of personal protective devices, application of immunoprophylaxis to health care workers in the surgical departments. METHODS. A retrospective study was carried out from January to June 2006. Data were collected in the surgical departments of Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine. An anonymous questionnaire survey was performed. RESULTS. More than half (51.4%) of the respondents experienced sharps injuries, 62.1% were exposed to biological fluids, and 39.6% of the workers experienced both injury and exposure. In all cases, the hands were injured during sharps injuries. Exposure of healthy skin and eyes to biological fluids occurred in 63% and 20% of the cases, respectively. Majority of exposures were blood splashes (60%). Physicians most frequently experienced sharps injury during the surgery (79.3%), nurses - during the preparation of instruments (35.1%), supporting staff - disposing the waste (75.8%). Commonly physicians were injured by surgical needles (72.4%), nurses - by needlestick (72.4%), and supporting staff - by glass waste (60.6%). Majority of the respondents (86%) were not vaccinated with HB vaccine. No personal protective equipment was used by 14.5% of the respondents during sharps injuries and 5% during exposures. CONCLUSIONS. More than half of the respondents experienced sharps injury or exposure to biological fluids during the study period. Physicians and nurses experience sharps injury and exposure to biological fluids more commonly as compared to supporting staff. Hepatitis B vaccination is insufficient among health care workers.

  20. Are there biological programming effects for psychological development? Findings from a study of Romanian adoptees.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Michael; O'Connor, Thomas G

    2004-01-01

    Associations between experiences and outcomes could be due to (a) continuation of adversity or (b) organismic changes, including experience-expectant and experience-adaptive developmental programming. The adoption into British families of children who had been reared in profoundly depriving institutions in Romania presented an opportunity to test mechanisms. Romanian children reared from infancy in very depriving institutions for periods up to 42 months were compared with 52 nondeprived UK-born children placed into adoptive families before the age of 6 months. The results at 6 years of age showed substantial normal cognitive and social functioning after the provision of family rearing but also major persistent deficits in a substantial minority. The pattern of findings suggests some form of early biological programming or neural damage stemming from institutional deprivation, but the heterogeneity in outcome indicates that the effects are not deterministic.

  1. MCF: a tool to find multi-scale community profiles in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Chen, Alan; Rahmani, Ali; Jarada, Tamer; Alhajj, Reda; Demetrick, Doug; Zeng, Jia

    2013-12-01

    Recent developments of complex graph clustering methods have implicated the practical applications with biological networks in different settings. Multi-scale Community Finder (MCF) is a tool to profile network communities (i.e., clusters of nodes) with the control of community sizes. The controlling parameter is referred to as the scale of the network community profile. MCF is able to find communities in all major types of networks including directed, signed, bipartite, and multi-slice networks. The fast computation promotes the practicability of the tool for large-scaled analysis (e.g., protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression networks). MCF is distributed as an open-source C++ package for academic use with both command line and user interface options, and can be downloaded at http://bsdxd.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/MCF. Detailed user manual and sample data sets are also available at the project website. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cerebral microbleeds: their associated factors, radiologic findings, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are tiny, round dark-signal lesions that are most often detected on gradient-echo MR images. CMBs consist of extravasations of blood components through fragile microvascular walls characterized by lipohyalinosis and surrounding macrophages. The prevalence of CMBs in elderly subjects with no history of cerebrovascular disease is around 5%, but is much higher in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Development of CMBs is closely related to various vascular risk factors; in particular, lobar CMBs are thought to be associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The presence of CMBs has been hypothesized to reflect cerebral-hemorrhage-prone status in patients with hypertension or amyloid microangiopathy. Stroke survivors with CMBs have been consistently found to have an elevated risk of subsequent hemorrhagic stroke or an antithrombotic-related hemorrhagic complication, although studies have failed to establish a link between CMBs and hemorrhagic transformation after thrombolytic treatment. A large prospective study is required to clarify the clinical significance of CMBs and their utility in a decision-making index.

  3. Cerebral Microbleeds: Their Associated Factors, Radiologic Findings, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Joon

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are tiny, round dark-signal lesions that are most often detected on gradient-echo MR images. CMBs consist of extravasations of blood components through fragile microvascular walls characterized by lipohyalinosis and surrounding macrophages. The prevalence of CMBs in elderly subjects with no history of cerebrovascular disease is around 5%, but is much higher in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Development of CMBs is closely related to various vascular risk factors; in particular, lobar CMBs are thought to be associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The presence of CMBs has been hypothesized to reflect cerebral-hemorrhage-prone status in patients with hypertension or amyloid microangiopathy. Stroke survivors with CMBs have been consistently found to have an elevated risk of subsequent hemorrhagic stroke or an antithrombotic-related hemorrhagic complication, although studies have failed to establish a link between CMBs and hemorrhagic transformation after thrombolytic treatment. A large prospective study is required to clarify the clinical significance of CMBs and their utility in a decision-making index. PMID:24396809

  4. CytoKavosh: A Cytoscape Plug-In for Finding Network Motifs in Large Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Razaghi Moghadam Kashani, Zahra; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Khakabimamaghani, Sahand

    2012-01-01

    Network motifs are small connected sub-graphs that have recently gathered much attention to discover structural behaviors of large and complex networks. Finding motifs with any size is one of the most important problems in complex and large networks. It needs fast and reliable algorithms and tools for achieving this purpose. CytoKavosh is one of the best choices for finding motifs with any given size in any complex network. It relies on a fast algorithm, Kavosh, which makes it faster than other existing tools. Kavosh algorithm applies some well known algorithmic features and includes tricky aspects, which make it an efficient algorithm in this field. CytoKavosh is a Cytoscape plug-in which supports us in finding motifs of given size in a network that is formerly loaded into the Cytoscape work-space (directed or undirected). High performance of CytoKavosh is achieved by dynamically linking highly optimized functions of Kavosh's C++ to the Cytoscape Java program, which makes this plug-in suitable for analyzing large biological networks. Some significant attributes of CytoKavosh is efficiency in time usage and memory and having no limitation related to the implementation in motif size. CytoKavosh is implemented in a visual environment Cytoscape that is convenient for the users to interact and create visual options to analyze the structural behavior of a network. This plug-in can work on any given network and is very simple to use and generates graphical results of discovered motifs with any required details. There is no specific Cytoscape plug-in, specific for finding the network motifs, based on original concept. So, we have introduced for the first time, CytoKavosh as the first plug-in, and we hope that this plug-in can be improved to cover other options to make it the best motif-analyzing tool. PMID:22952659

  5. Biological factors and the determination of androgens in female subjects.

    PubMed

    Enea, C; Boisseau, N; Diaz, V; Dugué, B

    2008-11-01

    The idea of the presence of androgens in females may sound peculiar as androgens generally refer to male hormones. Although produced in small amounts in women, androgens have direct and significant effects on many aspects of female physiology. Moreover, androgens are precursors to estrogens, which are the predominant female sex hormones. The measurement of androgens in blood is important in the diagnosis of both gonadal and adrenal functional disturbances, as well as monitoring subsequent treatments. The accuracy of such measurements is crucial in sports medicine and doping control. Therefore, the concentration of androgens in female subjects is frequently measured. Analysing such compounds with accuracy is especially difficult, costly and time consuming. Therefore, laboratories widely use direct radioimmunoassay kits, which are often insensitive and inaccurate. It is especially complicated to determine the level of androgens in women, as the concentration is much lower compared to the concentration found in males. Additionally, the amount of androgens in fluids tends to decrease with aging. Analyses of hormone concentrations are influenced by a myriad of factors. The factors influencing the outcome of these tests can be divided into in vivo preanalytical factors (e.g., aging, chronobiological rhythms, diet, menstrual cycle, physical exercise, etc.), in vitro preanalytical factors (e.g., specimen collection, equipment, transport, storage, etc.) and as mentioned before, analytical factors. To improve the value of these tests, the strongly influencing factors must be controlled. This can be accomplished using standardised assays and specimen collection procedures. In general, sufficient attention is not given to the preanalytical (biological) factors, especially in the measurement of androgens in females. Biological factors (non-pathological factors) that may influence the outcome of these tests in female subjects have received little attention and are the topic of

  6. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  7. Relationship of biological factors to survival in spinal gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Seçer, Mehmet; Ulutaş, Murat; Alagöz, Fatih; Uçkun, Özhan Merzuk; Çınar, Kadir; Yel, Cihat; Gökçe, Emre Cemal; Dalgıç, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Gunshot injuries are the third leading cause of spinal injuries, after falls from a significant height and traffic accidents. Severity of spinal damage from gunshot injury depends upon certain mechanical and biological factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of biological factors on survival in cases of spinal gunshot injury. A total of 110 cases of spinal gunshot injury admitted multiple times to emergency services between 2012 and 2014 were included. Age, sex, region of trauma, additional organ or systemic involvement, treatment modalities (conservative, surgical), and mortality rates were analyzed. Effects of biological factors on survival were evaluated. Mean age of the study population was 25.51±11.74 years (min: 4; max: 55) and 95.5% of the population was male. Regions of trauma were thoracic in 50 (45.4%) subjects, cervical in 42 (38.2%), and lumbar in 18 (16.4%). Most common American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score was category A, as was found in 77 (70%) cases. No significant correlation was found among age, sex, ASIA score, treatment modality (conservative or surgical), and survival (p>0.05). Additional organ or systemic injury was present in 66 (60%) patients. Additional organ or systemic injury significantly affected survival, independent of the spinal region of trauma (p<0.01). Spinal gunshot injuries are complex, with unclear treatment protocol. Irrespective of the indications of spinal surgery, additional organ injuries unfavorably affect survival in cases of spinal gunshot injury. Appropriate management of all biological factors directly affects mortality rate in cases of spinal gunshot injury.

  8. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Prest, Emmanuelle I; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  9. T-box transcription factors in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Wansleben, Sabina; Peres, Jade; Hare, Shannagh; Goding, Colin R; Prince, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved T-box family of transcription factors have critical and well-established roles in embryonic development. More recently, T-box factors have also gained increasing prominence in the field of cancer biology where a wide range of cancers exhibit deregulated expression of T-box factors that possess tumour suppressor and/or tumour promoter functions. Of these the best characterised is TBX2, whose expression is upregulated in cancers including breast, pancreatic, ovarian, liver, endometrial adenocarcinoma, glioblastomas, gastric, uterine cervical and melanoma. Understanding the role and regulation of TBX2, as well as other T-box factors, in contributing directly to tumour progression, and especially in suppression of senescence and control of invasiveness suggests that targeting TBX2 expression or function alone or in combination with currently available chemotherapeutic agents may represent a therapeutic strategy for cancer.

  10. 76 FR 15935 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... Significant Impact for a Biological Control Agent for Air Potato AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... relative to the control of air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera). Based on its finding of no significant impact... biological control agent to reduce the severity of air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) infestations. On January...

  11. Correlation analyses of clinical and molecular findings identify candidate biological pathways in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xuefeng B; Macaubas, Claudia; Alexander, Heather C; Wen, Qiaojun; Chen, Edward; Peng, Sihua; Sun, Yue; Deshpande, Chetan; Pan, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Richard; Lih, Chih-Jian; Chang, Sheng-Yung P; Lee, Tzielan; Sandborg, Christy; Begovich, Ann B; Cohen, Stanley N; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2012-10-23

    Clinicians have long appreciated the distinct phenotype of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) compared to polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (POLY). We hypothesized that gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from children with each disease would reveal distinct biological pathways when analyzed for significant associations with elevations in two markers of JIA activity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and number of affected joints (joint count, JC). PBMC RNA from SJIA and POLY patients was profiled by kinetic PCR to analyze expression of 181 genes, selected for relevance to immune response pathways. Pearson correlation and Student's t-test analyses were performed to identify transcripts significantly associated with clinical parameters (ESR and JC) in SJIA or POLY samples. These transcripts were used to find related biological pathways. Combining Pearson and t-test analyses, we found 91 ESR-related and 92 JC-related genes in SJIA. For POLY, 20 ESR-related and 0 JC-related genes were found. Using Ingenuity Systems Pathways Analysis, we identified SJIA ESR-related and JC-related pathways. The two sets of pathways are strongly correlated. In contrast, there is a weaker correlation between SJIA and POLY ESR-related pathways. Notably, distinct biological processes were found to correlate with JC in samples from the earlier systemic plus arthritic phase (SAF) of SJIA compared to samples from the later arthritis-predominant phase (AF). Within the SJIA SAF group, IL-10 expression was related to JC, whereas lack of IL-4 appeared to characterize the chronic arthritis (AF) subgroup. The strong correlation between pathways implicated in elevations of both ESR and JC in SJIA argues that the systemic and arthritic components of the disease are related mechanistically. Inflammatory pathways in SJIA are distinct from those in POLY course JIA, consistent with differences in clinically appreciated target organs. The limited

  12. Cultural and biological factors modulate spatial biases over development.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Luisa; Marinelli, Chiara Valeria; Grossi, Giuseppe; Arduino, Lisa S

    2017-01-19

    Increasing evidence supports the contribution of both biological and cultural factors to visuospatial processing. The present study adds to the literature by exploring the interplay of perceptual and linguistic mechanisms in determining visuospatial asymmetries in adults (Experiment 1) and children (Experiment 2). In particular, pre-schoolers (3 and 5 year-olds), school-aged children (8 year-old), and adult participants were required to bisect different types of stimuli, that is, lines, words, and figure strings. In accordance with the literature, results yielded a leftward bias for lines and words and a rightward bias for figure strings, in adult participants. More critically, different biases were found for lines, words, and figure strings in children as a function of age, reflecting the impact of both cultural and biological factors on the processing of different visuospatial materials. Specifically, an adult-like pattern of results emerged only in the older group of children (8 year-old), but not in pre-schoolers. Results are discussed in terms of literacy, reading habits exposure, and biological maturation.

  13. Neighborhood Context and Social Disparities in Cumulative Biological Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    King, Katherine E.; Morenoff, Jeffrey D.; House, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examines the role of neighborhood context in the accumulation of biological risk factors and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities. Method Data come from face-to-face interviews and blood collection on a probability sample of adults (n=549) in the 2002 Chicago Community Adult Health Study. Following the approach of prior studies, we constructed an index of cumulative biological risk (CBR) by counting how many of eight biomarkers exceeded clinically defined criteria for “high risk”: systolic and diastolic blood pressure, resting heart rate, hemoglobin A1c, C-reactive protein, waist size, and total and HDL cholesterol. Data are presented as incidence rate ratios (IRR) based on generalized linear models with a Poisson link function and population-average estimates with robust standard errors. Results Non-Hispanic blacks (n=200), Hispanics (n=149), and people with low (n=134) and moderate (n=275) education had significantly higher numbers of biological risks than their respective reference groups (IRR=1.48, 1.59, 1.62, and 1.48, respectively, with p-values <0.01). Black-white (p<0.001) and Hispanic-white (p<0.003) disparities in CBR remained significant after adjusting for individual-level socioeconomic position and behavioral factors, while individual-level controls substantially diminished the low/high (p<0.069) and moderate/high (p<0.042) educational differences. Estimating “within-neighborhood” disparities to adjust for neighborhood context fully explained the black-white gap in CBR (p<0.542) and reduced the Hispanic-white gap to borderline significance (p<0.053). Neighborhood affluence predicted lower levels of CBR (IRR=0.82, p<0.027), but neighborhood disadvantage was not significantly associated with CBR (IRR=1.00, p<0.948). Conclusions Neighborhood environments appear to play a pivotal role in the accumulation of biological risk and disparities therein. PMID:21862824

  14. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range.

    PubMed

    Grün, Rebecca; Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Zink, Klemens; Durante, Marco; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Scholz, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1. Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques. Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems. The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam.

  15. An algorithm for finding biologically significant features in microarray data based on a priori manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Hira, Zena M; Trigeorgis, George; Gillies, Duncan F

    2014-01-01

    Microarray databases are a large source of genetic data, which, upon proper analysis, could enhance our understanding of biology and medicine. Many microarray experiments have been designed to investigate the genetic mechanisms of cancer, and analytical approaches have been applied in order to classify different types of cancer or distinguish between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue. However, microarrays are high-dimensional datasets with high levels of noise and this causes problems when using machine learning methods. A popular approach to this problem is to search for a set of features that will simplify the structure and to some degree remove the noise from the data. The most widely used approach to feature extraction is principal component analysis (PCA) which assumes a multivariate Gaussian model of the data. More recently, non-linear methods have been investigated. Among these, manifold learning algorithms, for example Isomap, aim to project the data from a higher dimensional space onto a lower dimension one. We have proposed a priori manifold learning for finding a manifold in which a representative set of microarray data is fused with relevant data taken from the KEGG pathway database. Once the manifold has been constructed the raw microarray data is projected onto it and clustering and classification can take place. In contrast to earlier fusion based methods, the prior knowledge from the KEGG databases is not used in, and does not bias the classification process--it merely acts as an aid to find the best space in which to search the data. In our experiments we have found that using our new manifold method gives better classification results than using either PCA or conventional Isomap.

  16. PCSK9 inhibition to reduce cardiovascular disease risk: recent findings from the biology of PCSK9

    PubMed Central

    Tavori, Hagai; Giunzioni, Ilaria; Fazio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Review novel insights into the biology of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) that may explain the extreme efficiency of PCSK9 inhibition and the unexpected metabolic effects resulting from PCSK9 monoclonal antibody therapy, and may identify additional patients as target of therapy. Recent findings For over 20 years, the practical knowledge of cholesterol metabolism has centered around cellular mechanisms, and around the idea that statin therapy is the essential step to control metabolic abnormalities for cardiovascular risk management. This view has been embraced by the recent AHA/ACC guidelines, but is being challenged by recent studies including nonstatin medications and by the development of a new class of cholesterol-lowering agents that seems destined to early US Food and Drug Administration approval. The discovery of PCSK9 – a circulating protein that regulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and serum LDL cholesterol levels – has led to a race for its therapeutic inhibition. Recent findings on PCSK9 regulation and pleiotropic effects will help identify additional patient groups likely to benefit from the inhibitory therapy and unravel the full potential of PCSK9 inhibition therapy. Summary Injectable human monoclonal antibodies to block the interaction between PCSK9 and LDL receptor are demonstrating extraordinary efficacy (LDL reductions of up to 70%) and almost the absence of any side-effects. A more moderate effect is seen on other lipoprotein parameters, with the exception of lipoprotein(a) levels. We describe mechanisms that can explain the effect on lipoprotein(a), predict a potential effect on postprandial triglyderides, and suggest a new category of patients for anti-PCSK9 therapy. PMID:25692926

  17. Translating Lung Function Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) Findings: New Insights for Lung Biology.

    PubMed

    Kheirallah, A K; Miller, S; Hall, I P; Sayers, I

    2016-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases are a major cause of worldwide mortality and morbidity. Although hereditary severe deficiency of α1 antitrypsin (A1AD) has been established to cause emphysema, A1AD accounts for only ∼ 1% of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) cases. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful at detecting multiple loci harboring variants predicting the variation in lung function measures and risk of COPD. However, GWAS are incapable of distinguishing causal from noncausal variants. Several approaches can be used for functional translation of genetic findings. These approaches have the scope to identify underlying alleles and pathways that are important in lung function and COPD. Computational methods aim at effective functional variant prediction by combining experimentally generated regulatory information with associated region of the human genome. Classically, GWAS association follow-up concentrated on manipulation of a single gene. However association data has identified genetic variants in >50 loci predicting disease risk or lung function. Therefore there is a clear precedent for experiments that interrogate multiple candidate genes in parallel, which is now possible with genome editing technology. Gene expression profiling can be used for effective discovery of biological pathways underpinning gene function. This information may be used for informed decisions about cellular assays post genetic manipulation. Investigating respiratory phenotypes in human lung tissue and specific gene knockout mice is a valuable in vivo approach that can complement in vitro work. Herein, we review state-of-the-art in silico, in vivo, and in vitro approaches that may be used to accelerate functional translation of genetic findings.

  18. "The role of oxytocin in psychiatric disorders: A review of biological and therapeutic research findings"

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, David; Fallon, Daniel; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone integral in parturition, milk let-down, and maternal behaviors that has been demonstrated in animal studies to be important in the formation of pair bonds and in social behaviors. This hormone is increasingly recognized as an important regulator of human social behaviors, including social decision making, evaluating and responding to social stimuli, mediating social interactions, and forming social memories. In addition, oxytocin is intricately involved in a broad array of neuropsychiatric functions, and may be a common factor important in multiple psychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders. This review article examines the extant literature on the evidence for oxytocin dysfunction in a variety of psychiatric disorders and highlights the need for further research to understand the complex role of the oxytocin system in psychiatric disease to pave the way for developing new therapeutic modalities. Articles were selected that involved human participants with various psychiatric disorders, either comparing oxytocin biology to healthy controls or examining the effects of exogenous oxytocin administration. PMID:24651556

  19. Human milk and formulae: neurotrophic and new biological factors.

    PubMed

    Serpero, Laura D; Frigiola, Alessandro; Gazzolo, Diego

    2012-03-01

    Mother milk is widely accepted to be a unique product believed to contain biological factors involved in the regulation of newborn optimal growth including brain when compared to milk-formula milks. In this setting, there is growing evidence that in milk-formula neuro-oxidative stress biomarkers, neurotrophic proteins and calcium binding proteins, known to be involved in a cascade of events leading to brain, cardiac and vascular development/damage, are to date lacking or at a lower concentration than breast milk. Therefore, this review is aimed at offering additional insights to the role in human milk of some selected biomarkers such as: i) neurotrophic factors such as Activin A; ii) Calcium binding protein such as S100B and, iii) heat shock protein known to be involved in oxidative stress response (namely hemeoxygenase-1, HO-1 or Heat shock Protein 32, HSP32). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. How Genetic and Other Biological Factors Interact with Smoking Decisions.

    PubMed

    Bierut, Laura; Cesarini, David

    2015-09-01

    Despite clear links between genes and smoking, effective public policy requires far richer measurement of the feedback between biological, behavioral, and environmental factors. The Kavli HUMAN Project (KHP) plans to exploit the plummeting costs of data gathering and to make creative use of new technologies to construct a longitudinal panel data set that would compare favorably to existing longitudinal surveys, both in terms of the richness of the behavioral measures and the cost-effectiveness of the data collection. By developing a more comprehensive approach to characterizing behavior than traditional methods, KHP will allow researchers to paint a much richer picture of an individual's life-cycle trajectory of smoking, alcohol, and drug use, and interactions with other choices and environmental factors. The longitudinal nature of KHP will be particularly valuable in light of the increasing evidence for how smoking behavior affects physiology and health. The KHP could have a transformative impact on the understanding of the biology of addictive behaviors such as smoking, and of a rich range of prevention and amelioration policies.

  1. Male breast cancer: risk factors, biology, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship.

    PubMed

    Ruddy, K J; Winer, E P

    2013-06-01

    The causes, optimal treatments, and medical/psychosocial sequelae of breast cancer in men are poorly understood. A systematic review of the English language literature was conducted to identify studies relevant to male breast cancer between 1987 and 2012 and including at least 20 patients. Searches were carried out on PubMed using the title terms 'male breast cancer' or 'male breast carcinoma'. Relevant published data regarding risk factors, biological characteristics, presentation and prognosis, appropriate evaluation and treatment, and survivorship issues in male breast cancer patients are presented. BRCA2 mutations, age, conditions that alter the estrogen/androgen ratio, and radiation are proven risk factors. Disease biology is distinct in men, but diagnostic approaches and treatments for men are generally extrapolated from those in women due to inadequate research in men. Survivorship issues in men may include sexual and hormonal side-effects of endocrine therapies as well as unique psychosocial impacts of the disease. Further research is needed to address gaps in knowledge pertaining to care of male breast cancer patients and survivors.

  2. Finding Clarity by Fostering Confusion: Reflections on Teaching an Undergraduate Integrated Biological Systems Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kirsten H.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biology programs in smaller liberal arts colleges are increasingly becoming focused on health science fields. This narrowing of focus potentially decreases opportunities for these students to explore other sub-fields of biology. This perspectives article highlights how one small university in Connecticut decided to institute a…

  3. Applying Systems Biology Methodology To Identify Genetic Factors Possibly Associated with Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kurowski, Brad G; Treble-Barna, Amery; Pitzer, Alexis J; Wade, Shari L; Martin, Lisa J; Chima, Ranjit S; Jegga, Anil

    2017-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is linked with a number of medical, neurological, cognitive, and behavioral sequelae. The influence of genetic factors on the biology and related recovery after TBI is poorly understood. Studies that seek to elucidate the impact of genetic influences on neurorecovery after TBI will lead to better individualization of prognosis and inform development of novel treatments, which are considerably lacking. Current genetic studies related to TBI have focused on specific candidate genes. The objectives of this study were to use a system biology-based approach to identify biologic processes over-represented with genetic variants previously implicated in clinical outcomes after TBI and identify unique genes potentially related to recovery after TBI. After performing a systematic review to identify genes in the literature associated with clinical outcomes, we used the genes identified to perform a systems biology-based integrative computational analysis to ascertain the interactions between molecular components and to develop models for regulation and function of genes involved in TBI recovery. The analysis identified over-representation of genetic variants primarily in two biologic processes: response to injury (cell proliferation, cell death, inflammatory response, and cellular metabolism) and neurocognitive and behavioral reserve (brain development, cognition, and behavior). Overall, this study demonstrates the use of a systems biology-based approach to identify unique/novel genes or sets of genes important to the recovery process. Findings from this systems biology-based approach provide additional insight into the potential impact of genetic variants on the underlying complex biological processes important to TBI recovery and may inform the development of empirical genetic-related studies for TBI. Future studies that combine systems biology methodology and genomic

  4. ATF2, a paradigm of the multifaceted regulation of transcription factors in biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory; Ronai, Ze'ev; Lau, Eric

    2017-02-15

    Stringent transcriptional regulation is crucial for normal cellular biology and organismal development. Perturbations in the proper regulation of transcription factors can result in numerous pathologies, including cancer. Thus, understanding how transcription factors are regulated and how they are dysregulated in disease states is key to the therapeutic targeting of these factors and/or the pathways that they regulate. Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) has been studied in a number of developmental and pathological conditions. Recent findings have shed light on the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that influence ATF2 function, and thus, the transcriptional programs coordinated by ATF2. Given our current knowledge of its multiple levels of regulation and function, ATF2 represents a paradigm for the mechanistic complexity that can regulate transcription factor function. Thus, increasing our understanding of the regulation and function of ATF2 will provide insights into fundamental regulatory mechanisms that influence how cells integrate extracellular and intracellular signals into a genomic response through transcription factors. Characterization of ATF2 dysfunction in the context of pathological conditions, particularly in cancer biology and response to therapy, will be important in understanding how pathways controlled by ATF2 or other transcription factors might be therapeutically exploited. In this review, we provide an overview of the currently known upstream regulators and downstream targets of ATF2.

  5. Factors Potentially Influencing Student Acceptance of Biological Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, Jason R.

    This investigation explored scientific, religious, and otherwise nonscientific factors that may influence student acceptance of biological evolution and related concepts, how students perceived these factors to have influenced their levels of acceptance of evolution and changes therein, and what patterns arose among students' articulations of how their levels of acceptance of evolution may have changed. This exploration also measured the extent to which students' levels of acceptance changed following a treatment designed to address factors identified as potentially affecting student acceptance of evolution. Acceptance of evolution was measured using the MATE instrument (Rutledge and Warden, 1999; Rutledge and Sadler, 2007) among participants enrolled in a secondary-level academic program during the summer prior to their final year of high school and as they transitioned to the post-secondary level. Student acceptance of evolution was measured to be significantly higher than pre-treatment levels both immediately following and slightly over one year after treatment. Qualitative data from informal questionnaires, from formal course evaluations, and from semi-structured interviews of students engaged in secondary level education and former students at various stages of post-secondary education confirmed that the suspected factors were perceived by participants to have influenced their levels of acceptance of evolution. Furthermore, participant reports provided insight regarding the relative effects they perceived these factors to have had on their evolution acceptance levels. Additionally, many participants reported that their science teachers in public schools had avoided, omitted, or denigrated evolution during instruction, and several of these students expressed frustration regarding what they perceived to have been a lack of education of an important scientific principle. Finally, no students expressed feelings of being offended by having been taught about

  6. International biological standards for coagulation factors and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Anthony R

    2007-04-01

    The use of international biological standards during the last 30 years has proved extremely successful in promoting global harmonization of estimates between laboratories and methods. Experience has led to the identification of physical criteria essential for standards to be suitable for long-term use. High precision of liquid filling coupled with low residual moisture and oxygen and the use of sealed glass ampoules have been found consistent with homogeneous and stable International Standards (ISs). Most plasma coagulation factors and inhibitors are calibrated in International Units (IU), which are defined as the amount of analyte in 1 mL of normal pooled plasma. Adoption of the IU has provided clarity in the definition of normal and abnormal states and has facilitated dose calculation for replacement therapy. The assay of like-versus-like materials (e.g., concentrate versus concentrate) has been found to improve interlaboratory agreement and there are now both plasma and concentrate ISs available for many coagulation factors and inhibitors. Studies into the assay of recombinant factor VIII have indicated that additional measures, such as modifications to assay methodology, are necessary to reduce interlaboratory variability. This experience may prove valuable in the future, when we have to deal increasingly with the challenges to standardization associated with the products of bioengineering.

  7. Newest clinical trial results with antitumor necrosis factor and nonantitumor necrosis factor biologics for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Millán, Iris; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2013-05-01

    To highlight recent evidence from the clinical trials of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and non anti-TNF biologics for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) focused on comparative clinical efficacy including safety outcomes and medication discontinuation. Patients with RA are sometimes able to attain low disease activity or remission since the introduction of biologic therapy for RA. Biologics like anti-TNF, anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6), anti-CD20 and those that modulate T-cell co-stimulation have consistently shown good efficacy in patients with RA. Preliminary data from comparative efficacy studies to evaluate the potential differences between anti-TNF and non anti-TNF biologics have shown little differences among these. There is ongoing work in comparative efficacy to answer this question further. Biologic therapy in RA has significantly changed the course of RA in the last decade. Recently published clinical trials have been focused on comparative efficacy, cardiovascular safety of biologics and potential anti-TNF therapy discontinuation in patients with RA.

  8. The epidermal growth factor receptor family: Biology driving targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wieduwilt, M. J.; Moasser, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs) plays essential roles in regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration. The ErbB receptors carry out both redundant and restricted functions in mammalian development and in the maintenance of tissues in the adult mammal. Loss of regulation of the ErbB receptors underlies many human diseases, most notably cancer. Our understanding of the function and complex regulation of these receptors has fueled the development of targeted therapeutic agents for human malignancies in the last 15 years. Here we review the biology of ErbB receptors, including their structure, signaling, regulation, and roles in development and disease, then briefly touch on their increasing roles as targets for cancer therapy. PMID:18259690

  9. Biologics formulation factors affecting metal leachables from stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuxia; Schöneich, Christian; Singh, Satish K

    2011-03-01

    An area of increasing concern and scientific scrutiny is the potential contamination of drug products by leachables entering the product during manufacturing and storage. These contaminants may either have a direct safety impact on the patients or act indirectly through the alteration of the physicochemical properties of the product. In the case of biotherapeutics, trace amounts of metal contaminants can arise from various sources, but mainly from contact with stainless steel (ss). The effect of the various factors, buffer species, solution fill volume per unit contact surface area, metal chelators, and pH, on metal leachables from contact with ss over time were investigated individually. Three major metal leachables, iron, chromium, and nickel, were monitored by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry because they are the major components of 316L ss. Iron was primarily used to evaluate the effect of each factor since it is the most abundant. It was observed that each studied factor exhibited its own effect on metal leachables from contact with ss. The effect of buffer species and pH exhibited temperature dependence over the studied temperature range. The metal leachables decreased with the increased fill volume (mL) per unit contact ss surface area (cm(2)) but a plateau was achieved at approximately 3 mL/cm(2). Metal chelators produced the strongest effect in facilitating metal leaching. In order to minimize the metal leachables and optimize biological product stability, each formulation factor must be evaluated for its impact, to balance its risk and benefit in achieving the target drug product shelf life.

  10. 76 FR 13597 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... finding of no significant impact relative to the release of the hawkweed gall wasp, Aulacidea... hawkweed gall wasp, Aulacidea subterminalis, into the continental United States for the biological control... no significant impact (FONSI) regarding the release of the hawkweed gall wasp into the continental...

  11. The College Student and Marijuana: Research Findings Concerning Adverse Biological and Psychological Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholi, Armand M., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    This paper focuses on current knowledge about adverse biological and psychological affects of marijuana use, with special reference to risks for college students. Short-term effects on intellectual functioning and perceptual-motor coordination and long-term effects on reproduction and motivation are highlighted. (PP)

  12. Identifying Chemical and Biological Factors Affecting Soil Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrant, D. N.; Naughton, H.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes a majority of the terrestrial carbon stock, but current models of carbon compound cycling lack grounding in biological and chemical mechanisms. We investigated microbial aerobic and anaerobic respiration rates with respect to depth and the distribution of electron acceptors as possible climate-sensitive drivers of SOM cycling. Soil reactors were designed to simulate the sediment column such that oxygenated water flows horizontally over a column of soil. A native soil that was rich in iron oxides was treated with nitrate, sulfate, neither, and a combination of nitrate and sulfate to mimic potential gradients of available electron acceptors observed in natural environments. Assuming a typical high-to-low oxygen gradient along a soil profile, microbial respiration is expected to decrease at greater depths as available electron acceptors become less energetically favorable. High-energy SOM is expected to be increasingly depleted with depth to counteract low-energy available electron acceptors. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations in the reactor effluent were calculated with Henry's Law using the effluent pH and headspace CO2 content. Anaerobic respiration was quantified along the soil profile via incubations and both porewater and solid-state sampling of Mn(II), Fe(II), nitrate, sulfate, and H2S. SOM chemistry was analyzed via carbon near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Initial results exhibit highest DIC concentrations in the nitrate treatment, corresponding to nitrate's high reduction potential. This research can improve existing models of carbon storage under different redox conditions through examination of the biological and chemical factors determining SOM respiration and storage.

  13. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF CONTROLLED RELEASING DELIVERY OF BIOLOGICAL FACTORS FOR CARTILAGE REPAIR].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jialei; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-08-01

    To summarize the recent progress of the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors for cartilage repair. The recently published literature at home and abroad on the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors for cartilage repair was reviewed and summarized. Various biological factors have been applied for repairing cartilage. For better cartilage repair effects, controlled releasing delivery of biological factors can be applied by means of combining biological factors with degradable biomaterials, or by micro- and nano-particles. Meanwhile, multiple biologic delivery and temporally controlled delivery are also inevitable choices. Although lots of unsolved problems exist, the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors has been a research focus for cartilage repair because of the controllability and delicacy.

  14. Finding Complex Biological Relationships in Recent PubMed Articles Using Bio-LDA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huijun; Ding, Ying; Tang, Jie; Dong, Xiao; He, Bing; Qiu, Judy; Wild, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming amount of available scholarly literature in the life sciences poses significant challenges to scientists wishing to keep up with important developments related to their research, but also provides a useful resource for the discovery of recent information concerning genes, diseases, compounds and the interactions between them. In this paper, we describe an algorithm called Bio-LDA that uses extracted biological terminology to automatically identify latent topics, and provides a variety of measures to uncover putative relations among topics and bio-terms. Relationships identified using those approaches are combined with existing data in life science datasets to provide additional insight. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the Bio-LDA model, including association predication, association search and connectivity map generation. This combined approach offers new opportunities for knowledge discovery in many areas of biology including target identification, lead hopping and drug repurposing. PMID:21448266

  15. Finding complex biological relationships in recent PubMed articles using Bio-LDA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijun; Ding, Ying; Tang, Jie; Dong, Xiao; He, Bing; Qiu, Judy; Wild, David J

    2011-03-23

    The overwhelming amount of available scholarly literature in the life sciences poses significant challenges to scientists wishing to keep up with important developments related to their research, but also provides a useful resource for the discovery of recent information concerning genes, diseases, compounds and the interactions between them. In this paper, we describe an algorithm called Bio-LDA that uses extracted biological terminology to automatically identify latent topics, and provides a variety of measures to uncover putative relations among topics and bio-terms. Relationships identified using those approaches are combined with existing data in life science datasets to provide additional insight. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the Bio-LDA model, including association predication, association search and connectivity map generation. This combined approach offers new opportunities for knowledge discovery in many areas of biology including target identification, lead hopping and drug repurposing.

  16. PiNGO: a Cytoscape plugin to find candidate genes in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Smoot, Michael; Ono, Keiichiro; Ideker, Trey; Maere, Steven

    2011-04-01

    PiNGO is a tool to screen biological networks for candidate genes, i.e. genes predicted to be involved in a biological process of interest. The user can narrow the search to genes with particular known functions or exclude genes belonging to particular functional classes. PiNGO provides support for a wide range of organisms and Gene Ontology classification schemes, and it can easily be customized for other organisms and functional classifications. PiNGO is implemented as a plugin for Cytoscape, a popular network visualization platform. PiNGO is distributed as an open-source Java package under the GNU General Public License (http://www.gnu.org/), and can be downloaded via the Cytoscape plugin manager. A detailed user guide and tutorial are available on the PiNGO website (http://www.psb.ugent.be/esb/PiNGO.

  17. Unraveling retrograde signaling pathways: finding candidate signaling molecules via metabolomics and systems biology driven approaches.

    PubMed

    Caldana, Camila; Fernie, Alisdair R; Willmitzer, Lothar; Steinhauser, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    A tight coordination of biological processes between cellular compartments and organelles is crucial for the survival of any eukaryotic organism. According to cellular requirements, signals can be generated within organelles, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria, modulating the nuclear gene expression in a process called retrograde signaling. Whilst many research efforts have been focused on dissecting retrograde signaling pathways using biochemical and genetics approaches, metabolomics and systems biology driven studies have illustrated their great potential for hypotheses generation and for dissecting signaling networks in a rather unbiased or untargeted fashion. Recently, integrative genomics approaches, in which correlation analysis has been applied on transcript and metabolite profiling data of Arabidopsis thaliana, revealed the identification of metabolites which are putatively acting as mediators of nuclear gene expression. Complimentary, the continuous technological developments in the field of metabolomics per se has further demonstrated its potential as a very suitable readout to unravel metabolite-mediated signaling processes. As foundation for these studies here we outline and discuss recent advances in elucidating retrograde signaling molecules and pathways with an emphasis on metabolomics and systems biology driven approaches.

  18. [The Leonhard classification of endogenous psychoses--initial biological findings and differential therapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Lanczik, M; Fritze, J

    1992-08-01

    Current systems of classification of endogenous psychoses, the APA's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and the International Classification of Diseases in particular, aim at a synthesis of Kraepelin's prognosis-orientated diagnostic scheme with the symptomatological approach as established by Eugen Bleuler and Kurt Schneider. The restriction to few diagnostic entities has remained unchanged to the present day and appeared at first to be confirmed and validated by modern pharmaco-psychiatry. Kraepelin's dichotomy has failed to make a major contribution to the etiologic clarification of endogenous psychoses. New diagnostic concepts beyond those currently applied in clinical psychiatry and biological psychiatric research must therefore be considered and should lead towards a more differentiated approach to psycho-pathological phenomena. Karl Leonhard's classification of endogenous psychoses which rests upon the pioneer work of Carl Wernicke and Karl Kleist is part of a tradition in psychopathology emphasizing the interface of biology and psychopathology. It might provide a basis for future empirical research in biological psychiatry and pharmacopsychiatry.

  19. Clinical and Biological Risk Factors for Neuropsychological Impairment in Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Ludivine; Coulbault, Laurent; Lannuzel, Coralie; Boudehent, Céline; Segobin, Shailendra; Eustache, Francis; Vabret, François; Pitel, Anne Lise; Beaunieux, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The effects of alcoholism on cognitive and motor functioning are heterogeneous. While the role of some factors (patterns of alcohol consumption, eating habits or associated liver disease) has been hypothesized, the origins of this heterogeneity remain difficult to establish. The goals of the present study were thus to identify the clinical and biological risk factors for alcohol-related neuropsychological impairments and to determine the threshold beyond which these risk factors can be considered significant. Thirty alcoholic patients and 15 healthy controls had a blood test and underwent a neuropsychological examination. Alcohol severity measures, and liver, thiamine and malnutrition variables, were included in logistic regression models to determine the risk factors for cognitive and motor impairments (executive functions, visuospatial abilities, verbal episodic memory, ataxia), as well as those related to the severity of patients’ overall neuropsychological profile (moderate or severe impairments). Liver fibrosis was found to be a risk factor for executive impairments and also for ataxia, when it was associated with long-term alcohol misuse and symptoms of withdrawal. Altered thiamine metabolism was solely predictive of verbal episodic memory impairments. This combination of biological abnormalities was associated with a profile of moderate neuropsychological impairments. Malnutrition was associated with a profile of more severe impairments. Malnutrition, altered liver function and thiamine metabolism explain, at least partially, the heterogeneity of alcohol-related neuropsychological impairments. Our findings could allow clinicians to identify patients at particular risk of severe neuropsychological impairments before the onset of irreversible and debilitating neurological complications. PMID:27617840

  20. Elucidating biological risk factors in suicide: role of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Yogesh; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2011-06-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern. Although there have been several studies of suicidal behavior that focused on the roles of psychosocial and sociocultural factors, these factors are of too little predictive value to be clinically useful. Therefore, research on the biological perspective of suicide has gained a stronghold and appears to provide a promising approach to identify biological risk factors associated with suicidal behavior. Recent studies demonstrate that an alteration in synaptic and structural plasticity is key to affective illnesses and suicide. Signal transduction molecules play an important role in such plastic events. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a crucial enzyme in the adenylyl cyclase signal transduction pathway and is involved in regulating gene transcription, cell survival, and plasticity. In this review, we critically and comprehensively discuss the role of PKA in suicidal behavior. Because stress is an important component of suicide, we also discuss whether stress affects PKA and how this may be associated with suicidal behavior. In addition, we also discuss the functional significance of the findings regarding PKA by describing the role of important PKA substrates (i.e., Rap1, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein, and target gene brain-derived neurotrophic factor). These studies suggest the interesting possibility that PKA and related signaling molecules may serve as important neurobiological factors in suicide and may be relevant in target-specific therapeutic interventions for these disorders.

  1. Elucidating biological risk factors in suicide: role of protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Yogesh; Pandey, Ghanshyam N.

    2010-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern. Although there have been several studies of suicidal behavior that focused on the roles of psychosocial and sociocultural factors, these factors are of too little predictive value to be clinically useful. Therefore, research on the biological perspective of suicide has gained a stronghold and appears to provide a promising approach to identify biological risk factors associated with suicidal behavior. Recent studies demonstrate that an alteration in synaptic and structural plasticity is key to affective illnesses and suicide. Signal transduction molecules play an important role in such plastic events. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a crucial enzyme in the adenylyl cyclase signal transduction pathway and is involved in regulating gene transcription, cell survival, and plasticity. In this review, we critically and comprehensively discuss the role of PKA in suicidal behavior. Because stress is an important component of suicide, we also discuss whether stress affects PKA and how this may be associated with suicidal behavior. In addition, we also discuss the functional significance of the findings regarding PKA by describing the role of important PKA substrates (i.e., Rap1, cyclic adenosine monophosphate–response element binding protein, and target gene brain-derived neurotrophic factor). These studies suggest the interesting possibility that PKA and related signaling molecules may serve as important neurobiological factors in suicide and may be relevant in target-specific therapeutic interventions for these disorders. PMID:20817068

  2. [Chromium exposure biological indices and clinical findings in chromium plating industry (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Franchini, I; Cavatorta, A; Mutti, A; Marcato, M; Bottazzi, D; Cigala, F

    1977-09-01

    According to the investigations carried out on workers of two chromium plating plants, the authors believe that chromium urinary excretion allows to determine the degree of its acute absorption. Moreover, the renal clearance of diffusible chromium allows the evaluation of chromium body burden and is related to the duration as well as to the severity of exposure. This interpretation is supported by the relation between the exposure biological indexes and the clinical and instrumental investigations which make possible the evaluation of lesions caused by chromium exposure, mostly concerning the respiratory system.

  3. Is chronic insomnia a precursor to major depression? Epidemiological and biological findings.

    PubMed

    Baglioni, Chiara; Riemann, Dieter

    2012-10-01

    Insomnia has been found to be a clinical predictor of subsequent depression. Nevertheless the biological processes underlying this causal relationship are yet not fully understood. Both conditions share a common imbalance of the arousal system. Patients with insomnia present fragmented REM sleep, which probably interferes with basal processes of emotion regulation. The interaction between the arousal and the affective system with the persistence of the disorder could slowly alter also the cognitive system and lead to depression. Although preliminary results seem to support this hypothesis, data are still too few to make valid conclusions.

  4. Computerized image-searching method for finding correct patients for misfiled chest radiographs in a PACS server by use of biological fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Toge, Risa; Morishita, Junji; Sasaki, Yasuo; Doi, Kunio

    2013-07-01

    We have developed an automated image-searching method based on biological fingerprints for identifying correct patients in misfiled chest radiographs in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) server. We used five biological fingerprints including distinctive anatomic structures in a misfiled chest radiograph of an unknown patient to find another image of the same patient stored with correct patient information in a PACS server. The correlation values were determined for the corresponding biological fingerprints in all images in the image server. The correlation indices as a measure of the overall similarity of the two images were determined from the summation of five correlation values and the combination of correlation values with the weighting factors. Finally, the correct patient was identified automatically by the image with the highest correlation index. By use of the summation of five correlation values as the correlation index, 78.0% (156/200) of the 200 patients for misfiled images were correctly identified in the database. When we applied the weighting factors for each biological fingerprint to determine the correlation index, the performance in identifying the correct patient was improved to 87.5% (175/200). An additional 5.0% (10/200) of images were included in the Top 10 ranking of the correlation index in the database. These cases could be identified manually by radiology personnel. We conclude that the automated image-searching method based on biological fingerprints with weighting factors would be useful for identification of the correct patient in the case of misfiled chest radiographs in a PACS server.

  5. Identification of biological factors predictive of response to imatinib mesylate in aggressive fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, A; Bertucci, F; Penel, N; Le Cesne, A; Bui, B; Tubiana-Hulin, M; Ray-Coquard, I; Cupissol, D; Chevreau, C; Perol, D; Goncalves, A; Jimenez, M; Bringuier, P P; Blay, J Y

    2010-08-10

    Imatinib induces responses and disease stabilisations in non-resectable patients with aggressive fibromatosis (AF). The precise target of imatinib in AF and predictive factors for response to treatment are unknown. We investigated factors potentially predictive of response to imatinib in a series of 40 patients with progressive AF included in a phase II trial of imatinib: we tested the presence of KIT exon 10 variant (M541L), the expression of imatinib-sensitive kinases and cell cycle proteins by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and other clinical and biological factors. Of 10 patients for whom DNA could be extracted, 3 had a KIT exon 10 variant (30%), with no correlation with response or progression-free survival (PFS). The expression of other imatinib targets (PDGFRA/B, macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (M-CSFR)) and of downstream components of the cell cycle, cell proliferation and proliferation pathway (cyclin D1, ERK, MEK 1-2) did not correlate with PFS. Pre-treatment lymphopenia (<1500/microl) and tumour size >120 mm correlated with shorter PFS in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our findings show that a baseline biological characteristic of the patient is the major parameter influencing response to imatinib in aggressive fibromatosis. Tumour characteristics, including the presence of a KIT exon 10 M541L variant, may influence tumour control but this needs to be confirmed and better explained.

  6. Biological consequences of stress: conflicting findings on the association between job strain and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Fornari, C; Ferrario, M; Menni, C; Sega, R; Facchetti, R; Cesana, G C

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective is to verify the relation between job strain and clinic blood pressure in a working population from the Milan municipality (1,909 men, 3,786 women) enrolled from 1992 to 1996. Job strain was investigated through the Karasek model. Clinic blood pressure was evaluated using standard procedures from the MONICA project. The association between the two was calculated controlling for age, education, smoking, body mass index, total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Significantly, associations were found for systolic blood pressure in men and for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in women. However, these results do not reflect biological plausibility. The relationship between job strain and blood pressure is an unfinished business: sample characteristics and measurement methods should be carefully considered.

  7. Direct and indirect effects of biological factors on extinction risk in fossil bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Harnik, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Biological factors, such as abundance and body size, may contribute directly to extinction risk and indirectly through their influence on other biological characteristics, such as geographic range size. Paleontological data can be used to explicitly test many of these hypothesized relationships, and general patterns revealed through analysis of the fossil record can help refine predictive models of extinction risk developed for extant species. Here, I use structural equation modeling to tease apart the contributions of three canonical predictors of extinction—abundance, body size, and geographic range size—to the duration of bivalve species in the early Cenozoic marine fossil record of the eastern United States. I find that geographic range size has a strong direct effect on extinction risk and that an apparent direct effect of abundance can be explained entirely by its covariation with geographic range. The influence of geographic range on extinction risk is manifest across three ecologically disparate bivalve clades. Body size also has strong direct effects on extinction risk but operates in opposing directions in different clades, and thus, it seems to be decoupled from extinction risk in bivalves as a whole. Although abundance does not directly predict extinction risk, I reveal weak indirect effects of both abundance and body size through their positive influence on geographic range size. Multivariate models that account for the pervasive covariation between biological factors and extinction are necessary for assessing causality in evolutionary processes and making informed predictions in applied conservation efforts. PMID:21808004

  8. Direct and indirect effects of biological factors on extinction risk in fossil bivalves.

    PubMed

    Harnik, Paul G

    2011-08-16

    Biological factors, such as abundance and body size, may contribute directly to extinction risk and indirectly through their influence on other biological characteristics, such as geographic range size. Paleontological data can be used to explicitly test many of these hypothesized relationships, and general patterns revealed through analysis of the fossil record can help refine predictive models of extinction risk developed for extant species. Here, I use structural equation modeling to tease apart the contributions of three canonical predictors of extinction--abundance, body size, and geographic range size--to the duration of bivalve species in the early Cenozoic marine fossil record of the eastern United States. I find that geographic range size has a strong direct effect on extinction risk and that an apparent direct effect of abundance can be explained entirely by its covariation with geographic range. The influence of geographic range on extinction risk is manifest across three ecologically disparate bivalve clades. Body size also has strong direct effects on extinction risk but operates in opposing directions in different clades, and thus, it seems to be decoupled from extinction risk in bivalves as a whole. Although abundance does not directly predict extinction risk, I reveal weak indirect effects of both abundance and body size through their positive influence on geographic range size. Multivariate models that account for the pervasive covariation between biological factors and extinction are necessary for assessing causality in evolutionary processes and making informed predictions in applied conservation efforts.

  9. Finding electromagnetic and chemical enhancement factors of surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Dvoynenko, Mykhaylo M; Wang, Juen-Kai

    2007-12-15

    The authors report two methods to determine electromagnetic and chemical enhancement factors in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which are based on saturation property and decay dynamics of photoluminescence and concurrent measurements of photoluminescence and resonance Raman scattering intensities. Considerations for experimental implementation are discussed. This study is expected to facilitate the understanding of SERS mechanisms and the advancement of the usage of SERS in chemical and biological sensor applications.

  10. Direct detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei and biological factors in soil.

    PubMed

    Sermswan, Rasana W; Royros, Phairat; Khakhum, Nittaya; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, is a severe infectious agent that causes melioidosis and soil is the most important reservoir. One hundred and forty soil samples were tested for pH, moisture content and total C and N measurements and used for DNA extraction and culture for B. pseudomallei. The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting wcbG, a putative capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis protein gene of B. pseudomallei, was developed to detect the bacterium, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to detect the microbial diversity in soil. The acidic pH was correlated with the presence of the bacterium. Forty-four soil sites (44/140, 31.4%) were positive for B. pseudomallei by qPCR, of which 21 were positive by culture. The limit of detection is 32 fg of DNA (about 4 genomes). The RAPD method could classify the soil samples into low diversity (LD) and high diversity (HD) sites. The trend of LD was found with B. pseudomallei positive soil sites. The acidity of the soil or metabolites from organisms in the sites may contribute to the presence of the bacterium. Further investigation of microbes by a more robust method should elucidate biological factors that promote the presence of B. pseudomallei and may be used for controlling the bacterium in the environment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. An unsupervised learning approach to find ovarian cancer genes through integration of biological data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized largely by the accumulation of out-of-control somatic mutations during the lifetime of a patient. Distinguishing driver mutations from passenger mutations has posed a challenge in modern cancer research. With the advanced development of microarray experiments and clinical studies, a large numbers of candidate cancer genes have been extracted and distinguishing informative genes out of them is essential. As a matter of fact, we proposed to find the informative genes for cancer by using mutation data from ovarian cancers in our framework. In our model we utilized the patient gene mutation profile, gene expression data and gene gene interactions network to construct a graphical representation of genes and patients. Markov processes for mutation and patients are triggered separately. After this process, cancer genes are prioritized automatically by examining their scores at their stationary distributions in the eigenvector. Extensive experiments demonstrate that the integration of heterogeneous sources of information is essential in finding important cancer genes. PMID:26328548

  12. HotPatch: A Statistical Approach to Finding Biologically Relevant Features on Protein Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Frank K.; Bare, Emiko; Tsai, Albert; Bowie, James U.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a fully automated algorithm for finding functional sites on protein structures. Our method finds surface patches of unusual physicochemical properties on protein structures, and estimates the patches’ probability of overlapping functional sites. Other methods for predicting the locations of specific types of functional sites exist, but in previous analyses, it has been difficult to compare methods when they are applied to different types of sites. Thus, we introduce a new statistical framework that enables rigorous comparisons of the usefulness of different physicochemical properties for predicting virtually any kind of functional site. The program’s statistical models were trained for 11 individual properties (electrostatics, concavity, hydrophobicity, etc.) and for 15 neural network combination properties, all optimized and tested on 15 diverse protein functions. To simulate what to expect if the program were run on proteins of unknown function, as might arise from structural genomics, we tested it on 618 proteins of diverse mixed functions. In the higher-scoring top half of all predictions, a functional residue could typically be found within the first 1.7 residues chosen at random. The program may or may not use partial information about the protein’s function type as an input, depending on which statistical model the user chooses to employ. If function type is used as an additional constraint, prediction accuracy usually increases, and is particularly good for enzymes, DNA-interacting sites, and oligomeric interfaces. The program can be accessed online at http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu. PMID:17451744

  13. Mars - is it a habitable planet? - A biological approach to find answers to this question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, J. P.; Lorek, A.; Koncz, A.; Khan, A.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Möhlmann, D.; Spohn, T.

    2012-12-01

    An overview on different experiments with photosynthetic organisms such as extremophilic microorganisms like lichens and cyanobacteria and even higher plants shows the different degrees of adaptation. The most resistant organisms can be found in tropic deserts and in polar and alpine habitats. The reason for their resistance can be explained by their occurrence in intensely irradiated, very dry and/or cold environments which are supposed to be as close as possible to Martian surface conditions. A systematically approach comparing measurements on photosynthetic activity of a variety of organisms in relation to measured environmental parameters obtained in Mars analog field sites with data collected from space exposed samples or during Mars simulation experiments will show differences and common results after analyzing the investigated organisms. Some of the investigated species were exposed during different experiments either directly to real space conditions on space exposure platforms like BIOPAN and EXPOSE-E on the International Space Station or to Mars simulation conditions in a Mars simulation chamber. Some of these species were also exposed to both of the extreme environmental conditions. In parallel environmental parameters were monitored in space and in the simulation chambers to get an impression about the influence of each of the tested parameters on metabolic activity. The outcome of this work might be relevant to classify e.g. Mars as a habitable planet by a new experimental and biological approach and to evaluate how bio-regenerative life supporting systems might be feasible and discuss the likelihood of terra forming Mars in the far future.

  14. Biological and Sociocultural Factors During the School Years Predicting Women's Lifetime Educational Attainment.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, C Emily; Cohen, Alison K; Deardorff, Julianna; Cance, Jessica D

    2016-03-01

    Lifetime educational attainment is an important predictor of health and well-being for women in the United States. In this study, we examine the roles of sociocultural factors in youth and an understudied biological life event, pubertal timing, in predicting women's lifetime educational attainment. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (N = 3889), we conducted sequential multivariate linear regression analyses to investigate the influences of macro-level and family-level sociocultural contextual factors in youth (region of country, urbanicity, race/ethnicity, year of birth, household composition, mother's education, and mother's age at first birth) and early menarche, a marker of early pubertal development, on women's educational attainment after age 24. Pubertal timing and all sociocultural factors in youth, other than year of birth, predicted women's lifetime educational attainment in bivariate models. Family factors had the strongest associations. When family factors were added to multivariate models, geographic region in youth, and pubertal timing were no longer significant. Our findings provide additional evidence that family factors should be considered when developing comprehensive and inclusive interventions in childhood and adolescence to promote lifetime educational attainment among girls. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  15. Social and Behavioral Risk Marker Clustering Associated with Biological Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease: NHANES 2001–2004

    PubMed Central

    Everage, Nicholas J.; Linkletter, Crystal D.; Gjelsvik, Annie; McGarvey, Stephen T.; Loucks, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Social and behavioral risk markers (e.g., physical activity, diet, smoking, and socioeconomic position) cluster; however, little is known whether clustering is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Objectives were to determine if sociobehavioral clustering is associated with biological CHD risk factors (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and diabetes) and whether associations are independent of individual clustering components. Methods. Participants included 4,305 males and 4,673 females aged ≥20 years from NHANES 2001–2004. Sociobehavioral Risk Marker Index (SRI) included a summary score of physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption, smoking, and educational attainment. Regression analyses evaluated associations of SRI with aforementioned biological CHD risk factors. Receiver operator curve analyses assessed independent predictive ability of SRI. Results. Healthful clustering (SRI = 0) was associated with improved biological CHD risk factor levels in 5 of 6 risk factors in females and 2 of 6 risk factors in males. Adding SRI to models containing age, race, and individual SRI components did not improve C-statistics. Conclusions. Findings suggest that healthful sociobehavioral risk marker clustering is associated with favorable CHD risk factor levels, particularly in females. These findings should inform social ecological interventions that consider health impacts of addressing social and behavioral risk factors. PMID:24719858

  16. Sedimentary selenium as a causal factor for adverse biological effects: Toxicity thresholds and stream modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Va Derveer, W.; Canton, S.

    1995-12-31

    Selenium (Se) in the aquatic environment exhibits a strong association with particulate organic matter and as a result, measurements of waterborne concentration can be an unreliable predictor of bioaccumulation and adverse effects. Particulate-bound Se, typically measured as sedimentary Se, has been repeatedly implicated as a causal factor for Se bioaccumulation and subsequent potential for reproductive failures in fish and/or birds at sites receiving coal-fired power plant and refinery effluents as well as irrigation drainage. In fact, the premise that adverse biological effects are largely induced by sedimentary Se satisfies all of Hill`s criteria for a causal association. Despite these findings, most efforts to control Se continue to focus on waterborne concentrations because sedimentary toxicity thresholds are largely unknown. Sedimentary Se and associated biological effects data from studies of Se-bearing industrial effluent and irrigation drainage were compiled to initiate development of biological effects thresholds, The probability of adverse effects on fish or birds appears to be low up to a sedimentary Se concentration of about 2.8 {micro}g/g dry weight and high at 6.4 {micro}g/g dry weight (10th and 50th percentile of effects data, respectively). In addition, a preliminary regression model was derived for predicting dissolved to sedimentary Se transfer in streams as an interactive function of site-specific sedimentary organic carbon content (R{sup 2} = 0,870, p < 0.001) based on irrigation drainage studies in Colorado. This dissolved Se interaction with sedimentary organic carbon provides a possible explanation for the variable biological response to waterborne Se-organic-rich sites are predisposed to greater Se bioaccumulation and subsequent biological effects than organic-poor sites.

  17. Computational approaches to find the active binding sites of biological targets against busulfan.

    PubMed

    Karthick, T; Tandon, Poonam

    2016-06-01

    Determination of electrophilic and nucleophilic sites of a molecule is the primary task to find the active sites of the lead molecule. In the present study, the active sites of busulfan have been predicted by molecular electrostatic potential surface and Fukui function analysis with the help of dispersion corrected density functional theory. Similarly, the identification of active binding sites of the proteins against lead compound plays a vital role in the field of drug discovery. Rigid and flexible molecular docking approaches are used for this purpose. For rigid docking, Hex 8.0.0 software employing fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm has been used. The partial flexible blind docking simulations have been performed with AutoDock 4.2 software; where a Lamarckian genetic algorithm is employed. The results showed that the most electrophilic atoms of busulfan bind with the targets. It is clear from the docking studies that busulfan has inhibition capability toward the targets 12CA and 1BZM. Graphical Abstract Docking of ligand and protein.

  18. The Teacher as One of the Factors Influencing Students' Perception of Biology as a School Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiatko, Milan; Torkar, Gregor; Rovnanova, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of our research was to determine whether the teacher is one of the factors influencing students' perception of biology as a school subject. The study also aimed to identify the influence of certain other factors in this regard, specifically: students' gender and place of residence, the number of biology teachers who have taught the…

  19. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchun; Mahony, Shaun; Gifford, David K

    2012-01-01

    An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM). GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the implementation of combinatorial

  20. Factors Moderating Children's Adjustment to Parental Separation: Findings from a Community Study in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Helen; Dunn, Judy; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Golding, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Research findings show that there is marked variability in children's response to parental separation, but few studies identify the sources of this variation. This prospective longitudinal study examines the factors modifying children's adjustment to parental separation in a community sample of 5,635 families in England. Children's…

  1. Development of Transcription Factor-Based Designer Macrolide Biosensors for Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Kasey, Christian M; Zerrad, Mounir; Li, Yiwei; Cropp, T Ashton; Williams, Gavin J

    2017-10-12

    Macrolides are a large group of natural products that display broad and potent biological activities and are biosynthesized by type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) and associated enzymatic machinery. There is an urgent need to access macrolides and unnatural macrolide derivatives for drug discovery, drug manufacture, and probe development. Typically, efforts to engineer the biosynthesis of macrolides and macrolide analogues in various microbial hosts are hampered by the complexity of macrolide biosynthetic pathways and our limited ability to rationally reprogram type I PKSs and post-PKS machinery. High-throughput approaches based on synthetic biology and directed evolution could overcome this problem by testing the function of large libraries of variants. Yet, methods that can identify mutant enzymes, pathways, and strains that produce the desired macrolide target are not generally available. Here we show that the promiscuous macrolide sensing transcription factor MphR is a powerful platform for engineering variants with tailored properties. We identified variants that displayed improved sensitivity toward erythromycin, tailored the inducer specificity, and significantly improved sensitivity to macrolides that were very poor inducers of the wild-type MphR biosensor. Designer macrolide biosensors should find broad utility and enable applications related to high-throughput synthetic biology and directed evolution of macrolide biosynthesis.

  2. Bioprospecting finds the toughest biological material: extraordinary silk from a giant riverine orb spider.

    PubMed

    Agnarsson, Ingi; Kuntner, Matjaz; Blackledge, Todd A

    2010-09-16

    change in material properties of silk co-occurred with ecological shifts within the genus, and can thus be tested by combining material science, behavioral observations, and phylogenetics. Our findings highlight the potential benefits of natural history-informed bioprospecting to discover silks, as well as other materials, with novel and exceptional properties to serve as models in biomimicry.

  3. Bioprospecting Finds the Toughest Biological Material: Extraordinary Silk from a Giant Riverine Orb Spider

    PubMed Central

    Agnarsson, Ingi; Kuntner, Matjaž; Blackledge, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    . This hypothesis predicts that rapid change in material properties of silk co-occurred with ecological shifts within the genus, and can thus be tested by combining material science, behavioral observations, and phylogenetics. Our findings highlight the potential benefits of natural history–informed bioprospecting to discover silks, as well as other materials, with novel and exceptional properties to serve as models in biomimicry. PMID:20856804

  4. Tumour targeting: biological factors and formulation advances in injectable lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, V S; Vijay, I K; Murthy, R S R

    2005-04-01

    Cancer chemotherapeutic agents are often administered systemically. Following systemic administration, numerous biological factors associated with the tumours influence the delivery of the drugs to the tumours. These factors have been extensively studied for the last 2 decades. The influence of these biological factors has brought about a drastic change in the design of drug delivery systems to solid tumours. This review discusses the various biological factors influencing drug delivery to tumours and the subsequent development of injectable delivery systems (i.e., lipid-based nanoparticles (SLNs)) for adequate delivery of drug to solid tumours.

  5. New findings on the pollination biology of Mauritia flexuosa (Arecaceae) in Roraima, Brazil: linking dioecy, wind, and habitat.

    PubMed

    Khorsand Rosa, Roxaneh; Koptur, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Despite the ecological, economic, and cultural importance of the palm Mauritia flexuosa in Amazonia, knowledge of its reproductive biology is scarce. Previous observations of this species suggested beetles as the probable pollinator, but experimental work to confirm this hypothesis was lacking. • We investigated the floral biology and pollination of M. flexuosa in undisturbed forest, undisturbed savanna/forest ecotone, and fragmented savanna within plantations of the exotic tree, Acacia mangium, in northern Brazilian Amazonia. In each habitat, we examined floral biology, combined floral visitor observations with laboratory analyses, and performed anemophily and exclusion experiments. • Fruit set was significantly greater in the visitor exclusion treatment than in the wind + visitor exclusion treatment and significantly lower in the wind + visitor exclusion treatment than the open control, but there was no difference in fruit set between the visitor exclusion treatment and the control. We found no significant difference in pollen dispersal among the three habitats. The presence of A. mangium appears to have no immediate effect on pollination of M. flexuosa, although it may indirectly affect other aspects of this native's reproductive ecology. • Floral visitors of M. flexuosa are not pollinators. This dioecious palm depends on wind as its primary pollen vector. Wind pollination is not necessarily most effective in open habitats. These findings are important because they re-evaluate traditional assumptions of wind pollination and can improve management strategies of this natural resource in the Amazon.

  6. Fact-finding survey of actual garbage discharged from dormitory and its biological anaerobic-aerobic treatment.

    PubMed

    Imai, T; Ukita, M; Sekine, M; Fukagawa, M; Nakanishi, H

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a possibility of complete treatment of garbage and resource recovery (production of methane from available utility of carbon resource in garbage) by biological treatment process. As the first step, a fact-finding survey of actual garbage discharged from the dormitory of the Ube National College of Technology (equivalent to 300 population) was carried out. Second, the combined biological anaerobic-aerobic treatment, i.e. combination of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process and aerobic membrane bioreactor (AMB) process, was applied to the garbage treatment. The applicability and efficiency of this system were investigated in this study. The survey results showed that the composition and quantity of garbage from a student dormitory changed slightly during a week due to the change of the menu, however, they remained almost unchanged during the entire experimental period. The experimental results showed high biodegradability of the garbage, and demonstrated its suitability for methane production. The soluble nitrogen removal was high: over 97%. No excess sludge was wasted from the system. A high treatment efficiency of simultaneous organic carbon and nitrogen was obtained. The possibility of complete treatment of garbage with this process has been positively demonstrated by this study.

  7. Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics Analysis for the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Results and Findings

    SciTech Connect

    GARVIN, L.J.

    1999-09-20

    The purpose for this supplemental report is to follow-up and update the information in SNF-3907, Human Factors Engineering (HFE) Analysis: Results and Findings. This supplemental report responds to applicable U.S. Department of Energy Safety Analysis Report review team comments and questions. This Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics (HFE/Erg) analysis was conducted from April 1999 to July 1999; SNF-3907 was based on analyses accomplished in October 1998. The HFE/Erg findings presented in this report and SNF-3907, along with the results of HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report,'' Chapter A3.0, ''Hazards and Accidents Analyses,'' provide the technical basis for preparing or updating HNF-3553. Annex A, Chaptex A13.0, ''Human Factors Engineering.'' The findings presented in this report allow the HNF-3553 Chapter 13.0, ''Human Factors,'' to respond fully to the HFE requirements established in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  8. Method for Finding Metabolic Properties Based on the General Growth Law. Liver Examples. A General Framework for Biological Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Shestopaloff, Yuri K.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method for finding metabolic parameters of cells, organs and whole organisms, which is based on the earlier discovered general growth law. Based on the obtained results and analysis of available biological models, we propose a general framework for modeling biological phenomena and discuss how it can be used in Virtual Liver Network project. The foundational idea of the study is that growth of cells, organs, systems and whole organisms, besides biomolecular machinery, is influenced by biophysical mechanisms acting at different scale levels. In particular, the general growth law uniquely defines distribution of nutritional resources between maintenance needs and biomass synthesis at each phase of growth and at each scale level. We exemplify the approach considering metabolic properties of growing human and dog livers and liver transplants. A procedure for verification of obtained results has been introduced too. We found that two examined dogs have high metabolic rates consuming about 0.62 and 1 gram of nutrients per cubic centimeter of liver per day, and verified this using the proposed verification procedure. We also evaluated consumption rate of nutrients in human livers, determining it to be about 0.088 gram of nutrients per cubic centimeter of liver per day for males, and about 0.098 for females. This noticeable difference can be explained by evolutionary development, which required females to have greater liver processing capacity to support pregnancy. We also found how much nutrients go to biomass synthesis and maintenance at each phase of liver and liver transplant growth. Obtained results demonstrate that the proposed approach can be used for finding metabolic characteristics of cells, organs, and whole organisms, which can further serve as important inputs and constraints for many applications in biology (such as protein expression), biotechnology (synthesis of substances), and medicine. PMID:24940740

  9. Factors on polygamy in sub-Saharan Africa: findings based on the Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Y; Liaw, K L

    1997-09-01

    This study presents a brief review of the historical and cultural context of polygamy in sub-Saharan Africa and examines the sociodemographic factors that influence polygamous union formation. Data were obtained from the Demographic and Health Surveys in Ghana (1988), Senegal (1986), Kenya (1989), and Zimbabwe (1988-89). The sample was restricted to currently married or cohabitating women. The proportion of women in a polygamous union was 48% in Senegal, 31% in Ghana, 23% in Kenya, and 16% in Zimbabwe. The authors state that rates may have been higher in Senegal and Ghana due to the higher involvement of women in the cultivation of root crops and trading at local markets. Rate differences indicated a greater proportion of men and women with no education and Muslim affiliation in the high polygamy countries of Senegal and Ghana in West Africa compared to Kenya and Zimbabwe. Single factor analysis was performed for the effects of women's formal education, men's formal education, religion, urbanization, current age, age at first marriage, and ethnicity. Multivariate analysis by country indicated the importance of rising husbands' education and the lack of significance of women's education. As husband's education rose to the secondary level, polygamy declined. Other significant factors were religion, ethnicity, and current age, which was the most important factor. In Ghana, the effect of husbands' education overwhelmed the effect of women's education. Current age was the most important explanatory factor, followed by religion. In Kenya, both women's and men's education, ethnicity, urbanization, and age were significant factors. Ethnicity was the most important factor. In Zimbabwe, every factor was significant. Women's education was the most important factor. Findings reveal different prevalence of polygamy and different effects of sociodemographic factors.

  10. Clinical Factors Associated With Chest Imaging Findings in Hospitalized Infants With Bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Nazif, Joanne M; Taragin, Benjamin H; Azzarone, Gabriella; Rinke, Michael L; Liewehr, Sheila; Choi, Jaeun; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora

    2017-10-01

    Despite recommendations against routine imaging, chest radiography (CXR) is frequently performed on infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis. We conducted a review of 811 infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis to identify clinical factors associated with imaging findings. CXR was performed on 553 (68%) infants either on presentation or during hospitalization; 466 readings (84%) were normal or consistent with viral illness. Clinical factors significantly associated with normal/viral imaging were normal temperature (odds ratio = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.03-2.67) and normal oxygen saturation (odds ratio = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.1-2.83) on presentation. Afebrile patients with normal oxygen saturations were nearly 3 times as likely to have a normal/viral CXR as patients with both fever and hypoxia. Our findings support the limited role of radiography in the evaluation of hospitalized infants with bronchiolitis, especially patients without fever or hypoxia.

  11. Human telomere biology: A contributory and interactive factor in aging, disease risks, and protection.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Epel, Elissa S; Lin, Jue

    2015-12-04

    Telomeres are the protective end-complexes at the termini of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomere attrition can lead to potentially maladaptive cellular changes, block cell division, and interfere with tissue replenishment. Recent advances in the understanding of human disease processes have clarified the roles of telomere biology, especially in diseases of human aging and in some aging-related processes. Greater overall telomere attrition predicts mortality and aging-related diseases in inherited telomere syndrome patients, and also in general human cohorts. However, genetically caused variations in telomere maintenance either raise or lower risks and progression of cancers, in a highly cancer type-specific fashion. Telomere maintenance is determined by genetic factors and is also cumulatively shaped by nongenetic influences throughout human life; both can interact. These and other recent findings highlight both causal and potentiating roles for telomere attrition in human diseases.

  12. Biological and behavioral factors modify urinary arsenic metabolic profiles in a U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Hudgens, Edward E; Drobna, Zuzana; He, Bin; Le, X C; Styblo, Miroslav; Rogers, John; Thomas, David J

    2016-05-26

    consistently predicted by gender, body mass index, age, and smoking. These findings suggest that analyses of dose-response relations in arsenic-exposed populations should account for biological and behavioral factors that modify levels of inorganic and methylated arsenicals in urine. Evidence of significant effects of these factors on arsenic metabolism may also support mode of action studies in appropriate experimental models.

  13. Do Sophisticated Epistemic Beliefs Predict Meaningful Learning? Findings from a Structural Equation Model of Undergraduate Biology Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships among college students' epistemic beliefs in biology (EBB), conceptions of learning biology (COLB), and strategies of learning biology (SLB). EBB includes four dimensions, namely "multiple-source," "uncertainty," "development," and "justification." COLB is further…

  14. Do Sophisticated Epistemic Beliefs Predict Meaningful Learning? Findings from a Structural Equation Model of Undergraduate Biology Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships among college students' epistemic beliefs in biology (EBB), conceptions of learning biology (COLB), and strategies of learning biology (SLB). EBB includes four dimensions, namely "multiple-source," "uncertainty," "development," and "justification." COLB is further…

  15. Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) in Brazilian Samples of Different Age Groups: Findings from Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Brietzke, Elisa; Viola, Thiago Wendt; Manfro, Gisele Gus; Kristensen, Christian Haag; Arteche, Adriane Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is internationally accepted as a key tool for the assessment of childhood abuse and neglect experiences. However, there are relative few psychometric studies available and some authors have proposed two different factor solutions. We examined the dimensional structure and internal consistency of the Brazilian version of the CTQ. A total of 1,925 participants from eight different clinical and non-clinical samples including adolescents, adults and elders were considered in this study. First, we performed Confirmatory Factor Analysis to investigate the goodness of fit of the two proposed competitive factor structure models for the CTQ. We also investigated the internal consistency of all factors. Second, multi-group analyses were used to investigate measurement invariance and population heterogeneity across age groups and sex. Our findings revealed that the alternative factor structure as opposed to the original factor structure was the most appropriate model within adolescents and adults Brazilian samples. We provide further evidence for the validity and reliability of the CTQ within the Brazilian samples and report that the alternative model showed an improvement in fit indexes and may be a better alternative over the original model. PMID:24475237

  16. Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

    2001-09-14

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

  17. Ecological, Social and Biological Risk Factors for Continued Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission by Triatoma dimidiata in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Dulce M.; De Urioste-Stone, Sandra M.; Juárez, José G.; Pennington, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease transmission by Triatoma dimidiata persists in Guatemala and elsewhere in Central America under undefined ecological, biological and social (eco-bio-social) conditions. Methodology Eco-bio-social risk factors associated with persistent domiciliary infestation were identified by a cross-sectional survey and qualitative participatory methods. Quantitative and qualitative data were generated regarding Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs and triatomine hosts. Blood meal analysis and infection of insects, dogs and rodents were determined. Based on these data, multimodel inference was used to identify risk factors for domestic infestation with the greatest relative importance (>0.75). Principal Findings Blood meal analysis showed that 64% of 36 bugs fed on chickens, 50% on humans, 17% on dogs; 24% of 34 bugs fed on Rattus rattus and 21% on Mus musculus. Seroprevalence among 80 dogs was 37%. Eight (17%) of 46 M. musculus and three (43%) of seven R. rattus from households with infected triatomines were infected with T. cruzi Distinct Typing Unit I. Results from interviews and participatory meetings indicated that vector control personnel and some householders perceived chickens roosting and laying eggs in the house as bug infestation risk factors. House construction practices were seen as a risk factor for bug and rodent infestation, with rodents being perceived as a pest by study participants. Multimodel inference showed that house infestation risk factors of high relative importance are dog density, mouse presence, interior wall plaster condition, dirt floor, tile roofing and coffee tree presence. Conclusions/Significance Persistent house infestation is closely related to eco-bio-social factors that maintain productive T. dimidiata habitats associated with dogs, chickens and rodents. Triatomine, dog and rodent infections indicate active T. cruzi transmission. Integrated vector control methods should include actions that consider the role of

  18. Identification of biological and environmental risk factors for language delay: The Let's Talk STEPS study.

    PubMed

    Korpilahti, Pirjo; Kaljonen, Anne; Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this population-based study was to identify demographic factors for language delays at an early age. The risk analysis covered 11 biological and 8 environmental factors. The mothers' concerns regarding language development were also examined. A total of 226 children from a Finnish cohort study were invited to participate in language assessments at 36 months. The test results for word finding and language comprehension were compared with parental questionnaires about children's vocabulary at 13 and 24 months. Regression analysis revealed that the father's social class (t=-2.79, p=0.006) and working full time (t=-2.86, p=0.005) significantly predicted children's language delay. In addition, language comprehension was significantly predicted by the mother's social class (t=-2.06, p=0.041) and by gender, with an advantage to girls (t=-2.71, p=0.008). Vocabulary at 24 months was a powerful predictor for lexical development (t=4.58, p<0.0001) and language comprehension (t=4.85, p<0.0001) at 36 months. Mothers' concerns were correlated with children's limited lexicons as early as 24 months (r=0.31, p<0.0001) and poor language comprehension (r=-0.35, p<0.0001) at 36 months. Mothers were especially concerned if the parents needed special education during school years. At the population-level, gender was the most powerful biological factor in predicting language delays. Similarly, both parents' social status had predictive value for the child's language development. In addition, it was found that the mother's concern about her child's slow language acquisition should be taken into account when making decisions regarding special support.

  19. Podoplanin lymphatic density and invasion correlate with adverse clinicopathologic and biological factors and survival in neuroblastomas.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Pramila; Somerville, Michelle S; May, Margaret T

    2012-06-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a challenging problem in oncology, as the majority of patients have lymphatic and/or hematogenous metastases at diagnosis. We investigated the prognostic significance of lymphatic density (LD) and invasion (LI) in NBs using the lymphatic endothelial marker podoplanin (PDPN). A total of 77 neuroblastic tumors and 9 ganglioneuromas (GNs) were immunostained for PDPN using D2-40 antibody. Intratumoral lymphatics were identified in 87% (67/77) of NBs and 7/9 GNs. The LD counts were significantly higher (P<0.01) in NBs (median=19.6, range=0.00 to 89.3) than in GNs (median=10.2, range=0 to 18.7). LI, assessed in D2-40-stained lymphatics, was present in 52/67 (78%) NBs. LDs were significantly higher in NBs from patients with adverse clinical factors (advanced-stage, high-risk group, primary abdominal compared with extra-abdominal sites), biological factors (MYCN amplification, 1p deletion, 17q gain), and distant lymph node metastases. LDs and LI were also significantly higher in NBs belonging to an unfavorable pathology prognostic group and in those with a high mitosis-karyorrhexis index. High LD and the presence of LI correlated with a shorter event-free survival in univariable analyses. High LD and the presence of LI were also associated with worse overall survival, although the association was less strong. In conclusion, increased LDs and the presence of LI correlated with adverse clinicopathologic and biological factors and survival. These findings suggest that PDPN has the potential to provide valuable prognostic information to clinicians for risk assessment in NBs.

  20. Biological and behavioral factors modify biomarkers of arsenic exposure in a U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Rebecca L; Hudgens, Edward E; Carty, Cara; He, Bin; Le, X Chris; Rogers, John; Thomas, David J

    2013-10-01

    Although consumption of drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is usually considered the primary exposure route, aggregate exposure to arsenic depends on direct consumption of water, use of water in food preparation, and the presence in arsenicals in foods. To gain insight into the effects of biological and behavioral factors on arsenic exposure, we determined arsenic concentrations in urine and toenails in a U.S. population that uses public or private water supplies containing inorganic arsenic. Study participants were 904 adult residents of Churchill County, Nevada, whose home tap water supplies contained <3 to about 1200 µg of arsenic per liter. Biomarkers of exposure for this study were summed urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites (speciated arsenical), of all urinary arsenicals (total arsenical), and of all toenail arsenicals (total arsenical). Increased tap water arsenic concentration and consumption were associated with significant upward trends for urinary speciated and total and toenail total arsenical concentrations. Significant gender differences in concentrations of speciated and total arsenicals in urine and toenails reflected male-female difference in water intake. Both recent and higher habitual seafood consumption significantly increased urinary total but not speciated arsenical concentration. In a stepwise general linear model, seafood consumption significantly predicted urinary total arsenical but not urinary speciated or toenail total arsenical concentrations. Smoking behavior significantly predicted urinary speciated or total arsenical concentration. Gender, tap water arsenic concentration, and primary drinking water source significantly predicted urinary speciated and total concentrations and toenail total arsenical concentrations. These findings confirm the primacy of home tap water as a determinant of arsenic concentration in urine and toenails. However, biological and behavioral factors can

  1. [Clinical and biological prognostic factors in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia patients].

    PubMed

    Yébenes-Ramírez, Manuel; Serrano, Josefina; Martínez-Losada, Carmen; Sánchez-García, Joaquín

    2016-09-02

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most frequent type of acute leukemia in adults. Despite recent advances in the characterization of pathogenesis of AML, the cure rates are under 40%, being leukemia relapse the most common cause of treatment failure. Leukaemia relapse occurs due to clonal evolution or clonal escape. In this study, we aimed to analyze the clinical and biological factors influencing outcomes in patients with AML relapse. We included a total of 75 AML patients who experienced leukaemia relapse after achieving complete remission. We performed complete immunophenotyping and conventional karyotyping in bone marrow aspirates obtained at diagnosis and at leukemia relapse. Overall survival (OS) of the series was 3.7%±2.3, leukaemia progression being the most common cause of death. Patients relapsing before 12 months and those with adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk had statistically significant worse outcomes. A percentage of 52.5 of patients showed phenotypic changes and 50% cytogenetic changes at relapse. We did not find significant clinical factors predicting clonal evolution. The presence of clonal evolution at relapse did not have a significant impact on outcome. Patients with relapsed AML have a dismal prognosis, especially those with early relapse and adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk. Clonal evolution with phenotypic and cytogenetic changes occurred in half of the patients without predictive clinical factors or impact on outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Important biological factors for utilizing native plant species

    Treesearch

    Loren E. Wiesner

    1999-01-01

    Native plant species are valuable resources for revegetation of disturbed ecosystems. The success of these plantings is dependent on the native species selected, quality of seed used, condition of the soil, environmental conditions before and after planting, planting equipment used, time of planting, and other factors. Most native species contain dormant seed. Dormancy...

  3. Factors influencing food choices of adolescents: findings from focus-group discussions with adolescents.

    PubMed

    Neumark-Sztainer, D; Story, M; Perry, C; Casey, M A

    1999-08-01

    To assess adolescents' perceptions about factors influencing their food choices and eating behaviors. Data were collected in focus-group discussions. The study population included 141 adolescents in 7th and 10th grade from 2 urban schools in St Paul, Minn, who participated in 21 focus groups. Data were analyzed using qualitative research methodology, specifically, the constant comparative method. Factors perceived as influencing food choices included hunger and food cravings, appeal of food, time considerations of adolescents and parents, convenience of food, food availability, parental influence on eating behaviors (including the culture or religion of the family), benefits of foods (including health), situation-specific factors, mood, body image, habit, cost, media, and vegetarian beliefs. Major barriers to eating more fruits, vegetables, and dairy products and eating fewer high-fat foods included a lack of sense of urgency about personal health in relation to other concerns, and taste preferences for other foods. Suggestions for helping adolescents eat a more healthful diet include making healthful food taste and look better, limiting the availability of unhealthful options, making healthful food more available and convenient, teaching children good eating habits at an early age, and changing social norms to make it "cool" to eat healthfully. The findings suggest that if programs to improve adolescent nutrition are to be effective, they need to address a broad range of factors, in particular environmental factors (e.g., the increased availability and promotion of appealing, convenient foods within homes schools, and restaurants).

  4. Characterization of Psychological and Biological Factors in an Animal Model of Warrior Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-26

    Characterization of psychological and biological factors in an animal model of Warrior Stress by Angela M. Yarnell...biological factors in an animal model of Warrior Stress" Name of Candidate: Angela M. Yarnell Doctor of Philosophy Degree July 26. 2013 DISSERTATION...Medical Psychology and develop my skills as a scientist. I am grateful to the members of my doctoral dissertation committee, Drs. Andrew Waters , Mark

  5. New insights into the biology of tissue factor pathway inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    MARONEY, S. A.; MAST, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) dampens the initiation of blood coagulation by inhibiting two potent procoagulant complexes, tissue factor–factor VIIa (TF–FVIIa) and early forms of prothrombinase. TFPI isoforms, TFPIα and TFPIβ, result from alternative splicing of mRNA, producing distinct C-terminal ends of the two proteins. Both isoforms inhibit TF–FVIIa, but only TFPIα can inhibit early forms of prothrombinase by binding of its positively charged C-terminus with high affinity to the acidic B-domain exosite of FVa, which is generated upon activation by FXa. TFPIα and TFPIβ are produced in cultured human endothelial cells, while platelets contain only TFPIα. Knowledge of the anticoagulant mechanisms and tissue expression patterns of TFPIα and TFPIβ have improved our understanding of the phenotypes observed in different mouse models of TFPI deficiency, the east Texas bleeding disorder, and the development of pharmaceutical agents that block TFPI function to treat hemophilia. PMID:26149025

  6. A systems biology approach to the global analysis of transcription factors in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological entities do not perform in isolation, and often, it is the nature and degree of interactions among numerous biological entities which ultimately determines any final outcome. Hence, experimental data on any single biological entity can be of limited value when considered only in isolation. To address this, we propose that augmenting individual entity data with the literature will not only better define the entity’s own significance but also uncover relationships with novel biological entities. To test this notion, we developed a comprehensive text mining and computational methodology that focused on discovering new targets of one class of molecular entities, transcription factors (TF), within one particular disease, colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods We used 39 molecular entities known to be associated with CRC along with six colorectal cancer terms as the bait list, or list of search terms, for mining the biomedical literature to identify CRC-specific genes and proteins. Using the literature-mined data, we constructed a global TF interaction network for CRC. We then developed a multi-level, multi-parametric methodology to identify TFs to CRC. Results The small bait list, when augmented with literature-mined data, identified a large number of biological entities associated with CRC. The relative importance of these TF and their associated modules was identified using functional and topological features. Additional validation of these highly-ranked TF using the literature strengthened our findings. Some of the novel TF that we identified were: SLUG, RUNX1, IRF1, HIF1A, ATF-2, ABL1, ELK-1 and GATA-1. Some of these TFs are associated with functional modules in known pathways of CRC, including the Beta-catenin/development, immune response, transcription, and DNA damage pathways. Conclusions Our methodology of using text mining data and a multi-level, multi-parameter scoring technique was able to identify both known and novel TF that have roles in

  7. Molecular and cellular biology of von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Denis, Cécile V

    2002-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a plasma protein that performs 2 main functions in hemostasis: it mediates platelet adhesion to the injured vessel wall, and it carries and protects coagulation factor VIII. VWF is synthesized through a multistep process in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes as a very large polymer composed of identical disulfide-linked 250-kd subunits. In endothelial cells, VWF not only directs the formation of its own storage granules, the Weibel-Palade bodies, but it also acts as a chaperone molecule to direct other proteins, such as P-selectin, into these granules. Upon stimulation of the endothelium, the Weibel-Palade bodies will be translocated to the plasma membrane, and their contents will be secreted into the plasma milieu. The expression of VWF can be regulated at different levels by a number of genetic and environmental factors, resulting in control of its activity. New roles for VWF, especially in inflammatory processes, have recently been suggested, indicating that some aspects of this well-studied protein remain to be investigated.

  8. Biological factors that impinge on Chagas disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Amanda F; Jayawardhana, Shiromani; Lewis, Michael D; Taylor, Martin C; Kelly, John M

    2017-08-23

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the insect-transmitted protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is the most important parasitic infection in Latin America. The current drugs, benznidazole and nifurtimox, are characterized by limited efficacy and toxic side-effects, and treatment failures are frequently observed. The urgent need for new therapeutic approaches is being met by a combined effort from the academic and commercial sectors, together with major input from not-for-profit drug development consortia. With the disappointing outcomes of recent clinical trials against chronic Chagas disease, it has become clear that an incomplete understanding of parasite biology and disease pathogenesis is impacting negatively on the development of more effective drugs. In addition, technical issues, including difficulties in establishing parasitological cure in both human patients and animal models, have greatly complicated the assessment of drug efficacy. Here, we outline the major questions that need to be addressed and discuss technical innovations that can be exploited to accelerate the drug development pipeline.

  9. Learner, Text, and Context Factors on Conceptual Change in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevors, Gregory

    This thesis investigated how instructional environments might be optimally designed for all students to restructure prior knowledge and learn counter-intuitive science concepts, referred to as conceptual change. Three independent variables were examined in relation to real-time cognitive processes and subsequent learning outcomes: a learner characteristic (students' beliefs about knowledge and knowing, or epistemic beliefs), a property of instructional texts (refutational text structures), and a variable of instructional contexts (reading goals). Fifty-one university students with misconceptions in biological evolution were classified as espousing either absolutistic or evaluativist epistemic beliefs. Participants were randomly assigned to receive a refutational or expository texts and a global comprehension or elaborative interrogation reading goal in a 2x2 nested design. Data on think aloud responses while reading and open-ended essays post-reading were collected. Results reveal that refutations enriched conceptual evolutionary knowledge but failed to foster restructuring of misconceptions. Epistemic beliefs were related to cognitive processing, with evaluativists adapting their processes according to instructional texts. Reading goals likewise enriched conceptual knowledge and did not revise misconceptions, but no interaction between assigned goals and epistemic beliefs was observed. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  10. Toward finding a universally applicable parameterization of the β factor for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Teresa; Hrdina, Amy; Thomas, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The traditional eddy covariance (EC) technique requires the use of fast responding sensors (≥ 10 Hz) that do not exist for many chemical species found in the atmosphere. In this case, the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) method offers a means to calculate fluxes of trace gases and other scalar quantities (Businger and Oncley, 1990) and was originally derived from the eddy accumulation method (EA) first proposed by Desjardins (1972). While REA lessens the requirements for sensors and sampling and thus offers practical appeal, it introduces a dependence of the computed flux from a proportionality factor β. The accuracy of the REA fluxes hinges upon the correct determination of β, which was found to vary between 0.40 and 0.63 (Milne et al., 1999, Ammann and Meixner, 2002, Ruppert et al., 2006). However, formulating a universally valid parameterization for β instead of empirical evaluation has remained a conundrum and has been a main limitation for REA. In this study we take a fresh look at the dependencies and mathematical models of β by analyzing eddy covariance (EC) data and REA simulations for two field experiments in drastically contrasting environments: an exclusively physically driven environment in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, and a biologically active system in a grassland in Germany. The main objective is to work toward a model parameterization for β that can be applied over wide range of surface conditions and forcings without the need for empirical evaluation, which is not possible for most REA applications. Our study discusses two different models to define β: (i) based upon scalar-scalar similarity, in which a different scalar is measured with fast-response sensors as a proxy for the scalar of interest, here referred to as β0; and (ii) computed solely from the vertical wind statistics, assuming a linear relationship between the scalar of interest and the vertical wind speed, referred to as βw. Results are presented for the carbon

  11. Occupational risk factors and pancreatic cancer: a review of recent findings.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Gabriella; Silverman, Debra T

    2012-01-01

    Several occupational exposures have been linked to excess risk of pancreatic cancer; however, most associations are not well established. The objective of this review article is to report on the more recently published studies (1998-2010), and provide a summary of the most consistently reported occupational risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, nitrosamines, radiation, various airborne particles, and employment in sedentary occupations. We conclude that the strongest and most consistent findings linking occupational exposures with pancreatic cancer risk to date are for chlorinated hydrocarbons and PAHs.

  12. Factors influencing food choices of food-allergic consumers: findings from focus groups.

    PubMed

    Sommer, I; Mackenzie, H; Venter, C; Dean, T

    2012-10-01

    Up to 35% of the population modify their diet for adverse reactions to food. This study described the food choice behaviour of diagnosed food-allergic (DFA), self-reported food-allergic or intolerant (SFA) and nonfood-allergic (NFA) consumers, and explored differences between them. Six focus groups with adults (n = 44) were conducted. Data analysis was performed using thematic content analysis. Compared to NFA participants, DFA consumers were deprived of satisfaction and pleasure from foods, experienced difficulties finding safe foods and had to be organized with eating. SFA participants faced similar problems, but to a lesser degree; their food choices were strongly influenced by emotional factors or health awareness. Food-allergic consumers' food choices are influenced by a number of factors that differ to those of NFA consumers. It is therefore important to offer people with food allergies or intolerances advice that goes beyond how to avoid allergens. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Finding the Perfect Match: Factors That Influence Family Medicine Residency Selection.

    PubMed

    Wright, Katherine M; Ryan, Elizabeth R; Gatta, John L; Anderson, Lauren; Clements, Deborah S

    2016-04-01

    Residency program selection is a significant experience for emerging physicians, yet there is limited information about how applicants narrow their list of potential programs. This study examines factors that influence residency program selection among medical students interested in family medicine at the time of application. Medical students with an expressed interest in family medicine were invited to participate in a 37-item, online survey. Students were asked to rate factors that may impact residency selection on a 6-point Likert scale in addition to three open-ended qualitative questions. Mean values were calculated for each survey item and were used to determine a rank order for selection criteria. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors that predict a strong interest in urban, suburban, and rural residency programs. Logistic regression was also used to identify factors that predict a strong interest in academic health center-based residencies, community-based residencies, and community-based residencies with an academic affiliation. A total of 705 medical students from 32 states across the country completed the survey. Location, work/life balance, and program structure (curriculum, schedule) were rated the most important factors for residency selection. Logistic regression analysis was used to refine our understanding of how each factor relates to specific types of residencies. These findings have implications for how to best advise students in selecting a residency, as well as marketing residencies to the right candidates. Refining the recruitment process will ensure a better fit between applicants and potential programs. Limited recruitment resources may be better utilized by focusing on targeted dissemination strategies.

  14. Anatomic findings in revision endoscopic sinus surgery: Case series and review of contributory factors

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Jessica; Egro, Francesco M.; Masterson, Liam; Javer, Amin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is recognized that patients who undergo endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) do not always achieve control of their disease. The causes are multifactorial; variations in surgical practice have been identified as possible factors in refractory disease. Objective: To reflect on the frequent anatomic findings of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who require revision ESS. Methods: A retrospective review of patients who required revision ESS at a tertiary institution over a 3-year period. Patients for whom maximal medical therapy failed for CRS underwent computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses and image-guided surgery. Surgical records of anatomic findings were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Over 3 years, a total of 75 patients underwent revision procedures, 28% of all ESS performed in the unit. The most frequent finding was a residual uncinate process in 64% of the patients (n = 48); other findings included a maxillary antrostomy not based on the natural ostium of the maxillary sinus in 47% (n = 35), an oversized antrostomy in 29% (n = 22), resected middle turbinates in 35% (n = 26), middle meatal stenosis in 15% (n = 11), synechiae in 29% (n = 22), and osteitic bone that required drilling in 13% (n = 10). Conclusion: Surgical technique can give rise to anatomic variations that may prevent adequate mucociliary clearance and medication delivery, which leads to failure in ESS in patients with CRS. This study demonstrated the surgical findings encountered in revision ESS that should be highlighted in the training of Ear, Nose and Throat surgeons to help prevent primary failure and reduce health care costs. PMID:28107148

  15. Students' application of a biological concept: Factors affecting consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David

    1996-12-01

    This study investigated factors affecting students' ability to apply consistently the concept of adaptations (i.e., characteristics which suit an organism to its environment). Individual interviews were carried out with 74 Year 10 students, of whom only 47% showed an understanding of the concept. These students were asked to indicate on a list of living and non-living items which ones whould have adaptations. It was found that they were more likely to apply the concept to vertebrates than to other types of living things. In addition, many students appeared to be unable to separate consistently the idea of “adaptations as characteristics” from the other everyday and scientific meanings of the terms “adapt” and “adaptation”.

  16. Factors associated with Taiwanese lesbians' breast health-care behavior and intentions: Qualitative interview findings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Ching; Griffiths, Jane; Grande, Gunn

    2016-08-11

    This article presents the qualitative findings of a mixed-methods study that explored factors influencing lesbians' breast health-care behavior and intentions. A total of 37 semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted among women who self-identified as lesbians or women who partnered with the same gender who were aged 20 years or above in four areas of Taiwan (North, Central, South, and East Taiwan) between August 2012 and October 2012. Interviews were audio recorded with participants' consent. The interviews were analyzed using constant comparative analysis with Nvivo audio-coding support. Four themes were identified to be strongly associated with the lesbians' breast health-care behavior and their intentions, namely, gender identity, gender role expression, partners' support, and concerns about health-care providers' reactions. Important barriers to the women's breast health-care behavior and intentions were masculine identity ("T-identity" in Taiwan), masculine appearance, concerns about health-care providers' lack of knowledge of multiple gender diversity, and their attitudes toward lesbians. Conversely, their partners' support was a factor facilitating the women's breast health-care behavior and intentions, particularly for the T-identity lesbians. These findings suggest the significance of and need for culturally competent care and are important for improving Taiwanese lesbians' breast health.

  17. 76 FR 42675 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Significant Impact for a Biological Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... biological control agent to reduce the severity of hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae, HWA) infestations... release of this biological control agent into the continental United States. \\1\\ To view the notice, EA...

  18. 75 FR 23221 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... Significant Impact for a Biological Control Agent for Water Hyacinth AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... for use as a biological control agent to reduce the severity of water hyacinth infestations. Based on... the continental United States for use as a biological control agent to reduce the severity of water...

  19. 78 FR 14509 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Significant Impact for a Biological Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... eastern United States for use as a biological control agent to reduce the severity of hemlock woolly... biological control agent into the eastern United States. \\1\\ To view the notice, EA, and FONSI go to http...

  20. Clinical and biological significance of hepatoma-derived growth factor in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fenfen; Shi, Huijuan; Zhen, Tiantian; Dai, Sujuan; Kang, Lili; Liang, Yingjie; Wang, Jin; Han, Anjia

    2013-11-01

    We sought to investigate the clinicopathological significance and biological function of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) in Ewing's sarcoma. Our results showed that HDGF expression is up-regulated in Ewing's sarcoma. Nuclear HDGF expression is significantly associated with tumour volume (p < 0.001), metastases at diagnosis (p < 0.001), low overall survival rate (p < 0.001) and low disease-free survival rate (p < 0.001). HDGF knock-down results in significant reduction of Ewing's sarcoma cell growth, proliferation and enhances tumourigenesis, both in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, HDGF knock-down causes cell cycle arrest and enhanced sensitization to serum starvation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, recombinant HDGF promotes proliferation and colony formation of Ewing's sarcoma cells. Ninety-eight candidate HDGF downstream genes were identified in Ewing's sarcoma cells using cDNA microarray analysis. In addition, we found that HDGF knock-down inhibited FLI1 expression in Ewing's sarcoma cells at the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings suggest that HDGF exhibits oncogenic properties and may be a novel prognostic factor in Ewing's sarcoma. Targeting HDGF might be a potential therapeutic strategy for Ewing's sarcoma.

  1. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Manassantin Analogues for Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do-Yeon; Lee, Hye Eun; Weitzel, Douglas H; Park, Kyunghye; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Chen-Ting; Stephenson, Tesia N; Park, Hyeri; Fitzgerald, Michael C; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Mook, Robert A; Dewhirst, Mark W; Lee, You Mie; Hong, Jiyong

    2015-10-08

    To cope with hypoxia, tumor cells have developed a number of adaptive mechanisms mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) to promote angiogenesis and cell survival. Due to significant roles of HIF-1 in the initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to treatment of most solid tumors, a considerable amount of effort has been made to identify HIF-1 inhibitors for treatment of cancer. Isolated from Saururus cernuus, manassantins A (1) and B (2) are potent inhibitors of HIF-1 activity. To define the structural requirements of manassantins for HIF-1 inhibition, we prepared and evaluated a series of manassantin analogues. Our SAR studies examined key regions of manassantin's structure in order to understand the impact of these regions on biological activity and to define modifications that can lead to improved performance and drug-like properties. Our efforts identified several manassantin analogues with reduced structural complexity as potential lead compounds for further development. Analogues MA04, MA07, and MA11 down-regulated hypoxia-induced expression of the HIF-1α protein and reduced the levels of HIF-1 target genes, including cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These findings provide an important framework to design potent and selective HIF-1α inhibitors, which is necessary to aid translation of manassantin-derived natural products to the clinic as novel therapeutics for cancers.

  2. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Manassantin Analogues for Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To cope with hypoxia, tumor cells have developed a number of adaptive mechanisms mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) to promote angiogenesis and cell survival. Due to significant roles of HIF-1 in the initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to treatment of most solid tumors, a considerable amount of effort has been made to identify HIF-1 inhibitors for treatment of cancer. Isolated from Saururus cernuus, manassantins A (1) and B (2) are potent inhibitors of HIF-1 activity. To define the structural requirements of manassantins for HIF-1 inhibition, we prepared and evaluated a series of manassantin analogues. Our SAR studies examined key regions of manassantin’s structure in order to understand the impact of these regions on biological activity and to define modifications that can lead to improved performance and drug-like properties. Our efforts identified several manassantin analogues with reduced structural complexity as potential lead compounds for further development. Analogues MA04, MA07, and MA11 down-regulated hypoxia-induced expression of the HIF-1α protein and reduced the levels of HIF-1 target genes, including cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These findings provide an important framework to design potent and selective HIF-1α inhibitors, which is necessary to aid translation of manassantin-derived natural products to the clinic as novel therapeutics for cancers. PMID:26394152

  3. Upper GI endoscopy in elderly patients: predictive factors of relevant endoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Buri, Luigi; Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Bersani, Gianluca; Anti, Marcello; Bianco, Maria A; Cipolletta, Livio; Giulio, Emilio Di; Matteo, Giovanni Di; Familiari, Luigi; Ficano, Leonardo; Loriga, Piero; Morini, Sergio; Pietropaolo, Vincenzo; Zambelli, Alessandro; Grossi, Enzo; Tessari, Francesco; Intraligi, Marco; Buscema, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Elderly patients are at increased risk for peptic ulcer and cancer. Predictive factors of relevant endoscopic findings at upper endoscopy in the elderly are unknown. This was a post hoc analysis of a nationwide, endoscopic study. A total of 3,147 elderly patients were selected. Demographic, clinical, and endoscopic data were systematically collected. Relevant findings and new diagnoses of peptic ulcer and malignancy were computed. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 1,559 (49.5%), 213 (6.8%), 93 (3%) relevant findings, peptic ulcers, and malignancies were detected. Peptic ulcers and malignancies were more frequent in >85-year-old patients (OR 3.1, 95% CI = 2.0-4.7, p = 0.001). The presence of dysphagia (OR = 5.15), weight loss (OR = 4.77), persistent vomiting (OR = 3.68), anaemia (OR = 1.83), and male gender (OR = 1.9) were significantly associated with a malignancy, whilst overt bleeding (OR = 6.66), NSAIDs use (OR = 2.23), and epigastric pain (OR = 1.90) were associated with the presence of peptic ulcer. Peptic ulcer or malignancies were detected in 10% of elderly patients, supporting the use of endoscopy in this age group. Very elderly patients appear to be at higher risk of such lesions.

  4. Biological factors contributing to bark and ambrosia beetle species diversification.

    PubMed

    Gohli, Jostein; Kirkendall, Lawrence R; Smith, Sarah M; Cognato, Anthony I; Hulcr, Jiri; Jordal, Bjarte H

    2017-03-03

    The study of species diversification can identify the processes that shape patterns of species richness across the tree of life. Here we perform comparative analyses of species diversification using a large dataset of bark beetles. Three examined covariates - permanent inbreeding (sibling mating), fungus farming, and major host type - represent a range of factors that may be important for speciation. We studied the association of these covariates with species diversification while controlling for evolutionary lag on adaptation. All three covariates were significantly associated with diversification, but fungus farming showed conflicting patterns between different analyses. Genera that exhibited interspecific variation in host type had higher rates of species diversification, which may suggest that host switching is a driver of species diversification or that certain host types or forest compositions facilitate colonization and thus allopatric speciation. Because permanent inbreeding is thought to facilitate dispersal, the positive association of permanent inbreeding on diversification rates suggests that dispersal ability may contribute to species richness. Bark beetles are ecologically unique; however, our results indicate that their impressive species diversity is largely driven by mechanisms shown to be important for many organism groups. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Biological factors underlying sex differences in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Loke, Hannah; Harley, Vincent; Lee, Joohyung

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence, age of onset, pathophysiology, and symptomatology of many neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions differ significantly between males and females. Females suffer more from mood disorders such as depression and anxiety, whereas males are more susceptible to deficits in the dopamine system including Parkinson's disease (PD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Until recently, these sex differences have been explained solely by the neuroprotective actions of sex hormones in females. Emerging evidence however indicates that the sex chromosome genes (i.e. X- and Y-linked genes) also contribute to brain sex differences. In particular, the Y-chromosome gene, SRY (Sex-determining Region on the Y chromosome) is an interesting candidate as it is expressed in dopamine-abundant brain regions, where it regulates dopamine biosynthesis and dopamine-mediated functions such as voluntary movement in males. Furthermore, SRY expression is dysregulated in a toxin-induced model of PD, suggesting a role for SRY in the pathogenesis of dopamine cells. Taken together, these studies highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between sex-specific hormones and sex-specific genes in healthy and diseased brain. In particular, better understanding of regulation and function of SRY in the male brain could provide entirely novel and important insights into genetic factors involved in the susceptibility of men to neurological disorders, as well as development of novel sex-specific therapies. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor I: a biologic maturation indicator.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Ramy Abdul Rahman; Soliman, Sanaa Abou Zeid; Foda, Manal Yehya; Fayed, Mona Mohamed Salah

    2012-11-01

    Determination of the maturation level and the subsequent evaluation of growth potential during preadolescence and adolescence are important for optimal orthodontic treatment planning and timing. This study was undertaken to evaluate the applicability of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) blood level as a maturation indicator by correlating it to the cervical vertebral maturation index. The study was conducted with 120 subjects, equally divided into 60 males (ages, 10-18 years) and 60 females (ages, 8-16 years). A lateral cephalometric radiograph and a blood sample were taken from each subject. For each subject, cervical vertebral maturation and IGF-I serum level were assessed. Mean values of IGF-I in each stage of cervical vertebral maturation were calculated, and the means in each stage were statistically compared with those of the other stages. The IGF-I mean value at each cervical vertebral maturation stage was statistically different from the mean values at the other stages. The highest mean values were observed in stage 4, followed by stage 5 in males and stage 3 in females. IGF-I serum level is a reliable maturation indicator that could be applied in orthodontic diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  8. Making the Grade in Undergraduate Biology Courses: Factors that Distinguish High and Low Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nist, Sherrie L.; And Others

    The factors that influence the performance of undergraduate students in introductory biology courses were studied, considering cognitive, metacognitive, and behavioral factors. From 612 participants volunteering, 52 consistent high performers and 57 consistent low performers were selected. Information was collected on their study habits,…

  9. Biological, social, and urban design factors affecting young street tree mortality in New York City

    Treesearch

    Jacqueline W.T. Lu; Erika S. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell; Jennifer Greenfeld; Jessie Braden; Kristen King; Nancy. Falxa-Raymond

    2010-01-01

    In dense metropolitan areas, there are many factors including traffic congestion, building development and social organizations that may impact the health of street trees. The focus of this study is to better understand how social, biological and urban design factors affect the mortality rates of newly planted street trees. Prior analyses of street trees planted by the...

  10. Factors moderating children's adjustment to parental separation: findings from a community study in England.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Helen; Dunn, Judy; O'connor, Thomas G; Golding, Jean

    2006-04-01

    Research findings show that there is marked variability in children's response to parental separation, but few studies identify the sources of this variation. This prospective longitudinal study examines the factors modifying children's adjustment to parental separation in a community sample of 5,635 families in England. Children's behavioral/emotional problems were assessed when children were aged 47 and 81 months; marital quality, maternal depression, socioeconomic circumstances, and demographic variables were assessed prior to the separation from maternal report. Results indicated that 346 mothers separated from their partners in the 3-year period. Preseparation differences were found for measures of family process and parent risk factors, with effect sizes ranging from small to trivial. Parental separation was associated with a significant but modest increase in behavioral/emotional problems, independent of marital quality, maternal depression, socioeconomic circumstances, and demographic variables. Moderation analyses showed that children of cohabiting parents had a greater increase in adjustment problems following parental separation than children of married parents. Further research elucidating the factors that moderate children's adjustment to parental separation is needed to improve our understanding of who may most likely benefit from preventive interventions.

  11. Social support as a protective factor in suicide: findings from two nationally representative samples.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Evan M; Liu, Richard T

    2013-09-05

    Suicide is a problem of worldwide concern and research on possible protective factors is needed. We explored the role of social support as one such factor. Specifically, we hypothesized that increased social support would be associated with decreased likelihood of a lifetime suicide attempt in two nationally representative samples as well as a high-risk subsample. We analyzed the relationship between social support and lifetime history of a suicide attempt, controlling for a variety of related psychopathology and demographic variables, in the National Comorbidity Study Replication (NCS-R), a United States sample and the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Study (APMS), an English sample. Results indicate that social support is associated with decreased likelihood of a lifetime suicide attempt controlling for a variety of related predictors in both the full US sample (OR=0.68, p<.001) and the full English sample (OR=0.93, p<.01). The cross-sectional data do not allow true cause and effect analyses. Our findings suggest social support is associated with decreased likelihood of a lifetime suicide attempt. Social support is a highly modifiable factor that can be used to improve existing suicide prevention programs worldwide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Perceptions of factors influencing healthful food consumption behavior in the Lower Mississippi Delta: focus group findings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Bernestine B; Richardson, Valerie; Johnson, Glenda S; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Yadrick, Kathleen; Ndirangu, Murugi; Goolsby, Susan; Watkins, Debra; Simpson, Pippa M; Hyman, Edith; Stigger, Flavelia; Bogle, Margaret L; Kramer, Tim R; Strickland, Earline; McCabe-Sellers, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    To identify perceptions of Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) residents regarding factors that influence a change in healthful food consumption behavior to assist in planning sustainable nutrition interventions in the LMD. Nine focus groups were conducted with LMD residents in 9 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. One focus group was held in each county on the topical area of behavioral change. Nine counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The study population included 91 persons, 85 females and 6 males (18-60+ years of age), of whom 71 were African Americans, 17 were Caucasians, and 3 were Hispanics, who participated in the focus group discussions. Data analyses were completed by general and specific content coding. Data were reviewed for emerging themes for each topic. The Social Cognitive Theory served as the framework for understanding the determinants of a change in healthful food consumption behavior. The study showed considerable variability in perceptions that are influenced by both personal and external factors. These factors include health concerns, family influence, and need for and availability of nutrition information. Participants were interested in learning about healthful eating, food preparation skills, and portion control. Focus groups in the LMD identified many important themes relevant to the development of nutrition interventions in these communities. These data will be used to guide the community-based participatory interventions that will be developed and implemented in the LMD. The findings could be applicable to other researchers designing interventions for similar populations.

  13. Biology and Physics of von Willebrand Factor Concatamers

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Structural specialisations enable von Willebrand factor (VWF) to assemble during biosynthesis into helical tubules in Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB). Specialisations include a pH-regulated dimeric bouquet formed by the C-terminal half of VWF and helical assembly guided by the N-terminal half that templates inter-dimer disulphide bridges. Orderly assembly and storage of ultra-long concatamers in helical tubules, without crosslinking of neighboring tubules, enables unfurling during secretion without entanglement. Length regulation occurs post-secretion, by hydrodynamic force-regulated unfolding of the VWF A2 domain, and its cleavage by the plasma protease ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13). VWF is longest at its site of secretion, where its haemostatic function is most important. Moreover, elongational hydrodynamic forces on VWF are strongest just where needed, when bound to the vessel wall, or in elongational flow in the circulation at sites of vessel rupture or vasoconstriction in haemostasis. Elongational forces regulate haemostasis by activating binding of the A1 domain to platelet GPIbα, and over longer time periods, regulate VWF length by unfolding of the A2 domain for cleavage by ADAMTS13. Recent structures of A2 and single molecule measurements of A2 unfolding and cleavage by ADAMTS13 illuminate the mechanisms of VWF length regulation. Single molecule studies on the A1-GPIb receptor-ligand bond demonstrate a specialised flex-bond that enhances resistance to the strong hydrodynamic forces experienced at sites of haemorrhage. PMID:21781248

  14. Biological, Psychological, and Sociocultural Factors Contributing to the Drive for Muscularity in Weight-Training Men.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Catharina; Rollitz, Laura; Voracek, Martin; Hennig-Fast, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The drive for muscularity and associated behaviors (e.g., exercising and dieting) are of growing importance for men in Western societies. In its extreme form, it can lead to body image concerns and harmful behaviors like over-exercising and the misuse of performance-enhancing substances. Therefore, investigating factors associated with the drive for muscularity, especially in vulnerable populations like bodybuilders and weight trainers can help identify potential risk and protective factors for body image problems. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the aim of the current study was to explore different factors associated with drive for muscularity in weight-training men. To this purpose, German-speaking male weight trainers (N = 248) completed an online survey to determine the extent to which biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors contribute to drive for muscularity and its related attitudes and behaviors. Using multiple regression models, findings showed that media ideal body internalization was the strongest positive predictor for drive for muscularity, while age (M = 25.9, SD = 7.4) held the strongest negative association with drive for muscularity. Dissatisfaction with muscularity, but not with body fat, was related to drive for muscularity. The fat-free mass index, a quantification of the actual degree of muscularity of a person, significantly predicted drive for muscularity-related behavior but not attitudes. Body-related aspects of self-esteem, but not global self-esteem, were significant negative predictors of drive for muscularity. Since internalization of media body ideals presented the highest predictive value for drive for muscularity, these findings suggest that media body ideal internalizations may be a risk factor for body image concerns in men, leading, in its most extreme form to disordered eating or muscle dysmorphia. Future research should investigate the relations between drive for muscularity, age, body composition

  15. Biological, Psychological, and Sociocultural Factors Contributing to the Drive for Muscularity in Weight-Training Men

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Catharina; Rollitz, Laura; Voracek, Martin; Hennig-Fast, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The drive for muscularity and associated behaviors (e.g., exercising and dieting) are of growing importance for men in Western societies. In its extreme form, it can lead to body image concerns and harmful behaviors like over-exercising and the misuse of performance-enhancing substances. Therefore, investigating factors associated with the drive for muscularity, especially in vulnerable populations like bodybuilders and weight trainers can help identify potential risk and protective factors for body image problems. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the aim of the current study was to explore different factors associated with drive for muscularity in weight-training men. To this purpose, German-speaking male weight trainers (N = 248) completed an online survey to determine the extent to which biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors contribute to drive for muscularity and its related attitudes and behaviors. Using multiple regression models, findings showed that media ideal body internalization was the strongest positive predictor for drive for muscularity, while age (M = 25.9, SD = 7.4) held the strongest negative association with drive for muscularity. Dissatisfaction with muscularity, but not with body fat, was related to drive for muscularity. The fat-free mass index, a quantification of the actual degree of muscularity of a person, significantly predicted drive for muscularity-related behavior but not attitudes. Body-related aspects of self-esteem, but not global self-esteem, were significant negative predictors of drive for muscularity. Since internalization of media body ideals presented the highest predictive value for drive for muscularity, these findings suggest that media body ideal internalizations may be a risk factor for body image concerns in men, leading, in its most extreme form to disordered eating or muscle dysmorphia. Future research should investigate the relations between drive for muscularity, age, body composition

  16. Neurotrophic factors and CNS disorders: findings in rodent models of depression and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Mathé, Aleksander A; Aloe, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are proteins involved in neuronal survival and plasticity of dopaminergic, cholinergic and serotonergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Loss of neurons in specific brain regions has been found in depression and schizophrenia, and this chapter summarizes the findings of altered neurotrophins in animal models of those two disorders under baseline condition and following antidepressive and antipsychotic treatments. In a model of depression (Flinders sensitive line/Flinders resistant line; FSL/FRL rats), increased NGF and BDNF concentrations were found in frontal cortex of female, and in occipital cortex of male 'depressed' FSL compared to FRL control rats. Using the same model, the effects of electroconvulsive stimuli (ECS) and chronic lithium treatment on brain NGF, BDNF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors were investigated. ECS and lithium altered the brain concentrations of neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, occipital cortex and striatum. ECS mimic the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) that is an effective treatment for depression and also schizophrenia. Since NGF and BDNF may also be changed in the CNS of animal models of schizophrenia, we investigated whether treatment with antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol, risperidone, and olanzapine) affects the constitutive levels of NGF and BDNF in the CNS. Both typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs altered the regional brain levels of NGF and BDNF. Other studies also demonstrated that these drugs differentially altered neurotrophin mRNAs. Overall, these studies indicate that alteration of brain level of NGF and BDNF could constitute part of the biochemical alterations induced by antipsychotic drugs.

  17. Diurnal rhythmicity in biological processes involved in bioavailability of functional food factors.

    PubMed

    Tsurusaki, Takashi; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Aoshima, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Sakono, Masanobu; Shimoi, Kayoko

    2013-05-01

    In the past few decades, many types of functional factors have been identified in dietary foods; for example, flavonoids are major groups widely distributed in the plant kingdom. However, the absorption rates of the functional food factors are usually low, and many of these are difficult to be absorbed in the intact forms because of metabolization by biological processes during absorption. To gain adequate beneficial effects, it is therefore mandatory to know whether functional food factors are absorbed in sufficient quantity, and then reach target organs while maintaining beneficial effects. These are the reasons why the bioavailability of functional food factors has been well investigated using rodent models. Recently, many of the biological processes have been reported to follow diurnal rhythms recurring every 24 h. Therefore, absorption and metabolism of functional food factors influenced by the biological processes may vary with time of day. Consequently, the evaluation of the bioavailability of functional food factors using rodent models should take into consideration the timing of consumption. In this review, we provide a perspective overview of the diurnal rhythm of biological processes involved in the bioavailability of functional food factors, particularly flavonoids.

  18. Diurnal rhythmicity in biological processes involved in bioavailability of functional food factors

    PubMed Central

    Tsurusaki, Takashi; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Aoshima, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Sakono, Masanobu; Shimoi, Kayoko

    2013-01-01

    In the past few decades, many types of functional factors have been identified in dietary foods; for example, flavonoids are major groups widely distributed in the plant kingdom. However, the absorption rates of the functional food factors are usually low, and many of these are difficult to be absorbed in the intact forms because of metabolization by biological processes during absorption. To gain adequate beneficial effects, it is therefore mandatory to know whether functional food factors are absorbed in sufficient quantity, and then reach target organs while maintaining beneficial effects. These are the reasons why the bioavailability of functional food factors has been well investigated using rodent models. Recently, many of the biological processes have been reported to follow diurnal rhythms recurring every 24 h. Therefore, absorption and metabolism of functional food factors influenced by the biological processes may vary with time of day. Consequently, the evaluation of the bioavailability of functional food factors using rodent models should take into consideration the timing of consumption. In this review, we provide a perspective overview of the diurnal rhythm of biological processes involved in the bioavailability of functional food factors, particularly flavonoids. PMID:23704810

  19. Impact of different economic factors on biological invasions on the global scale.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Cheng, Xinyue; Xu, Rumei

    2011-04-13

    Social-economic factors are considered as the key to understand processes contributing to biological invasions. However, there has been few quantified, statistical evidence on the relationship between economic development and biological invasion on a worldwide scale. Herein, using principal factor analysis, we investigated the relationship between biological invasion and economic development together with biodiversity for 91 economies throughout the world. Our result indicates that the prevalence of invasive species in the economies can be well predicted by economic factors (R(2) = 0.733). The impact of economic factors on the occurrence of invasive species for low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high income economies are 0%, 34.3%, 46.3% and 80.8% respectively. Greenhouse gas emissions (CO(2), Nitrous oxide, Methane and Other greenhouse gases) and also biodiversity have positive relationships with the global occurrence of invasive species in the economies on the global scale. The major social-economic factors that are correlated to biological invasions are different for various economies, and therefore the strategies for biological invasion prevention and control should be different.

  20. How motif environment influences transcription factor search dynamics: Finding a needle in a haystack

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Iris; Rohs, Remo

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) have to find their binding sites, which are distributed throughout the genome. Facilitated diffusion is currently the most widely accepted model for this search process. Based on this model the TF alternates between one‐dimensional sliding along the DNA, and three‐dimensional bulk diffusion. In this view, the non‐specific associations between the proteins and the DNA play a major role in the search dynamics. However, little is known about how the DNA properties around the motif contribute to the search. Accumulating evidence showing that TF binding sites are embedded within a unique environment, specific to each TF, leads to the hypothesis that the search process is facilitated by favorable DNA features that help to improve the search efficiency. Here, we review the field and present the hypothesis that TF‐DNA recognition is dictated not only by the motif, but is also influenced by the environment in which the motif resides. PMID:27192961

  1. Clinical findings and prognostic factors for dogs undergoing cholecystectomy for gall bladder mucocele.

    PubMed

    Malek, Sarah; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Hosgood, Giselle; Moens, Noel M M; Baily, Trina; Boston, Sarah E

    2013-05-01

    To report clinical findings and explore prognostic factors for dogs that had cholecystectomy for gall bladder mucocele. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n = 43) with gall bladder mucoceles. Diagnosis of gall bladder mucoceles was confirmed by histopathology and 74% were diagnosed based on preoperative abdominal ultrasonography. Intraoperative evidence of gall bladder rupture was noted in 10 dogs (23%), and 16 (37%) had evidence of previous leakage in the abdominal cavity. One dog had positive bacterial growth from the gall bladder content. The most common histopathologic findings in liver biopsies obtained at surgery were cholangiohepatitis, biliary hyperplasia, or cholestasis. Univariate analysis showed evidence of postoperative hypotension (P = .05) to be significantly negatively associated with survival. Significant difference in mean postoperative serum lactate (P = .034) and postoperative packed cell volume (P = .063) between dogs that survived and died was also noted. Elevations in postoperative serum lactate concentrations and immediate postoperative hypotension in dogs undergoing cholecystectomy for gall bladder mucoceles are associated with poor clinical outcome. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Men's attitudes toward breastfeeding: findings from the 2007 Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Vaaler, Margaret L; Castrucci, Brian C; Parks, Sharyn E; Clark, Jamie; Stagg, Julie; Erickson, Tracy

    2011-02-01

    Past research on breastfeeding demonstrates that male partners' support is a significant factor in mothers' decisions to breastfeed. This study explored the diversity of men's opinions about breastfeeding, for the purpose of increasing breastfeeding support among men. This study used the Texas sample of the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to examine whether men's attitudes toward breastfeeding varied by their demographic characteristics and whether fathers' breastfeeding attitudes were related to couples' choice of infant feeding method. Descriptive statistics and linear regression estimated the influence of each demographic characteristic on breastfeeding attitudes. Among a subsample of fathers, multinomial logistic regression analyzed the influence of men's breastfeeding attitudes on their choice of infant feeding method. Findings showed that Spanish-speaking Hispanic men were most likely to agree that breastfeeding had social limitations (e.g. interfere with social life) for mothers, yet they viewed public images of breastfeeding as more acceptable compared with other men. In comparison to U.S.-born men, foreign-born men were in greater agreement that employers should accommodate breastfeeding. Among fathers, support of public images of breastfeeding and attitudes toward employers' accommodations were positively associated with the choice to use breast milk. Men's ethnicity, country of origin, education level, and socioeconomic status all contribute to different norms and expectations about breastfeeding. Men's attitudes about public images of breastfeeding and employers' accommodations for breastfeeding mothers influence the choice of breast milk as the sole infant-feeding method.

  3. Factors that affect the nearshore aggregations of Antarctic krill in a biological hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Kim S.; Cimino, Megan; Fraser, William; Kohut, Josh; Oliver, Matthew J.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna; Schofield, Oscar M. E.; Statscewich, Hank; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Winsor, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, is a highly abundant and ecologically important zooplankton species in the Southern Ocean. Regions of elevated Antarctic krill biomass exist around Antarctica, often as a result of the concentrating effect of bathymetry and ocean currents. Such areas are considered biological hotspots and are key foraging grounds for numerous top predators in the region. A hotspot of Antarctic krill biomass exists off the southern extent of Anvers Island, Western Antarctic Peninsula, and supports a population of Adélie penguins that feed almost exclusively on it, as well as numerous other top predators. We investigated the spatio-temporal variability in Antarctic krill biomass and aggregation structure over four consecutive summer seasons, identifying environmental factors that were responsible. We identified three distinct krill aggregation types (Large-dense, Small-close and Small-sparse), and found that the relative proportion of each type to total aggregation numbers varied significantly between survey days. Large-dense aggregations occurred more frequently when westerly winds predominated and when the local mixed tide was in the diurnal regime. Small-close aggregations were also more frequent during diurnal tides and were negatively correlated with phytoplankton biomass. Small-sparse aggregations, on the other hand, were more prevalent when the mixed tide was in the semi-diurnal phase. We suggest that, under certain conditions (i.e. diurnal tides and westerly winds), the biological hotspot in the nearshore waters off Palmer Station, Anvers Island, functions as a zone of accumulation, concentrating krill biomass. Our findings provide important information on the dynamics of Antarctic krill at the local scale.

  4. Peripheral blood metabolic and inflammatory factors as biomarkers to ocular findings in diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Puigdollers, Anna; Matas, Jessica; Vinagre, Irene; Ríos, José; Adán, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Aims To study the association between peripheral blood metabolic and inflammatory factors and presence of diabetic macular edema (DME) and its related anatomic features in type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) patients. Material and methods Observational cross-sectional study on a proof of concept basis. Seventy-six T2DM included patients were divided based on the presence (n = 58) or absence of DME (n = 18) according to optical coherence tomography (OCT). Ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography (UWFA) was performed in DME patients. Fasting peripheral blood sample testing included glycemia, glycated hemoglobin, creatinin and lipid levels among others. Serum levels of a broad panel of cytokines and inflammatory mediators were also analysed. OCT findings included central subfoveal thickness, diffuse retinal thickness (DRT), cystoid macular edema (CME), serous retinal detachment and epirretinal membrane. UWFA items included pattern of DME, presence of peripheral retinal ischemia and enlarged foveal avascular zone (FAZ). Results Metabolic and inflammatory factors did not statistically differ between groups. However, several inflammatory mediators did associate to certain ocular items of DME cases: IL-6 was significantly higher in patients with DRT (p = 0.044), IL-10 was decreased in patients with CME (p = 0.012), and higher IL-8 (p = 0.031) and VEGF levels (p = 0.031) were observed in patients with enlarged FAZ. Conclusion Inflammatory and metabolic peripheral blood factors in T2DM may not be differentially associated to DME when compared to non-DME cases. However, some OCT and UWFA features of DME such as DRT, CME and enlarged FAZ may be associated to certain systemic inflammatory mediators. PMID:28328965

  5. Factors Associated with Initiation of Ecstasy Use among US Adolescents: Findings from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Xinhua; Fan, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Aims To investigate adolescent pathways to ecstasy use by (1) examining how early onsets of smoking, drinking, and marijuana use are related to a child’s risk of initiation of ecstasy use and (2) assessing the influence of other individual and parental factors on ecstasy use initiation. Methods Data on 6,426 adolescents (12–17 years old at baseline) from the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY), a longitudinal, nationally-representative household survey of youth and their parents, were used in the analyses. Information on youth substance use, including ecstasy use, as well as familial and parental characteristics, was available. Results Initiation of ecstasy use is predicted by an adolescent’s early initiation of smoking, drinking, or marijuana use. In particular, early initiation either of marijuana use, or of both smoking and drinking, increases a child’s risk for ecstasy use initiation. Among the familial and parental variables, parent drug use emerged as significantly predictive of child initiation of ecstasy use; living with both parents and close parental monitoring, on the other hand, are negatively associated with ecstasy use initiation, and may be protective against it. At the individual level, sensation seeking tendencies and positive attitudes toward substance use, as well as close associations with deviant peers, are predictive of adolescent initiation of ecstasy use. Conclusion Our findings on the risk and protective factors for initiation of ecstasy use, especially with regard to factors that are modifiable, will be useful for prevention programs targeting youth use not only of ecstasy, but also of other drugs. PMID:19781862

  6. Peripheral blood metabolic and inflammatory factors as biomarkers to ocular findings in diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Figueras-Roca, Marc; Molins, Blanca; Sala-Puigdollers, Anna; Matas, Jessica; Vinagre, Irene; Ríos, José; Adán, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    To study the association between peripheral blood metabolic and inflammatory factors and presence of diabetic macular edema (DME) and its related anatomic features in type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) patients. Observational cross-sectional study on a proof of concept basis. Seventy-six T2DM included patients were divided based on the presence (n = 58) or absence of DME (n = 18) according to optical coherence tomography (OCT). Ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography (UWFA) was performed in DME patients. Fasting peripheral blood sample testing included glycemia, glycated hemoglobin, creatinin and lipid levels among others. Serum levels of a broad panel of cytokines and inflammatory mediators were also analysed. OCT findings included central subfoveal thickness, diffuse retinal thickness (DRT), cystoid macular edema (CME), serous retinal detachment and epirretinal membrane. UWFA items included pattern of DME, presence of peripheral retinal ischemia and enlarged foveal avascular zone (FAZ). Metabolic and inflammatory factors did not statistically differ between groups. However, several inflammatory mediators did associate to certain ocular items of DME cases: IL-6 was significantly higher in patients with DRT (p = 0.044), IL-10 was decreased in patients with CME (p = 0.012), and higher IL-8 (p = 0.031) and VEGF levels (p = 0.031) were observed in patients with enlarged FAZ. Inflammatory and metabolic peripheral blood factors in T2DM may not be differentially associated to DME when compared to non-DME cases. However, some OCT and UWFA features of DME such as DRT, CME and enlarged FAZ may be associated to certain systemic inflammatory mediators.

  7. On finding and using identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear dynamic systems biology models and COMBOS: a novel web implementation.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Kuo, Christine Er-zhen; DiStefano, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI) is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O) biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable) subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I-O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE) systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app)-COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and-importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It's illustrated and validated here for models of moderate complexity, with

  8. Challenges in Implementing Technology-Rich Curricular High School Biology Materials: First Year Findings from the "Exploring Life" Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Betsy; Cates, Ward M.; Bodzin, Alex

    Eighteen high school biology teachers from a stratified sample of 13 distinct geographical United States regions participated in evaluation of the first year prototypes of Exploring Life, a biology program that includes a textbook with an accompanying Internet component and wet-lab investigations. Web activities explain and reinforce the text and…

  9. 76 FR 4859 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Significant Impact for a Biological Control Agent for Asian Citrus Psyllid AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... relative to the control of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama). The environmental assessment... continental United States for use as a biological control agent to reduce the severity of Asian citrus psyllid...

  10. Assessing the Factor Structure Invariance of Self-Concept Measurement across Ethnic and Gender Groups: Findings from a National Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Ping; Fan, Xitao

    2003-01-01

    Studied the degree of factor structure invariance of self-concept measurement across ethnic and gender groups using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988. Findings suggest it would be reasonable to consider the factor pattern coefficients and factor variances and covariances as invariant across ethnic and gender groups. (SLD)

  11. [Biological and psychosocial factors as a reason for enuresis in children].

    PubMed

    Karakhanova, M S; Mamedova, R Iu; Gadzhieva, F N

    2002-01-01

    Biological (pregnancy in neurotic mothers) and psychosocial (wrong attitude of the family to enuretic child) risk factors were studied in 68 children with enuresis aged 4 to 15 years. It is shown that the presence of biological and psychosocial factors in combination with enuresis in children necessitate antenatal consultations of obstetricians, pediatrists, psychologists and parents on prevention of enuresis in children, active screening-testing children with enuresis for dysfunction of the urinary bladder and psychoneurological disorders affecting harmonic development of personality in children.

  12. Effects of biological drug adalimumab on tumour necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme activation.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Sabrina; Sisto, Margherita

    2010-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-converting enzyme (TACE) is a membrane-bound metalloprotease and disintegrin. It is produced by a number of host cells and is known to shed and release cell-bound cytokines, particularly members of the TNF family. No investigations into the regulation of this enzyme by autoantibodies have been reported. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies, purified from IgG fractions of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, are capable to regulate TACE expression and activation in human salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC). We also evaluated the potential physiological and therapeutic consequences of TNF-alpha blocking by the biological agent adalimumab, the first fully human (100% human peptide sequences) therapeutic anti-TNF-alpha antibody, on post-translational regulation of TACE. Taken together, our results show a dose-dependent increase in TACE expression in anti-Ro/SSA Abs-treated SGEC, followed by internalization, pro-domain shedding and activation of TACE protein. Adalimumab treatment brought TACE expression to levels than those observed in untreated SGEC. These findings, showing the presence of autoantibodies-dependent mechanisms by which TACE levels are regulated in human SGECs, may have implications in the context of current investigations on the pathological role of autoantibodies.

  13. Analysis of environmental factors determining development and succession in biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Lan, Shubin; Wu, Li; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2015-12-15

    Biological soil crusts play important ecological functions in arid and semi-arid regions, while different crust successional patterns appeared in different regions. Therefore in this study, the environmental conditions between Shapotou (with cyanobacterial, lichen and moss crusts) and Dalate Banner (with only cyanobacterial and moss crusts) regions of China were compared to investigate why lichen crusts only appeared in Shapotou; at the same time, artificial moss inoculation was conducted to find out the environmental factors promoting crust succession to moss stage. The results showed lichen crusts always developed from cyanobacterial crusts, which provide not only the stable soil surface, but also the biomass basis for lichen formation; furthermore, addition of crust physicochemical characteristics (primarily silt content) play a facilitating effect on lichen emergence (R(2)=0.53). The inoculation experiment demonstrated early crust soil surface and enough water holding content (>4%) provided the essential guarantee for moss germination. Our results show that there is heterogeneity in crust succession in different regions, which may be mainly affected by the ambient soil microenvironments. It is concluded that a positive feedback mechanism is expected between crust succession and ambient soil microenvironments; while a negative feedback mechanism forms between crust succession and free living cyanobacteria and algae.

  14. An analysis of the structure of the compound biological effectiveness factor

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Koji

    2016-01-01

    This report is an analysis of the structure of the compound biological effectiveness (CBE) factor. The value of the CBE factor previously reported was revalued for the central nervous system, skin and lung. To describe the structure, the following terms are introduced: the vascular CBE (v-CBE), intraluminal CBE (il-CBE), extraluminal CBE (el-CBE) and non-vascular CBE (nv-CBE) factors and the geometric biological factor (GBF), i.e. the contributions that are derived from the total dose to the vasculature, each dose to vasculature from the intraluminal side and the extraluminal side, the dose to the non-vascular tissue and the factor to calculate el-CBE from il-CBE, respectively. The el-CBE factor element was also introduced to relate il-CBE to el-CBE factors. A CBE factor of 0.36 for disodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) for the CNS was independent of the 10B level in the blood; however, that for p-Boron-L-phenylalanine (BPA) increased with the 10B level ratio of the normal tissue to the blood (N/B). The CBE factor was expressed as follows: factor = 0.32 + N/B × 1.65. The factor of 0.32 at 0 of N/B was close to the CBE factor for BSH. GBFs had similar values, between BSH and BPA, 1.39 and 1.52, respectively. The structure of the CBE factor for BPA to the lung was also elucidated based on this idea. The factor is described as follows: CBE factor = 0.32 + N/B × 1.80. By this elucidation of the structure of the CBE factor, it is expected that basic and clinical research into boron neutron capture therapy will progress. PMID:27021218

  15. Factors associated with crisis pregnancies in Ireland: findings from three nationally representative sexual health surveys.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Ashling; Kelleher, Caroline; Boduszek, Daniel; Morgan, Karen

    2015-03-02

    Findings on the demographic and sexual health characteristics associated with the experience of a crisis pregnancy are important to inform the public health policy of a country, including Ireland. Studies from other jurisdictions have suggested that certain demographic groups are at risk for unintended pregnancies and the disparity between the groups has been growing in recent years. Ireland is a country which experienced much economic and societal change in the first decade of the 21(st) century; changes which are likely to have affected demographic variables pertaining to sexual health. The current study had two aims: to investigate changes in the socioeconomic characteristics associated with crisis pregnancies over a seven year period [2003 to 2010], and to investigate the recent [2010] socioeconomic risk factors associated with crisis pregnancies in Ireland. The study compared the results from 18-45 year old women using data from three broadly similar nationally representative Irish sexual health surveys carried out in 2003, 2004-2006 and 2010. Chi square analysis compared of the socioeconomic characteristics across the seven year period. A logistic regression then investigated the sexual health history and socioeconomic factors associated with the experience of a recent crisis pregnancy using the most recent 2010 data. In 2010, 74% of women experienced parenthood and 23% experienced abortion as the outcome of their crisis pregnancy. Receipt of sex education and contraception use at first sex significantly predicted the experiencing of a recent crisis pregnancy. Younger women and those with a lower level of education were more likely to report having experienced a recent crisis pregnancy. Similar demographic groups are at risk for experiencing a crisis pregnancy in Ireland compared with international research, yet the disparities between demographic groups who have experienced a crisis pregnancy appear to be decreasing rather than increasing over a seven year

  16. Associations of biological factors and affordances in the home with infant motor development.

    PubMed

    Saccani, Raquel; Valentini, Nadia C; Pereira, Keila Rg; Müller, Alessandra B; Gabbard, Carl

    2013-04-01

    Whereas considerable work has been published regarding biological factors associated with infant health, much less is known about the associations of environmental context with infant development - the focus of the present cross-sectional study. Data were collected on 561 infants, aged newborn to 18 months. Measures included the Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development-Infant Scale, Alberta Infant Motor Scale, and selected bio/medical factors. Correlation and regression were used to analyze the data. Home environmental factors were associated with children's motor development as much as some typically high-risk biologic factors. The home environment partially explained infant development outcomes and infants at risk could possibly be helped with a home assessment for affordances. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2012 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. The non-negative matrix factorization toolbox for biological data mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) has been introduced as an important method for mining biological data. Though there currently exists packages implemented in R and other programming languages, they either provide only a few optimization algorithms or focus on a specific application field. There does not exist a complete NMF package for the bioinformatics community, and in order to perform various data mining tasks on biological data. Results We provide a convenient MATLAB toolbox containing both the implementations of various NMF techniques and a variety of NMF-based data mining approaches for analyzing biological data. Data mining approaches implemented within the toolbox include data clustering and bi-clustering, feature extraction and selection, sample classification, missing values imputation, data visualization, and statistical comparison. Conclusions A series of analysis such as molecular pattern discovery, biological process identification, dimension reduction, disease prediction, visualization, and statistical comparison can be performed using this toolbox. PMID:23591137

  18. Factors associated with the prescription of "traditional" or "biological" systemic treatment in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Tabolli, Stefano; Paradisi, Andrea; Giannantoni, Patrizia; Gubinelli, Emanuela; Abeni, Damiano

    2015-02-01

    Abstract The choice of an adequate psoriasis treatment is critical to good disease management and to overall patient health. It is estimated that about 20-30% of patients requires systemic treatment: "traditional" (methotrexate, acitretina and cyclosporin) or "biological" (etanercept, adalimumab and infliximab). Clinical records of 784 outpatients with psoriasis were analyzed. 51.5% received traditional treatments and 48.5% a biological treatment. Males were 67.8% of patients. Psoriatic arthritis was observed in 37.3%. Females and younger patients were more likely to receive biological treatments. No differences were observed for Body Mass Index or for presence of comorbidities. Patients with psoriatic arthritis were also more frequently prescribed biological drug treatment. In a multivariate logistic regression model, only the older age-group (≥60 years) had a statistically significant OR (p=0.001) with a reduction of about 80% the likelihood of receiving biological treatment compared to the younger age-group (<40 years). Patients with a PASI score ≥20 and patients with arthritis have a probability to be prescribed biologics about five times higher than the other patients. In conclusion, younger age, psoriatic arthritis and the previous use of systemic drugs are factors associated with the use of biological treatment rather than the traditional systemic drugs.

  19. PTSD in Court II: Risk factors, endophenotypes, and biological underpinnings in PTSD.

    PubMed

    Young, Gerald

    The second article in the series of three for the journal on "PTSD in Court" especially concerns the biological bases that have been found to be associated with PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). The cohering concepts in this section relate to risk factors; candidate genes; polygenetics; "gene×environment" interactions; epigenetics; endophenotypes; biomarkers; and connective networks both structurally and functionally (in terms of intrinsic connectivity networks, ICNs, including the DMN, SN, and CEN; that is, default mode, salience, and central executive networks, respectively). Risk factors related to PTSD include pre-event, event- and post-event ones. Some of the genes related to PTSD include: FKBP5, 5-HTTLPR, and COMT (which are, respectively, FK506-binding protein 5 gene, serotonin-transporter linked polymorphic region, catechol-O-methyl-transferase). These genetic findings give an estimate of 30% for the genetic influence on PTSD. The typical brain regions involved in PTSD include the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex, along with the insula. Causal models of behavior are multifactorial and biopsychosocial, and these types of models apply to PTSD, as well. The paper presents a multilevel systems model of psychopathology, including PTSD, which involves three levels - a top-down psychological construct one, a bottom-up symptom connection one, and a middle one involving symptom appraisal. Legally, causality refers to the event at issue needing to meet the bar of being materially contributory to the outcome. Finally, this section of the article reviews empirically-supported therapies for PTSD and the dangers of not receiving treatment for it.

  20. Factors associated with small-scale agricultural machinery adoption in Bangladesh: Census findings.

    PubMed

    Mottaleb, Khondoker Abdul; Krupnik, Timothy J; Erenstein, Olaf

    2016-08-01

    There is strong advocacy for agricultural machinery appropriate for smallholder farmers in South Asia. Such 'scale-appropriate' machinery can increase returns to land and labour, although the still substantial capital investment required can preclude smallholder ownership. Increasing machinery demand has resulted in relatively well-developed markets for rental services for tillage, irrigation, and post-harvest operations. Many smallholders thereby access agricultural machinery that may have otherwise been cost prohibitive to purchase through fee-for-service arrangements, though opportunity for expansion remains. To more effectively facilitate the development and investment in scale-appropriate machinery, there is a need to better understand the factors associated with agricultural machinery purchases and service provision. This paper first reviews Bangladesh's historical policy environment that facilitated the development of agricultural machinery markets. It then uses recent Bangladesh census data from 814,058 farm households to identify variables associated with the adoption of the most common smallholder agricultural machinery - irrigation pumps, threshers, and power tillers (mainly driven by two-wheel tractors). Multinomial probit model results indicate that machinery ownership is positively associated with household assets, credit availability, electrification, and road density. These findings suggest that donors and policy makers should focus not only on short-term projects to boost machinery adoption. Rather, sustained emphasis on improving physical and civil infrastructure and services, as well as assuring credit availability, is also necessary to create an enabling environment in which the adoption of scale-appropriate farm machinery is most likely.

  1. Cocaine Use among the College Age Group: Biological and Psychological Effects--Clinical and Laboratory Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholi, Armand M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Knowledge about cocaine's effect on the human mind and body is limited and not clearly documented. This article discusses various biological and psychological effects of the drug based on clinical and laboratory studies of man. (Author/DF)

  2. Biological factors that may contribute to regional and racial disparities in HIV prevalence.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Rupert; Cohen, Craig R; Chege, Duncan; Yi, Tae J; Tharao, Wangari; McKinnon, Lyle R; Remis, Robert; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua

    2011-03-01

    Despite tremendous regional and subregional disparities in HIV prevalence around the world, epidemiology consistently demonstrates that black communities have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. There are many reasons for this, and a narrow focus on socio-behavioural causes may be seen as laying blame on affected communities or individuals. HIV sexual transmission is very inefficient, and a number of biological factors are critical in determining whether an unprotected sexual exposure to HIV results in productive infection. This review will focus on ways in which biology, rather than behaviour, may contribute to regional and racial differences in HIV epidemic spread. Specific areas of focus are viral factors, host genetics, and the impact of co-infections and host immunology. Considering biological causes for these racial disparities may help to destigmatize the issue and lead to new and more effective strategies for prevention. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Biophysical and biological factors determining the ability to achieve long-term cryobiological preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1997-12-01

    The BESTCapsule will maintain appropriate biological specimens for decades or centuries at cryogenic temperatures in the living state. Maintenance at temperatures below {approximately} {minus}140 C is not a problem. No ordinary chemical reactions in aqueous solutions can occur. The only source of damage will be the slow accumulation of physical damage to DNA from background ionizing radiation. But this source of damage should not become serious in less than a millennium. Rather, the main problem in cryopreservation is to devise procedures for cooling the biological specimens to {minus}196 C and returning them to normal temperatures without inflicting lethal injury. Regardless of the cell type, there are certain encompassing biophysical factors and constraints that determine whether they will survive or die during freezing and thawing. Superimposed on these may be special biological factors that apply to specific cell types. This paper will emphasize the former and give illustrative examples of the latter.

  4. On Finding and Using Identifiable Parameter Combinations in Nonlinear Dynamic Systems Biology Models and COMBOS: A Novel Web Implementation

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI) is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O) biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable) subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I–O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE) systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app)–COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and–importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It’s illustrated and validated here for models of moderate complexity

  5. Biological and Sociocultural Factors during the School Years Predicting Women's Lifetime Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrick, C. Emily; Cohen, Alison K.; Deardorff, Julianna; Cance, Jessica D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lifetime educational attainment is an important predictor of health and well-being for women in the United States. In this study, we examine the roles of sociocultural factors in youth and an understudied biological life event, pubertal timing, in predicting women's lifetime educational attainment. Methods: Using data from the National…

  6. A Study on the Factors Affecting Biological Concept Learning of Junior High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Min-Nan Maynard; Wu, Kun-Chang; Huang, Tai-Chu Iris

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how factors such as personal traits and school locations influence junior high school students' conceptual learning of biology. The study was carried out island-wide with the whole area divided into 10 districts, from which 4,537 students were selected using stratified random sampling. A questionnaire on…

  7. Biological and Sociocultural Factors during the School Years Predicting Women's Lifetime Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrick, C. Emily; Cohen, Alison K.; Deardorff, Julianna; Cance, Jessica D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lifetime educational attainment is an important predictor of health and well-being for women in the United States. In this study, we examine the roles of sociocultural factors in youth and an understudied biological life event, pubertal timing, in predicting women's lifetime educational attainment. Methods: Using data from the National…

  8. Which environmental factors are associated with lived health when controlling for biological health? - a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Cristina; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Stucki, Gerold; Bickenbach, Jerome; Cieza, Alarcos

    2015-05-27

    Lived health and biological health are two different perspectives of health introduced by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Since in the concept of lived health the impact of the environment on biological health is inherently included, it seems intuitive that when identifying the environmental determinants of health, lived health is the appropriate outcome. The Multilevel Item Response Theory (MLIRT) model has proven to be a successful method when dealing with the relation between a latent variable and observed variables. The objective of this study was to identify environmental factors associated with lived health when controlling for biological health by using the MLIRT framework. We performed a psychometric study using cross-sectional data from the Spanish Survey on Disability, Independence and Dependency Situation. Data were collected from 17,303 adults living in 15,263 dwellings. The MLIRT model was used for each of the two steps of the analysis to: (1) calculate people's biological health abilities and (2) estimate the association between lived health and environmental factors when controlling for biological health. The hierarchical structure of individuals in dwellings was considered in both models. Social support, being able to maintain one's job, the extent to which one's health needs are addressed and being discriminated against due to one's health problems were the environmental factors identified as associated with lived health. Biological health also had a strong positive association with lived health. This study identified environmental factors associated with people's lived health differences within and between dwellings according to the MLIRT-model approach. This study paves the way for the future implementation of the MLIRT model when analysing ICF-based data.

  9. Role of biological and non biological factors in congestive heart failure mortality: PREDICE-SCORE: a clinical prediction rule.

    PubMed

    de la Cámara, Agustín Gómez; Guerravales, Juan Manuel; Tapia, Purificación Magán; Esteban, Eva Andrés; del Pozo, Silvia Vázquez Fernández; Sandubete, Enrique Calderón; Ortega, Francisco J Medrano; Puerto, Asunción Navarro; Marín-León, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (HF) is a chronic, frequent and disabling condition but with a modifiable course and a large potential for improving. The aim of this project was to develop a clinical prediction model of biological and non biological factors in patients with first diagnosis of HF that facilitates the risk-stratification and decision-making process at the point of care. Historical cohort analysis of 600 patients attended at three tertiary hospitals and diagnosed of a first episode of HF according Framingham criteria. There were followed 1 year. We analyzed sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data with potential prognostic value. The modelling process concluded into a logistic regression multivariable analysis and a predictive rule: PREDICE SCORE. Age, dependency for daily basic activities, creatinine clearance, sodium levels at admission and systolic dysfunction diagnosis (HF with left ventricular ejection fraction 〈 40%) were the selected variables. The model showed a c-statistic of 0.763. PREDICE Score, has range of 22 points to stratifications of 1-year mortality. The follow-up of 600 patients hospitalized by a first episode of congestive HF, allowed us to obtain a predictive 1 year mortality model from the combination of demographic data, routine biochemistry and easy handling social and functional variables at the point of care. The variables included were non-invasive, undemanding to collect, and widely available. It allows for risk stratification and therapeutical targeting and may help in the clinical decisions process in a sustainable way.

  10. Biologically active molecules regulating the IgE antibody system: biochemical and biological comparisons of suppressive factor of allergy (SFA) and enhancing factor of allergy (EFA).

    PubMed

    Katz, D H; Chen, S S; Liu, F T; Bogowitz, C A; Katz, L R

    1984-01-01

    Studies in recent years directed at unraveling the complex regulatory mechanisms controlling IgE antibody production have demonstrated the existence of soluble factors that exert selective regulatory effects on the IgE antibody system. In addition, the demonstration of IgE-specific Fc receptors (FcR epsilon) on B and T lymphocytes, especially after exposure to high concentrations of IgE either in vivo or in vitro, has provided increasingly strong indications of an important role for such cells in the overall control of the IgE system. In our own laboratory, we have been studying soluble regulatory factors known as suppressive factor of allergy (SFA) and enhancing factor of allergy (EFA), which were initially identified by their selective, and opposing, regulatory effects on in vivo IgE responses in inbred mice. More recently, in an in vitro system in which it is possible to induce the de novo expression of FcR epsilon on lymphocytes cultured in the presence of monoclonal IgE, we reported that concomitant exposure of such cultured cells to SFA selectively blocked the induction of FcR epsilon expression. In the present study, we have extended these investigations by making a direct comparison between certain biological properties and biochemical characteristics of SFA and EFA. We found that SFA and EFA can be distinguished biochemically on the basis of size, SFA falling in the range of 30,000 daltons or so, and EFA falling in the range of 15,000 daltons. In examining their biological properties, we unexpectedly found that although SFA-enriched and EFA-enriched fractions exert dramatically distinct biological effects on in vivo IgE antibody synthesis (as implied by their names), the two respective active fractions are totally indistinguishable in their inhibitory effects on IgE-mediated induction of FcR epsilon + lymphocytes in vitro when intact spleen cell populations are exposed to monoclonal IgE. That the active entities in SFA and EFA responsible for inhibition of

  11. State-of-the-art technologies, current opinions and developments, and novel findings: news from the field of histochemistry and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Asan, Esther; Drenckhahn, Detlev

    2008-12-01

    Investigations of cell and tissue structure and function using innovative methods and approaches have again yielded numerous exciting findings in recent months and have added important data to current knowledge, inspiring new ideas and hypotheses in various fields of modern life sciences. Topics and contents of comprehensive expert reviews covering different aspects in methodological advances, cell biology, tissue function and morphology, and novel findings reported in original papers are summarized in the present review.

  12. Time of farmers' exposure to biological factors in agricultural working environment.

    PubMed

    Mołocznik, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Working time in conditions of exposure to hazardous factors is an important element indispensable for the evaluation of human exposure in the working environment. Agricultural work is accompanied by co-occurrence of many risk factors threatening farmers' health, e.g. dust, elements of the thermal environment, noise, vibration, chemical and biological agents. Biological factors cause diseases with contagious, allergic or immuno-toxic backgrounds which constitute the majority of farmers' occupational diseases registered in Poland. Exposure to hazardous factors in agricultural working environment is due to contact with plants, animals and organic wastes, more precisely--with microbes, plant and animal particles present in aerogenic agricultural dust, as well as pathogens of contagious and invasive diseases present in contaminated soil, water and plants. Data concerning the duration of farmers' exposure to biological and other factors of the working environment were obtained with the use of the Private Farmer Work Chart. Time-schedule observations concerned an annual work cycle. The study covered 30 farms with the following production profiles: plant (Group A), animal (Group B) and mixed production (Group C). The total working time was: in Group A - from 106-163 % of the legal working time; in Group B - from 75-147 %; in Group C - from 136-167 %. Among 48 work activities contributing to the full working cycle among the farmers examined, 15 activities were accompanied by 5 factors. These were mainly field activities which covered plant harvesting and fertilizing, chemical plant protection, as well as cultivation activities. Agricultural dust and elements of the thermal environment were the environmental factors most frequently accompanying agricultural work, followed by contact with biological factors, noise, vibration, and chemical agents. Biological factors are a specific element associated with 19 work activities, mainly the spreading of manure, animal breeding and

  13. Exploring the Factors Related to Acceptance of Evolutionary Theory among Turkish Preservice Biology Teachers: Toward a More Informative Conceptual Ecology for Biological Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deniz, Hasan; Donnelly, Lisa A.; Yilmaz, Irfan

    2008-01-01

    In this study, using multiple regression analysis, we aimed to explore the factors related to acceptance of evolutionary theory among preservice Turkish biology teachers using conceptual ecology for biological evolution as a theoretical lens. We aimed to determine the extent to which we can account for the variance in acceptance of evolutionary…

  14. Exploring the Factors Related to Acceptance of Evolutionary Theory among Turkish Preservice Biology Teachers: Toward a More Informative Conceptual Ecology for Biological Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deniz, Hasan; Donnelly, Lisa A.; Yilmaz, Irfan

    2008-01-01

    In this study, using multiple regression analysis, we aimed to explore the factors related to acceptance of evolutionary theory among preservice Turkish biology teachers using conceptual ecology for biological evolution as a theoretical lens. We aimed to determine the extent to which we can account for the variance in acceptance of evolutionary…

  15. Parathyroid nuclear scan. A focused review on the technical and biological factors affecting its outcome.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Subramanian; Milas, Mira; Neumann, Donald; Parikh, Rikesh T; Siperstein, Alan; Licata, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Technetium Parathyroid Scintigraphy (TS) is the most popular noninvasive localization procedure in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Awareness of various factors involved in technetium uptake helps understand the outcome of TS. We utilize a case of changing TS scans in a patient to review the literature on the various biological and technical factors involved in technetium uptake by the abnormal parathyroid tissue. A 56 year female was diagnosed with PHPT and osteopenia. An initial scan using (99m)Tc-Tetrofosmin showed no definite areas of abnormal parathyroid tissue. Patient refused surgical exploration, was started on Bisphosponates and subsequently monitored. Five years later she suffered fracture of her right wrist. A repeat TS using (99m)Tc-Sestamibi revealed hypervascular parathyroid lesion in the right lower neck. She underwent successful removal of a right lower parathyroid adenoma. Technical factors like the type of Tc isotope used, imaging techniques and biological factors like biochemical parameters (calcium, vitamin D levels), adenoma size, content of oxyphilic cells, vascularity can affect the outcome of the scan. Clinicians should be aware of technical and biological factors that could result in negative scan in parathyroid nuclear scintigraphy.

  16. Determinants of male health: the interaction of biological and social factors

    PubMed Central

    de Kretser, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the social and biological factors that may influence male development from conception to adulthood and also underlie the development of health disorders. It will provide assistance to those who may be considering the formulation of a male health policy. It aims to emphasize that social determinants function on a biological background that is profoundly influenced by a male's genome, inherited from his parents. The importance of the male-specific reproductive disorders is emphasized, but these also affect somatic structures through the secretion of androgens secreted from the testes. In turn, the function of the cardiovascular and nervous systems can significantly influence reproductive processes such as erectile dysfunction. PMID:20364153

  17. In-Class Use of Laptop Computers to Enhance Engagement within an Undergraduate Biology Curriculum: Findings and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Kirsten; Smit, Julie; Higgs, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Laptop computers were provided for use in three biology classes with differing formats (a second year lecture course of 100 students, a third/fourth year lecture course of 50 students, and a second year course with greater than 250 students, in groups of 25 during the laboratory portion of the class) to assess their impact on student learning and…

  18. In-Class Use of Laptop Computers to Enhance Engagement within an Undergraduate Biology Curriculum: Findings and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Kirsten; Smit, Julie; Higgs, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Laptop computers were provided for use in three biology classes with differing formats (a second year lecture course of 100 students, a third/fourth year lecture course of 50 students, and a second year course with greater than 250 students, in groups of 25 during the laboratory portion of the class) to assess their impact on student learning and…

  19. Teacher Related Factors Influencing Students' Enrollment in Biology Subject in Public Secondary Schools in Meru Central Sub County in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirima, Teresia Mugure; Kinyua, Susan Muthoni

    2016-01-01

    This study examined teacher related factors influencing students' enrollment in Biology subject in public secondary schools in Meru Central Sub County in Kenya. The study utilized the descriptive survey research design on a target population of 9,859 respondents consisting of 9,748 Biology students, 62 trained Biology teachers and 49 Heads of…

  20. The importance of biological factors affecting trace metal concentration as revealed from accumulation patterns in co-occurring terrestrial invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Frederik; Maelfait, Jean-Pierre; Bogaert, Nicolas; Tojal, Catarina; Du Laing, Gijs; Tack, Filip M G; Verloo, Marc G

    2004-01-01

    As physicochemical properties of the soil highly influence the bioavailable fraction of a particular trace metal, measured metal body burdens in a particular species are often assumed to be more reliable estimators of the contamination of the biota. To test this we compared the Cd, Cu and Zn content of three spiders (generalist predators) and two amphipods (detritivores), co-occurring in seven tidal marshes along the river Schelde, between each other and with the total metal concentrations and the concentrations of four sequential extractions of the soils. Correlations were significant in only one case and significant site x species interactions for all metals demonstrate that factors affecting metal concentration were species and site specific and not solely determined by site specific characteristics. These results emphasize that site and species specific biological factors might be of the utmost importance in determining the contamination of the biota, at least for higher trophic levels. A hypothetical example clarifies these findings.

  1. Biological and socio-cultural factors during the school years predicting women’s lifetime educational attainment

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, C. Emily; Cohen, Alison K.; Deardorff, Julianna

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lifetime educational attainment is an important predictor of health and well-being for women in the United States. In the current study, we examine the roles of socio-cultural factors in youth and an understudied biological life event, pubertal timing, in predicting women’s lifetime educational attainment. METHODS Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (N = 3889), we conducted sequential multivariate linear regression analyses to investigate the influences of macro-level and family-level socio-cultural contextual factors in youth (region of country, urbanicity, race/ethnicity, year of birth, household composition, mother’s education, mother’s age at first birth) and early menarche, a marker of early pubertal development, on women’s educational attainment after age 24. RESULTS Pubertal timing and all socio-cultural factors in youth, other than year of birth, predicted women’s lifetime educational attainment in bivariate models. Family factors had the strongest associations. When family factors were added to multivariate models, geographic region in youth and pubertal timing were no longer significant. CONCLUSION Our findings provide additional evidence that family factors should be considered when developing comprehensive and inclusive interventions in childhood and adolescence to promote lifetime educational attainment among girls. PMID:26830508

  2. Psychologic and Biologic Factors Associated with Fatigue in Patients with Persistent Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Starkweather, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom associated with neuropathic pain (NP) and can have negative consequences on psychosocial functioning, physical endurance, and quality of life. Recent evidence indicates that immune activation modulated through the increased release of proinflammatory cytokines can predict fatigue in some patient populations. Although earlier studies have shown that immune activation is a pathophysiologic feature of NP, there have been no studies to examine the relationship between immune activation and fatigue in persons with NP. Therefore, the purpose of this exploratory study was to: 1) determine the relationships among fatigue, pain, psychosocial factors, and selected biologic markers of immune activation (interleukin [IL] 6 and soluble IL-6 receptor [sIL-6R]) in participants with persistent radiculopathy; and 2) determine the differences in these variables based on fatigue severity. Participants (n = 80) were classified according to their level of fatigue as low (27.5%), moderate (32.5%), or high (40%), and significant differences were found between fatigue categories (p =.001). Multivariate analyses of variance revealed that individuals with moderate to high levels of fatigue differed from those with the lowest levels of fatigue in psychologic distress, depressive symptoms, IL-6, and sIL-6R, whereas the differences between moderate and high levels of fatigue were significant for psychologic distress and sIL-6R only. The findings suggest that immune activation affects fatigue severity and possibly other behavioral responses, offering important information when providing care to patients with persistent radiculopathy. The integration of biobehavioral nursing interventions in pain management may have a greater impact on quality of life than treatment focused only on pain. PMID:23452526

  3. Translational research approach to biological and modifiable risk factors of psychosis and affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Baune, B T; Thome, J

    2011-09-01

    This review summarizes the literature on (molecular-) biological, medical, environmental and modifiable risk factors for psychosis and mood disorders with the view of their suitability for translational research and mental health practice from preventative and clinical treatment perspectives. This review summarized literature on biological, medical, environmental and modifiable risk factors for psychosis and mood disorders evaluating their potential for translational research and clinical practice. Based on the concept of the gene - environment interaction in the development of mental disorders, we highlight the numerous risk factors reported to contribute to an increased susceptibility to schizophrenia and mood disorders of young adults to late-life. Special emphasis is placed onto the discussion on the requirement of translational and interdisciplinary research approaches integrating basic and clinical neuroscience approaches that may have important implications for future studies and clinical practice. Interdisciplinary research approaches integrating developmental neuroscience and policy makers are encouraged in order to achieve effective prevention and intervention programs addressing environmental, behavioural, biological factors relevant to psychiatric disorders during young ages, adulthood and aging.

  4. Paradoxical Roles of Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Prostate Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Brian W. C.; Scott, Kieran F.; Russell, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with dual roles in cancer biology including prostate cancer (PCa). On the one hand, there is evidence that it stimulates tumour angiogenesis, is involved in the initiation of PCa from an androgen-dependent to a castrate resistant state, plays a role in epithelial to mesenchymal plasticity, and may contribute to the aberrant regulation of eicosanoid pathways. On the other hand, TNF has also been reported to inhibit neovascularisation, induce apoptosis of PCa cells, and stimulate antitumour immunity. Much of the confusion surrounding its seemingly paradoxical roles in cancer biology stems from the dependence of its effects on the biological model within which TNF is investigated. This paper will address some of these issues and also discuss the therapeutic implications. PMID:23326670

  5. Implications of biological factors on accumulation of persistent organic pollutants in Antarctic notothenioid fish.

    PubMed

    Ríos, J M; Lana, N B; Ciocco, N F; Covaci, A; Barrera-Oro, E; Moreira, E; Altamirano, J C

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, the possible associations between selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and biological factors were assessed in different tissues of two Antarctic notothenioid fish: Notothenia rossii (NOR) and Trematomus newnesi (TRN) collected at Potter Cove, King George Island/Isla 25 de Mayo, South Shetland Islands. Specifically, association patterns between biological factors (body size, lipid content, body condition) and POP concentrations (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and metabolites, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordanes (CHLs) and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs)), were explored by using two approaches: multivariate analyses (principal component analysis: PCA) and intraspecific correlations. Integrating results suggest that biological factors such as size, KI and tissue type seemed to be associated to selective accumulation of POPs for immature specimens of N. rossii, and KI and tissue type for mature specimens of T. newnesi. Each particular factor should be considered when choosing N. rossii or T. newnesi as sentinels for POPs pollution in Antarctic marine environments. Further, both nototheniids showed a selective accumulation pattern in their gonads of penta-chlorinated biphenyls (penta-CBs; 55.5 and 29ngg(-1) lw for N. rossii and T. newnesi, respectively) and organochlorine pesticides such as DDTs (199 and 13.3ngg(-1) lw, for N. rossii and T. newnesi respectively), and of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in gills (97.2 and 22.1 for ngg(-1) lw, for N. rossii and T. newnesi, respectively), highlighting the importance of these tissues in monitoring studies of pollution in fish. The current study expands the knowledge concerning the biological factors to be investigated when specific pollutants are monitored and supports the importance of tissue type for the selective accumulation of POPs in Antarctic

  6. Psychosocial work factors and sleep problems: findings from the French national SIP survey.

    PubMed

    Chazelle, Emilie; Chastang, Jean-François; Niedhammer, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed at exploring the cross-sectional and prospective associations between psychosocial work factors and sleep problems. The study population consisted of a national representative sample of the French working population (SIP survey). The sample sizes were 7506 and 3555 for the cross-sectional and prospective analyses. Sleep problems were defined by either sleep disturbances or insufficient sleep duration at least several times a week. Psychosocial work factors included classical (job strain model factors) and emergent factors (recognition, insecurity, role/ethical conflict, emotional demands, work-life imbalance, etc.). Occupational factors related to working time/hours and physical work environment were also included as well as covariates related to factors outside work. Statistical analyses were performed using weighted Poisson regression analysis. In the cross-sectional analyses, psychological demands, low social support, low recognition, emotional demands, perception of danger, work-life imbalance and night work were found to be associated with sleep problems. In the prospective analyses, psychological demands and night work were predictive of sleep problems. Using a less conservative method, more factors were found to be associated with sleep problems. Dose-response associations were observed, showing that the more frequent the exposure to these factors, the higher the risk of sleep problems. No effect of repeated exposure was found on sleep problems. Classical and emergent psychosocial work factors were associated with sleep problems. More prospective studies and prevention policies may be needed.

  7. Technological, environmental and biological factors: referent variance values for infrared imaging of the bovine.

    PubMed

    Montanholi, Yuri R; Lim, Melissa; Macdonald, Alaina; Smith, Brock A; Goldhawk, Christy; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, Karen; Miller, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Despite its variety of potential applications, the wide implementation of infrared technology in cattle production faces technical, environmental and biological challenges similar to other indicators of metabolic state. Nine trials, divided into three classes (technological, environmental and biological factors) were conducted to illustrate the influence of these factors on body surface temperature assessed through infrared imaging. Evaluation of technological factors indicated the following: measurements of body temperatures were strongly repeatable when taken within 10 s; appropriateness of differing infrared camera technologies was influenced by distance to the target; and results were consistent when analysis of thermographs was compared between judges. Evaluation of environmental factors illustrated that wind and debris caused decreases in body surface temperatures without affecting metabolic rate; additionally, body surface temperature increased due to sunlight but returned to baseline values within minutes of shade exposure. Examination/investigation/exploration of animal factors demonstrated that exercise caused an increase in body surface temperature and metabolic rate. Administration of sedative and anti-sedative caused changes on body surface temperature and metabolic rate, and during late pregnancy a foetal thermal imprint was visible through abdominal infrared imaging. The above factors should be considered in order to standardize operational procedures for taking thermographs, thereby optimizing the use of such technology in cattle operations.

  8. Factor structure of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI): findings from a large incarcerated sample.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Craig S; Malterer, Melanie B; Newman, Joseph P

    2008-06-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; S. O. Lilienfeld, 1990; S. O. Lilienfeld & B. P. Andrews, 1996) with a community sample has suggested that the PPI subscales may comprise 2 higher order factors (S. D. Benning, C. J. Patrick, B. M. Hicks, D. M. Blonigen, & R. F. Krueger, 2003). However, substantive and structural evidence raises concerns about the viability of this 2-factor model, particularly in offender populations. The authors attempted to replicate the S. D. Benning et al. 2-factor solution using a large (N = 1,224) incarcerated male sample. Confirmatory factor analysis of this model resulted in poor model fit. Similarly, using the same EFA procedures as did S. D. Benning et al., the authors found little evidence for a 2-factor model. When they followed the recommendations of J.-W. van Prooijen and W. A. van der Kloot (2001) for recovering EFA solutions, model fit results provided some evidence that a 3-factor EFA solution could be recovered via confirmatory factor analysis.

  9. Toward Finding Driving Communications Factors in the System of Systems Survivability Simulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    method using a supersaturated design that could be used to eliminate insignificant design parameters for given scenarios. Eliminating insignificant...Design, Factor Screening, Survivability Lethality and Vulnerability Assessment, Supersaturated Design, Stepwise Regression 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 77...simulated battlefield. This thesis explores a factor screening method using a supersaturated design that could be used to eliminate insignificant

  10. Factors which influence Texas biology teachers' decisions to emphasize fundamental concepts of evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilica, Kimberly Lynn

    emphasis that Texas biology teachers currently as well as prefer to place on fundamental evolution concepts in relationship to specific belief factors which influence biology teachers' curricular decisions.

  11. Estimating Escherichia coli loads in streams based on various physical, chemical, and biological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Dipankar; Mohanty, Binayak P.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2013-05-01

    Microbes have been identified as a major contaminant of water resources. Escherichia coli is a commonly used indicator organism. It is well recognized that the fate of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by multiple physical, chemical, and biological factors. The aim of this work is to provide insight into the physical, chemical, and biological factors along with their interactions that are critical in the estimation of E. coli loads in surface streams. There are various models to predict E. coli loads in streams, but they tend to be system- or site-specific or overly complex without enhancing our understanding of these factors. Hence, based on available data, a Bayesian neural network (BNN) is presented for estimating E. coli loads based on physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams. The BNN has the dual advantage of overcoming the absence of quality data (with regard to consistency in data) and determination of mechanistic model parameters by employing a probabilistic framework. This study evaluates whether the BNN model can be an effective alternative tool to mechanistic models for E. coli load estimation in streams. For this purpose, a comparison with a traditional model (load estimator (LOADEST), U.S. Geological Survey) is conducted. The models are compared for estimated E. coli loads based on available water quality data in Plum Creek, Texas. All the model efficiency measures suggest that overall E. coli load estimations by the BNN model are better than the E. coli load estimations by the LOADEST model on all the three occasions (threefold cross validation). Thirteen factors were used for estimating E. coli loads with the exhaustive feature selection technique, which indicated that 6 of 13 factors are important for estimating E. coli loads. Physical factors included temperature and dissolved oxygen; chemical factors include phosphate and ammonia; and biological factors include suspended solids and chlorophyll. The results highlight that

  12. Estimating Escherichia coli loads in streams based on various physical, chemical, and biological factors

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Dipankar; Mohanty, Binayak P.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Microbes have been identified as a major contaminant of water resources. Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a commonly used indicator organism. It is well recognized that the fate of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by multiple physical, chemical, and biological factors. The aim of this work is to provide insight into the physical, chemical, and biological factors along with their interactions that are critical in the estimation of E. coli loads in surface streams. There are various models to predict E. coli loads in streams, but they tend to be system or site specific or overly complex without enhancing our understanding of these factors. Hence, based on available data, a Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) is presented for estimating E. coli loads based on physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams. The BNN has the dual advantage of overcoming the absence of quality data (with regards to consistency in data) and determination of mechanistic model parameters by employing a probabilistic framework. This study evaluates whether the BNN model can be an effective alternative tool to mechanistic models for E. coli loads estimation in streams. For this purpose, a comparison with a traditional model (LOADEST, USGS) is conducted. The models are compared for estimated E. coli loads based on available water quality data in Plum Creek, Texas. All the model efficiency measures suggest that overall E. coli loads estimations by the BNN model are better than the E. coli loads estimations by the LOADEST model on all the three occasions (three-fold cross validation). Thirteen factors were used for estimating E. coli loads with the exhaustive feature selection technique, which indicated that six of thirteen factors are important for estimating E. coli loads. Physical factors included temperature and dissolved oxygen; chemical factors include phosphate and ammonia; biological factors include suspended solids and chlorophyll. The results highlight that the LOADEST model

  13. Estimating Escherichia coli loads in streams based on various physical, chemical, and biological factors.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Dipankar; Mohanty, Binayak P; Lesikar, Bruce J

    2013-05-01

    Microbes have been identified as a major contaminant of water resources. Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a commonly used indicator organism. It is well recognized that the fate of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by multiple physical, chemical, and biological factors. The aim of this work is to provide insight into the physical, chemical, and biological factors along with their interactions that are critical in the estimation of E. coli loads in surface streams. There are various models to predict E. coli loads in streams, but they tend to be system or site specific or overly complex without enhancing our understanding of these factors. Hence, based on available data, a Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) is presented for estimating E. coli loads based on physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams. The BNN has the dual advantage of overcoming the absence of quality data (with regards to consistency in data) and determination of mechanistic model parameters by employing a probabilistic framework. This study evaluates whether the BNN model can be an effective alternative tool to mechanistic models for E. coli loads estimation in streams. For this purpose, a comparison with a traditional model (LOADEST, USGS) is conducted. The models are compared for estimated E. coli loads based on available water quality data in Plum Creek, Texas. All the model efficiency measures suggest that overall E. coli loads estimations by the BNN model are better than the E. coli loads estimations by the LOADEST model on all the three occasions (three-fold cross validation). Thirteen factors were used for estimating E. coli loads with the exhaustive feature selection technique, which indicated that six of thirteen factors are important for estimating E. coli loads. Physical factors included temperature and dissolved oxygen; chemical factors include phosphate and ammonia; biological factors include suspended solids and chlorophyll. The results highlight that the LOADEST model

  14. Biochemistry and biology of the inducible multifunctional transcription factor TFII-I.

    PubMed

    Roy, A L

    2001-08-22

    An animal cell has the capability to respond to a variety of external signals through cell surface receptors. The response is usually manifested in terms of altered gene expression in the nucleus. Thus, in modern molecular and cell biology, it has become important to understand how the communication between extracellular signals and nuclear gene transcription is achieved. Originally discovered as a basal factor required for initiator-dependent transcription in vitro, recent evidence suggests that TFII-I is also an inducible multifunctional transcription factor that is activated in response to a variety of extracellular signals and translocates to the nucleus to turn on signal-induced genes. Here I review the biochemical and biological properties of TFII-I and related proteins in nuclear gene transcription, signal transduction and genetic disorders.

  15. Benefit Finding and Quality of Life in Caregivers of Childhood Cancer Survivors: The Moderating Roles of Demographic and Psychosocial Factors.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Molly H; Mrug, Sylvie; Schwebel, David C; Phipps, Sean; Whelan, Kimberly; Madan-Swain, Avi

    Benefit finding, or finding positive outcomes in the face of adversity, may play a role in predicting quality of life (QoL) among caregivers, but mixed results suggest that other factors may moderate this relationship. This study examined demographic and psychosocial moderators of the association between benefit finding and QoL among caregivers of childhood cancer survivors. Caregivers of childhood cancer survivors (n = 83) completed measures of benefit finding, QoL, coping, optimism, social support, caregiving demand, posttraumatic stress, and demographics. The relationship between benefit finding and QoL was moderated by caregiver age, marital status, socioeconomic status, geographic location, acceptance and emotion-focused coping, optimism, caregiving demand, and posttraumatic stress. Benefit finding was more strongly related to QoL among caregivers with fewer demographic/psychosocial resources. Results suggest that finding benefits in the cancer experience may have a greater positive impact for caregivers with relatively fewer demographic and psychosocial resources and may have less of an impact for caregivers with relatively greater resources. Findings further point to the complex nature of QoL among caregivers of childhood cancer survivors. Results may aid clinicians in identifying caregivers at particular risk for low QoL. They may be counseled to find benefits in their experience or provided with resources to strengthen other factors that impact QoL.

  16. Factor Structure of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI): Findings from a Large Incarcerated Sample

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Craig S.; Malterer, Melanie B.; Newman, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld, 1990) with a community sample suggested that the PPI subscales may be comprised of two higher-order factors (Benning et al., 2003). However, little research has examined the PPI structure in offenders. The current study attempted to replicate the Benning et al. two-factor solution using a large (N=1224) incarcerated male sample. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of this model with the full sample resulted in poor model fit. Next, to identify a factor solution that would summarize the offender data, EFA was conducted using a split-half of the total sample, followed by an attempt to replicate the EFA solution via CFA with the other split-half sample. Using the recommendations of Prooijen and van der Kloot (2001) for recovering EFA solutions, model fit results provided some evidence that the EFA solution could be recovered via CFA. However, this model involved extensive cross-loadings of the subscales across three factors, suggesting item overlap across PPI subscales. In sum, the two-factor solution reported by Benning et al. (2003) was not a viable model for the current sample of offenders, and additional research is needed to elucidate the latent structure of the PPI. PMID:18557694

  17. Growth factors and myometrium: biological effects in uterine fibroid and possible clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Islam, Md. Soriful; Reis, Fernando M.; Gray, Peter C.; Bloise, Enrrico; Petraglia, Felice; Vale, Wylie; Castellucci, Mario

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Growth factors are proteins secreted by a number of cell types that are capable of modulating cellular growth, proliferation and cellular differentiation. It is well accepted that uterine cellular events such as proliferation and differentiation are regulated by sex steroids and their actions in target tissues are mediated by local production of growth factors acting through paracrine and/or autocrine mechanisms. Myometrial mass is ultimately modified in pregnancy as well as in tumour conditions such as leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma. Leiomyomas, also known as fibroids, are benign tumours of the uterus, considered to be one of the most frequent causes of infertility in reproductive years in women. METHODS For this review, we searched the database MEDLINE and Google Scholar for articles with content related to growth factors acting on myometrium; the findings are hereby reviewed and discussed. RESULTS Different growth factors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF), acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and TGF-β perform actions in myometrium and in leiomyomas. In addition to these growth factors, activin and myostatin have been recently identified in myometrium and leiomyoma. CONCLUSIONS Growth factors play an important role in the mechanisms involved in myometrial patho-physiology. PMID:21788281

  18. Macrophage colony stimulating factor: not just for macrophages anymore! A gateway into complex biologies.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Thomas G; Driggers, Lara; Zhang, Jian Gang; Hoa, Neil; Delgado, Christina; Williams, Christopher C; Dan, Qinhong; Sanchez, Ramon; Jeffes, Edward W B; Wepsic, H Terry; Myers, Michael P; Koths, Kirston; Jadus, Martin R

    2008-10-01

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, also called colony stimulating factor-1) has traditionally been viewed as a growth/differentiation factor for monocytes, macrophages, and some female-specific tumors. As a result of alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational processing, several forms of M-CSF protein are produced: a secreted glycoprotein, a longer secreted form containing proteoglycan, and a short membrane-bound isoform. These different forms of M-CSF all initiate cell signaling in cells bearing the M-CSF receptor, called c-fms. Here we review the biology of M-CSF, which has important roles in bone physiology, the intestinal tract, cancer metastases to the bone, macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing and tumor immunity. Although this review concentrates mostly on the membrane form of human M-CSF (mM-CSF), the biology of the soluble forms and the M-CSF receptor will also be discussed for comparative purposes. The mechanisms of the biological effects of the membrane-bound M-CSF reveal that this cytokine is unexpectedly involved in many complex molecular events. Recent experiments suggest that a tumor vaccine based on membrane-bound M-CSF-transduced tumor cells, combined with anti-angiogenic therapy, should be evaluated further for use in clinical trials.

  19. A systems biological approach to identify key transcription factors and their genomic neighborhoods in human sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Ylipää, Antti; Yli-Harja, Olli; Zhang, Wei; Nykter, Matti

    2011-01-01

    Identification of genetic signatures is the main objective for many computational oncology studies. The signature usually consists of numerous genes that are differentially expressed between two clinically distinct groups of samples, such as tumor subtypes. Prospectively, many signatures have been found to generalize poorly to other datasets and, thus, have rarely been accepted into clinical use. Recognizing the limited success of traditionally generated signatures, we developed a systems biology-based framework for robust identification of key transcription factors and their genomic regulatory neighborhoods. Application of the framework to study the differences between gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS) resulted in the identification of nine transcription factors (SRF, NKX2-5, CCDC6, LEF1, VDR, ZNF250, TRIM63, MAF, and MYC). Functional annotations of the obtained neighborhoods identified the biological processes which the key transcription factors regulate differently between the tumor types. Analyzing the differences in the expression patterns using our approach resulted in a more robust genetic signature and more biological insight into the diseases compared to a traditional genetic signature.

  20. Factors influencing rheumatologists' prescription of biological treatment in rheumatoid arthritis: an interview study.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Almina; Roback, Kerstin; Hallert, Eva; Carlsson, Per

    2014-10-11

    The introduction of biological drugs involved a fundamental change in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The extent to which biological drugs are prescribed to RA patients in different regions in Sweden varies greatly. Previous research has indicated that differences in health care practice at the regional level might obscure differences at the individual level. The objective of this study is to explore what influences individual rheumatologists' decisions when prescribing biological drugs. Semi-structured interviews, utilizing closed- and open-ended questions, were conducted with senior rheumatologists, selected through a mix of random and purposive sampling. The interview questions consisted of two parts, with a "parallel mixed method" approach. In the first and main part, open-ended exploratory questions were posed about factors influencing prescription. In the second part, the rheumatologists were asked to rate predefined factors that might influence their prescription decisions. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) was used as a conceptual framework for data collection and analysis. Twenty-six rheumatologists were interviewed. A constellation of various factors and their interaction influenced rheumatologists' prescribing decisions, including the individual rheumatologist's experiences and perceptions of the evidence, the structure of the department including responsibility for costs, peer pressure, political and administrative influences, and participation in clinical trials. The patient as an actor emerged as an important factor. Hence, factors both at organizational and individual levels influenced the prescribing of biological drugs. The factors should not be seen as individual influences but were described as influencing prescription in an interactive, nonlinear way. Potential factors explaining differences in prescription practice are experience and perception of the evidence on the individual level and the structure of

  1. Neurotrophic factors and neural prostheses: potential clinical applications based upon findings in the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Pettingill, Lisa N; Richardson, Rachael T; Wise, Andrew K; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K

    2007-06-01

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the target cells of the cochlear implant, a neural prosthesis designed to provide important auditory cues to severely or profoundly deaf patients. The ongoing degeneration of SGNs that occurs following a sensorineural hearing loss is, therefore, considered a limiting factor in cochlear implant efficacy. We review neurobiological techniques aimed at preventing SGN degeneration using exogenous delivery of neurotrophic factors. Application of these proteins prevents SGN degeneration and can enhance neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, chronic electrical stimulation of SGNs increases neurotrophic factor-induced survival and is correlated with functional benefits. The application of neurotrophic factors has the potential to enhance the benefits that patients can derive from cochlear implants; moreover, these techniques may be relevant for use with neural prostheses in other neurological conditions.

  2. Neurotrophic factors and neural prostheses: potential clinical applications based upon findings in the auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Pettingill, L.N.; Richardson, R.T.; Wise, A.K.; O'Leary, S.; Shepherd, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the target cells of the cochlear implant, a neural prosthesis designed to provide important auditory cues to severely or profoundly deaf patients. The ongoing degeneration of SGNs that occurs following a sensorineural hearing loss is therefore considered a limiting factor in cochlear implant efficacy. We review neurobiological techniques aimed at preventing SGN degeneration using exogenous delivery of neurotrophic factors. Application of these proteins prevents SGN degeneration and can enhance neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, chronic electrical stimulation of SGNs increases neurotrophic factor-induced survival and is correlated with functional benefits. The application of neurotrophic factors has the potential to enhance the benefits that patients can derive from cochlear implants; moreover, these techniques may be relevant for use with neural prostheses in other neurological conditions. PMID:17551571

  3. Metadiscourse markers in biological research articles and journal impact factor: Non-native writers vs. native writers.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Javad; Ilghami, Roghayeh

    2016-07-08

    Metadiscourse markers (MDMs) are lexical resources that writers employ to organize their discourse and state their stance towards the content or the reader. This study investigated the frequency with which interactive and interactional MDMs were employed in biological research articles (RAs). It also explored the possible relationship between the frequency of these markers and Impact Factor (IF) of journals as an index of quality. Moreover, it aimed at finding out the difference(s) between two groups of authors (Iranian and American) in their use of these markers. Forty biological RAs published in years 2008-2011 written by Iranian non-native authors and published in four ISI journals with different IFs and 40 articles with the same characteristics published by American native authors were selected and examined for the use of the markers. The results showed that there was a strong positive correlation between the frequency of MDMs and IF of the journals. Regarding the frequency of MDMs, it was observed that Iranian authors employed interactive and interactional markers slightly more than their American counterparts. These results may provisionally confirm the considerable role of MDMs in enhancing the coherence and organization of articles for possible publication in high-impact journals. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):349-360, 2016.

  4. On finding bicliques in bipartite graphs: a novel algorithm and its application to the integration of diverse biological data types

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrating and analyzing heterogeneous genome-scale data is a huge algorithmic challenge for modern systems biology. Bipartite graphs can be useful for representing relationships across pairs of disparate data types, with the interpretation of these relationships accomplished through an enumeration of maximal bicliques. Most previously-known techniques are generally ill-suited to this foundational task, because they are relatively inefficient and without effective scaling. In this paper, a powerful new algorithm is described that produces all maximal bicliques in a bipartite graph. Unlike most previous approaches, the new method neither places undue restrictions on its input nor inflates the problem size. Efficiency is achieved through an innovative exploitation of bipartite graph structure, and through computational reductions that rapidly eliminate non-maximal candidates from the search space. An iterative selection of vertices for consideration based on non-decreasing common neighborhood sizes boosts efficiency and leads to more balanced recursion trees. Results The new technique is implemented and compared to previously published approaches from graph theory and data mining. Formal time and space bounds are derived. Experiments are performed on both random graphs and graphs constructed from functional genomics data. It is shown that the new method substantially outperforms the best previous alternatives. Conclusions The new method is streamlined, efficient, and particularly well-suited to the study of huge and diverse biological data. A robust implementation has been incorporated into GeneWeaver, an online tool for integrating and analyzing functional genomics experiments, available at http://geneweaver.org. The enormous increase in scalability it provides empowers users to study complex and previously unassailable gene-set associations between genes and their biological functions in a hierarchical fashion and on a genome-wide scale. This practical

  5. The master role of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor in melanocyte and melanoma biology.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Akinori; Fisher, David E

    2017-03-06

    Certain transcription factors have vital roles in lineage development, including specification of cell types and control of differentiation. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a key transcription factor for melanocyte development and differentiation. MITF regulates expression of numerous pigmentation genes to promote melanocyte differentiation, as well as fundamental genes for maintaining cell homeostasis, including genes encoding proteins involved in apoptosis (eg, BCL2) and the cell cycle (eg, CDK2). Loss-of-function mutations of MITF cause Waardenburg syndrome type IIA, whose phenotypes include depigmentation due to melanocyte loss, whereas amplification or specific mutation of MITF can be an oncogenic event that is seen in a subset of familial or sporadic melanomas. In this article, we review basic features of MITF biological function and highlight key unresolved questions regarding this remarkable transcription factor.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.9.

  6. Toward a unified theory of childhood trauma and psychosis: A comprehensive review of epidemiological, clinical, neuropsychological and biological findings.

    PubMed

    Misiak, Błażej; Krefft, Maja; Bielawski, Tomasz; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Frydecka, Dorota

    2017-02-16

    There is a growing body of research focused on the relationship between childhood trauma and the risk of developing psychosis. Numerous studies, including many large-scale population-based studies, controlling for possible mediating variables, provide persuasive evidence of a dose-response association and are indicative of a causal relationship. Existing evidence supports the specificity model, showing differential associations between particular adversities and clinical symptoms, with cumulative adversity causing less favorable clinical and functional outcomes in psychotic patients. To date, several psychological and biological models have been proposed to search for underlying developmental trajectories leading to the onset of psychosis, influencing psychopathological manifestation and negative functional outcomes due to a history of childhood trauma. In this article, we provide a unified review on the relationship between childhood trauma and psychosis by integrating results of epidemiological, clinical, neuropsychological and biological studies. The question whether psychosis with a positive history of childhood trauma should be considered as a new psychotic phenotype, requiring specific therapeutic interventions, warrants further investigation.

  7. Factors that predict the use or non-use of virtual dissection by high school biology teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockerham, William

    2001-07-01

    With the advent of computers into scholastic classrooms, virtual dissection has become a potential educational tool in high school biology lab settings. Utilizing non-experimental survey research methodology, this study attempted to identify factors that may influence high school biology teachers to use or not to use a virtual dissection. A 75-item research survey instrument consisting of both demographic background and Likert style questions was completed by 215 high school members of the National Association of Biology Teachers. The survey responses provided data to answer the research questions concerning the relationship between the likelihood of a high school biology teacher using a virtual dissection and a number of independent variables from the following three categories: (a) demographics, (b) attitude and experience, and (c) resources and support. These data also allowed for the determination of a demographic profile of the sample population. The demographic profile showed the sample population of high school biology teachers to be two-thirds female, mature, highly educated and very experienced. Analysis of variance and Pearson product moment correlational statistics were used to determine if there was a relationship between high school biology teachers' likelihood to use a virtual dissection and the independent variables. None of the demographic or resource and support independent variables demonstrated a strong relationship to the dependent variable of teachers' likelihood to use a virtual dissection. Three of the attitude and experience independent variables showed a statistically significant (p < .05) relationship to teachers' likelihood to use a virtual dissection: attitude toward virtual dissection, previous use of a virtual dissection and intention to use a real animal dissection. These findings may indicate that teachers are using virtual dissection as a supplement rather than a substitute. It appears that those concerned with promoting virtual

  8. Factors Affecting Children's Judgement of Culturally Deviant Acts: Findings from an International School in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutsuki, Aya; Tanaka, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between perceptions of culturally deviant acts and multicultural experiences of elementary-school children attending an international school in Japan. Findings indicated that children judged a Japanese harsher than a foreigner, irrespective of the children's age. It was also found that younger children were…

  9. Applying Effective Instruction Research Findings in Teacher Education: Six Influencing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Elsie W.

    This preliminary report provides an overview of the Applying Research to Teacher Education (ARTE) Research Utilization in Elementary Teacher Education (RUETE) study which began in 1982 and will continue through 1985. ARTE: RUETE explores specific processes for incorporating recent research findings of effective instruction into preservice…

  10. Applying Effective Instruction Research Findings in Teacher Education: Six Influencing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Elsie W.

    This preliminary report provides an overview of the Applying Research to Teacher Education (ARTE) Research Utilization in Elementary Teacher Education (RUETE) study which began in 1982 and will continue through 1985. ARTE: RUETE explores specific processes for incorporating recent research findings of effective instruction into preservice…

  11. Factors Affecting Children's Judgement of Culturally Deviant Acts: Findings from an International School in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutsuki, Aya; Tanaka, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between perceptions of culturally deviant acts and multicultural experiences of elementary-school children attending an international school in Japan. Findings indicated that children judged a Japanese harsher than a foreigner, irrespective of the children's age. It was also found that younger children were…

  12. Factors influencing concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Le Boedec, Marion; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Ferlet, Jean-François; Marhadour, Thierry; Chales, Gérard; Grange, Laurent; Hacquard-Bouder, Cécile; Loeuille, Damien; Sellam, Jérémie; Albert, Jean-David; Bentin, Jacques; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Etchepare, Fabien; Gaudin, Philippe; Hudry, Christophe; Dougados, Maxime; Saraux, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Clinical joint examination (CJE) is less time-consuming than ultrasound (US) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Low concordance between CJE and US would indicate that the 2 tests provide different types of information. Knowledge of factors associated with CJE/US concordance would help to select patients and joints for US. Our objective was to identify factors associated with CJE/US concordance. Seventy-six patients with RA requiring tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) antagonist therapy were included in a prospective, multicenter cohort. In each patient, 38 joints were evaluated. Synovitis was scored using CJE, B-mode US (B-US), and power Doppler US (PDUS). Joints whose kappa coefficient (κ) for agreement CJE/US was < 0.1 were considered discordant. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors independently associated with CJE/US concordance, defined as factors yielding p < 0.05 and OR > 2. Concordance before TNF-α antagonist therapy varied across joints for CJE/US (κ = -0.08 to 0.51) and B-US/PDUS (κ = 0.30 to 0.67). CJE/US concordance was low at the metatarsophalangeal joints and shoulders (κ < 0.1). Before TNF-α antagonist therapy, a low 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) was associated with good CJE/B-US concordance, and no factors were associated with CJE/PDUS concordance. After TNF-α antagonist therapy, only the joint site was associated with CJE/B-US concordance; joint site and short disease duration were associated with CJE/PDUS concordance. Concordance between CJE and US is poor overall. US adds information to CJE, most notably at the metatarsophalangeal joints and shoulders. Usefulness is decreased for B-US when DAS28 is low and for PDUS when disease duration is short.

  13. Midterm clinico-radiologic findings of an open label observation study of add-on tacrolimus with biologics or non-biologic DMARDs.

    PubMed

    Takakubo, Yuya; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Hirayama, Tomoyuki; Iwazaki, Kiyoshi; Yang, Suran; Sasaki, Akiko; Nakano, Haruki; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Takagi, Michiaki

    2012-11-01

    Tacrolimus (TAC) suppresses immune-inflammation by an intermediary inhibition of calcineurin activation in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various combination therapies for RA have been reported to be superior to monotherapies. The aim was therefore to study add-on TAC in a combination with biologics (BIO) and/or non-BIO disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in treatment-resistant patients. In eight RA patients, TAC was added on to BIO (TAC/BIO group) and in forty-one to non-BIO DMARDs (TAC/non-BIO group). The mean C-reactive protein (CRP) decreased from 33 mg/l at the baseline to 16 mg/l at first year in the TAC/BIO group (P < 0.05), from 41 to 14 mg/l in the TAC/non-BIO group (P < 0.05); the mean DAS28-CRP (28 joint count) disease activity score decreased from 5.3 to 4.4 in the TAC/BIO group (P < 0.05) and from 5.0 to 3.9 in the TAC/non-BIO group (P < 0.05). The median of Δ modified total Sharp score decreased from 43 during the year preceding the baseline to 3 during the first year of the follow-up in the TAC/BIO group (P < 0.05) and from 22 to 0 during the second year in the TAC/non-BIO group (P < 0.05). Twenty-six adverse events occurred in this study in 26 patients (53% in all); however, the only severe adverse event was one case of an atypical mycobacterial disease (2%). The combination therapy of TAC with BIO or non-BIO DMARDs represents an effective and relatively safe mode of therapy in treatment-resistant RA.

  14. Finding Color in Conformity: A Commentary on Culturally Specific Risk Factors for Violence in Australia.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Stephane M

    2015-11-01

    This article outlines the current utility of Indigenous culturally specific risk factors for violence and the ramifications for cross-cultural risk prediction. The Indigenous culturally specific violence risk factor literature has provided a rich body of contextual information outlining Indigenous patterns of criminal behaviour. This information has the capacity to facilitate offender responsivity and treatment targets in addition to assisting clinicians identify the presence of risk markers among Indigenous clients. However, if intended for inclusion in risk prediction models, culturally specific risk items then require further quantitative analysis to establish robust associations and probability estimates for recidivistic outcome. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. A systems biology perspective on the role of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Rushton, Paul J

    2014-02-01

    Drought is one of the major challenges affecting crop productivity and yield. However, water stress responses are notoriously multigenic and quantitative with strong environmental effects on phenotypes. It is also clear that water stress often does not occur alone under field conditions but rather in conjunction with other abiotic stresses such as high temperature and high light intensities. A multidisciplinary approach with successful integration of a whole range of -omics technologies will not only define the system, but also provide new gene targets for both transgenic approaches and marker-assisted selection. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling and some constitute major hubs in the signaling webs. The main transcription factors in this network include MYB, bHLH, bZIP, ERF, NAC, and WRKY transcription factors. The role of WRKY transcription factors in abiotic stress signaling networks is just becoming apparent and systems biology approaches are starting to define their places in the signaling network. Using systems biology approaches, there are now many transcriptomic analyses and promoter analyses that concern WRKY transcription factors. In addition, reports on nuclear proteomics have identified WRKY proteins that are up-regulated at the protein level by water stress. Interactomics has started to identify different classes of WRKY-interacting proteins. What are often lacking are connections between metabolomics, WRKY transcription factors, promoters, biosynthetic pathways, fluxes and downstream responses. As more levels of the system are characterized, a more detailed understanding of the roles of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in crops will be obtained.

  16. Finding and defining the natural automata acting in living plants: Toward the synthetic biology for robotics and informatics in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Tomonori; Bouteau, François; Mancuso, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The automata theory is the mathematical study of abstract machines commonly studied in the theoretical computer science and highly interdisciplinary fields that combine the natural sciences and the theoretical computer science. In the present review article, as the chemical and biological basis for natural computing or informatics, some plants, plant cells or plant-derived molecules involved in signaling are listed and classified as natural sequential machines (namely, the Mealy machines or Moore machines) or finite state automata. By defining the actions (states and transition functions) of these natural automata, the similarity between the computational data processing and plant decision-making processes became obvious. Finally, their putative roles as the parts for plant-based computing or robotic systems are discussed. PMID:23336016

  17. Finding Mouse Models of Human Lymphomas and Leukemia’s using The Jackson Laboratory Mouse Tumor Biology Database

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Dale A.; Sundberg, John P.; Krupke, Debra M.; Neuhauser, Steven B.; Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  18. Finding of Correction Factor and Dimensional Error in Bio-AM Model by FDM Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manmadhachary, Aiamunoori; Ravi Kumar, Yennam; Krishnanand, Lanka

    2016-06-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is the swift manufacturing process, in which input data can be provided from various sources like 3-Dimensional (3D) Computer Aided Design (CAD), Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and 3D scanner data. From the CT/MRI data can be manufacture Biomedical Additive Manufacturing (Bio-AM) models. The Bio-AM model gives a better lead on preplanning of oral and maxillofacial surgery. However manufacturing of the accurate Bio-AM model is one of the unsolved problems. The current paper demonstrates error between the Standard Triangle Language (STL) model to Bio-AM model of dry mandible and found correction factor in Bio-AM model with Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) technique. In the present work dry mandible CT images are acquired by CT scanner and supplied into a 3D CAD model in the form of STL model. Further the data is sent to FDM machine for fabrication of Bio-AM model. The difference between Bio-AM to STL model dimensions is considered as dimensional error and the ratio of STL to Bio-AM model dimensions considered as a correction factor. This correction factor helps to fabricate the AM model with accurate dimensions of the patient anatomy. These true dimensional Bio-AM models increasing the safety and accuracy in pre-planning of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The correction factor for Dimension SST 768 FDM AM machine is 1.003 and dimensional error is limited to 0.3 %.

  19. Factors That Explain Placement Decisions for Students with Multiple Disabilities: Findings from National Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Rashida; Sundeen, Todd; Hutchinson, Susan R.; Jackson, Lewis

    2017-01-01

    The Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study data set was utilised to examine the potential influences on placement decisions for students with multiple disabilities in the US. The sample consisted of 415 students. Specifically, the study investigated whether factors including students' prior special education experiences, parental…

  20. Gene-Environment Interplay in Internalizing Disorders: Consistent Findings across Six Environmental Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Brian M.; Dirago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Background: Behavior genetic methods can help to elucidate gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of internalizing (INT) disorders (i.e., major depression and anxiety disorders). To date, however, no study has conducted a comprehensive analysis examining multiple environmental risk factors with the purpose of delineating general…

  1. Perceptions of Factors Influencing Healthful Food Consumption Behavior in the Lower Mississippi Delta: Focus Group Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Bernestine B.; Richardson, Valerie; Johnson, Glenda S.; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Yadrick, Kathleen; Ndirangu, Murugi; Goolsby, Susan; Watkins, Debra; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hyman, Edith; Stigger, Flavelia; Bogle, Margaret L.; Kramer, Tim R.; Strickland, Earline; McCabe-Sellers, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify perceptions of Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) residents regarding factors that influence a change in healthful food consumption behavior to assist in planning sustainable nutrition interventions in the LMD. Design: Nine focus groups were conducted with LMD residents in 9 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. One…

  2. Enhancing Coping and Supporting Protective Factors after a Disaster: Findings From a Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Tara; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article presents the Journey of Hope (JoH), a school-based intervention for children who have experienced a collective trauma such as a natural disaster. Through the use of group work, the JoH focuses on building coping skills and enhancing protective factors to help children recover. Method: This quasi-experimental research…

  3. Perceptions of Factors Influencing Healthful Food Consumption Behavior in the Lower Mississippi Delta: Focus Group Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Bernestine B.; Richardson, Valerie; Johnson, Glenda S.; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Yadrick, Kathleen; Ndirangu, Murugi; Goolsby, Susan; Watkins, Debra; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hyman, Edith; Stigger, Flavelia; Bogle, Margaret L.; Kramer, Tim R.; Strickland, Earline; McCabe-Sellers, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify perceptions of Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) residents regarding factors that influence a change in healthful food consumption behavior to assist in planning sustainable nutrition interventions in the LMD. Design: Nine focus groups were conducted with LMD residents in 9 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. One…

  4. Factors related to taste sensitivity in elderly: cross-sectional findings from SONIC study.

    PubMed

    Uota, M; Ogawa, T; Ikebe, K; Arai, Y; Kamide, K; Gondo, Y; Masui, Y; Ishizaki, T; Inomata, C; Takeshita, H; Mihara, Y; Maeda, Y

    2016-12-01

    The sense of taste is important, as it allows for assessment of nutritional value, as well as safety and quality of foods, with several factors suggested to be associated with taste sensitivity. However, comprehensive variables regarding taste and related factors have not been utilised in previous studies for assessments of sensitivity. In the present study, we performed cross-sectional analyses of taste sensitivity and related factors in geriatric individuals who participated in the SONIC Study. We analysed 2 groups divided by age, 69-71 years (young-old, n = 687) and 79-81 years (old-old, n = 621), and performed a general health assessment, an oral examination and determination of taste sensitivity. Contributing variables were selected by univariate analysis and then subjected to multivariate logistic regression analysis. In both groups, females showed significantly better sensitivity for bitter and sour tastes. Additionally, higher cognitive scores for subjects with a fine taste for salty were commonly seen in both groups, while smoking, drinking, hypertension, number of teeth, stimulated salivary flow salt intake and years of education were also shown to be associated with taste sensitivity. We found gender and cognitive status to be major factors affecting taste sensitivity in geriatric individuals.

  5. Gene-environment interplay in internalizing disorders: consistent findings across six environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Brian M; DiRago, Ana C; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2009-10-01

    Behavior genetic methods can help to elucidate gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of internalizing (INT) disorders (i.e., major depression and anxiety disorders). To date, however, no study has conducted a comprehensive analysis examining multiple environmental risk factors with the purpose of delineating general mechanisms of G-E influence in the development of INT disorders. The sample consisted of 1315 male and female twin pairs participating in the age 17 assessment of the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Quantitative G-E interplay models were used to examine how genetic and environmental risk for INT disorders changes as a function of environmental context. Multiple measures and informants were employed to construct composite measures of INT disorders and six environmental risk factors including: stressful life events, mother-child and father-child relationship problems, antisocial and prosocial peer affiliation, and academic achievement and engagement. Significant moderation effects were detected between each environmental risk factor and INT such that in the context of greater environmental adversity, nonshared environmental factors became more important in the etiology of INT symptoms. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that environmental stressors have a causative effect on the emergence of INT disorders. The consistency of our results suggests a general mechanism of environmental influence on INT disorders regardless of the specific form of environmental risk.

  6. Gene-Environment Interplay in Internalizing Disorders: Consistent Findings across Six Environmental Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Brian M.; Dirago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Background: Behavior genetic methods can help to elucidate gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of internalizing (INT) disorders (i.e., major depression and anxiety disorders). To date, however, no study has conducted a comprehensive analysis examining multiple environmental risk factors with the purpose of delineating general…

  7. Enhancing Coping and Supporting Protective Factors after a Disaster: Findings From a Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Tara; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article presents the Journey of Hope (JoH), a school-based intervention for children who have experienced a collective trauma such as a natural disaster. Through the use of group work, the JoH focuses on building coping skills and enhancing protective factors to help children recover. Method: This quasi-experimental research…

  8. Factors Associated with Use of Automated Smoking Cessation Interventions: Findings from the eQuit Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balmford, James; Borland, Ron; Benda, Peter; Howard, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to better understand structural factors associated with uptake of automated tailored interventions for smoking cessation. In a prospective randomized controlled trial with interventions only offered, not mandated, participants were randomized based on the following: web-based expert system (QuitCoach); text messaging program (onQ);…

  9. Risk Factors for Stillbirth: Findings from a Population-Based Case-Control Study, Haryana, India.

    PubMed

    Neogi, Sutapa Bandyopadhyay; Negandhi, Preeti; Chopra, Sapna; Das, Ankan Mukherjee; Zodpey, Sanjay; Gupta, Ravi Kant; Gupta, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Stillbirth is a prevalent adverse outcome of pregnancy in India despite efforts to improve care of women during pregnancy. Risk factors for stillbirths include sociodemographic factors, medical complications during pregnancy, intake of harmful drugs, and complications during delivery. The objective of the study was to examine the risk factors for stillbirth with a focus on sex selection drugs (SSDs). A population-based case-control study was undertaken in Haryana. Cases of stillbirths were identified from the Maternal Infant Death Review System portal of Haryana state for the months of August-September 2014. A consecutive birth from the same geographical area as the case was selected as the control. The sample size was 325 per group. Mothers were interviewed using a validated tool. Bivariate analyses and logistic regression were conducted to examine the association between risk factors and stillbirth. Attributable risk proportions (ARP) and population attributable risk proportions (PARP) were estimated. The sociodemographic profiles of the cases and controls were similar. History of intake of SSDs [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5, 4.5] emerged as a risk factor. Other significant factors were preterm <37 weeks (OR 3.5, 95% CI 2.1, 6.0), history of previous stillbirths (OR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1, 7.8), and complications during labour (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.1, 5.3). Estimates of the ARP and PARP for intake of SSDs were 0.60 (95% CI 0.32, 0.77) and 0.1 (95% CI -0.13, 0.28), respectively. SSDs could be attributed as a risk factor in a fifth of the cases of stillbirths. The number needed to harm for the use of SSDs in causing adverse effect of stillbirths was 5, suggesting thereby that for every five mothers exposed to SSDs, one would have stillbirth. Greater efforts are required to inform people about the harmful effects of SSD consumption during pregnancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Using biologic predictive factors to direct therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Cliona; Wilson, Wyndham H.

    2013-01-01

    While diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was once considered to be a single disease entity, recent biological insights have demonstrated that it can be divided up into at least three molecular subtypes. Gene expression profiling has revealed that DLBCL consists of a germinal center B-cell like subtype (GCB), an activated B-cell like subtype (ABC) and a primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma subtype (PMBL). These three entities arise from different stages of B-cell differentiation and are characterized by distinct mechanisms of oncogenic activation. In GCB DLBCL, the BCL6 transcription factor may play an important role in tumor survival and treatment resistance and strategies that target this are under investigation. ABC DLBCL is characterized by high expression of target genes of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)/Rel family of transcription factors and strategies that target NF-κB are in clinical trials. PMBL is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that shares many molecular features with nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and may benefit from dose intensity approaches and inhibition of the Janus kinases. Other biologic predictive factors such as MYC and BCL2 may be overexpressed in both the GCB and ABC subtypes and strategies that target these complexes are also being tested. PMID:23610613

  11. Prognostic factors in neuroendocrine carcinoma: biological markers are more useful than histomorphological markers

    PubMed Central

    Freis, Patricia; Graillot, Emmanuelle; Rousset, Pascal; Hervieu, Valérie; Chardon, Laurence; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Walter, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NEC) are a very aggressive type of cancer, for which prognostic factors are lacking. We analysed clinical and histomorphological prognostic markers of overall survival (OS), completed with a record of biological and haematological data of patients diagnosed between December 2002 and December 2015. The median OS was 16 months (95% CI 13.9–18.1). After univariate analysis, performance status (PS) ≥ 2 and stage IV were associated with a worse outcome (9 months and 14 months, respectively), as well as patients with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels ≥ 2 ULN (9 months and 8 months, respectively). After multivariate analysis, LDH and AST levels were the only factors that remained significantly associated with better survival: HR 0.36 (p = 0.04) and 0.31 (p = 0.03), respectively. When patients had elevated LDH and AST levels, OS was 20 months, when they had high LDH or AST levels, 13 months and 8 months in the group with low LDH and AST levels (p < 0.001). Therefore, biological data appeared to be more relevant prognostic factors than usual factors described in other studies (PS, stage, and Ki-67). Considering LDH and AST levels at diagnosis could help physicians to predict survival and to stratify patients for clinical trials. PMID:28074897

  12. Stability and biological activity evaluations of PEGylated human basic fibroblast growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Hadadian, Shahin; Shamassebi, Dariush Norouzian; Mirzahoseini, Hasan; Shokrgozar, Mohamad Ali; Bouzari, Saeid; Sepahi, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human basic fibroblast growth factor (hBFGF) is a heparin-binding growth factor and stimulates the proliferation of a wide variety of cells and tissues causing survival properties and its stability and biological activity improvements have received much attention. Materials and Methods: In the present work, hBFGF produced by engineered Escherichia coli and purified by cation exchange and heparin affinity chromatography, was PEGylated under appropriate condition employing 10 kD polyethylene glycol. The PEGylated form was separated by size exclusion chromatography. Structural, biological activity, and stability evaluations were performed using Fourier transform infrared (FITR) spectroscopy, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and effect denaturing agent, respectively. Results: FITR spectroscopy revealed that both PEGylated and native forms had the same structures. MTT assay showed that PEGyalated form had a 30% reduced biological activity. Fluorescence spectrophotometry indicated that the PEGylated form denatured at higher concentrations of guanidine HCl (1.2 M) compared with native, which denatured at 0.8 M guanidine HCl. Conclusions: PEGylation of hBFGF makes it more stable against denaturing agent but reduces its bioactivity up to 30%. PMID:26605215

  13. Causal factors of corporate crime in Taiwan: qualitative and quantitative findings.

    PubMed

    Mon, Wei-Teh

    2002-04-01

    Street crimes are a primary concern of most criminologists in Taiwan. In recent years, however, crimes committed by corporations have increased greatly in this country. Employing the empirical approach to collect data about causal factors of corporate crime, the research presented in this article is the first systematic empirical study concerning corporate crime in Taiwan. The research sample was selected from a corporation with a criminal record of pollution caused by the release of toxic chemicals into the environment and a corporation with no criminal record. Questionnaire survey and interviews of corporate employees and managers were conducted, and secondary data were collected from official agencies. This research indicated the causal factors of corporate crime as follows: the failure of government regulation, lack of corporate self-regulation, lack of public concern about corporate crime, corporate mechanistic structure, and the low self-control tendency of corporate managers.

  14. Social Factors and Healthy Aging: Findings from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS)

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Katie E.; Brown, Jennifer Silva; Kim, Sangkyu; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2016-01-01

    Social behaviors are associated with health outcomes in later life. The authors examined relationships among social and physical activities and health in a lifespan sample of adults (N = 771) drawn from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). Four age groups were compared: younger (21-44 years), middle-aged (45-64 years), older (65-84 years), and oldest-old adults (85 to 101 years). Linear regression analyses indicated that physical activity, hours spent outside of the house, and social support were significantly associated with self-reported health, after controlling for sociodemographic factors. Number of clubs was significantly associated with objective health status, after controlling for sociodemographic factors. These data indicate that social and physical activities remain an important determinant of self-perceived health into very late adulthood. Implications of these data for current views on successful aging are discussed. PMID:27034910

  15. Interpersonal violence on college campuses: understanding risk factors and working to find solutions.

    PubMed

    Littleton, Heather

    2014-10-01

    This commentary discusses the contributions of Drs. Antonia Abbey and Catherine Kaukinen to our understanding of risk factors for sexual and physical aggression among college students. Major contributions of their work are outlined. These include Abbey's contributions to our understanding of trajectories of sexually aggressive behavior among college men, risk factors for engaging in sexual aggression among men, and the role of alcohol in sexual aggression. In addition, Kaukinen's work has increased our understanding of the frequency of violence in college dating relationships as well as the association of violent relationships with health risk behaviors. Directions for future research are also outlined including a need to identify trajectories of violence risk as well as a need to understand the complex interrelationships among health risk behaviors and interpersonal violence. Finally, implications for practice and university policy are discussed, including a focus on the development of effective preventive strategies and proactive responses to violence.

  16. Prevalence and associated factors of sarcopenia among elderly in Brazil: findings from the SABE study.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, T da Silva; Duarte, Y A de Oliveira; Santos, J L Ferreira; Wong, R; Lebrão, M L

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence and factors associated with sarcopenia in older residents in São Paulo, Brazil. Cross-sectional study. São Paulo, Brazil. 1,149 older individuals from the second wave of the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE) study from 2006. The definition of sarcopenia was based on the consensus of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), which include three components: low muscle mass, assessed by a skeletal muscle mass index of ≤8.90 kg/m2 for men and ≤6.37 kg/m2 for women; low muscle strength, assessed by handgrip strength <30 kg for men and <20 kg for women; and low physical performance, assessed by gait speed <0.8 m/s. Diagnosis of sarcopenia required presence of low muscle mass plus low muscle strength or low physical performance. Socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics, medical conditions and nutritional status were considered as independent variables to determine the associated factors using a logistic regression model. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 16.1% in women and 14.4% in men. Advanced age with a dose response effect, cognitive impairment, lower income, smoking, undernutrition and risk for undernutrition (p<0.05) were factors associated with sarcopenia. The EWGSOP algorithm is useful to define sarcopenia. The prevalence of sarcopenia in the Brazilian elderly population is high and several associated factors show that this syndrome is affected by multiple domains. No differences were observed by gender in any age groups.

  17. Human Factors and ISS Medical Systems: Highlights of Procedures and Equipment Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, V. E.; Hudy, C.; Smith, D.; Whitmore, M.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Space Human Factors Engineering Critical Questions Roadmap, a three year Technology Development Project (TDP) was funded by NASA Headquarters to examine emergency medical procedures on ISS. The overall aim of the emergency medical procedures project was to determine the human factors issues in the procedures, training, communications and equipment, and to recommend solutions that will improve the survival rate of crewmembers in the event of a medical emergency. Currently, each ISS crew remains on orbit for six month intervals. As there is not standing requirement for a physician crewmember, during such time, the maintenance of crew health is dependant on individual crewmembers. Further, in the event of an emergency, crew will need to provide prolonged maintenance care, as well as emergency treatment, to an injured crewmember while awaiting transport to Earth. In addition to the isolation of the crew, medical procedures must be carried out within the further limitations imposed by the physical environment of the space station. For example, in order to administer care on ISS without the benefit of gravity, the Crew Medical Officers (CMOs) must restrain the equipment required to perform the task, restrain the injured crewmember, and finally, restrain themselves. Both the physical environment and the physical space available further limit the technology that can be used onboard. Equipment must be compact, yet able to withstand high levels of radiation and function without gravity. The focus here is to highlight the human factors impacts from our three year project involving the procedures and equipment areas that have been investigated and provided valuable to ISS and provide groundwork for human factors requirements for medical applications for exploration missions.

  18. Atherosclerosis risk factors in American Indians with Alzheimer disease: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myron F; Rosenberg, Roger N; Womack, Kyle B; Svetlik, Doris A; Fuller, Carey; Fields, Julie; Hynan, Linda S

    2008-01-01

    Factors predisposing to and associated with atherosclerosis may impact the onset and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). The high prevalence of atherosclerosis and associated risk factors in American Indians makes them ideal subjects to test this association. We compared frequency of history of hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and high cholesterol in 34 American Indians with AD with 34 age-matched American Indian controls, and 34 age-matched whites with probable AD. We also measured waist size, height, and weight, and acquired blood for determination of plasma homocysteine and apolipoprotein E genotype. The 3 groups did not differ significantly in age or sex. History of hypertension and diabetes was significantly more common among American Indian AD patients than Indian controls or whites with AD. The 3 groups did not differ in history of stroke or myocardial infarction. Body mass index was significantly greater in both Indian groups than the white AD group. Plasma homocysteine levels were greater, but not significantly so, in the Indian AD than the Indian control group. Thus, there is preliminary evidence of a modest association between history of hypertension and diabetes and AD in a small sample of American Indians. This suggests that changes in lifestyle factors could influence the expression of AD in American Indians.

  19. Environmental and Biological Factors Influencing Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) Vector Competence for West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephanie L.; Lord, Cynthia C.; Pesko, Kendra N.; Tabachnick, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between environmental and biological factors affect the vector competence of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus for West Nile virus. Three age cohorts from two Cx. p. quinquefasciatus colonies were fed blood containing a low- or high-virus dose, and each group was held at two different extrinsic incubation temperatures (EIT) for 13 days. The colonies differed in the way that they responded to the effects of the environment on vector competence. The effects of mosquito age on aspects of vector competence were dependent on the EIT and dose, and they changed depending on the colony. Complex interactions must be considered in laboratory studies of vector competence, because the extent of the genetic and environmental variation controlling vector competence in nature is largely unknown. Differences in the environmental (EIT and dose) and biological (mosquito age and colony) effects from previous studies of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus vector competence for St. Louis encephalitis virus are discussed. PMID:20595491

  20. Study of the biological effectiveness of a nanosilver-epidermal growth factor sustained-release carrier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-DA; Wang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Rui; Zhou, Chun-Jiao; Cao, Ke; Liu, Jin-Yan; Chen, Yao; Chen, Feng-Hua

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the biological effectiveness and character of a nanosilver-epidermal growth factor (EGF) sustained-release carrier. This was synthesized using the self-assembly method and then characterized by transmission electron microscopy and UV spectrophotometry. The biological activity of the sustained release carrier was determined through cytological, bacteriological and wound-healing experiments. The results showed that the nanosilver-EGF sustained-release carrier was well dispersed with uniform particle size and that it had good antibacterial properties similar to those of nanosilver. The nanosilver-EGF sustained-release carrier is superior to EGFs in effectively promoting cell division and proliferation. The results of the wound-healing experiments provide evidence of its curative effects.

  1. [Effect of backwashing on dominant microorganism stabilization of BEAC filter controlled by the biological factors].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shui; Li, Wei-guang; Gao, Yu-nan; Wang, Guang-zhi; Zhang, Duo-ying; Xie, Feng-bo; Gan, Shi-xin

    2009-12-01

    Six kinds of dominant microorganism used for the bioenhancement activated carbon(BEAC) filter were investigated for the study of backwashing effect on microorganism stabilization. The pilot plant results showed the average biomass loss was 15.47% when only water backwashing invited during the start-up period and air-water scour backwashing invited during stabilization operation period. The optimal backwashing parameters were determined by the biological factor of biomass respiration potential (BRP). The optimal air flow rate for the BEAC filter was 8-10 L/(m2 x s) under which conditions the biomass and biological activity of the dominant microorganism had the minimum variation before and after backwashing. The SEM and PCR-DGGE photos showed that the biomass of dominant microorganism after air-water scour backwashing decreased during start-up period and retained stability during stabilization operation period.

  2. Identification of factors influencing the restoration of cyanobacteria-dominated biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Chongfeng; Wu, Shufang; Yang, Yongsheng; Zheng, Mingguo

    2014-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) cover >35% of the Earth's land area and contribute to important ecological functions in arid and semiarid ecosystems, including erosion reduction, hydrological cycling, and nutrient cycling. Artificial rapid cultivation of BSCs can provide a novel alternative to traditional biological methods for controlling soil and water loss such as the planting of trees, shrubs, and grasses. At present, little is known regarding the cultivation of BSCs in the field due to lack of knowledge regarding the influencing factors that control BSCs growth. Thus, we determined the effects of various environmental factors (shade; watering; N, P, K, and Ca concentrations) on the growth of cyanobacteria-dominated BSCs from the Sonoran Desert in the southwestern United States. The soil surface changes and chlorophyll a concentrations were used as proxies of BSC growth and development. After 4 months, five factors were found to impact BSC growth with the following order of importance: NH4NO3 ≈ watering frequency>shading>CaCO3 ≈ KH2PO4. The soil water content was the primary positive factor affecting BSC growth, and BSCs that were watered every 5 days harbored greater biomass than those watered every 10 days. Groups that received NH4NO3 consistently exhibited poor growth, suggesting that fixed N amendment may suppress BSC growth. The effect of shading on the BSC biomass was inconsistent and depended on many factors including the soil water content and availability of nutrients. KH2PO4 and CaCO3 had nonsignificant effects on BSC growth. Collectively, our results indicate that the rapid restoration of BSCs can be controlled and realized by artificial "broadcasting" cultivation through the optimization of environmental factors.

  3. Identification of Factors Influencing the Restoration of Cyanobacteria-Dominated Biological Soil Crusts

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Chongfeng; Wu, Shufang; Yang, Yongsheng; Zheng, Mingguo

    2014-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) cover >35% of the Earth’s land area and contribute to important ecological functions in arid and semiarid ecosystems, including erosion reduction, hydrological cycling, and nutrient cycling. Artificial rapid cultivation of BSCs can provide a novel alternative to traditional biological methods for controlling soil and water loss such as the planting of trees, shrubs, and grasses. At present, little is known regarding the cultivation of BSCs in the field due to lack of knowledge regarding the influencing factors that control BSCs growth. Thus, we determined the effects of various environmental factors (shade; watering; N, P, K, and Ca concentrations) on the growth of cyanobacteria-dominated BSCs from the Sonoran Desert in the southwestern United States. The soil surface changes and chlorophyll a concentrations were used as proxies of BSC growth and development. After 4 months, five factors were found to impact BSC growth with the following order of importance: NH4NO3 ≈ watering frequency>shading>CaCO3 ≈ KH2PO4. The soil water content was the primary positive factor affecting BSC growth, and BSCs that were watered every 5 days harbored greater biomass than those watered every 10 days. Groups that received NH4NO3 consistently exhibited poor growth, suggesting that fixed N amendment may suppress BSC growth. The effect of shading on the BSC biomass was inconsistent and depended on many factors including the soil water content and availability of nutrients. KH2PO4 and CaCO3 had nonsignificant effects on BSC growth. Collectively, our results indicate that the rapid restoration of BSCs can be controlled and realized by artificial “broadcasting” cultivation through the optimization of environmental factors. PMID:24625498

  4. Processing, secretion, and biological properties of a novel growth factor of the fibroblast growth factor family with oncogenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Delli-Bovi, P.; Curatola, A.M.; Newman, K.M.; Sato, Y.; Moscatelli, D.; Hewick, R.M.; Rifkin, D.B.; Basilico, C.

    1988-07-01

    The authors recently reported that the protein encoded in a novel human oncogene isolated from Kaposi sarcoma DNA was a growth factor with significant homology to basic and acidic fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). To study the properties of this growth factor (referred to as K-FGF) and the mechanism by which the K-fgf oncogene transforms cells, the authors have studied the production and processing of K-FGF in COS-1 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the K-fgf cDNA. The results show that, unkike basic and acidic FGFs, the K-FGF protein is cleaved after a single peptide, glycosylated, and efficiently secreted as a mature protein of 176 or 175 amino acids. Inhibition of glycosylation impaired secretion, and the stability of the secreted K-FGF was greatly enhanced by the presence of heparin in the cultured medium. They have used the conditioned medium from transfected COS-1 cells to test the K-FGF biological activity. Similar to basic FGF, the K-FGF protein was mitogenic for fibroblasts and endothelial cells and induced the growth of NIH 3T3 mouse cells in serum-free medium. Accordingly, K-fgf-transformed NIH 3T3 cells grew in serum-free medium consistent with an autorcrine mechanism of growth. The authors have also expressed the protein encoded in the K-fgf protooncogene in COS-1 cells, and it was indistinguishable in its molecular weight, glycosylation, secretion, and biological activity from K-FGF. Taken together, these results suggest that the mechanism of activation of this oncogene is due to overexpression rather than to mutations in the coding sequences.

  5. The contribution of occupational factors to social inequalities in health: findings from the national French SUMER survey.

    PubMed

    Niedhammer, Isabelle; Chastang, Jean-François; David, Simone; Kelleher, Cecily

    2008-12-01

    Social inequalities in health have long been demonstrated, but the understanding of these inequalities remains unclear. Work and its related occupational factors may contribute to these inequalities. The objective of this study was to study the contribution of work factors using an integrated approach (including all types of exposures) to social inequalities in three health outcomes: poor self-reported health, long sickness absence, and work injury. Respondents were 14,241 men and 10,245 women drawn from a survey of the national French working population (response rate: 96.5%). Work factors included job characteristics, and occupational exposures of the physical, ergonomic, biological, chemical, and psychosocial work environment. All work factors were measured through expert evaluation by occupational physicians, except psychosocial work factors, which were self-reported. Strong social gradients were found for all work factors, except for psychological demands, workplace bullying, and aggression from the public. Marked social gradients were also observed for the health outcomes studied, blue collar workers being more likely to report poor self-reported health, long sickness absence, and work injury. The social differences in health were reduced strongly after adjustment for work factors (psychological demands excluded) by 24-58% according to sex and health outcomes. The strongest impacts were found for decision latitude, ergonomic, physical, and chemical exposures, as well as for work schedules. A detailed analysis allowed us to identify more precisely the contributing occupational factors. It suggests that concerted prevention of occupational risk factors would be useful not only to improve health at work, but also to reduce social inequalities in health.

  6. Specific language disorders and season of birth: underlying environmental factors or chance findings?

    PubMed

    Ghezzo, Alessandro; Chiappedi, Matteo; Ballerini, Antonina; Seragni, Giorgio; Zanette, Michela; Conti, Chiara; Stefanini, Maria Chiara; Ferrari-Ginevra, Oreste; Spelta, Patrizia; Angelini, Lucia; Beghi, Ettore

    2012-01-01

    The medical records of 358 children and adolescents with specific language disorders (SLD; 122 girls and 236 boys) seen in rehabilitation centers from Northern and Central Italy were examined to compare season of birth in these cases to those of the Italian population. Exposure was calculated using univariate and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Compared to the Italian population, patients with SLD had a 1.67 (95% CI [1.35-2.07]) chance of birth in October-December. Independent predictors were younger age at inclusion and being firstborn. Different neurobiological hypotheses can be drawn to explain these findings.

  7. Environmental factors associated with childhood eczema: Findings from a national web-based survey.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Mari; Yoshida, Koichi; Adachi, Yuichi; Furukawa, Mayumi; Itazawa, Toshiko; Odajima, Hiroshi; Saito, Hirohisa; Hide, Michihiro; Akasawa, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Genetic and environmental factors are known to be related to the development of childhood eczema. Our aim was to assess the environmental factors associated with the prevalence of eczema among children using a web-based survey. In June 2012, we conducted a nation-wide web-based survey to identify the prevalence and characteristics of allergic diseases among Japanese children. The prevalence of allergic diseases including eczema was assessed using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood core questionnaire. The associations between eczema prevalence and environmental factors, as well as those between background characteristics and comorbid allergic diseases among 6-12 year old children were assessed. A total of 28,348 children were included in the analysis. The prevalence of current eczema was 13.0%. Current eczema was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of wheeze, rhinitis, and food allergy. In multiple logistic regression models, birth during autumn (aOR: 1.18 95%CI: 1.06-1.31) or winter (aOR: 1.21 95%CI: 1.08-1.34), duration of exclusive breastfeeding for at least 6 months (aOR: 1.14 95%CI: 1.06-1.23), and ownership of a pet from infancy (aOR: 2.61 95%CI: 1.68-4.07) were also associated with a higher prevalence of eczema. The prevalence was lower in those with a high annual household income (aOR: 0.90 95%CI: 0.81-0.99) and 2 or more siblings (aOR: 0.86 95%CI: 0.76-0.97). Duration of breastfeeding, season of birth, pet ownership, household income, and the number of siblings were associated with the prevalence of childhood eczema in a nationwide web survey. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 3CPET: finding co-factor complexes from ChIA-PET data using a hierarchical Dirichlet process.

    PubMed

    Djekidel, Mohamed Nadhir; Liang, Zhengyu; Wang, Qi; Hu, Zhirui; Li, Guipeng; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Michael Q

    2015-12-22

    Various efforts have been made to elucidate the cooperating proteins involved in maintaining chromatin interactions; however, many are still unknown. Here, we present 3CPET, a tool based on a non-parametric Bayesian approach, to infer the set of the most probable protein complexes involved in maintaining chromatin interactions and the regions that they may control, making it a valuable downstream analysis tool in chromatin conformation studies. 3CPET does so by combining data from ChIA-PET, transcription factor binding sites, and protein interactions. 3CPET results show biologically significant and accurate predictions when validated against experimental and simulation data.

  9. Patterns of Treatment Sequences in Chemotherapy and Targeted Biologics for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Findings from a Large Community-Based Cohort of Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Rohan C; Du, Xianglin L; Morgan, Robert O; Lairson, David R

    Over the last decade, multiple chemotherapies/targeted biologics have been approved for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, evidence is limited with regards to the array of treatments received by mCRC patients. This study examines treatment sequences (first- to third-line chemotherapy/targeted biologics) and the factors associated with first-line targeted biologics and common treatment sequences for elderly mCRC patients treated in a community setting. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in mCRC patients diagnosed from January 2004 through December 2009 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Medicare-linked database. The treatment sequences administered to elderly mCRC patients were empirically identified. Of 4418 mCRC patients who received treatment, 1370 (31 %) received first, second, and third line; 1164 (26 %) received first and second line; and 1884 (43 %) received only first line. The most common first line of treatment for mCRC patients was 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin + oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) + bevacizumab (23 %) and FOLFOX (23 %). 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin + irinotecan (FOLFIRI)-based regimens were commonly (22 %) administered in second line. The most common treatment sequence was first-line oxaliplatin or irinotecan followed by second-line oxaliplatin or irinotecan + bevacizumab followed by a third-line targeted biologic. Of patients who received first-line therapy, 47 % also received a targeted biologic, and the factors associated were age, comorbidity score, cancer site, geographic location, and year of diagnosis. Elderly mCRC patients receive a multitude of treatments in various sequences. Further exploration of the comparative effectiveness of treatment sequences may yield important information for improving mCRC survival.

  10. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF): Biological Activities and Relation with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Camila Cristina Guimarães; de Araújo, Josélio Maria Galvão; Fernandes, Thales Allyrio Araújo de Medeiros; Cobucci, Ricardo Ney Oliveira; Lanza, Daniel Carlos Ferreira; Andrade, Vânia Sousa; Fernandes, José Veríssimo

    2016-10-23

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) emerged in recent years as an important inflammation mediator, playing a prominent role in the pathogenesis of various types of malignant neoplasm. MIF is a glycoprotein that presents a wide spectrum of biological activities and exerts a complex interaction with various cellular signaling pathways, causing imbalance of homeostasis. Experimental and clinical studies show that high levels of MIF are found in almost all types of human cancers and are implicated in seemingly all stages of development of the tumors. The production of MIF is triggered through an autocrine signal emitted by tumor cells, and stimulates the production of cytokines, chemokines, and growth as well as angiogenic factors that lead to growth of the tumor, increasing its aggressiveness and metastatic potential. MIF is produced by virtually all types of human body cells, in response to stress caused by different factors, leading to pathological conditions such as chronic inflammation and immunomodulation with suppression of immune surveillance and of immune response against tumors, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis. In this review, we present recent advances on the biological activity of MIF, the signaling pathways with which it is involved and their role in tumorigenesis.

  11. Review of biological factors relevant to import risk assessments for epizootic ulcerative syndrome (Aphanomyces invadans).

    PubMed

    Oidtmann, B

    2012-02-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) is a disease affecting both wild and farmed fish in freshwater and estuarine environments. After it was first described in Japan in 1971, the disease has spread widely across Asia and to some regions of Australia, North America and Africa. In Asia and Africa, the spread of the disease has substantially affected livelihoods of fish farmers and fishermen. No reports are yet published showing the presence of the disease in Europe or South America. Given its epizootic nature and its broad susceptible fish species range, it would appear that the disease has the potential for further spread. This study provides a review of the scientific literature on several biological factors of the pathogen, Aphanomyces invadans, associated with the disease EUS and aspects of the disease that are relevant to undertaking import risk assessments (IRA) covering (i) Life cycle and routes of transmission; (ii) Minimum infectious dose; (iii) Tissue localization and pathogen load; (iv) Predisposing factors for infection and factors influencing expression of disease; (v) Carrier state in fish; (vi) Diagnostic methods; (vii) Survival in the environment; (viii) Permissive temperature range; (ix) Stability of the agent in aquatic animal products; (x) Prevalence of infection; and (xi) Affected life stages. Much of the biological information presented is relevant to a broad range of risk questions. Areas where data are lacking were identified, and the information provided is put into context with other aspects that need to be addressed in an IRA. © 2011 Crown copyright.

  12. [Relationships among Oxidative Stress Markers, Life Style Factors and Biochemical Findings.].

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Kyung; Lee, Duk Hee; Jin, Soo Hee; Lee, Won Gil; Song, Kyung Eun

    2006-10-01

    In many studies, oxidative stress markers have been employed to serve as a measure of a disease process or to reflect oxidative status. These oxidative stress markers must have some degree of predictive validity, but full substantiation of this relation is still lacking. This paper presents data on levels of three biomarkers, oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL), carbonyl, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and a number of life style factors associated with oxidative stress in healthy adults. For 237 healthy adults aged 40-60 years, a number of life style factors, biochemical characteristics and oxidative status were evaluated. Markers of oxidative stress were measured by an ELISA method. Waist-hip ratio and use of vitamin supplement were associated with serum oxidized LDL (P<0.05). Body mass index and stress had a relationship (P<0.05) with protein carbonyl. Creactive protein was related to serum oxidized LDL (P<0.01). There was no correlation among three oxidative stress markers, oxidized LDL, carbonyl, and 8-OHdG. The oxidative stress markers used in this study could not be regarded as a general estimate of the healthy individual oxidative status. Further studies focusing on the development of biomarkers to reflect changes in the oxidative status under normal, non-pathological conditions in humans will be required.

  13. Factors influencing African-American mothers' concerns about immunization safety: a summary of focus group findings.

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Irene; Kennedy, Allison; Wooten, Karen; Schwartz, Benjamin; Gust, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the vaccine safety concerns of African-American mothers who, despite concerns, have their children immunized. METHODS: Six focus groups of Atlanta-area African-American mothers who were very concerned about vaccine safety but whose children were fully vaccinated were conducted. RESULTS: Major factors influencing participants' concerns about immunizations included: lack of information and mistrust of the medical community and government. Factors that convinced parents to have their child immunized despite their concerns included social norms and/or laws supporting immunization and fear of the consequences of not immunizing. Suggestions given to reduce concerns included improving available information that addressed their concerns and provider-patient communication. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing mothers' concerns about immunization is important both from an ethical perspective, in assuring that they are fully informed of the risks and benefits of immunizations, as well as from a practical one, in reducing the possibility that they will decide not to immunize their child. Changes in the childhood immunization process should be made to reduce parental concern about vaccine safety. Some changes that may be considered include improved provider communication about immunizations and additional tailored information about the necessity and safety of vaccines. PMID:15926642

  14. Factors influencing African-American mothers' concerns about immunization safety: a summary of focus group findings.

    PubMed

    Shui, Irene; Kennedy, Allison; Wooten, Karen; Schwartz, Benjamin; Gust, Deborah

    2005-05-01

    To examine the vaccine safety concerns of African-American mothers who, despite concerns, have their children immunized. Six focus groups of Atlanta-area African-American mothers who were very concerned about vaccine safety but whose children were fully vaccinated were conducted. Major factors influencing participants' concerns about immunizations included: lack of information and mistrust of the medical community and government. Factors that convinced parents to have their child immunized despite their concerns included social norms and/or laws supporting immunization and fear of the consequences of not immunizing. Suggestions given to reduce concerns included improving available information that addressed their concerns and provider-patient communication. Addressing mothers' concerns about immunization is important both from an ethical perspective, in assuring that they are fully informed of the risks and benefits of immunizations, as well as from a practical one, in reducing the possibility that they will decide not to immunize their child. Changes in the childhood immunization process should be made to reduce parental concern about vaccine safety. Some changes that may be considered include improved provider communication about immunizations and additional tailored information about the necessity and safety of vaccines.

  15. Risk factors for colorectal cancer in man induce aberrant crypt foci in rats: Preliminary findings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Fard, Sara; Furrer, Rudolf; Archer, Michael C.; Bruce, W. Robert; Lip, HoYin; Mehta, Rhea; O'Brien, Peter J.; Giacca, Adria; Ward, Wendy E.; Femia, A. Pietro; Caderni, Giovanna; Medline, Alan; Banks, Kate

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemiological studies have demonstrated clear associations between specific dietary and environmental risk factors and incidence of colorectal cancer, but the mechanisms responsible for these associations are not known. An animal model could facilitate such an understanding. Both genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens induce aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colons of F344 rats. F344 rats were provided with diets that contained putative risk factors for CRC: low calcium and low vitamin D, high iron, high fructose, and decreased light (UV) exposure or a control diet for 14 wk. The rats were then assessed with biochemical measures and by topological examination for evidence of colon abnormalities. Circulating ionized calcium was decreased from 2.85 to 1.69 mmol/L, and ACF were increased from 0.7 to 13.6 lesions/colon (both P < 0.001). Rats exposed to the multiple environmental conditions associated with colon cancer, developed ACF similar to the heterogeneous or ill-defined ACF in the human colon. Heterogeneous ACF are the most frequently seen in humans and are also seen in rats shortly after exposure to the non-genotoxic colon carcinogen, dextransulfate sodium. The rodent model could be used to assess the pathways from diet and environment to colon cancer and to provide guidance for clinical studies. PMID:26709971

  16. Biologic markers of breast cancer in nipple aspirate fluid and nipple discharge are associated with clinical findings1

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Edward R.; Wagner-Mann, Colette; Ehya, Hormoz; Klein-Szanto, Andres

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective study was to assess predictive markers in nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) and pathologic nipple discharge (PND) collected prior to excisional breast biopsy, as well as clinical factors available prior to biopsy, with histopathologic results in women with a radiographically suspicious and/or palpable breast lesion. Methods 208 NAF samples from 191 women were evaluated for the following candidate predictive proteins and cellular markers: prostate-specific antigen (PSA), human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), S phase fraction (SPF), DNA index, and cytology. Clinical factors included whether or not the lesion was palpable, menopausal status, history of pregnancy, history of birth control or hormone replacement use, and PND. Results Considering all women, bFGF (p=0.005) and SPF (0.031) were associated, and abnormal cytology approached an association (p=0.056) with the presence of breast cancer. Women with PND were less likely to have breast cancer (4 vs. 37%, p<0.001) or palpable lesions (10 vs.43%, p < 0.001), were younger, had lower PSA levels (p=0.046), and were more likely to have atypical NAF cytology (p=0.002). Excluding PND, increased age, postmenopause (both p<0.01), high bFGF (p=0.004) and low PSA (p=0.05) were associated with cancer. The best breast cancer predictive model included cytology, bFGF, and age (88% sensitive and 57% specific). When the data were divided by menopausal status, the optimal models, which included NAF hK2 or PSA and age, were 100% sensitive and 41% specific in pre- vs. 93% sensitive and 12% specific in predicting breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Conclusion NAF and clinical biomarkers are sensitive predictors of whether a breast contains cancer, and may ultimately help guide treatment. Future studies to determine the optimal combination of predictive markers are warranted. PMID:17317033

  17. Multiple impacts of epilepsy and contributing factors: findings from an ethnographic study in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Nuran; Trung, Dang Vu; Snape, Dee; Baker, Gus A; Jacoby, Ann

    2009-11-01

    We investigated issues related to treatment, impact of epilepsy, attitudes toward epilepsy, and disclosure in Vietnam through in-depth interviews with people with epilepsy (PWE) and their family members. We found that although participants prefer Western to traditional treatment, they experience problems in accessing different kinds of antiepileptic drugs and higher-level treatment facilities and with respect to treatment expenses. The impact of epilepsy can be observed in a wide range of daily living activities which include working, education, marriage, and family formation. Although both families and society at large do not hold negative attitudes toward epilepsy, most PWE reported a sense of burden to others. Both PWE and family members generally prefer disclosing epilepsy rather than concealing it from others. Our findings strongly suggest a need in Vietnam for different types of antiepileptic drugs and epilepsy support information for PWE, family members, and the general public.

  18. Multiple impacts of epilepsy and contributing factors: findings from an ethnographic study in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Nuran; Vu Trung, Dang; Snape, Dee; Baker, Gus A; Jacoby, Ann

    2009-01-01

    We investigated issues related to treatment, impact of epilepsy, attitudes toward epilepsy and disclosure in Vietnam by using in depth interviews with people with epilepsy (PWE) and their family members. We found that although participants prefer Western treatment methods more than traditional ones, they experience problems in accessing different kinds of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and higher-level treatment facilities and with respect to treatment expenses. The impact of epilepsy can be observed in a wide range of daily living activities which include working, education, marriage prospects and family formation. Although both families and society at large do not hold negative attitudes toward epilepsy, most PWE reported a sense of burden to others. Both PWE and family members generally prefer disclosing epilepsy rather than concealing it from others. Our findings strongly suggest a need for different types of AEDs, and supporting information for PWE, family members and general public about epilepsy. PMID:19800851

  19. Factors that trigger emergency physicians to contact a poison centre: findings from a Swiss study.

    PubMed

    Schurter, David; Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Jahns, Maximilian; Haberkern, Monika; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Eriksson, Urs; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    Poison centres offer rapid and comprehensive support for emergency physicians managing poisoned patients. This study investigates institutional, case-specific and poisoning-specific factors which influence the decision of emergency physicians to contact a poison centre. Retrospective, consecutive review of all poisoning-related admissions to the emergency departments (EDs) of a primary care hospital and a university hospital-based tertiary referral centre during 2007. Corresponding poison centre consultations were extracted from the poison centre database. Data were matched and analysed by logistic regression and generalised linear mixed models. 545 poisonings were treated in the participating EDs (350 (64.2%) in the tertiary care centre, 195 (35.8%) in the primary care hospital). The poison centre was consulted in 62 (11.4%) cases (38 (61.3%) by the tertiary care centre and 24 (38.7%) by the primary care hospital). Factors significantly associated with poison centre consultation included gender (female vs male) (OR 2.99; 95% CI 1.69 to 5.29; p<0.001), number of ingested substances (>1 vs 1) (OR 2.84; 95% CI 1.65 to 4.9; p<0.001) and situation (accidental vs intentional) (OR 2.76; 95% CI 1.05 to 7.25; p=0.039). In contrast, age, medical history and hospital size did not influence poison centre consultation. Poison centre consultation was significantly higher during the week, and significantly less during night shifts. The poison centre was consulted significantly more when patients were admitted to intensive care units (OR 5.81; 95% CI 3.25 to 10.37; p<0.001). Asymptomatic and severe versus mild cases were associated with more frequent consultation (OR 4.48; 95% CI 1.78 to 11.26; p=0.001 and OR 2.76; 95% CI 1.42 to 5.38; p=0.003). We found low rates of poison centre consultation by emergency physicians. It appears that intensive care unit admission and other factors reflecting either complexity or uncertainty of the clinical situation are the strongest predictors

  20. Epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor receptors collaborate to induce multiple biological responses in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Accornero, P; Martignani, E; Miretti, S; Starvaggi Cucuzza, L; Baratta, M

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this work was to explore whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) could increase the biological responses of a mammary epithelial cell line of bovine origin when added simultaneously. We also investigated a possible molecular mechanism underlying this cooperation. The development of mammary gland requires several circulating and locally produced hormones. Hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET), are expressed and temporally regulated during mammary development and differentiation. Epidermal growth factor receptor and its ligands have also been implicated in the growth and morphogenesis of the mammary epithelium. Both EGF and HGF seem to exert a morphogenic program in this tissue; therefore, we hypothesized that these cytokines could act cooperatively in bovine mammary epithelial cells. We have already shown that the bovine BME-UV cell line, a nontumorigenic mammary epithelial line, expresses both MET and EGF receptor. Simultaneous treatment with HGF and EGF elicited an increase in proliferation, dispersion, degradation of extracellular matrix, and motility. Following EGF treatment, BME-UV mammary cells exhibited an increase in MET expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Long-term treatment of BME-UV cells with HGF and EGF together increased the level of activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and protein kinase B signaling pathways when compared with HGF or EGF alone. These data outline a possible cooperative role of the EGF and HGF pathways and indicate that cross-talk between their respective receptors may modulate mammary gland development in the cow.

  1. Insights into the biological functions of Dock family guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Mélanie; Côté, Jean-François

    2014-03-15

    Rho GTPases play key regulatory roles in many aspects of embryonic development, regulating processes such as differentiation, proliferation, morphogenesis, and migration. Two families of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) found in metazoans, Dbl and Dock, are responsible for the spatiotemporal activation of Rac and Cdc42 proteins and their downstream signaling pathways. This review focuses on the emerging roles of the mammalian DOCK family in development and disease. We also discuss, when possible, how recent discoveries concerning the biological functions of these GEFs might be exploited for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  2. Insights into the biological functions of Dock family guanine nucleotide exchange factors

    PubMed Central

    Laurin, Mélanie; Côté, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases play key regulatory roles in many aspects of embryonic development, regulating processes such as differentiation, proliferation, morphogenesis, and migration. Two families of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) found in metazoans, Dbl and Dock, are responsible for the spatiotemporal activation of Rac and Cdc42 proteins and their downstream signaling pathways. This review focuses on the emerging roles of the mammalian DOCK family in development and disease. We also discuss, when possible, how recent discoveries concerning the biological functions of these GEFs might be exploited for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24637113

  3. Can social factors explain sex differences in insomnia? Findings from a national survey in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Kawachi, I.; Subramanian, S; Acevedo-Garcia, D.; Lee, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Study objective: To examine sociological explanations for the higher level of insomnia in women, including social roles and socioeconomic status (SES). Design: Cross sectional survey research Setting: Taiwanese 2001 "social trend survey" Participants: A nationally representative sample of 39 588 citizens aged 15 years or older living in Taiwan. Main results: On average, women scored 1.25 points higher than men on the insomnia inventory (p<0.001) but after controlling for social roles, the sex discrepancy in insomnia decreased slightly. SES did not, however, explain women's higher levels of insomnia. Subscale analysis showed an association between the role of homemaker and increased night time sleep disturbance and decreased daytime sequelae of poor sleep while higher educational attainment was related only to more severe daytime sequelae. Conclusion: The sex discrepancy in insomnia narrowed slightly after taking social role factors into consideration but was not explained by SES. The persistent sex gap in insomnia warrants further investigation. PMID:15911645

  4. Finding imaging patterns of structural covariance via Non-Negative Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Resnick, Susan M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) for the analysis of structural neuroimaging data. The goal is to identify the brain regions that co-vary across individuals in a consistent way, hence potentially being part of underlying brain networks or otherwise influenced by underlying common mechanisms such as genetics and pathologies. NNMF offers a directly data-driven way of extracting relatively localized co-varying structural regions, thereby transcending limitations of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and other related methods that tend to produce dispersed components of positive and negative loadings. In particular, leveraging upon the well known ability of NNMF to produce parts-based representations of image data, we derive decompositions that partition the brain into regions that vary in consistent ways across individuals. Importantly, these decompositions achieve dimensionality reduction via highly interpretable ways and generalize well to new data as shown via split-sample experiments. We empirically validate NNMF in two data sets: i) a Diffusion Tensor (DT) mouse brain development study, and ii) a structural Magnetic Resonance (sMR) study of human brain aging. We demonstrate the ability of NNMF to produce sparse parts-based representations of the data at various resolutions. These representations seem to follow what we know about the underlying functional organization of the brain and also capture some pathological processes. Moreover, we show that these low dimensional representations favorably compare to descriptions obtained with more commonly used matrix factorization methods like PCA and ICA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Finding Imaging Patterns of Structural Covariance via Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Resnick, Susan M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) for the analysis of structural neuroimaging data. The goal is to identify the brain regions that co-vary across individuals in a consistent way, hence potentially being part of underlying brain networks or otherwise influenced by underlying common mechanisms such as genetics and pathologies. NNMF offers a directly data-driven way of extracting relatively localized co-varying structural regions, thereby transcending limitations of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and other related methods that tend to produce dispersed components of positive and negative loadings. In particular, leveraging upon the well known ability of NNMF to produce parts-based representations of image data, we derive decompositions that partition the brain into regions that vary in consistent ways across individuals. Importantly, these decompositions achieve dimensionality reduction via highly interpretable ways and generalize well to new data as shown via split-sample experiments. We empirically validate NNMF in two data sets: i) a Diffusion Tensor (DT) mouse brain development study, and ii) a structural Magnetic Resonance (sMR) study of human brain aging. We demonstrate the ability of NNMF to produce sparse parts-based representations of the data at various resolutions. These representations seem to follow what we know about the underlying functional organization of the brain and also capture some pathological processes. Moreover, we show that these low dimensional representations favorably compare to descriptions obtained with more commonly used matrix factorization methods like PCA and ICA. PMID:25497684

  6. Effects of lexical factors on lexical access among typical language-learning children and children with word-finding difficulties.

    PubMed

    Newman, Rochelle S; German, Diane J

    2002-09-01

    This investigation studied the influence of lexical factors, known to impact lexical access in adults, on the word retrieval of children. Participants included 320 typical and atypical (word-finding difficulties) language-learning children, ranging in age from 7 to 12 years. Lexical factors examined included word frequency, age-of-acquisition, neighborhood density, neighborhood frequency, and stress pattern. Findings indicated that these factors did influence lexical access in children. Words which were high in frequency and neighborhood frequency, low in neighborhood density and age-of-acquisition, and which contained the typical stress pattern for the language were easier to name. Further, the number of neighbors that were more frequent than the target word also had an effect on the word's ease of retrieval. Significant interactions indicated that age-of-acquisition effects decreased with maturation for typically-learning children whereas these effects continued to impact the lexical access of children with word-finding difficulties across the ages studied, suggesting that these children's difficulties in accessing words may have prevented them from developing strong access paths to these words. These findings support a view of lexical access in which access paths to words become strengthened with successful use.

  7. Risk factors and placental histopathological findings of term born low birth weight neonates.

    PubMed

    Nkwabong, E; Kamgnia Nounemi, N; Sando, Z; Mbu, R E; Mbede, J

    2015-02-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, this condition should be well studied. The aims of this study were to identify the risk factors for term born LBW, as well as the placental histopathological lesions observed. This case control study was carried out in the University Teaching Hospital and the Central Maternity, both of Yaoundé, Cameroon, from November 1st, 2013 to April 30th, 2014. Maternal medical records and placentas of term born (≥37 completed weeks) LBW (<2500 g at birth) or normal weight (3000-3500 g) were compared. The main variables recorded included maternal age and parity, maternal height, complications that occurred during pregnancy, maternal pre-gestational body mass index, the number of antenatal visits, the sex and birth weight of the newborn, the umbilical cord length, the placental weight and placental histology. Data were analyzed using Epi info 3.5.4. Fisher exact test, t-test and logistic regression were used for comparison. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. and A total of 30 cases of LBW and the same number of controls were examined. Significant risk factors for LBW were primiparity (aOR 14.0, 95%CI 2.1-92.7), hypertensive diseases of pregnancy (aOR 18.1, 95%CI 1.02-322.5) and <4 antenatal visits (aOR 9.5, 95%CI 1.3-67.5). Significant placental lesions were placental infarction (aOR 19.5, 95%CI 2.9-130.1) and chronic villitis (aOR 35.9, 95%CI 1.2-1034.3). Our study showed that primiparous women, those with pregnancy-induced hypertensive diseases and those with <4 antenatal visits were more at risk for LBW. Significant placental lesions observed among LBW were placental infarcts and chronic villitis. Since LBW has the tendency to recur, and given that some causes such as placental infarcts are preventable, we recommend that a histological examination of the placenta should always be carried out in cases of LBW. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonnegative matrix factorization: an analytical and interpretive tool in computational biology.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Karthik

    2008-07-25

    In the last decade, advances in high-throughput technologies such as DNA microarrays have made it possible to simultaneously measure the expression levels of tens of thousands of genes and proteins. This has resulted in large amounts of biological data requiring analysis and interpretation. Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) was introduced as an unsupervised, parts-based learning paradigm involving the decomposition of a nonnegative matrix V into two nonnegative matrices, W and H, via a multiplicative updates algorithm. In the context of a pxn gene expression matrix V consisting of observations on p genes from n samples, each column of W defines a metagene, and each column of H represents the metagene expression pattern of the corresponding sample. NMF has been primarily applied in an unsupervised setting in image and natural language processing. More recently, it has been successfully utilized in a variety of applications in computational biology. Examples include molecular pattern discovery, class comparison and prediction, cross-platform and cross-species analysis, functional characterization of genes and biomedical informatics. In this paper, we review this method as a data analytical and interpretive tool in computational biology with an emphasis on these applications.

  9. bioNMF: a web-based tool for nonnegative matrix factorization in biology

    PubMed Central

    Mejía-Roa, E.; Carmona-Saez, P.; Nogales, R.; Vicente, C.; Vázquez, M.; Yang, X. Y.; García, C.; Tirado, F.; Pascual-Montano, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years, advances in high-throughput technologies are generating large amounts of biological data that require analysis and interpretation. Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has been established as a very effective method to reveal information about the complex latent relationships in experimental data sets. Using this method as part of the exploratory data analysis, workflow would certainly help in the process of interpreting and understanding the complex biology mechanisms that are underlying experimental data. We have developed bioNMF, a web-based tool that implements the NMF methodology in different analysis contexts to support some of the most important reported applications in biology. This online tool provides a user-friendly interface, combined with a computational efficient parallel implementation of the NMF methods to explore the data in different analysis scenarios. In addition to the online access, bioNMF also provides the same functionality included in the website as a public web services interface, enabling users with more computer expertise to launch jobs into bioNMF server from their own scripts and workflows. bioNMF application is freely available at http://bionmf.dacya.ucm.es. PMID:18515346

  10. Nonnegative Matrix Factorization: An Analytical and Interpretive Tool in Computational Biology

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Karthik

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in high-throughput technologies such as DNA microarrays have made it possible to simultaneously measure the expression levels of tens of thousands of genes and proteins. This has resulted in large amounts of biological data requiring analysis and interpretation. Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) was introduced as an unsupervised, parts-based learning paradigm involving the decomposition of a nonnegative matrix V into two nonnegative matrices, W and H, via a multiplicative updates algorithm. In the context of a p×n gene expression matrix V consisting of observations on p genes from n samples, each column of W defines a metagene, and each column of H represents the metagene expression pattern of the corresponding sample. NMF has been primarily applied in an unsupervised setting in image and natural language processing. More recently, it has been successfully utilized in a variety of applications in computational biology. Examples include molecular pattern discovery, class comparison and prediction, cross-platform and cross-species analysis, functional characterization of genes and biomedical informatics. In this paper, we review this method as a data analytical and interpretive tool in computational biology with an emphasis on these applications. PMID:18654623

  11. Investigation of biological factors influencing the placental mRNA profile in maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Nancy B Y; Wong, Cesar S C; Chow, Katherine C K; Lo, Elena S F; Cheng, Yvonne K Y

    2014-03-01

    Circulating placental-derived RNA is useful for noninvasive prenatal investigation. However, in addition to placental gene expression, there are limited investigations on other biological parameters that may affect the circulating placental RNA profile. In this study, we explored two of these potential parameters. We first demonstrated the existence of such biological parameters by comparing the relative levels of a panel of placental-derived transcripts between the placentas and maternal plasma by digital PCRs. We then compared the post-delivery clearance of the transcripts by serial plasma samples collected from pregnant women after delivery. We also studied the placental in vivo localization of the transcripts by in situ hybridization. There was an imperfect correlation of the transcript levels between the placentas and maternal plasma, with placenta-specific 4 (PLAC4) mRNA showing the largest discrepancy. Although PLAC4 mRNA showed a similar clearance half-life with other transcripts, we observed a preferential localization of PLAC4 mRNA around the villous surface. We speculated that this phenomenon might play a role in favoring the release of PLAC4 mRNA molecules into maternal plasma. We revealed that in addition to expression levels in the placenta, other biological factors might interplay to determine the maternal plasma profile of placental-derived RNAs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Sexual Orientation Differences in Satisfaction with Healthcare: Findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2014.

    PubMed

    Blosnich, John R

    2017-06-01

    In the United States, the Affordable Care Act and marriage equality may have eased sexual orientation-based differences in access to healthcare coverage, but limited research has investigated sexual orientation-based differences in healthcare satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to examine whether satisfaction with healthcare varied by sexual orientation in a large population-based sample of adults. Data are from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, including items about sexual orientation and healthcare (n = 113,317). Healthcare coverage included employer-based insurance; individually purchased insurance; Medicare; Medicaid; or TRICARE, VA, or military care. Respondents indicated whether they were "very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, or not at all satisfied" with healthcare. After adjusting for several sociodemographic covariates, lesbian, gay, and bisexual status was associated with lower satisfaction with healthcare with individually purchased insurance (adjusted odds ratio = 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.24-1.80). Efforts are needed to examine and reduce sexual orientation differences in satisfaction with healthcare.

  13. Finding subtypes of transcription factor motif pairs with distinct regulatory roles

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Abha Singh; Kaminski, Naftali; Benos, Panayiotis V.

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences bound by a transcription factor (TF) are presumed to contain sequence elements that reflect its DNA binding preferences and its downstream-regulatory effects. Experimentally identified TF binding sites (TFBSs) are usually similar enough to be summarized by a ‘consensus’ motif, representative of the TF DNA binding specificity. Studies have shown that groups of nucleotide TFBS variants (subtypes) can contribute to distinct modes of downstream regulation by the TF via differential recruitment of cofactors. A TFA may bind to TFBS subtypes a1 or a2 depending on whether it associates with cofactors TFB or TFC, respectively. While some approaches can discover motif pairs (dyads), none address the problem of identifying ‘variants’ of dyads. TFs are key components of multiple regulatory pathways targeting different sets of genes perhaps with different binding preferences. Identifying the discriminating TF–DNA associations that lead to the differential downstream regulation is thus essential. We present DiSCo (Discovery of Subtypes and Cofactors), a novel approach for identifying variants of dyad motifs (and their respective target sequence sets) that are instrumental for differential downstream regulation. Using both simulated and experimental datasets, we demonstrate how current motif discovery can be successfully leveraged to address this question. PMID:21486752

  14. Role of Environmental Factors on Resuming Valued Activities Poststroke: A Systematic Review of Qualitative and Quantitative Findings.

    PubMed

    Jellema, Sandra; van der Sande, Rob; van Hees, Suzanne; Zajec, Jana; Steultjens, Esther M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W

    2016-06-01

    To investigate how reengagement in valued activities poststroke is influenced by environmental factors. PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched to June 2015 using multiple search terms for stroke, activities, disability, and home and community environments, with the following constraints: English, humans, and adults. Studies were included that contained data on how reengagement in valued activities of community-dwelling stroke survivors was influenced by the environment. Two reviewers independently selected the studies. The search yielded 3726 records; 39 studies were eventually included. Findings were extracted from qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-design studies. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using the Oxford Critical Appraisal Skills Programme lists and independently extracted results. Thematic analysis was conducted on qualitative data, revealing 9 themes related to the iterative nature of the process of reengagement and the associated environmental factors. During the process of reengagement, environmental factors interact with personal and disease-related factors in a gradual process of shaping or abandoning valued activities. The sociocultural context in this case determines what activities are valued and can be resumed by stroke survivors. Social support; activity opportunities and obligations; familiar and accessible environments; resources and reminders; and a step-by-step return facilitate stroke survivors to explore, adapt, resume, and maintain their activities. Social support is helpful at all stages of the process and particularly is important in case stroke survivors are fearful to explore their activity possibilities. The quantitative data identified largely endorsed these findings. No quantitative data were found in respect to the iterative nature of the process, familiar environments, or accessibility. Reengagement in valued activities is a gradual process. In each stage of the process, several environmental factors

  15. Familial monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma: epidemiology, risk factors, and biological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Alexandra J; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Vachon, Celine M

    2012-06-07

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), a precursor to multiple myeloma (MM), is one of the most common premalignant conditions in the general population. The cause of MGUS is largely unknown. Recent studies show that there is an increased prevalence of MGUS in blood relatives of persons with lymphoproliferative and plasma cell proliferative disorders, suggesting presence of shared underlying genetic influences. In the past few years, additional studies have examined risk factors and biologic characteristics that may contribute to the increased prevalence of MGUS among relatives of probands with MGUS, MM, and other blood malignancies. This article reviews the known epidemiology and risk factors for familial MGUS and myeloma, the risk of lymphoproliferative disorders and other malignancies among blood-relatives of patients with MGUS and MM, and discusses future directions for research.

  16. Recent advances in the structural molecular biology of Ets transcription factors: interactions, interfaces and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Christopher D.O.; Newman, Joseph A.; Gileadi, Opher

    2014-01-01

    The Ets family of eukaryotic transcription factors is based around the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain. Although their DNA-binding selectivity is biochemically and structurally well characterized, structures of homodimeric and ternary complexes point to Ets domains functioning as versatile protein-interaction modules. In the present paper, we review the progress made over the last decade to elucidate the structural mechanisms involved in modulation of DNA binding and protein partner selection during dimerization. We see that Ets domains, although conserved around a core architecture, have evolved to utilize a variety of interaction surfaces and binding mechanisms, reflecting Ets domains as dynamic interfaces for both DNA and protein interaction. Furthermore, we discuss recent advances in drug development for inhibition of Ets factors, and the roles structural biology can play in their future. PMID:24450640

  17. Recent advances in the structural molecular biology of Ets transcription factors: interactions, interfaces and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Gileadi, Opher

    2014-02-01

    The Ets family of eukaryotic transcription factors is based around the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain. Although their DNA-binding selectivity is biochemically and structurally well characterized, structures of homodimeric and ternary complexes point to Ets domains functioning as versatile protein-interaction modules. In the present paper, we review the progress made over the last decade to elucidate the structural mechanisms involved in modulation of DNA binding and protein partner selection during dimerization. We see that Ets domains, although conserved around a core architecture, have evolved to utilize a variety of interaction surfaces and binding mechanisms, reflecting Ets domains as dynamic interfaces for both DNA and protein interaction. Furthermore, we discuss recent advances in drug development for inhibition of Ets factors, and the roles structural biology can play in their future.

  18. High molecular weight FGF2: the biology of a nuclear growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Chlebova, K.; Bryja, V.; Dvorak, P.; Kozubik, A.; Wilcox, W. R.

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is one of the most studied growth factors to date. Most attention has been dedicated to the smallest, 18kDa FGF2 variant that is released by cells and acts through activation of cell-surface FGF-receptor tyrosine kinases. There are, however, several higher molecular weight (HMW) variants of FGF2 that rarely leave their producing cells, are retained in the nucleus and act independently of FGF-receptors (FGFR). Despite significant evidence documenting the expression and intracellular trafficking of HMW FGF2, many important questions remain about the physiological roles and mechanisms of action of HMW FGF2. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the biology of HMW FGF2, its role in disease and areas for future investigation. PMID:18850066

  19. The Caveolin‐3 G56S sequence variant of unknown significance: Muscle biopsy findings and functional cell biological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Zahedi, René P.; Beckmann, Alf; Mohanadas, Nilane; Bauer, Hartmut; Häusler, Martin; Thoma, Stéphanie; Kress, Wolfram; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    1 Purpose In the era of next‐generation sequencing, we are increasingly confronted with sequence variants of unknown significance. This phenomenon is also known for variations in Caveolin‐3 and can complicate the molecular diagnosis of the disease. Here, we aimed to study the ambiguous character of the G56S Caveolin‐3 variant. 2 Experimental design A comprehensive approach combining genetic and morphological studies of muscle derived from carriers of the G56S Caveolin‐3 variant were carried out and linked to biochemical assays (including phosphoblot studies and proteome profiling) and morphological investigations of cultured myoblasts. 3 Results Muscles showed moderate chronic myopathic changes in all carriers of the variant. Myogenic RCMH cells expressing the G56S Caveolin‐3 protein presented irregular Caveolin‐3 deposits within the Golgi in addition to a regular localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. This result was associated with abnormal findings on the ultra‐structural level. Phosphoblot studies revealed that G56S affects EGFR‐signaling. Proteomic profiling demonstrated alterations in levels of physiologically relevant proteins which are indicative for antagonization of G56S Caveolin‐3 expression. Remarkably, some proteomic alterations were enhanced by osmotic/mechanical stress. 4 Conclusions and clinical relevance Our studies suggest that G56S might influence the manifestation of myopathic changes upon the presence of additional cellular stress burden. Results of our studies moreover improve the current understanding of (genetic) causes of myopathic disorders classified as caveolinopathies. PMID:27739254

  20. A Survey of Needs of Texas Biology Teachers Relative to Teaching Cardiovascular Diseases and Associated Risk Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Robert C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The data show that biology teachers spend relatively little time on diseases of the cardiovascular system. Approximately one period per year is spent on each of eight given cardiovascular disease risk factors. (MP)

  1. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chon, Young Eun; Seong, Jinsil; Kim, Beom Kyung; Cha, Jihye; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Do Young

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  2. Factors facilitating a national quality registry to aid clinical quality improvement: findings of a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; Wallin, Lars; Fredriksson, Mio; Vengberg, Sofie; Winblad, Ulrika; Halford, Christina; Dahlström, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While national quality registries (NQRs) are suggested to provide opportunities for systematic follow-up and learning opportunities, and thus clinical improvements, features in registries and contexts triggering such processes are not fully known. This study focuses on one of the world's largest stroke registries, the Swedish NQR Riksstroke, investigating what aspects of the registry and healthcare organisations facilitate or hinder the use of registry data in clinical quality improvement. Methods Following particular qualitative studies, we performed a quantitative survey in an exploratory sequential design. The survey, including 50 items on context, processes and the registry, was sent to managers, physicians and nurses engaged in Riksstroke in all 72 Swedish stroke units. Altogether, 242 individuals were presented with the survey; 163 responded, representing all but two units. Data were analysed descriptively and through multiple linear regression. Results A majority (88%) considered Riksstroke data to facilitate detection of stroke care improvement needs and acknowledged that their data motivated quality improvements (78%). The use of Riksstroke for quality improvement initiatives was associated (R2=0.76) with ‘Colleagues’ call for local results’ (p=<0.001), ‘Management Request of Registry data’ (p=<0.001), and it was said to be ‘Simple to explain the results to colleagues’ (p=0.02). Using stepwise regression, ‘Colleagues’ call for local results’ was identified as the most influential factor. Yet, while 73% reported that managers request registry data, only 39% reported that their colleagues call for the unit's Riksstroke results. Conclusions While an NQR like Riksstroke demonstrates improvement needs and motivates stakeholders to make progress, local stroke care staff and managers need to engage to keep the momentum going in terms of applying registry data when planning, performing and evaluating quality initiatives. PMID

  3. Risk factors, microbiological findings and outcomes of necrotizing fasciitis in New Zealand: a retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence and mortality from necrotizing fasciitis (NF) are increasing in New Zealand (NZ). Triggered by a media report that traditional Samoan tattooing was causing NF, we conducted a chart review to investigate the role of this and other predisposing and precipitating factors and to document NF microbiology, complications and interventions in NZ. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of 299 hospital charts of patients discharged with NF diagnosis codes in eight hospitals in NZ between 2000 and 2006. We documented and compared by ethnicity the prevalence of predisposing and precipitating conditions, bacteria isolated, complications and interventions used. Results Out of 299 charts, 247 fulfilled the case definition. NF was most common in elderly males. Diabetes was the most frequent co-morbid condition, followed by obesity. Nearly a quarter of patients were taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Traditional Samoan tattooing was an uncommon cause. Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus were the two commonly isolated bacteria. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was implicated in a relatively small number of cases. Shock, renal failure, coagulation abnormality and multi-organ dysfunction were common complications. More than 90% of patients underwent surgical debridement, 56% were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) and slightly less than half of all patients had blood product transfusion. One in six NF cases had amputations and 23.5% died. Conclusion This chart review found that the highest proportion of NF cases was elderly males with co-morbidities, particularly diabetes and obesity. Tattooing was an uncommon precipitating event. The role of NSAID needs further exploration. NF is a serious disease with severe complications, high case fatality and considerable use of health care resources. PMID:23234429

  4. Structure, expression, and biological function of INSM1 transcription factor in neuroendocrine differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Michael S.; Breslin, Mary B.

    2009-01-01

    Zinc-finger transcription factors are DNA-binding proteins that are implicated in many diverse biological functions. INSM1 (formerly IA-1) contains five zinc-finger motifs and functions as a transcription factor. INSM1 protein structure is highly conserved in homologues of different species. It is predominantly expressed in developing neuroendocrine tissues and the nervous system in mammals. INSM1 represents an important player in early embryonic neurogenesis. In pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation, Ngn3 first activates INSM1 and subsequently NeuroD/β2. Conversely, INSM1 exerts a feedback mechanism to suppress NeuroD/β2 and its own gene expression. INSM1 gene ablation in the mouse results in the impairment of pancreatic endocrine cell maturation. Further, deletion of INSM1 severely impairs catecholamine biosynthesis and secretion from the adrenal gland that results in early embryonic lethality. Genetically, INSM1 acts as a downstream factor of Mash 1 and Phox2b in the differentiation of the sympatho-adrenal lineage. In the developing neocortex, mouse embryos lacking INSM1 expression contain half the number of basal progenitors and show a reduction in cortical plate radial thickness. Cell signaling studies reveal that INSM1 contributes to the induction of cell cycle arrest/exit necessary to facilitate cellular differentiation. INSM1 is highly expressed in tumors of neuroendocrine origin. Hence, its promoter could serve as a tumor-specific promoter that drives a specific targeted cancer gene therapy for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. Taken together, all of these features of INSM1 strongly support its role as an important regulator during neuroendocrine differentiation.—Lan, M. S., Breslin, M. B. Structure, expression, and biological function of INSM1 transcription factor in neuroendocrine differentiation. PMID:19246490

  5. Impact of environmental factors and biological soil crust types on soil respiration in a desert ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yuqing; Jia, Xin; Wu, Bin; Zha, Tianshan; Qin, Shugao; Wang, Ben; Shao, Chenxi; Liu, Jiabin; Fa, Keyu

    2014-01-01

    The responses of soil respiration to environmental conditions have been studied extensively in various ecosystems. However, little is known about the impacts of temperature and moisture on soils respiration under biological soil crusts. In this study, CO2 efflux from biologically-crusted soils was measured continuously with an automated chamber system in Ningxia, northwest China, from June to October 2012. The highest soil respiration was observed in lichen-crusted soil (0.93 ± 0.43 µmol m-2 s-1) and the lowest values in algae-crusted soil (0.73 ± 0.31 µmol m-2 s-1). Over the diurnal scale, soil respiration was highest in the morning whereas soil temperature was highest in the midday, which resulted in diurnal hysteresis between the two variables. In addition, the lag time between soil respiration and soil temperature was negatively correlated with the soil volumetric water content and was reduced as soil water content increased. Over the seasonal scale, daily mean nighttime soil respiration was positively correlated with soil temperature when moisture exceeded 0.075 and 0.085 m3 m-3 in lichen- and moss-crusted soil, respectively. However, moisture did not affect on soil respiration in algae-crusted soil during the study period. Daily mean nighttime soil respiration normalized by soil temperature increased with water content in lichen- and moss-crusted soil. Our results indicated that different types of biological soil crusts could affect response of soil respiration to environmental factors. There is a need to consider the spatial distribution of different types of biological soil crusts and their relative contributions to the total C budgets at the ecosystem or landscape level.

  6. Impact of Environmental Factors and Biological Soil Crust Types on Soil Respiration in a Desert Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yuqing; Jia, Xin; Wu, Bin; Zha, Tianshan; Qin, Shugao; Wang, Ben; Shao, Chenxi; Liu, Jiabin; Fa, Keyu

    2014-01-01

    The responses of soil respiration to environmental conditions have been studied extensively in various ecosystems. However, little is known about the impacts of temperature and moisture on soils respiration under biological soil crusts. In this study, CO2 efflux from biologically-crusted soils was measured continuously with an automated chamber system in Ningxia, northwest China, from June to October 2012. The highest soil respiration was observed in lichen-crusted soil (0.93±0.43 µmol m−2 s−1) and the lowest values in algae-crusted soil (0.73±0.31 µmol m−2 s−1). Over the diurnal scale, soil respiration was highest in the morning whereas soil temperature was highest in the midday, which resulted in diurnal hysteresis between the two variables. In addition, the lag time between soil respiration and soil temperature was negatively correlated with the soil volumetric water content and was reduced as soil water content increased. Over the seasonal scale, daily mean nighttime soil respiration was positively correlated with soil temperature when moisture exceeded 0.075 and 0.085 m3 m−3 in lichen- and moss-crusted soil, respectively. However, moisture did not affect on soil respiration in algae-crusted soil during the study period. Daily mean nighttime soil respiration normalized by soil temperature increased with water content in lichen- and moss-crusted soil. Our results indicated that different types of biological soil crusts could affect response of soil respiration to environmental factors. There is a need to consider the spatial distribution of different types of biological soil crusts and their relative contributions to the total C budgets at the ecosystem or landscape level. PMID:25050837

  7. Non-biological factors associated with tooth retention in Irish adults.

    PubMed

    Guiney, H; Woods, N; Whelton, H; Mullane, D O

    2011-03-01

    To identify non-biological factors associated with retention of natural teeth and sound untreated natural teeth among adults in Ireland. Data were collected in the 2000/'02 epidemiological survey of the oral health of Irish adults. Participants underwent a clinical oral examination in health board dental clinics and a detailed interview pertaining to oral and general health. The analysis is based on a random sample of adults aged 16-24 years (n = 1,196), 35-44 years (n = 978), and 65 years and older (n = 714). Dependent variables were number of natural teeth present (NT), number of sound untreated natural teeth (SUNT), likelihood of being dentate, having 21 or more NT (21+NT), 28 or more NT (28+NT), and 18 or more SUNT (18+SUNT). Socioeconomic status (SES) was based on being disadvantaged, occupation status and educational attainment. Behavioural factors included smoking, snacking, brushing frequency and dental visiting patterns. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Tooth retention decreased with increasing age group. Level of education, disadvantage status, being in employment, frequent brushing and visiting the dentist for a check-up (instead of when in need or pain) were associated with tooth retention. Attending for a check-up moderated the impact of disadvantage on tooth retention among 35-44 year-olds. The results of this study indicate that several non-biological determinants are important for dental health in this adult population.

  8. Production of feline leukemia inhibitory factor with biological activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kanegi, R; Hatoya, S; Tsujimoto, Y; Takenaka, S; Nishimura, T; Wijewardana, V; Sugiura, K; Takahashi, M; Kawate, N; Tamada, H; Inaba, T

    2016-07-15

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine which is essential for oocyte and embryo development, embryonic stem cell, and induced pluripotent stem cell maintenance. Leukemia inhibitory factor improves the maturation of oocytes in the human and the mouse. However, feline LIF (fLIF) cloning and effects on oocytes during IVM have not been reported. Thus, we cloned complete cDNA of fLIF and examined its biological activity and effects on oocytes during IVM in the domestic cat. The aminoacid sequence of fLIF revealed a homology of 81% or 92% with that of mouse or human. The fLIF produced by pCold TF DNA in Escherichia coli was readily soluble and after purification showed bioactivity in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mouse embryonic stem cells and enhancing the proliferation of human erythrocyte leukemia cells. Furthermore, 10- and 100-ng/mL fLIF induced cumulus expansion with or without FSH and EGF (P < 0.05). The rate of metaphase II oocytes was also improved with 100-ng/mL fLIF (P < 0.05). We therefore confirmed the successful production for the first time of biologically active fLIF and revealed its effects on oocytes during IVM in the domestic cat. Feline LIF will further improve reproduction and stem cell research in the feline family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An evaluation of a foundational course in high school biology as measured by cognitive and affective factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Cynthia Thompson

    There is little written about the use of foundational courses in high school science. This study seeks to identify if a foundational course in high school biology improves student outcomes as measured by Biology I EOC exam proficiency scale scores and student growth. Efforts were made to determine differences in cognitive skill areas and affective/conative skill areas as students progress from the foundational course of Greenhouse Biology (GH Bio) to Biology I. Three years of test score data from over 15,000 student participants are evaluated, as well as extant survey data from biology teachers and district student scheduling personnel. Findings from the study indicate GH Bio does make a difference in academic outcomes in students taking the foundational course before taking the Biology I course, and subsequently, the Biology I EOC exam. Findings also show there are cognitive, affective, and conative differences between the GH Bio students and their non-GH Bio peers while in Biology I. The study also seeks to determine why some students are scheduled for GH Bio and others are not. Findings indicate there are variances as to the reasons and intent for scheduling students into GH Bio. Some students who could benefit from the course are not being scheduled into the course.

  10. Vitamin D, Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Incident Cognitive Impairment: Findings from the REGARDS Study

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Judd, Suzanne E.; Howard, Virginia J.; Jenny, Nancy S.; Wadley, Virginia G.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D protects against cognitive decline in animals but evidence in humans has been inconsistent. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a hormone that inhibits vitamin D activation yet few studies examined whether FGF23 is associated with cognitive impairment. The objective of this study was to examine associations of 25(OH)D and FGF23 with incident cognitive impairment in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a cohort of black and white adults ≥45 years old. FGF23 and 25(OH)D were measured in 474 incident impairment cases and 561 controls. In multivariable-adjusted models, there were no significant associations of FGF23 with incident cognitive impairment. In analyses using clinically-relevant categories of 25(OH)D (< 20 ng/ml, 20–29.9 ng/ml, ≥30 ng/ml), there was no statistically significant association of lower 25(OH)D concentrations with odds of incident cognitive impairment in models adjusted for demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables and season of blood draw (tertile 1 [≥30 ng/ml] reference; tertile 2 [20–29.9 ng/ml], odds ratio [OR] 0.96, 95%CI 0.67, 1.38; tertile 3 [<20 ng/ml] OR 1.26, 95%CI 0.83, 1.91). When 25(OH)D was modeled as race-specific tertiles, there were no significant associations of 25(OH)D with incident cognitive impairment in whites, whereas lower 25(OH)D was associated with higher odds in blacks (tertile 1 [>23 ng/ml] reference; tertile 2 [15–23 ng/ml], OR 2.96, 95%CI 1.48,5.94; tertile 3 [<15 ng/ml] OR 2.40, 95%CI 1.07,5.40) in the fully adjusted model. In this cohort of older adults, lower race-specific tertiles of 25(OH)D were associated with higher incidence of cognitive impairment in black individuals but not white individuals. These data suggest that treating low 25(OH)D may be a novel strategy for addressing racial disparities in neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:27812184

  11. Association of biological, psychological and lifestyle risk factors for eating disturbances in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Teresa; Espinoza, Paola; Penelo, Eva; Mora, Marisol; González, Marcela L; Rosés, Rocío; Raich, Rosa M

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to assess the association of several risk factors for eating disturbances in adolescents. Participants were 448 girls and boys aged 12-15 years. Being female, higher body mass index, internalisation of standard of appearance, perfectionism, body dissatisfaction, number of lifetime addictive behaviours and lower self-esteem were associated with higher eating disturbance scores, whereas frequency of sedentary behaviours and physical activity were not (R(2) ⩾ 41%). Findings suggest the need to guide prevention efforts towards the broad spectrum of individual potentially modifiable factors. A non-specific comprehensive perspective may be adequate to prevent problems related to weight, body image and drug use.

  12. Expression of biologically active atrial natriuretic factor following intrahepatic injection of a replication-defective adenoviral vector in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, V; Adam, M; Deprez, I; Ambriovic, A; Rosenberg, D; Crespeau, F; Saana, M; Pham, I; Eloit, M; Adnot, S; Pouchelon, J L

    1999-01-20

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasoactive hormone produced and released by atrial cardiomyocytes. We investigated whether adenovirus-mediated ANF gene delivery to dogs leads to a sustained increase in circulating ANF levels resulting in long-lasting biological effects. An adenoviral vector containing the canine ANF cDNA under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus 3' long terminal repeat (AdRSV-ANF) was injected via the intrahepatic route to nonvaccinated 2-month-old dogs. In the first group of four dogs injected with AdRSV-ANF (10(10.2) TCID50), a short-lived increase in plasma ANF concentrations not associated with biological effects occurred 8-10 days after the injection, as compared with four control dogs injected with an adenovirus encoding a luciferase reporter gene (AdRSV-luc). In a second series of experiments, six dogs received AdRSV-ANF at a dose of 10(10) TCID50 and a replication-defective type 5 adenovirus harboring a modified VAI gene (Ad-VAr) at the same dose. Sustained increases in plasma ANF concentrations and urinary cGMP excretion starting on day 2 and persisting until day 20 were seen, as well as concomitant elevations in natriuresis and diuresis, a transient increase in cardiac output, and a delay in body weight gain, as compared with control dogs injected with AdRSV-luc/Ad-VAr. These results show that adenovirus-mediated ANF gene expression can lead to systemic biological effects in dogs, a finding of potential relevance for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and sodium-retaining disorders.

  13. Biology of Bone Tissue: Structure, Function, and Factors That Influence Bone Cells.

    PubMed

    Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Sasso, Gisela Rodrigues da Silva; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Simões, Manuel Jesus; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is continuously remodeled through the concerted actions of bone cells, which include bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, whereas osteocytes act as mechanosensors and orchestrators of the bone remodeling process. This process is under the control of local (e.g., growth factors and cytokines) and systemic (e.g., calcitonin and estrogens) factors that all together contribute for bone homeostasis. An imbalance between bone resorption and formation can result in bone diseases including osteoporosis. Recently, it has been recognized that, during bone remodeling, there are an intricate communication among bone cells. For instance, the coupling from bone resorption to bone formation is achieved by interaction between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Moreover, osteocytes produce factors that influence osteoblast and osteoclast activities, whereas osteocyte apoptosis is followed by osteoclastic bone resorption. The increasing knowledge about the structure and functions of bone cells contributed to a better understanding of bone biology. It has been suggested that there is a complex communication between bone cells and other organs, indicating the dynamic nature of bone tissue. In this review, we discuss the current data about the structure and functions of bone cells and the factors that influence bone remodeling.

  14. Radicular Cyst: An Update of the Biological Factors Related to Lining Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Lisiane; Visioli, Fernanda; Nör, Carolina; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki

    2015-12-01

    Radicular cysts are common lesions in daily dentistry practice. However, the mechanisms related to epithelial lining formation and cavity growth are not fully understood. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to review the biological factors implicated in these process. Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases matching the following key words in the title or abstract: "cyst" OR "granuloma" OR "abscess" AND "radicular" OR "apical" OR "periapical" AND "epithelium" OR "epithelial" OR "epithelial lining." The PubMed database was searched for articles published between 1975 and 2014. Only English language was applied to the search. The literature search yielded a total of 187 articles. After duplicate references were discarded, a subsequent search at the title and abstract level revealed 42 articles for full-text reading. The articles were categorized into 5 main subtopics: (1) cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis; (2) extracellular matrix constituents; (3) inflammatory components; (4) bone metabolic factors and; (5) others. These subtopics described the characteristics of radicular cysts focusing on the epithelial tissue effects. Several factors from different sources (epithelial cells, stromal cells, extracellular matrix, and bone matrix) were implicated on apical cyst pathogenesis. Probably a combination of many factors involving an epithelial-stromal interaction is responsible for the sustenance and growth of apical cysts. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biology of Bone Tissue: Structure, Function, and Factors That Influence Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Simões, Manuel Jesus; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is continuously remodeled through the concerted actions of bone cells, which include bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, whereas osteocytes act as mechanosensors and orchestrators of the bone remodeling process. This process is under the control of local (e.g., growth factors and cytokines) and systemic (e.g., calcitonin and estrogens) factors that all together contribute for bone homeostasis. An imbalance between bone resorption and formation can result in bone diseases including osteoporosis. Recently, it has been recognized that, during bone remodeling, there are an intricate communication among bone cells. For instance, the coupling from bone resorption to bone formation is achieved by interaction between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Moreover, osteocytes produce factors that influence osteoblast and osteoclast activities, whereas osteocyte apoptosis is followed by osteoclastic bone resorption. The increasing knowledge about the structure and functions of bone cells contributed to a better understanding of bone biology. It has been suggested that there is a complex communication between bone cells and other organs, indicating the dynamic nature of bone tissue. In this review, we discuss the current data about the structure and functions of bone cells and the factors that influence bone remodeling. PMID:26247020

  16. Finding biomarkers in non-model species: literature mining of transcription factors involved in bovine embryo development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since processes in well-known model organisms have specific features different from those in Bos taurus, the organism under study, a good way to describe gene regulation in ruminant embryos would be a species-specific consideration of closely related species to cattle, sheep and pig. However, as highlighted by a recent report, gene dictionaries in pig are smaller than in cattle, bringing a risk to reduce the gene resources to be mined (and so for sheep dictionaries). Bioinformatics approaches that allow an integration of available information on gene function in model organisms, taking into account their specificity, are thus needed. Besides these closely related and biologically relevant species, there is indeed much more knowledge of (i) trophoblast proliferation and differentiation or (ii) embryogenesis in human and mouse species, which provides opportunities for reconstructing proliferation and/or differentiation processes in other mammalian embryos, including ruminants. The necessary knowledge can be obtained partly from (i) stem cell or cancer research to supply useful information on molecular agents or molecular interactions at work in cell proliferation and (ii) mouse embryogenesis to supply useful information on embryo differentiation. However, the total number of publications for all these topics and species is great and their manual processing would be tedious and time consuming. This is why we used text mining for automated text analysis and automated knowledge extraction. To evaluate the quality of this “mining”, we took advantage of studies that reported gene expression profiles during the elongation of bovine embryos and defined a list of transcription factors (or TF, n = 64) that we used as biological “gold standard”. When successful, the “mining” approach would identify them all, as well as novel ones. Methods To gain knowledge on molecular-genetic regulations in a non model organism, we offer an approach based on

  17. Finding biomarkers in non-model species: literature mining of transcription factors involved in bovine embryo development.

    PubMed

    Turenne, Nicolas; Tiys, Evgeniy; Ivanisenko, Vladimir; Yudin, Nikolay; Ignatieva, Elena; Valour, Damien; Degrelle, Séverine A; Hue, Isabelle

    2012-08-29

    Since processes in well-known model organisms have specific features different from those in Bos taurus, the organism under study, a good way to describe gene regulation in ruminant embryos would be a species-specific consideration of closely related species to cattle, sheep and pig. However, as highlighted by a recent report, gene dictionaries in pig are smaller than in cattle, bringing a risk to reduce the gene resources to be mined (and so for sheep dictionaries). Bioinformatics approaches that allow an integration of available information on gene function in model organisms, taking into account their specificity, are thus needed. Besides these closely related and biologically relevant species, there is indeed much more knowledge of (i) trophoblast proliferation and differentiation or (ii) embryogenesis in human and mouse species, which provides opportunities for reconstructing proliferation and/or differentiation processes in other mammalian embryos, including ruminants. The necessary knowledge can be obtained partly from (i) stem cell or cancer research to supply useful information on molecular agents or molecular interactions at work in cell proliferation and (ii) mouse embryogenesis to supply useful information on embryo differentiation. However, the total number of publications for all these topics and species is great and their manual processing would be tedious and time consuming. This is why we used text mining for automated text analysis and automated knowledge extraction. To evaluate the quality of this "mining", we took advantage of studies that reported gene expression profiles during the elongation of bovine embryos and defined a list of transcription factors (or TF, n = 64) that we used as biological "gold standard". When successful, the "mining" approach would identify them all, as well as novel ones. To gain knowledge on molecular-genetic regulations in a non model organism, we offer an approach based on literature-mining and score

  18. Influence of biologic factor on the velocity of propagation of pulse waves in vessels of living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumets, Pavel

    2012-11-01

    In this work there has been examined a mathematical model illustrating propagation of a pulse wave, with biological activity of a blood vessel's walls taken into consideration. The influence of the biological factor was allowed for in the equations connecting stresses and deformations of the vessel's walls among themselves. There has been deduced a formula defining the pulse wave propagation velocity in an orthotropic resilient blood-filled vessel, influenced by the biological factor. The obtained results allow us to make a conclusion that stimulation of muscle fibers of the vessel's wall brings on an increase in the pulse wave propagation velocity.

  19. Ecological, social and biological risk factors for continued Trypanosoma cruzi transmission by Triatoma dimidiata in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Dulce M; De Urioste-Stone, Sandra M; Juárez, José G; Pennington, Pamela M

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease transmission by Triatoma dimidiata persists in Guatemala and elsewhere in Central America under undefined ecological, biological and social (eco-bio-social) conditions. Eco-bio-social risk factors associated with persistent domiciliary infestation were identified by a cross-sectional survey and qualitative participatory methods. Quantitative and qualitative data were generated regarding Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs and triatomine hosts. Blood meal analysis and infection of insects, dogs and rodents were determined. Based on these data, multimodel inference was used to identify risk factors for domestic infestation with the greatest relative importance (>0.75). Blood meal analysis showed that 64% of 36 bugs fed on chickens, 50% on humans, 17% on dogs; 24% of 34 bugs fed on Rattus rattus and 21% on Mus musculus. Seroprevalence among 80 dogs was 37%. Eight (17%) of 46 M. musculus and three (43%) of seven R. rattus from households with infected triatomines were infected with T. cruzi Distinct Typing Unit I. Results from interviews and participatory meetings indicated that vector control personnel and some householders perceived chickens roosting and laying eggs in the house as bug infestation risk factors. House construction practices were seen as a risk factor for bug and rodent infestation, with rodents being perceived as a pest by study participants. Multimodel inference showed that house infestation risk factors of high relative importance are dog density, mouse presence, interior wall plaster condition, dirt floor, tile roofing and coffee tree presence. Persistent house infestation is closely related to eco-bio-social factors that maintain productive T. dimidiata habitats associated with dogs, chickens and rodents. Triatomine, dog and rodent infections indicate active T. cruzi transmission. Integrated vector control methods should include actions that consider the role of peridomestic animals in transmission and community memberś level of knowledge

  20. Technique sensitivity: biological factors contributing to clinical success with various restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cox, C F; Tarim, B; Kopel, H; Gürel, G; Hafez, A

    2001-08-01

    Since the 1950s, clinicians have relied on various formulations of Ca(OH)2 to stimulate dentin bridge formation. Various studies (Kozlov and Massler, 1966; Massler, 1967; Brännström, 1978; Cox et al., 1987; Snuggs et al., 1993) have demonstrated that pulp healing and dentin bridging can occur against a pH spectrum of materials. Recent studies (Akimoto et al., 1998; Cox et al., 1998, 1999; Tarim et al., 1998; Kitasako et al., 1999; Hafez et al., 2000) have reported successful pulp healing and dentin bridging using adhesives for direct capping of exposed pulps. However, others (Costa et al., 1997; Stanley and Pameijer, 1997; Pameijer, 1998; Hebling et al., 1999; Carvalho et al., 2000) have reported unsatisfactory results when exposures were direct-capped with adhesives. Biological and technical factors, or a combination of both, might be postulated to explain these differences. Recent studies have demonstrated that biological success is dependent upon proper hemorrhage control at the exposure site. This review explores the differences and common factors influencing successful dentin bridging, focusing on data derived from animal studies conducted according to ISO usage guidelines for cavity preparation and material placement. In the past, there has been concern that etching of vital dentin leads to immediate pulp death due to low pH. Recent studies have reported that acidic cements cause breakdown of only the smear layer and fail to seal the restoration interface, leading to inflammation and necrosis. A properly hybridized dentinadhesive interface provides a "bacteriometic" seal to both dentin and pulp tissues. Recent ISO usage studies have shown a high incidence of dentin bridging with adhesives following proper hemorrhage control and removal of both operative debris and biofilm at the dentin-pulp interface by agents such as NaOCl. These are important technique-sensitivity factors to be considered for pulp healing and dentin bridge formation.

  1. Hepatocyte growth factor exerts multiple biological functions on bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Accornero, P; Martignani, E; Macchi, E; Baratta, M

    2007-09-01

    The met proto-oncogene product Met is a member of the family of tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors, and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) has been identified as its only ligand. Bovine Met and HGF/SF have been recently cloned and their expression has been characterized in the mammary gland, but no data regarding the biological effects of this ligand/receptor couple in bovine mammary cells are yet available. We examined the role of HGF/SF and its receptor in a bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV). Expression of Met at the mRNA level in BME-UV mammary epithelial cells evaluated by real-time PCR was similar to the expression in MDCK cells, a widely used model for Met biology. Met expression in BME-UV at the protein level was confirmed by western blot. The analysis of some signal transductional pathways downstream from the Met receptor revealed that HGF/SF addition to BME-UV cells induced activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 proliferative pathway and the Akt antiapoptotic pathway. The BME-UV cells treated with HGF responded with increased proliferation, cell scatter, and motility. Met activation by HGF induced degradation of the extracellular matrix and migration through matrigel coated transwells. Moreover, BME-UV cells included in a 3-dimensional matrix of collagen and treated with HGF developed tubular structures, reminiscent of the mammary gland ducts. These data indicate that HGF and Met might be important regulators of mammary gland growth, morphogenesis, and development in the bovine.

  2. Brain responses to biological motion predict treatment outcome in young adults with autism receiving Virtual Reality Social Cognition Training: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y J Daniel; Allen, Tandra; Abdullahi, Sebiha M; Pelphrey, Kevin A; Volkmar, Fred R; Chapman, Sandra B

    2017-03-29

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by remarkable heterogeneity in social, communication, and behavioral deficits, creating a major barrier in identifying effective treatments for a given individual with ASD. To facilitate precision medicine in ASD, we utilized a well-validated biological motion neuroimaging task to identify pretreatment biomarkers that can accurately forecast the response to an evidence-based behavioral treatment, Virtual Reality-Social Cognition Training (VR-SCT). In a preliminary sample of 17 young adults with high-functioning ASD, we identified neural predictors of change in emotion recognition after VR-SCT. The predictors were characterized by the pretreatment brain activations to biological vs. scrambled motion in the neural circuits that support (a) language comprehension and interpretation of incongruent auditory emotions and prosody, and (b) processing socio-emotional experience and interpersonal affective information, as well as emotional regulation. The predictive value of the findings for individual adults with ASD was supported by regression-based multivariate pattern analyses with cross validation. To our knowledge, this is the first pilot study that shows neuroimaging-based predictive biomarkers for treatment effectiveness in adults with ASD. The findings have potentially far-reaching implications for developing more precise and effective treatments for ASD.

  3. Signaling by the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily in B-cell biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Robert C; Jellusova, Julia; Miletic, Ana V

    2011-11-01

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) participate prominently in B-cell maturation and function. In particular, B-cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family receptor (BAFF-R), B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), and transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) play critical roles in promoting B-cell survival at distinct stages of development by engaging a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and/or BAFF. CD40 is also essential for directing the humoral response to T-cell-dependent antigens. Signaling by the TNFRSF is mediated primarily, albeit not exclusively, via the TNFR-associated factor (TRAF) proteins and activation of the canonical and/or non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. Dysregulated signaling by TNFRSF members can promote B-cell survival and proliferation, causing autoimmunity and neoplasia. In this review, we present a current understanding of the functions of and distinctions between APRIL/BAFF signaling by their respective receptors expressed on particular B-cell subsets. These findings are compared and contrasted with CD40 signaling, which employs similar signaling conduits to achieve distinct cellular outcomes in the context of the germinal center response. We also underscore how new findings and conceptual insights into TNFRSF signaling are facilitating the understanding of B-cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases.

  4. Associations of leg fat accumulation with adiposity-related biological factors and risk of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Hu, Emily A; Wu, Hongyu; Malik, Vasanti; Sun, Qi

    2013-04-01

    To examine associations between regional fat mass (FM) distribution and cardiometabolic risk factors among ethnic minority groups, such as non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. The associations among 8,802 US residents who participated in the 1999-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were examined. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Leg fat indices included leg FM, leg FM percent (FM%), leg to whole body FM ratio (leg/whole), and leg to trunk FM ratio (leg/trunk). The correlation between leg fat indices and adiposity-related risk factors, as well as the association of these indices with metabolic syndrome (MetS) was evaluated. After adjusting for covariates including age, gender, and trunk FM or trunk FM%, higher leg FM and leg FM% were, in general, correlated favorably with adiposity-related risk factors and associated with lower odds of MetS in all ethnicities, including non-Hispanic whites and blacks and Hispanic groups. In addition, in all multivariate-adjusted models, leg/whole and leg/trunk ratios were strongly associated with lower levels of most risk factors and decreased odds of MetS in these ethnicities (all odds ratios comparing extreme quintiles < 0.1). Results show that leg fat accumulation is inversely associated with adiposity-related biological factors and risk of MetS in both whites and ethnic groups, suggesting that regional fat distribution plays an important role in the etiology of adiposity-related diseases in these populations. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  5. Associations of Leg Fat Accumulation with Adiposity-Related Biological Factors and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Hu, Emily A.; Wu, Hongyu; Malik, Vasanti; Sun, Qi

    2012-01-01

    The association between regional fat mass distribution and cardiometabolic risk factors has been inconsistent in the literature, and data for ethnic minority groups, such as non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, are lacking. We aimed to examine this association among 8802 US residents who participated in the 1999-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Leg fat indices included leg fat mass (FM), leg fat mass percent (FM%), leg to whole body FM ratio (leg/whole) and leg to trunk FM ratio (leg/trunk). We evaluated the correlation between leg fat indices and adiposity-related risk factors, as well as the association of these indices with metabolic syndrome (MetS). After adjusting for covariates including age, gender, and trunk FM or trunk FM%, higher leg FM and leg FM% were, in general, correlated favorably with adiposity-related risk factors and associated with lower odds of MetS in all ethnicities, including non-Hispanic whites and blacks and Hispanic groups. In addition, in all multivariate-adjusted models, leg/whole and leg/trunk ratios were strongly associated with lower levels of most risk factors and decreased odds of MetS in these ethnicities (all odds ratios comparing extreme quintiles < 0.1). Our results show that leg fat accumulation is inversely associated with adiposity-related biological factors and risk of MetS in both whites and ethnic groups, suggesting that regional fat distribution plays an important role in the etiology of adiposity-related diseases in these populations. PMID:23404933

  6. Radiogenomics: A systems biology approach to understanding genetic risk factors for radiotherapy toxicity?

    PubMed

    Herskind, Carsten; Talbot, Christopher J; Kerns, Sarah L; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Rosenstein, Barry S; West, Catharine M L

    2016-11-01

    Adverse reactions in normal tissue after radiotherapy (RT) limit the dose that can be given to tumour cells. Since 80% of individual variation in clinical response is estimated to be caused by patient-related factors, identifying these factors might allow prediction of patients with increased risk of developing severe reactions. While inactivation of cell renewal is considered a major cause of toxicity in early-reacting normal tissues, complex interactions involving multiple cell types, cytokines, and hypoxia seem important for late reactions. Here, we review 'omics' approaches such as screening of genetic polymorphisms or gene expression analysis, and assess the potential of epigenetic factors, posttranslational modification, signal transduction, and metabolism. Furthermore, functional assays have suggested possible associations with clinical risk of adverse reaction. Pathway analysis incorporating different 'omics' approaches may be more efficient in identifying critical pathways than pathway analysis based on single 'omics' data sets. Integrating these pathways with functional assays may be powerful in identifying multiple subgroups of RT patients characterised by different mechanisms. Thus 'omics' and functional approaches may synergise if they are integrated into radiogenomics 'systems biology' to facilitate the goal of individualised radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrical injuries. Biological values measurements as a prediction factor of local evolution in electrocutions lesions

    PubMed Central

    Teodoreanu, R; Popescu, SA; Lascar, I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rationale. Taking into account the incidence and the severity of electrocutions, we consider it extremely necessary to find effective, appropriate and particularized therapeutic solutions aimed at improving the survival, decreasing the mortality, ensuring a superior functional and aesthetic effect and facilitating the social reintegration. Given the severity of the general condition of the electrically injured patient and the fact that any worsening of the lesions has a systemic echo, the selection of the timing for re-excision is very important. The postponement of the surgical timing can break the precarious metabolic equilibrium and can hasten the installation of the multisystem organ failure (MSOF). Objective. The study is intended to establish a possible connection between the clinical evolution of the electrically injured patient and the dynamics of three important biological parameters, able to provide data concerning the therapeutic attitude to be followed. The patients with a diagnostic of high-voltage electrocution, who will be admitted to the Clinic, will be followed for a period of 2 years. The parameters to be followed daily will be: - Creatin-kinase, as a marker of muscular damage - Hemoglobin, as a marker of tissue oxygenation - Leukocytes, as an indicator of a possible septic evolution. The therapeutic alternatives, including the administration of antiplatelet drugs will be studied. Methods and Results. In the period October 2010-June 2013 a total of 12 cases of high-voltage electrocution were admitted in our clinic. Among these, some could be placed in the study of 7 cases, as the remaining patients died within the first 24 hours of hospitalization due to the endured lesions. All the patients were admitted to the ICU ward that supported the treatment and monitoring until their stabilization, at which time they were transferred to the ward. All the patients received anti-thromboxane treatment from their admission (injectable NSAIDs

  8. Predicting protein-protein interactions from multimodal biological data sources via nonnegative matrix tri-factorization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Huang, Heng; Ding, Chris; Nie, Feiping

    2013-04-01

    Protein interactions are central to all the biological processes and structural scaffolds in living organisms, because they orchestrate a number of cellular processes such as metabolic pathways and immunological recognition. Several high-throughput methods, for example, yeast two-hybrid system and mass spectrometry method, can help determine protein interactions, which, however, suffer from high false-positive rates. Moreover, many protein interactions predicted by one method are not supported by another. Therefore, computational methods are necessary and crucial to complete the interactome expeditiously. In this work, we formulate the problem of predicting protein interactions from a new mathematical perspective--sparse matrix completion, and propose a novel nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF)-based matrix completion approach to predict new protein interactions from existing protein interaction networks. Through using manifold regularization, we further develop our method to integrate different biological data sources, such as protein sequences, gene expressions, protein structure information, etc. Extensive experimental results on four species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, and Caenorhabditis elegans, have shown that our new methods outperform related state-of-the-art protein interaction prediction methods.

  9. [Biological effect of extracellular peptide factor from Lateococcus japonicas subsp. casei on probiotic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, L I; Khodzhaev, E Iu; Kharchenko, N V; Novikova, T M; Cherdyntseva, T A

    2014-01-01

    The biological effect of the extracellular peptide reactivating factor (RF) from Luteococcus casei on cells of probiotic cultures was studied. The RF showed the protective and reactivating effects on the Bifidobacterium bifidum cells under the action of bile salts and an acidic stress. Also, it acted as a cryoprotector during lyophilisation and long-term culture storage. The RF and the L. casei culture liquid (CL) were shown to have bifidogenic properties. The degree of protection and reactivation of lactic-acid bacteria under the action of bile salts depended on the particular strain properties. The maximum degree of protection (more than thirteen-fold) and reactivation (close to three-fold) was found in Lactobacillus casei, while the minimum values were characteristic of Lactobacillus reuterii. The resistance of lactobacilli to bile was increased in the row of L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, and L. reuterii correlating with the RF protection degree.

  10. Synthesis of ribozyme against vascular endothelial growth factor165 and its biological activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhong-Ping; Wang, Yun-Jie; Wu, Yu; Li, Jin-Ge; Chen, Nong-An

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the designation, synthesis and biological activity of against vascular endothelial growth factor165 (VEGF165) ribozyme. METHODS: The ribozyme against VEGF165 was designed with computer. The transcriptional vector was constructed which included the anti-VEGF165 ribozyme and 5’, 3’ self-splicing ribozymes. The hammerhead ribozyme and substrate VEGF165 mRNA were synthesized through transcription in vitro. The cleavage activity of the ribozyme on target RNA was observed in a cell-free system. RESULTS: The anti-VEGF165 ribozyme was released properly from the transcription of pGEMRz212 cleaved by 5’ and 3’ self-splicing ribozymes which retained its catalytic activity, and the cleavage efficiency of ribozyme reached 90.7%. CONCLUSION: The anti-VEGF165 ribozyme designed with computer can cleave VEGF165 mRNA effectively. PMID:15133860

  11. Sex differences in parking are affected by biological and social factors.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Claudia C; Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Oren, Beyza; Becker, Cordula; Hofstätter, Andrea; Bös, Christa; Popken, Markus; Thorstensen, Truls; Güntürkün, Onur

    2010-07-01

    The stereotype of women's limited parking skills is deeply anchored in modern culture. Although laboratory tests prove men's average superiority in visuospatial tasks and parking requires complex, spatial skills, underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. Here, we investigated performance of beginners (nine women, eight men) and more experienced drivers (21 women, 27 men) at different parking manoeuvres. Furthermore, subjects conducted the mental rotation test and self-assessed their parking skills. We show that men park more accurately and especially faster than women. Performance is related to mental rotation skills and self-assessment in beginners, but only to self-assessment in more experienced drivers. We assume that, due to differential feedback, self-assessment incrementally replaces the controlling influence of mental rotation, as parking is trained with increasing experience. Results suggest that sex differences in spatial cognition persist in real-life situations, but that socio-psychological factors modulate the biological causes of sex differences.

  12. Pertussis toxin and adenylate cyclase toxin: key virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis and cell biology tools

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2010-01-01

    Pertussis toxin and adenylate cyclase toxin are two important virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, the bacterial cause of the respiratory disease pertussis or whooping cough. In addition to studies on the structure, function and role in pathogenesis of these two toxins, they are both used as cell biology tools for a variety of applications owing to their ability to enter mammalian cells, perform enzymatic activities and modify cell signaling events. In this article, recent data from the research literature that enhance our understanding of the nature of these two toxins, their role in the pathogenesis of B. pertussis infection and disease, particularly in modulating host immune responses, and their use as tools for other areas of research will be outlined. PMID:20210554

  13. [Tumor necrosis factor alfa in cardiovascular diseases: molecular biology and genetics].

    PubMed

    Fragoso Lona, José Manuel; Sierra Martínez, Mónica; Vargas Alarcón, Gilberto; Barrios Rodas, Angélica; Ramírez Bello, Julián

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major public health problem globally. In 1997, cardiovascular disease caused 41% of deaths in the United States. It has been reported that about 60 million people in the United States have some form of cardiovascular disease. These entities are chronic conditions initiated by a dysregulation of the immune response. One gene and its protein product -tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-α)- a powerful pleiotropic cytokine with multiple cellular functions, plays a role in the inflammation, initiation, development, susceptibility, severity, and response to treatment, etc. of coronary artery disease (CAD). The focus of the present review is to summarize recent evidence showing the biological role of TNF-α in the initiation and progression of endothelial dysfunction and complications of atherosclerosis, and as a genetic variation of TNF-α confer susceptibility, severity, and treatment response in CAD: ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and coronary restenosis.

  14. Cordyceps fungi as natural killers, new hopes for medicine and biological control factors.

    PubMed

    Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    The Cordyceps genus includes many species of fungi, most of which are endoparasitoids on arthropods.The distribution of these fungi is cosmopolitan, but many occur in regions such as Asia with a hot, humid climate. These pathogens of insect pests are promising candidates for use as biological control factors. Entomopathogenic fungi including the famous Cordyceps sinensis produce bioactive compounds. Lately Cordyceps sinensis was renamed Ophiocordyceps sinensis. This fungus has a long history as a medicinal fungus. It germinates in a living host, kills and mummifies the larva, and then grows from the body of the host. Is known in Tibet as the “winter worm, summer grass”,or “Caterpillar fungus” (Yartsa gunbu). Collecting Ophiocordyceps has become an important source of money for local households in Nepal. Ophiocordyceps sinensis is cultivated as an anamorph for its medicinal and pharmaceutical properties in an artificial medium on an industrial scale. Ophiocordyceps compounds have immunostimulating properties and antitumor activity.

  15. Prognostic factors, predictive markers and cancer biology: the triad for successful oral cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Monteiro de Oliveira Novaes, Jose Augusto; William, William N

    2016-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas represent a significant cancer burden worldwide. Unfortunately, chemoprevention strategies investigated to date have failed to produce an agent considered standard of care to prevent oral cancers. Nonetheless, recent advances in clinical trial design may streamline drug development in this setting. In this manuscript, we review some of these improvements, including risk prediction tools based on molecular markers that help select patients most suitable for chemoprevention. We also discuss the opportunities that novel preclinical models and modern molecular profiling techniques will bring to the prevention field in the near future, and propose a clinical trials framework that incorporates molecular prognostic factors, predictive markers and cancer biology as a roadmap to improve chemoprevention strategies for oral cancers.

  16. Effects of an Educational Experience Incorporating an Inventory of Factors Potentially Influencing Student Acceptance of Biological Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Jason R.; Alters, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This investigation provides an extensive review of scientific, religious, and otherwise non-scientific factors that may influence student acceptance of biological evolution. We also measure the extent to which students' levels of acceptance changed following an educational experience designed to address an inclusive inventory of factors identified…

  17. Effects of an Educational Experience Incorporating an Inventory of Factors Potentially Influencing Student Acceptance of Biological Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Jason R.; Alters, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This investigation provides an extensive review of scientific, religious, and otherwise non-scientific factors that may influence student acceptance of biological evolution. We also measure the extent to which students' levels of acceptance changed following an educational experience designed to address an inclusive inventory of factors identified…

  18. An efficient method for simultaneous isolation of biologically active transcription factors and DNA.

    PubMed

    Caruccio, L; Banerjee, R

    1999-11-19

    Transcription factors play a crucial role in gene regulation during different stages of eukaryotic development as well as in controlling various cellular disorders involving the immune system. In order to study the role of cellular DNAs and the effects of certain biologically active regulatory proteins, which can affect gene expression, we have developed a rapid and efficient method for preparing highly purified DNAs as well as nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, simultaneously. These DNAs and proteins can be effectively analyzed to determine their genetic integrity and binding motifs to specific DNA sequences, respectively. This protocol avoids the drastic use of mechanical shearing of cells, aggressive use of detergents or high speed ultracentrifugation steps, as well as facilitating the ease of collecting samples in a sequential and effective manner with minimal time lapse during processing. Such an approach permits the analysis of a large number of samples in a short time. The current technique uses a non-ionic detergent to isolate nuclei, and obtain the cytosolic extract, a low-ionic strength buffer to wash off the detergent and a high-salt buffer to extract nuclear proteins including transcription factors. The remainder of the cellular products are processed for DNA extraction. This method will be particularly useful to evaluate the time course effects of various cell signal transducing biological modifiers such as cytokines or mitogens, as well as drugs used in therapy, especially in infectious diseases and also in immunological or neoplastic disorders, with minimal physical contact to the laboratory personnel. This rapid DNA and protein isolation method can be widely used in various systems to analyze the modulation of DNA characteristics and transcriptionally active proteins as biomarkers in different human diseases.

  19. Factors in seventh grade academics associated with performance levels on the tenth grade biology end of course test in selected middle and high schools in northwest Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jennifer Henry

    This study attempted to identify factors in seventh grade academics that are associated with overall success in tenth grade biology. The study addressed the following research questions: Are there significant differences in performance levels in seventh grade Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) scores in science, math, reading, and language arts associated with performance categories in tenth grade biology End of Course Test (EOCT) and the following demographic variables : gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability category, and English language proficiency level? Is there a relationship among the categorical variables on the tenth grade biology EOCT and the same five demographic variables? Retrospective causal comparative research was used on a representative sample from the middle schools in three North Georgia counties who took the four CRCTs in the 2006-2007 school year, and took the biology EOCT in the 2009-2010 school year. Chi square was used to determine the relationships of the various demographic variables on three biology EOCT performance categories. Twoway ANOVA determined relationships between the seventh grade CRCT scores of students in the various demographic groups and their performance levels on the biology EOCT. Students' performance levels on the biology EOCT matched their performance levels on the seventh grade CRCTs consistently. Females performed better than males on all seventh grade CRCTs. Black and Hispanic students did worse than White and Asian/Asian Indian students on the math CRCT. Students living in poverty did worse on reading and language arts CRCTs than students who were better off. Special education students did worse on science, reading, and language arts CRCTs than students not receiving special education services. English language learners did worse than native English speakers on all seventh grade CRCTs. These findings suggest that remedial measures may be taken in the seventh grade that could impact

  20. Climatic, tectonic, and biological factors affecting the oxidation state of the atmosphere and oceans: Implications for Phanerozoic O2 evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, K.; Tajika, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's atmosphere and oceans have seen fundamental changes in its oxidation state in response to the climatic, tectonic and geochemical variations. Over the past decade, several geochemical proxies have led to significant progress in understanding the paleredox states of ancient oceans. However, a quantitative interpretation of these data for atmospheric O2 levels remain unclear because the relationship between atmospheric O2 levels (pO2) and oceanic redox state depends on several environmental factors, such as terrestrial weathering rate, sea-level stands, and sinking rate of particulate organic matter (POM) in the water column and so on. It is widely thought that the redox-dependent P cycling also plays a crucial role in regulating pO2 because it acts as a negative feedback on a geological timescale. It is important that strength of this feedback for a given pO2 is also modulated by environmental factors, affecting not only O2 levels at steady state but also its susceptibility to environmental changes. In this study, a quantitative role of environmental factors in the oxidation state of Earth's surface environment is evaluated with an oceanic biogeochemical cycle model (CANOPS) coupled with global C cycle model, which enables us to understand the ancient CO2 and O2 evolution. Our results demonstrate that atmospheric O2 level at steady state is affected by CO2 input flux from Earth's interior via changes in biogeochemical cycles, but its response is modulated by several internal factors such as shelf area and POM sinking rate. We also found that early Paleozoic atmospheric O2 levels before the advent of land plant would be determined so that oceans may locate at the "edge of anoxia (EoA)" where the redox-dependency of marine P cycle plays a crucial role in regulating O2 cycle, and that POM sinking rate has a great impact on the EoA. Our findings provide insights into the O2 cycle over the Phanerozoic in response to the climatic and tectonic variations and

  1. Correlation between mammographic and sonographic findings and prognostic factors in patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Kim, H H; Huh, M O; Kim, M J; Yi, A; Kim, H; Son, B H; Ahn, S H

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate sonographic and mammographic findings with prognostic factors in patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer. Sonographic and mammographic findings in 710 consecutive patients (age range 21-81 years; mean age 49 years) with 715 node-negative invasive breast cancers were retrospectively evaluated. Pathology reports relating to tumour size, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), extensive intraductal component (EIC), oestrogen receptor (ER) status and HER-2/neu status were reviewed and correlated with the imaging findings. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression analysis and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). On mammography, non-spiculated masses with calcifications were associated with all poor prognostic factors: high histological grade, positive LVI, EIC, HER-2/neu status and negative ER. Other lesions were associated with none of these poor prognostic factors. Hyperdense masses on mammography, the presence of mixed echogenicity, posterior enhancement, calcifications in-or-out of masses and diffusely increased vascularity on sonography were associated with high histological grade and negative ER. Associated calcifications on both mammograms and sonograms were correlated with EIC and HER-2/neu overexpression. The ICC value for the disease extent was 0.60 on mammography and 0.70 on sonography. Several sonographic and mammographic features can have a prognostic value in the subsequent treatment of patients with node-negative invasive breast cancer. Radiologists should pay more attention to masses that are associated with calcifications because on both mammography and sonography associated calcifications were predictors of positive EIC and HER-2/neu overexpression.

  2. Biological characterization of human fibroblast-derived mitogenic factors for human melanocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Imokawa, G; Yada, Y; Morisaki, N; Kimura, M

    1998-01-01

    To clarify the paracrine linkage between human fibroblasts and melanocytes in cutaneous pigmentation, we studied the effects of human fibroblast-derived factors on the proliferation of human melanocytes. In medium conditioned for 4 days with human fibroblast culture, factors were produced that markedly stimulated DNA synthesis of human melanocytes. The stimulatory effect was higher in medium conditioned with fibroblasts from aged skin than in medium conditioned with fibroblasts from young skin, and was interrupted by inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, such as tyrphostin, genistein and herbimycin, but not by inhibitors of protein kinases C and A, such as H-7 and phloretin. The conditioned medium was also capable of activating mitogen-activated protein kinase of human melanocytes, with old fibroblasts being more effective than young ones. Analysis of factors released into the conditioned medium revealed that levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) were increased in old-fibroblast-conditioned medium compared with young-fibroblast-conditioned medium. In contrast, levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were similar in both media. When the conditioned medium was treated with HGF antibody with or without SCF antibody, the increase in DNA synthesis by human melanocytes was decreased to 20% of the elevated level, whereas antibodies to bFGF had no effect. Analysis of the medium conditioned for 4 days after cytokine application demonstrated that, of the cytokines tested, interleukin 1alpha and tumour necrosis factor alpha are highly effective in stimulating HGF secretion by old fibroblasts. HGF and SCF, but not bFGF, were markedly increased in culture medium in the presence of IL-1alpha, and this stimulatory effect was confined to young human fibroblasts. These findings suggest that SCF and HGF derived from human fibroblasts may play a part in regulating cutaneous pigmentation during inflammation and aging. PMID:9494091

  3. Nutritional, socioeconomic, and reproductive factors in relation to female breast cancer mortality: findings from a cross-national study.

    PubMed

    Hebert, J R; Rosen, A

    1996-01-01

    Using data from 66 countries, we conducted an international comparison study to identify the most important predictors of female breast cancer mortality rates. This study was unique in that it included data on per capita tobacco disappearance, alcohol consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), reproductive factors, and a wide array of nutritional data. Results of correlation and single independent-variable linear regression models indicated that breast cancer mortality was most strongly associated with dietary factors typically associated with affluence, especially animal products. The strongest negative (i.e., protective) associations were with those variables related to increased fertility and population growth. A multiple linear regression that accounted for all important predictors simultaneously explained 91% of the variability in mortality rates across these countries. This model indicated a strong positive association between breast cancer mortality and calories from animal sources. Fish and cereal products as well as annual percentage growth in population appeared to exert protective effects. Despite the limitations of this type of analysis, the observed effect of high meat and animal product consumption, the major contributor to variability in dietary fat, as well as the protective effect of increased fertility are consistent with the known biology of breast cancer. The protective effect of fish and cereal consumption that we observed will require further study.

  4. Factors Associated with Self-Injurious Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Findings from Two Large National Samples.

    PubMed

    Soke, G N; Rosenberg, S A; Hamman, R F; Fingerlin, T; Rosenberg, C R; Carpenter, L; Lee, L C; Giarelli, E; Wiggins, L D; Durkin, M S; Reynolds, A; DiGuiseppi, C

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we explored potential associations among self-injurious behaviors (SIB) and a diverse group of protective and risk factors in children with autism spectrum disorder from two databases: Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and the Autism Speaks-Autism Treatment Network (AS-ATN). The presence of SIB was determined from children's records in ADDM and a parent questionnaire in AS-ATN. We used multiple imputation to account for missing data and a non-linear mixed model with site as a random effect to test for associations. Despite differences between the two databases, similar associations were found; SIB were associated with developmental, behavioral, and somatic factors. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to possible etiology, future longitudinal studies, and clinical practice.

  5. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in cancer: novel findings from the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study (CATS).

    PubMed

    Königsbrügge, Oliver; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2014-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs frequently in patients with cancer and contributes to elevated morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for the occurrence of VTE events in patients with cancer have been investigated in numerous clinical studies. For now more than 10 years, the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study (CATS) has focused on the identification of parameters predictive of future VTE occurrence. CATS has contributed to new findings, which may help identify patients at high risk of developing VTE, by means of biomarkers (such as D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1+2, soluble P-selectin, platelet count, coagulation factor VIII activity, thrombin generation potential, etc.). The association of tissue factor bearing microparticles and the mean platelet volume with the risk of VTE was also elaborately investigated in the framework of CATS. More recently CATS has researched clinical and clinicopathologic parameters which contribute to identification of patients at risk of VTE. The type of cancer is one of the most important risk factor for VTE occurrence. Also the stage of cancer and the histological grade of a tumor have been found to be associated with the occurrence of cancer-related VTE. In further investigations, venous diseases including a history of previous VTE, a history of superficial thrombophlebitis and the presence of varicose veins, have been associated with the risk of VTE in CATS.

  6. Clinical and biological factors affecting response to radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Homer, J J; Slevin, N J; Musgrove, B T; Sloan, P; Price, P; West, C M L

    2007-10-01

    The main aim of this article was to review the clinical and biological factors that have been shown to influence the response of the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to primary radiotherapy and briefly discuss how some of these factors could be exploited to improve outcome. Medline based search covering 1982-2006 to identify the HNSCC literature where the effect of clinical and biological factors on locoregional control and overall survival were investigated. Clinical factors are routinely used in management decisions. Nevertheless, identically staged tumours receiving the same treatment may have different outcomes. Biological factors such as hypoxia, proliferation and radio-sensitivity play an important role in radiation response. However, these are not currently used in practise because tests that are clinically reliable and feasible are not available. High-quality translational research will allow us to develop biological tests that can be used in routine clinical practise to tailor individual treatment, with the ability to improve patient outcome further by modifying the underlying tumour biology.

  7. Modeling post-fledging survival of lark buntings in response to ecological and biological factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yackel Adams, A.A.; Skagen, S.K.; Savidge, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the influences of several ecological, biological, and methodological factors on post-fledging survival of a shortgrass prairie bird, the Lark Bunting (Calamospiza melanocorys). We estimated daily post-fledging survival (n = 206, 82 broods) using radiotelemetry and color bands to track fledglings. Daily survival probabilities were best explained by drought intensity, time in season (quadratic trend), ages a??3 d post-fledging, and rank given drought intensity. Drought intensity had a strong negative effect on survival. Rank was an important predictor of fledgling survival only during the severe drought of 2002 when the smallest fledglings had lower survival. Recently fledged young (ages a??3 d post-fledging) undergoing the transition from nest to surrounding habitat experienced markedly lower survival, demonstrating the vulnerable nature of this time period. Survival was greater in mid and late season than early season, corresponding to our assumptions of food availability. Neither mark type nor sex of attending parent influenced survival. The model-averaged product of the 22-d survival calculated using mean rank and median value of time in season was 0.360 A? 0.08 in 2001 and 0.276 A? 0.08 in 2002. Survival estimates that account for age, condition of young, ecological conditions, and other factors are important for parameterization of realistic population models. Biologists using population growth models to elucidate mechanisms of population declines should attempt to estimate species-specific of post-fledging survival rather than use generalized estimates.

  8. Combined physical, chemical and biological factors shape Alexandrium ostenfeldii blooms in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Karen M; Domis, Lisette N de Senerpont; Wohlrab, Sylke; Krock, Bernd; John, Uwe; van Scheppingen, Yvonne; van Donk, Ellen; Van de Waal, Dedmer B

    2017-03-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are globally expanding, compromising water quality worldwide. HAB dynamics are determined by a complex interplay of abiotic and biotic factors, and their emergence has often been linked to eutrophication, and more recently to climate change. The dinoflagellate Alexandrium is one of the most widespread HAB genera and its success is based on key functional traits like allelopathy, mixotrophy, cyst formation and nutrient retrieval migrations. Since 2012, dense Alexandrium ostenfeldii blooms (up to 4500cellsmL(-1)) have recurred annually in a creek located in the southwest of the Netherlands, an area characterized by intense agriculture and aquaculture. We investigated how physical, chemical and biological factors influenced A. ostenfeldii bloom dynamics over three consecutive years (2013-2015). Overall, we found a decrease in the magnitude of the bloom over the years that could largely be linked to changing weather conditions during summer. More specifically, low salinities due to excessive rainfall and increased wind speed corresponded to a delayed A. ostenfeldii bloom with reduced population densities in 2015. Within each year, highest population densities generally corresponded to high temperatures, low DIN:DIP ratios and low grazer densities. Together, our results demonstrate an important role of nutrient availability, absence of grazing, and particularly of the physical environment on the magnitude and duration of A. ostenfeldii blooms. Our results suggest that predicted changes in the physical environment may enhance bloom development in future coastal waters and embayments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-11-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas the effect of NGF was not influenced. 3 An oxidized NGF-derivative without biological activity did not cause a shape change reaction, neither did epidermal growth factor. 4 Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and pretreatment of the platelets with 3% butanol, which counteract the shape changes caused by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate, also antagonized those induced by NGF and SP. Neither heparin nor methysergide, an antagonist of 5-HT-receptors, influenced the shape change induced by NGF or SP. The action of NGF was also antagonized by a specific antibody to NGF. 5 Thymopoietin, like the basic polypeptide polyornithine (mol. wt. 40,000) was not antagonized by PGE1 and butanol. Heparin, which counteracted the effect of polyornithine, did not influence that of thymopoietin. 6 In conclusion, different modes of action are involved in the shape change of blood platelets induced by polypeptides and proteins. SP and NGF may act by stimulating specific membrane receptors.

  10. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT). PMID:10704074

  11. Influence of Biological Factors on Connectivity Patterns for Concholepas concholepas (loco) in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Garavelli, Lysel; Colas, François; Verley, Philippe; Kaplan, David Michael; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Lett, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In marine benthic ecosystems, larval connectivity is a major process influencing the maintenance and distribution of invertebrate populations. Larval connectivity is a complex process to study as it is determined by several interacting factors. Here we use an individual-based, biophysical model, to disentangle the effects of such factors, namely larval vertical migration, larval growth, larval mortality, adults fecundity, and habitat availability, for the marine gastropod Concholepas concholepas (loco) in Chile. Lower transport success and higher dispersal distances are observed including larval vertical migration in the model. We find an overall decrease in larval transport success to settlement areas from northern to southern Chile. This spatial gradient results from the combination of current direction and intensity, seawater temperature, and available habitat. From our simulated connectivity patterns we then identify subpopulations of loco along the Chilean coast, which could serve as a basis for spatial management of this resource in the future. PMID:26751574

  12. Influence of Biological Factors on Connectivity Patterns for Concholepas concholepas (loco) in Chile.

    PubMed

    Garavelli, Lysel; Colas, François; Verley, Philippe; Kaplan, David Michael; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Lett, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In marine benthic ecosystems, larval connectivity is a major process influencing the maintenance and distribution of invertebrate populations. Larval connectivity is a complex process to study as it is determined by several interacting factors. Here we use an individual-based, biophysical model, to disentangle the effects of such factors, namely larval vertical migration, larval growth, larval mortality, adults fecundity, and habitat availability, for the marine gastropod Concholepas concholepas (loco) in Chile. Lower transport success and higher dispersal distances are observed including larval vertical migration in the model. We find an overall decrease in larval transport success to settlement areas from northern to southern Chile. This spatial gradient results from the combination of current direction and intensity, seawater temperature, and available habitat. From our simulated connectivity patterns we then identify subpopulations of loco along the Chilean coast, which could serve as a basis for spatial management of this resource in the future.

  13. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT).

  14. Cosmetics alter biologically-based factors of beauty: evidence from facial contrast.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alex L; Russell, Richard; Ward, Robert

    2015-02-28

    The use of cosmetics by women seems to consistently increase their attractiveness. What factors of attractiveness do cosmetics alter to achieve this? Facial contrast is a known cue to sexual dimorphism and youth, and cosmetics exaggerate sexual dimorphisms in facial contrast. Here, we demonstrate that the luminance contrast pattern of the eyes and eyebrows is consistently sexually dimorphic across a large sample of faces, with females possessing lower brow contrasts than males, and greater eye contrast than males. Red-green and yellow-blue color contrasts were not found to differ consistently between the sexes. We also show that women use cosmetics not only to exaggerate sexual dimorphisms of brow and eye contrasts, but also to increase contrasts that decline with age. These findings refine the notion of facial contrast, and demonstrate how cosmetics can increase attractiveness by manipulating factors of beauty associated with facial contrast.

  15. [Chemoanalytical studies in the hygienic safety assessment of the influence of biological factors on the population's health].

    PubMed

    Malysheva, A G; Rastiannikov, E G; Ushakov, D I

    2010-01-01

    Chromatography-mass spectrometric identification of chemical pollutants released into the ambient air and water prior to and after microbiotic purification facilities, as well as those contained in the sludge has indicated a risk from underestimation of transformation and biotransformation products resulting from the influence of biological factors. Methods for physicochemical analysis have demonstrated to be of importance for adequate hygienic evaluation of the safety and efficiency of novel technologies for biological purification of atmospheric emissions and industrial and household sewage.

  16. [Scientific-and-methodic bases of the study, assessment, and regulation of biological factors in environmental hygiene].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the scientific-and-methodic problems in the study, assessment, and regulation of biological factors in various environmental objects. It describes the main lines and results of basic and applied studies of the impact of biological (bacterial, viral, parasitic, and fungal) environmental contaminations on the population's health. The methodological aspects in the regulation of biological contamination standards (direct sanitary indicators) for various environments (water, air, soil, habitats) and the scientific-and-methodic issues of prophylactic actions are considered to assure human epidemic safety.

  17. Childbirth as a biological model for stress? Associations with endocrine and obstetric factors.

    PubMed

    Bergant, A M; Kirchler, H; Heim, K; Daxenbichler, G; Herold, M; Schröcksnadel, H

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were to measure corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), corticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol before, during and after delivery searching for an endocrine intercorrelation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and to correlate these findings with obstetrical variables. Blood was sampled from 50 women with singleton pregnancies at term without uterine contractions, during delivery (after full cervical dilatation) and on the 4th postnatal day. Hormones were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The correlation between obstetric variables, sociodemographic and endocrine data were evaluated using the Spearman rank coefficient. Group comparisons for continuous variables were calculated using the Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Maternal plasma ACTH and cortisol increased significantly during labor, declining toward the 4th postnatal day (p < 0.001) and showing a significant intercorrelation (p < 0.01). Compared to women without uterine contractions CRH rose during labor (p < 0.05) and decreased rapidly to the 4th postnatal day (p < 0.001). No correlations between CRH and ACTH or cortisol were observed. None of the obstetrical variables (parity, newborn's weight, duration of delivery) revealed any significant correlation with ACTH. Analgetic medication (pethidine hydrochloride) was not able to influence the endocrine response to labor stress. Stressful experience during childbirth has an impact on endocrine response. However, this is not fully evident along the HPA axis in a simple biological model with monocausal dependencies. This 'biological stress model' is not sensitive enough to detect different childbirth conditions and the hormones in the maternal compartment have partially fetal (placental) origin.

  18. Factoring genetic determinism: An analysis of sociobiological discourse and debate and their presentations in biology textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schifellite, Carmen James

    This thesis is about Sociobiology, especially human sociobiological discourse, and its emergence as a paradigm especially through the formulations of E. O. Wilson. It asks two distinct and related questions. The first question asks why and how has the general project of Wilsonian or determinist human sociobiology has maintained its appeal and continued to garner popularity and support despite the many cogent and detailed critiques. The second question, covered in part two of this thesis, asks how the sociobiological controversy is presented in three Biology textbooks. Part one of this work examines the development of human sociobiology and its related disciplines and the debates that have arisen around this paradigm. It chronicles how this Wilsonian human sociobiological discourse constructs its legitimacy, the major issues critics have raised and recent developments in human sociobiology and related fields. It also suggests modified epistemological positions and avenues of critique. As such, this work utilizes theory developed within utilizes theory developed within science studies, hegemony studies, discourse theory, textual analysis, and science education. Part Two examines three textbooks used in Ontario Academic Courses (OAC's) in Biology in high school in grade thirteen in Ontario. These texts are similar if not identical to textbooks used in introductory biology courses in universities in North America. This textual analysis, examines how the textbooks portray sociobiology and the related fields of Genetics, Evolutionary theory and the Nature of Science itself. This analysis provides a way both to gauge the influence of Wilsonian human and non-human sociobiological discourse and to gauge the ways in which this controversial issue is handled by the texts. This analysis finds that all three textbooks fail to use sociobiology as an example of a scientific controversy to engage students in a discussion of this topic. They also fail to engage students in any of

  19. Research on Influencing Factors of Biological Filtration Tower Treating Toluene Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Changping; Cao, Ziqing; Lu, Yuqi; Du, Linggai

    2017-05-01

    Through the orthogonal experimental design, the optimal combination of Triton X-100, nitrogen source, Fe2+, temperature, concentration of antibiotics, pH and spray quantity was determined with surfactants, nitrogen and iron elements as additive, by which the key influencing factors were determined. In the test, the removal efficiency of the second groups was higher than that of the eighth groups, which were 89% and 87%, respectively. The best combination of a group of removal was as follows: nitrogen source concentration was 2 g ·L-1, antibiotic concentration was 300 U·mL-1, the concentration of Triton X-100 was 0.05 mL·L-1, Fe2+ concentration was 14 mL·L-1, pH was 7, the temperature was 34°C, spray amount was 6 L ·h-1. The antibiotic concentration was the most important factor on the removal efficiency of the toluene. The concentration of gas in each layer of toluene was detected; the curve of the outlet concentration in the optimal combination and the average state was obtained. The removal efficiency of the optimal combination was much better than the average, and it was found that the removal rate decreased with the increase of the height of the filling layer. The change of oxygen content in each layer was detected which was no significant change. It showed that oxygen was not the limiting factor of the removal of toluene by microorganisms. Keywords: surfactants; biological filtration tower; toluene; orthogonal test

  20. Biological activity in Technosols as a key factor of their structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watteau, Françoise; Villemin, Geneviève; Bouchard, Adeline; Monserié, Marie-France; Séré, Geoffroy; Schwartz, Christophe; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    )availability. HAP also contributed to the aggregation of technogenic constituents in Technosol 1. The biological activity generated by the presence of exogenous organic matter is thus in short (0-2 years) and mean (30 years) terms, a key factor of the structuration and by there of the pedogenesis of Technosols.

  1. Keep it simple: vascular risk factors and focal exam findings correctly identify posterior circulation ischemia in "dizzy" patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Karen; Schneider, Andrea L C; Llinas, Rafael H; Marsh, Elisabeth B

    2016-09-13

    Dizziness is a common chief complaint of patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED). Physicians must quickly and accurately identify patients whose etiology is most likely ischemia. Additional tools are available, but often require further training (vestibular testing) or are costly and not always readily available (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). This study evaluates the ability of a routine history and simple physical examination to correctly identify dizzy patients with posterior circulation ischemia, and the added utility of CT angiography (CTA). We performed a retrospective analysis of all individuals presenting to the ED with a reported chief complaint of dizziness. Neurology was consulted and CTA ordered at the discretion of the ED provider. Demographic, medical, and radiographic variables were evaluated along with final diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and ROC analysis were used to determine factors associated with ischemia, the sensitivity of vascular risk factors and focal exam findings in predicting ischemia, and the additional benefit, if any, of CTA. One thousand two-hundred sixteen individuals meeting inclusion criteria presented to the ED over a 2 year period and were included in analysis. One hundred (8.2 %) were diagnosed with posterior circulation ischemia. For the entire cohort, age (OR 1.4 per 10 years, p < 0.0001), systolic blood pressure (OR 1.3 per 10 mmHg, p < 0.0001), and focal exam findings (OR 28.69, p < 0.0001) were most significantly associated with ischemia in multivariable modeling. When age, race, sex, presence of vascular risk factors, and focal neurologic findings were entered into ROC analysis, the AUC for correctly identifying posterior circulation ischemia was 0.90. In the subset of patients who underwent CTA (n = 87), the AUC did not improve (0.78 with and without CTA in ROC analysis, p = 0.52). A vascular risk assessment and neurological examination are adequate for risk

  2. Prediction of Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Bezoars Using Risk Factor Categories on Multidetector Computed Tomographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Lian-qin; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to detect factors associated with small bowel obstruction (SBO) caused by bezoars on multidetector computed tomographic findings. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 61 patients who had bezoars in the small bowels on MDCT. The patients were divided into SBO patients group and non-SBO patients group. The mean values of the diameter, volume, and CT attenuation as well as location and characteristics of the bezoars were compared between the two groups. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine factors associated with SBO. Results. There were 32 patients (52.5%) in the SBO group and 29 patients (47.5%) in the non-SBO group. The bezoars in the SBO group had greater values of each mean diameter and mean volume than those in the non-SBO group (3.2 ± 0.5 cm versus 1.6 ± 0.7 cm, P < 0.0001, 14.9 ± 6.4 cm3 versus 2.5 ± 2.7 cm3, P < 0.0001, resp.) and had a lower CT attenuation than the non-SBO group (55.5 ± 23.4 versus 173.0 ± 68.0, P < 0.0001). The SBO group had higher prevalence of phytobezoar appearance (75.0% versus 10.3%, P < 0.0001). Major diameters of bezoar and phytobezoar were significant independent risk factors associated with SBO (odds ratio = 36.09, 8.26, resp., and P = 0.0004, 0.044, resp.). Conclusions. Major diameter of bezoar or phytobezoar is a potential risk factor associated with SBO. PMID:27403434

  3. Biological and physical factors controlling aggregate stability under different climatic conditions in Southern Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángel Gabarrón-Galeote, Miguel; Damián Ruiz-Sinoga, Jose; Francisco Martinez-Murillo, Juan; Lavee, Hanoch

    2013-04-01

    Soil aggregation is a key factor determining the soil structure. The presence of stable aggregates is essential to maintain a good soil structure, that in turn plays an important role in sustaining agricultural productivity and preserving environmental quality. A wide range of physical and biological soil components are involved in the aggregate formation and stabilization, namely clay mineral content; the quantity and quality of organic matter, that can be derived from plants, fungal hyphae, microorganism and soil animals; and the soil water content. Climatic conditions, through their effect on soil water content, vegetation cover and organic matter content, are supposed to affect soil aggregation. Thus the main objective of this research is to analyse the effect of organic matter, clay content and soil water content on aggregate stability along a climatic transect in Southern Spain. This study was conducted in four catchments along a pluviometric gradient in the South of Spain (rainfall depth decreases from west to east from more than 1000 mm year-1 to less than 300 mm year-1) and was based on a methodology approximating the climatic gradient in Mediterranean conditions. The selected sites shared similar conditions of geology, topography and soil use, which allowed making comparisons among them and relating the differences to the pluviometric conditions. In February 2007, 250 disturbed and undisturbed samples from the first 5cm of the soil were collected along the transect. We measured the aggregate stability, organic matter, clay content and bulk density of every sample. In the field we measured rainfall, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, solar radiation, potential evapotranspiration, soil water content, vegetation cover and presence of litter. Our results suggest that aggregate stability is a property determined by a great number of highly variable factors, which can make extremely difficult to predict its behavior taking in

  4. The treatment of parental height as a biological factor in studies of birth weight and childhood growth

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, N; Logan, S

    2002-01-01

    Parental height is frequently treated as a biological variable in studies of birth weight and childhood growth. Elimination of social variables from multivariate models including parental height as a biological variable leads researchers to conclude that social factors have no independent effect on the outcome. This paper challenges the treatment of parental height as a biological variable, drawing on extensive evidence for the determination of adult height through a complex interaction of genetic and social factors. The paper firstly seeks to establish the importance of social factors in the determination of height. The methodological problems associated with treatment of parental height as a purely biological variable are then discussed, illustrated by data from published studies and by analysis of data from the 1958 National Childhood Development Study (NCDS). The paper concludes that a framework for studying pathways to pregnancy and childhood outcomes needs to take account of the complexity of the relation between genetic and social factors and be able to account for the effects of multiple risk factors acting cumulatively across time and across generations. Illustrations of these approaches are given using NCDS data. PMID:12193422

  5. The influence of biological factors on students' sexual behaviour at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mutinta, Given; Govender, Kaymarlin; George, Gavin; Gow, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Studies in South African universities reveal that the prevalence of sexual risk behaviour is very high, putting many students at high risk of HIV infection. This study explored the biological influences on students' sexual taking behaviour at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A qualitative approach was used, comprising a total of 80 in-depth interviews and 4 focus group discussions. These were conducted between late 2008 and early 2010. The research had equal representation of male and female students, different races, two campuses and different levels of study. Factors associated with students' sexual behaviour were identified. The data were analysed using thematic analysis, and the themes identified form the basis for discussion in this paper. Students' sexual behaviour was positively associated with the influence of a range of biological factors. Factors such as age, judgement of the health of the partner by looking at appearances, pursuit of physical beauty, sexual debut, sexual fit, and search for sexual pleasure encouraged students to engage in sexual behaviour. Most students are young and lack experience in assessing the influence of biological factors on their sexual behaviours, and need education on biological factors. This poses a big challenge to controlling students' sexual behaviour, especially if HIV and sexually transmitted diseases prevention interventions are to be successful.

  6. Acculturation, immigration status and cardiovascular risk factors among Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg: findings from ORISCAV-LUX study.

    PubMed

    Alkerwi, Ala'a; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Pagny, Sybil; Beissel, Jean; Delagardelle, Charles; Lair, Marie-Lise

    2012-10-11

    to second generation (P=0.028). Although we observed a tendency of lower risk with higher acculturation, none of the acculturation markers, both individually and taken together as a score, was statistically significant after controlling for age and gender. Compared to Luxembourgers, odds of overweight/obesity were significantly higher among Portuguese immigrants, in unadjusted model 1 (P=0.043), in age and gender-adjusted model 2 (P<0.0001), in socioeconomic status adjusted model 3 (P= 0.01), in physical activity adjusted model 4 (P=0.007). However, this difference was attenuated and statistically disappeared after controlling for dietary factors (P=0.09). These findings address a lack of heterogeneity between Portuguese immigrants and Luxembourgers regarding hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, and current cigarette smoking. However, Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg were more likely to be overweight/obese than Luxembourgers participants. This risk may be explained by different dietary practice. An in-depth comparative assessment of dietary habits of Luxembourgers and Portuguese immigrants is warranted.

  7. 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia: summary of main findings and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J J; Andrade, J; Bogod, D G; Hitchman, J M; Jonker, W R; Lucas, N; Mackay, J H; Nimmo, A F; O'Connor, K; O'Sullivan, E P; Paul, R G; Palmer, J H M G; Plaat, F; Radcliffe, J J; Sury, M R J; Torevell, H E; Wang, M; Hainsworth, J; Cook, T M

    2014-10-01

    We present the main findings of the 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia (AAGA). Incidences were estimated using reports of accidental awareness as the numerator, and a parallel national anaesthetic activity survey to provide denominator data. The incidence of certain/probable and possible accidental awareness cases was ~1:19,600 anaesthetics (95% confidence interval 1:16,700-23,450). However, there was considerable variation across subtypes of techniques or subspecialities. The incidence with neuromuscular block (NMB) was ~1:8200 (1:7030-9700), and without, it was ~1:135,900 (1:78,600-299,000). The cases of AAGA reported to NAP5 were overwhelmingly cases of unintended awareness during NMB. The incidence of accidental awareness during Caesarean section was ~1:670 (1:380-1300). Two-thirds (82, 66%) of cases of accidental awareness experiences arose in the dynamic phases of anaesthesia, namely induction of and emergence from anaesthesia. During induction of anaesthesia, contributory factors included: use of thiopental, rapid sequence induction, obesity, difficult airway management, NMB, and interruptions of anaesthetic delivery during movement from anaesthetic room to theatre. During emergence from anaesthesia, residual paralysis was perceived by patients as accidental awareness, and commonly related to a failure to ensure full return of motor capacity. One-third (43, 33%) of accidental awareness events arose during the maintenance phase of anaesthesia, mostly due to problems at induction or towards the end of anaesthesia. Factors increasing the risk of accidental awareness included: female sex, age (younger adults, but not children), obesity, anaesthetist seniority (junior trainees), previous awareness, out-of-hours operating, emergencies, type of surgery (obstetric, cardiac, thoracic), and use of NMB. The following factors were not risk factors for accidental awareness: ASA physical status, race, and use or omission

  8. Factors influencing legacy pollutant accumulation in alpine osprey: biology, topography, or melting glaciers?

    PubMed

    Elliott, John E; Levac, Joshua; Guigueno, Mélanie F; Shaw, D Patrick; Wayland, Mark; Morrissey, Christy A; Muir, Derek C G; Elliott, Kyle H

    2012-09-04

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) can be transported long distances and deposited into alpine environments via cold trapping and snow scavenging processes. Here we examined biotic and abiotic factors determining contaminant variability of wildlife in alpine ecosystems. We measured POPs in eggs and plasma of an apex predator, the osprey (Pandion haliaetus) breeding in 15 mountainous watersheds across a broad latitudinal, longitudinal and altitudinal range in western Canada. After accounting for proximate biotic factors such as trophic level (δ(15)N) and carbon source (δ(13)C), variability in contaminant concentrations, including ΣDDT (sum of trichlorodiphenylethane-related compounds), toxaphene, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), total chlordane, and ΣPCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) in osprey tissues was explained by interactions among relative size of watersheds, water bodies, elevation, and glacial input. ΣDDT in nestling plasma, for example, decreased with lake elevation, probably as a result of local past inputs from agricultural or public health usage at lower altitude sites. In contrast, toxaphene, never used as an insecticide in western Canada, increased with elevation and year-round snow and ice cover in both plasma and eggs, indicating long-range atmospheric sources as dominant for toxaphene. Lower chlorinated PCBs in plasma tended to decrease with elevation and ice cover consistent with published data and model outcomes. Temporal trends of POPs in osprey eggs are coincident with some modeled predictions of release from melting glaciers due to climate change. Currently we suggest that contaminants largely are released through annual snowpack melt and deposited in large lower elevation lakes, or some smaller lakes with poor drainage. Our study highlights the importance of understanding how biological processes integrate physical when studying the environmental chemistry of wildlife.

  9. HIF-1α up-regulation is associated with adverse clinicopathological and biological factors in neuroblastomas.

    PubMed

    Dungwa, Josiah V; Hunt, Linda P; Ramani, Pramila

    2012-09-01

    To study the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in clinical neuroblastoma (NB) samples and its association with the clinicopathological features, biological features and survival of NB patients. Immunohistochemistry indicated that elevated HIF-1α expression was present in 30 of 90 (33%) NBs. This expression was correlated significantly and positively with higher clinical stage (P = 0.002), ≥18 months of age at presentation (P = 0.020), high-risk group (P = 0.005), unfavourable pathology (P = 0.002), MYCN amplification (P < 0.001), 1p deletion (P = 0.004) and 17q gain (P = 0.002). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that total HIF-1α protein was significantly higher in NBs of patients with all examined adverse prognostic factors except for age. Univariate survival analysis revealed that higher-than-median HIF-1α total protein levels were associated significantly with a decrease in event-free survival (EFS) (P = 0.017), but not in overall survival (OS) (P = 0.12). HIF-1α immunoexpression by ≥10% of tumour cells was associated significantly with decreased OS and EFS (P = 0.002 and P = 0.004, respectively), but not in multivariate analysis after adjusting for the high-risk group (P = 0.16 and P = 0.19, respectively). HIF-1α was increased significantly in patients with NB associated with unfavourable characteristics. HIF-1α is a prognostic indicator of poor OS and EFS and defines subgroups of NBs with aggressive clinical behaviour. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Environmental factors influencing biological rhythms in newborns: From neonatal intensive care units to home.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Clarissa; Menna-Barreto, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Photic and non-photic environmental factors are suggested to modulate the development of circadian rhythms in infants. Our aim is to evaluate the development of biological rhythms (circadian or ultradian) in newborns in transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) to home and along the first 6 months of life, to identify masking and entraining environment factors along development. Ten newborns were evaluated in their last week inside the NICU and in the first week after being delivered home; 6 babies were also followed until 6 months of corrected age. Activity, recorded with actimeters, wrist temperature and observed sleep and feeding behavior were recorded continuously along their last week inside the NICU and in the first week at home and also until 6 months of corrected age for the subjects who remained in the study. Sleep/wake and activity/rest cycle showed ultradian patterns and the sleep/wake was strongly influenced by the 3 h feeding schedule inside the NICU, while wrist temperature showed a circadian pattern that seemed no to be affected by environmental cycles. A circadian rhythm emerges for sleep/wake behavior in the first week at home, whereas the 3 h period vanishes. Both activity/rest and wrist temperature presented a sudden increase in the contribution of the circadian component immediately after babies were delivered home, also suggesting a masking effect of the NICU environment. We found a positive correlation of postconceptional age and the increase in the daily component of activity and temperature along the following 6 months, while feeding behavior became arrhythmic.

  11. Serum is an indispensable factor in the maintenance of the biological characteristics of sweat gland cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing; Deng, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Yun-Liang; Zhen, Yun-Fang; Li, Fang; Chen, Rui-Hua; Liang, Han-Si; Zhang, Feng; Qin, Ming-De; Zhang, Xue-Guang

    2017-09-01

    The tolerance of sweat gland cells for in vitro amplification and subcultivation is low as they are somatic cells. The present study aimed to formulate an optimal medium for the culture of human eccrine sweat gland cells (HESGCs) and to establish a method for induction of HESGCs proliferation, whilst maintaining the characteristics of sweat gland cells. HESGCs cultured in sweat gland (SG):keratinocyte growth medium‑2 (KGM‑2) (1:1) medium had a higher proliferation rate and a stable morphology compared with cells cultured in SG and KGM‑2 medium only. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction indicated that cells cultured in the SG:KGM‑2 (1:1) medium exhibited higher expression levels of α‑smooth muscle actin, keratin (K)77, carcinoembryonic antigen, K8, K18, ectodysplasin A receptor, c‑Myc, Kruppel‑like factor 4 and octamer‑binding transcription factor 4 compared with cells cultured in SG only or KGM‑2 only medium. Three‑dimensional culture analysis revealed that HESGCs cultured in SG:KGM‑2 1:1 medium differentiated into sweat gland‑like structures, whereas cells cultured in KGM‑2 only medium underwent cornification. The present study also determined that the maintenance of the biological characteristics of HESGCs occurred due to the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cells cultured in medium without FBS differentiated into keratinocytes. Therefore, the SG:KGM‑2 (1:1) medium may be a suitable culture medium for HESGCs. In conclusion, this mixed medium is a valuable compound and should be considered to be a potential supplemental medium for HESGCs.

  12. Streptococcus gallolyticus infection in colorectal cancer and association with biological and clinical factors

    PubMed Central

    Andres-Franch, Maria; Galiana, Antonio; Sanchez-Hellin, Victoria; Ochoa, Enrique; Hernandez-Illan, Eva; Lopez-Garcia, Pilar; Castillejo, Adela; Castillejo, Maria Isabel; Barbera, Victor Manuel; Garcia-Dura, Josefa; Gomez-Romero, Francisco Javier; Royo, Gloria; Soto, Jose Luis

    2017-01-01

    There is an unambiguous association of Streptococcus gallolyticus infection with colorectal cancer, although there is limited information about epidemiology or interaction between molecular and environmental factors. We performed an original quantitative analysis of S. gallolyticus in unselected colorectal cancer patients (n = 190) and their association with clinical, pathological tumor molecular profiles (microsatellite instability, hypermethylator phenotype and chromosomal instability pathways), and other biological factors in colorectal tumor and normal tissues (cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection). We developed a new quantitative method to assess bacterial load. Analytical validation was reached with a very high sensitivity and specificity. Our results showed a 3.2% prevalence of S. gallolyticus infection in our unselected cohort of colorectal cancer cases (6/190). The average S. gallolyticus copy number was 7,018 (range 44–34,585). No previous reports relating to S. gallolyticus infection have been published for unselected cohorts of patients. Finally, and despite a low prevalence of S. gallolyticus in this study, we were able to define a specific association with tumor tissue (p = 0.03) and with coinfection with Epstein-Barr virus (p = 0.042; OR: 9.49; 95% IC: 1.1–82.9). The prevalence data provided will be very useful in the design of future studies, and will make it possible to estimate the sample size needed to assess precise objectives. In conclusion, our results show a low prevalence of S. gallolyticus infection in unselected colorectal cancer patients and an association of positive S. gallolyticus infection with tumor tissue and Epstein-Barr virus coinfection. Further studies will be needed to definitively assess the prevalence of S. gallolyticus in colorectal cancer and the associated clinicopathological and molecular profiles. PMID:28355283

  13. Parent education and biologic factors influence on cognition in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    King, Allison A; Strouse, John J; Rodeghier, Mark J; Compas, Bruce E; Casella, James F; McKinstry, Robert C; Noetzel, Michael J; Quinn, Charles T; Ichord, Rebecca; Dowling, Michael M; Miller, J Philip; Debaun, Michael R

    2014-02-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia have a high prevalence of silent cerebral infarcts (SCIs) that are associated with decreased full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). While the educational attainment of parents is a known strong predictor of the cognitive development of children in general, the role of parental education in sickle cell anemia along with other factors that adversely affect cognitive function (anemia, cerebral infarcts) is not known. We tested the hypothesis that both the presence of SCI and parental education would impact FSIQ in children with sickle cell anemia. A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 19 US sites of the Silent Infarct Transfusion Trial among children with sickle cell anemia, age 5-15 years. All were screened for SCIs. Participants with and without SCI were administered the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. A total of 150 participants (107 with and 43 without SCIs) were included in the analysis. In a multivariable linear regression model for FSIQ, the absence of college education for the head of household was associated with a decrease of 6.2 points (P = 0.005); presence of SCI with a 5.2 point decrease (P = 0.017); each $1000 of family income per capita with a 0.33 point increase (P = 0.023); each increase of 1 year in age with a 0.96 point decrease (P = 0.023); and each 1% (absolute) decrease in hemoglobin oxygen saturation with 0.75 point decrease (P = 0.030). In conclusion, FSIQ in children with sickle cell anemia is best accounted for by a multivariate model that includes both biologic and socioenvironmental factors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Parent education and biologic factors influence on cognition in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    King, Allison A.; Strouse, John J.; Rodeghier, Mark J.; Compas, Bruce E.; Casella, James F.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Noetzel, Michael J.; Quinn, Charles T.; Ichord, Rebecca; Dowling, Michael M.; Miller, J. Philip; DeBaun, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia have a high prevalence of silent cerebral infarcts (SCIs) that are associated with decreased full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). While the educational attainment of parents is a known strong predictor of the cognitive development of children in general, the role of parental education in sickle cell anemia along with other factors that adversely affect cognitive function (anemia, cerebral infarcts) is not known. We tested the hypothesis that both the presence of SCI and parental education would impact FSIQ in children with sickle cell anemia. A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 19 US sites of the Silent Infarct Transfusion Trial among children with sickle cell anemia, age 5–15 years. All were screened for SCIs. Participants with and without SCI were administered the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. A total of 150 participants (107 with and 43 without SCIs) were included in the analysis. In a multivariable linear regression model for FSIQ, the absence of college education for the head of household was associated with a decrease of 6.2 points (P=0.005); presence of SCI with a 5.2 point decrease (P=0.017); each $1000 of family income per capita with a 0.33 point increase (P=0.023); each increase of 1 year in age with a 0.96 point decrease (P=0.023); and each 1% (absolute) decrease in hemoglobin oxygen saturation with 0.75 point decrease (P=0.030). In conclusion, FSIQ in children with sickle cell anemia is best accounted for by a multivariate model that includes both biologic and socioenvironmental factors. PMID:24123128

  15. [Recording cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Part 2: influencing factors, evaluation of findings and clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Hörmann, K; Pfaar, O

    2010-11-01

    VEMP measurements are subject to various influencing factors: patient age, threshold, sound intensity and frequency. Using air (AC) and bone conduction (BC) the vestibular receptors and afferents of the otolith organs can be activated to varying degrees. Recordings of cervical (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) are clinically possible. AC-cVEMP are primarily an indicator of the sacculocollic reflex pathway. Together with findings on the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) and complimentary otolith tests, VEMP enable otolith function analysis of each side separately. In addition, the distinction between combined or isolated canal and otolith dysfunction in terms of subtyping and patterns of damage in mono- and bilateral disorders, such as vestibular neuritis or bilateral vestibulopathy, is possible. Moreover, VEMP is relevant in terms of prognostic and therapeutic considerations as well as expert assessments.

  16. Relationship between biological factors and catastrophizing and clinical outcomes for female patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Miyagawa, Hirofumi; Shiro, Yukiko; Arai, Young-Chang Park; Akao, Machiko; Murotani, Kenta; Ushida, Takahiro; Deie, Masataka

    2017-03-18

    To investigate the correlations between clinical outcomes and biopsychological variables in female patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Seventy-seven patients with symptomatic knee OA were enrolled in this study. We investigated the age, body mass index (BMI), pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) and radiographic severity of bilateral knees using a Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grading system of the subjects. Subsequently, a multiple linear regression was conducted to determine which variables best correlated with main outcomes of knee OA, which were pain severity, moving capacity by measuring timed-up-and-go test and Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM). We found that the significant contributor to pain severity was PCS (β = 0.555) and BMI (β = 0.239), to moving capacity was K-L grade (β = 0.520) and to PCS (β = 0.313), and to a JKOM score was PCS (β = 0.485) and K-L grade (β = 0.421), respectively. The results suggest that pain catastrophizing as well as biological factors were associated with clinical outcomes in female patients with knee OA, irrespective of radiographic severity.

  17. Characterization of the action of epidermal growth factor in three different biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woost, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    In general, these studies characterized in each system one or more of the following aspects of EGF's biological action: EGF binding, EGF-induced phosphorylation, or EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. In human corneal fibroblasts (HCF), EGF binds to specific, saturable, high affinity receptors and stimulated (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation, and in vitro measurement of DNA synthesis, approximately 2.5 fold above control cultures, with maximal stimulation occurring at approximately 1 nM EGF. In addition, fibroblasts growth factor (FGF) and insulin stimulated maximal (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation in HCF at approximately 100 ng ml/sup -1/ and 1 nM, respectively. In combination with dexamethasone (5 nM), the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation by EGF was maintained. However, dexamethasone abolished the stimulatory action of FGF. Highly purified preparations of human placental outer cell membranes and intracellular organelles were assayed for functional EGF binding proteins (EGF-receptors). Functionality of a protein was determined by covalent labeling with (/sup 125/I)-EGF and EGF-stimulated autophosphorylation.

  18. Relationship between biological factors and catastrophizing and clinical outcomes for female patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Miyagawa, Hirofumi; Shiro, Yukiko; Arai, Young-Chang Park; Akao, Machiko; Murotani, Kenta; Ushida, Takahiro; Deie, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the correlations between clinical outcomes and biopsychological variables in female patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS Seventy-seven patients with symptomatic knee OA were enrolled in this study. We investigated the age, body mass index (BMI), pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) and radiographic severity of bilateral knees using a Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grading system of the subjects. Subsequently, a multiple linear regression was conducted to determine which variables best correlated with main outcomes of knee OA, which were pain severity, moving capacity by measuring timed-up-and-go test and Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM). RESULTS We found that the significant contributor to pain severity was PCS (β = 0.555) and BMI (β = 0.239), to moving capacity was K-L grade (β = 0.520) and to PCS (β = 0.313), and to a JKOM score was PCS (β = 0.485) and K-L grade (β = 0.421), respectively. CONCLUSION The results suggest that pain catastrophizing as well as biological factors were associated with clinical outcomes in female patients with knee OA, irrespective of radiographic severity. PMID:28361021

  19. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    PubMed Central

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  20. Anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment in cherubism--clinical, radiological and histological findings in two children.

    PubMed

    Hero, M; Suomalainen, A; Hagström, J; Stoor, P; Kontio, R; Alapulli, H; Arte, S; Toiviainen-Salo, S; Lahdenne, P; Mäkitie, O

    2013-01-01

    Cherubism is a rare and disfiguring genetic disorder with excessive bone resorption and multilocular lesions in the mandible and/or maxilla. The disease-causing gain-of-function mutations in the SH3-binding protein 2 (SH3BP2) gene result in increased myeloid cell responses to macrophage colony stimulating factor and RANK ligand, formation of hyperactive osteoclasts (giant cells), and hyper-reactive macrophages that produce excessive amounts of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Recent findings in the cherubism mouse model suggest that TNF-α plays a major role in disease pathogenesis and that removal of TNF-α prevents development of the bone phenotype. We treated two children with cherubism with the TNF-α antagonist adalimumab for approximately 2.5 years and collected extensive clinical, radiological and histological follow-up data during the treatment. Histologically the treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the number of multinucleated giant cells and TNF-α staining positivity in both patients. As evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the lesions in Patient 1 showed either moderate enlargement (mandibular symphysis) or remained stable (mandibular rami and body, the maxilla). In Patient 2, the lesions in mandibular symphysis showed enlargement during the first 8 months of treatment, and thereafter the lesions remained unchanged. Bone formation and resorption markers remained unaffected. The treatment was well tolerated. Based on our findings, TNF-α antagonist may decrease the formation of pathogenic giant cells, but does not result in lesion regression or prevent lesion expansion in active cherubism. TNF-α modulator treatment thus does not appear to provide sufficient amelioration for patients suffering from cherubism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk Factors for Inadequate TB Case Finding in Rural Western Kenya: A Comparison of Actively and Passively Identified TB Patients

    PubMed Central

    van’t Hoog, Anna H.; Marston, Barbara J.; Ayisi, John G.; Agaya, Janet A.; Muhenje, Odylia; Odeny, Lazarus O.; Hongo, John; Laserson, Kayla F.; Borgdorff, Martien W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The findings of a prevalence survey conducted in western Kenya, in a population with 14.9% HIV prevalence suggested inadequate case finding. We found a high burden of infectious and largely undiagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), that a quarter of the prevalent cases had not yet sought care, and a low case detection rate. Objective and methods We aimed to identify factors associated with inadequate case finding among adults with PTB in this population by comparing characteristics of 194 PTB patients diagnosed in a health facility after self-report, i.e., through passive case detection, with 88 patients identified through active case detection during the prevalence survey. We examined associations between method of case detection and patient characteristics, including HIV-status, socio-demographic variables and disease severity in univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Findings HIV-infection was associated with faster passive case detection in univariable analysis (crude OR 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0–5.9), but in multivariable logistic regression this was largely explained by the presence of cough, illness and clinically diagnosed smear-negative TB (adjusted OR (aOR) HIV 1.8, 95% CI 0.85–3.7). Among the HIV-uninfected passive case detection was less successful in older patients aOR 0.76, 95%CI 0.60–0.97 per 10 years increase), and women (aOR 0.27, 95%CI 0.10–0.73). Reported current or past alcohol use reduced passive case detection in both groups (0.42, 95% CI 0.23–0.79). Among smear-positive patients median durations of cough were 4.0 and 6.9 months in HIV-infected and uninfected patients, respectively. Conclusion HIV-uninfected patients with infectious TB who were older, female, relatively less ill, or had a cough of a shorter duration were less likely found through passive case detection. In addition to intensified case finding in HIV-infected persons, increasing the suspicion of TB among HIV-uninfected women

  2. Key Findings from Preclinical and Clinical Drug Interaction Studies Presented in New Drug and Biological License Applications Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjing; Ritchie, Tasha K; Zhou, Zhu; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory approval documents contain valuable information, often not published, to assess the drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of newly marketed drugs. This analysis aimed to systematically review all drug metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetics, and DDI data available in the new drug applications and biologic license applications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014, using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database, and to highlight the significant findings. Among the 30 new drug applications and 11 biologic license applications reviewed, 35 new molecular entities (NMEs) were well characterized with regard to drug metabolism, transport, and/or organ impairment and were fully analyzed in this review. In vitro, a majority of the NMEs were found to be substrates or inhibitors/inducers of at least one drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter. In vivo, when NMEs were considered as victim drugs, 16 NMEs had at least one in vivo DDI study with a clinically significant change in exposure (area under the time-plasma concentration curve or Cmax ratio ≥2 or ≤0.5), with 6 NMEs shown to be sensitive substrates of cytochrome P450 enzymes (area under the time-plasma concentration curve ratio ≥5 when coadministered with potent inhibitors): paritaprevir and naloxegol (CYP3A), eliglustat (CYP2D6), dasabuvir (CYP2C8), and tasimelteon and pirfenidone (CYP1A2). As perpetrators, seven NMEs showed clinically significant inhibition involving both enzymes and transporters, although no clinically significant induction was observed. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and pharmacogenetics studies were used for six and four NMEs, respectively, to optimize dosing recommendations in special populations and/or multiple impairment situations. In addition, the pharmacokinetic evaluations in patients with hepatic or renal impairment provided useful quantitative information to support drug administration in these fragile populations.

  3. Factors associated with computer and Internet technology implementation in biology, chemistry, and physics education in Turkish secondary schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Melike

    The main purposes of the research were to identify computer and Internet use by biology, chemistry and physics teachers in Turkish secondary schools and identify factors associated with computer and Internet technology. To this end, survey documents were sent by the Provincial Directorate of National Education to 250 selected schools' administrators for further distribution. Administrators were asked to complete the "Computer and Internet Use: School Survey," and to distribute the "Science Teacher Computer and Internet Use" surveys to the two teachers who teach science class. Surveys were then returned to the General Directorate of Educational Technologies. Research findings showed that computer and Internet use has not occurred effectively. Computers were first introduced to Turkish schools in 1984; unfortunately the current situation of computer and Internet use in science education is not at the projected earlier point in time. Considering the fact that science teachers' participation in technology-related professional development program is higher than other subject teachers, the use of computer and Internet technologies in Turkish secondary schools is still at its early stages. Lack of computer knowledge and not knowing how to integrate computers into education were the major factors reported. With regard to computer and Internet use, a regression model for Turkish schools, which includes access and knowledge, explains a large part of the variance in study results. There was a significant relationship between computer attitude (computer liking, usefulness, and confidence) and computer and Internet use. Although there was a significant negative relationship between Internet and computer uses and the attitudinal component, computer anxiety, it did not deter individuals from expressing a desire to engage in computer use in education.

  4. Prevalence, risk factor analysis, and hematological findings of hemoplasma infection in domestic cats from Valdivia, Southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Walker Vergara, Romina; Morera Galleguillos, Francisco; Gómez Jaramillo, Marcelo; Pereira Almosny, Nadia Regina; Arauna Martínez, Pía; Grob Behne, Paulina; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Müller, Ananda

    2016-06-01

    Four distinct cat hemoplasma species are recognized worldwide. However, this is the first study to investigate the prevalence, risk factors, and hematological findings of hemoplasmas in cats from Chile. Complete blood count and 16S rRNA real-time PCR for cat hemoplasma species were performed in 384 blood samples from domestic cats in Valdivia, Chile. Among the 384 samples the species-specific prevalence was as follows: 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (7.8%), Mycoplasma haemofelis (4.4%), 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' (1%), 'Ca. M. haemominutum'+M. haemofelis (0.78%), 'Ca. M. haemominutum'+'Ca. M. turicensis' (0.52%), 'Ca. M. haemominutum'+'Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum' (0.26%) and 'Ca. M. haemominutum'+M. haemofelis+'Ca. M. haematoparvum' (0.26%). Male sex, older age, outdoor access, and FIV status were risk factors for hemoplasmosis. Mycoplasma haemofelis-positive cats had higher mean corpuscular volume and monocyte count. Four hemoplasma species circulate in the cat population of Valdivia. 'Candidatus M. turicensis' and 'Ca. M. haematoparvum' have been reported for the first time in Chilean cats.

  5. A systematic review of qualitative findings on factors enabling and deterring uptake of HIV testing in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) being the epicenter of the HIV epidemic, uptake of HIV testing is not optimal. While qualitative studies have been undertaken to investigate factors influencing uptake of HIV testing, systematic reviews to provide a more comprehensive understanding are lacking. Methods Using Noblit and Hare’s meta-ethnography method, we synthesised published qualitative research to understand factors enabling and deterring uptake of HIV testing in SSA. We identified 5,686 citations out of which 56 were selected for full text review and synthesised 42 papers from 13 countries using Malpass’ notion of first-, second-, and third-order constructs. Results The predominant factors enabling uptake of HIV testing are deterioration of physical health and/or death of sexual partner or child. The roll-out of various HIV testing initiatives such as ‘opt-out’ provider-initiated HIV testing and mobile HIV testing has improved uptake of HIV testing by being conveniently available and attenuating fear of HIV-related stigma and financial costs. Other enabling factors are availability of treatment and social network influence and support. Major barriers to uptake of HIV testing comprise perceived low risk of HIV infection, perceived health workers’ inability to maintain confidentiality and fear of HIV-related stigma. While the increasingly wider availability of life-saving treatment in SSA is an incentive to test, the perceived psychological burden of living with HIV inhibits uptake of HIV testing. Other barriers are direct and indirect financial costs of accessing HIV testing, and gender inequality which undermines women’s decision making autonomy about HIV testing. Despite differences across SSA, the findings suggest comparable factors influencing HIV testing. Conclusions Improving uptake of HIV testing requires addressing perception of low risk of HIV infection and perceived inability to live with HIV. There is also a need to continue

  6. A study of energy and effective atomic number dependence of the exposure build-up factors in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, G S; Singh, P S; Mudahar, G S

    2000-03-01

    A theoretical method is presented to determine the gamma-radiation build-up factors in various biological materials. The gamma energy range is 0.015-15.0 MeV, with penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths considered. The dependence of the exposure build-up factor on incident photon energy and the effective atomic number (Zeff) has also been assessed. In a practical analysis of dose burden to gamma-irradiated biological materials, the sophistication of Monte Carlo computer techniques would be applied, with associated detailed modelling. However, a feature of the theoretical method presented is its ability to make the consequences of the physics of the scattering process in biological materials more transparent. In addition, it can be quickly employed to give a first-pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed computer study.

  7. A simulation analysis of various biological and physical factors influencing the deep-chlorophyll maximum structure in oligotrophic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, R. A.; Cruzado, A.; Tintoré, Joaquín

    1994-07-01

    A detailed analysis of the Varela et al. (1992) coupled physical/biological model shows the influence of several physical and biological factors on the depth and magnitude of the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). We show here the importance of a careful computation of the eddy diffusion coefficient below the thermocline for a correct estimation of the depth and magnitude of the DCM. We also show that light extinction is critical in determining the DCM depth. Atmospheric nitrate supply influences the vertical phytoplankton distribution only in the upper surface layer, leaving unaffected the DCM. Among the biological factors considered, zooplankton grazing on large phytoplankton and heterotroph grazing on small phytoplankton affect the DCM magnitude but not its depth. The large phytoplankton cells (> 20 μM) seem to have advantages when compared to smaller cells (> 20 μM) when the nutrient supply increased, but small cells almost always constituted the dominant phytoplankton fraction.

  8. Frequency, imaging findings, risk factors, and long-term sequelae of distal clavicular osteolysis in young patients.

    PubMed

    Roedl, Johannes B; Nevalainen, Mika; Gonzalez, Felix M; Dodson, Christopher C; Morrison, William B; Zoga, Adam C

    2015-05-01

    Atraumatic distal clavicular osteolysis (DCO) has been described in adult male weightlifters. Our purpose was to investigate the frequency, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, risk factors, and long-term sequelae of DCO in young patients. Individuals with atraumatic DCO were identified in a retrospective review of 1,432 consecutive MRI shoulder reports in patients between 13 and 19 years of age. MRI findings of DCO, association with athletic activity, short-term clinical outcome after 3-6 months, and long-term clinical and MRI outcome after 2 years were analyzed. A pre-MRI questionnaire assessed the patients' athletic history including overhead activity and weightlifting. At a mean age of 15.9 years, 6.5 % (93/1432) of patients had atraumatic DCO, and 24 % were females. The combination of an overhead sport (basketball, volleyball, tennis, swimming) and supplemental weight training was a risk factor for DCO (odds ratio = 38, p = 0.01). Ninety-three percent of patients responded to conservative therapy. On follow-up imaging, 71 % of DCO patients had acromioclavicular (AC) joint osteoarthritis (vs. 35 % in controls, p = 0.006); 79 % had flattening of the distal clavicle and interval widening of the AC joint to a mean of 5.0 mm (compared to 2.4 mm in controls, p < 0.001). Severity of DCO edema was associated with pain (p < 0.02) at initial presentation and with AC joint osteoarthritis (p = 0.004) on follow-up. In athletic teenagers, the combination of weightlifting and overhead activity is a risk factor for atraumatic DCO, and females are affected in 24 %. Long-term sequelae include widening of the AC joint and AC joint osteoarthritis.

  9. Population Size, HIV, and Behavior Among MSM in Luanda, Angola: Challenges and Findings in the First Ever HIV and Syphilis Biological and Behavioral Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Carl; Kerr, Ligia Regina Franco Sansigolo; Mota, Rosa Maria Salani; Cavalcante, Socorro; Macena, Raimunda Hermelinda Maia; Chen, Sanny; Gaffga, Nicholas; Monterosso, Edgar; Bastos, Fransisco I.; Serrano, Dulcelina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To conduct the first population size estimation and biological and behavioral surveillance survey among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Angola. Design Population size estimation with multiplier method and a cross-sectional study using respondent-driven sampling. Setting Luanda Province, Angola. Study was conducted in a large hospital. Participants Seven hundred ninety-two self-identified MSM accepted a unique object for population size estimation. Three hundred fifty-one MSM were recruited with respondent-driven sampling for biological and behavioral surveillance survey. Methods Interviews and testing for HIV and syphilis were conducted on-site. Analysis used Respondent-Driven Sampling Analysis Tool and STATA 11.0. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses examined factors associated with HIV and unprotected sex. Six imputation strategies were used for missing data for those refusing to test for HIV. Main Outcome A population size of 6236 MSM was estimated. Twenty-seven of 351 individuals were tested positive. Adjusted HIV prevalence was 3.7% (8.7% crude). With imputation, HIV seroprevalence was estimated between 3.8% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6 to 6.5] and 10.5% (95% CI: 5.6 to 15.3). Being older than 25 (odds ratio = 10.8, 95% CI: 3.5 to 32.8) and having suffered episodes of homophobia (odds ratio = 12.7, 95% CI: 3.2 to 49.6) significantly increased the chance of HIV seropositivity. Conclusions Risk behaviors are widely reported, but HIV seroprevalence is lower than expected. The difference between crude and adjusted values was mostly due to treatment of missing values in Respondent-Driven Sampling Analysis Tool. Solutions are proposed in this article. Although concerns were raised about feasibility and adverse outcomes for MSM, the study was successfully and rapidly completed with no adverse effects. PMID:25014130

  10. Behavioral, Biological, and Demographic Risk and Protective Factors for New HIV Infections among Youth, Rakai, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Santelli, John S.; Edelstein, Zoe R.; Mathur, Sanyukta; Wei, Ying; Zhang, Wenfei; Orr, Mark G.; Higgins, Jenny A.; Nalugoda, Fred; Gray, Ron H.; Wawer, Maria J.; Serwadda, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevalence of HIV infection is considerable among youth, although data on risk factors for new (incident) infections is limited. We examined incidence of HIV infection and risk and protective factors among youth in rural Uganda, including the role of gender and social transitions. Methods Participants were sexually experienced youth (15–24 years-old) enrolled in the Rakai Community Cohort Study,1999–2008 (n=6741). Poisson regression with robust standard errors was used to estimate incident rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of incident HIV infection. Results HIV incidence was greater among young women than young men (14.1 vs. 8.3 per 1000 person-years, respectively); this gender disparity was greater among teens (14.9 vs. 3.6). Beyond behavioral (multiple partners and concurrency) and biological factors (sexually transmitted infection (STI) symptoms), social transitions such as marriage and staying in school influenced HIV risk. In multivariate analyses among women, HIV incidence was associated with living in a trading village [adjusted IRR (aIRR) = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.04 to 2.11], being a student (aIRR = 0.22; 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.72), current marriage (aIRR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.37 to 0.81), former marriage (aIRR = 1.73; 95% CI: 1.01 to 2.96), having multiple partners, and sexually transmitted infection symptoms. Among men, new infections were associated with former marriage (aIRR = 5.57; 95% CI: 2.51 to 12.36), genital ulceration (aIRR = 3.56; 95% CI: 1.97 to 6.41), and alcohol use (aIRR = 2.08; 95% CI: 1.15 to 3.77). Conclusions During the third decade of the HIV epidemic in Uganda, HIV incidence remains considerable among youth, with young women particularly at risk. The risk for new infections was strongly shaped by social transitions such as leaving school, entrance into marriage, and marital dissolution; the impact of marriage was different for young men than women. PMID:23535293

  11. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: Implications in human hemophilia treatment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVII...

  12. Meat science and muscle biology symposium: In utero factors that influence postnatal muscle growth, carcass composition, and meat quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Meat Science and Muscle Biology Symposium titled “In utero factors that influence postnatal muscle growth, carcass composition, and meat quality” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting in Phoenix, AZ, July 15 to 19, 2012. The goal of this symposium was to highlight research on the impact of fetal...

  13. Critical-Thinking Grudge Match: Biology vs. Chemistry--Examining Factors That Affect Thinking Skill in Nonmajors Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quitadamo, Ian J.; Kurtz, Martha J.; Cornell, Caitlyn Nicole; Griffith, Lindsay; Hancock, Julie; Egbert, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry students appear to bring significantly higher critical-thinking skill to their nonmajors course than do biology students. Knowing student preconceptions and thinking ability is essential to learning growth and effective teaching. Of the factors investigated, ethnicity and high school physics had the largest impact on critical-thinking…

  14. The Adult Learning Open University Determinants (ALOUD) Study: Biological and Psychological Factors Associated with Learning Performance in Adult Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neroni, Joyce; Gijselaers, Hieronymus J. M.; Kirschner, Paul A.; Groot, Renate H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Learning is crucial for everyone. The association between biological (eg, sleep, nutrition) and psychological factors (eg, test anxiety, goal orientation) and learning performance has been well established for children, adolescents and college students in traditional education. Evidence for these associations for adult distance students is lacking…

  15. The Adult Learning Open University Determinants (ALOUD) Study: Biological and Psychological Factors Associated with Learning Performance in Adult Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neroni, Joyce; Gijselaers, Hieronymus J. M.; Kirschner, Paul A.; Groot, Renate H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Learning is crucial for everyone. The association between biological (eg, sleep, nutrition) and psychological factors (eg, test anxiety, goal orientation) and learning performance has been well established for children, adolescents and college students in traditional education. Evidence for these associations for adult distance students is lacking…

  16. [Mechanisms underlying physiological functions of food factors via non-specific interactions with biological proteins].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira

    2015-01-01

      We previously reported that zerumbone, a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet SMITH, showed notable cancer preventive effects in various organs of experimental rodents. This agent up-regulated nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2)-dependent expressions of anti-oxidative and xenobiotics-metabolizing enzymes, leading to an increased self-defense capacity. On the other hand, zerumbone markedly suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, an inducible pro-inflammatory enzyme, by disrupting mRNA stabilizing processes. Binding experiments using a biotin derivative of zerumbone demonstrated that Keap1, an Nrf2 repressive protein, is one of its major binding proteins that promotes their dissociation for inducing Nrf2 transactivation. We then generated a specific antibody against zerumbone-modified proteins and found that zerumbone modified numerous cellular proteins in a non-specific manner, with global distribution of the modified proteins seen not only in cytoplasm but also the nucleus. Based on those observations, zerumbone was speculated to cause proteo-stress, a notion supported by previous findings that it increased the C-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein-dependent protein ubiquitination and also promoted aggresome formation. Interestingly, zerumbone counteracted proteo-stress and heat stress via up-regulation of the protein quality control systems (PQCs), e.g., heat shock proteins (HSPs), ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy. Meanwhile, several phytochemicals, including ursolic acid and curcumin, were identified as marked HSP70 inducers, whereas most nutrients tested were scarcely active. Recent studies have revealed that PQCs play important roles in the prevention of many lifestyle related diseases, such as cancer, thus non-specific binding of phytochemicals to cellular proteins may be a novel and unique mechanism underlying their physiological activities.

  17. Quantifying the contributions of behavioral and biological risk factors to socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease incidence: the MORGEN study.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Kiarri N; Droomers, Mariël; Robinson, Whitney R; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Daviglus, Martha L; Monique Verschuren, W M

    2013-10-01

    Quantifying the impact of different modifiable behavioral and biological risk factors on socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease (CHD) may help inform targeted, population-specific strategies to reduce the unequal distribution of the disease. Previous studies have used analytic approaches that limit our ability to disentangle the relative contributions of these risk factors to CHD disparities. The goal of this study was to assess mediation of the effect of low education on incident CHD by multiple risk factors simultaneously. Analyses are based on 15,067 participants of the Dutch Monitoring Project on Risk Factors for Chronic Diseases aged 20-65 years examined 1994-1997 and followed for events until January 1, 2008. Path analysis was used to quantify and test mediation of the low education-CHD association by behavioral (current cigarette smoking, heavy alcohol use, poor diet, and physical inactivity) and biological (obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia) risk factors. Behavioral and biological risk factors accounted for 56.6 % (95 % CI 42.6-70.8 %) of the low education-incident CHD association. Smoking was the strongest mediator, accounting for 27.3 % (95 % CI 17.7-37.4 %) of the association, followed by obesity (10.2 %; 95 % CI 4.5-16.1 %), physical inactivity (6.3 %; 95 % CI 2.7-10.0 %), and hypertension (5.3 %; 95 % CI: 2.8-8.0 %). In summary, in a Dutch cohort, the majority of the relationship between low education and incident CHD was mediated by traditional behavioral and biological risk factors. Addressing barriers to smoking cessation, blood pressure and weight management, and physical activity may be the most effective approaches to eliminating socioeconomic inequalities in CHD.

  18. Quantifying the contributions of behavioral and biological risk factors to socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease incidence: The MORGEN study

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Droomers, Mariël; Robinson, Whitney R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Verschuren, W.M. Monique

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the impact of different modifiable behavioral and biological risk factors on socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease (CHD) may help inform targeted, population-specific strategies to reduce the unequal distribution of the disease. Previous studies have used analytic approaches that limit our ability to disentangle the relative contributions of these risk factors to CHD disparities. The goal of this study was to assess mediation of the effect of low education on incident CHD by multiple risk factors simultaneously. Analyses are based on 15,067 participants of the Dutch Monitoring Project on Risk Factors for Chronic Diseases aged 20–65 years examined 1994–1997 and followed for events until January 1, 2008. Path analysis was used to quantify and test mediation of the low education-CHD association by behavioral (current cigarette smoking, heavy alcohol use, poor diet, and physical inactivity) and biological (obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia) risk factors. Behavioral and biological risk factors accounted for 56.6% (95% CI: 42.6%–70.8%) of the low education-incident CHD association. Smoking was the strongest mediator, accounting for 27.3% (95% CI: 17.7%–37.4%) of the association, followed by obesity (10.2%; 95% CI: 4.5%–16.1%), physical inactivity (6.3%; 95% CI: 2.7%–10.0%), and hypertension (5.3%; 95% CI: 2.8%–8.0%). In summary, in a Dutch cohort, the majority of the relationship between low education and incident CHD was mediated by traditional behavioral and biological risk factors. Addressing barriers to smoking cessation, blood pressure and weight management, and physical activity may be the most effective approaches to eliminating socioeconomic inequalities in CHD. PMID:24037117

  19. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual.

  20. Influence of biological and ecological factors on hematological values in wild Little Penguins, Eudyptula minor.

    PubMed

    Sergent, N; Rogers, T; Cunningham, M

    2004-07-01

    Clinical hematology and biochemistry are recognized as useful aids in health diagnosis in birds. The Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) is endemic to Australia and numbers are declining due to a number of factors including declining health. This 2-year study on both Bowen and Lion Island populations aimed at assessing the potential causes of their declining health. Blood was collected from a total of 294 adult Little Penguins. R.B.C., Hb, P.C.V., M.C.V., M.C.H., M.C.H.C., W.B.C. and differential counts, thrombocytes and T.P.P. were measured. Multiple regression was used to identify relationships between hematological values and the following predictor variables: site, season, sex, time held prior to sampling and body condition. Values obtained showed some differences compared to the values for other penguin species reported in the literature. P.C.V., R.B.C., Hb, M.C.H.C. and T.P.P. showed major differences in comparison with a previous study on little penguins. Considering the influence of predictor variables, it appeared that: P.C.V., R.B.C., M.C.V., M.C.H., M.C.H.C. varied according to seasons; P.C.V., R.B.C., M.C.H., T.P.P. were correlated to body condition; P.C.V. was higher in birds on Bowen Island compared to birds on Lion Island; and T.P.P. was higher in females. These ecological and biological predictor variables have a strong influence upon hematological values. As a consequence, they must be taken into consideration when interpreting results of future studies.

  1. Biological factors and overestimation of left ventricular ejection fraction by gated SPECT.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marco Antônio Condé de; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Gonzalez, Maria Margarita C; Moises, Valdir Ambrósio; Alonso, Gilberto; Lima, Eduardo Vilaça; Smanio, Paola Emanuela; Martins, Luiz Roberto Fernandes; Oliveira, Carlos A R; Mastrocolla, Luiz Eduardo

    2008-05-01

    Some patients present an overestimated left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) on electrocardiogram-gated myocardial scintigraphy (gated SPECT). To establish the relationship between biological factors and overestimated LVEF. We selected 3838 patients who underwent gated SPECT between May 20, 2000 and September 16, 2005 with normal perfusion images and LVEF > or =50%. The following variables were analyzed: gender (29.4% females and 70.6% males), age (from 20 to 94 years - mean: 56 years), weight (from 33.5 to 150 kg - mean: 79.6 kg), height (from 138 to 220 cm - mean: 171 cm) and BMI (from 13.9 to 54 - mean: 27.2). In a subgroup of 1002 patients who underwent echocardiogram, the diastolic diameter (from 36 to 68 mm - mean 47.5 mm) and systolic diameter (from 22 to 41 mm - mean 29.8 mm) variables were included. The patients were divided into two groups: normal LVEF (< or =80%) and overestimated LVEF (>80%). The odds ratio (OR) for presenting an overestimated LVEF was calculated for each variable using logistic regression. The following odds ratios were found (p < 0.005): female gender OR = 3.585 (95%CI: 2.745 to 4.683), age in years OR = 1.020 (95%CI: 1.011 to 1.029) and height in cm OR = 0.893 (95%CI: 0.829 to 0.962). Weight and BMI were not significantly associated with LVEF (p>0.2). In the subgroup of 1002 patients, a statistically significant influence was found in overestimated LVEF values for the systolic diameter, gender and height variables. Although systolic diameter influences the overestimation of LVEF, the gender and height variables have an independent influence on LVEF overestimation by gated SPECT.

  2. Model-Based Analysis of the Role of Biological, Hydrological and Geochemical Factors Affecting Uranium Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2011-01-24

    Uranium contamination is a serious concern at several sites motivating the development of novel treatment strategies such as the Geobacter-mediated reductive immobilization of uranium. However, this bioremediation strategy has not yet been optimized for the sustained uranium removal. While several reactive-transport models have been developed to represent Geobacter-mediated bioremediation of uranium, these models often lack the detailed quantitative description of the microbial process (e.g., biomass build-up in both groundwater and sediments, electron transport system, etc.) and the interaction between biogeochemical and hydrological process. In this study, a novel multi-scale model was developed by integrating our recent model on electron capacitance of Geobacter (Zhao et al., 2010) with a comprehensive simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrologic transport, heat transfer, and biogeochemical reactions. This mechanistic reactive-transport model accurately reproduces the experimental data for the bioremediation of uranium with acetate amendment. We subsequently performed global sensitivity analysis with the reactive-transport model in order to identify the main sources of prediction uncertainty caused by synergistic effects of biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes. The proposed approach successfully captured significant contributing factors across time and space, thereby improving the structure and parameterization of the comprehensive reactive-transport model. The global sensitivity analysis also provides a potentially useful tool to evaluate uranium bioremediation strategy. The simulations suggest that under difficult environments (e.g., highly contaminated with U(VI) at a high migration rate of solutes), the efficiency of uranium removal can be improved by adding Geobacter species to the contaminated site (bioaugmentation) in conjunction with the addition of electron donor (biostimulation). The simulations also highlight the interactive effect of

  3. [Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of Heavy Metals in Three Gorges Reservoir and Effect of Biological Factors].

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-li; Zhou, Qiong; Xie, Cong-xin; Wang, Jun; Li, Jun

    2016-01-15

    Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) reached the maximum water level (175 m) of impoundment in Oct. 2010. In order to reveal the potential influence of the greatest water-level impoundment on the heavy metal pollution in the typical waters of TGR, the content level of trace metals ( Hg, Cd and Pb) in biota and potential biomagnification along the aquatic food chain were investigated in the main stem of TGR from July 2011 to August 2012, as well as the relationship between the trace metal concentrations of aquatic consumers (fish and aquatic invertebrate) and biological factors. Our study showed that no individual data of the three trace metals in biota exceeded the edible safety criteria of aquatic products in China and FAO. In contrast with those before the impoundment of TGR, Hg showed a little higher, while Cd and Pb exhibited a little lower level after the impoundment. Trace metals in TGR exhibited relatively lower concentrations compared with those in reservoirs in other countries. Significant correlations were found between the Cd concentration and body size (body length and body weight) of Cyprinus carpio, as well as the Hg concentration and body size (body length and body weight) of Erythroculter ilishaeformis. As for feeding habits, there was statistically significant difference between trace metal concentrations in herbivorous, planktonic, omnivorous and carnivorous fish. However, no significant difference was found between the metal concentrations in fish with different habitats (pelagic, mesopelagic and benthic). Even so, the overall trend was that fish living in benthic layer had higher heavy metal concentrations than those in pelagic and mesopelagic zones. The regression slopes of log-Hg concentration versus delta(15)N, served as an indicator of trophic magnification factor (TMF). Significant correlations (P < 0.05) were observed for Hg in the food web of TGR. TMF of Hg in TGR indicated lower level (0.046-0.066) in contrast with those in the reservoirs of

  4. The association of non-accidental trauma with historical factors, exam findings and diagnostic testing during the initial trauma evaluation.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Auerbach, Marc; Flynn-O'Brien, Katherine; Tiyyagura, Gunjan; Borgman, Matthew A; Duffy, Susan J; Falcone, Kelly; Burke, Rita; Cox, John M; Maguire, Sabine

    2017-03-23

    Early identification of non-accidental trauma (NAT) is a critical component of pediatric trauma care. Literature searches were conducted related to the association of NAT with seven key areas: history, exam findings (burns, oral trauma, bruising) and imaging (fractures, abdominal and brain injuries). When available, odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations with NAT are presented. Systematic reviews have been published in six of the seven key areas and are described. The operational definition of NAT was widely variable across studies, prohibiting meta-analysis. Select highly associated findings included bruising in a pre-mobile child, clustering of bruises (OR 4.0, CI 2.5-6.4), petechiae (OR 9.3, CI 2.9-30.2), chemical burns 24.6 (4.94-135); contact burns 5.2 (1.6-22.9); scald burns 17.4 (6.4-72), burns to hand 1.8 (1.3-2.6), feet 6.3 (4.6-8.6), buttocks 3.1 (2.2-4.5), and perineum 2.5 (1.7-3.7), subdural hematoma (OR 8.2, 6.1-11), hypoxic ischemic injury (OR 4.2, CI 0.6-2.7), and retinal hemorrhages (OR 14.7, CI 6.4 to 33.6) among others. Of note, hollow viscus injuries, particularly duodenal injuries in children < 4 years were indicative of NAT. While there is substantial research on factors associated with NAT, future work is needed to standardize the definition of NAT for investigation and practice, such that evidence-based guidelines can be created to inform trauma providers when a comprehensive NAT evaluation is indicated.

  5. [Clinical factors and findings in knee arthroscopy of patients with knee arthrosis candidates for conversion to total replacement].

    PubMed

    Figueroa, D; Calvo, R; Villalón, I; Tuca, M J; Vaisman, A; Valdés, M

    2013-01-01

    To identify those clinical characteristic and arthroscopic findings in patients with knee arthrosis that are associated with worsening of the disease and subsequent total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted on 78 consecutive patients (88 knees) who underwent knee arthroscopy for arthrosis. The study included 44 women and 34 men, with a mean age of 58.9 years (range: 37-78 years). After a mean follow-up of 50.4 months (range: 12-96 months), those patients who progressed towards TKA were identified. A logistic regression model was applied to recognise the factors associated with deterioration of the arthrosis, with consequent progression towards a TKA. Twenty-four out of the 88 knees progressed towards a TKA (27.3%) within a mean time of 13.5 months after arthroscopy (range: 13-29 months). The clinical characteristics that showed a significant association with poor progression of the arthrosis were: female gender (0.02) and Ahlbäck 2 (P=.04). Arthroscopic finding that proved significant correlation with worsening of the arthrosis towards TKA were: meniscal tears of the posterior horn (P=.02), meniscectomies above 60% (P=.03), and 2nd degree chondral lesions in loading areas of the medial femoral condyle (P=.02). The variables associated with a greater chance of progressing towards a TKA after a knee arthroscopy due to arthrosis in this study were, female gender, grade 2 radiographic arthrosis, posterior horn meniscal lesions, meniscectomies over 60%, and chondral lesions in loading area of the medial femoral condyle. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Acculturation, immigration status and cardiovascular risk factors among Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg: findings from ORISCAV-LUX study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    first generation compared to second generation (P=0.028). Although we observed a tendency of lower risk with higher acculturation, none of the acculturation markers, both individually and taken together as a score, was statistically significant after controlling for age and gender. Compared to Luxembourgers, odds of overweight/obesity were significantly higher among Portuguese immigrants, in unadjusted model 1 (P=0.043), in age and gender-adjusted model 2 (P<0.0001), in socioeconomic status adjusted model 3 (P= 0.01), in physical activity adjusted model 4 (P=0.007). However, this difference was attenuated and statistically disappeared after controlling for dietary factors (P=0.09). Conclusions These findings address a lack of heterogeneity between Portuguese immigrants and Luxembourgers regarding hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, and current cigarette smoking. However, Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg were more likely to be overweight/obese than Luxembourgers participants. This risk may be explained by different dietary practice. An in-depth comparative assessment of dietary habits of Luxembourgers and Portuguese immigrants is warranted. PMID:23057477

  7. The influence of coagulation factors on the in-treatment biological variation of international normalized ratio for patients on warfarin.

    PubMed

    Sølvik, Una Ø; Røraas, Thomas; Petersen, Per H; Stavelin, Anne; Monsen, Grete; Sandberg, Sverre

    2014-09-01

    Biological variation is usually estimated in healthy individuals during steady-state conditions. The aim of this study was to estimate the in-treatment biological variation of the International normalised ratio (INR) and to investigate to what extent the different levels of coagulation factors could explain this variation. Blood samples were collected from randomly included patients on warfarin treatment. INR was determined on a laboratory instrument (STA Compact(®)) and on three point-of-care instruments (Simple Simon(®)PT, CoaguChek(®)XS and INRatio(™)). The level of fibrinogen, and the activity of coagulation factors II, V, VII and X were determined. The in-treatment within- and between-subject coefficients of variation of INR were dependent on the method and varied between 18 and 24% and 13 and 19%, respectively, and were reduced to 3.9-5.1% and 2.3-5.8%, after correction for coagulation factors which could explain 91-95% of the variance of INR. The in-treatment biological variation of INR was higher than reported for healthy individuals as well as patients in a steady-state condition, but by correcting for appropriate coagulation factors it was reduced. The association between INR and coagulation factors was different for the different PT methods mainly due to different sensitivity towards FII and FVII.

  8. Environmental and Biological Factors Influencing Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) Vector Competence for Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephanie L.; Lord, Cynthia C.; Pesko, Kendra; Tabachnick, Walter J.

    2009-01-01

    Complex interactions between environmental and biological factors influence the susceptibility of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to St. Louis encephalitis virus and could affect the epidemiology of virus transmission. Similar interactions could have epidemiologic implications for other vector-virus systems. We conducted an experiment to examine four such factors in combination: mosquito age, extrinsic incubation temperature (EIT), virus dose, and colony. The proportion of mosquitoes with body infections or disseminated infections varied between colonies, and was dependant on age, EIT, and dose. We also show that the probability of a body or leg infection interacted in complex ways between colonies, ages, EITs, and doses. The complex interactive effects of environmental and biological factors must be taken into account for studies of vector competence and epidemiology, especially when laboratory studies are used to generalize to natural transmission dynamics where the extent of variation is largely unknown. PMID:19635881

  9. Vitamin B12 concentration and its association with sociodemographic factors in Colombian children: Findings from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Martínez-Torres, Javier; Meneses-Echávez, José Francisco; Lobelo, Felipe

    2016-02-01

    Rapid changes in dietary patterns, economic development, and urbanization in low- to middle-income countries are fueling complex malnutrition states that need better characterization using population-level data. The aim of this study was to describe the key findings related to vitamin B12 status to identify the prevalence and associated sociodemographic factors in a representative sample of children in Colombia, based on the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 6910 Colombian children between the ages of 5 and 12. Serum vitamin B12 concentrations were determined by chemiluminescence. Sociodemographic data was assessed by computer-assisted personal interview technology. Of the children assessed, 2.8% had vitamin B12 deficiency, defined as levels <200 pg/mL, and 18.1% had marginal vitamin B12 deficiency, defined as levels between 200 and 300 pg/mL. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed increased risks for vitamin B12 deficiency among children ages ≥9 y and for those living in the eastern, western, and southern regions of the country. No significant associations were found for ethnic groups, socioeconomic status, or urbanity levels. Being 11 y of age (odds ratio [OR], 2.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.56-3.00; P = 0.0001), living in the west (Pacific) region of the country (OR, 3.92; 95% CI, 3.14-4.90; P = 0.0001), and being male (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.20-1.65; P = 0.0001) were the factors most strongly associated with an increased risk for vitamin B12 deficiency. Compared with data from other Latin American countries, Colombian children have a lower prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency; however the prevalence of marginal deficiency is substantial. Continued surveillance and implementation of interventions to improve dietary patterns among the high-risk groups identified should be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dairy food intake is positively associated with cardiovascular health: findings from Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Georgina E; Alkerwi, Ala'a

    2014-12-01

    Conflicting findings have been reported about dairy food consumption and risk for cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, few studies have examined dairy food intake in relation to cardiovascular health and the incorporation of lifestyle factors such as diet and physical activity. This study examined whether dairy food consumption was associated with cardiovascular health, recently defined by the American Heart Association. Data were analyzed from 1352 participants from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg survey. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to measure intakes of milk, yogurt, cheese, dairy desserts, ice cream, and butter. Seven cardiovascular health metrics were assessed: smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diet, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose. A total cardiovascular health score (CHS) was determined by summing the total number of health metrics at ideal levels. It was hypothesized that greater dairy food consumption (both low fat and whole fat) would be associated with better global cardiovascular health, as indicated by a higher CHS. Total dairy food intake was positively associated with the CHS. Higher intakes of whole fat milk, yogurt, and cheese were associated with better cardiovascular health. Even when controlling for demographic and dietary variables, those who consumed at least 5 servings per week of these dairy products had a significantly higher CHS than those who consumed these products less frequently. Higher total whole fat dairy food intake was also associated with other positive health behaviors, including being a nonsmoker, consuming the suggested dietary intakes of recommended foods, and having a normal body mass index. Increased dairy food consumption was associated with better cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Important factors in predicting mortality outcome from stroke: findings from the Anglia Stroke Clinical Network Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    O. Bachmann, Max; Loke, Yoon Kong; D. Musgrave, Stanley; Price, Gill M.; Hale, Rachel; Metcalf, Anthony Kneale; Turner, David A.; Day, Diana J.; A. Warburton, Elizabeth; Potter, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background although variation in stroke service provision and outcomes have been previously investigated, it is less well known what service characteristics are associated with reduced short- and medium-term mortality. Methods data from a prospective multicentre study (2009–12) in eight acute regional NHS trusts with a catchment population of about 2.6 million were used to examine the prognostic value of patient-related factors and service characteristics on stroke mortality outcome at 7, 30 and 365 days post stroke, and time to death within 1 year. Results a total of 2,388 acute stroke patients (mean (standard deviation) 76.9 (12.7) years; 47.3% men, 87% ischaemic stroke) were included in the study. Among patients characteristics examined increasing age, haemorrhagic stroke, total anterior circulation stroke type, higher prestroke frailty, history of hypertension and ischaemic heart disease and admission hyperglycaemia predicted 1-year mortality. Additional inclusion of stroke service characteristics controlling for patient and service level characteristics showed varying prognostic impact of service characteristics on stroke mortality over the disease course during first year after stroke at different time points. The most consistent finding was the benefit of higher nursing levels; an increase in one trained nurses per 10 beds was associated with reductions in 30-day mortality of 11–28% (P < 0.0001) and in 1-year mortality of 8–12% (P < 0.001). Conclusions there appears to be consistent and robust evidence of direct clinical benefit on mortality up to 1 year after acute stroke of higher numbers of trained nursing staff over and above that of other recognised mortality risk factors. PMID:28181626

  12. Prevalence and factors associated with hardcore smoking in Poland: Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (2009–2010)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Estimating the prevalence of hardcore smoking and identifying linked factors is fundamental to improve planning and implementation of effective tobacco control measures. Given the paucity of data on that topic, we aimed to assess the prevalence of and factors associated with hardcore smoking in Poland. Methods We used data from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS). GATS is a representative, cross-sectional, household based survey conducted in Poland between 2009 and 2010. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to explore the associations of socio-demographic and smoking related variables with hardcore smoking among daily smokers. Results The prevalence of hardcore smoking was 10.0% (13.0% among men and 7.3% among women) in the whole population of Poland at age 26 years and above. Hardcore smokers constitute 39.9% (41.6% among men and 37.7% among women) of all daily smokers in analyzed age frame. Being older, having started smoking at earlier ages, living in large cities (in women only), being less aware of negative health effects of smoking, having less restrictions on smoking at home was associated with higher risk of being hardcore smoker. Educational attainment and economic activity were not associated with hardcore smoking among daily smokers. Conclusions High prevalence of hardcore smokers may be a grand challenge for curbing non-communicable diseases epidemic in Poland. Our findings should urge policy makers to consider hardcore smoking issues while planning and implementing tobacco control policies. Prevention of smoking uptake, education programs, and strengthening cessation services appeared to be the top priorities. PMID:24916122

  13. Prevalence and factors associated with hardcore smoking in Poland: findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Dorota; Usidame, Bukola; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elżbieta; Makowiec-Dąbrowska, Teresa; Leinsalu, Mall

    2014-06-11

    Estimating the prevalence of hardcore smoking and identifying linked factors is fundamental to improve planning and implementation of effective tobacco control measures. Given the paucity of data on that topic, we aimed to assess the prevalence of and factors associated with hardcore smoking in Poland. We used data from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS). GATS is a representative, cross-sectional, household based survey conducted in Poland between 2009 and 2010. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to explore the associations of socio-demographic and smoking related variables with hardcore smoking among daily smokers. The prevalence of hardcore smoking was 10.0% (13.0% among men and 7.3% among women) in the whole population of Poland at age 26 years and above. Hardcore smokers constitute 39.9% (41.6% among men and 37.7% among women) of all daily smokers in analyzed age frame. Being older, having started smoking at earlier ages, living in large cities (in women only), being less aware of negative health effects of smoking, having less restrictions on smoking at home was associated with higher risk of being hardcore smoker. Educational attainment and economic activity were not associated with hardcore smoking among daily smokers. High prevalence of hardcore smokers may be a grand challenge for curbing non-communicable diseases epidemic in Poland. Our findings should urge policy makers to consider hardcore smoking issues while planning and implementing tobacco control policies. Prevention of smoking uptake, education programs, and strengthening cessation services appeared to be the top priorities.

  14. Factors associated with the choice of the first biologic in psoriasis: real-life analysis from the Psobioteq cohort.

    PubMed

    Sbidian, E; Giboin, C; Bachelez, H; Paul, C; Beylot-Barry, M; Dupuy, A; Viguier, M; Lacour, J-P; Schmutz, J-L; Bravard, P; Mahé, E; Beneton, N; Misery, L; Delaporte, E; Modiano, P; Barbarot, S; Regnier, E; Jullien, D; Richard, M-A; Joly, P; Tubach, F; Chosidow, O

    2017-06-13

    Decision-making is a complex process. The aim of our study was to assess factors associated with the choice of the first biological treatment in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Data on all patients included in the French prospective, observational, cohort, Psobioteq and initiating a first biologic prescription between July 2012 and July 2016 were analysed. Demographic information and clinical features were collected during routine clinical assessments by the dermatology team at the recruiting centres using a standardized case report form. The primary outcome was the nature of the first biologic treatment. Four groups were identified as follows: adalimumab, etanercept, ustekinumab and infliximab groups. Factors associated with the choice of the first biological agent were determined by a multinomial logistic regression model adjusted on year of inclusion. The study population included the 830 biological-naïve patients who initiated a first biological agent. The mean age was 46.6 years (±SD 13.9), and 318 patients (38.3%) were female. The most commonly prescribed biologic was adalimumab: 355 (42.8%) patients, then etanercept (n = 247, 29.8%), ustekinumab (n = 194, 23.4%) and infliximab (n = 34, 4.0%). In the multinomial logistic regression analysis, patients were significantly more likely to receive adalimumab if they had a severe psoriasis as defined by baseline PASI or if they had psoriatic arthritis compared to etanercept (aOR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.16-1.07) and ustekinumab (aOR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.04-0.52). Patients were significantly more likely to receive ustekinumab (aOR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.04-5.50) if they had a positive screening for latent tuberculosis compared to adalimumab. Younger patients were also more likely to receive ustekinumab. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were more likely to be prescribed ustekinumab or etanercept compared to adalimumab. There was a trend in favour of etanercept prescription in patients with

  15. Factors Associated with Findings of Published Trials of Drug–Drug Comparisons: Why Some Statins Appear More Efficacious than Others

    PubMed Central

    Bero, Lisa; Oostvogel, Fieke; Bacchetti, Peter; Lee, Kirby

    2007-01-01

    Background Published pharmaceutical industry–sponsored trials are more likely than non-industry-sponsored trials to report results and conclusions that favor drug over placebo. Little is known about potential biases in drug–drug comparisons. This study examined associations between research funding source, study design characteristics aimed at reducing bias, and other factors that potentially influence results and conclusions in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of statin–drug comparisons. Methods and Findings This is a cross-sectional study of 192 published RCTs comparing a statin drug to another statin drug or non-statin drug. Data on concealment of allocation, selection bias, blinding, sample size, disclosed funding source, financial ties of authors, results for primary outcomes, and author conclusions were extracted by two coders (weighted kappa 0.80 to 0.97). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression identified associations between independent variables and favorable results and conclusions. Of the RCTs, 50% (95/192) were funded by industry, and 37% (70/192) did not disclose any funding source. Looking at the totality of available evidence, we found that almost all studies (98%, 189/192) used only surrogate outcome measures. Moreover, study design weaknesses common to published statin–drug comparisons included inadequate blinding, lack of concealment of allocation, poor follow-up, and lack of intention-to-treat analyses. In multivariate analysis of the full sample, trials with adequate blinding were less likely to report results favoring the test drug, and sample size was associated with favorable conclusions when controlling for other factors. In multivariate analysis of industry-funded RCTs, funding from the test drug company was associated with results (odds ratio = 20.16 [95% confidence interval 4.37–92.98], p < 0.001) and conclusions (odds ratio = 34.55 [95% confidence interval 7.09–168.4], p < 0.001) that favor the test drug when

  16. Childhood maltreatment as a risk factor for COPD: findings from a population-based survey of Canadian adults.

    PubMed

    Shields, Margot E; Hovdestad, Wendy E; Gilbert, Charles P; Tonmyr, Lil E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between childhood maltreatment (CM) and COPD in adulthood. Data were from 15,902 respondents to the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey - Mental Health. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine associations between CM and COPD and the role of smoking and mental and substance use variables as mediators in associations. COPD in adulthood was related to CM, with associations differing by sex. Among females, COPD was related to childhood physical abuse (CPA), childhood sexual abuse, and childhood exposure to intimate partner violence, but in the fully adjusted models, the association with CPA did not persist. Among males, COPD was related to childhood exposure to intimate partner violence and severe and frequent CPA, but these associations did not persist in the fully adjusted models. Results from this study establish CM as a risk factor for COPD in adulthood. A large part of the association is attributable to cigarette smoking, particularly for males. These findings underscore the importance of interventions to prevent CM as well as programs to assist victims of CM in dealing with tobacco addiction.

  17. Childhood maltreatment as a risk factor for COPD: findings from a population-based survey of Canadian adults

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Margot E; Hovdestad, Wendy E; Gilbert, Charles P; Tonmyr, Lil E

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the associations between childhood maltreatment (CM) and COPD in adulthood. Methods Data were from 15,902 respondents to the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey – Mental Health. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine associations between CM and COPD and the role of smoking and mental and substance use variables as mediators in associations. Results COPD in adulthood was related to CM, with associations differing by sex. Among females, COPD was related to childhood physical abuse (CPA), childhood sexual abuse, and childhood exposure to intimate partner violence, but in the fully adjusted models, the association with CPA did not persist. Among males, COPD was related to childhood exposure to intimate partner violence and severe and frequent CPA, but these associations did not persist in the fully adjusted models. Conclusion Results from this study establish CM as a risk factor for COPD in adulthood. A large part of the association is attributable to cigarette smoking, particularly for males. These findings underscore the importance of interventions to prevent CM as well as programs to assist victims of CM in dealing with tobacco addiction. PMID:27822027

  18. Socioeconomic position and factors associated with use of a nonsupine infant sleep position: findings from the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey.

    PubMed

    Smylie, Janet; Fell, Deshayne B; Chalmers, Beverley; Sauve, Reg; Royle, Catherine; Allan, Billie; O'Campo, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    With a focus on socioeconomic position, we examined the association between maternal education and nonsupine infant sleep position, and examined patterns of effect modification with additional sociodemographic, maternal, infant, and health services predictors. Data were from the Maternity Experiences Survey, a national population-based sample of 76 178 new Canadian mothers (unweighted n = 6421) aged 15 years or older interviewed in 2006-2007. Using logistic regression, we developed multivariate models for 3 maternal education strata. Level of maternal education was significantly and inversely related to nonsupine infant sleep position. Stratified analyses revealed different predictive factors for nonsupine infant sleep position across strata of maternal education. Postpartum home visits were not associated with use of this sleep position among new mothers with less than high school completion. Adequacy of postpartum information regarding sudden infant death syndrome was not associated with nonsupine infant sleep position in any of the educational strata. These findings suggest a need to revisit Back to Sleep health promotion strategies and to ensure that these interventions are tailored to match the information needs of all families, including mothers with lower levels of formal education.

  19. New Findings in eNOS gene and Thalidomide Embryopathy Suggest pre-transcriptional effect variants as susceptibility factors.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Hutz, Mara Helena; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz

    2016-03-23

    Antiangiogenic properties of thalidomide have created an interest in the use of the drug in treatment of cancer. However, thalidomide is responsible for thalidomide embryopathy (TE). A lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of thalidomide teratogenesis acts as a barrier in the aim to synthesize a safer analogue of thalidomide. Recently, our group detected a higher frequency of alleles that impair the pro-angiogenic mechanisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the NOS3 gene. In this study we evaluated variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) functional polymorphism in intron 4 of NOS3 in individuals with TE (38) and Brazilians without congenital anomalies (136). Haplotypes were estimated for this VNTR with previously analyzed polymorphisms, rs2070744 (-786C > T) and rs1799983 (894T > G), in promoter region and exon 7, respectively. Haplotypic distribution was different between the groups (p = 0.007). Alleles -786C (rs2070744) and 4b (VNTR), associated with decreased NOS3 expression, presented in higher frequency in TE individuals (p = 0.018; OR = 2.57; IC = 1.2-5.8). This association was not identified with polymorphism 894T > G (p = 0.079), which influences eNOS enzymatic activity. These results suggest variants in NOS3, with pre-transcriptional effects as susceptibility factors, influencing the risk TE development. This finding generates insight for a new approach to research that pursues a safer analogue.

  20. The Burden and Determinants of Non Communicable Diseases Risk Factors in Nepal: Findings from a Nationwide STEPS Survey

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Sushhama; Vaidya, Abhinav; Dhimal, Meghnath; Dhakal, Purushottam; Rana, Sangeeta; Bhusal, Chop Lal; Lohani, Guna Raj; Paulin, Frank Herbert; Garg, Renu Madanlal; Guthold, Regina; Cowan, Melanie; Riley, Leanne Margaret; Karki, Khem Bahadur

    2015-01-01

    Background World Health Organization (WHO) estimates for deaths attributed to Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) in Nepal have risen from 51% in 2010 to 60% in 2014. This study assessed the distribution and determinants of NCD risk factors among the Nepalese adult population. Methods and Findings A nationally representative cross-sectional survey was conducted from Jan to June 2013 on the prevalence of NCD risk factors using the WHO NCD STEPS instrument. A multistage cluster sampling method was used to randomly select the 4,200 respondents. The adjusted prevalence ratio (APR) was used to assess the determinants of NCD risk factors using a Poisson regression model. The prevalence of current smoking (last 30 days) was 19% (95%CI:16.6-20.6), and harmful alcohol consumption (≥60 g of pure alcohol for men and ≥40 g of pure alcohol for women on an average day) was 2% (95%CI:1.4-2.9). Almost all (99%, 95%CI:98.3-99.3) of the respondents consumed less than five servings of fruits and vegetables combined on an average day and 3% (95%CI:2.7-4.3) had low physical activity. Around 21% (95%CI:19.3-23.7) were overweight or obese (BMI≥25). The prevalence of raised blood pressure (SBP≥140 mm of Hg or DBP≥90 mm of Hg) and raised blood glucose (fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dl), including those on medication were 26% (95%CI:23.6-28.0) and 4% (95%CI:2.9-4.5) respectively. Almost one quarter of respondents, 23% (95%CI:20.5-24.9), had raised total cholesterol (total cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl or under current medication for raised cholesterol). he study revealed a lower prevalence of smoking among women than men (APR:0.30; 95%CI:0.25-0.36), and in those who had higher education levels compared to those with no formal education (APR:0.39; 95%CI:0.26-0.58). Harmful alcohol use was also lower in women than men (APR:0.26; 95%CI:0.14-0.48), and in Terai residents compared to hill residents (APR:0.16; 95%CI:0.07-0.36). Physical inactivity was lower among women than men (APR:0.55; 95

  1. The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) in breast cancer: biology and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Motallebnezhad, Morteza; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Nickho, Hamid; Samadi-Kafil, Hosein; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. Although patients are often diagnosed in the early and curable stages, the treatment of metastatic breast cancer remains a major clinical challenge. The combination of chemotherapy with new targeting agents, such as bevacizumab, is helpful in improving patient survival; however, novel treatment strategies are required to improve clinical outcomes. The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is a tyrosine kinase cell surface receptor which is involved in the regulation of cell growth and metabolism. Previous studies have shown that activation of the IGF-IR signaling pathway promotes proliferation, survival, and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Additionally, overexpression of IGF-IR is associated with breast cancer cell resistance to anticancer therapies. Recently, IGF-IR has been introduced as a marker of stemness in breast cancer cells and there is also accumulating evidence that IGF-IR contributes to the establishment and maintenance of breast cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Therefore, pharmacological or molecular targeting of IGF-IR could be a promising strategy, in the treatment of patients with breast cancer, particularly in order to circumvent the therapeutic resistance and targeting breast cancer stem/progenitors. Currently, many strategies have been developed for targeting IGF-IR, some have entered clinical trials and some are in preclinical stages for breast cancer therapy. In this review, we will first discuss on the biology of IGF-IR in an attempt to find the role of this receptor in breast cancer and then discuss about therapeutic strategies to target this receptor.

  2. [Analysis of the contents of Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Co and Ni in thymopeptide and transfer factor biological injections].

    PubMed

    Leng, Hong-xia; Liu, Wei-ming; Zhu, Zhi-guo; Han, Li-qin

    2004-05-01

    Thymopeptide and transfer factor are two common clinic biological preparations, which are used to cure immunodeficiency, low immunofunction or infectious disease caused by virus or fungi owing to their functions of increasing body immunity. In order to discuss the relationship between trace elements and those related diseases, to coordinate sound clinic use of the preparations and to provide productive data on them, atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to detect the contents of Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Co and Ni in thymopeptide and transfer factor biological preparations. Respective contents of detected elements were compared in a statistical way. Results show that Zn and Co contents in thymopeptide were lower than in transfer factor; the contents of Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni, in thymopeptide were higher than in transfer factor. For Zn, Cu, Mn and Co, there was a significant difference between the two biologicam preparations (P<0.01). For Fe and Ni there was a great difference (Q<0.05). The results can provide useful data for sound clinic biological injection to promote immune function, and for increasing or decreasing certain trace elements in preparation.

  3. Fission Yeast CSL Transcription Factors: Mapping Their Target Genes and Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Tvarůžková, Jarmila; Zach, Róbert; Folk, Petr; Půta, František; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Background Cbf11 and Cbf12, the fission yeast CSL transcription factors, have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cycle progression, but no specific roles have been described and their target genes have been only partially mapped. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a combination of transcriptome profiling under various conditions and genome-wide analysis of CSL-DNA interactions, we identify genes regulated directly and indirectly by CSL proteins in fission yeast. We show that the expression of stress-response genes and genes that are expressed periodically during the cell cycle is deregulated upon genetic manipulation of cbf11 and/or cbf12. Accordingly, the coordination of mitosis and cytokinesis is perturbed in cells with genetically manipulated CSL protein levels, together with other specific defects in cell-cycle progression. Cbf11 activity is nutrient-dependent and Δcbf11-associated defects are mitigated by inactivation of the protein kinase A (Pka1) and stress-activated MAP kinase (Sty1p38) pathways. Furthermore, Cbf11 directly regulates a set of lipid metabolism genes and Δcbf11 cells feature a stark decrease in the number of storage lipid droplets. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide a framework for a more detailed understanding of the role of CSL proteins in the regulation of cell-cycle progression in fission yeast. PMID:26366556

  4. Brain metastasis in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: from biology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Taeryool

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is found in about 20% of breast cancer patients. With treatment using trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, systemic control is improved. Nonetheless, the incidence of brain metastasis does not be improved, rather seems to be increased in HER2-positive breast cancer. The mainstay treatment for brain metastases is radiotherapy. According to the number of metastatic lesions and performance status of patients, radiosurgery or whole brain radiotherapy can be performed. The concurrent use of a radiosensitizer further improves intracranial control. Due to its large molecular weight, trastuzumab has a limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as lapatinib, has been noted to be a promising agent that can be used as a radiosensitizer to affect HER2-positive breast cancer. This review will outline general management of brain metastases and will focus on preclinical findings regarding the radiosensitizing effect of small molecule HER2 targeting agents. PMID:27104161

  5. Non-tumor necrosis factor-based biologic therapies for rheumatoid arthritis: present, future, and insights into pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Filipe Seguro; Alves, José Delgado

    2014-01-01

    The way rheumatoid arthritis is treated has changed dramatically with the introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologics. Nevertheless, many patients still have less than adequate control of their disease activity even with these therapeutic regimens, and current knowledge fails to explain all the data already gathered. There is now a wide range of drugs from different classes of biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs available (and soon this number will increase significantly), that provides the opportunity to address each patient as a particular case and thereby optimize medical intervention. Currently available biologics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis apart from anti-TNF-based therapies are reviewed, along with an analysis of the new insights they provide into the pathogenesis of the disease and a discussion of future prospects in the area. PMID:24353404

  6. CloudNMF: A MapReduce Implementation of Nonnegative Matrix Factorization for Large-scale Biological Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ruiqi; Zhang, Yifan; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, advances in high-throughput technologies have led to the generation of huge amounts of biological data that require analysis and interpretation. Recently, nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has been introduced as an efficient way to reduce the complexity of data as well as to interpret them, and has been applied to various fields of biological research. In this paper, we present CloudNMF, a distributed open-source implementation of NMF on a MapReduce framework. Experimental evaluation demonstrated that CloudNMF is scalable and can be used to deal with huge amounts of data, which may enable various kinds of a high-throughput biological data analysis in the cloud. CloudNMF is freely accessible at http://admis.fudan.edu.cn/projects/CloudNMF.html. PMID:23933456

  7. CloudNMF: a MapReduce implementation of nonnegative matrix factorization for large-scale biological datasets.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ruiqi; Zhang, Yifan; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2014-02-01

    In the past decades, advances in high-throughput technologies have led to the generation of huge amounts of biological data that require analysis and interpretation. Recently, nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has been introduced as an efficient way to reduce the complexity of data as well as to interpret them, and has been applied to various fields of biological research. In this paper, we present CloudNMF, a distributed open-source implementation of NMF on a MapReduce framework. Experimental evaluation demonstrated that CloudNMF is scalable and can be used to deal with huge amounts of data, which may enable various kinds of a high-throughput biological data analysis in the cloud. CloudNMF is freely accessible at http://admis.fudan.edu.cn/projects/CloudNMF.html. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Biological factors contributing to failures of osseointegrated oral implants. (I). Success criteria and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M; Hirsch, J M; Lekholm, U; Thomsen, P

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this review was to offer a critical evaluation of the literature and to provide the clinician with scientifically-based diagnostic criteria for monitoring the implant condition. The review presents the current opinions on definitions of osseointegration and implant failure. Further, distinctions between failed and failing implants are discussed together with the presently used parameters to assess the implant status. Radiographic examinations together with implant mobility tests seem to be the most reliable parameters in the assessment of the prognosis for osseointegrated implants. On the basis of 73 published articles, the rates of early and late failures of Brånemark implants, used in various anatomical locations and clinical situations, were analyzed using a metanalytic approach. Biologically related implant failures calculated on a sample of 2,812 implants were relatively rare: 7.7% over a 5-year period (bone graft excluded). The predictability of implant treatment was remarkable, particularly for partially edentulous patients, who showed failure rates about half those of totally edentulous subjects. Our analysis also confirmed (for both early and late failures) the general trend of maxillas, having almost 3 times more implant losses than mandibles, with the exception of the partially edentulous situation which displayed similar failure rates both in upper and lower jaws. Surgical trauma together with anatomical conditions are believed to be the most important etiological factors for early implant losses (3.60% of 16,935 implants). The low prevalence of failures attributable to peri-implantitis found in the literature together with the fact that, in general, partially edentulous patients have less resorbed jaws, speak in favour of jaw volume, bone quality, and overload as the three major determinants for late implant failures in the Brånemark system. Conversely, the ITI system seemed to be characterized by a higher prevalence of losses due to peri

  9. Activity of distinct growth factor receptor network components in breast tumors uncovers two biologically relevant subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mumtahena; MacNeil, Shelley M; Jenkins, David F; Shrestha, Gajendra; Wyatt, Sydney R; McQuerry, Jasmine A; Piccolo, Stephen R; Heiser, Laura M; Gray, Joe W; Johnson, W Evan; Bild, Andrea H

    2017-04-26

    The growth factor receptor network (GFRN) plays a significant role in driving key oncogenic processes. However, assessment of global GFRN activity is challenging due to complex crosstalk among GFRN components, or pathways, and the inability to study complex signaling networks in patient tumors. Here, pathway-specific genomic signatures were used to interrogate GFRN activity in breast tumors and the consequent phenotypic impact of GRFN activity patterns. Novel pathway signatures were generated in human primary mammary epithelial cells by overexpressing key genes from GFRN pathways (HER2, IGF1R, AKT1, EGFR, KRAS (G12V), RAF1, BAD). The pathway analysis toolkit Adaptive Signature Selection and InteGratioN (ASSIGN) was used to estimate pathway activity for GFRN components in 1119 breast tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and across 55 breast cancer cell lines from the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP43). These signatures were investigated for their relationship to pro- and anti-apoptotic protein expression and drug response in breast cancer cell lines. Application of these signatures to breast tumor gene expression data identified two novel discrete phenotypes characterized by concordant, aberrant activation of either the HER2, IGF1R, and AKT pathways ("the survival phenotype") or the EGFR, KRAS (G12V), RAF1, and BAD pathways ("the growth phenotype"). These phenotypes described a significant amount of the variability in the total expression data across breast cancer tumors and characterized distinctive patterns in apoptosis evasion and drug response. The growth phenotype expressed lower levels of BIM and higher levels of MCL-1 proteins. Further, the growth phenotype was more sensitive to common chemotherapies and targeted therapies directed at EGFR and MEK. Alternatively, the survival phenotype was more sensitive to drugs inhibiting HER2, PI3K, AKT, and mTOR, but more resistant to chemotherapies. Gene expression profiling revealed a bifurcation pattern

  10. HIV prevalence, risky behaviors, and discrimination experiences among transgender women in Cambodia: descriptive findings from a national integrated biological and behavioral survey.

    PubMed

    Yi, Siyan; Ngin, Chanrith; Tuot, Sovannary; Chhoun, Pheak; Chhim, Srean; Pal, Khuondyla; Mun, Phalkun; Mburu, Gitau

    2017-05-23

    Transgender people are disproportionately affected by HIV. Despite their high vulnerability to HIV, lack of adequate epidemiological and surveillance data related to this population in many countries prevents provision of appropriate services. This paper summarizes descriptive findings from a national integrated biological and behavioral survey and discusses policy implications of the findings on HIV prevention among transgender women in Cambodia. This cross-sectional study was conducted between December 2015 and February 2016. Participants were recruited from 20 sites in the capital city and 12 provinces of Cambodia using Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) method. Behavioral data were collected through structured questionnaire interviews, and rapid finger-prick HIV testing was performed. Descriptive data analyses were conducted using STATA. This study included 1,375 transgender women with a mean age of 25.9 years (SD = 7.1). The overall prevalence of HIV was 5.9%. The prevalence of HIV was significantly higher among urban participants compared to their rural counterparts (6.5 vs. 2.6%, p = 0.02). Almost one in five (19.6%) had never been tested for HIV prior to the study. Overall, 45.0% reported ever using gender affirming hormones. More than one-third (39.1%) reported not using condoms in their last sex, 29.8% had engaged in sex in exchange for money/gifts, and 14.0% reported that they had experienced at least one symptom of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in the past year. About one in ten (10.1%) reported having used some form of amphetamine-type stimulant drugs, while 6.5% reported having sex during or after using illicit drugs. A significant number of participants experienced sexual abuse (39.2%), losing a job (24.3%), or physical abuse (23.6%) because of their transgender identity. In addition, 82.9 and 88.9% would be willing to use the HIV self-test and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), respectively, if they become available. The high prevalence

  11. New Findings in eNOS gene and Thalidomide Embryopathy Suggest pre-transcriptional effect variants as susceptibility factors

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Hutz, Mara Helena; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic properties of thalidomide have created an interest in the use of the drug in treatment of cancer. However, thalidomide is responsible for thalidomide embryopathy (TE). A lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of thalidomide teratogenesis acts as a barrier in the aim to synthesize a safer analogue of thalidomide. Recently, our group detected a higher frequency of alleles that impair the pro-angiogenic mechanisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the NOS3 gene. In this study we evaluated variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) functional polymorphism in intron 4 of NOS3 in individuals with TE (38) and Brazilians without congenital anomalies (136). Haplotypes were estimated for this VNTR with previously analyzed polymorphisms, rs2070744 (−786C > T) and rs1799983 (894T > G), in promoter region and exon 7, respectively. Haplotypic distribution was different between the groups (p = 0.007). Alleles −786C (rs2070744) and 4b (VNTR), associated with decreased NOS3 expression, presented in higher frequency in TE individuals (p = 0.018; OR = 2.57; IC = 1.2–5.8). This association was not identified with polymorphism 894T > G (p = 0.079), which influences eNOS enzymatic activity. These results suggest variants in NOS3, with pre-transcriptional effects as susceptibility factors, influencing the risk TE development. This finding generates insight for a new approach to research that pursues a safer analogue. PMID:27004986

  12. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-producing ascending colon cancer as indicated by histopathological findings: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yushi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Takatsuka, Satoshi; Kaizaki, Ryoji; Inoue, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    Various types of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-producing malignant tumors have been reported. However, a G-CSF-producing colorectal cancer is rare. We present a case of G-CSF-producing ascending colon cancer. An 81-year-old man was referred to our hospital with right lower abdominal pain. A colon fiberscopy revealed an ascending colon tumor, and histological examination revealed tubular adenocarcinoma. He was admitted due to worsening abdominal pain. Although laboratory data showed an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count of 17000/mm3 with 77.8% neutrophils, elevated C-reaction protein (CRP) was insignificant (1.06 mg/dL), and he was afebrile. Because computed tomography indicated that the tumor penetrated into surrounding tissue, a semi-urgent ileocecal resection was performed. An abscess was not located. The tumor was staged as T3N2aM0 and as stage IIB according to the TNM classification. Microscopically, significant neutrophil infiltration between cancer cells was observed, suggesting the presence of a G-CSF-producing tumor. Immunohistochemical staining using a G-CSF antibody revealed cytoplasmic staining in cancer cells. The serum concentration of G-CSF upon admission was 334 pg/mL. After surgical resection, the WBC count decreased to within a normal range. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of G-CSF-producing ascending colon cancer. The prognosis of G-CSF-producing tumors is considered to be poor. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment are needed for patients with G-CSF-producing tumors, and continuous careful follow-up is required.

  13. [Lymphocytic alveolitis in the early stages of HIV infection: correlation with biological and prognostic factors].

    PubMed

    Quint, L; Autran, B; Guillon, J M; Parrot, A; Denis, M; Debre, P; Mayaud, C M; Akoun, G M

    1992-01-01

    Broncho-alveolar lavage was performed to assess the degree of pulmonary lymphocytic alveolitis in 32 asymptomatic patients who were infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (VIH). The patients were stages II and III of the CDC classification and the aim of the study was to determine the frequency, nature and prognostic role of the findings. 62.5% of the subjects (20/32) presented with a lymphocytic alveolitis which consisted predominantly of CD8 lymphocyte (64.3 +/- 3.5%), in the absence of an opportunistic infection or broncho-pulmonary tumours. Two sub-populations of alveolar CD8 were shown at comparable levels, a) sub-population CD8+D44+ (22.1 +/- 5%), in whom we showed the possession of cytotoxic activity in particular specific for VIH; b) sub-population CD8+CD57+ (19.6 +/- 3%) which we have shown to be capable in vitro of inhibiting the effector phase of cytotoxic activity of CD8+D44+ alveolar cells specific for VIH. In this group of 32 patients the occurrence of an alveolitis was not correlated with the usual prognostic factors of infection by VIH measured simultaneously with broncho-alveolar lavage (the level of CD4+ blood lymphocytes, and the beta 2-plasma microglobulins and the presence of p24 antigenaemia). In addition the level of CD4 lymphocytes supperior to 400/mm3 and of beta 2-microglobulins less then 3 mg/l whether a lymphocytic alveolitis was there or not confirmed the relatively poorly developed state of the VIH infection in these asymptomatic patients. Also the occurrence of a lymphocytic alveolitis did not seem to be linked to progression of the disease in the group of patients studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Summary of Effects of Biological Factors on Sex-Related Differences in Mathematics Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Julia

    Critically reviewed evidence relevant to hypotheses of biological sources of sex-related cognitive differences as they relate to mathematics achievement include the following: explanations based on the assumption of greater variability in male cognitive performance; sex-related differences in serum urate; effects of estrogens compared to androgens…

  15. Factors Influencing Academic Performance of Students Enrolled in a Lower Division Cell Biology Core Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Julio G.; Anand, Sulekha

    2009-01-01

    Students' performance in two semesters of our Cell Biology course was examined for this study. Teaching strategies, behaviors, and pre-course variables were analyzed with respect to students' performance. Pre-semester and post-semester surveys were administered to ascertain students' perceptions about class difficulty, amount of study and effort…

  16. Summary of Effects of Biological Factors on Sex-Related Differences in Mathematics Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Julia

    Critically reviewed evidence relevant to hypotheses of biological sources of sex-related cognitive differences as they relate to mathematics achievement include the following: explanations based on the assumption of greater variability in male cognitive performance; sex-related differences in serum urate; effects of estrogens compared to androgens…

  17. Using ANN to predict E. coli accumulation in coves based on interaction amongst various physical, chemical and biological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, D.; Mohanty, B. P.; Lesikar, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    The accumulation of Escherichia Coli (E. coli) in canals, coves and streams is the result of a number of interacting processes operating at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Fate and transport of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by different physical, chemical, and biological processes. Various models developed to quantify each of these processes occurring at different scales are not so far pooled into a single predictive model. At present, very little is known about the fate and transport of E. coli in the environment. We hypothesize that E. coli population heterogeneity in canals and coves is affected by physical factors (average stream width and/ depth, secchi depth, flow and flow severity, day since precipitation, aquatic vegetation, solar radiation, dissolved and total suspended solids etc.); chemical factors (basic water quality, nutrients, organic compounds, pH, and toxicity etc.); and biological factors (type of bacterial strain, predation, and antagonism etc.). The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) examine the interactions between E. coli and various coupled physical, chemical and biological factors; (2) examine the interactions between E. coli and toxic organic pollutants and other pathogens (viruses); and (3) evaluate qualitatively the removal efficiency of E. coli. We suggest that artificial neural networks (ANN) may be used to provide a possible solution to this problem. To demonstrate the application of the approach, we develop an ANN representing E. coli accumulation in two polluted sites at Lake Granbury in the upper part of the Brazos River in North Central Texas. The graphical structure of ANN explicitly represents cause- and-effect relationship between system variables. Each of these relationships can then be quantified independently using an approach suitable for the type and scale of information available. Preliminary results revealed that E. coli concentrations in canals show seasonal variations regardless of change

  18. A Finding Method of Business Risk Factors Using Characteristics of Probability Distributions of Effect Ratios on Qualitative and Quantitative Hybrid Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samejima, Masaki; Negoro, Keisuke; Mitsukuni, Koshichiro; Akiyoshi, Masanori

    We propose a finding method of business risk factors on qualitative and quantitative hybrid simulation in time series. Effect ratios of qualitative arcs in the hybrid simulation vary output values of the simulation, so we define effect ratios causing risk as business risk factors. Finding business risk factors in entire ranges of effect ratios is time-consuming. It is considered that probability distributions of effect ratios in present time step and ones in previous time step are similar, the probability distributions in present time step can be estimated. Our method finds business risk factors in only estimated ranges effectively. Experimental results show that a precision rate and a recall rate are 86%, and search time is decreased 20% at least.

  19. Socioeconomic Factors and Leukocyte Telomere Length In A Multi-Ethnic Sample: Findings From The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Judith E.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Adler, Nancy E.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous findings have linked lower socioeconomic status (SES) with elevated morbidity and mortality. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which also has been associated with age-related disease morbidity and mortality, is a marker of aging at the cellular level, making it a valuable early biomarker of risk and an indicator of biological age. It is hypothesized that SES will be associated with LTL, indicating that SES influences disease risk by accelerating biological aging. In the present sample we test for associations of childhood SES and adult SES (i.e. education, income, home ownership) with LTL, and examine whether these associations vary by racial/ethnic group. Analyses on 963 subjects (18.7% White, 53% Hispanics, and 28.5% African American) from the Stress ancillary study of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis revealed a significant difference in LTL between home owners and renters in Hispanic and White participants (p < .05), but not amongst African Americans (p = .98). There were no linear associations of adult education or family income with LTL, however, there was an inverse association between father’s education and LTL (p = .03). These findings suggest that for Whites and Hispanics renting vs. owning a home is associated with an older biological age; however we did not replicate previous findings linking education with LTL. PMID:23142704

  20. Determination of scattering coefficient considering wavelength and absorption dependence of anisotropy factor measured by polarized beam for biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, D.; Ishii, K.; Awazu, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, is the most important parameter to accurately determine scattering coefficient μs in the inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulation. It has been reported that g has wavelength and absorption dependence, however, there are few attempts in order to calculate μs of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of g. In this study, the scattering angular distributions of biological tissue phantoms were measured in order to determine g by using goniometric measurements with three polarization conditions at strongly and weakly absorbing wavelengths of hemoglobin. Then, optical properties, especially, μs were measured by integrating sphere measurements and iMC simulation in order to confirm the influence of measured g on optical properties in comparison of with general value of g (0.9) for soft biological tissue. Consequently, it was found that μs was overestimated at strongly absorbing wavelength, however, μs was underestimated at weakly absorbing wavelength if the g was not considered its wavelength and absorption dependence.

  1. Cardiovascular risk factors and behavior lifestyles of young women: implications from findings of the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, C E; Nicklas, T A; Myers, L; Johnson, C C; Berenson, G S

    1997-12-01

    The primary purposes of this article are to highlight important issues related to cardiovascular risk factors and behavior life-styles in young women and to examine racial (black-white) differences in risk factors that relate to cardiovascular disease. In childhood, some girls show cardiovascular risk factors of higher blood pressure levels, dyslipidemia, and obesity, all of which continue into young adulthood. Factors that contribute to abnormal risk factors are a high-saturated fat diet, excess energy intake related to inactivity, and cigarette smoking. Trends of obesity are documented; and young white girls are continuing to use tobacco, more so than boys and black girls. Although the onset of clinical cardiovascular disease is delayed in women, the stage is set in childhood for the development of early cardiovascular risk.

  2. [Biological, chemical, and radiation factors in the classification of medical waste].

    PubMed

    Rusakov, N V; Korotkova, G I; Orlov, A Iu; Kadyrov, D E

    2011-01-01

    The current classification of medical waste does not consider the sanitary-and-chemical hazard of epidemiologically dangerous and extremely dangerous medical waste (classes B and C). According to the results of the studies performed, the authors propose the improved classification of medical waste, which makes it possible to take into account not only infectious, radiation, and toxicological, but also sanitary-and-chemical hazards (toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and biological activity) of medical waste.

  3. A Systems Biology Approach to Link Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation with Lethal Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    progression of prostate cancer to a lethal disease . We aim to identify patients with lethal prostate cancer using a systems biology approach focused on...activation which are associated with lethal disease . (Months 1 to 18) Task 1A: Perform gene profiling of tumors and determine whether a set of genes and...panel to be assessed for correlation with lethal disease . (Month 1 to 18) Accomplishments: In the first 12 months of the grant we have (i

  4. Biological and environmental factors associated with risk of schistosomiasis mansoni transmission in Porto de Galinhas, Pernambuco State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Leal Neto, Onicio Batista; Gomes, Elainne Christine de Souza; Oliveira Junior, Fernando José Moreira de; Andrade, Rafael; Reis, Diego Leandro; Souza-Santos, Reinaldo; Bocanegra, Silvana; Barbosa, Constança Simões

    2013-02-01

    Schistosomiasis has expanded to the coast of Pernambuco State, Brazil, where there are frequent reports of Biomphalaria glabrata snails and human cases of the disease. This study analyzes factors related to schistosomiasis transmission risk in Porto de Galinhas. A one-year malacological survey was conducted to identify biological, abiotic, and environmental factors related to the host snail breeding sites. Data analysis used Excel 2010, GTM Pro, and ArcGis 10. A total of 11,012 B. glabrata snails were captured in 36 breeding sites, and 11 schistosomiasis transmission foci were identified. A negative correlation was found between breeding site temperature and snail density and infection rate, and a positive correlation with pH and salinity. The rainy season showed a positive correlation with snail density and infection rate. The study emphasizes the factors involved in the maintenance of schistosomiasis breeding sites, in light of persistence of this disease in Porto de Galinhas for more than 10 years.

  5. Heart disease occurs in a biological, psychological, and social matrix: cardiac risk factors, symptom presentation, and recovery as illustrative examples.

    PubMed

    Suls, Jerry; Martin, René

    2011-04-01

    Despite the basic premise of behavioral medicine that understanding and treatment of physical well-being require a full appreciation of the confluence of micro-, molar-, and macro-variables, the field tends to focus on linear, causal relationships. In this paper, we argue that more attention be given to a dynamic matrix approach, which assumes that biological, psychological, and social elements are interconnected and continually influence each other (consistent with the biopsychosocial model). To illustrate, the authors draw from their independent and collaborative research programs on overlapping cardiac risk factors, symptom interpretation, and treatment delay for cardiac care and recovery from heart disease. "Cabling" across biological, psychological, and social variables is considered as a transformative strategy for medicine and the other health-related disciplines.

  6. Factors Determining the Oxygen Permeability of Biological Membranes: Oxygen Transport Across Eye Lens Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes.

    PubMed

    Subczynski, Witold Karol; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman

    2017-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-label oximetry allows the oxygen permeability coefficient to be evaluated across homogeneous lipid bilayer membranes and, in some cases, across coexisting membrane domains without their physical separation. The most pronounced effect on oxygen permeability is observed for cholesterol, which additionally induces the formation of membrane domains. In intact biological membranes, integral proteins induce the formation of boundary and trapped lipid domains with a low oxygen permeability. The effective oxygen permeability coefficient across the intact biological membrane is affected not only by the oxygen permeability coefficients evaluated for each lipid domain but also by the surface area occupied by these domains in the membrane. All these factors observed in fiber cell plasma membranes of clear human eye lenses are reviewed here.

  7. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  8. Biological factors in plasma from diabetes mellitus patients enhance hyperglycaemia and pulsatile shear stress-induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, X F; Yu, J Q; Dalan, R; Liu, A Q; Luo, K Q

    2014-05-01

    People suffering from Diabetes Mellitus (DM) are prone to an array of vascular complications leading to end organ damage. The hallmark of these vascular complications is endothelium dysfunction, which is caused by endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis. Although the endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by hyperglycaemia and fluid shear stress has been studied, the effects of biological factors in the blood of DM patients on EC integrity have not been reported in the in vitro models that mimic the physiological pulsatile nature of the vascular system. This study reports the development of a hemodynamic lab-on-a-chip system to investigate this issue. The pulsatile flow was applied to a monolayer of endothelial cells expressing a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor that changes colour from green to blue in response to caspase-3 activation during apoptosis. Plasma samples from healthy volunteers and DM patients were compared to identify biological factors that are critical to endothelial disruption. Three types of microchannels were designed to simulate the blood vessels under healthy and partially blocked pathological conditions. The results showed that EC apoptosis rates increased with increasing glucose concentration and levels of shear stress. The rates of apoptosis further increased by a factor of 1.4-2.3 for hyperglycaemic plasma under all dynamic conditions. Under static conditions, little difference was detected in the rate of EC apoptosis between experiments using plasma from DM patients and glucose medium, suggesting that the effects of hyperglycaemia and biological factors on the induction of EC apoptosis are all shear flow-dependent. A proteomics study was then conducted to identify biological factors, demonstrating that the levels of eight proteins, including haptoglobin and clusterin, were significantly down-regulated, while six proteins, including apolipoprotein C-III, were significantly up-regulated in the plasma of DM patients

  9. Transforming growth factor alpha: mutation of aspartic acid 47 and leucine 48 results in different biological activities.

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, E; Watanabe, S; Dalton, S; Sporn, M B

    1988-01-01

    To study the relationship between the primary structure of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and some of its functional properties (competition with epidermal growth factor (EGF) for binding to the EGF receptor and induction of anchorage-independent growth), we introduced single amino acid mutations into the sequence for the fully processed, 50-amino-acid human TGF-alpha. The wild-type and mutant proteins were expressed in a vector by using a yeast alpha mating pheromone promoter. Mutations of two amino acids that are conserved in the family of the EGF-like peptides and are located in the carboxy-terminal part of TGF-alpha resulted in different biological effects. When aspartic acid 47 was mutated to alanine or asparagine, biological activity was retained; in contrast, substitutions of this residue with serine or glutamic acid generated mutants with reduced binding and colony-forming capacities. When leucine 48 was mutated to alanine, a complete loss of binding and colony-forming abilities resulted; mutation of leucine 48 to isoleucine or methionine resulted in very low activities. Our data suggest that these two adjacent conserved amino acids in positions 47 and 48 play different roles in defining the structure and/or biological activity of TGF-alpha and that the carboxy terminus of TGF-alpha is involved in interactions with cellular TGF-alpha receptors. The side chain of leucine 48 appears to be crucial either indirectly in determining the biologically active conformation of TGF-alpha or directly in the molecular recognition of TGF-alpha by its receptor. PMID:3285178

  10. An integrated model of transcription factor diffusion shows the importance of intersegmental transfer and quaternary protein structure for target site finding.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hugo G; Sewitz, Sven; Andrews, Steven S; Lipkow, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational model of transcription factor motion that explains both the observed rapid target finding of transcription factors, and how this motion influences protein and genome structure. Using the Smoldyn software, we modelled transcription factor motion arising from a combination of unrestricted 3D diffusion in the nucleoplasm, sliding along the DNA filament, and transferring directly between filament sections by intersegmental transfer. This presents a fine-grain picture of the way in which transcription factors find their targets two orders of magnitude faster than 3D diffusion alone allows. Eukaryotic genomes contain sections of nucleosome free regions (NFRs) around the promoters; our model shows that the presence and size of these NFRs can be explained as their acting as antennas on which transcription factors slide to reach their targets. Additionally, our model shows that intersegmental transfer may have shaped the quaternary structure of transcription factors: sequence specific DNA binding proteins are unusually enriched in dimers and tetramers, perhaps because these allow intersegmental transfer, which accelerates target site finding. Finally, our model shows that a 'hopping' motion can emerge from 3D diffusion on small scales. This explains the apparently long sliding lengths that have been observed for some DNA binding proteins observed in vitro. Together, these results suggest that transcription factor diffusion dynamics help drive the evolution of protein and genome structure.

  11. An Integrated Model of Transcription Factor Diffusion Shows the Importance of Intersegmental Transfer and Quaternary Protein Structure for Target Site Finding

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Hugo G.; Sewitz, Sven; Andrews, Steven S.; Lipkow, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational model of transcription factor motion that explains both the observed rapid target finding of transcription factors, and how this motion influences protein and genome structure. Using the Smoldyn software, we modelled transcription factor motion arising from a combination of unrestricted 3D diffusion in the nucleoplasm, sliding along the DNA filament, and transferring directly between filament sections by intersegmental transfer. This presents a fine-grain picture of the way in which transcription factors find their targets two orders of magnitude faster than 3D diffusion alone allows. Eukaryotic genomes contain sections of nucleosome free regions (NFRs) around the promoters; our model shows that the presence and size of these NFRs can be explained as their acting as antennas on which transcription factors slide to reach their targets. Additionally, our model shows that intersegmental transfer may have shaped the quaternary structure of transcription factors: sequence specific DNA binding proteins are unusually enriched in dimers and tetramers, perhaps because these allow intersegmental transfer, which accelerates target site finding. Finally, our model shows that a ‘hopping’ motion can emerge from 3D diffusion on small scales. This explains the apparently long sliding lengths that have been observed for some DNA binding proteins observed in vitro. Together, these results suggest that transcription factor diffusion dynamics help drive the evolution of protein and genome structure. PMID:25333780

  12. Rates of, and risk factors for, severe infections in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases receiving biological agents off-label

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this observational study was to analyze the rates, characteristics and associated risk factors of severe infections in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD) who were treated off-label with biological agents in daily practice. Methods The BIOGEAS registry is an ongoing Spanish prospective cohort study investigating the long-term safety and efficacy of the off-label use of biological agents in adult patients with severe, refractory SAD. Severe infections were defined according to previous studies as those that required intravenous treatment or that led to hospitalization or death. Patients contributed person-years of follow-up for the period in which they were treated with biological agents. Results A total of 344 patients with SAD treated with biological agents off-label were included in the Registry until July 2010. The first biological therapies included rituximab in 264 (77%) patients, infliximab in 37 (11%), etanercept in 21 (6%), adalimumab in 19 (5%), and 'other' agents in 3 (1%). Forty-five severe infections occurred in 37 patients after a mean follow-up of 26.76 months. These infections resulted in four deaths. The crude rate of severe infections was 90.9 events/1000 person-years (112.5 for rituximab, 76.9 for infliximab, 66.9 for adalimumab and 30.5 for etanercept respectively). In patients treated with more than two courses of rituximab, the crude rate of severe infection was 226.4 events/1000 person-years. A pathogen was identified in 24 (53%) severe infections. The most common sites of severe infection were the lower respiratory tract (39%), bacteremia/sepsis (20%) and the urinary tract (16%). There were no significant differences relating to gender, SAD, agent, other previous therapies, number of previous immunosuppressive agents received or other therapies administered concomitantly. Cox regression analysis showed that age (P = 0.015) was independently associated with an increased risk of severe infection

  13. Factors Predicting the Use of Technology: Findings From the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE)

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Sara J.; Charness, Neil; Fisk, Arthur D.; Hertzog, Christopher; Nair, Sankaran N.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Sharit, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The successful adoption of technology is becoming increasingly important to functional independence. The present article reports findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE) on the use of technology among community-dwelling adults. The sample included 1,204 individuals ranging in age from 18–91 years. All participants completed a battery that included measures of demographic characteristics, self-rated health, experience with technology, attitudes toward computers, and component cognitive abilities. Findings indicate that the older adults were less likely than younger adults to use technology in general, computers, and the World Wide Web. The results also indicate that computer anxiety, fluid intelligence, and crystallized intelligence were important predictors of the use of technology. The relationship between age and adoption of technology was mediated by cognitive abilities, computer self-efficacy, and computer anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of training strategies to promote technology adoption. PMID:16768579

  14. Factors predicting the use of technology: findings from the Center for Research and Edu